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  1. Apollo experience report: Electronic systems test program accomplishments and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohnesorge, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    A chronological record is presented of the Electronic Systems Test Program from its conception in May 1963 to December 1969. The original concept of the program, which was primarily a spacecraft/Manned Space Flight Network communications system compatibility and performance evaluation, is described. The evolution of these concepts to include various levels of test detail, as well as systems level design verification testing, is discussed. Actual implementation of these concepts is presented, and the facility to support the program is described. Test results are given, and significant contributions to the lunar landing mission are underlined. Plans for modifying the facility and the concepts, based on Apollo experience, are proposed.

  2. International Research Results and Accomplishments From the International Space Station - A New Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, Tara; Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy; Perkins, Nekisha; Cohen, Luchino; Marcil, Isabelle; Heppener, Marc; Hatton, Jason; Tasaki, Kazuyuki; Umemura, Sayaka; Karabadzhak, Georgy; Sorokin, Igor V.; Cotronei, Vittorio; Jean, Sabbagh

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, the International Space Station (ISS) partnership published the first-ever compilation of international ISS research publications resulting from research performed on the ISS through 2011 (Expeditions 0 through 30). International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results. From 2000-2011 is a collection of over 1,200 journal publications that describe ISS research in the areas of biology and biotechnology; Earth and space science; educational activities and outreach; human research; physical sciences; technology development and demonstration; and, results from ISS operations. This paper will summarize the ISS results publications obtained through 2011 on behalf of the ISS Program Science Forum that is made up of senior science representatives across the international partnership. NASA's ISS Program Science office maintains an online experiment database (www.nasa.gov/iss- science) that tracks and communicates ISS research activities across the entire ISS partnership, and it is continuously updated by cooperation and linking with the results tracking activities of each partner. It captures ISS experiment summaries and results and includes citations to the journals, conference proceedings, and patents as they become available. This content is obtained through extensive and regular journal and patent database searches, and input provided by the ISS international partners ISS scientists themselves. The International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results From 2000-2011 is a testament to the research that was underway even as the ISS laboratory was being built. It rejects the scientific knowledge gained from ISS research, and how it impact the fields of science in both space and traditional science disciplines on Earth. Now, during a time when utilization is at its busiest, and with extension of the ISS through at least 2024, the ISS partners work together to track the accomplishments and the new knowledge gained in a

  3. Main results of the work accomplished at ZAO Interavtomatika for 15 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysko, V. V.; Sviderskii, A. G.; Bilenko, V. A.; Anan'ev, A. A.

    2008-10-01

    Main results of the activities carried out by ZAO Interavtomatika in the Russian market of power engineering are presented. Main lines of activities are described, the results of putting in use control systems are analyzed, and prospects for their further development are presented.

  4. Military medical advances resulting from the conflict in Korea, Part II: Historic clinical accomplishments.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael S

    2012-04-01

    Throughout the recorded history of civilization, there has been armed conflict. Warfare has been associated with advances in care for the wounded. Many of these advances when shown effective on the battlefield become incorporated into civilian health care. It is a laboratory where there is unfortunately much clinical material and presents opportunity for the creative, curious, and innovative. This article reviews the medical advances that resulted from the Korean War. There were notable advances in neurosurgery, vascular surgery, and plastic surgery. Tools from prior wars were rediscovered, dusted off, and used to stop combat losses from psychiatric trauma. A treatment was developed for cleft lip by a plastic surgeon, thus giving hope to young lives. War is a disruptive, destructive, and harrowing experience--but can lead to improvements in care for the wounded and these developments can improve the lives of people everywhere. PMID:22594134

  5. First drilling in the Ust' Lensky Rift Zone, Laptev Sea: accomplishment and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiletov, I. P.; Shakhova, N. E.; Dudarev, O.; Kosmach, D.; Tumskoy, V.; Charkin, A.; Samarkin, V.; Kholodov, A.; Grigoriev, M.; Nicolsky, D.; Bukhanov, B.; Krukhmalev, A.

    2011-12-01

    hydrocarbons, and free hydrogen were found. The temperature along the borehole increased from ~ -0.7-0.8C in the sediment upper boundary layer to -0.3-0.4C down by depth. Linear or exponential approximation of available temperature data suggests that the top of the sub-sea permafrost might be found at a depth of ~170m (linear extrapolation), but the existence of sub-sea permafrost at this particular site is questionable. In any case, preliminary data indicate that the seabed at this site functions as a pathway by which volatile gas components are able to migrate upward. The numerical modeling also demonstrated that in areas affected by the inflow of warm water (such as the Lena River plume), the permafrost can significantly degrade from the top down in addition to the "geothermal" down-top thawing ; this may explain both our drilling result, finding no subsea permafrost at a depth >>53 m.

  6. Accomplishments '70.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Center for Research and Development in Teaching.

    This annual report examines the accomplishments during 1970 of three programs. The first program was to improve the organizational and administrative environment for teaching. Its subsidiary projects were 1) the organizational context of teaching; 2) professional socialization of the teacher; 3) attitudes of teachers toward their occupation; 4)…

  7. Similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    In this 'Project Mathematics! series, sponsored by the California Institute for Technology (CalTech), the mathematical concept of similarity is presented. he history of and real life applications are discussed using actual film footage and computer animation. Terms used and various concepts of size, shape, ratio, area, and volume are demonstrated. The similarity of polygons, solids, congruent triangles, internal ratios, perimeters, and line segments using the previous mentioned concepts are shown.

  8. Similarity preserving snippet-based visualization of web search results.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Nieto, Erick; San Roman, Frizzi; Pagliosa, Paulo; Casaca, Wallace; Helou, Elias S; de Oliveira, Maria Cristina F; Nonato, Luis Gustavo

    2014-03-01

    Internet users are very familiar with the results of a search query displayed as a ranked list of snippets. Each textual snippet shows a content summary of the referred document (or webpage) and a link to it. This display has many advantages, for example, it affords easy navigation and is straightforward to interpret. Nonetheless, any user of search engines could possibly report some experience of disappointment with this metaphor. Indeed, it has limitations in particular situations, as it fails to provide an overview of the document collection retrieved. Moreover, depending on the nature of the query--for example, it may be too general, or ambiguous, or ill expressed--the desired information may be poorly ranked, or results may contemplate varied topics. Several search tasks would be easier if users were shown an overview of the returned documents, organized so as to reflect how related they are, content wise. We propose a visualization technique to display the results of web queries aimed at overcoming such limitations. It combines the neighborhood preservation capability of multidimensional projections with the familiar snippet-based representation by employing a multidimensional projection to derive two-dimensional layouts of the query search results that preserve text similarity relations, or neighborhoods. Similarity is computed by applying the cosine similarity over a "bag-of-words" vector representation of collection built from the snippets. If the snippets are displayed directly according to the derived layout, they will overlap considerably, producing a poor visualization. We overcome this problem by defining an energy functional that considers both the overlapping among snippets and the preservation of the neighborhood structure as given in the projected layout. Minimizing this energy functional provides a neighborhood preserving two-dimensional arrangement of the textual snippets with minimum overlap. The resulting visualization conveys both a global

  9. TEG® and ROTEM® in trauma: similar test but different results?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion in trauma is often empiric or based on traditional lab tests. Viscoelastic tests such as thromboelastography (TEG®) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) have been proposed as superior to traditional lab tests. Due to the similarities between the two tests, general opinion seems to consider them equivalent with interchangeable interpretations. However, it is not clear whether the results can be similarly interpreted. This review evaluates the comparability between TEG and ROTEM and performs a descriptive review of the parameters utilized in each test in adult trauma patients. Methods PUBMED database was reviewed using the keywords “thromboelastography” and “compare”, between 2000 and 2011. Original studies directly comparing TEG® with ROTEM® in any area were retrieved. To verify the individual test parameter used in studies involving trauma patients, we further performed a review using the keywords “thromboelastography” and “trauma” in the PUBMED database. Results Only 4 studies directly compared TEG® with ROTEM®. One in liver transplantation found that transfusion practice could differ depending on the device in use. Another in cardiac surgery concluded that all measurements are not completely interchangeable. The third article using commercially available plasma detected clinically significant differences in the results from the two devices. The fourth one was a head-to-head comparison of the technical aspects. The 24 articles reporting the use of viscoelastic tests in trauma patients, presented considerable heterogeneity. Conclusion Both tests are potentially useful as means to rapidly diagnose coagulopathy, guide transfusion and determine outcome in trauma patients. Differences in the activators utilized in each device limit the direct comparability. Standardization and robust clinical trials comparing the two technologies are needed before these tests can be widely recommended for clinical use in trauma. PMID

  10. International Space Station Science Research Accomplishments During the Assembly Years: An Analysis of Results from 2000-2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy; Thumm, Tracy; Crespo-Richey, Jessica; Baumann, David; Rhatigan, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes research accomplishments on the International Space Station (ISS) through the first 15 Expeditions. When research programs for early Expeditions were established, five administrative organizations were executing research on ISS: bioastronautics research, fundamental space biology, physical science, space product development, and space flight. The Vision for Space Exploration led to changes in NASA's administrative structures, so we have grouped experiments topically by scientific themes human research for exploration, physical and biological sciences, technology development, observing the Earth, and educating and inspiring the next generation even when these do not correspond to the administrative structure at the time at which they were completed. The research organizations at the time at which the experiments flew are preserved in the appendix of this document. These investigations on the ISS have laid the groundwork for research planning for Expeditions to come. Humans performing scientific investigations on ISS serve as a model for the goals of future Exploration missions. The success of a wide variety of investigations is an important hallmark of early research on ISS. Of the investigations summarized here, some are completed with results released, some are completed with preliminary results, and some remain ongoing.

  11. Why different gas flux velocity parameterizations result in so similar flux results in the North Atlantic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Wróbel, Iwona

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is a crucial region for both ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. Most of ocean deep waters are produced in the basin making it a large CO2 sink. The region, close to the major oceanographic centres has been well covered with cruises. This is why we have performed a study of net CO2 flux dependence upon the choice of gas transfer velocity k parameterization for this very region: the North Atlantic including European Arctic Seas. The study has been a part of a ESA funded OceanFlux GHG Evolution project and, at the same time, a PhD thesis (of I.W) funded by Centre of Polar Studies "POLAR-KNOW" (a project of the Polish Ministry of Science). Early results have been presented last year at EGU 2015 as a PICO presentation EGU2015-11206-1. We have used FluxEngine, a tool created within an earlier ESA funded project (OceanFlux Greenhouse Gases) to calculate the North Atlantic and global fluxes with different gas transfer velocity formulas. During the processing of the data, we have noticed that the North Atlantic results for different k formulas are more similar (in the sense of relative error) that global ones. This was true both for parameterizations using the same power of wind speed and when comparing wind squared and wind cubed parameterizations. This result was interesting because North Atlantic winds are stronger than the global average ones. Was the flux result similarity caused by the fact that the parameterizations were tuned to the North Atlantic area where many of the early cruises measuring CO2 fugacities were performed? A closer look at the parameterizations and their history showed that not all of them were based on North Atlantic data. Some of them were tuned to the South Ocean with even stronger winds while some were based on global budgets of 14C. However we have found two reasons, not reported before in the literature, for North Atlantic fluxes being more similar than global ones for different gas transfer velocity parametrizations

  12. Fewer Doses of HPV Vaccine Result in Immune Response Similar to Three-Dose Regimen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Releases NCI News Note Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose ... that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody ...

  13. A Theoretical Framework for Defining Similarity Measures for Boolean Search Request Formulations, Including Some Experimental Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radecki, Tadeusz

    1985-01-01

    Reports research results into a methodology for determining similarity between queries characterized by Boolean search request formulations and discusses similarity measures for Boolean combinations of index terms. Rationale behind these measures is outlined, and conditions ensuring their equivalence are identified. Results of an experiment…

  14. Wind Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Wind Program

    2012-05-24

    This fact sheet describes some of the accomplishments of DOE's Wind Program through its investments in technology development and market barrier reduction, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using the United States' abundant wind resources.

  15. Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose regimen

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen.

  16. A Uniqueness Result for Self-Similar Profiles to Smoluchowski's Coagulation Equation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niethammer, B.; Throm, S.; Velázquez, J. J. L.

    2016-07-01

    In this note we indicate how to correct the proof of a uniqueness result in [6] for self-similar solutions to Smoluchowski's coagulation equation for kernels K=K(x,y) that are homogeneous of degree zero and close to constant in the sense that begin{aligned} -\\varepsilon le K(x,y)-2 le \\varepsilon Big ( Big (x/yBig )^{α } + Big (y/xBig )^{α }Big ) for α in [0,1/2). Under the additional assumption, in comparison to [6], that K has an analytic extension to mathbb {C}{setminus } (-infty ,0] and that the precise asymptotic behaviour of K at the origin is prescribed, we prove that self-similar solutions with given mass are unique if \\varepsilon is sufficiently small. The complete details of the proof are available in [4]. In addition, we give here the proof of a uniqueness result for a related but simpler problem that appears in the description of self-similar solutions for x → infty.

  17. A Uniqueness Result for Self-Similar Profiles to Smoluchowski's Coagulation Equation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niethammer, B.; Throm, S.; Velázquez, J. J. L.

    2016-06-01

    In this note we indicate how to correct the proof of a uniqueness result in [6] for self-similar solutions to Smoluchowski's coagulation equation for kernels K=K(x,y) that are homogeneous of degree zero and close to constant in the sense that -ɛ ≤ K(x,y)-2 ≤ ɛ Big ( Big (x/yBig )^{α } + Big (y/xBig )^{α }Big ) for α in [0,1/2) . Under the additional assumption, in comparison to [6], that K has an analytic extension to {C}{setminus } (-∞ ,0] and that the precise asymptotic behaviour of K at the origin is prescribed, we prove that self-similar solutions with given mass are unique if ɛ is sufficiently small. The complete details of the proof are available in [4]. In addition, we give here the proof of a uniqueness result for a related but simpler problem that appears in the description of self-similar solutions for x → ∞.

  18. The Spacelab Accomplishments Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emond, J. (Editor); Bennett, N. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Murphy, K. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a record of the Spacelab Accomplishments Forum held in March 1999. Presentations made at the Forum covered the design, engineering, utilization, and science associated with Spacelab, as well as the international associations and impact of Spacelab and its use in the design and utilization of the International Space Station. Topics included Earth observations, space science, life science, commercial uses, microgravity science, and international participation.

  19. Similarity-based restoration of metrical information: different listening experiences result in different perceptual inferences.

    PubMed

    Creel, Sarah C

    2012-09-01

    How do perceivers apply knowledge to instances they have never experienced before? On one hand, listeners might use idealized representations that do not contain specific details. On the other, they might recognize and process information based on more detailed memory representations. The current study examined the latter possibility with respect to musical meter perception, previously thought to be computed based on highly-idealized (isochronous) internal representations. In six experiments, listeners heard sets of metrically-ambiguous melodies. Each melody was played in a simultaneous musical context with unambiguous metrical cues (3/4 or 6/8). Cross-melody similarity was manipulated by pairing certain cues-timbre (musical instrument) and motif content (2-6-note patterns)-with each meter, or distributing cues across meters. After multiple exposures, listeners heard each melody without context, and judged metrical continuations (all Experiments) or familiarity (Experiments 5-6). Responses were assessed for "metrical restoration"-the tendency to make metrical judgments that fit the melody's previously-heard metrical context. Cross-melody similarity affected the presence and degree of metrical restoration, and timbre affected familiarity. Results suggest that metrical processing may be calculated based on fairly detailed representations rather than idealized isochronous pulses, and is dissociated somewhat from familiarity judgments. Implications for theories of meter perception are discussed. PMID:22659582

  20. Life sciences accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    From its inception, the main charter of Life Sciences has been to define biomedical requirements for the design and development of spacecraft systems and to participate in NASA's scientific exploration of the universe. The role of the Life Sciences Division is to: (1) assure the health, well being and productivity of all individuals who fly in space; (2) study the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the universe; and (3) to utilize the space environment as a tool for research in biology and medicine. The activities, programs, and accomplishments to date in the efforts to achieve these goals are detailed and the future challenges that face the division as it moves forward from the shuttle era to a permanent manned presence in space space station's are examined.

  1. Life Sciences Accomplishments 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnell, Mary Lou (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    proposals for ground-based and flight research for all programs. Areas of particular interest to NASA were defined Proposals due April 29, 1994, will be peer reviewed - externally for scientific merit. This annual NRA process is now the mechanism for recruiting both extramural and intramural investigations. As an overview of LBSAD activities in 1993, this accomplishments document covers each of the major organizational components of the Division and the accomplishments of each. The second section is a review of the Space Life Sciences Research programs Space Biology, Space Physiology and Countermeasures, Radiation Health, Environmental Health, Space Human Factors, Advanced Life Support, and Global Monitoring and Disease Prediction, The third section, Research in Space Flight, describes the substantial contributions of the Spacelab Life Sciences 2 (SLS-2) mission to life sciences research and the significant contributions of the other missions flown in 1993, along with plans for future missions. The Division has greatly expanded and given high priority to its Education and Outreach Programs, which are presented in the fourth section. The fifth and final section, Partners for Space, shows the Divisions Cooperative efforts with other national and international agencies to achieve common goals, along with the accomplishments of joint research and analysis programs.

  2. Implantation of peritoneal catheters by laparotomy: nephrologists obtained similar results to general surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Cesar A; Buitrago, Carlos Alberto; Holguin, Cielo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the complications and costs of minilaparotomies performed by a nephrologist (group A) compared with conventional laparotomies performed by a surgeon (group B) for peritoneal catheter implantation. Setting Two university hospitals (Santa Sofia and Caldas) in Manizales, Caldas, Colombia. Methods The study included stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients, with indication of renal replacement therapy, who were candidates for peritoneal dialysis and gave informed consent for a peritoneal catheter implant. Minilaparotomies were performed by a nephrologist in a minor surgery room under local anesthesia. Conventional laparotomies were performed by a surgeon in an operating room under general anesthesia. Results Two nephrologists inserted 157 peritoneal catheters, and seven general surgeons inserted 185 peritoneal catheters. The groups had similar characteristics: the mean age was 55 years, 49.5% were men, and the primary diagnoses were diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephropathy, and unknown etiology. The implant was successful for 98.09% of group A and 99.46% of group B. There was no procedure-related mortality. The most frequent complications in the first 30 days postsurgery in group A versus group B, respectively, were: peritonitis (6.37% versus 3.78%), exit-site infection (3.82% versus 2.16%), tunnel infection (0% versus 0.54%), catheter entrapment by omentum (1.27% versus 3.24%), peritoneal effluent spillover (1.91% versus 2.16%), draining failure (4.46% versus 6.49%), hematoma (0% versus 1.08%), catheter migration with kinking (3.18% versus 2.70%), hemoperitoneum (1.27% versus 0%), and hollow viscera accidental puncture (1.91% versus 0.54%). There were no statistically significant differences in the number of complications between groups. In 2013, the cost of a surgeon-implanted peritoneal dialysis catheter in Colombia was US $366 (666,000 COP), whereas the cost of a nephrologist-implanted catheter was US $198 (356,725 COP). Conclusion

  3. EFRC CMSNF Major Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hurley; Todd R. Allen

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) has been to develop a first-principles-based understanding of thermal transport in the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2, in the presence of defect microstructure associated with radiation environments. The overarching goal within this mission was to develop an experimentally validated multiscale modeling capability directed toward a predictive understanding of the impact of radiation and fission-product induced defects and microstructure on thermal transport in nuclear fuel. Implementation of the mission was accomplished by integrating the physics of thermal transport in crystalline solids with microstructure science under irradiation through multi institutional experimental and computational materials theory teams from Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Purdue University, the University of Florida, the University of Wisconsin, and the Colorado School of Mines. The Center’s research focused on five major areas: (i) The fundamental aspects of anharmonicity in UO2 crystals and its impact on thermal transport; (ii) The effects of radiation microstructure on thermal transport in UO2; (iii) The mechanisms of defect clustering in UO2 under irradiation; (iv) The effect of temperature and oxygen environment on the stoichiometry of UO2; and (v) The mechanisms of growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation. The Center has made important progress in each of these areas, as summarized below.

  4. Similar herpes zoster incidence across Europe: results from a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Herpes zoster (HZ) is caused by reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and mainly affects individuals aged ≥50 years. The forthcoming European launch of a vaccine against HZ (Zostavax®) prompts the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology of HZ in Europe. Therefore the aim of this systematic review was to summarize the available data on HZ incidence in Europe and to describe age-specific incidence. Methods The Medline database of the National Library of Medicine was used to conduct a comprehensive literature search of population-based studies of HZ incidence published between 1960 and 2010 carried out in the 27 member countries of the European Union, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. The identified articles were reviewed and scored according to a reading grid including various quality criteria, and HZ incidence data were extracted and presented by country. Results The search identified 21 studies, and revealed a similar annual HZ incidence throughout Europe, varying by country from 2.0 to 4.6/1 000 person-years with no clearly observed geographic trend. Despite the fact that age groups differed from one study to another, age-specific HZ incidence rates seemed to hold steady during the review period, at around 1/1 000 children <10 years, around 2/1 000 adults aged <40 years, and around 1–4/1 000 adults aged 40–50 years. They then increased rapidly after age 50 years to around 7–8/1 000, up to 10/1 000 after 80 years of age. Our review confirms that in Europe HZ incidence increases with age, and quite drastically after 50 years of age. In all of the 21 studies included in the present review, incidence rates were higher among women than men, and this difference increased with age. This review also highlights the need to identify standardized surveillance methods to improve the comparability of data within European Union Member States and to monitor the impact of VZV immunization on the epidemiology of HZ. Conclusions

  5. Transmutation Fuels Campaign FY-09 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year 2009 (FY-08) accomplishments for the Transmutation Fuels Campaign (TFC). The emphasis is on the accomplishments and relevance of the work. Detailed description of the methods used to achieve the highlighted results and the associated support tasks are not included in this report.

  6. Results of analysis of galaxy clusters from the standpoint of similarity and dimensional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golitsyn, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of galaxy clusters enable the evolution of the Universe at various stages of its life to be traced. The luminosities, sizes, temperatures, and masses of clusters are measured during their observations. Clusters are bound by gravitation with the universal constant G into a single whole. All these quantities are defined by three units of measurement: mass, length, and time. Therefore, there are two dimensionless parameters in the system usually called similarity parameters. One of them is the virial ratio of the potential and kinetic energies.

  7. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties.

    PubMed

    Weids, Alan J; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J; Grant, Chris M

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved. PMID:27086931

  8. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties

    PubMed Central

    Weids, Alan J.; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J.; Grant, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved. PMID:27086931

  9. Accomplishing Districtwide Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharratt, Lyn; Fullan, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This is a mystery story. It is about a district that apparently did the right things but seemed not to get commensurate results across all classrooms and schools. In this article, we look closely at the details and discover an important lesson about districtwide reform. The district is York Region District School Board, which is a large…

  10. NASA space biology accomplishments, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W.; Pleasant, L. G.

    1983-01-01

    Summaries of NASA's Space Biology Program projects are provided. The goals, objectives, accomplishments, and future plans of each project are described in this publication as individual technical summaries.

  11. Hipparcos: mission accomplished

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-08-01

    During the last few months of its life, as the high radiation environment to which the satellite was exposed took its toll on the on-board system, Hipparcos was operated with only two of the three gyroscopes normally required for such a satellite, following an ambitious redesign of the on-board and on-ground systems. Plans were in hand to operate the satellite without gyroscopes at all, and the first such "gyro- less" data had been acquired, when communication failure with the on-board computers on 24 June 1993 put an end to the relentless flow of 24000 bits of data that have been sent down from the satellite each second, since launch. Further attempts to continue operations proved unsuccessful, and after a short series of sub-systems tests, operations were terminated four years and a week after launch. An enormous wealth of scientific data was gathered by Hipparcos. Even though data analysis by the scientific teams involved in the programme is not yet completed, it is clear that the mission has been an overwhelming success. "The ESA advisory bodies took a calculated risk in selecting this complex but fundamental programme" said Dr. Roger Bonnet, ESA's Director of Science, "and we are delighted to have been able to bring it to a highly successful conclusion, and to have contributed unique information that will take a prominent place in the history and development of astrophysics". Extremely accurate positions of more than one hundred thousand stars, precise distance measurements (in most cases for the first time), and accurate determinations of the stars' velocity through space have been derived. The resulting HIPPARCOS Star Catalogue, expected to be completed in 1996, will be of unprecedented accuracy, achieving results some 10-100 times more accurate than those routinely determined from ground-based astronomical observatories. A further star catalogue, the Thyco Star Catalogue of more than a million stars, is being compiled from additional data accumulated by the

  12. Hipparcos: mission accomplished

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-08-01

    During the last few months of its life, as the high radiation environment to which the satellite was exposed took its toll on the on-board system, Hipparcos was operated with only two of the three gyroscopes normally required for such a satellite, following an ambitious redesign of the on-board and on-ground systems. Plans were in hand to operate the satellite without gyroscopes at all, and the first such "gyro- less" data had been acquired, when communication failure with the on-board computers on 24 June 1993 put an end to the relentless flow of 24000 bits of data that have been sent down from the satellite each second, since launch. Further attempts to continue operations proved unsuccessful, and after a short series of sub-systems tests, operations were terminated four years and a week after launch. An enormous wealth of scientific data was gathered by Hipparcos. Even though data analysis by the scientific teams involved in the programme is not yet completed, it is clear that the mission has been an overwhelming success. "The ESA advisory bodies took a calculated risk in selecting this complex but fundamental programme" said Dr. Roger Bonnet, ESA's Director of Science, "and we are delighted to have been able to bring it to a highly successful conclusion, and to have contributed unique information that will take a prominent place in the history and development of astrophysics". Extremely accurate positions of more than one hundred thousand stars, precise distance measurements (in most cases for the first time), and accurate determinations of the stars' velocity through space have been derived. The resulting HIPPARCOS Star Catalogue, expected to be completed in 1996, will be of unprecedented accuracy, achieving results some 10-100 times more accurate than those routinely determined from ground-based astronomical observatories. A further star catalogue, the Thyco Star Catalogue of more than a million stars, is being compiled from additional data accumulated by the

  13. Subduction in fancy: stripping young slabs as a result of similar crust-mantle rheologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, Philippe; Yamato, Philippe; Soret, Mathieu; Prigent, Cécile; Guillot, Stéphane; Plunder, Alexis; Dubacq, Benoît; Monié, Patrick; Chauvet, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Understanding subduction rheology in both space and time has been a challenge since the advent of plate tectonics. We herein focus on "subduction infancy", which corresponds to the first ~0-2 My immediately following subduction nucleation, when a newly born slab penetrates into the overriding plate mantle and heats up. The only remnants of this critical, yet elusive, geodynamic step are thin metamorphic soles, commonly found beneath pristine, 100-1000 km long portions of oceanic lithosphere emplaced on top of continents (i.e., ophiolites). In this study, we show how, during subduction infancy, transient mechanical properties of both the mantle and crust across the subduction plate interface (during ~100s ky) control and hinder the penetration of tectonic plates into the mantle, and how this results in strong peaks of resistance and even slicing of their surface - leaving behind thin, chopped-off metamorphic slivers (i.e., metamorphic soles). These findings constrain the mechanical behaviour of the subduction plate interface (with implications for coupling processes and earthquake generation) as well as the properties of the crust and mantle. They also highlight the role of fluids in enabling subduction to overcome this early resistance.

  14. ADVANCED FUELS CAMPAIGN 2013 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2013-10-01

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This includes development of a state-of-the art Research and Development (R&D) infrastructure to support the use of “goal-oriented science-based approach.” In support of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program, AFC is responsible for developing advanced fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY) 2013 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section.

  15. Joint Winter Runway Friction Program Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Wambold, James C.; Henry, John J.; Andresen, Arild; Bastian, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The major program objectives are: (1) harmonize ground vehicle friction measurements to report consistent friction value or index for similar contaminated runway conditions, for example, compacted snow, and (2) establish reliable correlation between ground vehicle friction measurements and aircraft braking performance. Accomplishing these objectives would give airport operators better procedures for evaluating runway friction and maintaining acceptable operating conditions, providing pilots information to base go/no go decisions, and would contribute to reducing traction-related aircraft accidents.

  16. Advanced Fuels Campaign 2012 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2012-11-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is responsible for developing fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The fiscal year 2012 (FY 2012) accomplishments are highlighted below. Kemal Pasamehmetoglu is the National Technical Director for AFC.

  17. Infant Mortality: 1989 Research Accomplishments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Collected in this document are reports of the National Institutes of Health's 1989 accomplishments in research on the problem of infant mortality. Reports are provided by the: (1) National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; (2) National Cancer Institute; (3) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; (4) National Institute of…

  18. The Joint Accomplishment of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Gresalfi, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Identity has become a central concept in the analysis of learning from social perspectives. In this article, we draw on a situative perspective to conceptualize identity as a "joint accomplishment" between individuals and their interactions with norms, practices, cultural tools, relationships, and institutional and cultural contexts.…

  19. Space Biophysics: Accomplishments, Trends, Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Physics and biology are inextricably linked. All the chemical and biological processes of life are dutifully bound to follow the rules and laws of physics. In space, these physical laws seem to turn on their head and biological systems, from microbes to humans, adapt and evolve in myriad ways to cope with the changed physical influences of the space environment. Gravity is the most prominent change in space that influences biology. In microgravity, the physical processes of sedimentation, density-driven convective flow, influence of surface tension and fluid pressure profoundly influence biology at the molecular and cellular level as well as at the whole-body level. Gravity sensing mechanisms are altered, structural and functional components of biology (such as bone and muscle) are reduced and changes in the way fluids and gasses behave also drive the way microbial systems and biofilms grow as well as the way plants and animals adapt. The radiation environment also effects life in space. Solar particle events and high energy cosmic radiation can cause serious damage to DNA and other biomolecules. The results can cause mutation, cellular damage or death, leading to health consequences of acute radiation damage or long-term health consequences such as increased cancer risk. Space Biophysics is the study and utilization of physical changes in space that cause changes in biological systems. The unique physical environment in space has been used successfully to grow high-quality protein crystals and 3D tissue cultures that could not be grown in the presence of unidirectional gravitational acceleration here on Earth. All biological processes that change in space have their root in a biophysical alteration due to microgravity and/or the radiation environment of space. In order to fully-understand the risks to human health in space and to fully-understand how humans, plants, animals and microbes can safely and effectively travel and eventually live for long periods beyond

  20. Near-wall similarity in three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers. I - Model review. II - Pressure-driven flow results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, F. J.; Mcallister, J. E.; Tennant, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    Eleven proposed models for near-wall similarity for three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer flows are reviewed. Six of these models are comparatively simple scalar models and five are more complex and/or two-component vector models. Ten of the models can be tested as to their validity or predictive capability with the aid of measured mean velocity field, wall pressure field, and direct wall shear stress field (magnitude and direction) data. One of the models cannot be tested owing to its dependence on two parameters that are at present extremely difficult (if not impossible) to measure. Ten three-dimensional near-wall similarity models are then evaluated with direct wall shear, velocity field, and pressure gradient data from a three-dimensional pressure-driven boundary layer flow. In a primary focus of the interval where y+ is between 50 and 300, graphical results suggest that six simpler models and the freestream component of one complex model are adequate for profiles with monotone increasing skew up to about 15 deg.

  1. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions Resulting as Picometer Interactions with Similarity to K-Shell Electron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Li, X. Z.; Kelly, J. C.; Osman, F.

    2006-02-01

    Since the appeal by Brian Josephson at the meeting of the Nobel Laureates July 2004, it seems to be indicated to summarize the following serious, reproducible and confirmed observations on reactions of protons or deuterons incorporated in host metals such as palladium. Some reflections to Rutherford's discovery of nuclear physics, the Cockroft-Oliphant discovery of anomalous low-energy fusion reactions and the chemist Hahn's discovery of fission had to be included. Using gaseous atmosphere or discharges between palladium targets, rather significant results were seen e.g. from the "life after death" heat production of such high values per host atom that only nuclear reactions can be involved. This supports the earlier evaluation of neutron generation in fully reversible experiments with gas discharges hinting that a reasonable screening effect - preferably in the swimming electron layer - may lead to reactions at nuclear distances d of picometers with reaction probability times U of about megaseconds similar to the K-shell capture radioactivity. Further electrolytic experiments led to low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) where the involvement of pollution could be excluded from the appearance of very seldom rare earth elements. A basically new theory for DD cross-sections is used to confirm the picometer-megasecond reactions of cold fusion. Other theoretical aspects are given from measured heavy element distributions similar to the standard abundance distribution, SAD, in the Universe with consequences on endothermic heavy nuclei generation, magic numbers and to quark-gluon plasmas.

  2. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2011 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01

    One of the major research and development (R&D) areas under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is advanced fuels development. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has the responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY 20) 2011 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section. The order of the accomplishments in this report is consistent with the AFC work breakdown structure (WBS).

  3. Activities and Accomplishments of ICAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief historical background on establishing the Institute for Computational and Applied Mechanics (ICAM) is presented and basic goals and objectives are discussed. It is emphasized that the goal of the ICAM has been to develop and maintain a self-sustaining center of excellence in computational methods at Old Dominion University (ODU). Information is provided on funding sources and budget disposition, recent activities and accomplishments, list of graduate students supported on the program, and number of students who received graduate degrees (M.S. as well as Ph.D.). Information is also provided on research coordination with various scientists and engineers, and on different reports specifically written for ICAM. ICAM has been supported, in part, by NASA Langley Research Center through Grant NAG-1-363. This report constitutes the final report for ICAM for the period ending December 1996. The grant has been monitored by the University Affairs Officers at NASA Langley.

  4. NASA total quality management 1989 accomplishments report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Described here are the accomplishments of NASA as a result of the use of Total Quality Management (TQM). The principles in practice which led to these process refinements are important cultural elements to any organization's productivity and quality efforts. The categories of TQM discussed here are top management leadership and support, strategic planning, focus on the customer, employee training and recognition, employee empowerment and teamwork, measurement and analysis, and quality assurance.

  5. FY005 Accomplishments for Colony Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Inglett, T; Tauferner, A

    2005-07-05

    The Colony Project is developing operating system and runtime system technology to enable efficient general purpose environments on tens of thousands of processors. To accomplish this, we are investigating memory management techniques, fault management strategies, and parallel resource management schemes. Recent results show promising findings for scalable strategies based on processor virtualization, in-memory checkpointing, and parallel aware modifications to full featured operating systems.

  6. Two Measurement Methods of Leaf Dry Matter Content Produce Similar Results in a Broad Range of Species

    PubMed Central

    Vaieretti, María Victoria; Díaz, Sandra; Vile, Denis; Garnier, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf dry matter content (LDMC) is widely used as an indicator of plant resource use in plant functional trait databases. Two main methods have been proposed to measure LDMC, which basically differ in the rehydration procedure to which leaves are subjected after harvesting. These are the ‘complete rehydration’ protocol of Garnier et al. (2001, Functional Ecology 15: 688–695) and the ‘partial rehydration’ protocol of Vendramini et al. (2002, New Phytologist 154: 147–157). Methods To test differences in LDMC due to the use of different methods, LDMC was measured on 51 native and cultivated species representing a wide range of plant families and growth forms from central-western Argentina, following the complete rehydration and partial rehydration protocols. Key Results and Conclusions The LDMC values obtained by both methods were strongly and positively correlated, clearly showing that LDMC is highly conserved between the two procedures. These trends were not altered by the exclusion of plants with non-laminar leaves. Although the complete rehydration method is the safest to measure LDMC, the partial rehydration procedure produces similar results and is faster. It therefore appears as an acceptable option for those situations in which the complete rehydration method cannot be applied. Two notes of caution are given for cases in which different datasets are compared or combined: (1) the discrepancy between the two rehydration protocols is greatest in the case of high-LDMC (succulent or tender) leaves; (2) the results suggest that, when comparing many studies across unrelated datasets, differences in the measurement protocol may be less important than differences among seasons, years and the quality of local habitats. PMID:17353207

  7. BEAUTY: an enhanced BLAST-based search tool that integrates multiple biological information resources into sequence similarity search results.

    PubMed

    Worley, K C; Wiese, B A; Smith, R F

    1995-09-01

    BEAUTY (BLAST enhanced alignment utility) is an enhanced version of the NCBI's BLAST data base search tool that facilitates identification of the functions of matched sequences. We have created new data bases of conserved regions and functional domains for protein sequences in NCBI's Entrez data base, and BEAUTY allows this information to be incorporated directly into BLAST search results. A Conserved Regions Data Base, containing the locations of conserved regions within Entrez protein sequences, was constructed by (1) clustering the entire data base into families, (2) aligning each family using our PIMA multiple sequence alignment program, and (3) scanning the multiple alignments to locate the conserved regions within each aligned sequence. A separate Annotated Domains Data Base was constructed by extracting the locations of all annotated domains and sites from sequences represented in the Entrez, PROSITE, BLOCKS, and PRINTS data bases. BEAUTY performs a BLAST search of those Entrez sequences with conserved regions and/or annotated domains. BEAUTY then uses the information from the Conserved Regions and Annotated Domains data bases to generate, for each matched sequence, a schematic display that allows one to directly compare the relative locations of (1) the conserved regions, (2) annotated domains and sites, and (3) the locally aligned regions matched in the BLAST search. In addition, BEAUTY search results include World-Wide Web hypertext links to a number of external data bases that provide a variety of additional types of information on the function of matched sequences. This convenient integration of protein families, conserved regions, annotated domains, alignment displays, and World-Wide Web resources greatly enhances the biological informativeness of sequence similarity searches. BEAUTY searches can be performed remotely on our system using the "BCM Search Launcher" World-Wide Web pages (URL is < http:/ /gc.bcm.tmc.edu:8088/ search

  8. Basic Energy Sciences: Summary of Accomplishments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1990-05-01

    For more than four decades, the Department of Energy, including its predecessor agencies, has supported a program of basic research in nuclear- and energy-related sciences, known as Basic Energy Sciences. The purpose of the program is to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user'' facilities necessary for conducting basic research. Its technical interests span the range of scientific disciplines: physical and biological sciences, geological sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences. Its products and facilities are essential to technology development in many of the more applied areas of the Department's energy, science, and national defense missions. The accomplishments of Basic Energy Sciences research are numerous and significant. Not only have they contributed to Departmental missions, but have aided significantly the development of technologies which now serve modern society daily in business, industry, science, and medicine. In a series of stories, this report highlights 22 accomplishments, selected because of their particularly noteworthy contributions to modern society. A full accounting of all the accomplishments would be voluminous. Detailed documentation of the research results can be found in many thousands of articles published in peer-reviewed technical literature.

  9. Basic energy sciences: Summary of accomplishments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-05-01

    For more than four decades, the Department of Energy, including its predecessor agencies, has supported a program of basic research in nuclear- and energy related sciences, known as Basic Energy Sciences. The purpose of the program is to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user facilities necessary for conducting basic research. Its technical interests span the range of scientific disciplines: physical and biological sciences, geological sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences. Its products and facilities are essential to technology development in many of the more applied areas of the Department's energy, science, and national defense missions. The accomplishments of Basic Energy Sciences research are numerous and significant. Not only have they contributed to Departmental missions, but have aided significantly the development of technologies which now serve modern society daily in business, industry, science, and medicine. In a series of stories, this report highlights 22 accomplishments, selected because of their particularly noteworthy contributions to modern society. A full accounting of all the accomplishments would be voluminous. Detailed documentation of the research results can be found in many thousands of articles published in peer-reviewed technical literature.

  10. Selection Indices and Multivariate Analysis Show Similar Results in the Evaluation of Growth and Carcass Traits in Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Brito Lopes, Fernando; da Silva, Marcelo Corrêa; Magnabosco, Cláudio Ulhôa; Goncalves Narciso, Marcelo; Sainz, Roberto Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This research evaluated a multivariate approach as an alternative tool for the purpose of selection regarding expected progeny differences (EPDs). Data were fitted using a multi-trait model and consisted of growth traits (birth weight and weights at 120, 210, 365 and 450 days of age) and carcass traits (longissimus muscle area (LMA), back-fat thickness (BF), and rump fat thickness (RF)), registered over 21 years in extensive breeding systems of Polled Nellore cattle in Brazil. Multivariate analyses were performed using standardized (zero mean and unit variance) EPDs. The k mean method revealed that the best fit of data occurred using three clusters (k = 3) (P < 0.001). Estimates of genetic correlation among growth and carcass traits and the estimates of heritability were moderate to high, suggesting that a correlated response approach is suitable for practical decision making. Estimates of correlation between selection indices and the multivariate index (LD1) were moderate to high, ranging from 0.48 to 0.97. This reveals that both types of indices give similar results and that the multivariate approach is reliable for the purpose of selection. The alternative tool seems very handy when economic weights are not available or in cases where more rapid identification of the best animals is desired. Interestingly, multivariate analysis allowed forecasting information based on the relationships among breeding values (EPDs). Also, it enabled fine discrimination, rapid data summarization after genetic evaluation, and permitted accounting for maternal ability and the genetic direct potential of the animals. In addition, we recommend the use of longissimus muscle area and subcutaneous fat thickness as selection criteria, to allow estimation of breeding values before the first mating season in order to accelerate the response to individual selection. PMID:26789008

  11. Paternal DNA damage resulting from various sperm treatments persists after fertilization and is similar before and after DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M; Ward, Monika A

    2012-01-01

    In spite of its highly condensed state, sperm DNA is vulnerable to damage that can originate from oxidative stress, the activity of sperm-specific nucleases, or both. After fertilization, in the oocyte, paternal chromatin undergoes dramatic changes, and during this extensive remodeling, it can be both repaired and degraded, and these processes can be linked to DNA synthesis. Here, we analyzed sperm response to damage-inducing treatments both before and after fertilization and before or after zygotic DNA replication. Epididymal mouse spermatozoa were either frozen without cryoprotection (FT) or treated with detergent Triton X-100 coupled with dithiothreitol (TX+DTT) to induce DNA damage. Fresh, untreated sperm served as control. Immediately after preparation, spermatozoa from 3 groups were taken for comet assay, or for intracytoplasmic sperm injection into prometaphase I oocytes to visualize prematurely condensed single-chromatid chromosomes, or into mature metaphase II oocytes to visualize chromosomes after DNA replication. Comet assay revealed increased DNA fragmentation in treated sperm when compared with control, with FT sperm more severely affected. Chromosome analysis demonstrated paternal DNA damage in oocytes injected with treated, but not with fresh, sperm, with FT and TX+DTT groups now yielding similar damage. There were no differences in the incidence of abnormal paternal karyoplates before and after DNA synthesis in all examined groups. This study provides evidence that subjecting sperm to DNA damage-inducing treatments results in degradation of highly condensed sperm chromatin when it is still packed within the sperm head, and that this DNA damage persists after fertilization. The difference in DNA damage in sperm subjected to 2 treatments was ameliorated in the fertilized oocytes, suggesting that some chromatin repair might have occurred. This process, however, was independent of DNA synthesis and took place during oocyte maturation. PMID:21546611

  12. Selection Indices and Multivariate Analysis Show Similar Results in the Evaluation of Growth and Carcass Traits in Beef Cattle.

    PubMed

    Brito Lopes, Fernando; da Silva, Marcelo Corrêa; Magnabosco, Cláudio Ulhôa; Goncalves Narciso, Marcelo; Sainz, Roberto Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This research evaluated a multivariate approach as an alternative tool for the purpose of selection regarding expected progeny differences (EPDs). Data were fitted using a multi-trait model and consisted of growth traits (birth weight and weights at 120, 210, 365 and 450 days of age) and carcass traits (longissimus muscle area (LMA), back-fat thickness (BF), and rump fat thickness (RF)), registered over 21 years in extensive breeding systems of Polled Nellore cattle in Brazil. Multivariate analyses were performed using standardized (zero mean and unit variance) EPDs. The k mean method revealed that the best fit of data occurred using three clusters (k = 3) (P < 0.001). Estimates of genetic correlation among growth and carcass traits and the estimates of heritability were moderate to high, suggesting that a correlated response approach is suitable for practical decision making. Estimates of correlation between selection indices and the multivariate index (LD1) were moderate to high, ranging from 0.48 to 0.97. This reveals that both types of indices give similar results and that the multivariate approach is reliable for the purpose of selection. The alternative tool seems very handy when economic weights are not available or in cases where more rapid identification of the best animals is desired. Interestingly, multivariate analysis allowed forecasting information based on the relationships among breeding values (EPDs). Also, it enabled fine discrimination, rapid data summarization after genetic evaluation, and permitted accounting for maternal ability and the genetic direct potential of the animals. In addition, we recommend the use of longissimus muscle area and subcutaneous fat thickness as selection criteria, to allow estimation of breeding values before the first mating season in order to accelerate the response to individual selection. PMID:26789008

  13. How similar are the changes in neural activity resulting from mindfulness practice in contrast to spiritual practice?

    PubMed

    Barnby, Joseph M; Bailey, Neil W; Chambers, Richard; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-11-01

    Meditation and spiritual practices are conceptually similar, eliciting similar subjective experiences, and both appear to provide similar benefits to the practicing individuals. However, no research has examined whether the mechanism of action leading to the beneficial effects is similar in both practices. This review examines the neuroimaging research that has focused on groups of meditating individuals, groups who engage in religious/spiritual practices, and research that has examined groups who perform both practices together, in an attempt to assess whether this may be the case. Differences in the balance of activity between the parietal and prefrontal cortical activation were found between the three groups. A relative prefrontal increase was reflective of mindfulness, which related to decreased anxiety and improved well-being. A relative decrease in activation of the parietal cortex, specifically the inferior parietal cortex, appears to be reflective of spiritual belief, whether within the context of meditation or not. Because mindful and spiritual practices differ in focus regarding the 'self' or 'other' (higher being), these observations about neurological components that reflect spirituality may continue work towards understanding how the definition of 'self' and 'other' is represented in the brain, and how this may be reflected in behaviour. Future research can begin to use cohorts of participants in mindfulness studies which are controlled for using the variable of spirituality to explicitly examine how functional and structural similarities and differences may arise. PMID:26172520

  14. Technical Report --Final Work Accomplishment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun Heui

    2007-11-19

    The main goal of this project was to understand the solution structure of nonlinear boundary value problems arising in self-similar solutions of nonlinear systems of multidimensional conservation laws. This project further extended to study on biocomplex systems including Morphogen gradients systems (reaction-diffusion systems) and tumor growth and its treatment model problems (free boundary, conservation of mass and reaction-diffusion systems). The list of publications and the summary of those publications are listed.

  15. Gender-Role Orientation, Creative Accomplishments and Cognitive Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hittner, James B.; Daniels, Jennifer R.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the association of gender-role orientation to creative accomplishments and cognitive styles in 127 college students. Results indicated that the gender role orientation of instrumentality was positively associated with creative accomplishments in the business venture domain and that androgynous, versus non-androgynous,…

  16. Assessing Accomplished Teaching: Good Strides, Great Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Antony D.

    2010-01-01

    This article surveys efforts at the national and international level to define and assess accomplished teaching with particular attention devoted to how assessments of accomplished teaching connect to student learning. The author finds that most assessments are based on aspects of teaching that, presumably, come together as accomplished teaching.…

  17. Are patterns of bone loss in anorexic and postmenopausal women similar? Preliminary results using high resolution peripheral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Milos, Gabriella; Häuselmann, Hans-Jörg; Krieg, Marc-Antoine; Rüegsegger, Peter; Gallo, Luigi M

    2014-01-01

    This study intended to compare bone density and architecture in three groups of women: young women with anorexia nervosa (AN), an age-matched control group of young women, and healthy late postmenopausal women. Three-dimensional peripheral quantitative high resolution computed-tomography (HR-pQCT) at the ultradistal radius, a technology providing measures of cortical and trabecular bone density and microarchitecture, was performed in the three cohorts. Thirty-six women with AN aged 18-30 years (mean duration of AN: 5.8 years), 83 healthy late postmenopausal women aged 70-81 as well as 30 age-matched healthy young women were assessed. The overall cortical and trabecular bone density (D100), the absolute thickness of the cortical bone (CTh), and the absolute number of trabecules per area (TbN) were significantly lower in AN patients compared with healthy young women. The absolute number of trabecules per area (TbN) in AN and postmenopausal women was similar, but significantly lower than in healthy young women. The comparison between AN patients and post-menopausal women is of interest because the latter reach bone peak mass around the middle of the fertile age span whereas the former usually lose bone before reaching optimal bone density and structure. This study shows that bone mineral density and bone compacta thickness in AN are lower than those in controls but still higher than those in postmenopause. Bone compacta density in AN is similar as in controls. However, bone inner structure in AN is degraded to a similar extent as in postmenopause. This last finding is particularly troubling. PMID:24084384

  18. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2010 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase

    2010-12-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Accomplishment Report documents the high-level research and development results achieved in fiscal year 2010. The AFC program has been given responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. The science-based approach combines theory, experiments, and multi-scale modeling and simulation aimed at a fundamental understanding of the fuel fabrication processes and fuel and clad performance under irradiation. The scope of the AFC includes evaluation and development of multiple fuel forms to support the three fuel cycle options described in the Sustainable Fuel Cycle Implementation Plan4: Once-Through Cycle, Modified-Open Cycle, and Continuous Recycle. The word “fuel” is used generically to include fuels, targets, and their associated cladding materials. This document includes a brief overview of the management and integration activities; but is primarily focused on the technical accomplishments for FY-10. Each technical section provides a high level overview of the activity, results, technical points of contact, and applicable references.

  19. Moderate-intensity intermittent work in the heat results in similar low-level dehydration in young and older males.

    PubMed

    Wright, Heather E; Larose, Joanie; McLellan, Tom M; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-01-01

    Older individuals may be more susceptible to the negative thermal and cardiovascular consequences of dehydration during intermittent work in the heat. This study examined the hydration, thermal, and cardiovascular responses to intermittent exercise in the heat in 14 Young (Y, Mean ± SE; 25.8 ± 0.8 years), Middle-age (MA, 43.6 ± 0.9 years), and Older (O, 57.2 ± 1.5 years) healthy, non-heat acclimated males matched for height, mass, body surface area, and percent body fat. Rectal temperature (Tre), heart rate (HR), local sweat rate (LSR), and hydration indices were measured during 4 × 15-min moderate to heavy cycling bouts at 400 W heat production, each followed by a 15-min rest period, in Warm/Dry (35°C, 20% relative humidity [RH]) and Warm/Humid (35°C, 60% RH) heat. No differences were observed between the age groups for Tre, Tre change, HR, LSR, mass change, urine specific gravity, and plasma protein concentration in either condition, irrespective of the greater level of thermal and cardiovascular strain experienced in the Warm/Humid environment. Plasma volume changes (Dry Y: -5.4 ± 0.7, MA: -6.2 ± 0.9, O: -5.7 ± 0.9%, Humid Y: -7.3 ± 1.0, MA: -7.9 ± 0.8, O: -8.4 ± 1.0%) were similar between groups, as were urine specific gravity and plasma protein concentrations. Thus, physically active Young, Middle-age, and Older males demonstrate similar hydration, thermal, and cardiovascular responses during moderate- to high-intensity intermittent exercise in the heat. PMID:24521064

  20. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  1. Prepubertal goat oocytes from large follicles result in similar blastocyst production and embryo ploidy than those from adult goats.

    PubMed

    Romaguera, R; Moll, X; Morató, R; Roura, M; Palomo, M J; Catalá, M G; Jiménez-Macedo, A R; Hammami, S; Izquierdo, D; Mogas, T; Paramio, M T

    2011-07-01

    Developmental competence of oocytes from prepubertal females is lower than those from adult females. Oocyte development competence is positively related to follicular diameter. Most of the follicles of prepubertal goat ovaries are smaller than 3 mm. The aim of this study was to compare oocytes of two follicle sizes (< 3 mm and ≥ 3 mm) from prepubertal goats with oocytes from adult goats in relation to their in vitro production and quality of blastocysts. Oocytes from prepubertal goats were obtained from slaughterhouse ovaries and selected according to the follicle diameter whereas oocytes from adult goats were recovered in vivo by LOPU technique without prior selection of follicle size. COCs were IVM for 27 h, IVF at the conventional conditions with fresh semen and presumptive zygotes were cultured in SOF medium for 8 days. Blastocysts obtained were vitrified and after warming their blastocoele re-expansion and the ploidy by FISH technique were assessed. We found significant differences between blastocysts yield of oocytes recovered from follicles smaller than 3 mm of prepubertal goats compared to those from adult goats (5.45% vs 20. 83%, respectively) however, these differences disappear if oocytes were recovered form large follicles (18.07%). A total of 28 blastocysts were analysed and 96.43% showed mixoploidy. Age did not affect the number of embryos with abnormal ploidy or blastocyst re-expansion after warming. Furthermore, the percentage of diploid blastomeres per embryo was similar in the 3 groups studied, adult, prepubertal from follicles ≥ 3 mm and < 3 mm (68.6%, 80.8% and 73.6%, respectively). In conclusion, IVP of blastocysts coming from follicles larger than 3 mm of goats 45 days old were not different to the blastocysts produced from adult goats, both in terms of quantity and quality. PMID:21295839

  2. Memories of traumatic events in childhood fade after experiencing similar less stressful events: results from two natural experiments.

    PubMed

    Weems, Carl F; Russell, Justin D; Banks, Donice M; Graham, Rebecca A; Neill, Erin L; Scott, Brandon G

    2014-10-01

    The long-term stability of youth reports of traumatic events is largely unknown. Translational animal research suggests that there may be an alteration of memories for traumatic events via memory reconsolidation processes, whereas clinical research suggests memory alteration may occur through augmentation by negative emotions. In this report, 2 natural experiments test reconsolidation model and augmentation model predictions about the course of traumatic memories in youth. Data are from 2 prospective studies that assessed reports of an initial traumatic event (Hurricane Katrina) and tested recall both pre and post a similar event (Hurricane Gustav). In the 1st (Sample 1; n = 94, initial Grade 9 followed to 11), youth were assessed at 4 time points: Times 1-3 were 13, 20, and 26 months post-Katrina and then Time 4 was 5 months post-Hurricane Gustav. In the 2nd (Sample 2; n = 141, Grades 4 through 8), youth were assessed at 12 months pre-Gustav (Time 1; 24 months post-Katrina) and then again at 1 month (Time 2) and 8 months (Time 3) post-Gustav. Those with relatively high Gustav exposure showed more stability in their reports of Katrina exposure events, whereas in those with low Gustav exposure, reports of Katrina events decreased. Time spans between recall, age, gender, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, or cognitive/learning ability did not explain changes in the reports. The study provides the 1st long-term data on the consistency of youth reports of disaster-related experiences and provides initial evidence for the ecological validity of memory reconsolidation theory applied to traumatic events in youth. PMID:25068536

  3. Correlation Between Geometric Similarity of Ice Shapes and the Resulting Aerodynamic Performance Degradation: A Preliminary Investigation Using WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Chung, James

    1999-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance calculations were performed using WIND on ten experimental ice shapes and the corresponding ten ice shapes predicted by LEWICE 2.0. The resulting data for lift coefficient and drag coefficient are presented. The difference in aerodynamic results between the experimental ice shapes and the LEWICE ice shapes were compared to the quantitative difference in ice shape geometry presented in an earlier report. Correlations were generated to determine the geometric features which have the most effect on performance degradation. Results show that maximum lift and stall angle can be correlated to the upper horn angle and the leading edge minimum thickness. Drag coefficient can be correlated to the upper horn angle and the frequency-weighted average of the Fourier coefficients. Pitching moment correlated with the upper horn angle and to a much lesser extent to the upper and lower horn thicknesses.

  4. Acute leukemias of different lineages have similar MLL gene fusions encoding related chimeric proteins resulting from chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, J.; Forster, A.; Thompson, S.; Rabbitts, T.H. ); Lampert, F. ); Kaneko, Y. ); Slater, R.; Kroes, W.G. ); Van Der Schoot, C.E. ); Ludwig, W.D. ); Karpas, A. ); Pocock, C.; Cotter, F. )

    1993-09-15

    The MLL gene, on human chromosome 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation in acute leukemias, resulting in gene fusion with AF4 (chromosome 4) and ENL (chromosome 19). The authors report here translocation of MLL with nine different chromosomes and two paracentric chromosome 11 deletions in early B cell, B- or T-cell lineage, or nonlymphocytic acute leukemias. The mRNA translocation junction from 22t(4;11) patients, including six adult leukemias, and nine t(11;19) tumors reveals a remarkable conservation of breakpoints within MLL, AF4, or ENL genes, irrespective of tumor phenotype. Typically, the breakpoints are upstream of the zinc-finger region of MLL, and deletion of this region can accompany translocation, supporting the der(11) chromosome as the important component in leukemogenesis. Partial sequence of a fusion between MLL and the AFX1 gene from chromosome X shows the latter to be rich in Ser/Pro codons, like the ENL mRNA. These data suggest that the heterogeneous 11q23 abnormalities might cause attachment of Ser/Pro-rich segments to the NH[sub 2] terminus of MLL, lacking the zinc-finger region, and that translocation occurs in early hematopoietic cells, before commitment to distinct lineages. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Similar Results in Children with Asthma for Steady State Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Ciclesonide Inhaled with or without Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Boss, H.; Minic, P.; Nave, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ciclesonide is an inhaled corticosteroid administered by a metered dose inhaler (MDI) to treat bronchial asthma. After inhalation, the inactive ciclesonide is converted by esterases in the airways to active metabolite desisobutyryl-ciclesonide (des-CIC). Aim: To compare the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of des-CIC in children after administration of therapeutic dose of ciclesonide with and without spacer (AeroChamber Plus™). Methods: Open-label, 3 period, cross over, repeated dose, PK study in 37 children with mild to moderate stable asthma (age: 6–11 y; body weight: 20–53 kg). During each 7-day treatment period, ciclesonide was inhaled once in the morning: A) 160 μg MDI with spacer, B) 80 μg MDI with spacer, and C) 160 μg MDI without spacer. Serum PK parameters of ciclesonide and des-CIC were determined on Day 7 of each period. The primary PK parameters were the AUCτ and Cmax for des-CIC. Results: Inhaling ciclesonide with spacer led to a dose proportional systemic exposure (AUCτ) of des-CIC (0.316 μg*h/L for 80 μg and 0.663 μg*h/L for 160 μg). The dose-normalized systemic exposure for des-CIC (based on AUCτ) was 27% higher after inhalation of ciclesonide 80 μg or 160 μg with spacer than without spacer; the corresponding Cmax values for des-CIC were, respectively, 63% and 55% higher with spacer. No clinically relevant abnormalities or adverse drug reactions were observed. Conclusions: Inhalation of therapeutic ciclesonide dose with spacer led to a slight increase in the systemic exposure of des-CIC, which does not warrant dose adjustment. PMID:23761990

  6. High Speed Research: Propulsion Project Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    This past year has been one of great accomplishment for the propulsion element of NASA's High Speed Research (HSR) Program. The HSR Program is a NASA/industry partnership to develop the high-risk/high-payoff airframe and propulsion technologies applicable to a second-generation supersonic commercial transport, or High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The propulsion element, which also involves industry partners, is managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center. These technologies will contribute greatly to U.S. industry's ability to make an informed product launch decision for an HSCT vehicle. Specific NASA Lewis accomplishments in 1997 include: 1. Small-scale combustor sector tests conducted in Lewis' Engine Research Building contributed to the evolution of approaches to developing a combustor with ultralow NOx emissions. 2. Components were tested in Lewis' CE-9 facility (in Lewis' Engine Research Building) to assess the performance of candidate ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials in this realistic combustion environment. Test results were promising, and acceptable levels of structural durability were demonstrated for the ceramic matrix composite material tested. Ceramic matrix composites continue to show great promise for use in HSCT combustor liners. 3. Engine emissions tests in Lewis' Propulsion Systems Laboratory provided insight into other classes of emissions (e.g., particulates and aerosols) which will be important to control in HSCT propulsion system designs. 4. Small-scale nozzle tests conducted in Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory are contributing to the design of a low-noise, high-performance mixer/ejector nozzle configuration for HSCT engines. Over 18,000 hours of durability testing were completed in Lewis' materials laboratories to evaluate superalloy and g-titanium aluminide performance for HSCT nozzle applications. A two-dimensional supersonic inlet concept was tested in Lewis' 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The extensive database and

  7. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  8. Accomplishments of Science by the Year 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Current and projected accomplishments in science and technology are examined from a social and political perspective. It is observed that the present level of research and development in the United States is inadequate for many possible advancements to occur.

  9. Engineering Accomplishments in the Construction of NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    G. H. Neilson; P.J. Heitzenroeder; B.E. Nelson; W.T. Reiersen; A. Brooks; T.G. Brown; J.H. Chrzanowski; M.J. Cole; F. Dahlgren; T. Dodson; L.E. Dudek; R.A. Ellis; H.M. Fan; P.J. Fogarty; K.D. Freudenberg; P.L. Goranson; J.H. Harris; M.R. Kalish; G. Labik; J.F. Lyon; N. Pomphrey; C.D. Priniski; S. Raftopoulos; D.J. Rej; W.R. Sands; R.T. Simmons; B.E. Stratton; R.L. Strykowsky; M.E. Viola; D.E. Williamson; M.C. Zarnstorff

    2008-09-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test a compact, quasiaxisymmetric stellarator configuration. Flexibility and accurate realization of its complex 3D geometry were key requirements affecting the design and construction. While the project was terminated before completing construction, there were significant engineering accomplishments in design, fabrication, and assembly. The design of the stellarator core device was completed. All of the modular coils, toroidal field coils, and vacuum vessel sectors were fabricated. Critical assembly steps were demonstrated. Engineering advances were made in the application of CAD modeling, structural analysis, and accurate fabrication of complex-shaped components and subassemblies. The engineering accomplishments of the project are summarized

  10. Accomplishing Multiple Goals through Community Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Jody

    2007-01-01

    With schools being asked to accomplish more and more, it is increasingly important to, whenever possible, address multiple goals in teaching. Educating the whole child dictates that we find ways to ensure our graduates are well-rounded, independent thinkers capable of becoming well-adjusted, contributing adults. Thus community service has become a…

  11. Accomplished Teachers Implementation of Quality Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Weiyun; Hammond-Bennett, Austin; Upton, Ashely; Mason, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how accomplished teachers implement the quality of teaching practices in their daily lessons. The participants were four elementary physical education teachers (one male, three female). The data sources consisted of videotape of the teachers teaching 12 lessons, transcription of the taped lessons,…

  12. Unraveling bovin phylogeny: accomplishments and challenges.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Faysal; Vrba, Elisabeth S

    2010-01-01

    The phylogenetic systematics of bovin species forms a common basis for studies at multiple scales, from the level of domestication in populations to major cladogenesis. The main big-picture accomplishments of this productive field, including two recent works, one in BMC Genomics, are reviewed with an eye for some of the limitations and challenges impeding progress. PMID:20525112

  13. Acoustics Division recent accomplishments and research plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. R.; Morgan, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The research program currently being implemented by the Acoustics Division of NASA Langley Research Center is described. The scope, focus, and thrusts of the research are discussed and illustrated for each technical area by examples of recent technical accomplishments. Included is a list of publications for the last two calendar years. The organization, staff, and facilities are also briefly described.

  14. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Full Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE’s) Biomass Program works with industry, academia and its national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This document provides Program accomplishments for 2007.

  15. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Report Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE’s) Biomass Program works with industry, academia and its national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This document provides the introduction to the 2007 Program Accomplishments Report.

  16. Navajo Health Authority: Accomplishments--Future Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    Accomplishments of the Navajo Health Authority (NHA) since it began in 1972 are presented in synopsis form in a report of programs underway at Window Rock and Shiprock, along with NHA goals: to promote development of Navajo Health manpower, preventive medicine, health education, and native healing sciences. After a brief review of executive and…

  17. 2014 Survey of States: Initiatives, Trends, and Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyyan, Vitaliy; Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the fourteenth survey of states by the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) at the University of Minnesota. Results are presented for the 50 regular states and eight of the 11 unique states. The purpose of this report is to provide a snapshot of the new initiatives, trends, accomplishments, and emerging issues…

  18. Enhanced surveillance program FY1998 accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, J

    1998-10-01

    This report highlights the accomplishments of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP), the highest-priority research and development effort in stockpile management today. This is volume one of eleven, the unclassified summary of selected program highlights. These highlights fall into the following focus areas: pits, high explosives, organics, dynamics, diagnostics, systems, secondaries, materials-aging models, non-nuclear components, and routine surveillance testing system upgrades. Principal investigators from around the DOE complex contributed to this report.

  19. NASA total quality management 1990 accomplishments report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's efforts in Total Quality Management are based on continuous improvement and serve as a foundation for NASA's present and future endeavors. Given here are numerous examples of quality strategies that have proven effective and efficient in a time when cost reduction is critical. These accomplishment benefit our Agency and help to achieve our primary goal, keeping American in the forefront of the aerospace industry.

  20. Unraveling bovin phylogeny: accomplishments and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The phylogenetic systematics of bovin species forms a common basis for studies at multiple scales, from the level of domestication in populations to major cladogenesis. The main big-picture accomplishments of this productive field, including two recent works, one in BMC Genomics, are reviewed with an eye for some of the limitations and challenges impeding progress. See Research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/10/177 PMID:20525112

  1. Significant Accomplishments in Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of a symposium on significant accomplishments in science and technology are presented. The symposium was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center in December 1973. The subjects discussed are as follows: (1) cometary physics, (2) X-ray and gamma ray astronomy, (3) solar and terrestrial physics, (4) spacecraft technology, (5) Earth Resources Technology Satellite, (6) earth and ocean physics, (6) communications and navigation, (7) mission operations and data systems, and (8) networks systems and operations.

  2. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathryn A.

    2015-02-01

    Welcome to the 2014 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Accomplishments Report, covering research and development highlights from 2014. The LWRS Program is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development program to inform and support the long-term operation of our nation’s commercial nuclear power plants. The research uses the unique facilities and capabilities at the Department of Energy national laboratories in collaboration with industry, academia, and international partners. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants is essential to supporting our nation’s base load energy infrastructure, as well as reaching the Administration’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The purpose of the LWRS Program is to provide technical results for plant owners to make informed decisions on long-term operation and subsequent license renewal, reducing the uncertainty, and therefore the risk, associated with those decisions. In January 2013, 104 nuclear power plants operated in 31 states. However, since then, five plants have been shut down (several due to economic reasons), with additional shutdowns under consideration. The LWRS Program aims to minimize the number of plants that are shut down, with R&D that supports long-term operation both directly (via data that is needed for subsequent license renewal), as well indirectly (with models and technology that provide economic benefits). The LWRS Program continues to work closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to ensure that the body of information needed to support SLR decisions and actions is available in a timely manner. This report covers selected highlights from the three research pathways in the LWRS Program: Materials Aging and Degradation, Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization, and Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies, as well as a look-ahead at planned activities for 2015. If you

  3. Sandia technology engineering and science accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Sandia is a DOE multiprogram engineering and science laboratory with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California, and a test range near Tonapah, Nevada. We have major research and development responsibilities for nuclear weapons, arms control, energy, the environment, economic competitiveness, and other areas of importance to the needs of the nation. Our principal mission is to support national defense policies by ensuring that the nuclear weapon stockpile meets the highest standards of safety, reliability, security, use control, and military performance. Selected unclassified technical activities and accomplishments are reported here. Topics include advanced manufacturing technologies, intelligent machines, computational simulation, sensors and instrumentation, information management, energy and environment, and weapons technology.

  4. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2015 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Braase, Lori Ann; Carmack, William Jonathan

    2015-10-29

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This report is a compilation of technical accomplishment summaries for FY-15. Emphasis is on advanced accident-tolerant LWR fuel systems, advanced transmutation fuels technologies, and capability development.

  5. Similar names for similar biologics.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Nicole; Felix, Thomas; Strober, Bruce E; Warnock, David G

    2014-10-01

    Approval of the first biosimilar in the USA may occur by the end of 2014, yet a naming approach for biosimilars has not been determined. Biosimilars are highly similar to their biologic reference product but are not identical to it, because of their structural complexity and variations in manufacturing processes among companies. There is a need for a naming approach that can distinguish a biosimilar from its reference product and other biosimilars and ensure accurate tracing of adverse events (AEs) to the administered product. In contrast, generic small-molecule drugs are identical to their reference product and, therefore, share the same nonproprietary name. Clinical trials required to demonstrate biosimilarity for approval may not detect rare AEs or those occurring after prolonged use, and the incidence of such events may differ between a biosimilar and its reference product. The need for precise biologic identification is further underscored by the possibility of biosimilar interchangeability, a US designation that will allow substitution without prescriber intervention. For several biologics, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has used a naming approach that adds a prefix to a common root nonproprietary name, enabling healthcare providers to distinguish between products, avoid medication errors, and facilitate pharmacovigilance. We recommend that the FDA implement a biosimilars naming policy that likewise would add a distinguishable prefix or suffix to the root nonproprietary name of the reference product. This approach would ensure that a biosimilar could be distinguished from its reference product and other biosimilars in patient records and pharmacovigilance databases/reports, facilitating accurate attribution of AEs. PMID:25001080

  6. Health and Environmental Research. Summary of Accomplishments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1984-04-01

    This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  7. Low Cost Methods to Accomplish Aeronomy Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Accomplishment of aeronomy science using low cost methods involves a number of innovative considerations. These methods will be discussed. They include making broad use of internet to control and operate distributed sensors. Sensor controls should be simple and most important reliable. Imagers are a common sensor for optical systems and include common computer interfaces and menu driven operations which often don't require special software or engineering development. Small, inexpensive but reliable satellite systems are evolving in the Cubesat community. Effective use of students is invaluable, giving them responsibility to operate instrumentation and to routinely archive the data. Management of students is especially important in the early phase of their training to insure quality performance. These ideas will be elaborated on, and most importantly, the science motive is the most important driver for what is done.

  8. NASA total quality management 1989 accomplishments report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Betty P. (Editor); Stewart, Lynne M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    NASA and contractor employees achieved many notable improvements in 1989. The highlights of those improvements, described in this seventh annual Accomplishments Report, demonstrate that the people who support NASA's activities are getting more involved in quality and continuous improvement efforts. Their gains solidly support NASA's and this Nation's goal to remain a leader in space exploration and in world-wide market competition, and, when communicated to others through avenues such as this report, foster improvement efforts across government and industry. The principles in practice which led to these process refinements are important cultural elements to any organization's productivity and quality efforts. The categories in this report reflect NASA principles set forth in the 1980's and are more commonly known today as Total Quality Management (TQM): top management leadership and support; strategic planning; focus on the customer; employee training and recognition; employee empowerment and teamwork; measurement and analysis; and quality assurance.

  9. Health and environmental research. Summary of accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  10. Vertex similarity in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leicht, E. A.; Holme, Petter; Newman, M. E. J.

    2006-02-01

    We consider methods for quantifying the similarity of vertices in networks. We propose a measure of similarity based on the concept that two vertices are similar if their immediate neighbors in the network are themselves similar. This leads to a self-consistent matrix formulation of similarity that can be evaluated iteratively using only a knowledge of the adjacency matrix of the network. We test our similarity measure on computer-generated networks for which the expected results are known, and on a number of real-world networks.

  11. High-Intensity Interval Training and Isocaloric Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training Result in Similar Improvements in Body Composition and Fitness in Obese Individuals.

    PubMed

    Martins, Catia; Kazakova, Irina; Ludviksen, Marit; Mehus, Ingar; Wisloff, Ulrik; Kulseng, Bard; Morgan, Linda; King, Neil

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of 12 weeks of isocaloric programs of high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) or a short-duration HIIT (1/2HIIT) inducing only half the energy deficit on a cycle ergometer, on body weight and composition, cardiovascular fitness, resting metabolism rate (RMR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), nonexercise physical activity (PA) levels and fasting and postprandial insulin response in sedentary obese individuals. Forty-six sedentary obese individuals (30 women), with a mean BMI of 33.3 ± 2.9 kg/m2 and a mean age of 34.4 ± 8.8 years were randomly assigned to one of the three training groups: HIIT (n = 16), MICT (n = 14) or 1/2HIIT (n = 16) and exercise was performed 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Overall, there was a significant reduction in body weight, waist (p < .001) and hip (p < .01) circumference,, trunk and leg fat mass (FM; p < .01) and an increase in trunk and leg fat free mass (FFM; p < .01) and cardiovascular fitness (VO2max in ml/kg/min; p < .001) with exercise. However, no significant differences were observed between groups. There was no significant change in RMR, RER, nonexercise PA levels, fasting insulin or insulin sensitivity with exercise or between groups. There was a tendency for a reduction in AUC insulin with exercise (p = .069), but no differences between groups. These results indicate that isocaloric training protocols of HIIT or MICT (or 1/2HIIT inducing only half the energy deficit) exert similar metabolic and cardiovascular improvements in sedentary obese individuals. PMID:26479856

  12. Impacting Teachers' Understanding of Geometric Similarity: Results from Field Testing of the Learning and Teaching Geometry Professional Development Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seago, Nanette M.; Jacobs, Jennifer K.; Heck, Daniel J.; Nelson, Courtney L.; Malzahn, Kristen A.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the Learning and Teaching Geometry project is to build professional development materials that provide opportunities for teachers to learn about mathematical similarity through the use of videocases, in which specific and increasingly complex mathematical ideas are presented within the dynamics of classroom practice. The central…

  13. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration Through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Lunabotics Mining Competition is designed to promote the development of interest in space activities and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. The competition uses excavation, a necessary first step towards extracting resources from the regolith and building bases on the moon. The unique physical properties of lunar regolith and the reduced 1/6th gravity, vacuum environment make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The competition is conducted annually by NASA at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The teams that can use telerobotic or autonomous operation to excavate a lunar regolith geotechnical simulant, herein after referred to as Black Point-1 (or BP-1) and score the most points (calculated as an average of two separate 10-minute timed competition attempts) will eam points towards the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence and the scores will reflect ranking in the on-site mining category of the competition. The minimum excavation requirement is 10.0 kg during each competition attempt and the robotic excavator, referred to as the "Lunabot", must meet all specifications. This paper will review the achievements of the Lunabotics Mining Competition in 2010 and 2011, and present the new rules for 2012. By providing a framework for robotic design and fabrication, which culminates in a live competition event, university students have been able to produce sophisticated lunabots which are tele-operated. Multi-disciplinary teams are encouraged and the extreme sense of accomplishment provides a unique source of inspiration to the participating students, which has been shown to translate into increased interest in STEM careers. Our industrial sponsors (Caterpillar, Newmont Mining, Harris, Honeybee Robotics) have all stated that there is a strong need for skills in the workforce related

  14. Some History and Accomplishments of the IUSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Hartemink, Alfred E.

    2013-04-01

    Urban Soils) and three standing committees (Committee on awards and prizes, Committee on budget and finances, and Committee on statutes and byelaws). Membership in ISSS/IUSS increased from around 550 after WWII to over 60,000 today. The IUSS also provides Honorary Membership to soil scientists who have significant accomplishments in the field; to date 87 soil scientists have been so recognized from all over the globe. The IUSS is the most important global link to the world's leading soil science and soil scientists.

  15. APPLYING SIMPLE TECHNOLOGY ACCOMPLISHES VISUAL INSPECTION CHALLENGES

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, C

    2007-07-21

    This paper discusses the successful implementation of simple video technologies at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to perform complex visual inspection, monitoring, and surveillance tasks. Because SRS facilities are similar to those of an industrial plant, the environmental and accessibility considerations for remote viewing are the primary determining factors in the selection of technology. The constraints and challenges associated with remote viewing are discussed, and examples of applications are given.

  16. Expanding the results of a high throughput screen against an isochorismate-pyruvate lyase to enzymes of a similar scaffold or mechanism.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Luo, Qianyi; Riley, Andrew P; Taylor, Byron; Roy, Anuradha; Stein, Ross L; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Lamb, Audrey L

    2014-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing health concern, and new avenues of antimicrobial drug design are being actively sought. One suggested pathway to be targeted for inhibitor design is that of iron scavenging through siderophores. Here we present a high throughput screen to the isochorismate-pyruvate lyase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an enzyme required for the production of the siderophore pyochelin. Compounds identified in the screen are high nanomolar to low micromolar inhibitors of the enzyme and produce growth inhibition in PAO1 P. aeruginosa in the millimolar range under iron-limiting conditions. The identified compounds were also tested for enzymatic inhibition of Escherichia coli chorismate mutase, a protein of similar fold and similar chemistry, and of Yersinia enterocolitica salicylate synthase, a protein of differing fold but catalyzing the same lyase reaction. In both cases, subsets of the inhibitors from the screen were found to be inhibitory to enzymatic activity (mutase or synthase) in the micromolar range and capable of growth inhibition in their respective organisms (E. coli or Y. enterocolitica). PMID:25282647

  17. Marking Student Programs Using Graph Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, Kevin A.; Greyling, Jean H.; Vogts, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel approach to the automated marking of student programming assignments. Our technique quantifies the structural similarity between unmarked student submissions and marked solutions, and is the basis by which we assign marks. This is accomplished through an efficient novel graph similarity measure ("AssignSim"). Our experiments…

  18. Material Recovery and Waste Form Development FY 2015 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Terry Allen; Braase, Lori Ann

    2015-11-01

    The Material Recovery and Waste Form Development (MRWFD) Campaign under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is responsible for developing advanced separation and waste form technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The FY 2015 Accomplishments Report provides a highlight of the results of the research and development (R&D) efforts performed within the MRWFD Campaign in FY-14. Each section contains a high-level overview of the activities, results, technical point of contact, applicable references, and documents produced during the fiscal year. This report briefly outlines campaign management and integration activities, but primarily focuses on the many technical accomplishments made during FY-15. The campaign continued to utilize an engineering driven-science-based approach to maintain relevance and focus. There was increased emphasis on development of technologies that support near-term applications that are relevant to the current once-through fuel cycle.

  19. Oocyte maturation and fertilization in marine nemertean worms: using similar sorts of signaling pathways as in mammals, but often with differing results.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Stephen A; Cline, Cory; Goodrich, David

    2013-08-01

    In marine worms belonging to the phylum Nemertea, oocyte maturation and fertilization are regulated by the same general kinds of signals that control such processes in mammals. However, unlike mammalian oocytes that develop within follicles, nemertean oocytes characteristically lack a surrounding sheath of follicle cells and often respond differently to maturation-related cues than do mammalian oocytes. For example, elevators of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels promote the resumption of meiotic maturation (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in nemertean oocytes, whereas increasing intraoocytic cAMP and cGMP typically blocks GVBD in mammals. Similarly, AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signaling keeps nemertean oocytes from maturing, but in mouse oocytes, AMPK activation triggers GVBD. In addition, protein kinase C (PKC) activity is required for seawater-induced GVBD in nemerteans, whereas some PKCs have been shown to inhibit GVBD in mammals. Furthermore, although fertilization causes both types of oocytes to reorganize their endoplasmic reticulum and generate calcium oscillations that can involve soluble sperm factor activity and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling, some discrepancies in the spatiotemporal patterns and underlying mechanisms of fertilization are also evident in nemerteans versus mammals. Thus, to characterize differences and similarities in gamete biology more fully, aspects of oocyte maturation and fertilization in marine nemertean worms are reviewed and briefly compared with related findings that have been published for mammalian oocytes. In addition, possible causes of the alternative responses displayed by oocytes in these two animal groups are addressed. PMID:23995739

  20. X-RAY SELECTED AGN HOST GALAXIES ARE SIMILAR TO INACTIVE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 3: RESULTS FROM CANDELS/CDF-S

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Wuyts, S.; Nandra, K.; Mozena, M.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Koekemoer, A.; Ferguson, H.; Grogin, N.; McGrath, E.; Hathi, N. P.; Dekel, A.; Donley, J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Giavalisco, M.; Guo, Y.; Kocevski, D. D.; Laird, E.; Rangel, C.; Newman, J.; and others

    2013-01-20

    We use multi-band spatially resolved photometry from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South to explore the nuclear and extended colors, color gradients, and stellar populations of the host galaxies of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) out to z = 3. Based on a study of their central light, we develop X-ray based criteria to exclude objects with strong AGN contamination. We use stellar masses from the FIREWORKS database to understand and account for stellar mass selection effects and carefully study, for the first time, the resolved host galaxy properties of AGNs at z {approx} 2 in their rest-frame optical light without substantial nuclear contamination. AGN hosts span a sizable range of stellar masses, colors, and color gradients at these redshifts. Their colors, color gradients, and stellar population properties are very similar to inactive galaxies of the same stellar mass. At z {approx} 1, we find a slightly narrower range in host colors compared to inactive galaxies, as well as hints of more recent star formation. These differences are weaker or non-existent among AGN hosts at z {approx} 2. We discuss the importance of AGN-driven feedback in the quenching of galaxies at z {approx}> 1 and speculate on possible evolution in the relationship between black hole accretion and the host galaxy toward high redshifts.

  1. JOVE: Program Accomplishments and Research Continuation Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hmelo, Anthony B.

    1997-01-01

    We designed and constructed a centrifuge for high gravity materials science research. One Master's theses project on the directional solidification of Pb-Sn alloys demonstrated effects of high gravity on the fluid flow at the solid-liquid interface during processing. These results were published. Another investigation applied flow visualization techniques to image flow patterns in a water cell. This activity supported our research proposal for aqueous growth of L-Anginin Phosphate Single Crystals in a high gravity environment. This proposal was well reviewed but ultimately denied funding.

  2. Magnetospheric research as accomplished by IMS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.

    1990-12-01

    This study is based on the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) program launched and carried out during 1976-1979. Brief descriptions of various experiments aboard the different satellites are given. The magnetospheric features revealed by these measurements are described and discussed. The experiments covered include those aboard the ISEE, GEOS, ATS-6, P78-2 (SCATHA), S3-3, and Prognoz-7 missions. The IMS ground-based experiments are also briefly outlined. Among the results discussed are the tangential and rotational discontinuities in the magnetopause, flux transfer events at the magnetopause, plasma sheet and magnetotail phenomena, and the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  3. Recent NASA research accomplishments aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; North, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    The activation of the US Laboratory Module "Destiny" on the International Space Station (ISS) in February 2001 launched a new era in microgravity research. Destiny provides the environment to conduct long-term microgravity research utilizing human intervention to assess, report, and modify experiments real time. As the only available pressurized space platform, ISS maximizes today's scientific resources and substantially increases the opportunity to obtain much longed-for answers on the effects of microgravity and long-term exposure to space. In addition, it evokes unexpected questions and results while experiments are still being conducted, affording time for changes and further investigation. While building and outfitting the ISS is the main priority during the current ISS assembly phase, seven different space station crews have already spent more than 2000 crew hours on approximately 80 scientific investigations, technology development activities, and educational demonstrations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Cooperative Public Outreach - It can be Accomplished

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, K. W.; Carpenter, K. D.; Davis, S. L.; Smith, C. F.; Washburne, J. C.; Woodard, G. C.

    2002-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (Santa Catalina Ranger District of the Coronado National Forest), the U.S. Geological Survey (Water Resources Discipline, Arizona District), and the National Science Foundation sponsored Science and Technology Center (Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas) have created a series of exhibits on the hydrology of Sabino Creek, an ephemeral stream within the Sonoran Desert (USA) visited by over 1 million people annually. A clear set of educational objectives established at the beginning of the process and interagency cooperation resulted in a cohesive grouping of exhibits while minimizing single agency dominance. The multimedia exhibits are a collection of visual displays along with a touch-screen kiosk that has animations and other links that expand along many avenues to educate people on ephemeral streams, sky islands, siltation, and ground-water recharge within the Sonoran Desert. In addition, the exhibit incorporates real-time climate and streamflow data collected by four science agencies. The real-time data incorporated into the kiosk and linking web page is used to educate visitors about the natural environment within Sabino Canyon and inform them about flash-flooding and fire dangers. Thus, before entering the canyon, a visitor can view the exhibit and readily determine the air and water temperature, stream activity, and several other current and historical environmental variables. In summary, the cooperative efforts between the agencies resulted in a series of exhibits that are far more beneficial to the public than if the efforts had been attempted separately.

  5. Glacier Monitoring: Opportunities, Accomplishments, and Limitations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, M. F.; Dyurgerov, M. B.

    2001-12-01

    Glaciers and ice caps, exclusive of the two major ice sheets, have been monitored for more than a century. Initially sparked by interest in the effect of glaciers on the landscape and their sensitive response to changes of climate, glacier study is now additionally motivated because of impacts on cold-regions ecology and hydrology as well as global sea-level rise. Glacier observations in many areas provide the only real data on climate change in the mountains. A substantial number of mass balance programs were initiated during the 1960s that improved our understanding of spatial and temporal changes in climate, and provided a basis for projecting future changes to glaciers and sea level. These results show a general increase in both snow accumulation and ice melting during the last 40 years (but with net wastage predominating), and a marked increase in the sensitivity of ice wastage to air temperature since the late 1980s. The World Data Center system provided unrestricted exchange of data among glaciologists during the `cold war.' The World Glacier Monitoring Service together with the National Snow and Ice Data Center and several individuals now provide ready access to glacier data. Remaining problems include inadequate access to digital data, a size bias to small glaciers, some traditional methodologies which limit the usefulness of the results, slow incorporation of new technologies, complexity of incorporating glacier dynamics in mass balance analysis, and insufficient attention by some investigators to reporting observational error. Perhaps the most difficult problems are the extension of limited data to the synthesis of broad regional or global conclusions, and a general dwindling of support for monitoring activities.

  6. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1894 and accomplishments for FY 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    The Objectives, Expected Results, Approach, and Fiscal Year FY 1984 Milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division's research programs are examined. The FY 1983 Accomplishments are presented where applicable.

  7. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Space Mining for resources such as water ice, and regolith, which contain many elements in the form of metals, minerals, volatiles and other compounds, is a necessary step in Space Resource Utilization. One of the primary goals is to extract propellants from the regolith such as oxygen and hydrogen which could then be used for in-space transportation. In addition, the space mining system can be used for various construction tasks that can benefit human and robotic exploration as well as scientific investigations based on the exposed topography. The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) Lunabotics Mining Competition is a university-level competition designed to engage and retain students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload. The challenge is for students to design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 15 minutes. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the lunar simulant, the weight and size limitations of the lunabot, and the ability to control the lunabot from a remote control center or operate autonomously. This paper will present an update of the results and lessons learned during the first and second annual Lunabotics Mining Competitions held in May 2010 and May 2011. It will also preview the 2012 competition with a review of the revised rules. In 2010,22 United States (US) universities competed, and in May 2011 the competition was opened to international participation. In 2011, 36 teams actually competed from 26 USA states and 4 foreign countries (India, Bangladesh, Colombia and Canada). This combined total directly inspired an

  8. Overview and accomplishments of the Borexino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranucci, G.; Agostini, M.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    The Borexino experiment is running at the Laboratori del Gran Sasso in Italy since 2007. Its technical distinctive feature is the unprecedented ultralow background of the inner scintillating core, which is the basis of the outstanding achievements accumulated by the experiment. In this talk, after recalling the main features of the detector, the impressive solar data gathered so far by the experiment will be summarized, with special emphasis to the most recent and prominent result concerning the detection of the fundamental pp solar neutrino flux, which is the direct probe of the engine mechanism powering our star. Such a milestone measurement puts Borexino in the unique situation of being the only experiment able to do solar neutrino spectroscopy over the entire solar spectrum; the counterpart of this peculiar status in the oscillation interpretation of the data is the capability of Borexino alone to perform the full validation across the solar energy range of the MSW-LMA paradigm. The talk will be concluded highlighting the perspectives for the final stage of the solar program of the experiment, centered on the goal to fully complete the solar spectroscopy with the missing piece of the CNO neutrinos. If successful, such a measurement would represent the final crowning of the long quest of Borexino to unravel all the properties of the neutrinos from the Sun.

  9. Exposure of first-feeding cod larvae to dispersed crude oil results in similar transcriptional and metabolic responses as food deprivation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Lie, Kai K; Størseth, Trond R; Nordtug, Trond; Altin, Dag; Olsvik, Pål A

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of first-feeding cod larvae (Gadus morhua) to dispersed oil results in reduced feeding during an important transition period. First-feeding cod larvae were subjected to a 4-d treatment of food deprivation and sampled for microarray analyses. These microarray data were combined with data from cod larvae treated with mechanically and chemically dispersed oil in an attempt to understand to what extent starvation might explain some of the effects observed in first-feeding cod larvae during oil exposure. Transcriptional profiling of cod larvae suggested that the influence of oil exposure was almost as dramatic as being completely deprived of food. Protein and cellular degradation and loss of amino acids and glucose appear to be concomitant responses to both oil exposure and starvation. Fluorescence imaging of gut content indicated low uptake of food, and reduced growth (decrease in dry weight and in carbon and nitrogen content) was also noted in oil-exposed larvae, providing phenotypic anchoring of microarray data. The study displays the importance in combining use of high-throughput molecular tools with assessment of fitness-related endpoints in order to provide a greater understanding of toxicant-induced responses. This combined-approach investigation suggests that reduction of food uptake is an important process to be included when predicting effects of accidental oil spills. Finally, when comparing data from two oil treatments, exposure to chemically dispersed oil did not appear to result in greater toxicity than exposure to mechanically dispersed oil. PMID:27484138

  10. Research Progress and Accomplishments on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Lesa B.; Uri, John J.

    2002-01-01

    The first research payloads reached the International Space Station (ISS) more than two years ago, with research operating continuously since March 2001. Seven research racks are currently on-orbit, with three more arriving soon to expand science capabilities. Through the first five expeditions, 60 unique NASA-managed investigations from 11 nations have been supported, many continuing into later missions. More than 90,000 experiment hours have been completed, and more than 1,000 hours of crew time have been dedicated to research, numbers that grow daily. The multidisciplinary program includes research in life sciences, physical sciences, biotechnology, Earth sciences, technology demonstrations as well as commercial endeavors and educational activities. The Payload Operations and Integration Center monitors the onboard activities around the clock, working with numerous Principal Investigators and Payload Developers at their remote sites. Future years will see expansion of the station with research modules provided by the European Space Agency and Japan, which will be outfitted with additional research racks. The first research payloads arrived at ISS more than two years ago, and continuous science has been ongoing for more than one and a half years. During this time, the research capabilities have been tremendously increased, even as assembly of the overall platform continues. Despite significant challenges along the way, ISS continues to successfully support a large number of investigations in a variety of research disciplines. The results of some of the early investigations are reaching the publication stage. The near future looms with new challenges, but experience to date and dedicated efforts give reason to be optimistic that the challenges will be overcome and that new and greater successes will be added to past ones.

  11. E-cigarette use results in suppression of immune and inflammatory-response genes in nasal epithelial cells similar to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Clapp, Phillip W; Rebuli, Meghan E; Pawlak, Erica A; Glista-Baker, Ellen; Benowitz, Neal L; Fry, Rebecca C; Jaspers, Ilona

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is known to result in impaired host defense responses and immune suppressive effects. However, the effects of new and emerging tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, on the immune status of the respiratory epithelium are largely unknown. We conducted a clinical study collecting superficial nasal scrape biopsies, nasal lavage, urine, and serum from nonsmokers, cigarette smokers, and e-cigarette users and assessed them for changes in immune gene expression profiles. Smoking status was determined based on a smoking history and a 3- to 4-wk smoking diary and confirmed using serum cotinine and urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) levels. Total RNA from nasal scrape biopsies was analyzed using the nCounter Human Immunology v2 Expression panel. Smoking cigarettes or vaping e-cigarettes resulted in decreased expression of immune-related genes. All genes with decreased expression in cigarette smokers (n = 53) were also decreased in e-cigarette smokers. Additionally, vaping e-cigarettes was associated with suppression of a large number of unique genes (n = 305). Furthermore, the e-cigarette users showed a greater suppression of genes common with those changed in cigarette smokers. This was particularly apparent for suppressed expression of transcription factors, such as EGR1, which was functionally associated with decreased expression of 5 target genes in cigarette smokers and 18 target genes in e-cigarette users. Taken together, these data indicate that vaping e-cigarettes is associated with decreased expression of a large number of immune-related genes, which are consistent with immune suppression at the level of the nasal mucosa. PMID:27288488

  12. Silencing of a metaphase I-specific gene results in a phenotype similar to that of the Pairing homeologous 1 (Ph1) gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Ramanjot; Nagarajan, Ragupathi; Bennypaul, Harvinder; Sidhu, Gaganpreet K; Sidhu, Gaganjot; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Gill, Kulvinder S

    2014-09-30

    Although studied extensively since 1958, the molecular mode of action of the Pairing homeologous 1 (Ph1) gene is still unknown. In polyploid wheat, the diploid-like chromosome pairing is principally controlled by the Ph1 gene via preventing homeologous chromosome pairing (HECP). Here, we report a candidate Ph1 gene (C-Ph1) present in the Ph1 locus, transient as well as stable silencing of which resulted in a phenotype characteristic of the Ph1 gene mutants, including HECP, multivalent formation, and disrupted chromosome alignment on the metaphase I (MI) plate. Despite a highly conserved DNA sequence, the C-Ph1 gene homeologues showed a dramatically different structure and expression pattern, with only the 5B copy showing MI-specific expression, further supporting our claim for the Ph1 gene. In agreement with the previous reports about the Ph1 gene, the predicted protein of the 5A copy of the C-Ph1 gene is truncated, and thus perhaps less effective. The 5D copy is expressed around the onset of meiosis; thus, it may function during the earlier stages of chromosome pairing. Along with alternate splicing, the predicted protein of the 5B copy is different from the protein of the other two copies because of an insertion. These structural and expression differences among the homeologues concurred with the previous observations about Ph1 gene function. Stable RNAi silencing of the wheat gene in Arabidopsis showed multivalents and centromere clustering during meiosis I. PMID:25232038

  13. Silencing of a metaphase I-specific gene results in a phenotype similar to that of the Pairing homeologous 1 (Ph1) gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Ramanjot; Nagarajan, Ragupathi; Bennypaul, Harvinder; Sidhu, Gaganpreet K.; Sidhu, Gaganjot; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Gill, Kulvinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Although studied extensively since 1958, the molecular mode of action of the Pairing homeologous 1 (Ph1) gene is still unknown. In polyploid wheat, the diploid-like chromosome pairing is principally controlled by the Ph1 gene via preventing homeologous chromosome pairing (HECP). Here, we report a candidate Ph1 gene (C-Ph1) present in the Ph1 locus, transient as well as stable silencing of which resulted in a phenotype characteristic of the Ph1 gene mutants, including HECP, multivalent formation, and disrupted chromosome alignment on the metaphase I (MI) plate. Despite a highly conserved DNA sequence, the C-Ph1 gene homeologues showed a dramatically different structure and expression pattern, with only the 5B copy showing MI-specific expression, further supporting our claim for the Ph1 gene. In agreement with the previous reports about the Ph1 gene, the predicted protein of the 5A copy of the C-Ph1 gene is truncated, and thus perhaps less effective. The 5D copy is expressed around the onset of meiosis; thus, it may function during the earlier stages of chromosome pairing. Along with alternate splicing, the predicted protein of the 5B copy is different from the protein of the other two copies because of an insertion. These structural and expression differences among the homeologues concurred with the previous observations about Ph1 gene function. Stable RNAi silencing of the wheat gene in Arabidopsis showed multivalents and centromere clustering during meiosis I. PMID:25232038

  14. Marine hydrogeology: recent accomplishments and future opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.

    2005-03-01

    Marine hydrogeology is a broad-ranging scientific discipline involving the exploration of fluid-rock interactions below the seafloor. Studies have been conducted at seafloor spreading centers, mid-plate locations, and in plate- and continental-margin environments. Although many seafloor locations are remote, there are aspects of marine systems that make them uniquely suited for hydrologic analysis. Newly developed tools and techniques, and the establishment of several multidisciplinary programs for oceanographic exploration, have helped to push marine hydrogeology forward over the last several decades. Most marine hydrogeologic work has focused on measurement or estimation of hydrogeologic properties within the shallow subsurface, but additional work has emphasized measurements of local and global fluxes, fluid source and sink terms, and quantitative links between hydrogeologic, chemical, tectonic, biological, and geophysical processes. In addition to summarizing selected results from a small number of case studies, this paper includes a description of several new experiments and programs that will provide outstanding opportunities to address fundamental hydrogeologic questions within the seafloor during the next 20-30 years. L'hydrogéologie marine est une large discipline scientifique impliquant l' exploration des interactions entre les fluides et les roches sous les fonds marins. Des études ont été menées dans les différents environnements sous-marins (zone abyssale, plaque océanique, marges continentales). Bien que de nombreux fonds marins soient connus, il existe des aspects des systèmes marins qui les rendent inadaptés à l'analyse hydrologique. De nouveaux outils et techniques, et la mise en oeuvre de nombreux programmes multidisciplinaires d'exploration océanographique, ont aidé à pousser en avant l'hydrogéologie marine ces dix dernières années. La plus part des études hydrogéologiques se sont concentrées jusqu'à présent sur la mesure ou

  15. Space directorate research and technology accomplishments for FY 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The major accomplishments and test highlights for FY 1988 that occurred in the Space Dirctorate are given. Accomplishments and test highlights are presented by Division and Branch. The presented information will be useful in program coordination with government organizations, universities, and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  16. Sex and Ethnic-Group Differences on Accomplishments Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, Lawrence J.; Rock, Donald A.; Bennett, Randy Elliot

    2001-01-01

    Studied sex and ethnic group differences on 6 scales that measure accomplishments for 739 male and 1,746 female graduate school applicants. With the exception of the scale measuring mechanical accomplishment, men and women did not differ in performance, and ethnic groups did not differ on any scale. (SLD)

  17. Accomplishments in 2008 in the Management of Localized Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Eileen M.; Lutz, Manfred P.; Neuhaus, Peter

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Overview of the DiseaseIncidenceRisk FactorsPrognostic or Predictive FactorsCurrent General Therapy StandardsAccomplishments During the YearTherapyBiomarkersBasic ScienceWhat Needs to Be Done?Applications of the AccomplishmentsControversies and DisagreementsFuture DirectionsComments on ResearchObstacles to Progress PMID:20011563

  18. Space directorate research and technology accomplishments for fiscal year 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    The major accomplishments and test highlights of the Space Directorate of NASA Langley Research Center for FY87 are presented. Accomplishments and test highlights are listed by Division and Branch. This information should be useful in coordinating programs with government organizations, universities, and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  19. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S.

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  20. Multivariate Hypergeometric Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a similarity measure based on the multivariate hypergeometric distribution for the pairwise comparison of images and data vectors. The formulation and performance of the proposed measure are compared with other similarity measures using synthetic data. A method of piecewise approximation is also implemented to facilitate application of the proposed measure to large samples. Example applications of the proposed similarity measure are presented using mass spectrometry imaging data and gene expression microarray data. Results from synthetic and biological data indicate that the proposed measure is capable of providing meaningful discrimination between samples, and that it can be a useful tool for identifying potentially related samples in large-scale biological data sets. PMID:24407308

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Mission Accomplishments, Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Todd Randall; Wright, Virginia Latta

    2015-09-01

    A summary of mission accomplishments for the research organizations at the Idaho National Laboratory for FY 2015. Areas include Nuclear Energy, National and Homeland Security, Science and Technology Addressing Broad DOE Missions; Collaborations; and Stewardship and Operation of Research Facilities.

  2. Enhanced surveillance program FY97 accomplishments. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauzy, A.; Laake, B.

    1997-10-01

    This annual report is one volume of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) FY97 Accomplishments. The complete accomplishments report consists of 11 volumes. Volume 1 includes an ESP overview and a summary of selected unclassified FY97 program highlights. Volume 1 specifically targets a general audience, reflecting about half of the tasks conducted in FY97 and emphasizing key program accomplishments and contributions. The remaining volumes of the accomplishments report are classified, organized by program focus area, and present in technical detail the progress achieved in each of the 104 FY97 program tasks. Focus areas are as follows: pits; high explosives; organics; dynamics; diagnostics; systems; secondaries; nonnuclear materials; nonnuclear components; and Surveillance Test Program upgrades.

  3. Process development accomplishments: Waste and hazard minimization, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, D.A.

    1991-11-04

    This report summarizes significant technical accomplishments of the Mound Waste and Hazard Minimization Program for FY 1991. The accomplishments are in one of eight major areas: environmentally responsive cleaning program; nonhalogenated solvent trials; substitutes for volatile organic compounds; hazardous material exposure minimization; nonhazardous plating development; explosive processing waste reduction; tritium capture without conversion to water; and robotic assembly. Program costs have been higher than planned.

  4. Similarity of molecular shape.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A Y; Richards, W G

    1991-10-01

    The similarity of one molecule to another has usually been defined in terms of electron densities or electrostatic potentials or fields. Here it is expressed as a function of the molecular shape. Formulations of similarity (S) reduce to very simple forms, thus rendering the computerised calculation straightforward and fast. 'Elements of similarity' are identified, in the same spirit as 'elements of chirality', except that the former are understood to be variable rather than present-or-absent. Methods are presented which bypass the time-consuming mathematical optimisation of the relative orientation of the molecules. Numerical results are presented and examined, with emphasis on the similarity of isomers. At the extreme, enantiomeric pairs are considered, where it is the dissimilarity (D = 1 - S) that is of consequence. We argue that chiral molecules can be graded by dissimilarity, and show that D is the shape-analog of the 'chirality coefficient', with the simple form of the former opening up numerical access to the latter. PMID:1770379

  5. National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center project accomplishments: highlights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holl, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) has invested more than $20M since 2008 to put cutting-edge climate science research in the hands of resource managers across the Nation. With NCCWSC support, more than 25 cooperative research initiatives led by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers and technical staff are advancing our understanding of habitats and species to provide guidance to managers in the face of a changing climate. Projects focus on quantifying and predicting interactions between climate, habitats, species, and other natural resources such as water. Spatial scales of the projects range from the continent of North America, to a regional scale such as the Pacific Northwest United States, to a landscape scale such as the Florida Everglades. Time scales range from the outset of the 20th century to the end of the 21st century. Projects often lead to workshops, presentations, publications and the creation of new websites, computer models, and data visualization tools. Partnership-building is also a key focus of the NCCWSC-supported projects. New and on-going cooperative partnerships have been forged and strengthened with resource managers and scientists at Federal, tribal, state, local, academic, and non-governmental organizations. USGS scientists work closely with resource managers to produce timely and relevant results that can assist managers and policy makers in current resource management decisions. This fact sheet highlights accomplishments of five NCCWSC projects.

  6. The Mixed Waste Focus Area: Status and accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, J.E.; Williams, R.E.

    1997-08-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area began operations in February of 1995. Its mission is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate, and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation, and disposal. The MWFA`s mission arises from the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. Each DOE site facility that generates or stores mixed waste prepared a plan, the Site Treatment Plan, for developing treatment capacities and treating that waste. Agreements for each site were concluded with state regulators, resulting in Consent Orders providing enforceable milestones for achieving treatment of the waste. The paper discusses the implementation of the program, its status, accomplishments and goals for FY1996, and plans for 1997.

  7. Semantically enabled image similarity search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casterline, May V.; Emerick, Timothy; Sadeghi, Kolia; Gosse, C. A.; Bartlett, Brent; Casey, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Georeferenced data of various modalities are increasingly available for intelligence and commercial use, however effectively exploiting these sources demands a unified data space capable of capturing the unique contribution of each input. This work presents a suite of software tools for representing geospatial vector data and overhead imagery in a shared high-dimension vector or embedding" space that supports fused learning and similarity search across dissimilar modalities. While the approach is suitable for fusing arbitrary input types, including free text, the present work exploits the obvious but computationally difficult relationship between GIS and overhead imagery. GIS is comprised of temporally-smoothed but information-limited content of a GIS, while overhead imagery provides an information-rich but temporally-limited perspective. This processing framework includes some important extensions of concepts in literature but, more critically, presents a means to accomplish them as a unified framework at scale on commodity cloud architectures.

  8. Wear Independent Similarity.

    PubMed

    Steele, Adam; Davis, Alexander; Kim, Joohyung; Loth, Eric; Bayer, Ilker S

    2015-06-17

    This study presents a new factor that can be used to design materials where desired surface properties must be retained under in-system wear and abrasion. To demonstrate this factor, a synthetic nonwetting coating is presented that retains chemical and geometric performance as material is removed under multiple wear conditions: a coarse vitrified abradant (similar to sanding), a smooth abradant (similar to rubbing), and a mild abradant (a blend of sanding and rubbing). With this approach, such a nonwetting material displays unprecedented mechanical durability while maintaining desired performance under a range of demanding conditions. This performance, herein termed wear independent similarity performance (WISP), is critical because multiple mechanisms and/or modes of wear can be expected to occur in many typical applications, e.g., combinations of abrasion, rubbing, contact fatigue, weathering, particle impact, etc. Furthermore, these multiple wear mechanisms tend to quickly degrade a novel surface's unique performance, and thus many promising surfaces and materials never scale out of research laboratories. Dynamic goniometry and scanning electron microscopy results presented herein provide insight into these underlying mechanisms, which may also be applied to other coatings and materials. PMID:26018058

  9. Functional Similarity and Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neimeyer, Greg J.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    1981-01-01

    Students participated in dyadic disclosure exercises over a five-week period. Results indicated members of high functional similarity dyads evidenced greater attraction to one another than did members of low functional similarity dyads. "Friendship" pairs of male undergraduates displayed greater functional similarity than did "nominal" pairs from…

  10. The 1986-87 NASA space/gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space/Gravitational Biology program, for research conducted during the period January 1986 to April 1987. This program utilizes the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on Earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  11. The 1988-1989 NASA Space/Gravitational Biology Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's space/gravitational biology program, for research conducted during the period May 1988 to April 1989. This program is concerned with using the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on Earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  12. The 1989-1990 NASA space biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Individual technical summaries of research projects on NASA's Space Biology Program for research conducted during the period May 1989 to April 1990 are presented. This program is concerned with using the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance the following: (1) knowledge in the biological sciences; (2) understanding of how gravity has shaped and affected life on the Earth; and (3) understanding of how the space environment affects both plants and animals. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  13. The 1985-86 NASA space/gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Individual Technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space/Gravitational Biology Program are presented. This Program is concerned with using the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on Earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a listing of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  14. The 1987-1988 NASA space/gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Individual technical summaries of research projects of the NASA Space/Gravitational Biology Program, for research conducted during the period January 1987 to April 1988 are presented. This Program is concerned with using the characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  15. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  16. 5 CFR 720.305 - Agency accomplishment reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency accomplishment reports. 720.305 Section 720.305 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) AFFIRMATIVE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Program §...

  17. 5 CFR 720.305 - Agency accomplishment reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency accomplishment reports. 720.305 Section 720.305 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) AFFIRMATIVE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Program §...

  18. FAMILY GOALS AND SOME FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THEIR ACCOMPLISHMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSTON, RUPERT BERNARD

    GOALS OF FARM FAMILIES WERE ANALYZED AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THEIR ACCOMPLISHMENT STUDIED. DATA ON FARM GOALS, FARM AND HOME RESOURCES, AND INCOME WERE OBTAINED FROM 112 FAMILIES IN 18 MISSISSIPPI COUNTIES, IN WHICH THERE WERE THREE DIFFERENT COUNTY EXTENSION STAFFING PLANS. GOALS WERE CLASSIFIED IN GOUPS SUCH AS HOME AND GROUNDS, HOME…

  19. Women in History--Abigail Adams: Life, Accomplishments, and Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenan, Sharon K.

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles the life, accomplishments, and ideas of Abigail Adams. Born in 1944, Adams lacked a formal education, but she more than made up for that shortcoming with her love of reading, especially literature, and her interests in politics and events surrounding the young colonies. Adams was supportive of the advancement of women. She…

  20. UPPER SNAKE RIVER PRIORITY BASIN ACCOMPLISHMENT PLAN, APRIL 1973

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Upper Snake Accomplishment Basin (17040104, 170402, 170501) is defined as the Idaho and Oregon portions of 2 STORET Basins, the Upper Snake Basin and the Central Snake Basin. The Basin drains approximately 62,100 square miles in Southern Idaho and Southeastern Oregon. Four ...

  1. Final report on technical work accomplished under contract NASw-2953

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A report is given on the technical work accomplished in the area of plasma physics. The subjects covered are: (1) oblique whistler instabilities, (2) current-limited electron beam injection, (3) three-dimensional ion sound turbulence, (4) theoretical aspects of sounder antenna operation and (5) whistler modes in bow shock structures.

  2. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF...

  3. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF...

  4. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF...

  5. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID TO STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE,...

  6. Educational Accomplishment Audit: Past, Present, and Future. Proceedings of A National Symposium on Perspectives on Educational Accomplishment Auditing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Desmond L., Ed.; Stoycheff, Peter A., Ed.

    The papers comprising these proceedings discuss the nature and purpose of the Independent Educational Accomplishment Audit (IEAA), a concept born in the late 1960's to establish accountability for mandatory technical assistance programs funded by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act: (1) origins and rationale of the Independent Educational…

  7. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i) similar effect direction and (ii) similar effect magnitude. Methods 7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR) and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD) with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph. Results Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected. Conclusion Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials. PMID:26168274

  8. Self Similar Optical Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zheng-Xuan

    This research proposes Self Similar optical fiber (SSF) as a new type of optical fiber. It has a special core that consists of self similar structure. Such a structure is obtained by following the formula for generating iterated function systems (IFS) in Fractal Theory. The resulted SSF can be viewed as a true fractal object in optical fibers. In addition, the method of fabricating SSF makes it possible to generate desired structures exponentially in numbers, whereas it also allows lower scale units in the structure to be reduced in size exponentially. The invention of SSF is expected to greatly ease the production of optical fiber when a large number of small hollow structures are needed in the core of the optical fiber. This dissertation will analyze the core structure of SSF based on fractal theory. Possible properties from the structural characteristics and the corresponding applications are explained. Four SSF samples were obtained through actual fabrication in a laboratory environment. Different from traditional conductive heating fabrication system, I used an in-house designed furnace that incorporated a radiation heating method, and was equipped with automated temperature control system. The obtained samples were examined through spectrum tests. Results from the tests showed that SSF does have the optical property of delivering light in a certain wavelength range. However, SSF as a new type of optical fiber requires a systematic research to find out the theory that explains its structure and the associated optical properties. The fabrication and quality of SSF also needs to be improved for product deployment. As a start of this extensive research, this dissertation work opens the door to a very promising new area in optical fiber research.

  9. The 1992-1993 NASA Space Biology Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space Biology Program, for research conducted during the calendar years of 1992 and 1993. This program includes both plant and animal research, and is dedicated to understanding the role of gravity and the effects of microgravity on biological processes; determining the effects of the interaction of gravity and other environmental factors on biological systems; and using the microgravity of the space environment as a tool to advance fundamental scientific knowledge in the biological sciences to improve the quality of life on Earth and contribute to NASA's goal of manned exploration of space. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  10. The 1990-1991 NASA space biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space Biology Program, for research conducted during the period May 1990 through May 1991. This program includes both plant and animal research, and is dedicated to understanding the role of gravity and other environmental factors on biological systems and to using the microgravity of the space environment as a tool to advance fundamental scientific knowledge in the biological sciences to improve the quality of life on Earth and contribute to NASA's goal of manned exploration of space. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  11. FY 1995 research highlights: PNL accomplishments in OER programs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducts fundamental and applied research in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) core missions in science and technology, environmental quality, energy resources, and national security. Much of this research is funded by the program offices of DOE`s Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER), primarily the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), and by PNL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This document is a collection of research highlights that describe PNL`s accomplishments in DOE-ER funded programs during Fiscal Year 1995. Included are accomplishments in research funded by OHER`s Analytical Technologies, Environmental Research, Health Effects, General Life Sciences, and Carbon Dioxide Research programs; BES`s Materials Science, Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geoscience, and Applied Mathematical Sciences programs; and PNL`s LDRD Program. Summaries are given for 70 projects.

  12. Abstract and research accomplishments of University Coal Research Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their respective projects in time for distribution at a conference on June 13--14, 1995 at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to that request. For convenience, the 70 grants reported in this book are stored into eight technical areas, Coal Science, Coal Surface Science, Reaction Chemistry, Advanced Process Concepts, Engineering Fundamentals and Thermodynamics, Environmental Science, high Temperature Phenomena, and Special topics. Indexes are provided for locating projects by subject, principal investigators, and contracting organizations. Each extended abstract describes project objectives, work accomplished, significance to the Fossil Energy Program, and plans for the next year.

  13. The eighth NASA total quality management accomplishments report, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The eighth annual accomplishments report provides numerous examples of quality strategies that have proven effective and efficient in a time when cost reduction is critical. NASA's continuous improvement efforts can provide insight for others to succeed in their own endeavors. The report covers: top management leadership and support, strategic planning, focus on the customer, employee training and recognition, employee empowerment and teamwork, measurement and analysis, and quality assurance.

  14. Chemical Research Projects Office: Functions, accomplishments, and programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose, technical accomplishments, and related activities of the Chemical Research Project Group are outlined. Data cover efforts made to: (1) identify chemical research and technology required for solutions to problems of national urgency, synchronous with aeronautics and space effort; (2) conduct basic and applied interdisciplinary research on chemical problems in the areas of macromolecular science and fire research, and (3) provide productive liason with the engineering community and effective transfer of technology to other agencies and industry.

  15. Abstracts and research accomplishments of university coal research projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their projects in time for distribution at a grantees conference. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to the request. Abstracts discuss the following area: coal science, coal surface science, reaction chemistry, advanced process concepts, engineering fundamentals and thermodynamics, environmental science.

  16. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  17. Health and Environmental Research: summary of accomplishments. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through ''snapshots'' - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  18. Health and Environmental Research: Summary of Accomplishments. Volume 2

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through "snapshots" - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  19. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  20. When Lightning Strikes Twice: Profoundly Gifted, Profoundly Accomplished.

    PubMed

    Makel, Matthew C; Kell, Harrison J; Lubinski, David; Putallaz, Martha; Benbow, Camilla P

    2016-07-01

    The educational, occupational, and creative accomplishments of the profoundly gifted participants (IQs ⩾ 160) in the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) are astounding, but are they representative of equally able 12-year-olds? Duke University's Talent Identification Program (TIP) identified 259 young adolescents who were equally gifted. By age 40, their life accomplishments also were extraordinary: Thirty-seven percent had earned doctorates, 7.5% had achieved academic tenure (4.3% at research-intensive universities), and 9% held patents; many were high-level leaders in major organizations. As was the case for the SMPY sample before them, differential ability strengths predicted their contrasting and eventual developmental trajectories-even though essentially all participants possessed both mathematical and verbal reasoning abilities far superior to those of typical Ph.D. recipients. Individuals, even profoundly gifted ones, primarily do what they are best at. Differences in ability patterns, like differences in interests, guide development along different paths, but ability level, coupled with commitment, determines whether and the extent to which noteworthy accomplishments are reached if opportunity presents itself. PMID:27225220

  1. Biosimilar insulins: how similar is similar?

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Hompesch, Marcus

    2011-05-01

    Biosimilar insulins (BIs) are viewed as commercially attractive products by a number of companies. In order to obtain approval in the European Union or the United States, where there is not a single BI currently on the market, a manufacturer needs to demonstrate that a given BI has a safety and efficacy profile that is similar to that of the "original" insulin formulation that is already on the market. As trivial as this may appear at first glance, it is not trivial at all for a good number of reasons that will be discussed in this commentary. As with protein manufacturing, modifications in the structure of the insulin molecule can take place (which can have serious consequences for the biological effects induced), so a rigid and careful assessment is absolutely necessary. The example of Marvel's failed application with the European Medicines Agency provides insights into the regulatory and clinical challenges surrounding the matter of BI. Although a challenging BI approval process might be regarded as a hurdle to keep companies out of certain markets, it is fair to say that the potential safety and efficacy issues surrounding BI are substantial and relevant and do warrant a careful and evidence-driven approval process. PMID:21722590

  2. Applied research and development private sector accomplishments. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Beskid, N.J.; Devgun, J.S.; Zielke, M.M.; Erickson, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    Because of the nature of most US Department of Energy (DOE) operations, contamination at DOE sites presents complex problems. DOE sites may have radioactive, hazardous, or mixed contamination. The major contaminants include radionuclides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and heavy metals. The contamination exists in soils, groundwater, and buildings and materials. DOE`s special problems in site remediation have created a need for better and less costly technologies. Thus, DOE has implemented several initiatives for developing new technologies. This report describes the results of the first set of procurement contracts in this area. Similar research and development (R&D) activities are currently managed for DOE by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center.

  3. Space robotics: Recent accomplishments and opportunities for future research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Dorsey, John T.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Lallman, Frederick J.; Moerder, Daniel D.; Scott, Michael A.; Troutman, Patrick; Williams, Robert L., II

    1992-01-01

    The Langley Guidance, Navigation, and Control Technical Committee (GNCTC) was one of six technical committees created in 1991 by the Chief Scientist, Dr. Michael F. Card. During the kickoff meeting Dr. Card charged the chairmen to: (1) establish a cross-Center committee; (2) support at least one workshop in a selected discipline; and (3) prepare a technical paper on recent accomplishments in the discipline and on opportunities for future research. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control Committee was formed and selected for focus on the discipline of Space robotics. This report is a summary of the committee's assessment of recent accomplishments and opportunities for future research. The report is organized as follows. First is an overview of the data sources used by the committee. Next is a description of technical needs identified by the committee followed by recent accomplishments. Opportunities for future research ends the main body of the report. It includes the primary recommendation of the committee that NASA establish a national space facility for the development of space automation and robotics, one element of which is a telerobotic research platform in space. References 1 and 2 are the proceedings of two workshops sponsored by the committee during its June 1991, through May 1992 term. The focus of the committee for the June 1992 - May 1993 term will be to further define to the recommended platform in space and to add an additional discipline which includes aircraft related GN&C issues. To the latter end members performing aircraft related research will be added to the committee. (A preliminary assessment of future opportunities in aircraft-related GN&C research has been included as appendix A.)

  4. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the "Seed Money" program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  5. 2008 Accomplishments for CEV Parachute Assembly System (CPAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is responsible for the design, development, fabrication, qualification and delivery of the CEV parachute system to support the Orion pad/ascent flight tests and the first three orbital flight tests (including the first human mission). This article will discuss the technical and research achievements accomplished in calendar year 2008, broken into three key categories: prototype testing and analysis (also referred to as the Generation 1 design), system requirements definition and design of the flight engineering development unit, and support for the Orion vehicle flight testing (primarily Pad-Abort 1).

  6. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the ''Seed Money'' program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  7. Environmental Measurements Laboratory fiscal year 1998: Accomplishments and technical activities

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) is government-owned, government-operated, and programmatically under the DOE Office of Environmental Management. The Laboratory is administered by the Chicago Operations Office. EML provides program management, technical assistance and data quality assurance for measurements of radiation and radioactivity relating to environmental restoration, global nuclear nonproliferation, and other priority issues for the Department of Energy, as well as for other government, national, and international organizations. This report presents the technical activities and accomplishments of EML for Fiscal Year 1998.

  8. Gender similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2014-01-01

    Whether men and women are fundamentally different or similar has been debated for more than a century. This review summarizes major theories designed to explain gender differences: evolutionary theories, cognitive social learning theory, sociocultural theory, and expectancy-value theory. The gender similarities hypothesis raises the possibility of theorizing gender similarities. Statistical methods for the analysis of gender differences and similarities are reviewed, including effect sizes, meta-analysis, taxometric analysis, and equivalence testing. Then, relying mainly on evidence from meta-analyses, gender differences are reviewed in cognitive performance (e.g., math performance), personality and social behaviors (e.g., temperament, emotions, aggression, and leadership), and psychological well-being. The evidence on gender differences in variance is summarized. The final sections explore applications of intersectionality and directions for future research. PMID:23808917

  9. Similarity by compression.

    PubMed

    Melville, James L; Riley, Jenna F; Hirst, Jonathan D

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple and effective method for similarity searching in virtual high-throughput screening, requiring only a string-based representation of the molecules (e.g., SMILES) and standard compression software, available on all modern desktop computers. This method utilizes the normalized compression distance, an approximation of the normalized information distance, based on the concept of Kolmogorov complexity. On representative data sets, we demonstrate that compression-based similarity searching can outperform standard similarity searching protocols, exemplified by the Tanimoto coefficient combined with a binary fingerprint representation and data fusion. Software to carry out compression-based similarity is available from our Web site at http://comp.chem.nottingham.ac.uk/download/zippity. PMID:17238245

  10. Accomplishing Transformative Research in a Challenging Fiscal Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Bust, G.

    2014-12-01

    The shift in funding is forcing scientists to promise transformative research for a pittance. To accomplish this, researchers need to transform their methodology to include societal buy-in, use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology, and cross-discipline platform usage. As the cutting edge of research expands to view the system on the global scale with extremely fine resolution, fiscally reasonable budgets present a challenge to be met. Consider how do we measure a specific variable over 45-degrees of latitude in an isolated and hostile region of Earth - the total electron count over the South Pole? This work examines this transformative research using hosted payloads on buoys, balloons, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). We will show cutting edge research occurring simultaneous with education and public outreach, offering societal buy-in through interactive websites and student-built hosted payloads. These interactions provide a vision to the public and a new database to the scientists. The use of COTS technology and cross-discipline (oceanography and space) platforms keep the cost low. We will discuss a general methodology for accomplishing transformative research in a challenging fiscal environment through integration of COTS technology, assimilative and first principle models, and observing systems simulation experiments (OSSEs).

  11. Multivariate Time Series Similarity Searching

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jimin; Zhu, Yuelong; Li, Shijin; Wan, Dingsheng; Zhang, Pengcheng

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate time series (MTS) datasets are very common in various financial, multimedia, and hydrological fields. In this paper, a dimension-combination method is proposed to search similar sequences for MTS. Firstly, the similarity of single-dimension series is calculated; then the overall similarity of the MTS is obtained by synthesizing each of the single-dimension similarity based on weighted BORDA voting method. The dimension-combination method could use the existing similarity searching method. Several experiments, which used the classification accuracy as a measure, were performed on six datasets from the UCI KDD Archive to validate the method. The results show the advantage of the approach compared to the traditional similarity measures, such as Euclidean distance (ED), cynamic time warping (DTW), point distribution (PD), PCA similarity factor (SPCA), and extended Frobenius norm (Eros), for MTS datasets in some ways. Our experiments also demonstrate that no measure can fit all datasets, and the proposed measure is a choice for similarity searches. PMID:24895665

  12. Multivariate time series similarity searching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin; Zhu, Yuelong; Li, Shijin; Wan, Dingsheng; Zhang, Pengcheng

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate time series (MTS) datasets are very common in various financial, multimedia, and hydrological fields. In this paper, a dimension-combination method is proposed to search similar sequences for MTS. Firstly, the similarity of single-dimension series is calculated; then the overall similarity of the MTS is obtained by synthesizing each of the single-dimension similarity based on weighted BORDA voting method. The dimension-combination method could use the existing similarity searching method. Several experiments, which used the classification accuracy as a measure, were performed on six datasets from the UCI KDD Archive to validate the method. The results show the advantage of the approach compared to the traditional similarity measures, such as Euclidean distance (ED), cynamic time warping (DTW), point distribution (PD), PCA similarity factor (SPCA), and extended Frobenius norm (Eros), for MTS datasets in some ways. Our experiments also demonstrate that no measure can fit all datasets, and the proposed measure is a choice for similarity searches. PMID:24895665

  13. CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND RELEVANCE TO THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H.; Langton, C.; Flach, G.; Kosson, D.

    2010-11-15

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was initiated to reduce risk and uncertainties in the performance assessments that directly impact U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup and closure programs. The CBP is supported by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) and has been specifically addressing the following critical EM program needs: (i) the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities and (ii) increased understanding of contaminant transport behavior within cementitious barrier systems to support the development and deployment of adequate closure technologies. To accomplish this, the CBP has two initiatives: (1) an experimental initiative to increase understanding of changes in cementitious materials over long times (> 1000 years) over changing conditions and (2) a modeling initiative to enhance and integrate a set of computational tools validated by laboratory and field experimental data to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and waste forms used in nuclear applications. In FY10, the CBP developed the initial phase of an integrated modeling tool that would serve as a screening tool which could help in making decisions concerning disposal and tank closure. The CBP experimental programs are underway to validate this tool and provide increased understanding of how CM changes over time and under changing conditions. These initial CBP products that will eventually be enhanced are anticipated to reduce the uncertainties of current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increase the consistency and transparency of the DOE assessment process. These tools have application to low activity waste forms, high level waste tank closure, D&D and entombment of major nuclear facilities, landfill waste acceptance criteria, and in-situ grouting and immobilization of vadose zone contamination. This paper summarizes

  14. The Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Peter V.; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within…

  15. Separations and Waste Forms Research and Development FY 2013 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2013-12-01

    The Separations and Waste Form Campaign (SWFC) under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is responsible for developing advanced separation and waste form technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The fiscal year (FY) 2013 accomplishments report provides a highlight of the results of the research and development (R&D) efforts performed within SWFC in FY 2013. Each section contains a high-level overview of the activities, results, technical point of contact, applicable references, and documents produced during the fiscal year. This report briefly outlines campaign management and integration activities, but the intent of the report is to highlight the many technical accomplishments made during FY 2013.

  16. Fiscal Year 2005 Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Gotseff, P.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Anderberg, M.; Kay, B.; Bowen, A.

    2005-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiometry and Metrology task provides traceable optical radiometric calibrations and measurements to photovoltaic (PV) researchers and the PV industry. Traceability of NREL solar radiometer calibrations to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) was accomplished during Pyrheliometer Comparison at NREL in October 2004. Ten spectral and more than 200 broadband radiometers for solar measurements were calibrated this year. We measured detailed spectral distributions of the NREL and PV industry Pulsed Solar Simulators and are analyzing the influence of environmental variables on radiometer uncertainty. New systems for indoor and outdoor solar radiometer calibrations and ultraviolet (UV) spectral measurements and UV radiometer calibrations were purchased and tested. Optical metrology functions support the NREL Measurement and Characterization Task effort for ISO 17025 accreditation of NREL Solar Reference Cell Calibrations and have been integrated into the NREL quality system and audited for ISO17025 compliance.

  17. Recent Accomplishments in Laser-Photovoltaic Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John C.; Henley, Mark W.; Mankins, John C.; Howell, Joe T.; Fork, Richard L.; Cole, Spencer T.; Skinner, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Wireless power transmission can be accomplished over long distances using laser power sources and photovoltaic receivers. Recent research at AMOS has improved our understanding of the use of this technology for practical applications. Research by NASA, Boeing, the University of Alabama-Huntsville, the University of Colorado, Harvey Mudd College, and the Naval Postgraduate School has tested various commercial lasers and photovoltaic receiver configurations. Lasers used in testing have included gaseous argon and krypton, solid-state diodes, and fiber optic sources, at wavelengths ranging from the visible to the near infra-red. A variety of Silicon and Gallium Arsenide photovoltaic have been tested with these sources. Safe operating procedures have been established, and initial tests have been conducted in the open air at AMOS facilities. This research is progressing toward longer distance ground demonstrations of the technology and practical near-term space demonstrations.

  18. FY 2006 Accomplishment Colony - "Services and Interfaces to Support Large Numbers of Processors"

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Tauferner, A; Inglett, T

    2006-06-30

    The Colony Project is developing operating system and runtime system technology to enable efficient general purpose environments on tens of thousands of processors. To accomplish this, we are investigating memory management techniques, fault management strategies, and parallel resource management schemes. Recent results show promising findings for scalable strategies based on processor virtualization, in-memory checkpointing, and parallel aware modifications to full featured operating systems.

  19. Semantic Similarity in Biomedical Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Pesquita, Catia; Faria, Daniel; Falcão, André O.; Lord, Phillip; Couto, Francisco M.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, ontologies have become a mainstream topic in biomedical research. When biological entities are described using a common schema, such as an ontology, they can be compared by means of their annotations. This type of comparison is called semantic similarity, since it assesses the degree of relatedness between two entities by the similarity in meaning of their annotations. The application of semantic similarity to biomedical ontologies is recent; nevertheless, several studies have been published in the last few years describing and evaluating diverse approaches. Semantic similarity has become a valuable tool for validating the results drawn from biomedical studies such as gene clustering, gene expression data analysis, prediction and validation of molecular interactions, and disease gene prioritization. We review semantic similarity measures applied to biomedical ontologies and propose their classification according to the strategies they employ: node-based versus edge-based and pairwise versus groupwise. We also present comparative assessment studies and discuss the implications of their results. We survey the existing implementations of semantic similarity measures, and we describe examples of applications to biomedical research. This will clarify how biomedical researchers can benefit from semantic similarity measures and help them choose the approach most suitable for their studies. Biomedical ontologies are evolving toward increased coverage, formality, and integration, and their use for annotation is increasingly becoming a focus of both effort by biomedical experts and application of automated annotation procedures to create corpora of higher quality and completeness than are currently available. Given that semantic similarity measures are directly dependent on these evolutions, we can expect to see them gaining more relevance and even becoming as essential as sequence similarity is today in biomedical research. PMID:19649320

  20. Magnus expansion and in-medium similarity renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, T. D.; Parzuchowski, N. M.; Bogner, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    We present an improved variant of the in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG) based on the Magnus expansion. In the new formulation, one solves flow equations for the anti-Hermitian operator that, upon exponentiation, yields the unitary transformation of the IM-SRG. The resulting flow equations can be solved using a first-order Euler method without any loss of accuracy, resulting in substantial memory savings and modest computational speedups. Since one obtains the unitary transformation directly, the transformation of additional operators beyond the Hamiltonian can be accomplished with little additional cost, in sharp contrast to the standard formulation of the IM-SRG. Ground state calculations of the homogeneous electron gas (HEG) and 16O nucleus are used as test beds to illustrate the efficacy of the Magnus expansion.

  1. Indexing Similar DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Songbo; Lam, T. W.; Sung, W. K.; Tam, S. L.; Yiu, S. M.

    To study the genetic variations of a species, one basic operation is to search for occurrences of patterns in a large number of very similar genomic sequences. To build an indexing data structure on the concatenation of all sequences may require a lot of memory. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to index highly similar sequences by taking advantage of the similarity among the sequences. To store r sequences with k common segments, our index requires only O(n + NlogN) bits of memory, where n is the total length of the common segments and N is the total length of the distinct regions in all texts. The total length of all sequences is rn + N, and any scheme to store these sequences requires Ω(n + N) bits. Searching for a pattern P of length m takes O(m + m logN + m log(rk)psc(P) + occlogn), where psc(P) is the number of prefixes of P that appear as a suffix of some common segments and occ is the number of occurrences of P in all sequences. In practice, rk ≤ N, and psc(P) is usually a small constant. We have implemented our solution and evaluated our solution using real DNA sequences. The experiments show that the memory requirement of our solution is much less than that required by BWT built on the concatenation of all sequences. When compared to the other existing solution (RLCSA), we use less memory with faster searching time.

  2. Renewing the respect for similarity

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Shimon; Shahbazi, Reza

    2012-01-01

    In psychology, the concept of similarity has traditionally evoked a mixture of respect, stemming from its ubiquity and intuitive appeal, and concern, due to its dependence on the framing of the problem at hand and on its context. We argue for a renewed focus on similarity as an explanatory concept, by surveying established results and new developments in the theory and methods of similarity-preserving associative lookup and dimensionality reduction—critical components of many cognitive functions, as well as of intelligent data management in computer vision. We focus in particular on the growing family of algorithms that support associative memory by performing hashing that respects local similarity, and on the uses of similarity in representing structured objects and scenes. Insofar as these similarity-based ideas and methods are useful in cognitive modeling and in AI applications, they should be included in the core conceptual toolkit of computational neuroscience. In support of this stance, the present paper (1) offers a discussion of conceptual, mathematical, computational, and empirical aspects of similarity, as applied to the problems of visual object and scene representation, recognition, and interpretation, (2) mentions some key computational problems arising in attempts to put similarity to use, along with their possible solutions, (3) briefly states a previously developed similarity-based framework for visual object representation, the Chorus of Prototypes, along with the empirical support it enjoys, (4) presents new mathematical insights into the effectiveness of this framework, derived from its relationship to locality-sensitive hashing (LSH) and to concomitant statistics, (5) introduces a new model, the Chorus of Relational Descriptors (ChoRD), that extends this framework to scene representation and interpretation, (6) describes its implementation and testing, and finally (7) suggests possible directions in which the present research program can be

  3. Project ALERT Accomplishments by Objectives. Final Performance Report. Three-Year Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI. Coll. of Education.

    Project ALERT (Adult Literacy Enhanced & Redefined through Training) was a 3-year effort to develop and deploy a number of innovative approaches to delivering workplace literacy programs to business partners, including manufacturers and unions. The project designed, developed, and implemented workplace literacy programs tailored to the…

  4. NASA Intelligent Systems Project: Results, Accomplishments and Impact on Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coughlan, Joseph C.

    2005-01-01

    The Intelligent Systems Project was responsible for much of NASA's programmatic investment in artificial intelligence and advanced information technologies. IS has completed three major project milestones which demonstrated increased capabilities in autonomy, human centered computing, and intelligent data understanding. Autonomy involves the ability of a robot to place an instrument on a remote surface with a single command cycle. Human centered computing supported a collaborative, mission centric data and planning system for the Mars Exploration Rovers and data understanding has produced key components of a terrestrial satellite observation system with automated modeling and data analysis capabilities. This paper summarizes the technology demonstrations and metrics which quantify and summarize these new technologies which are now available for future Nasa missions.

  5. Solubility and speciation results from oversaturation experiments on neptunium, plutonium and americium in a neutral electrolyte with a total carbonate similar to water from Yucca Mountain Region Well UE- 25p No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Torretto, P.; Becraft, K.; Prussin, T.; Roberts, K.; Carpenter, S.; Hobart, D.; Nitsche, H.

    1995-12-01

    Solubility and speciation are important in understanding aqueous radionuclide transport through the geosphere. They define the source term for transport retardation processes such as sorption and colloid formation. Solubility and speciation data are useful in verifying the validity of geochemical codes that are a part of predictive transport models. Solubility experiments will approach solution equilibrium from both oversaturation and undersaturation. In these experiments, we have approached the solubility equilibrium from oversaturation, Results are given for solubility and speciation experiments from oversaturation of {sup 237} NpO{sub 2}{sup +} {sup 239}Pu{sup 4+}, and {sup 241}Am{sup 3+}/Nd{sup 3+} in a neutral electrolyte containing a total carbonate concentration similar to groundwater from the Yucca Mountain region, Nevada, which is being investigated as a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site, at 25{degrees}C and three pH values. In these experiments, the solubilitycontrolling steady-state solids were identified and the speciation and/or oxidation states present in the supernatant solutions were determined.

  6. EarthScope Education and Outreach: Accomplishments and Emerging Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S.; Ellins, K. K.; Semken, S. C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2014-12-01

    EarthScope's Education and Outreach (E&O) program aims to increase public awareness of Earth science and enhance geoscience education at the K-12 and college level. The program is distinctive among major geoscience programs in two ways. First, planning for education and public engagement occurred in tandem with planning for the science mission. Second, the NSF EarthScope program includes funding support for education and outreach. In this presentation, we highlight key examples of the program's accomplishments and identify emerging E&O opportunities. E&O efforts have been collaboratively led by the EarthScope National Office (ESNO), IRIS, UNAVCO, the EarthScope Education and Outreach Subcommittee (EEOSC) and PI-driven EarthScope projects. Efforts by the EEOSC, guided by an EarthScope Education and Outreach Implementation Plan that is periodically updated, focus EarthScope E&O. EarthScope demonstrated early success in engaging undergraduate students (and teachers) in its mission through their involvement in siting USArray across the contiguous U.S. Funded E&O programs such as TOTLE, Illinois EarthScope, CEETEP (for K-12), InTeGrate and GETSI (for undergraduates) foster use of freely available EarthScope data and research findings. The Next Generation Science Standards, which stress science and engineering practices, offer an opportunity for alignment with existing EarthScope K-12 educational resources, and the EEOSC recommends focusing efforts on this task. The EEOSC recognizes the rapidly growing use of mobile smart devices by the public and in formal classrooms, which bring new opportunities to connect with the public and students. This will capitalize on EarthScope's already prominent social media presence, an effort that developed to accomplish one of the primary goals of the EarthScope E&O Implementation Plan to "Create a high-profile public identity for EarthScope" and to "Promote science literacy and understanding of EarthScope among all audiences through

  7. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with social participation of older adults: association with quality of life and best correlates

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Johanne; Whiteneck, Gale

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to (1) explore whether quality of life (QOL) is more associated with satisfaction with social participation (SP) than with level of accomplishment in SP and (2) examine respective correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP. Methods A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 155 older adults (mean age = 73.7; 60% women) having various levels of activity limitations. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP (dependent variables) were estimated with the social roles items of the assessment of life habits. Potential correlates were human functioning components. Results Correlations between QOL and accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP did not differ (P = 0.71). However, best correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP were different. Higher accomplishment level of SP was best explained by younger age, activity level perceived as stable, no recent stressing event, better well-being, higher activity level, and fewer obstacles in “Physical environment and accessibility” (R2 = 0.79). Greater satisfaction with SP was best explained by activity level perceived as stable, better self-perceived health, better well-being, higher activity level, and more facilitators in “Social support and attitudes” (R2 = 0.51). Conclusion With some exceptions, these best correlates may be positively modified and thus warrant special attention in rehabilitation interventions. PMID:20237957

  8. The Vasimr Engine: Project Status and Recent Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ChangDiaz, Franklin R.; Squire, Jared P.; Bering, Edgar A., III; Baitty, F. Wally; Goulding, Richard H.; Bengtson, Roger D.

    2004-01-01

    The development of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) was initiated in the late 1970s to address a critical requirement for fast, high-power interplanetary space transportation. While not being a fusion rocket, it nevertheless borrows heavily from that technology and takes advantage of the natural topology of open-ended magnetic systems. In addition to its high power density and high exhaust velocity, VASIMR is capable of "constant power throttling" a feature, which allows in-flight mission-optimization of thrust and specific impulse to enhance performance and reduce trip time. A NASA-led, research team, involving industry, academia and government facilities is pursuing the development of this concept in the United States. The technology can be validated, in the near term, in venues such as the International Space Station, where it can also serve as both a drag compensation device and a plasma contactor for the orbital facility. Other near-Earth applications in the commercial and scientific satellite sectors are also envisioned. This presentation covers the evolution of the VASIMR concept to its present status, as well as recent accomplishments in our understanding of the physics. Approaches and collaborative programs addressing the major technical challenges will also be presented.

  9. Fort Collins Science Center: Fiscal Year 2007 Accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 2007 (FY07), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) continued research vital to U.S. Department of the Interior science and management needs and associated USGS programmatic goals. FORT work also supported the science needs of other government agencies as well as private cooperators. Specifically, FORT scientific research and technical assistance focused on client and partner needs and goals in the areas of biological information management, fisheries and aquatic systems, invasive species, status and trends of biological resources, terrestrial ecosystems, and wildlife resources. In addition, FORT's 5-year strategic plan was refined to incorporate focus areas identified in the USGS strategic science plan, including ecosystem-landscape analysis, global climate change, and energy and mineral resource development. As a consequence, several science projects initiated in FY07 were either entirely new research dor amplifications of existing work. Highlights of FORT project accomplishments are described below under the USGS science program with which each task is most closely associated. The work of FORT's 6 branches (Aquatic Systems and Technology Applications, Ecosystem Dynamics, Information Science, Invasive Species Science, Policy Analysis and Science Assistance, and Species and Habitats of Federal Interest) often involves major partnerships with other agencies or cooperation with other USGS disciplines (Geology, Geography, Water Resources) and the Geospatial Information Office.

  10. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-06-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. Boston University is active in seven principal areas: (1) Task A: Colliding Beams - physics of e(sup +)e(sup -) and (anti p)p collisions; (2) Task C: MACRO Experiment - search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; (3) Task D: Proton Decay - search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; (4) Tasks E, J, and N: Particle Theory - theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; (5) Task F: Muon G-2 - measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; (6) Task K: SSCintcal - calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; (7) Task L: Muon Detectors for the GEM Experiment. The body of the proposal is devoted to detailed discussions of each of the tasks. The total budget request for the program appears in a summary chapter that includes a general budget discussion and individual budget requests and explanations for each of the tasks.

  11. The qualitative similarity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Peter V; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within the purview of two groups of cognitive models: those that emphasize the cognitive development of individuals and those that pertain to disciplinary or knowledge structures. It is argued that the QSH has scientific merit with implications for classroom instruction. Future research should examine the validity of the QSH in other disciplines such as mathematics and science and should include perspectives from social as well as cognitive models. PMID:20415280

  12. Glycolic Acid Peels/Azelaic Acid 20% Cream Combination and Low Potency Triple Combination Lead to Similar Reduction in Melasma Severity in Ethnic Skin: Results of a Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Rahul; Kanwar, Amrinder Jit; Parsad, Davinder; Kumaran, Muthu Sendhil; Sharma, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous therapeutic options have been tried in the management of melasma. Aims and Objectives: This prospective randomized study was planned to assess the efficacy of low potency triple combination (TC) cream (TC-hydroquinone 2%/tretinoin 0.05%/fluocinolone 0.01%) versus glycolic acid (GA) peels/azelaic acid (AA) 20% cream (GA/AA) combination in melasma. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with melasma were recruited into this study and randomized into two groups. Group A consisting 20 patients received TC cream once a day for night time application for 3 months. Group B comprising of 20 patients received GA/AA 20% cream combination for 3 months. The disease severity was monitored with digital photography, melasma area and severity index (MASI) score, which was calculated at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks, and visual analog scale (VAS) score, which was calculated at baseline and 12 weeks. Results: Of 40 patients, 38 were completed the study. A significant reduction in MASI and VAS was recorded after 6 weeks and 12 weeks of treatment in both groups A and B (P = 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the mean MASI scores between the two groups at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Similarly, there was no difference in the mean VAS scores between the two groups at baseline and 12 weeks. Four patients in group A and 3 in group B experienced adverse effects such as irritation, dryness, and photosensitivity. Conclusion: Both low potency TC cream and GA/AA 20% cream combination are effective in treating melasma among Indian patients. PMID:25814702

  13. Astrobiology at Arizona State University: An Overview of Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack

    2005-01-01

    During our five years as an NAI charter member, Arizona State University sponsored a broadly-based program of research and training in Astrobiology to address the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Solar System. With such a large, diverse and active team, it is not possible in a reasonable space, to cover all details of progress made over the entire five years. The following paragraphs provide an overview update of the specific research areas pursued by the Arizona State University (ASU) Astrobiology team at the end of Year 5 and at the end of the 4 month and subsequent no cost month extensions. for a more detailed review, the reader is referred to the individual annual reports (and Executive Summaries) submitted to the NAI at the end of each of our five years of membership. Appended in electronic form is our complete publication record for all five years, plus a tabulation of undergraduates, graduate students and post-docs supported by our program during this time. The overarching theme of ASU s Astrobiology program was "Exploring the Living Universe: Studies of the Origin, Evolution and Distribution of Life in the Solar System". The NAi-funded research effort was organized under three basic sub- themes: 1. Origins of the Basic Building Blocks of Life. 2. Early Biosphere Evolution. and 3. Exploring for Life in the Solar System. These sub-theme areas were in turn, subdivided into Co-lead research modules. In the paragraphs that follow, accomplishments for individual research modules are briefly outlined, and the key participants presented in tabular form. As noted, publications for each module are appended in hard copy and digital formats, under the name(s) of lead co-Is.

  14. Performance Standards and Domains of College Students' Personal Accomplishments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaeddert, William P.; And Others

    A number of researchers have described individual differences in achievement goals and performance standards. To explore similarities and differences in these theories, and to provide an instrument to measure them, 273 female and 88 male college students responded to items designed to measure each of the dimensions defined by these theories. The…

  15. Short-term antidiabetic treatment with insulin or metformin has a similar impact on the components of metabolic syndrome in women with gestational diabetes mellitus requiring antidiabetic agents: results of a prospective, randomised study.

    PubMed

    Zawiejska, A; Wender-Ozegowska, E; Grewling-Szmit, K; Brazert, M; Brazert, J

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased prevalence of fetal and maternal complications primarily caused by maternal hyperglycemia, which results in abnormal fetal growth. Diet modification is a common first step in the treatment of GDM, followed by antidiabetic pharmacotherapy if this approach fails. Insulin therapy is generally accepted; however, oral hypoglycemic agents have been used in this population. In this prospective, randomised study, we compared maternal metabolic status after treatment with insulin or metformin. Pregnant women (gestational age: ≥ 20 weeks) with GDM requiring medical hypoglycemic treatment were randomly allocated to the Metformin (n = 35) or Insulin (n = 43) Groups. Maternal metabolic status - assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c) level, glycemic profile, insulin concentration, Homeostatic Model Assessment - Insulin Resistance index, and lipids - was recorded at booking and throughout pregnancy. The characteristics of the study group were: maternal age 33.5 ± 5.9 years, gestational age at baseline 28.5 ± 3.5 weeks, prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) 32.2 ± 3.5 kg/m(2), HbA1c at baseline 5.6 ± 0.6%, and average daily glycemia 5.9 ± 0.6 mmol/dl. Fasting glycemia at term was significantly lower in the Insulin Group but there were no significant differences in mean daily glycemia, HbA1c and BMI at term between the groups. Longitudinally, there was a small but significant increase in BMI and a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the Insulin Group and a significant increase in the atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and a trend towards higher triglycerides in the Metformin Group. Both fasting and average daily glycemia were significantly reduced following treatment in both groups. No such change was evident for HbA1c. In a relative risk analysis, metformin treatment was associated with an insignificant elevated risk of HbA1c, triglycerides and lipid indices falling within the

  16. An Evaluation of State Energy Program Accomplishments: 2002 Program Year

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.

    2005-07-13

    SEP activities performed by the states during the 2002 program year, based on primary data provided by the states themselves. This is the second systematic evaluation of SEP accomplishments performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE. A report documenting the findings of the first study was published in January 2003 (Schweitzer et.al., 2003).

  17. Accomplishing Mars exploration goals by returning a simple "locality" sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, G.; Draper, D.; Bogard, D.; Agee, C.; Ming, D.; Jones, J.

    A major stumbling block to a Mars sample return (MSR) mission is cost. This problem is greatly exacerbated by using elaborate rovers, sophisticated on-board instruments, and complex sample selection techniques to maximize diversity. We argue that many key science goals of the Mars Exploration Program may be accomplished by returning a simple "locality" sample from a well-chosen landing site. Such a sample , collected by a simple scoop, would consist of local regolith containing soil, windblown fines, and lithic fragments (plus Martian atmosphere). Even the simplest sample return mission could revolutionize our understanding of Mars, without the need for expensive rovers or sophisticated on-board instruments. We expect that by the time a MSR mission could be flown, information from the Mars Odyssey, Mars Express, 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers, and 2005 Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will be sufficient to choose a good landing site. Returned samples of Martian regolith have the potential to answer key questions of fundamental importance to the Mars Exploration Program: The search for life; the role and history of water and other volatiles; interpreting remotely-sensed spectral data; and understanding the planet as a system. A locality sample can further the search for life by identifying trace organics, biogenic elements and their isotopic compositions, evidence for water such as hydrous minerals or cements, the Martian soil oxidant, and trace biomarkers. Learning the nature and timing of atmosphere-soil-rock interactions will improve understanding of the role and history of water. An atmosphere sample will reveal fundamental information about current atmospheric processes. Information about the mineralogy and lithology of sample materials, the extent of impact gardening, and the nature of dust coatings and alteration rinds will provide much-needed ground truth for interpreting remotely-sensed data, including Mars Pathfinder. Basic planetology questions that might be

  18. School Rankings, Department Rankings, and Individual Accomplishments: What Factors Predict Obtaining Employment After the PhD?

    PubMed

    Stenstrom, Douglas M; Curtis, Mathew; Iyer, Ravi

    2013-03-01

    The outcome of a graduate student's hunt for employment is often attributed to the student's own accomplishments, the reputation of the department, and the reputation of the university. In 2007, a national survey of psychology graduate students was conducted to assess accomplishments and experiences in graduate school, part of which was an assessment of employment after completion of the doctorate (PhD). Five hundred and fifty-one respondents who had applied for employment reported whether they had obtained employment and in what capacity. Survey results were then integrated with the National Research Council's most recent official ranking system of academic departments. The strongest predictor of employment was department-level rankings even while controlling for individual accomplishments, such as publications, posters, and teaching experience. Equally accomplished applicants for an employment position were not equal, apparently, if they graduated from differently ranked departments. The results also show the degree to which school-level rankings, department-level rankings, and individual accomplishments uniquely predict the various types of employment, including jobs at PhD-granting institutions, master's-granting institutions, liberal arts colleges, 2-year schools, outside academia, or no employment at all. PMID:26172503

  19. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  20. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  1. Research on the International Space Station: Understanding Future Potential from Current Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    In November 2007, the International Space Station (ISS) will have supported seven years of continuous presence in space, with 15 Expeditions completed. These years have been characterized by the numerous technical challenges of assembly as well as operational and logistical challenges related to the availability of transportation by the Space Shuttle. During this period, an active set of early research objectives have also been accomplished alongside the assembly. This paper will review the research accomplishments on ISS to date, with the objective of drawing insights on the potential of future research following completion of ISS assembly. By the end of Expedition 15, an expected 121 U.S.-managed investigations will have been conducted on ISS, with 91 of these completed. Many of these investigations include multiple scientific objectives, with an estimated total of 334 scientists served. Through February 2007, 101 scientific publications have been identified. Another 184 investigations have been sponsored by ISS international partners, which independently track their scientists served and results publication. Through this survey of U.S. research completed on ISS, three different themes will be addressed: (1) How have constraints on transportation of mass to orbit affected the types of research successfully completed on the ISS to date? What lessons can be learned for increasing the success of ISS as a research platform during the period following the retirement of the Space Shuttle? (2) How have constraints on crew time for research during assembly and the active participation of crewmembers as scientists affected the types of research successfully completed on the ISS to date? What lessons can be learned for optimizing research return following the increase in capacity from 3 to 6 crewmembers (planned for 2009)? What lessons can be learned for optimizing research return after assembly is complete? (3) What do early research results indicate about the various

  2. Reform of financing for health coverage: what can reinsurance accomplish?

    PubMed

    Bovbjerg, R R

    1992-01-01

    Reinsurance is one way that insurance companies pool risk, in this case, across insurance companies. Under conventional private practice, primary health insurers, including self-insured groups and HMOs, voluntarily contract with reinsurers to share some risk and some premiums. Because the primary carrier mainly wants to protect its solvency against unpredictable variation in claims experience, it normally reinsures only the "high end" of claims risk. This retrospective coverage of unusually high losses helps primary insurers take on more risk than they otherwise could. But it does not help secure affordable coverage for people with prospectively known high risks. Some plans for reforming private health insurance also invoke reinsurance-like mechanisms, especially in the markets for individual and small group coverage. There, reinsurance serves as part of a strategy for requiring that primary insurance be made available to all applicants, regardless of risk. Reinsurance or similar rules for allocating the burden of unusually high risks can help keep any one private insurer from having to bear a disproportionate share of high risks, and thus extend the reach of private insurance markets through regulation. But reinsurance alone does not reduce the underlying high cost of providing such primary coverage. Nor can reinsurance alone provide the resources to cover the uninsured, ensure that insurers will want to cover them, or make them voluntarily buy private coverage. Only some combination of new subsidies and mandates can do that. PMID:1612717

  3. Accomplishments and Compromises in Prediction Research for World Records and Best Performances in Track and Field and Swimming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuanlong; Paul, Stanley; Fu, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    The conductors of this study reviewed prediction research and studied the accomplishments and compromises in predicting world records and best performances in track and field and swimming. The results of the study showed that prediction research only promises to describe the historical trends in track and field and swimming performances, to study…

  4. Design of a high activity and selectivity alcohol catalyst. Final status report and summary of accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, H.C.; Mills, G.A.

    1994-07-15

    This final DOE report for grant award number DE-FG22-90PC 90291 presents the results of our efforts to better understand the Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O3 catalytic system for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide to selectively form oxygenated products. The content of this report is divided into three major sections and a fourth, concluding section which addresses our major research accomplishments, as well as documents the most significant publications and presentations associated with this grant. The three main sections which make up the body of this report are presented in the in form of manuscripts which, in turn, summarize our progress in three areas of this project. The three body sections are organized as follows: Section I--Evidence for site isolation in Rh-Mo bimetallic catalysts derived from organometallic clusters; Section II--Surface Chemistry of Rh-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: An analysis of surface acidity; and Section III--Comparative study of Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Rh-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Catalysts. Section IV summarizes major accomplishments. The content of this final report is meant to generally highlight our progress in both characterizing the nature of the Rh-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} system and probing its reactivity for insight on the oxygenate synergy present in this class of catalysts.

  5. Similarity Solutions of the Compressible Flow Equations for a General Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Zachary; Ramsey, Scott; Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    The Euler compressible flow equations admit discontinuous (e.g. shock) solutions regardless of the equation of state (EOS) used to close them. In addition, certain classes of initial conditions and EOS admit special flows known as similarity solutions, including some containing shocks. These are useful (1) as test problems for hydrocodes, (2) as intermediate asymptotic estimates for non-symmetric problems, and (3) in forecasting experimental results. To date, the vast majority of work pertaining to similarity solutions of the Euler equations has been accomplished in the context of the ideal gas EOS; the case where the material is arbitrary is less well-understood. In this work, we classify using Lie-group analysis those materials which admit similarity solutions. We also indicate how such solutions may be found for a variety of materials of interest, including those characterized by particular forms of the Gruneisen EOS. Graduate Student Department of Mathematics, UCLA.

  6. Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project: Phase I accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeier, S.E.; Walters, B.G.; Crawford, D.C.

    1997-01-15

    The authors present the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase I efforts. The rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include decisions to use Echelon LonWorks networking protocol and Microsoft Access for the data system needs, a preliminary design for the plutonium canning system glovebox, identification of facilities and materials available for the demonstration, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, and a preliminary list of available sensor technologies. Recently imposed changes in the overall project schedule and scope are also discussed and budgetary requirements for competition of Phase II presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase I deliverables.

  7. Can Distributed Volunteers Accomplish Massive Data Analysis Tasks?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanefsky, B.; Barlow, N. G.; Gulick, V. C.

    2001-01-01

    We argue that many image analysis tasks can be performed by distributed amateurs. Our pilot study, with crater surveying and classification, has produced encouraging results in terms of both quantity (100,000 crater entries in 2 months) and quality. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Supporting and Rewarding Accomplished Teaching: Insights from Austin, Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lussier, David F.; Forgione, Pascal D., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the strategic compensation efforts of the Austin Independent School District (AISD) in Texas, which is piloting a system of supports and rewards for teachers and administrators. The article highlights the key components of this system, what it took to put a 4-year pilot program in place, and what results are emerging from…

  9. Some innovations and accomplishments of Ames Research Center since its inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The innovations and accomplishments of Ames Research Center from 1940 through 1966 are summarized and illustrated. It should be noted that a number of accomplishments were begun at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility before that facility became part of the Ames Research Center. Such accomplishments include the first supersonic flight, the first hypersonic flight, the lunar landing research vehicle, and the first digital fly-by-wire aircraft.

  10. Will the Brazilian alcohol program accomplish vehicles future demand?

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, E.L.; Coelho, S.T.

    1995-11-01

    The National Alcohol Program, {open_quotes}Proalcool{close_quotes}, established in Brazil in 1975, nowadays faces a decisive moment due to its economic and, consequently, supply problems. Since 1989, ethanol production has not been enough for the Brazilian alcohol fueled fleet. This unbalanced situation subjects it to a loss of reliability in the Program. The supply problems are due to the controversy regarding ethanol costs. Alcohol production has been maintained almost the same, since 1988, despite a reduction of sugar cane harvested surface, by an increase in agro-industrial productivity. This paper discusses the relationship between production and demand of ethanol as a strategic gasoline substitute. Ethanol production forecasts are compared to official goals related to alcohol demand for automotive purposes, which has established a given percentage of alcohol fueled vehicle in total sales. Two scenarios adopted in this work ({open_quotes}conservative{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}efficient{close_quotes}) estimate on ethanol production of 16.53 and 19.44 billion liters, respectively, for year 2015. These results, when compared to ethanol demand in the same year, 22.7 billion liters, lead to a significant deficit of alcohol. From the obtained results, measures for the adjustment of Proalcool are proposed.

  11. Exposure to Hexavalent Chromium Resulted in Significantly Higher Tissue Chromium Burden Compared With Trivalent Chromium Following Similar Oral Doses to Male F344/N Rats and Female B6C3F1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Bradley J.; Stout, Matthew D.; Levine, Keith E.; Kissling, Grace E.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Walden, Ramsey; Abdo, Kamal; Pritchard, John B.; Fernando, Reshan A.; Burka, Leo T.; Hooth, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    In National Toxicology Program 2-year studies, hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] administered in drinking water was clearly carcinogenic in male and female rats and mice, resulting in small intestine epithelial neoplasms in mice at a dose equivalent to or within an order of magnitude of human doses that could result from consumption of chromium-contaminated drinking water, assuming that dose scales by body weight3/4 (body weight raised to the 3/4 power). In contrast, exposure to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] at much higher concentrations may have been carcinogenic in male rats but was not carcinogenic in mice or female rats. As part of these studies, total chromium was measured in tissues and excreta of additional groups of male rats and female mice. These data were used to infer the uptake and distribution of Cr(VI) because Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III) in vivo, and no methods are available to speciate tissue chromium. Comparable external doses resulted in much higher tissue chromium concentrations following exposure to Cr(VI) compared with Cr(III), indicating that a portion of the Cr(VI) escaped gastric reduction and was distributed systemically. Linear or supralinear dose responses of total chromium in tissues were observed following exposure to Cr(VI), indicating that these exposures did not saturate gastric reduction capacity. When Cr(VI) exposure was normalized to ingested dose, chromium concentrations in the liver and glandular stomach were higher in mice, whereas kidney concentrations were higher in rats. In vitro studies demonstrated that Cr(VI), but not Cr(III), is a substrate of the sodium/sulfate cotransporter, providing a partial explanation for the greater absorption of Cr(VI). PMID:20843897

  12. The International Space Station Research Opportunities and Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alleyne, Camille W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the International Space Station (ISS) construction and assembly was completed to become a world-class scientific research laboratory. We are now in the era of utilization of this unique platform that facilitates ground-breaking research in the microgravity environment. There are opportunities for NASA-funded research; research funded under the auspice of the United States National Laboratory; and research funded by the International Partners - Japan, Europe, Russia and Canada. The ISS facilities offer an opportunity to conduct research in a multitude of disciplines such as biology and biotechnology, physical science, human research, technology demonstration and development; and earth and space science. The ISS is also a unique resource for educational activities that serve to motivate and inspire students to pursue careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Even though we have just commenced full utilization of the ISS as a science laboratory, early investigations are yielding major results that are leading to such things as vaccine development, improved cancer drug delivery methods and treatment for debilitating diseases, such as Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy. This paper

  13. Consistent declining trends in stroke mortality in Brazil: mission accomplished?

    PubMed

    Passos, Valéria M A; Ishitani, Lenice H; Franco, Glaura C; Lana, Gustavo C; Abreu, Daisy M X; Marinho, Maria de Fatima; França, Elisabeth B

    2016-05-01

    Stroke mortality rates are declining in Brazil, but diferences among regions need to be better investigated. The age-adjusted stroke mortality trends among adults (30-69 years-old) from Brazilian regions were studied between 1996 and 2011. Method Data were analyzed after: 1) reallocation of deaths with non-registered sex or age; 2) redistribution of garbage codes and 3) underreporting correction. A linear regression model with autoregressive errors and a state space model were fitted to the data, aiming the estimation of annual trends at every point in time. Results Although there were high values, a steady decrease of rates was observed. The decreasing trends among all regions were statistically significant, with higher values of decline among the Northeast and Northern regions, where rates were the highest. Conclusion Standardized methodology use is mandatory for correct interpretation of mortality estimates. Although declining, rates are still extremely high and efforts must be made towards prevention of stroke incidence, reduction of case-fatality rates and prevention of sequelae. PMID:27191233

  14. An Overview of SIMBIOS Program Activities and Accomplishments. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    The SIMBIOS Program was conceived in 1994 as a result of a NASA management review of the agency's strategy for monitoring the bio-optical properties of the global ocean through space-based ocean color remote sensing. At that time, the NASA ocean color flight manifest included two data buy missions, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Earth Observing System (EOS) Color, and three sensors, two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS) and the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), scheduled for flight on the EOS-Terra and EOS-Aqua satellites. The review led to a decision that the international assemblage of ocean color satellite systems provided ample redundancy to assure continuous global coverage, with no need for the EOS Color mission. At the same time, it was noted that non-trivial technical difficulties attended the challenge (and opportunity) of combining ocean color data from this array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. Thus, it was announced at the October 1994 EOS Interdisciplinary Working Group meeting that some of the resources budgeted for EOS Color should be redirected into an intercalibration and validation program (McClain et al., 2002).

  15. Global sea level record from satellite altimetry: accomplishments and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, L.

    2013-12-01

    The trend of sea level change and its geographic pattern present a powerful indicator of the overall extent of climate change as well as pose a long-term threat to the world's heavily populated coastal zones. The global and direct measurement of sea level from satellite altimetry over the past two decades, as a key part of a global observing system, has enabled quantitative determination of sea level change and its relation to natural and human-induced causes. Major results from the data record will be reviewed to highlight the challenges in distinguishing between natural variability and long-term trends from human activities. As long-term climate data records from satellite observations are inevitably to be built from successive missions with progressively changing technologies, a major challenge is concerted effort in cross-calibration to ensure consistency between new measurements with existing records. As the desire of increasing spatial resolution to resolve energetic small-scale variability dictates the development of high-resolution wide-swath altimeter, the need for thoughtful design of a system that is able to demonstrate proper transition of technologies in terms of providing consistent global sea level data record will be discussed.

  16. PFR/TREAT program: objectives, accomplishments, and plans. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Cowking, C.B.; Alter, H.; Stillwell, J.; Wood, M.H.; Woods, W.J.; Culley, G.E.; Klickman, A.E.; Borys, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    The PFR-TREAT collaborative program of transient safety testing of fast reactor fuel was established in 1979 to provide mutual advantage to USDOE and the UKAEA through irradiation of US and UK full-length fuel pins in PFR, followed by safety testing in TREAT. The tests which were planned include Transient Over-Power (TOP) and Transient Under-Cooling with Over-Power (TUCOP) tests to fuel destruction and re-distribution; the results will provide significant new information on fuel and cladding behavior in hypothetical reactor faults. The information obtained in both US and UK fuel pins is to be interpreted by both partners and published jointly when mutually agreed. Thirteen tests, on fresh and irradiated fuel, in single-pin and 7-pin test sections, were completed by the end of 1983. The test matrix, which is currently being re-evaluated, calls for additional tests to be run under the present agreement. There has been an extensive program of post irradiation examination of sibling pins in both the UK and the US to characterize the test fuel prior to destructive irradiation, including testing of irradiated cladding to determine its failure characteristics.

  17. NASA's Heliophysics Theory Program - Accomplishments in Life Cycle Ending 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Heliophysics Theory Program (HTP) is now into a new triennial cycle of funded research, with new research awards beginning in 2011. The theory program was established by the (former) Solar Terrestrial Division in 1980 to redress a weakness of support in the theory area. It has been a successful, evolving scientific program with long-term funding of relatively large "critical mass groups" pursuing theory and modeling on a scale larger than that available within the limits of traditional NASA Supporting Research and Technology (SR&T) awards. The results of the last 3 year funding cycle, just ended, contributed to ever more cutting edge theoretical understanding of all parts of the Sun-Earth Connection chain. Advances ranged from the core of the Sun out into the corona, through the solar wind into the Earth's magnetosphere and down to the ionosphere and lower atmosphere, also contributing to understanding the environments of other solar system bodies. The HTP contributions were not isolated findings but continued to contribute to the planning and implementation of NASA spacecraft missions and to the development of the predictive computer models that have become the workhorses for analyzing satellite and ground-based measurements.

  18. What the Philosophical Interpretation of Quantum Theory Can Accomplish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Martin

    I argue that philosophical reflection can contribute to a better understanding of physical theories by performing conceptual clarification, epistemological analysis and ontological exploration. I begin by reconstructing early ontological interpretations of quantum theory, i.e., by explaining Copenhagen instrumentalism and the shift toward a quantum realism. I turn to entanglement, whose chief philosophical challenge is to understand which deeper property of nature it reveals. The trouble is that the EPR-correlations it gives rise to are not produced by common causation. Conceptual analysis shows that this failure is due to the violation of separability in quantum theory. In entangled states, it is the composite state that is primary since it cannot be neatly divided into two states that unambiguously pertain to the partial systems. As a result, total states are not produced by an interaction among the parts. This feature can be interpreted in ontological terms as suggesting a holist picture of nature. Another question of philosophical import concerns the quantum measurement problem and the contribution decoherence makes to its solution. The conceptual point is what, precisely, this problem amounts to and what we require considering it settled. The issue that divides the philosophical factions is whether a solution needs to show that superpositions are actually destroyed or whether it suffices to demonstrate that superpositions become unobservable.

  19. Sandia Technology: Engineering and science accomplishments, February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is one of the Department of Energy`s primary research and development laboratories. Our essential mission is to support the national interests of the US in defense, energy, and the environment. Managed by Martin Marietta Corporation for DOE, Sandia focuses its resources on problems of national interest that require the integration of science and technology for their solution. We all hope that this period of sweeping alterations in international affairs will result in a successful transition from the Cold War to a period of sustainable global security and prosperity. In the meantime, our nation`s interests are best served by continued commitment to Sandia`s traditional responsibilities. Nonetheless, as momentous developments are reshaping the world, Sandia is also changing from its beginning as a closed operation concentrating on classified defense programs, Sandia has become a more accessible resource that focuses on research and development partnerships with industry and universities as a way to ensure continued success in DOE`s evolving core mission area of nuclear weapons, energy, environment, and the basis sciences. Through these collaborative efforts, Sandia and its partners are also benefiting the economic competitiveness of our nation. Sandia places a special emphasis on working with small businesses as both technology transfer partners and suppliers of goods and services. We are also reaching out the the larger community surrounding Sandia, striving to provide technological solution and accurate information to meet community needs. We believe that the dialogue we are creating will benefit Sandia, the community, and the nation. Our goal is to render `` exceptional service in the national interest`` by returning maximum value on the investment in the labs. As you review this document, look for new ways in which Sandia can contribute to the solution of problems facing our nation.

  20. Accomplishments in free-piston stirling tests at NASA GRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Skupinski, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    A power system based on the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) has been identified for potential use on deep space missions, as well as for Mars rovers that may benefit from extended operation. The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for developing the generator and the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is supporting DOE in this effort. The generator is based on a free-piston Stirling power convertor that has been developed by the Stirling Technology Company (STC) under contract to DOE. The generator would be used as a high-efficiency alternative to the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) that have been used on many previous missions. The increased efficiency leads to a factor of 3 to 4 reduction in the inventory of plutonium required to heat the generator. GRC has been involved in the development of Stirling power conversion technology for over 25 years. The support provided to this project by GRC has many facets and draws upon the lab's scientists and engineers that have gained experience in applying their skills to the previous Stirling projects. This has created a staff with an understanding of the subtleties involved in applying their expertise to Stirling systems. Areas include materials, structures, tribology, controls, electromagnetic interference, permanent magnets, alternator analysis, structural dynamics, and cycle performance. One of the key areas of support to the project is in the performance testing of the free-piston Stirling convertors. Since these power convertors are the smallest, lowest power Stirling machines that have been tested at GRC, a new laboratory was equipped for this project. Procedures and test plans have been created, instrumentation and data systems developed, and Stirling convertors have been tested. This paper will describe the GRC test facility, the test procedures that are used, present some of the test results and outline plans for the future. .

  1. Unverifiable Accomplishments and Publications on Applications for Gynecologic Oncology Fellowships

    PubMed Central

    Frumovitz, Michael; Kriseman, Maya L.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Blumenthal-Barby, Jennifer; Sood, Anil K.; Bodurka, Diane C.; Soliman, Pamela T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Selection of physicians for fellowships in obstetrics and gynecology subspecialties has become increasingly competitive. The number and quality of research publications is an important factor in the selection process. We sought to estimate the incidence of unverifiable (“ghost”) publications among gynecologic oncology fellowship applicants. Methods We reviewed the applications to a single gynecologic oncology fellowship program during 2004–2008. Articles and book chapters reported as published, “in press”, “submitted”, or “in progress” were systematically searched for by three reviewers using PubMed and Google. Chi-square analysis was used to evaluate associations between demographic factors and unverifiable publications. Results Two hundred forty-three applications met the inclusion criteria. Of the 35 applicants who listed membership in Alpha Omega Alpha, 4 (11%) were not listed on the organization’s website as inductees. Of the 464 articles reported as published or “in press”, only 387 (83%) could be verified. Of the 148 applicants who reported at least 1 published/“in press” article, 44 (30%) had at least 1 unverifiable publication. On multivariable analysis, only male gender increased the likelihood of unverifiable publications (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1–4.1). Of the 282 manuscripts reported as “submitted” or “in progress”, only 126 (44%) were published. Of the 124 applicants who reported at least 1 “submitted”/“in progress” manuscript, 88 (71%) had at least 1 unverifiable manuscript. Conclusion The proportion of unverifiable publications listed on gynecologic oncology fellowship applications is concerning. Stringent review of applications before interview invitations and match list submission is warranted. PMID:22353948

  2. Exemplar Similarity and Rule Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ulrike; Prat-Sala, Merce; Pothos, Emmanuel M.; Brumby, Duncan P.

    2010-01-01

    We report four experiments examining effects of instance similarity on the application of simple explicit rules. We found effects of similarity to illustrative exemplars in error patterns and reaction times. These effects arose even though participants were given perfectly predictive rules, the similarity manipulation depended entirely on…

  3. Acoustic Similarity and Dichotic Listening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Peter

    1978-01-01

    An experiment tests conjectures that right ear advantage (REA) has an auditory origin in competition or interference between acoustically similar stimuli and that feature-sharing effect (FSE) has its origin in assignment of features of phonetically similar stimuli. No effect on the REA for acoustic similarity, and a clear effect of acoustic…

  4. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Mark B.; Kapustin, Anton N.; Schwarz, John Henry; Carroll, Sean; Ooguri, Hirosi; Gukov, Sergei; Preskill, John; Hitlin, David G.; Porter, Frank C.; Patterson, Ryan B.; Newman, Harvey B.; Spiropulu, Maria; Golwala, Sunil; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-08-26

    of activity include: CDMS II data analysis, contributions to SuperCDMS Soudan operations and analysis, R&D towards SuperCDMS SNOLAB, development of a novel screener for radiocontamination (the BetaCage), and development of new WIMP detector concepts. Ren-Yuan Zhu leads the HEP crystal laboratory for the advanced detector R&D effort. The crystal lab is involved in development of novel scintillating crystals and has proposed several crystal based detector concepts for future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers. Its current research effort is concentrated on development of fast crystal scintillators with good radiation hardness and low cost. II) THEORETICAL PHYSICS The main theme of Sergei Gukov's current research is the relation between the geometry of quantum group invariants and their categorification, on the one hand, and the physics of supersymmetric gauge theory and string theory, on the other. Anton Kapustin's research spans a variety of topics in non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory (QFT). His main areas of interest are supersymmetric gauge theories, non-perturbative dualities in QFT, disorder operators, Topological Quantum Field Theory, and non-relativistic QFT. He is also interested in the foundations and possible generalizations of Quantum Mechanics. Hirosi Ooguri's current research has two main components. One is to find exact results in Calabi-Yau compactification of string theory. Another is to explore applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence. He also plans to continue his project with Caltech postdoctoral fellows on BPS spectra of supersymmetric gauge theories in diverse dimensions. John Preskill works on quantum information science. This field may lead to important future technologies, and also lead to new understanding of issues in fundamental physics John Schwarz has been exploring a number of topics in superstring theory/M-theory, supersymmetric gauge theory, and their AdS/CFT relationships. Much of the motivation for these

  5. Materials Division research and technology accomplishments for FY 87 and plans for FY 88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkley, Kay L.

    1988-01-01

    The research program of the Materials Division is presented as FY 87 accomplishments and FY 88 plans. The accomplishments for each Branch are highlighted and plans are outlined. Publications of the Division are included by Branch. This material will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations, universities, and industries in areas of mutual interest.

  6. The Role of Planned Professional Learning in Becoming an Accomplished Teacher: The Queensland Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Sherryl

    2009-01-01

    The role of planned professional learning in being an accomplished languages and cultures teacher has never been so important. Professional learning that focuses on "becoming" an accomplished practitioner as part of an ongoing professional learning experience rather than a process of detailing deficiencies is to be applauded. Indeed, the…

  7. Summaries of 1984-85 NASA space-gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W. (Compiler); Dutcher, F. R. (Compiler); Pleasant, L. G. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space/Gravitational Biology Program are presented. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a listing of the accomplishments, and an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments. Bibliographies for each project are also included.

  8. Working Memory and Short-Term Memory Abilities in Accomplished Multilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biedron, Adriana; Szczepaniak, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The role of short-term memory and working memory in accomplished multilinguals was investigated. Twenty-eight accomplished multilinguals were compared to 36 mainstream philology students. The following instruments were used in the study: three memory subtests of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale (Digit Span, Digit-Symbol Coding, and Arithmetic,…

  9. The Role of "Accomplished Teachers" in Professional Learning Communities: Uncovering Practice and Enabling Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Ann; Mace, Desiree H. Pointer

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the signature role played by accomplished, experienced teachers in professional learning communities, and the importance that these practitioners make their teaching public and shared. In so doing, the authors describe how accomplished practices can be shared between classrooms and between practitioners with varying levels of…

  10. Materials Division research and technical accomplishments for FY 1988 and plans for FY 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkley, Kay L.

    1989-01-01

    The research program of the Materials Division is presented as FY-88 accomplishments and FY-89 plans. The accomplishments for each Branch are highlighted and plans are outlined. Publications of the Division are included by Branch. This material is useful in program coordination with other government organizations, universities, and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  11. Teachers' Desire for Career-Long Learning: Becoming "Accomplished"--And Masterly…

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Cate; Drew, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    The "accomplished teacher" has emerged in educational policy as a term designed to capture the dispositions and skills of highly practised professionals. As such accomplishment is enacted within a current policy discourse of life-long, or career-long, professional learning which is concerned with continual self-development. This paper…

  12. Materials Division research and technology accomplishments for FY 89 and plans for FY 90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkley, Kay L.

    1990-01-01

    The research program of the Materials Division is presented as FY-89 accomplishments and FY-90 plans. The accomplishments for each Branch are highlighted and plans are outlined. Publications of the Division are included by Branch. This material will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations, universities, and industries in areas of mutual interest.

  13. Predicting College Student Success: A Historical and Predictive Examination of High School Activities and Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Carla Mae

    2010-01-01

    According to generational theorists, the interests and experiences of incoming students have fluctuated over time, with Millennial students being more engaged and accomplished than their predecessors. This project explored data from 1974-2007 to determine the actual trends in engagement and accomplishments for three generations of students. Over…

  14. Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts have greatly advanced the state of the art of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies—making significant progress toward overcoming many of the key challenges to widespread commercialization. DOE has also made major advances by demonstrating and validating the technologies under real-world conditions, supporting early markets through Recovery Act deployments, and leveraging domestic and international partnerships to advance the pace of commercialization.

  15. Mission accomplished

    SciTech Connect

    Rhinelander, J.B.; Rubin, J.P.

    1987-09-01

    In October 1085, then Security Adviser Robert McFarlane revealed the Reagan administration's new interpretation of the 1972 ABM Treaty, namely: develop and test Star Wars up to the point of deployment. This announcement led to storms of protest from NATO allies, members of Congress, and the Soviet Union. Congressional debate over the last two years, led by Senator Sam Nunn, demonstrated conclusively that when the Senate, by a vote of 88-2, gave its advice and consent to ratification in 1972, it did so on the basis of the traditional interpretation. The Reagan administration rested their case for the new interpretation primarily on their review of the treaty's negotiating record. One of the authors of this article (Rhinelander) was a legal adviser to the SALT I delegation. He and Rubin recently examined declassified portions of the negotiating record. Their findings are explicated here, with the conclusion reinforcing what all negotiators except Paul Nitze have said, namely: the traditional interpretation is irrefutably the one negotiated and agreed upon by both parties in 1972. They find the administration position extremely puzzling since the reinterpretation is not even necessary to continue a robust SDI program, which Nunn and other congressional leaders support.

  16. A framework for profile similarity: integrating similarity, normativeness, and distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Furr, R Michael

    2008-10-01

    Many questions in personality psychology lend themselves to the analysis of profile similarity. A profile approach to issues such as personality judgment, personality similarity, behavioral consistency, developmental stability, and person-environment fit is intuitively appealing. However, it entails conceptual and statistical challenges arising from the overlap among profile similarity and normativeness, which presents potential confounds and potential opportunities. This article describes the normativeness problem, articulating the need to evaluate profile similarity alongside normativeness and distinctiveness. It presents conceptual and psychometric foundations of a framework differentiating these elements for pairs of profiles. It derives two models from this framework, and it discusses the application of their components to a variety of research domains. Finally, it presents recommendations and implications regarding the use of these components and profile similarity more generally. This approach can reveal and manage potential confounds, and it can provide theoretical insights that might otherwise be overlooked. PMID:18705644

  17. Student Accomplishments in the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program: A 10-Year Review.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Rachel; Lechner, Breanne; Pulenzas, Natalie; Bedard, Gillian; Wong, Erin; Holden, Lori; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Szumacher, Ewa; Fenton, Gonenc; Chow, Edward; Popovic, Marko; Danjoux, Cyril

    2015-12-01

    In 1996, the Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre developed the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program (RRRP). The objective of this clinic is to consult, simulate, plan, and treat patients with palliative radiotherapy on the same day. In 2004, the RRRP initiated a program to provide clinical and research experience to undergraduate students interested in health sciences. The purpose of this study is to review the 10-year (2004-2013) experience of the RRRP and to examine whether the goals of the student program have been met. Students who worked in the RRRP from 2004 to 2013 were contacted to complete a short survey regarding their overall experience with the program and their current endeavors. Student accomplishments were collected from an internal database as well as PubMed. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. A total of 54 students from ten postsecondary institutions have worked in the RRRP; 29 were from the University of Waterloo undergraduate co-op program. In total, 214 articles with first authorship from students were published, 93 (43%) of which can be found on PubMed. Other accomplishments include 40 book chapters, 58 invited presentations, and 99 awards cumulatively. Qualitative data regarding student perspectives of their experience in the RRRP were also analyzed. Over the past 10 years, the RRRP has achieved its goal of providing quality medical and research experience to students interested in the health sciences. Using the responses of past and present students, we hope to continue to shape our program and provide unique opportunities to future students. PMID:25370839

  18. Dynamic similarity in erosional processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheidegger, A.E.

    1963-01-01

    A study is made of the dynamic similarity conditions obtaining in a variety of erosional processes. The pertinent equations for each type of process are written in dimensionless form; the similarity conditions can then easily be deduced. The processes treated are: raindrop action, slope evolution and river erosion. ?? 1963 Istituto Geofisico Italiano.

  19. Similarity Measures for Boolean Search Request Formulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radecki, Tadeusz

    1982-01-01

    Proposes a means for determining the similarity between search request formulations in online information retrieval systems, and discusses the use of similarity measures for clustering search formulations and document files in such systems. Experimental results using the proposed methods are presented in three tables. A reference list is provided.…

  20. Some Effects of Similarity Self-Disclosure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin C.; Strong, Stanley R.

    1972-01-01

    College males were interviewed about how college had altered their friendships, values, and plans. The interviewers diclosed experiences and feelings similar to those revealed by the students. Results support Byrne's Law of Similarity in generating interpersonal attraction in the interview and suggest that the timing of self-disclosures is…

  1. Thermodynamic similarity of physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccariello, Salvino

    2016-02-01

    Two different physical systems A and B are said to be thermodynamically similar if one of the thermodynamic potentials of system A is proportional to the corresponding potential of B after expressing the state variables of system A in terms of those of B by a transformation reversible throughout the state variables' domain. The thermodynamic similarity has a transitive nature so that physical systems divide into classes of thermodynamically similar systems that have similar phase diagrams. Considering the simplest physical systems, one finds that a class of thermodynamically similar systems is formed by the ideal classical gas, the Fermi and the Bose ideal quantum gases, whatever the dimensions of the confining spaces, and the one dimensional hard rod gas. Another class is formed by the physical systems characterized by interactions that coincide by a scaling of the distance and the coupling constant.

  2. What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

  3. WISM - A Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurement: Past Accomplishments, Current Status, and Path Forward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonds, Quenton; Racette, Paul; Durham, Tim (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    Presented are the prior accomplishments, current status and path forward for GSFC's Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurement (WISM). This work is a high level overview of the project, presented via Webinar to the IEEE young professionals.

  4. The genetics of music accomplishment: evidence for gene-environment correlation and interaction.

    PubMed

    Hambrick, David Z; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2015-02-01

    Theories of skilled performance that emphasize training history, such as K. Anders Ericsson and colleagues' deliberate-practice theory, have received a great deal of recent attention in both the scientific literature and the popular press. Twin studies, however, have demonstrated evidence for moderate-to-strong genetic influences on skilled performance. Focusing on musical accomplishment in a sample of over 800 pairs of twins, we found evidence for gene-environment correlation, in the form of a genetic effect on music practice. However, only about one quarter of the genetic effect on music accomplishment was explained by this genetic effect on music practice, suggesting that genetically influenced factors other than practice contribute to individual differences in music accomplishment. We also found evidence for gene-environment interaction, such that genetic effects on music accomplishment were most pronounced among those engaging in music practice, suggesting that genetic potentials for skilled performance are most fully expressed and fostered by practice. PMID:24957535

  5. Reshaping American Energy - A Look Back at BETO's Accomplishments in 2013

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    For more than a decade, BETO has been shaping the bioenergy industry. BETO helps transform the nation's renewable biomass resources into high-performance biofuels, biopower, and bioproducts. This fact sheet outlines some of our biggest accomplishments in 2013.

  6. Activity-relevant similarity values for fingerprints and implications for similarity searching

    PubMed Central

    Jasial, Swarit; Hu, Ye; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A largely unsolved problem in chemoinformatics is the issue of how calculated compound similarity relates to activity similarity, which is central to many applications. In general, activity relationships are predicted from calculated similarity values. However, there is no solid scientific foundation to bridge between calculated molecular and observed activity similarity. Accordingly, the success rate of identifying new active compounds by similarity searching is limited. Although various attempts have been made to establish relationships between calculated fingerprint similarity values and biological activities, none of these has yielded generally applicable rules for similarity searching. In this study, we have addressed the question of molecular versus activity similarity in a more fundamental way. First, we have evaluated if activity-relevant similarity value ranges could in principle be identified for standard fingerprints and distinguished from similarity resulting from random compound comparisons. Then, we have analyzed if activity-relevant similarity values could be used to guide typical similarity search calculations aiming to identify active compounds in databases. It was found that activity-relevant similarity values can be identified as a characteristic feature of fingerprints. However, it was also shown that such values cannot be reliably used as thresholds for practical similarity search calculations. In addition, the analysis presented herein helped to rationalize differences in fingerprint search performance. PMID:27127620

  7. Self-similar aftershock rates.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Jörn; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise-an intermittent avalanchelike relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes-the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is particularly true for the case of seismicity, and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high-resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing particularly clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved framework for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting. PMID:27627324

  8. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1989 and plans for FY 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jacqueline G.; Gardner, James E.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for FY 1989 and research plans for FY 1990. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  9. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1988 and plans for FY 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for FY 1988 and research plans for FY 1989. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and plans for the current year as they relate to five-year plans for each area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  10. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1993 and plans for FY 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynne, Eleanor C.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for F.Y. 1993 and research plans for F.Y. 1994. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5-year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  11. Loads and Aeroelasticity Division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1986 and plans for FY 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    The Loads and Aeroelasticity Division's research accomplishments for FY 86 and research plans for FY 87 are presented. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  12. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1987 and plans for FY 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, S. C.; Gardner, James E.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the Loads and Aeroelasticity Division's research accomplishments for FY87 and research plans for FY88. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  13. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1985 and plans for FY 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    The Langley Research Center Loads and Aeroelasticity Division's research accomplishments for FY85 and research plans for FY86 are presented. The rk under each branch (technical area) will be described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  14. Loads and Aeroelasticity Division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1984 and plans for FY 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The loads and aeroelasticity divisions research accomplishments are presented. The work under each branch or technical area, described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5 year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  15. Representation is representation of similarities.

    PubMed

    Edelman, S

    1998-08-01

    Advanced perceptual systems are faced with the problem of securing a principled (ideally, veridical) relationship between the world and its internal representation. I propose a unified approach to visual representation, addressing the need for superordinate and basic-level categorization and for the identification of specific instances of familiar categories. According to the proposed theory, a shape is represented internally by the responses of a small number of tuned modules, each broadly selective for some reference shape, whose similarity to the stimulus it measures. This amounts to embedding the stimulus in a low-dimensional proximal shape space spanned by the outputs of the active modules. This shape space supports representations of distal shape similarities that are veridical as Shepard's (1968) second-order isomorphisms (i.e., correspondence between distal and proximal similarities among shapes, rather than between distal shapes and their proximal representations). Representation in terms of similarities to reference shapes supports processing (e.g., discrimination) of shapes that are radically different from the reference ones, without the need for the computationally problematic decomposition into parts required by other theories. Furthermore, a general expression for similarity between two stimuli, based on comparisons to reference shapes, can be used to derive models of perceived similarity ranging from continuous, symmetric, and hierarchical ones, as in multidimensional scaling (Shepard 1980), to discrete and nonhierarchical ones, as in the general contrast models (Shepard & Arabie 1979; Tversky 1977). PMID:10097019

  16. Two perspectives on similarity between words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Stefan A.

    2003-10-01

    This presentation examines the similarity between words from both bottom up (phonetic) and top down (phonological/psycholinguistic) perspectives. From the phonological perspective, the influence of structure on similarity is explored using metalinguistic acceptability judgments for multisyllabic nonwords. Results from an experiment suggest that subjects try to align novel words with known words in order to maximize similarities while minimizing dissimilarities. This finding parallels results from psychology on similarity judgments for visual scenes. From the phonetic perspective, the influence of similar gestures on speech error rates is examined using ultrasound measurement of tongue position. In a pilot experiment, subjects, produced tongue twisters containing words where onset and vowel phonemes had similar gestures (e.g., tip, comb) and where the onset and vowel had dissimilar gestures (e.g., tube, keep). Preliminary results suggest that misarticulations are more frequent in the context of dissimilar gestures (e.g., in the tongue twister tip cape keep tape, error rates are higher for /k/ than /t/). These errors appear to be gestural interactions rather than errors at the phonemic or featural level of phonological spellout. Together, these two experiments indicate that similarity relations between words are found at multiple levels, any which are potentially relevant to the structure of phonological systems.

  17. Quantifying Similarity in Seismic Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W. S.; Jones, J. P.; Caffagni, E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring similarity in seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low S/N signals, and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via. computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Using records of the Mw=8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake from CNSN broadband sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and vertical borehole array data from a monitoring experiment at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Because histogram distance metrics are bounded by [0 1], clustering allows empirical time-frequency separation of seismic phase arrivals on single-station three-component records. Array processing for automatic seismic phase classification may be possible using subspace clustering of polarization similarity, but efficient algorithms are required to reduce the dimensionality.

  18. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  19. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  20. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on.

  1. Self-similar mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Oiwa, Nestor N; Glazier, James A

    2004-01-01

    We show that repeated sequences, like palindromes (local repetitions) and homologies between two different nucleotide sequences (motifs along the genome), compose a self-similar (fractal) pattern in mitochondrial DNA. This self-similarity comes from the looplike structures distributed along the genome. The looplike structures generate scaling laws in a pseudorandom DNA walk constructed from the sequence, called a Lévy flight. We measure the scaling laws from the generalized fractal dimension and singularity spectrum for mitochondrial DNA walks for 35 different species. In particular, we report characteristic loop distributions for mammal mitochondrial genomes. PMID:15371639

  2. What Difference Reveals about Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagi, Eyal; Gentner, Dedre; Lovett, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Detecting that two images are different is faster for highly dissimilar images than for highly similar images. Paradoxically, we showed that the reverse occurs when people are asked to describe "how" two images differ--that is, to state a difference between two images. Following structure-mapping theory, we propose that this disassociation arises…

  3. Similarity Measures for Comparing Biclusterings.

    PubMed

    Horta, Danilo; Campello, Ricardo J G B

    2014-01-01

    The comparison of ordinary partitions of a set of objects is well established in the clustering literature, which comprehends several studies on the analysis of the properties of similarity measures for comparing partitions. However, similarity measures for clusterings are not readily applicable to biclusterings, since each bicluster is a tuple of two sets (of rows and columns), whereas a cluster is only a single set (of rows). Some biclustering similarity measures have been defined as minor contributions in papers which primarily report on proposals and evaluation of biclustering algorithms or comparative analyses of biclustering algorithms. The consequence is that some desirable properties of such measures have been overlooked in the literature. We review 14 biclustering similarity measures. We define eight desirable properties of a biclustering measure, discuss their importance, and prove which properties each of the reviewed measures has. We show examples drawn and inspired from important studies in which several biclustering measures convey misleading evaluations due to the absence of one or more of the discussed properties. We also advocate the use of a more general comparison approach that is based on the idea of transforming the original problem of comparing biclusterings into an equivalent problem of comparing clustering partitions with overlapping clusters. PMID:26356865

  4. Mean Similarity Analysis Version 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    MEANSIM6 contains software for Mean Similarity Analysis, a method of assessing the strength of a classification of many objects (sites) into a relatively small number of groups. Classification strength is measured by the extent to which sites within the same groups are more simil...

  5. The contribution of the ACCOMPLISH trial to the treatment of stage 2 hypertension.

    PubMed

    Byrd, James Brian; Bakris, George; Jamerson, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) recommended a thiazide-like diuretic, alone or in combination with other antihypertensive drug classes, as initial therapy for hypertension. JNC 7, however, did not specify preferred combinations. The Avoiding Cardiovascular Events through Combination Therapy in Patients Living with Systolic Hypertension (ACCOMPLISH) trial was completed five years after the JNC 7 and demonstrated a 20 % advantage in cardiovascular risk reduction when blood pressure was lowered using the single-pill combination of benazepril-amlodipine compared to benazepril-hydrochlorothiazide (Jamerson et al. 359(23):2417-28 [1]). This new and significant finding provided compelling evidence that the long-standing preference for diuretics as initial therapy could be refuted, but it may also be relevant to the lower-than-expected reduction in coronary disease related events (compared to stroke) observed for decades prior to the ACCOMPLISH approach to therapy. The JNC 8 panel members recently published their recommendations, and while the group did not recommend benazepril-hydrochlorothiazide over other combinations, they did highlight the findings of ACCOMPLISH, rating the primary ACCOMPLISH paper as "good." The American Society of Hypertension position paper and the European Hypertension Society guidelines endorse such combinations as a first-line agent for patients with stage 2 hypertension. We review the current position of ACCOMPLISH in the guidelines regarding treatment of stage 2 hypertension. PMID:24474031

  6. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alard, C.

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  7. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  8. Satellite clock corrections estimation to accomplish real time ppp: experiments for brazilian real time network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Haroldo; Monico, João; Aquino, Marcio; Melo, Weyller

    2014-05-01

    applied in the Real Time PPP for Brazilian network stations and also for flight test of the Brazilian airplanes and the results show that it is possible to accomplish real time PPP in the static and kinematic modes with accuracy of the order of 10 to 20 cm, respectively.

  9. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1992 and plans for FY 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynne, Eleanor C.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for F.Y. 1992 and research plans for F.Y. 1993. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5-year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  10. Structural mechanics division research and technology accomplishments for CY 1992 and plans for CY 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, John B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the Structural Mechanics Division's research accomplishments for C.Y. 1992 and plans for C.Y. 1993. The technical mission and goals of the division and its constituent research branches are described. The work under each branch is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and plans for the current year as they relate to branch long range goals. This information is useful in program coordination with other government organizations, universities, and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  11. Innovative Partnerships Program Accomplishments: 2009-2010 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makufka, David

    2010-01-01

    This document reports on the accomplishments of the Innovative Partnerships Program during the two years of 2009 and 2010. The mission of the Innovative Partnerships Program is to provide leveraged technology alternatives for mission directorates, programs, and projects through joint partnerships with industry, academia, government agencies, and national laboratories. As outlined in this accomplishments summary, the IPP at NASA's Kennedy Space Center achieves this mission via two interdependent goals: (1) Infusion: Bringing external technologies and expertise into Kennedy to benefit NASA missions, programs, and projects (2) Technology Transfer: Spinning out space program technologies to increase the benefits for the nation's economy and humanity

  12. On self-similarity of crack layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botsis, J.; Kunin, B.

    1987-01-01

    The crack layer (CL) theory of Chudnovsky (1986), based on principles of thermodynamics of irreversible processes, employs a crucial hypothesis of self-similarity. The self-similarity hypothesis states that the value of the damage density at a point x of the active zone at a time t coincides with that at the corresponding point in the initial (t = 0) configuration of the active zone, the correspondence being given by a time-dependent affine transformation of the space variables. In this paper, the implications of the self-similarity hypothesis for qusi-static CL propagation is investigated using polystyrene as a model material and examining the evolution of damage distribution along the trailing edge which is approximated by a straight segment perpendicular to the crack path. The results support the self-similarity hypothesis adopted by the CL theory.

  13. Mechanisms for similarity based cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, A.

    2008-06-01

    Cooperation based on similarity has been discussed since Richard Dawkins introduced the term “green beard” effect. In these models, individuals cooperate based on an aribtrary signal (or tag) such as the famous green beard. Here, two different models for such tag based cooperation are analysed. As neutral drift is important in both models, a finite population framework is applied. The first model, which we term “cooperative tags” considers a situation in which groups of cooperators are formed by some joint signal. Defectors adopting the signal and exploiting the group can lead to a breakdown of cooperation. In this case, conditions are derived under which the average abundance of the more cooperative strategy exceeds 50%. The second model considers a situation in which individuals start defecting towards others that are not similar to them. This situation is termed “defective tags”. It is shown that in this case, individuals using tags to cooperate exclusively with their own kind dominate over unconditional cooperators.

  14. Creating Birds of Similar Feathers: Leveraging Similarity to Improve Teacher-Student Relationships and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehlbach, Hunter; Brinkworth, Maureen E.; King, Aaron M.; Hsu, Laura M.; McIntyre, Joseph; Rogers, Todd

    2016-01-01

    When people perceive themselves as similar to others, greater liking and closer relationships typically result. In the first randomized field experiment that leverages actual similarities to improve real-world relationships, we examined the affiliations between 315 9th grade students and their 25 teachers. Students in the treatment condition…

  15. Mechanisms for similarity matching in disparity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Goutcher, Ross; Hibbard, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Early neural mechanisms for the measurement of binocular disparity appear to operate in a manner consistent with cross-correlation-like processes. Consequently, cross-correlation, or cross-correlation-like procedures have been used in a range of models of disparity measurement. Using such procedures as the basis for disparity measurement creates a preference for correspondence solutions that maximize the similarity between local left and right eye image regions. Here, we examine how observers’ perception of depth in an ambiguous stereogram is affected by manipulations of luminance and orientation-based image similarity. Results show a strong effect of coarse-scale luminance similarity manipulations, but a relatively weak effect of finer-scale manipulations of orientation similarity. This is in contrast to the measurements of depth obtained from a standard cross-correlation model. This model shows strong effects of orientation similarity manipulations and weaker effects of luminance similarity. In order to account for these discrepancies, the standard cross-correlation approach may be modified to include an initial spatial frequency filtering stage. The performance of this adjusted model most closely matches human psychophysical data when spatial frequency filtering favors coarser scales. This is consistent with the operation of disparity measurement processes where spatial frequency and disparity tuning are correlated, or where disparity measurement operates in a coarse-to-fine manner. PMID:24409163

  16. Hydrologic similarity, comparative hydrology and hydrologic extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, T.; Laaha, G.; Koffler, D.; Singh, R.

    2012-04-01

    Recent years have brought a renewed focus on the issue of hydrologic similarity. What makes two catchments similar and what can we do with this understanding? The reason for this issue being so important lies at least partially in the need for generalization of results in a scientific field, which is limited through the large heterogeneity in our environment. The issue of hydrologic similarity is of course as old as hydrology itself, however, we believe that taking stock is needed from time to time to guide comparative hydrology efforts that have the potential to bring structure into the field of catchment hydrology. Apart from that, catchment similarity is the rational behind any attempt of predicting streamflow at ungauged basins, and a better understanding and definition of hydrologic similarity will enhance our ability to estimate water resources in absence of stream gauges. In this talk we focus on signatures of hydrologic extremes, i.e. flood and low flow characteristics of streamflow. Can similarity concepts relate catchment behavior under both high and low flow extremes? In how far do our understanding and our predictive capability regarding hydrologic extremes benefit from a holistic few of individual catchments, and from a comparative analysis between catchment? We will review different studies and present a meta analysis to highlight the proven and the potential benefit of taking a broader view.

  17. Skylab experiments. Volume 6: Mechanics. [Skylab program accomplishments for high school level education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab program activities are presented in a form adapted to instruction of high school students. The overall goals of the program are discussed. The specific accomplishments of the mechanics investigations are described. The subjects involved are as follows: (1) evaluation of mobility aids, (2) mass measurement devices, and (3) space guidance crew/vehicle disturbances.

  18. Accomplishments, Administrative Structure, and Activities of the Sensory Aids Evaluation and Development Center. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge. Sensory Aids Evaluation and Development Center.

    The report lists the staff and states the activities of the Sensory Aids Evaluation and Development Center (SAEDC). Work accomplished is reviewed, including work on the following; compiled speech output for the DOTSYS Information System; monotype reader; braille embosser; folding canes; pathsounder; Perkins brailler; evaluation of braille; speeded…

  19. Foreign and Domestic Accomplishments in Magnetic Bubble Device Technology. Computer Science & Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnar, Robert B. J.; Calomeris, Peter J.

    This document assesses the status of magnetic bubble technology as displayed by non-U.S. research and manufacturing facilities. Non-U.S. research and U.S. accomplishments are described while both technical and economic factors are addressed. Magnetic bubble devices are discussed whenever their application could impact future computer system…

  20. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1985 and accomplishments for FY 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives, FY 1985 plans, approach, and FY 1985 milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division's research programs are presented. The FY 1984 accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other government organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  1. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  2. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  3. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  4. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  5. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  6. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1986 and accomplishments for FY 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    Presented are the Objectives, FY 1986 Plans, Approach, and FY 1986 Milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division's research programs. FY 1985 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  7. DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program FY 2005 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, F. P.

    2005-11-01

    The DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates (MURA) Program encourages minority students to pursue careers in science and technology. In 2003, eight minority-serving institutions were awarded 3-year subcontracts that began in the summer/fall of FY 2004. This paper lists accomplishments made in the project's first phase.

  8. Accomplishing Marginalization in Bilingual Interaction: Relational Work as a Resource for the Intersubjective Construction of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Holly R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of impoliteness by Spanish-English bilingual pre-adolescents as a resource for accomplishing identities in spontaneous conversational interactions in an elementary school setting. The theoretical approach employed integrates the concept of relational work (Locher 2004; Locher and Watts 2005), which is based on Goffman's…

  9. Structural Mechanics Division research and technology plans for FY 1990 and accomplishments for FY 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Kay S.

    1990-01-01

    The Objectives, FY 1990 Plans, Approach, and FY 1990 Milestones for the Structural Mechanics Division's research programs are presented. FY 1989 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  10. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1987 and accomplishments for FY 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Kay S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the Objectives, FY 1987 Plans, Approach, and FY 1987 Milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division's research programs. FY 1986 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  11. Accomplishing Lessons in Postcolonial Classrooms: Comparative Perspectives from Botswana and Brunei Darussalam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Jo; Martin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Drawing on observations and audio-recordings of classroom language use in two postcolonial societies, the Republic of Botswana in Africa and the Sultanate of Brunei Darussalam in south-east Asia, this study seeks to explore how teachers and pupils face the challenge of accomplishing teaching and learning using a language which is not their own. In…

  12. Research and technology plans for FY 1989 and accomplishments for FY 1988. [Structural Mechanics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Kay S.

    1989-01-01

    The Objectives, FY 1989 Plans, Approach, and FY 1989 Milestones for the Structural Mechanics Division's research programs are presented. Fiscal year 1988 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  13. A Framework for the Preparation of Accomplished Career and Technical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Reforms in teacher preparation continue to spark national interest. In a statewide reform effort to improve teacher quality in Georgia, the State Department of Education, Board of Regents, and Professional Standards Commission have all adopted the Georgia Framework for Accomplished Teaching (Georgia Department of Education, 2003.). The Georgia…

  14. Reconstituting the ADHD Girl: Accomplishing Exclusion and Solidifying a Biomedical Identity in an ADHD Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjörne, Eva; Evaldsson, Ann-Carita

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore what happens to young people labelled as having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) after they have been excluded from mainstream class and placed in a special class. More specifically, we focus on how a specific disability identity is locally accomplished and ascribed to a girl placed in an ADHD class…

  15. Longitudinal Pathways from Math Intrinsic Motivation and Achievement to Math Course Accomplishments and Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Adele Eskeles; Marcoulides, George A.; Gottfried, Allen W.; Oliver, Pamella H.

    2013-01-01

    Across 20 years, pathways from math intrinsic motivation and achievement (ages 9-17) to high school math course accomplishments and educational attainment (age 29) were analyzed. Academic intrinsic motivation was the theoretical foundation. To determine how initial status and change in motivation and achievement related to course accomplishments…

  16. NREL PV Module Reliability and Performance R&D Status and Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during Fiscal Year (FY)2004 of the Photovoltaic (PV) Module Reliability and Performance R&D Subtask, which is part of the PV Module Reliability R&D Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).

  17. Investigating Essential Factors on Students' Perceived Accomplishment and Enjoyment and Intention to Learn in Web Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yulei; Dang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Web development is an important component in the curriculum of computer science and information systems areas. However, it is generally considered difficult to learn among students. In this study,we examined factors that could influence students' perceptions of accomplishment and enjoyment and their intention to learn in the web development…

  18. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1988 and accomplishments for FY 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Kay S.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are the Objectives, FY 1988 Plans, Approach, and FY 1988 Milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division (Langley Research Center) research programs. FY 1987 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  19. Activities and Accomplishments in Various Domains: Relationships with Creative Personality and Creative Motivation in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined relationships between five personal traits and adolescents' creative activities and accomplishments in five domains--music, visual arts, creative writing, science, and technology. Participants were 439 tenth graders (220 males and 219 females) in China. The relationships were examined using confirmatory factor analysis.…

  20. Service Efforts and Accomplishments (SEA) Reporting: A Challenge for School Financial Reporting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) research concerning the identification of indicators of service efforts and service accomplishments. The GASB has proposed that financial reports should not only be useful in assessing accountability, but they should also assist in making economic, social, and political decisions. (six…

  1. ERIC Annual Report, 2002: Summarizing the Recent Accomplishments of the Educational Resources Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smarte, Lynn; Starcher, Heather

    This ERIC Annual Report presents both accomplishments and historical perspectives, as 2001 marks 35 years of ERIC service in delivering educational research and information to the public. This annual report describes the developments in the database of educational literature, the growing variety of ERIC Web-based products and user services, and…

  2. 41 CFR 102-3.80 - How are minor charter amendments accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are minor charter amendments accomplished? 102-3.80 Section 102-3.80 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 3-FEDERAL ADVISORY...

  3. 41 CFR 102-3.85 - How are major charter amendments accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are major charter amendments accomplished? 102-3.85 Section 102-3.85 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 3-FEDERAL ADVISORY...

  4. Accomplishing the Visions for Teacher Education Programs Advocated in the "National Science Education Standards"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akcay, Hakan; Yager, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the advantages of an approach to instruction using current problems and issues as curriculum organizers and illustrating how teaching must change to accomplish real learning. The study sample consisted of 41 preservice science teachers (13 males and 28 females) in a model science teacher education…

  5. Technical summary of accomplishments made in preparation for the USSR barley exploratory experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. M.; Dailey, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    The highlights of the work accomplished under each subcomponent of the U.S.S.R. Barley Pilot Experiment, which is scheduled for completion in 1984, are summarized. A significant amount of developmental system implementation activity was in the final stages of preparation prior to the rescoping of project tasks. Unpublished materials which are significant to this exploratory experiment are incorporated into the appendixes.

  6. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1982 and plans for FY 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Accomplishments of the past year and plans for the coming year are highlighted as they relate to five year plans and the objectives of the following technical areas: aerothermal loads; multidisciplinary analysis and optimization; unsteady aerodynamics; and configuration aeroelasticity. Areas of interest include thermal protection system concepts, active control, nonlinear aeroelastic analysis, aircraft aeroelasticity, and rotorcraft aeroelasticity and vibrations.

  7. Definition and Measurement in the Affective Domain: Appreciation of Human Accomplishments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Paul B.; Beers, Joan S.

    The first three levels of the taxonomy in the affective domain guided the development of two inventories--the Pennsylvania Inventory of Cultural Appreciations (PICA) for 11th graders and Things People Do (TPD) for 5th graders--to measure appreciation of human accomplishments in seven areas: politics, sciences, sports, literature, visual arts,…

  8. The Accomplishments of Disabled Women's Advocacy Organizations and Their Future in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyung Mee

    2010-01-01

    Since the late 1990s disabled women's advocacy organizations have fought against oppression and have made great strides in Korea. This paper aims to describe the accomplishments, challenges and future directions of disabled women's advocacy organizations in Korea. A qualitative design was employed to explore disabled women's perspectives.…

  9. Assembling the "Accomplished" Teacher: The Performativity and Politics of Professional Teaching Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Set within the socio-political context of standards-based education reform, this article explores the constitutive role of teaching standards in the production of the practice and identity of the "accomplished" teacher. It contrasts two idioms for thinking about and studying these standards, the representational and the performative. Utilising the…

  10. Diversity and similarity of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of comets from an early stage where they were all similar, to the later diversity is reviewed. The elemental abundances of all pristine comets are likely to be primitive, that is in solar abundance ratios for all elements including C, N, O, S, but with the exception of H (and assumedly He and Ne) that are severely depleted. The solid phase was originally in very fine grains, typically 0.1 micron or less, eventually sintered into larger grain clusters. The volatile phase contains H, C, N, O, and S molecules frozen in the pores of the grain clusters; cosmic ray plus solar irradiation changes the volatile to refractory ratio of the crust. Differences in dust tails, in plasma tails, in photometry between young and old comets, and in the variable carbon depletion of the gas phase seem to be induced by the decay processes.

  11. Three-dimensional object recognition using similar triangles and decision trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    A system, TRIDEC, that is capable of distinguishing between a set of objects despite changes in the objects' positions in the input field, their size, or their rotational orientation in 3D space is described. TRIDEC combines very simple yet effective features with the classification capabilities of inductive decision tree methods. The feature vector is a list of all similar triangles defined by connecting all combinations of three pixels in a coarse coded 127 x 127 pixel input field. The classification is accomplished by building a decision tree using the information provided from a limited number of translated, scaled, and rotated samples. Simulation results are presented which show that TRIDEC achieves 94 percent recognition accuracy in the 2D invariant object recognition domain and 98 percent recognition accuracy in the 3D invariant object recognition domain after training on only a small sample of transformed views of the objects.

  12. Classification of wheat: Badhwar profile similarity technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Badwar profile similarity classification technique used successfully for classification of corn was applied to spring wheat classifications. The software programs and the procedures used to generate full-scene classifications are presented, and numerical results of the acreage estimations are given.

  13. Coupled attribute similarity learning on categorical data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Can; Dong, Xiangjun; Zhou, Fei; Cao, Longbing; Chi, Chi-Hung

    2015-04-01

    Attribute independence has been taken as a major assumption in the limited research that has been conducted on similarity analysis for categorical data, especially unsupervised learning. However, in real-world data sources, attributes are more or less associated with each other in terms of certain coupling relationships. Accordingly, recent works on attribute dependency aggregation have introduced the co-occurrence of attribute values to explore attribute coupling, but they only present a local picture in analyzing categorical data similarity. This is inadequate for deep analysis, and the computational complexity grows exponentially when the data scale increases. This paper proposes an efficient data-driven similarity learning approach that generates a coupled attribute similarity measure for nominal objects with attribute couplings to capture a global picture of attribute similarity. It involves the frequency-based intra-coupled similarity within an attribute and the inter-coupled similarity upon value co-occurrences between attributes, as well as their integration on the object level. In particular, four measures are designed for the inter-coupled similarity to calculate the similarity between two categorical values by considering their relationships with other attributes in terms of power set, universal set, joint set, and intersection set. The theoretical analysis reveals the equivalent accuracy and superior efficiency of the measure based on the intersection set, particularly for large-scale data sets. Intensive experiments of data structure and clustering algorithms incorporating the coupled dissimilarity metric achieve a significant performance improvement on state-of-the-art measures and algorithms on 13 UCI data sets, which is confirmed by the statistical analysis. The experiment results show that the proposed coupled attribute similarity is generic, and can effectively and efficiently capture the intrinsic and global interactions within and between

  14. Utilization Of Spatial Self-Similarity In Medical Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklinski, Walter S.

    1987-01-01

    Many current medical image processing algorithms utilize Fourier Transform techniques that represent images as sums of translationally invariant complex exponential basis functions. Selective removal or enhancement of these translationally invariant components can be used to effect a number of image processing operations such as edge enhancement or noise attenuation. An important characteristic of many natural phenomena, including the structures of interest in medical imaging is spatial self-similarity. In this work a filtering technique that represents images as sums of scale invariant self-similar basis functions will be presented. The decomposition of a signal or image into scale invariant components can be accomplished using the Mellin Transform, which diagonalizes changes of scale in a manner analogous to the way the Fourier Transform diagonalizes translation.

  15. Similarity in seismogeodynamics on different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhich, V. V.; Psakhie, S. G.; Levina, E. A.; Dimaki, A. V.; Astafurov, S. V.; Shilko, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    Long-term research in the preparation of earthquakes of different energies with M = 3.5-7.9 within the Baikal rift zones shows that they are similar to each other and to microquakes with E = 1-103 J initiated on tectonic fault fragments in natural experiments. Moreover, detailed studies of slickensides of dimensions 1-103 m2 in tectonic faults also demonstrate their physicomechanical similarity to each other and to nano- and microscale contact patches of different materials in laboratory experiments. The research results confirm the conclusion that there exists a similarity in the laws of contact interaction of different solids, including their stick-to-dynamic slip transition, from nanoscopic to geodynamic scales.

  16. Percolation in Self-Similar Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; Krioukov, Dmitri; Boguñá, Marián

    2011-01-01

    We provide a simple proof that graphs in a general class of self-similar networks have zero percolation threshold. The considered self-similar networks include random scale-free graphs with given expected node degrees and zero clustering, scale-free graphs with finite clustering and metric structure, growing scale-free networks, and many real networks. The proof and the derivation of the giant component size do not require the assumption that networks are treelike. Our results rely only on the observation that self-similar networks possess a hierarchy of nested subgraphs whose average degree grows with their depth in the hierarchy. We conjecture that this property is pivotal for percolation in networks.

  17. Self-Similar Compressible Free Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonEllenrieder, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lie group methods are used to find both exact and numerical similarity solutions for compressible perturbations to all incompressible, two-dimensional, axisymmetric vortex reference flow. The reference flow vorticity satisfies an eigenvalue problem for which the solutions are a set of two-dimensional, self-similar, incompressible vortices. These solutions are augmented by deriving a conserved quantity for each eigenvalue, and identifying a Lie group which leaves the reference flow equations invariant. The partial differential equations governing the compressible perturbations to these reference flows are also invariant under the action of the same group. The similarity variables found with this group are used to determine the decay rates of the velocities and thermodynamic variables in the self-similar flows, and to reduce the governing partial differential equations to a set of ordinary differential equations. The ODE's are solved analytically and numerically for a Taylor vortex reference flow, and numerically for an Oseen vortex reference flow. The solutions are used to examine the dependencies of the temperature, density, entropy, dissipation and radial velocity on the Prandtl number. Also, experimental data on compressible free vortex flow are compared to the analytical results, the evolution of vortices from initial states which are not self-similar is discussed, and the energy transfer in a slightly-compressible vortex is considered.

  18. Predicting missing links via structural similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Guo-Dong; Fan, Chang-Jun; Yu, Lian-Fei; Xiu, Bao-Xin; Zhang, Wei-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Predicting missing links in networks plays a significant role in modern science. On the basis of structural similarity, our paper proposes a new node-similarity-based measure called biased resource allocation (BRA), which is motivated by the resource allocation (RA) measure. Comparisons between BRA and nine well-known node-similarity-based measures on five real networks indicate that BRA performs no worse than RA, which was the best node-similarity-based index in previous researches. Afterwards, based on localPath (LP) and Katz measure, we propose another two improved measures, named Im-LocalPath and Im-Katz respectively. Numerical results show that the prediction accuracy of both Im-LP and Im-Katz measure improve compared with the original LP and Katz measure. Finally, a new path-similarity-based measure and its improved measure, called LYU and Im-LYU measure, are proposed and especially, Im-LYU measure is shown to perform more remarkably than other mentioned measures.

  19. Image fusion using bi-directional similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chunshan; Luo, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Infrared images are widely used in the practical applications to capture abundant information. However, it is still challenging to enhance the infrared image by the visual image. In this paper, we propose an effective method using bidirectional similarity. In the proposed method, we aim to find an optimal solution from many feasible solutions without introducing intermediate image. We employ some priori constraints to meet the requirements of image fusion which can be detailed to preserve both good characteristics in the infrared image and spatial information in the visual image. In the iterative step, we use the matrix with the square of the difference between images to integrate the image holding most information. We call this matrix the bidirectional similarity distance. By the bidirectional similarity distance, we can get the transitive images. Then, we fuse the images according to the weight. Experimental results show that, compared to the traditional image fusion algorithm, fusion images from bidirectional similarity fusion algorithm have greatly improved in the subjective vision, entropy, structural similarity index measurement. We believe that the proposed scheme can have a wide applications.

  20. Naturally fractured reservoirs: Optimized E and P strategies using a reaction-transport-mechanical simulator in an integrated approach. Summary of project accomplishments; Final report, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Sundberg, K.R.; Hoak, T.E.

    1998-12-01

    Major accomplishments of this project occurred in three primary categories: (1) fractured reservoir location and characteristics prediction for exploration and production planning; (2) implications of geologic data analysis and synthesis for exploration and development programs; and (3) fractured reservoir production modeling. The results in each category will be discussed in turn. Seven detailed reports have been processed separately.

  1. Accomplishments in 2008 in the Management of Curable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adam, René; Hoti, Emir; Folprecht, Gunnar; Benson, Al B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Overview of the Disease IncidencePrognosisCurrent Therapy Standards Colorectal Liver Metastases (CRLM) Resectable TumorsStrategies to Convert Nonresectable Liver Metastases to Resectable StatusSynchronous Colorectal Liver MetastasesPredictors of Survival After Resection of CRLMPeritoneal Carcinomatosis (PC) From Colorectal CancerColorectal Pulmonary Metastases (CRPM)Colorectal Liver Metastases With Extrahepatic DiseaseAccomplishments (or Lack of Accomplishments) During the Year Therapy New Staging SystemSystemic Chemotherapy in Resectable Liver MetastasesSystemic Chemotherapy in Nonresectable Liver MetastasesSelective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT)Selection of Patients for Liver ResectionRadiofrequency AblationBiomarkersWhat Needs To Be Done? Optimizing Patient CareFuture Directions Comments on ResearchObstacles to Overcome PMID:20011559

  2. Dynamics of self-regulation: How (un)accomplished goal actions affect motivation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Minjung; Fishbach, Ayelet

    2008-02-01

    Two factors increase the motivation to adhere to a goal: goal commitment and lack of goal progress. When people ask about commitment, focusing on what they have accomplished (to date) signals to them high commitment and increases motivation. Conversely, when commitment is certain and people ask about goal progress, focusing on what they have yet to accomplish (to go) signals to them lack of progress and increases motivation. Accordingly, 4 studies show that emphasizing to-date information increases goal adherence when commitment is uncertain--that is, when participants study for a relatively unimportant exam, consume luxuries, fulfill a desire, and make first-time contributions to a charity. Conversely, emphasizing to-go information increases goal adherence when commitment is certain--that is, when participants study for an important exam, consume necessities, fulfill a need, and make repeated contributions to a charity. PMID:18211171

  3. Quantifying the similarities within fold space.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Andrew; Pearl, Frances; Mott, Richard; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2002-11-01

    We have used GRATH, a graph-based structure comparison algorithm, to map the similarities between the different folds observed in the CATH domain structure database. Statistical analysis of the distributions of the fold similarities has allowed us to assess the significance for any similarity. Therefore we have examined whether it is best to represent folds as discrete entities or whether, in fact, a more accurate model would be a continuum wherein folds overlap via common motifs. To do this we have introduced a new statistical measure of fold similarity, termed gregariousness. For a particular fold, gregariousness measures how many other folds have a significant structural overlap with that fold, typically comprising 40% or more of the larger structure. Gregarious folds often contain commonly occurring super-secondary structural motifs, such as beta-meanders, greek keys, alpha-beta plait motifs or alpha-hairpins, which are matching similar motifs in other folds. Apart from one example, all the most gregarious folds matching 20% or more of the other folds in the database, are alpha-beta proteins. They also occur in highly populated architectural regions of fold space, adopting sandwich-like arrangements containing two or more layers of alpha-helices and beta-strands.Domains that exhibit a low gregariousness, are those that have very distinctive folds, with few common motifs or motifs that are packed in unusual arrangements. Most of the superhelices exhibit low gregariousness despite containing some commonly occurring super-secondary structural motifs. In these folds, these common motifs are combined in an unusual way and represent a small proportion of the fold (<10%). Our results suggest that fold space may be considered as continuous for some architectural arrangements (e.g. alpha-beta sandwiches), in that super-secondary motifs can be used to link neighbouring fold groups. However, in other regions of fold space much more discrete topologies are observed with

  4. Measuring community similarity with phylogenetic networks.

    PubMed

    Parks, Donovan H; Beiko, Robert G

    2012-12-01

    Environmental drivers of biodiversity can be identified by relating patterns of community similarity to ecological factors. Community variation has traditionally been assessed by considering changes in species composition and more recently by incorporating phylogenetic information to account for the relative similarity of taxa. Here, we describe how an important class of measures including Bray-Curtis, Canberra, and UniFrac can be extended to allow community variation to be computed on a phylogenetic network. We focus on phylogenetic split systems, networks that are produced by the widely used median network and neighbor-net methods, which can represent incongruence in the evolutionary history of a set of taxa. Calculating β diversity over a split system provides a measure of community similarity averaged over uncertainty or conflict in the available phylogenetic signal. Our freely available software, Network Diversity, provides 11 qualitative (presence-absence, unweighted) and 14 quantitative (weighted) network-based measures of community similarity that model different aspects of community richness and evenness. We demonstrate the broad applicability of network-based diversity approaches by applying them to three distinct data sets: pneumococcal isolates from distinct geographic regions, human mitochondrial DNA data from the Indonesian island of Nias, and proteorhodopsin sequences from the Sargasso and Mediterranean Seas. Our results show that major expected patterns of variation for these data sets are recovered using network-based measures, which indicates that these patterns are robust to phylogenetic uncertainty and conflict. Nonetheless, network-based measures of community similarity can differ substantially from measures ignoring phylogenetic relationships or from tree-based measures when incongruent signals are present in the underlying data. Network-based measures provide a methodology for assessing the robustness of β-diversity results in light of

  5. Similarity theory of lubricated Hertzian contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeijer, J. H.; Eggers, J.; Venner, C. H.

    2013-10-01

    We consider a heavily loaded, lubricated contact between two elastic bodies at relative speed U, such that there is substantial elastic deformation. As a result of the interplay between hydrodynamics and non-local elasticity, a fluid film develops between the two solids, whose thickness scales as U3/5. The film profile h is selected by a universal similarity solution along the upstream inlet. Another similarity solution is valid at the outlet, which exhibits a local minimum in the film thickness. The two solutions are connected by a hyperbolic problem underneath the contact. Our asymptotic results for a soft sphere pressed against a hard wall are shown to agree with both experiment and numerical simulations.

  6. Comparison of Two ``Document Similarity Search Engines''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinçot, Phillipe; Lesteven, Soizick; Murtagh, Fionn

    We have developed and used the ``CDS document map'' based on neural networks (Kohonen maps) http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/A+A/map.pl In this self-organizing map, documents are gradually clustered by subject themes. The tool is based on keywords associated with the documents. For one selected document, we locate it on the CDS document map and retrieve articles clustered in the same area. The second search engine, used by the ADS (NASA Astrophysics Data System http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr http://adswww.harvard.edu http://ads.nao.ac.jp, has the capability to find all similar abstracts in the ADS database, with ``keyword request''. We have compared the results of the document similarity search engines, using the same set of documents. One example will be described and results will be discussed.

  7. Fuzzy similarity measures for ultrasound tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emara, Salem M.; Badawi, Ahmed M.; Youssef, Abou-Bakr M.

    1995-03-01

    Computerized ultrasound tissue characterization has become an objective means for diagnosis of diseases. It is difficult to differentiate diffuse liver diseases, namely cirrhotic and fatty liver from a normal one, by visual inspection from the ultrasound images. The visual criteria for differentiating diffused diseases is rather confusing and highly dependent upon the sonographer's experience. The need for computerized tissue characterization is thus justified to quantitatively assist the sonographer for accurate differentiation and to minimize the degree of risk from erroneous interpretation. In this paper we used the fuzzy similarity measure as an approximate reasoning technique to find the maximum degree of matching between an unknown case defined by a feature vector and a family of prototypes (knowledge base). The feature vector used for the matching process contains 8 quantitative parameters (textural, acoustical, and speckle parameters) extracted from the ultrasound image. The steps done to match an unknown case with the family of prototypes (cirr, fatty, normal) are: Choosing the membership functions for each parameter, then obtaining the fuzzification matrix for the unknown case and the family of prototypes, then by the linguistic evaluation of two fuzzy quantities we obtain the similarity matrix, then by a simple aggregation method and the fuzzy integrals we obtain the degree of similarity. Finally, we find that the similarity measure results are comparable to the neural network classification techniques and it can be used in medical diagnosis to determine the pathology of the liver and to monitor the extent of the disease.

  8. Finding Protein and Nucleotide Similarities with FASTA.

    PubMed

    Pearson, William R

    2016-01-01

    The FASTA programs provide a comprehensive set of rapid similarity searching tools (fasta36, fastx36, tfastx36, fasty36, tfasty36), similar to those provided by the BLAST package, as well as programs for slower, optimal, local, and global similarity searches (ssearch36, ggsearch36), and for searching with short peptides and oligonucleotides (fasts36, fastm36). The FASTA programs use an empirical strategy for estimating statistical significance that accommodates a range of similarity scoring matrices and gap penalties, improving alignment boundary accuracy and search sensitivity. The FASTA programs can produce "BLAST-like" alignment and tabular output, for ease of integration into existing analysis pipelines, and can search small, representative databases, and then report results for a larger set of sequences, using links from the smaller dataset. The FASTA programs work with a wide variety of database formats, including mySQL and postgreSQL databases. The programs also provide a strategy for integrating domain and active site annotations into alignments and highlighting the mutational state of functionally critical residues. These protocols describe how to use the FASTA programs to characterize protein and DNA sequences, using protein:protein, protein:DNA, and DNA:DNA comparisons. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27010337

  9. Measuring structural similarity in large online networks.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yongren; Macy, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Structural similarity based on bipartite graphs can be used to detect meaningful communities, but the networks have been tiny compared to massive online networks. Scalability is important in applications involving tens of millions of individuals with highly skewed degree distributions. Simulation analysis holding underlying similarity constant shows that two widely used measures - Jaccard index and cosine similarity - are biased by the distribution of out-degree in web-scale networks. However, an alternative measure, the Standardized Co-incident Ratio (SCR), is unbiased. We apply SCR to members of Congress, musical artists, and professional sports teams to show how massive co-following on Twitter can be used to map meaningful affiliations among cultural entities, even in the absence of direct connections to one another. Our results show how structural similarity can be used to map cultural alignments and demonstrate the potential usefulness of social media data in the study of culture, politics, and organizations across the social and behavioral sciences. PMID:27480374

  10. Explosion Source Similarity Analysis via SVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, Matthew; Ben Horin, Yochai; Margrave, Gary

    2016-04-01

    An important seismological ingredient for establishing a regional seismic nuclear discriminant is the similarity analysis of a sequence of explosion sources. To investigate source similarity, we are fortunate to have access to a sequence of 1805 three-component recordings of quarry blasts, shot from March 2002 to January 2015. The centroid of these blasts has an estimated location 36.3E and 29.9N. All blasts were detonated by JPMC (Jordan Phosphate Mines Co.) All data were recorded at the Israeli NDC, HFRI, located at 30.03N and 35.03E. Data were first winnowed based on the distribution of maximum amplitudes in the neighborhood of the P-wave arrival. The winnowed data were then detrended using the algorithm of Cleveland et al (1990). The detrended data were bandpass filtered between .1 to 12 Hz using an eighth order Butterworth filter. Finally, data were sorted based on maximum trace amplitude. Two similarity analysis approaches were used. First, for each component, the entire suite of traces was decomposed into its eigenvector representation, by employing singular-valued decomposition (SVD). The data were then reconstructed using 10 percent of the singular values, with the resulting enhancement of the S-wave and surface wave arrivals. The results of this first method are then compared to the second analysis method based on the eigenface decomposition analysis of Turk and Pentland (1991). While both methods yield similar results in enhancement of data arrivals and reduction of data redundancy, more analysis is required to calibrate the recorded data to charge size, a quantity that was not available for the current study. References Cleveland, R. B., Cleveland, W. S., McRae, J. E., and Terpenning, I., Stl: A seasonal-trend decomposition procedure based on loess, Journal of Official Statistics, 6, No. 1, 3-73, 1990. Turk, M. and Pentland, A., Eigenfaces for recognition. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 3(1), 71-86, 1991.

  11. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development Phase 2 (AMTD-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  12. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  13. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  14. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) Development Activities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center - 2006 Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005-06, the Prometheus program funded a number of tasks at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to support development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system for future manned exploration missions. These tasks include the following: 1. NTP Design Develop Test & Evaluate (DDT&E) Planning 2. NTP Mission & Systems Analysis / Stage Concepts & Engine Requirements 3. NTP Engine System Trade Space Analysis and Studies 4. NTP Engine Ground Test Facility Assessment 5. Non-Nuclear Environmental Simulator (NTREES) 6. Non-Nuclear Materials Fabrication & Evaluation 7. Multi-Physics TCA Modeling. This presentation is a overview of these tasks and their accomplishments

  15. Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

    2012-10-01

    The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

  16. Learning based saliency weighted structural similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoliang; Liu, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Image quality assessment (IQA) is a critical issue in image processing applications, but commonly used criterions for image quality assessment do not map well with perceived quality. The recently proposed structural similarity (SSIM) is regarded as an excellent work in image quality assessment criterions, but it only consider local information and ignore some important global concepts. Based on the SSIM image quality assessment criterion and the detection of visual saliency in image, this paper proposes a learning based saliency weighted structural similarity IQA criterion. The algorithm combines the SSIM index and saliency map in a machine learning framework to learn a mapping from these features to perceived image quality. Experiments on a standard image quality assessment database show that our algorithm performs better than commonly used criterions, and our algorithm captures results which correlate well with subjective judgments of image quality.

  17. Dependency Similarity, Attraction and Perceived Happiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Janak

    1978-01-01

    Subjects were asked to evaluate either a similar personality or a dissimilar personality. Subjects rated similar others more positively than dissimilar others and, additionally, perceived similar others as more helpful and sympathetic than dissimilar others. (Author)

  18. Transcription of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Genes Is Accomplished by RNA Polymerase Holoenzyme Containing either Sigma 32 or Sigma 70

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huitao; Von Ohlen, Tonia; Cheng, Chuanmin; Faburay, Bonto; Ganta, Roman R.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial gene transcription is initiated by RNA polymerase containing a sigma factor. To understand gene regulation in Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an important tick-transmitted rickettsiae responsible for human monocytic ehrlichiosis, we initiated studies evaluating the transcriptional machinery of several genes of this organism. We mapped the transcription start sites of 10 genes and evaluated promoters of five genes (groE, dnaK, hup, p28-Omp14 and p28-Omp19 genes). We report here that the RNA polymerase binding elements of E. chaffeensis gene promoters are highly homologous for its only two transcription regulators, sigma 32 and sigma 70, and that gene expression is accomplished by either of the transcription regulators. RNA analysis revealed that although transcripts for both sigma 32 and sigma 70 are upregulated during the early replicative stage, their expression patterns remained similar for the entire replication cycle. We further present evidence demonstrating that the organism’s -35 motifs are essential to transcription initiations. The data suggest that E. chaffeensis gene regulation has evolved to support the organism’s growth, possibly to facilitate its intraphagosomal growth. Considering the limited availability of genetic tools, this study offers a novel alternative in defining gene regulation in E. chaffeensis and other related intracellular pathogens. PMID:24278458

  19. Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Recycle FY2015 Accomplishments and Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A.

    2015-09-30

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Recycle (STAAR) has made notable progress in FY 2015 toward the overarching goal to develop more efficient separation methods for actinides in support of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) objective of sustainable fuel cycles. Research in STAAR has been emphasizing the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MAs) to enable closed nuclear fuel recycle options mainly within the paradigm of aqueous reprocessing of used oxide nuclear fuel dissolved in nitric acid. Its major scientific challenge concerns achieving selectivity for trivalent actinides vs lanthanides. Not only is this challenge yielding to research advances, but technology concepts such as ALSEP (Actinide Lanthanide Separation) are maturing toward demonstration readiness. Efforts are organized in five task areas: 1) combining bifunctional neutral extractants with an acidic extractant to form a single process solvent, developing a process flowsheet, and demonstrating it at bench scale; 2) oxidation of Am(III) to Am(VI) and subsequent separation with other multivalent actinides; 3) developing an effective soft-donor solvent system for An(III) selective extraction using mixed N,O-donor or all-N donor extractants such as triazinyl pyridine compounds; 4) testing of inorganic and hybrid-type ion exchange materials for MA separations; and 5) computer-aided molecular design to identify altogether new extractants and complexants and theory-based experimental data interpretation. Within these tasks, two strategies are employed, one involving oxidation of americium to its pentavalent or hexavalent state and one that seeks to selectively complex trivalent americium either in the aqueous phase or the solvent phase. Solvent extraction represents the primary separation method employed, though ion exchange and crystallization play an important role. Highlights of accomplishments include: Confirmation of the first-ever electrolytic oxidation of Am(III) in a

  20. Overview and Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development Phase 2 (AMTD-2) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD Phase 1 completed all of its goals and accomplished all of its milestones. AMTD Phase 2 started in 2014. Key accomplishments include deriving primary mirror engineering specifications from science requirements; developing integrated modeling tools and using those tools to perform parametric design trades; and demonstrating new mirror technologies via sub-scale fabrication and test. AMTD-1 demonstrated the stacked core technique by making a 43-cm diameter 400 mm thick 'biscuit-cut' of a 4-m class mirror. AMTD-2 is demonstrating lateral scalability of the stacked core method by making a 1.5 meter 1/3rd scale model of a 4-m class mirror.

  1. Overview and accomplishments of advanced mirror technology development phase 2 (AMTD-2) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-09-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD Phase 1 completed all of its goals and accomplished all of its milestones. AMTD Phase 2 started in 2014. Key accomplishments include deriving primary mirror engineering specifications from science requirements; developing integrated modeling tools and using those tools to perform parametric design trades; and demonstrating new mirror technologies via sub-scale fabrication and test. AMTD-1 demonstrated the stacked core technique by making a 43-cm diameter 400 mm thick `biscuit-cut' of a 4-m class mirror. AMTD-2 is demonstrating lateral scalability of the stacked core method by making a 1.5 meter 1/3rd scale model of a 4-m class mirror

  2. Life paths and accomplishments of mathematically precocious males and females four decades later.

    PubMed

    Lubinski, David; Benbow, Camilla P; Kell, Harrison J

    2014-12-01

    Two cohorts of intellectually talented 13-year-olds were identified in the 1970s (1972-1974 and 1976-1978) as being in the top 1% of mathematical reasoning ability (1,037 males, 613 females). About four decades later, data on their careers, accomplishments, psychological well-being, families, and life preferences and priorities were collected. Their accomplishments far exceeded base-rate expectations: Across the two cohorts, 4.1% had earned tenure at a major research university, 2.3% were top executives at "name brand" or Fortune 500 companies, and 2.4% were attorneys at major firms or organizations; participants had published 85 books and 7,572 refereed articles, secured 681 patents, and amassed $358 million in grants. For both males and females, mathematical precocity early in life predicts later creative contributions and leadership in critical occupational roles. On average, males had incomes much greater than their spouses', whereas females had incomes slightly lower than their spouses'. Salient sex differences that paralleled the differential career outcomes of the male and female participants were found in lifestyle preferences and priorities and in time allocation. PMID:25384550

  3. Simpler images, better results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  4. Research on similarity measurement for texture image retrieval.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhengli; Zhao, Chunxia; Hou, Yingkun

    2012-01-01

    A complete texture image retrieval system includes two techniques: texture feature extraction and similarity measurement. Specifically, similarity measurement is a key problem for texture image retrieval study. In this paper, we present an effective similarity measurement formula. The MIT vision texture database, the Brodatz texture database, and the Outex texture database were used to verify the retrieval performance of the proposed similarity measurement method. Dual-tree complex wavelet transform and nonsubsampled contourlet transform were used to extract texture features. Experimental results show that the proposed similarity measurement method achieves better retrieval performance than some existing similarity measurement methods. PMID:23049785

  5. Hierarchical similarity transformations between Gaussian mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rigas, George; Nikou, Christophoros; Goletsis, Yorgos; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to estimate the density of a data space represented by a geometric transformation of an initial Gaussian mixture model. The geometric transformation is hierarchical, and it is decomposed into two steps. At first, the initial model is assumed to undergo a global similarity transformation modeled by translation, rotation, and scaling of the model components. Then, to increase the degrees of freedom of the model and allow it to capture fine data structures, each individual mixture component may be transformed by another, local similarity transformation, whose parameters are distinct for each component of the mixture. In addition, to constrain the order of magnitude of the local transformation (LT) with respect to the global transformation (GT), zero-mean Gaussian priors are imposed onto the local parameters. The estimation of both GT and LT parameters is obtained through the expectation maximization framework. Experiments on artificial data are conducted to evaluate the proposed model, with varying data dimensionality, number of model components, and transformation parameters. In addition, the method is evaluated using real data from a speech recognition task. The obtained results show a high model accuracy and demonstrate the potential application of the proposed method to similar classification problems. PMID:24808615

  6. Similarities between decapod and insect neuropeptidomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropeptides are important regulators of physiological processes and behavior. Although they tend to be generally well conserved, recent results using trancriptome sequencing on decapod crustaceans give the impression of significant differences between species, raising the question whether such differences are real or artefacts. Methods. The BLAST+ program was used to find short reads coding neuropeptides and neurohormons in publicly available short read archives. Such reads were then used to find similar reads in the same archives, and the DNA assembly program Trinity was employed to construct contigs encoding the neuropeptide precursors as completely as possible. Results. The seven decapod species analyzed in this fashion, the crabs Eriocheir sinensis, Carcinus maenas and Scylla paramamosain, the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, the lobster Homarus americanus, the fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and the crayfish Procambarus clarkii had remarkably similar neuropeptidomes. Although some neuropeptide precursors could not be assembled, in many cases individual reads pertaining to the missing precursors show unambiguously that these neuropeptides are present in these species. In other cases, the tissues that express those neuropeptides were not used in the construction of the cDNA libraries. One novel neuropeptide was identified: elongated PDH (pigment dispersing hormone), a variation on PDH that has a two-amino-acid insertion in its core sequence. Hyrg is another peptide that is ubiquitously present in decapods and is likely a novel neuropeptide precursor. Discussion. Many insect species have lost one or more neuropeptide genes, but apart from elongated PDH and hyrg all other decapod neuropeptides are present in at least some insect species, and allatotropin is the only insect neuropeptide missing from decapods. This strong similarity between insect and decapod neuropeptidomes makes it possible to predict the receptors for decapod neuropeptides

  7. Similarities between decapod and insect neuropeptidomes.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropeptides are important regulators of physiological processes and behavior. Although they tend to be generally well conserved, recent results using trancriptome sequencing on decapod crustaceans give the impression of significant differences between species, raising the question whether such differences are real or artefacts. Methods. The BLAST+ program was used to find short reads coding neuropeptides and neurohormons in publicly available short read archives. Such reads were then used to find similar reads in the same archives, and the DNA assembly program Trinity was employed to construct contigs encoding the neuropeptide precursors as completely as possible. Results. The seven decapod species analyzed in this fashion, the crabs Eriocheir sinensis, Carcinus maenas and Scylla paramamosain, the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, the lobster Homarus americanus, the fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and the crayfish Procambarus clarkii had remarkably similar neuropeptidomes. Although some neuropeptide precursors could not be assembled, in many cases individual reads pertaining to the missing precursors show unambiguously that these neuropeptides are present in these species. In other cases, the tissues that express those neuropeptides were not used in the construction of the cDNA libraries. One novel neuropeptide was identified: elongated PDH (pigment dispersing hormone), a variation on PDH that has a two-amino-acid insertion in its core sequence. Hyrg is another peptide that is ubiquitously present in decapods and is likely a novel neuropeptide precursor. Discussion. Many insect species have lost one or more neuropeptide genes, but apart from elongated PDH and hyrg all other decapod neuropeptides are present in at least some insect species, and allatotropin is the only insect neuropeptide missing from decapods. This strong similarity between insect and decapod neuropeptidomes makes it possible to predict the receptors for decapod neuropeptides

  8. Recent Accomplishments and Future Directions in US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Petti; Brad J. Merrill; Phillip Sharpe; L. C. Cadwallader; L. El-Guebaly; S. Reyes

    2006-07-01

    The US fusion program has long recognized that the safety and environmental (S&E) potential of fusion can be attained by prudent materials selection, judicious design choices, and integration of safety requirements into the design of the facility. To achieve this goal, S&E research is focused on understanding the behavior of the largest sources of radioactive and hazardous materials in a fusion facility, understanding how energy sources in a fusion facility could mobilize those materials, developing integrated state of the art S&E computer codes and risk tools for safety assessment, and evaluating S&E issues associated with current fusion designs. In this paper, recent accomplishments are reviewed and future directions outlined.

  9. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Project: Overview and Year 4 Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort initiated in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, to mature toward the next Technology Readiness Level (TRL) critical technologies required to enable 4-m-or-larger monolithic or segmented ultraviolet, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) space telescope primary-mirror assemblies for general astrophysics and ultra-high-contrast observations of exoplanets. Key hardware accomplishments of 2015/16 are the successful low-temperature fusion of a 1.5-meter diameter ULE mirror that is a 1/3rd scale model of a 4-meter mirror and the initiation of polishing of a 1.2-meter Extreme-Lightweight Zerodur mirror. Critical to AMTD's success is an integrated team of scientists, systems engineers, and technologists; and a science-driven systems engineering approach.

  10. NASA/Army Rotorcraft Transmission Research, a Review of Recent Significant Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    1994-01-01

    A joint helicopter transmission research program between NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Research Lab has existed since 1970. Research goals are to reduce weight and noise while increasing life, reliability, and safety. These research goals are achieved by the NASA/Army Mechanical Systems Technology Branch through both in-house research and cooperative research projects with university and industry partners. Some recent significant technical accomplishments produced by this cooperative research are reviewed. The following research projects are reviewed: oil-off survivability of tapered roller bearings, design and evaluation of high contact ratio gearing, finite element analysis of spiral bevel gears, computer numerical control grinding of spiral bevel gears, gear dynamics code validation, computer program for life and reliability of helicopter transmissions, planetary gear train efficiency study, and the Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program.

  11. Status of selected ion flow tube MS: accomplishments and challenges in breath analysis and other areas.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2016-06-01

    This article reflects our observations of recent accomplishments made using selected ion flow tube MS (SIFT-MS). Only brief descriptions are given of SIFT-MS as an analytical method and of the recent extensions to the underpinning analytical ion chemistry required to realize more robust analyses. The challenge of breath analysis is given special attention because, when achieved, it renders analysis of other air media relatively straightforward. Brief overviews are given of recent SIFT-MS breath analyses by leading research groups, noting the desirability of detection and quantification of single volatile biomarkers rather than reliance on statistical analyses, if breath analysis is to be accepted into clinical practice. A 'strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats' analysis of SIFT-MS is made, which should help to increase its utility for trace gas analysis. PMID:27212131

  12. Radiation Safety Training for Industrial Irradiators: What Are We Trying To Accomplish?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A.

    1998-06-01

    Radiation safety training at an industrial irradiator facility takes a different approach than the traditional methods and topics used at other facilities. Where the more routine industrial radiation users focus on standard training topics of contamination control, area surveys, and the traditional dogma of time, distance, and shielding, radiation safety in an industrial irradiation facility must be centered on preventing accidents. Because the primary methods for accomplishing that goal are engineering approaches such as safety system interlocks, training provided to facility personnel should address system operation and emergency actions. This presents challenges in delivering radiation safety to an audience of varied educational and technical background where little to no commercially available training material specific to this type of operation exists.

  13. A review of satellite time-transfer technology: Accomplishments and future applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R. S.; Chi, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    The research accomplishments by NASA in meeting the needs of the space program for precise time in satellite tracking are presented. As a major user of precise time signals for clock synchronization of NASA's worldwide satellite tracking networks, the agency provides much of the necessary impetus for the development of stable frequency sources and time synchronization technology. The precision time required for both satellite tracking and space science experiments has increased at a rate of about one order of magnitude per decade from 1 millisecond in the 1950's to 100 microseconds during the Apollo era in the 1960's to 10 microseconds in the 1970's. For the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System, satellite timing requirements will be extended to 1 microsecond and below. These requirements are needed for spacecraft autonomy and data packeting.

  14. Space Shuttle Program Primary Avionics Software System (PASS) Success Legacy -Major Accomplishments and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, James K.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation has shown the accomplishments of the PASS project over three decades and highlighted the lessons learned. Over the entire time, our goal has been to continuously improve our process, implement automation for both quality and increased productivity, and identify and remove all defects due to prior execution of a flawed process in addition to improving our processes following identification of significant process escapes. Morale and workforce instability have been issues, most significantly during 1993 to 1998 (period of consolidation in aerospace industry). The PASS project has also consulted with others, including the Software Engineering Institute, so as to be an early evaluator, adopter, and adapter of state-of-the-art software engineering innovations.

  15. Summary of in situ vitrification modeling and analysis accomplishments for fiscal year 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.E.

    1991-11-01

    The in situ vitrification (ISV) modeling activities encompass a variety of both modeling development efforts and analysis applications in support of the ISV project. The model development effort is directed toward modifying or developing a set of computer codes to simulate the ISV process. These codes are used to perform safety and environmental hazards analyses, assist in experimental test planning and design, assist in equipment design and development of operating procedures, and provide enhanced understanding of the ISV process. This report presents a summary description of the accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1991 for both the model development and analysis areas. Brief descriptions of the models that were developed and the more important conclusions from the analytical studies are presented.

  16. The Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program: Scientific and Engineering Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrez, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this project was to assist in the creation of the appendix for the book being written about the Space Shuttle that is titled The Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program: Scientific and Engineering Accomplishments. The specific responsibility of the intern was the creation of the human health and performance (life sciences) and space biology sections of the appendix. This included examining and finalizing the list of flights with life sciences and space biology experiments flown aboard them, researching the experiments performed, synopsizing each experiment into two sentences, and placing the synopses into an appendix template. Overall, approximately 70 flights had their experiments synopsized and a good method for researching and construction of the template was established this summer.

  17. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) program. Compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven {open_quotes}Vision Industries{close_quotes} that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. These are: (1) Aluminum; (2) Chemical; (3) Forest Products; (4) Glass; (5) Metal Casting; (6) Refineries; and (7) Steel. This report is a compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments on materials.

  18. Similarity Rules for Scaling Solar Sail Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen L.; Peddieson, John; Garbe, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Future science missions will require solar sails on the order of 200 square meters (or larger). However, ground demonstrations and flight demonstrations must be conducted at significantly smaller sizes, due to limitations of ground-based facilities and cost and availability of flight opportunities. For this reason, the ability to understand the process of scalability, as it applies to solar sail system models and test data, is crucial to the advancement of this technology. This paper will approach the problem of scaling in solar sail models by developing a set of scaling laws or similarity criteria that will provide constraints in the sail design process. These scaling laws establish functional relationships between design parameters of a prototype and model sail that are created at different geometric sizes. This work is applied to a specific solar sail configuration and results in three (four) similarity criteria for static (dynamic) sail models. Further, it is demonstrated that even in the context of unique sail material requirements and gravitational load of earth-bound experiments, it is possible to develop appropriate scaled sail experiments. In the longer term, these scaling laws can be used in the design of scaled experimental tests for solar sails and in analyzing the results from such tests.

  19. Affordability as a discursive accomplishment in a changing National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jill; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2012-12-01

    Health systems worldwide face the challenges of rationing. The English National Health Service (NHS) was founded on three core principles: universality, comprehensiveness, and free at the point of delivery. Yet patients are increasingly hearing that some treatments are unaffordable on the NHS. We considered affordability as a social accomplishment and sought to explore how those charged with allocating NHS resources achieved this in practice. We undertook a linguistic ethnography to examine the work practices of resource allocation committees in three Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) in England between 2005 and 2012, specifically deliberations over 'individual funding requests' (IFRs)--requests by patients and their doctors for the PCT to support a treatment not routinely funded. We collected and analysed a diverse dataset comprising policy documents, legal judgements, audio recordings, ethnographic field notes and emails from PCT committee meetings, interviews and a focus group with committee members. We found that the fundamental values of universality and comprehensiveness strongly influenced the culture of these NHS organisations, and that in this context, accomplishing affordability was not easy. Four discursive practices served to confer legitimacy on affordability as a guiding value of NHS health care: (1) categorising certain treatments as only eligible for NHS funding if patients could prove 'exceptional' circumstances; (2) representing resource allocation decisions as being not (primarily) about money; (3) indexical labelling of affordability as an ethical principle, and (4) recontextualising legal judgements supporting refusal of NHS treatment on affordability grounds as 'rational'. The overall effect of these discursive practices was that denying treatment to patients became reasonable and rational for an organisation even while it continued to espouse traditional NHS values. We conclude that deliberations about the funding of treatments at the margins of NHS

  20. International Space Station Research: Accomplishments and Pathways for Exploration and Fundamental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning with the launch of the European Columbus module planned for December 2007, we approach a transition in the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) that is of great importance for the sciences. During the following 18 months, we will operate the first experiments in Columbus physical science resource facilities and also launch and commission the Japanese Kibo module. In addition, two Multi-purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) flights will deliver the U.S. Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) and Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) along with their first science experiments. These facilities provide significant new capabilities for basic and applied physical science research in microgravity. New life support technologies will come online throughout 2008, and we will reach the milestone of a 6-person crew planned for April 2009. A larger crew enables significant more scientific use of all the facilities for the life of ISS. Planning for the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory is also maturing as we near the completion of assembly, enabling access to ISS as a research platform for other government agencies and the private sector. The latest updates on National Laboratory implementation will also be provided in this presentation. At the same time as these significant increases in scientific capability, there have been significant ongoing accomplishments in NASA's early ISS research both exploration related and fundamental research. These accomplishments will be reviewed in context as harbingers of the capabilities of the International Space Station when assembly is complete. The Vision for Space Exploration serves to focus NASA's applied investigations in the physical sciences. However, the broader capability of the space station as a National Laboratory and as a nexus for international collaboration will also influence the study of gravity-dependent processes by researchers around the world.

  1. Visual similarity effects in categorical search.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Robert G; Zelinsky, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    We asked how visual similarity relationships affect search guidance to categorically defined targets (no visual preview). Experiment 1 used a web-based task to collect visual similarity rankings between two target categories, teddy bears and butterflies, and random-category objects, from which we created search displays in Experiment 2 having either high-similarity distractors, low-similarity distractors, or "mixed" displays with high-, medium-, and low-similarity distractors. Analysis of target-absent trials revealed faster manual responses and fewer fixated distractors on low-similarity displays compared to high-similarity displays. On mixed displays, first fixations were more frequent on high-similarity distractors (bear = 49%; butterfly = 58%) than on low-similarity distractors (bear = 9%; butterfly = 12%). Experiment 3 used the same high/low/mixed conditions, but now these conditions were created using similarity estimates from a computer vision model that ranked objects in terms of color, texture, and shape similarity. The same patterns were found, suggesting that categorical search can indeed be guided by purely visual similarity. Experiment 4 compared cases where the model and human rankings differed and when they agreed. We found that similarity effects were best predicted by cases where the two sets of rankings agreed, suggesting that both human visual similarity rankings and the computer vision model captured features important for guiding search to categorical targets. PMID:21757505

  2. On the similarity of variable viscosity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voivenel, L.; Danaila, L.; Varea, E.; Renou, B.; Cazalens, M.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent mixing is ubiquitous in both nature and industrial applications. Most of them concern different fluids, therefore with variable physical properties (density and/or viscosity). The focus here is on variable viscosity flows and mixing, involving density-matched fluids. The issue is whether or not these flows may be self-similar, or self-preserving. The importance of this question stands on the predictability of these flows; self-similar dynamical systems are easier tractable from an analytical viewpoint. More specifically, self-similar analysis is applied to the scale-by-scale energy transport equations, which represent the transport of energy at each scale and each point of the flow. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are developed for inhomogeneous and anisotropic flows, in which the viscosity varies as a result of heterogeneous mixture or temperature variations. Additional terms are highlighted, accounting for the viscosity gradients, or fluctuations. These terms are present at both small and large scales, thus rectifying the common belief that viscosity is a small-scale quantity. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are then adapted for the particular case of a round jet evolving in a more viscous host fluid. It is further shown that the condition of self-preservation is not necessarily satisfied in variable-viscosity jets. Indeed, the jet momentum conservation, as well as the constancy of the Reynolds number in the central region of the jet, cannot be satisfied simultaneously. This points to the necessity of considering less stringent conditions (with respect to classical, single-fluid jets) when analytically tackling these flows and reinforces the idea that viscosity variations must be accounted for when modelling these flows.

  3. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware. PMID:24524158

  4. A Representational Similarity Analysis of the Dynamics of Object Processing Using Single-Trial EEG Classification.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Blair; Perreau Guimaraes, Marcos; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Norcia, Anthony M; Suppes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of object categories is effortlessly accomplished in everyday life, yet its neural underpinnings remain not fully understood. In this electroencephalography (EEG) study, we used single-trial classification to perform a Representational Similarity Analysis (RSA) of categorical representation of objects in human visual cortex. Brain responses were recorded while participants viewed a set of 72 photographs of objects with a planned category structure. The Representational Dissimilarity Matrix (RDM) used for RSA was derived from confusions of a linear classifier operating on single EEG trials. In contrast to past studies, which used pairwise correlation or classification to derive the RDM, we used confusion matrices from multi-class classifications, which provided novel self-similarity measures that were used to derive the overall size of the representational space. We additionally performed classifications on subsets of the brain response in order to identify spatial and temporal EEG components that best discriminated object categories and exemplars. Results from category-level classifications revealed that brain responses to images of human faces formed the most distinct category, while responses to images from the two inanimate categories formed a single category cluster. Exemplar-level classifications produced a broadly similar category structure, as well as sub-clusters corresponding to natural language categories. Spatiotemporal components of the brain response that differentiated exemplars within a category were found to differ from those implicated in differentiating between categories. Our results show that a classification approach can be successfully applied to single-trial scalp-recorded EEG to recover fine-grained object category structure, as well as to identify interpretable spatiotemporal components underlying object processing. Finally, object category can be decoded from purely temporal information recorded at single electrodes. PMID

  5. A Representational Similarity Analysis of the Dynamics of Object Processing Using Single-Trial EEG Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, Blair; Perreau Guimaraes, Marcos; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of object categories is effortlessly accomplished in everyday life, yet its neural underpinnings remain not fully understood. In this electroencephalography (EEG) study, we used single-trial classification to perform a Representational Similarity Analysis (RSA) of categorical representation of objects in human visual cortex. Brain responses were recorded while participants viewed a set of 72 photographs of objects with a planned category structure. The Representational Dissimilarity Matrix (RDM) used for RSA was derived from confusions of a linear classifier operating on single EEG trials. In contrast to past studies, which used pairwise correlation or classification to derive the RDM, we used confusion matrices from multi-class classifications, which provided novel self-similarity measures that were used to derive the overall size of the representational space. We additionally performed classifications on subsets of the brain response in order to identify spatial and temporal EEG components that best discriminated object categories and exemplars. Results from category-level classifications revealed that brain responses to images of human faces formed the most distinct category, while responses to images from the two inanimate categories formed a single category cluster. Exemplar-level classifications produced a broadly similar category structure, as well as sub-clusters corresponding to natural language categories. Spatiotemporal components of the brain response that differentiated exemplars within a category were found to differ from those implicated in differentiating between categories. Our results show that a classification approach can be successfully applied to single-trial scalp-recorded EEG to recover fine-grained object category structure, as well as to identify interpretable spatiotemporal components underlying object processing. Finally, object category can be decoded from purely temporal information recorded at single electrodes. PMID

  6. Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities

    MedlinePlus

    ... and COPD: differences and similarities Share | Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities This article has been reviewed ... you could have asthma, or you could have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) , such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Because ...

  7. Modeling listener perception of speaker similarity in dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Lansford, Kaitlin L; Berisha, Visar; Utianski, Rene L

    2016-06-01

    The current investigation contributes to a perceptual similarity-based approach to dysarthria characterization by utilizing an innovative statistical approach, multinomial logistic regression with sparsity constraints, to identify acoustic features underlying each listener's impressions of speaker similarity. The data-driven approach also permitted an examination of the effect of clinical experience on listeners' impressions of similarity. Listeners, irrespective of level of clinical experience, were found to rely on similar acoustic features during the perceptual sorting task, known as free classification. Overall, the results support the continued advancement of a similarity-based approach to characterizing the communication disorders associated with dysarthria. PMID:27369174

  8. Phonological similarity effect in complex span task.

    PubMed

    Camos, Valérie; Mora, Gérôme; Barrouillet, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that two systems are involved in verbal working memory; one is specifically dedicated to the maintenance of phonological representations through verbal rehearsal while the other would maintain multimodal representations through attentional refreshing. This theoretical framework predicts that phonologically related phenomena such as the phonological similarity effect (PSE) should occur when the domain-specific system is involved in maintenance, but should disappear when concurrent articulation hinders its use. Impeding maintenance in the domain-general system by a concurrent attentional demand should impair recall performance without affecting PSE. In three experiments, we manipulated the concurrent articulation and the attentional demand induced by the processing component of complex span tasks in which participants had to maintain lists of either similar or dissimilar words. Confirming our predictions, PSE affected recall performance in complex span tasks. Although both the attentional demand and the articulatory requirement of the concurrent task impaired recall, only the induction of an articulatory suppression during maintenance made the PSE disappear. These results suggest a duality in the systems devoted to verbal maintenance in the short term, constraining models of working memory. PMID:23419012

  9. Similarity and scale in catchment storm response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric F.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Beven, Keith

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, very little progress had been made in understanding the relationship between small-scale variability of topography, soil, and rainfalls and the storm response seen at the catchment scale. The work reviewed here represents the first attempt at a systematic theoretical framework for such understanding in the context of surface runoff generation by different processes. The parameterization of hydrological processes over a range of scales is examined, and the concept of the 'representative elementary area' (REA) is introduced. The REA is a fundamental scale for catchment modeling at which continuum assumptions can be applied for the spatially variable controls and parameters, and spatial patterns no longer have to be considered explicitly. The investigation of scale leads into the concept of hydrologic similarity in which the effects of the environmental controls on runoff generation and flood frequency response be investigated independently of catchment scale. The paper reviews the authors' initial results and hopefully will motivate others to also investigate the issues of hydrologic scale and similarity.

  10. Pharmacophore-Based Similarity Scoring for DOCK

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacophore modeling incorporates geometric and chemical features of known inhibitors and/or targeted binding sites to rationally identify and design new drug leads. In this study, we have encoded a three-dimensional pharmacophore matching similarity (FMS) scoring function into the structure-based design program DOCK. Validation and characterization of the method are presented through pose reproduction, crossdocking, and enrichment studies. When used alone, FMS scoring dramatically improves pose reproduction success to 93.5% (∼20% increase) and reduces sampling failures to 3.7% (∼6% drop) compared to the standard energy score (SGE) across 1043 protein–ligand complexes. The combined FMS+SGE function further improves success to 98.3%. Crossdocking experiments using FMS and FMS+SGE scoring, for six diverse protein families, similarly showed improvements in success, provided proper pharmacophore references are employed. For enrichment, incorporating pharmacophores during sampling and scoring, in most cases, also yield improved outcomes when docking and rank-ordering libraries of known actives and decoys to 15 systems. Retrospective analyses of virtual screenings to three clinical drug targets (EGFR, IGF-1R, and HIVgp41) using X-ray structures of known inhibitors as pharmacophore references are also reported, including a customized FMS scoring protocol to bias on selected regions in the reference. Overall, the results and fundamental insights gained from this study should benefit the docking community in general, particularly researchers using the new FMS method to guide computational drug discovery with DOCK. PMID:25229837

  11. Reconstructing of a Sequence Using Similar Sequences

    1995-11-28

    SIMSEQ reconstructs sequences from oligos. Similar known sequences are used as a reference. At present, simulated data are being used to develop the algorithm. SIMSEQ generates an initial random sequence, then generates a second sequence that is 60 to 90 percent similar to the first. Next, the second sequence is chopped into its appropriate oligos. All possible sequences are reconstructed to determine the most similar. Those with the highest similarity are printed as output.

  12. Determination of subjective similarity for pairs of masses and pairs of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms: Comparison of similarity ranking scores and absolute similarity ratings

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Schmidt, Robert A.; Shiraishi, Junji; Suzuki, Kenji; Newstead, Gillian M.; Doi, Kunio

    2007-07-15

    very high (0.92 and 0.96), which implies that the observers were able to compare the similarity of a mass pair with that of a calcification pair consistently. These results provide evidence that the concept of similarity for pairs of images is robust, even across different lesion types, and that radiologists are able to reliably determine subjective similarity for pairs of breast lesions.

  13. 41 CFR 102-75.675 - What responsibilities does the grantee or recipient of the property have in accomplishing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Real Property Disposal Property for Use As Public Park Or Recreation Areas § 102-75.675 What... recipient to bear the cost of any out-of-pocket expenses necessary to accomplish the transfer, such as...

  14. 41 CFR 102-75.675 - What responsibilities does the grantee or recipient of the property have in accomplishing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Real Property Disposal Property for Use As Public Park Or Recreation Areas § 102-75.675 What... recipient to bear the cost of any out-of-pocket expenses necessary to accomplish the transfer, such as...

  15. 41 CFR 102-75.675 - What responsibilities does the grantee or recipient of the property have in accomplishing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Real Property Disposal Property for Use As Public Park Or Recreation Areas § 102-75.675 What... recipient to bear the cost of any out-of-pocket expenses necessary to accomplish the transfer, such as...

  16. 41 CFR 102-75.675 - What responsibilities does the grantee or recipient of the property have in accomplishing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Real Property Disposal Property for Use As Public Park Or Recreation Areas § 102-75.675 What... recipient to bear the cost of any out-of-pocket expenses necessary to accomplish the transfer, such as...

  17. 41 CFR 102-75.675 - What responsibilities does the grantee or recipient of the property have in accomplishing or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Real Property Disposal Property for Use As Public Park Or Recreation Areas § 102-75.675 What... recipient to bear the cost of any out-of-pocket expenses necessary to accomplish the transfer, such as...

  18. Thematic Relations Affect Similarity via Commonalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golonka, Sabrina; Estes, Zachary

    2009-01-01

    Thematic relations are an important source of perceived similarity. For instance, the "rowing" theme of boats and oars increases their perceived similarity. The mechanism of this effect, however, has not been specified previously. The authors investigated whether thematic relations affect similarity by increasing commonalities or by decreasing…

  19. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for fiscal year 1990 and plans for fiscal year 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynne, Eleanor C.

    1991-01-01

    The research accomplishments of the Structural Dynamics Division for F.Y. 1991 are presented. The work is discussed in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and plans for the current year as they relate to 5-year plans and the objectives of each technical area. Included is research on unsteady aerodynamics, helicopter rotors, computational fluid dynamics, oscillations of leading edge flaps of a delta wing, and aircraft wing loads.

  20. Professional conceptualisation and accomplishment of patient safety in mental healthcare: an ethnographic approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study seeks to broaden current understandings of what patient safety means in mental healthcare and how it is accomplished. We propose a qualitative observational study of how safety is produced or not produced in the complex context of everyday professional mental health practice. Such an approach intentionally contrasts with much patient safety research which assumes that safety is achieved and improved through top-down policy directives. We seek instead to understand and articulate the connections and dynamic interactions between people, materials, and organisational, legal, moral, professional and historical safety imperatives as they come together at particular times and places to perform safe or unsafe practice. As such we advocate an understanding of patient safety 'from the ground up'. Methods/Design The proposed project employs a six-phase data collection framework in two mental health settings: an inpatient unit and a community team. The first four phases comprise multiple modes of focussed, unobtrusive observation of professionals at work, to enable us to trace the conceptualisation and enactment of safety as revealed in dialogue and narrative, use of artefacts and space, bodily activity and patterns of movement, and in the accomplishment of specific work tasks. An interview phase and a social network analysis phase will subsequently be conducted to offer comparative perspectives on the observational data. This multi-modal and holistic approach to studying patient safety will complement existing research, which is dominated by instrumentalist approaches to discovering factors contributing to error, or developing interventions to prevent or manage adverse events. Discussion This ethnographic research framework, informed by the principles of practice theories and in particular actor-network ideas, provides a tool to aid the understanding of patient safety in mental healthcare. The approach is novel in that it seeks to articulate an 'anatomy

  1. Retrieving Similar Styles to Parse Clothing.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kota; Kiapour, M Hadi; Ortiz, Luis E; Berg, Tamara L

    2015-05-01

    Clothing recognition is a societally and commercially important yet extremely challenging problem due to large variations in clothing appearance, layering, style, and body shape and pose. In this paper, we tackle the clothing parsing problem using a retrieval-based approach. For a query image, we find similar styles from a large database of tagged fashion images and use these examples to recognize clothing items in the query. Our approach combines parsing from: pre-trained global clothing models, local clothing models learned on the fly from retrieved examples, and transferred parse-masks (Paper Doll item transfer) from retrieved examples. We evaluate our approach extensively and show significant improvements over previous state-of-the-art for both localization (clothing parsing given weak supervision in the form of tags) and detection (general clothing parsing). Our experimental results also indicate that the general pose estimation problem can benefit from clothing parsing. PMID:26353326

  2. Image Steganalysis with Binary Similarity Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avcıbaş, İsmail; Kharrazi, Mehdi; Memon, Nasir; Sankur, Bülent

    2005-12-01

    We present a novel technique for steganalysis of images that have been subjected to embedding by steganographic algorithms. The seventh and eighth bit planes in an image are used for the computation of several binary similarity measures. The basic idea is that the correlation between the bit planes as well as the binary texture characteristics within the bit planes will differ between a stego image and a cover image. These telltale marks are used to construct a classifier that can distinguish between stego and cover images. We also provide experimental results using some of the latest steganographic algorithms. The proposed scheme is found to have complementary performance vis-à-vis Farid's scheme in that they outperform each other in alternate embedding techniques.

  3. Social values as arguments: similar is convincing.

    PubMed

    Maio, Gregory R; Hahn, Ulrike; Frost, John-Mark; Kuppens, Toon; Rehman, Nadia; Kamble, Shanmukh

    2014-01-01

    Politicians, philosophers, and rhetors engage in co-value argumentation: appealing to one value in order to support another value (e.g., "equality leads to freedom"). Across four experiments in the United Kingdom and India, we found that the psychological relatedness of values affects the persuasiveness of the arguments that bind them. Experiment 1 found that participants were more persuaded by arguments citing values that fulfilled similar motives than by arguments citing opposing values. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated this result using a wider variety of values, while finding that the effect is stronger among people higher in need for cognition and that the effect is mediated by the greater plausibility of co-value arguments that link motivationally compatible values. Experiment 4 extended the effect to real-world arguments taken from political propaganda and replicated the mediating effect of argument plausibility. The findings highlight the importance of value relatedness in argument persuasiveness. PMID:25147529

  4. Hepatic venous outflow obstruction: Three similar syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas Darda; Seren, Soley; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a detailed review of veno-occlusive disease (VOD), Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), and congestive hepatopathy (CH), all of which results in hepatic venous outflow obstruction. This is the first article in which all three syndromes have been reviewed, enabling the reader to compare the characteristics of these disorders. The histological findings in VOD, BCS, and CH are almost identical: sinusoidal congestion and cell necrosis mostly in perivenular areas of hepatic acini which eventually leads to bridging fibrosis between adjacent central veins. Tender hepatomegaly with jaundice and ascites is common to all three conditions. However, the clinical presentation depends mostly on the extent and rapidity of the outflow obstruction. Although the etiology and treatment are completely different in VOD, BCS, and CH; the similarities in clinical manifestations and liver histology may suggest a common mechanism of hepatic injury and adaptation in response to increased sinusoidal pressure. PMID:17461490

  5. Nonrigid image registration using an entropic similarity.

    PubMed

    Khader, Mohammed; Ben Hamza, A

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonrigid image registration technique by optimizing a generalized information-theoretic similarity measure using the quasi-Newton method as an optimization scheme and cubic B-splines for modeling the nonrigid deformation field between the fixed and moving 3-D image pairs. To achieve a compromise between the nonrigid registration accuracy and the associated computational cost, we implement a three-level hierarchical multiresolution approach such that the image resolution is increased in a coarse to fine fashion. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the registration accuracy of our approach. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated on a 3-D magnetic resonance data volume and also on clinically acquired 4-D CT image datasets. PMID:21690017

  6. Social values as arguments: similar is convincing

    PubMed Central

    Maio, Gregory R.; Hahn, Ulrike; Frost, John-Mark; Kuppens, Toon; Rehman, Nadia; Kamble, Shanmukh

    2014-01-01

    Politicians, philosophers, and rhetors engage in co-value argumentation: appealing to one value in order to support another value (e.g., “equality leads to freedom”). Across four experiments in the United Kingdom and India, we found that the psychological relatedness of values affects the persuasiveness of the arguments that bind them. Experiment 1 found that participants were more persuaded by arguments citing values that fulfilled similar motives than by arguments citing opposing values. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated this result using a wider variety of values, while finding that the effect is stronger among people higher in need for cognition and that the effect is mediated by the greater plausibility of co-value arguments that link motivationally compatible values. Experiment 4 extended the effect to real-world arguments taken from political propaganda and replicated the mediating effect of argument plausibility. The findings highlight the importance of value relatedness in argument persuasiveness. PMID:25147529

  7. Similarities between protein folding and granular jamming

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Prasanth P; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2012-01-01

    Grains and glasses, widely different materials, arrest their motions upon decreasing temperature and external load, respectively, in common ways, leading to a universal jamming phase diagram conjecture. However, unified theories are lacking, mainly because of the disparate nature of the particle interactions. Here we demonstrate that folded proteins exhibit signatures common to both glassiness and jamming by using temperature- and force-unfolding molecular dynamics simulations. Upon folding, proteins develop a peak in the interatomic force distributions that falls on a universal curve with experimentally measured forces on jammed grains and droplets. Dynamical signatures are found as a dramatic slowdown of stress relaxation upon folding. Together with granular similarities, folding is tied not just to the jamming transition, but a more nuanced picture of anisotropy, preparation protocol and internal interactions emerges. Results have implications for designing stable polymers and can open avenues to link protein folding to jamming theory. PMID:23093180

  8. Genetic similarity and hatching success in birds.

    PubMed Central

    Spottiswoode, Claire; Møller, Anders Pape

    2004-01-01

    The ecological correlates of fitness costs of genetic similarity in free-living, large populations of organisms are poorly understood. Using a dataset of genetic similarity as reflected by band-sharing coefficients of minisatellites, we show that bird species with higher genetic similarity experience elevated hatching failure of eggs, increasing by a factor of six across 99 species. Island distributions and cooperative breeding systems in particular were associated with elevated genetic similarity. These findings provide comparative evidence of detrimental fitness consequences of high genetic similarity across a wide range of species, and help to identify ecological factors potentially associated with increased risk of extinction. PMID:15058437

  9. Similarity Grouping and Repetition Blindness are Both Influenced by Attention

    PubMed Central

    de Haan, Bianca; Rorden, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported seemingly conflicting results regarding how the amount of stimulus similarity between two simultaneously presented target stimuli impacts perceptual performance. There are many reports of ‘repetition blindness’, where individuals do worse when shown two similar stimuli relative to two different stimuli. On the other hand, there are reports of ‘similarity grouping’, where participants perform better when identifying two similar objects relative to two different objects. This manuscript posits that repetition blindness and similarity grouping coexist and can be elicited in the same subjects in a single task. This not only explains the previous opposite effects of stimulus similarity on task performance, but also provides a unique opportunity to directly compare these opposite effects of stimulus similarity with respect to susceptibility to a modulating factor. Since previous studies have provided inconclusive results on whether attentional relevance can modulate the effect of stimulus similarity on task performance, the current manuscript aims to compare repetition blindness and similarity grouping with respect to their susceptibility to attentional relevance. The results of the first experiment confirmed that both repetition blindness and similarity grouping can be elicited in the same experiment, suggesting that repetition blindness and similarity grouping coexist. The results of the second experiment suggest that both repetition blindness and similarity grouping can be modulated by attentional relevance. These results support the explanation of repetition blindness as a token individuation failure. Furthermore, these results suggest that supposedly pre-attentional grouping mechanisms might not operate as independently from top-down attentional modulations as traditionally thought. PMID:20300466

  10. Using Reaction Mechanism to Measure Enzyme Similarity

    PubMed Central

    O’Boyle, Noel M.; Holliday, Gemma L.; Almonacid, Daniel E.; Mitchell, John B.O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The concept of reaction similarity has been well-studied in terms of the overall transformation associated with a reaction, but not in terms of mechanism. We present the first method to give a quantitative measure of the similarity of reactions based upon their explicit mechanisms. Two approaches are presented to measure the similarity between individual steps of mechanisms: a fingerprint-based approach which incorporates relevant information on each mechanistic step, and an approach based only on bond formation, cleavage and changes in order. The overall similarity for two reaction mechanisms is then calculated using the Needleman-Wunsch alignment algorithm. An analysis of MACiE, a database of enzyme mechanisms, using our measure of similarity identifies some examples of convergent evolution of chemical mechanism. In many cases mechanism similarity is not reflected by similarity according to the EC system of enzyme classification. In particular, little mechanistic information is conveyed by the class level of the EC. PMID:17400244

  11. Using Scientific Publications to Identify People with Similar Interests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Stanley; Lorenzi, Fabiana; Granada, Roger; Lichtnow, Daniel; Wives, Leandro Krug; Palazzo Moreira de Oliveira, José

    In many situations, related to some types of systems or organizations' tasks, it is necessary to identify people with similar profiles. In the case of a collaborative recommender system, items to be recommended are those associated to similar users. Another example, in the academic environment, is to identify new members to be part of a research group (people with similar profiles). This task of identifying people with similar profiles can be time-consuming. In this sense, this work considers that scientific papers written by people can be used to identify users with similar profiles. Considering this assumption, we have done some experiments to identify which parts of papers, which type of indexes (terms or concepts) and which type of similarity functions (Jaccard or a Fuzzy function) are more suitable to identify similar people. The paper presents the results of some experiments and some application scenarios considering academic environments.

  12. U.S. Spacesuit Knowledge Capture Accomplishments in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Oliva, Vladenka R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA U.S. spacesuit knowledge capture (KC) program has been in operations since the beginning 2008. The program was designed to augment engineers and others with information about spacesuits in a historical way. A multitude of seminars have captured spacesuit history and knowledge over the last six years of the programs existence. Subject matter experts have provided lectures and were interviewed to help bring the spacesuit to life so that lessons learned will never be lost. As well, the program concentrated in reaching out to the public and industry by making the recorded events part of the public domain through the NASA technical library via You Tube media. The U.S. spacesuit KC topics have included lessons learned from some of the most prominent spacesuit experts and spacesuit users including current and former astronauts. The events have enriched the spacesuit legacy knowledge from Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle and International Space Station Programs. As well, expert engineers and scientists have shared their challenges and successes to be remembered. The last few years have been some of the most successful years of the KC program program's life with numerous recordings and releases to the public. It is evidenced by the thousands that have view the recordings online. This paper reviews the events accomplished and archived over Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 and highlights a few of the most memorable ones. This paper also communicates ways to access the events that are available internally to NASA as well as in the public domain.

  13. US CLIVAR Accomplishments Over the Past 15 Years and Research Challenges for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, K.; Patterson, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    The US Climate Variability and Predictability Program (CLIVAR) has brought meaningful contributions to the understanding of the role the ocean plays in the global climate system since its launch in 1998. By fostering community-based planning and implementation, US CLIVAR has made strides in increasing our understanding of the climate system and its predictability. Key accomplishments include a better understanding of intraseasonal-to-centennial timescales, expansion of a sustained ocean observing system for monitoring and assessing climate variability and change, improved understanding of critical physical processes and their representation in climate and Earth system models, and coordinated inter-comparisons of ocean and coupled simulations that have led to improved predictive capability. Building upon these advancements, the new US CLIVAR Science Plan presents revised goals, strategies, and research challenges that emphasize strengthened ties to the broader Earth science community and relevance to societal impacts. We will highlight the scope and priorities for each of the following four research challenges: (i) decadal variability and predictability; (ii) climate and extreme events; (iii) polar climate; and (iv) climate and ocean biogeochemistry. We will also provide information on how scientists can participate in future planning and implementation activities.

  14. International Space Station Research for the Next Decade: International Coordination and Research Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thumm, Tracy L.; Robinson, Julie A.; Johnson-Green, Perry; Buckley, Nicole; Karabadzhak, George; Nakamura, Tai; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Sabbagh, Jean

    2011-01-01

    During 2011, the International Space Station reached an important milestone in the completion of assembly and the shift to the focus on a full and continuous utilization mission in space. The ISS partnership itself has also met a milestone in the coordination and cooperation of utilization activities including research, technology development and education. We plan and track all ISS utilization activities jointly and have structures in place to cooperate on common goals by sharing ISS assets and resources, and extend the impacts and efficiency of utilization activities. The basic utilization areas on the ISS include research, technology development and testing, and education/outreach. Research can be categorized as applied research for future exploration, basic research taking advantage of the microgravity and open space environment, and Industrial R&D / commercial research focused at industrial product development and improvement. Technology development activities range from testing of new spacecraft systems and materials to the use of ISS as an analogue for future exploration missions to destinations beyond Earth orbit. This presentation, made jointly by all ISS international partners, will highlight the ways that international cooperation in all of these areas is achieved, and the overall accomplishments that have come as well as future perspectives from the cooperation. Recently, the partnership has made special efforts to increase the coordination and impact of ISS utilization that has humanitarian benefits. In this context the paper will highlight tentative ISS utilization developments in the areas of Earth remote sensing, medical technology transfer, and education/outreach.

  15. The ICES Working Group on Zooplankton Ecology: Accomplishments of the first 25 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Peter H.; Harris, Roger; Gislason, Astthor; Margonski, Piotr; Skjoldal, Hein Rune; Benfield, Mark; Hay, Steve; O'Brien, Todd; Valdés, Luis

    2016-02-01

    The ICES Study Group on Zooplankton Ecology was created in 1991 to address issues of current and future concern within the field of zooplankton ecology. Within three years it became the ICES Working Group on Zooplankton Ecology (ICES WGZE) and this unique group in the world's oceanographic community has now been active for 25 years. This article reviews and synthesizes the products, and major accomplishments of the group. Achievements of the group, including the Zooplankton Methodology Manual, the Zooplankton Status Reports, and the International Zooplankton Symposia, have had an important impact on the wider field. Among the future issues that remain to be addressed by the group are the assessment of exploratory fisheries on zooplankton and micronekton species; further development of the zooplankton time-series; compilation and integration of allometric relationships for zooplankton species, and evaluation of new methodologies for the study of zooplankton distribution, abundance, physiology, and genetics. Marine science is an increasingly global undertaking and groups such as the ICES WGZE will continue to be essential to the advancement of understanding of zooplankton community structure and population dynamics in the world's oceans.

  16. Accomplishments of the Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program and Future Research Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Woodson, Shawn H.; Chambers, Joseph R.

    2003-01-01

    The Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program has addressed the problem of uncommanded lateral motions, such as wing drop and wing rock, at transonic speeds. The genesis of this Program was the experience of the F/A-18E/F Program in the late 199O's, when wing drop was discovered in the heart of the maneuver envelope for the pre-production aircraft. While the F/A-18E/F problem was subsequently corrected by a leading-edge flap scheduling change and the addition of a porous door to the wing fold fairing, the AWS Program was initiated as a national response to the lack of technology readiness available at the time of the F/A-18E/F Development Program. The AWS Program objectives were to define causal factors for the F/A-18E/F experience, to gain insights into the flow physics associated with wing drop, and to develop methods and analytical tools so that future programs could identify this type of problem before going to flight test. The paper reviews, for the major goals of the AWS Program, the status of the technology before the program began, the program objectives, accomplishments, and impacts. Lessons learned are presented for the benefit of future programs that must assess whether a vehicle will have uncommanded lateral motions before going to flight test. Finally, recommended future research needs are presented in light of the AWS Program experience.

  17. AIRS Science Accomplishments Version 4.0/Plans for Version 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut; Elliott, Denis; Granger, Stephanie; Kahn, Brain; Eldering, Annmarie; Irion, Bill; Fetzer, Eric; Olsen, Ed; Lee, Sung-Yung; Okonek, Sharon; Friedman, Steve; Fishbein, Evan; Gaiser, Steve

    2006-01-01

    This talk is about accomplishments with AIRS data and what we have learned from almost three years of data what part of this is emerging in Version 4.0 what part we would like to see filtering into Version 5.0 and what part constitute limitations in the AIRS requirements, such as spectral and spatial resolution, which have to be deferred to the wish list for the next generation hyperspectral sounder. The AIRS calibration accuracy at the 1OOmK and stability at the 6 mK/year level are amazing. It establishes the unique capability of a cooled grating array spectrometer in Earth orbit for climate research. Data which are sufficiently clear to match the radiometric accuracy of the instrument, have a yield of less than 1%. This is OK for calibration. The 2616/cm window channel combined with the RTG.SST for tropical ocean allow excellent assessment radiometric calibration accuracy and stability. For absolute calibration verification 100mK is the limit due to cloud contamination. The 10 micron window channels can be used for stability assessment, but accuracy is limited at 300mK due to water continuum absorption uncertainties.

  18. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. Boston University is active in seven principal areas: (1) Task A: Colliding Beams -- physics of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {anti p}p collisions; (2) Task C: MACRO Experiment -- search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; (3) Task D: Proton Decay -- search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; (4) Tasks E, J, and N: Particle Theory -- theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; (5) Task F: Muon G-2 -- measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; (6) Task K: SSCintcal -- calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; (7) Task L: Muon Detectors for the GEM Experiment. The body of the proposal is devoted to detailed discussions of each of the tasks. The total budget request for the program appears in a summary chapter that includes a general budget discussion and individual budget requests and explanations for each of the tasks.

  19. HMMER web server: interactive sequence similarity searching

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R.

    2011-01-01

    HMMER is a software suite for protein sequence similarity searches using probabilistic methods. Previously, HMMER has mainly been available only as a computationally intensive UNIX command-line tool, restricting its use. Recent advances in the software, HMMER3, have resulted in a 100-fold speed gain relative to previous versions. It is now feasible to make efficient profile hidden Markov model (profile HMM) searches via the web. A HMMER web server (http://hmmer.janelia.org) has been designed and implemented such that most protein database searches return within a few seconds. Methods are available for searching either a single protein sequence, multiple protein sequence alignment or profile HMM against a target sequence database, and for searching a protein sequence against Pfam. The web server is designed to cater to a range of different user expertise and accepts batch uploading of multiple queries at once. All search methods are also available as RESTful web services, thereby allowing them to be readily integrated as remotely executed tasks in locally scripted workflows. We have focused on minimizing search times and the ability to rapidly display tabular results, regardless of the number of matches found, developing graphical summaries of the search results to provide quick, intuitive appraisement of them. PMID:21593126

  20. Adapting Document Similarity Measures for Ligand-Based Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Himmat, Mubarak; Salim, Naomie; Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Saeed, Faisal; Ahmed, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the similarity of molecules is considered one of the major tasks in virtual screening. There are many similarity measures that have been proposed for this purpose, some of which have been derived from document and text retrieving areas as most often these similarity methods give good results in document retrieval and can achieve good results in virtual screening. In this work, we propose a similarity measure for ligand-based virtual screening, which has been derived from a text processing similarity measure. It has been adopted to be suitable for virtual screening; we called this proposed measure the Adapted Similarity Measure of Text Processing (ASMTP). For evaluating and testing the proposed ASMTP we conducted several experiments on two different benchmark datasets: the Maximum Unbiased Validation (MUV) and the MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR). The experiments have been conducted by choosing 10 reference structures from each class randomly as queries and evaluate them in the recall of cut-offs at 1% and 5%. The overall obtained results are compared with some similarity methods including the Tanimoto coefficient, which are considered to be the conventional and standard similarity coefficients for fingerprint-based similarity calculations. The achieved results show that the performance of ligand-based virtual screening is better and outperforms the Tanimoto coefficients and other methods. PMID:27089312

  1. Oxygen and carbon requirements for biological nitrogen removal processes accomplishing nitrification, nitritation, and anammox.

    PubMed

    Daigger, Glen T

    2014-03-01

    The oxygen and carbon savings associated with novel nitrogen removal processes for the treatment of high ammonia, low biodegradable organic matter waste streams such as the recycle streams from the dewatering of anaerobically digested sludges are well documented.This understanding may lead some to think that similar oxygen savings are possible if novel processes such as nitritation/ denitritation and partial nitritation-deammonification are incorporated into main liquid stream processes where influent biodegradable organic matter is used to denitrify residual oxidized nitrogen (nitrite and nitrate). It is demonstrated that the net oxygen required for nitrogen removal is 1.71 mg O2/mg ammonia-nitrogen converted to nitrogen gas as long as influent biodegradable organic matter is used to denitrify residual oxidized nitrogen. Less oxygen is required to produce oxidized nitrogen with these novel processes, but less biodegradable organic matter is also required for oxidized nitrogen reduction to nitrogen gas, resulting in reduced oxygen savings for the oxidation of biodegradable organic matter. The net oxygen requirement is the same since the net electron transfer for the conversion of ammonia-nitrogen to nitrogen gas is the same. The biodegradable organic matter required to reduce the oxidized nitrogen to nitrogen gas is estimated for these processes based on standard biological process calculations. It is estimated to be in the range of 3.5 to 4.0 mg biodegradable COD/mg ammonia-nitrogen reduced to nitrogen gas for nitrification-denitrification, 2.0 to 2.5 for nitritation-denitritation, and 0.5 for partial nitritation-deammonification. The resulting limiting influent wastewater carbon-to-nitrogen ratios are estimated and can be used to guide the appropriate selection of biological nitrogen removal process given knowledge of the biological process influent wastewater carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Energy savings possible for mainstream processes incorporating these novel

  2. Investigating materials for breast nodules simulation by using segmentation and similarity analysis of digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Paula N.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Schiabel, Homero

    2015-03-01

    The task of identifying the malignancy of nodular lesions on mammograms becomes quite complex due to overlapped structures or even to the granular fibrous tissue which can cause confusion in classifying masses shape, leading to unnecessary biopsies. Efforts to develop methods for automatic masses detection in CADe (Computer Aided Detection) schemes have been made with the aim of assisting radiologists and working as a second opinion. The validation of these methods may be accomplished for instance by using databases with clinical images or acquired through breast phantoms. With this aim, some types of materials were tested in order to produce radiographic phantom images which could characterize a good enough approach to the typical mammograms corresponding to actual breast nodules. Therefore different nodules patterns were physically produced and used on a previous developed breast phantom. Their characteristics were tested according to the digital images obtained from phantom exposures at a LORAD M-IV mammography unit. Two analysis were realized the first one by the segmentation of regions of interest containing the simulated nodules by an automated segmentation technique as well as by an experienced radiologist who has delineated the contour of each nodule by means of a graphic display digitizer. Both results were compared by using evaluation metrics. The second one used measure of quality Structural Similarity (SSIM) to generate quantitative data related to the texture produced by each material. Although all the tested materials proved to be suitable for the study, the PVC film yielded the best results.

  3. The Influence of Contour on Similarity Perception of Star Glyphs.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Johannes; Isenberg, Petra; Bezerianos, Anastasia; Fischer, Fabian; Bertini, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    We conducted three experiments to investigate the effects of contours on the detection of data similarity with star glyph variations. A star glyph is a small, compact, data graphic that represents a multi-dimensional data point. Star glyphs are often used in small-multiple settings, to represent data points in tables, on maps, or as overlays on other types of data graphics. In these settings, an important task is the visual comparison of the data points encoded in the star glyph, for example to find other similar data points or outliers. We hypothesized that for data comparisons, the overall shape of a star glyph--enhanced through contour lines--would aid the viewer in making accurate similarity judgments. To test this hypothesis, we conducted three experiments. In our first experiment, we explored how the use of contours influenced how visualization experts and trained novices chose glyphs with similar data values. Our results showed that glyphs without contours make the detection of data similarity easier. Given these results, we conducted a second study to understand intuitive notions of similarity. Star glyphs without contours most intuitively supported the detection of data similarity. In a third experiment, we tested the effect of star glyph reference structures (i.e., tickmarks and gridlines) on the detection of similarity. Surprisingly, our results show that adding reference structures does improve the correctness of similarity judgments for star glyphs with contours, but not for the standard star glyph. As a result of these experiments, we conclude that the simple star glyph without contours performs best under several criteria, reinforcing its practice and popularity in the literature. Contours seem to enhance the detection of other types of similarity, e. g., shape similarity and are distracting when data similarity has to be judged. Based on these findings we provide design considerations regarding the use of contours and reference structures on star

  4. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Large Aperture UVOIR Space Telescopes Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Per Astro2010, a new, larger UVO telescope is needed to answer fundamental scientific questions, such as: is there life on Earth-like exoplanets; how galaxies assemble stellar populations; how baryonic matter interacts with intergalactic medium; and how solar systems form and evolve. And, present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVO concept. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a funded SAT project. Our objective is to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. We have assembled an outstanding team from academia, industry, and government with extensive expertise in astrophysics and exoplanet characterization, and in the design/manufacture of monolithic and segmented space telescopes. One of our key accomplishments is that we have derived engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicle and its inherent mass and volume constraints. We defined and initiated a program to mature 6 key technologies required to fabricate monolithic and segmented space mirrors.

  5. The Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project: A Documentation of its History and Accomplishments: 1999-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    The Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project was one of the projects within NASA s Aviation Safety Program from 1999 through 2005. The objective of the ASMM Project was to develop the technologies to enable the aviation industry to undertake a proactive approach to the management of its system-wide safety risks. The ASMM Project entailed four interdependent elements: (1) Data Analysis Tools Development - develop tools to convert numerical and textual data into information; (2) Intramural Monitoring - test and evaluate the data analysis tools in operational environments; (3) Extramural Monitoring - gain insight into the aviation system performance by surveying its front-line operators; and (4) Modeling and Simulations - provide reliable predictions of the system-wide hazards, their causal factors, and their operational risks that may result from the introduction of new technologies, new procedures, or new operational concepts. This report is a documentation of the history of this highly successful project and of its many accomplishments and contributions to improved safety of the aviation system.

  6. Evaluating Whole Chemical Mixtures and Sufficient Similarity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation supports apresentation describing dose-response assessment for complex chemical mixtures including deriving reference doses for mixtures evaluating sufficient similarity among chemical mixtures.

  7. Self-similarity in the inertial region of wall turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klewicki, J.; Philip, J.; Marusic, I.; Chauhan, K.; Morrill-Winter, C.

    2014-12-01

    The inverse of the von Kármán constant κ is the leading coefficient in the equation describing the logarithmic mean velocity profile in wall bounded turbulent flows. Klewicki [J. Fluid Mech. 718, 596 (2013), 10.1017/jfm.2012.626] connects the asymptotic value of κ with an emerging condition of dynamic self-similarity on an interior inertial domain that contains a geometrically self-similar hierarchy of scaling layers. A number of properties associated with the asymptotic value of κ are revealed. This is accomplished using a framework that retains connection to invariance properties admitted by the mean statement of dynamics. The development leads toward, but terminates short of, analytically determining a value for κ . It is shown that if adjacent layers on the hierarchy (or their adjacent positions) adhere to the same self-similarity that is analytically shown to exist between any given layer and its position, then κ ≡Φ-2=0.381 966 ... , where Φ =(1 +√{5 })/2 is the golden ratio. A number of measures, derived specifically from an analysis of the mean momentum equation, are subsequently used to empirically explore the veracity and implications of κ =Φ-2 . Consistent with the differential transformations underlying an invariant form admitted by the governing mean equation, it is demonstrated that the value of κ arises from two geometric features associated with the inertial turbulent motions responsible for momentum transport. One nominally pertains to the shape of the relevant motions as quantified by their area coverage in any given wall-parallel plane, and the other pertains to the changing size of these motions in the wall-normal direction. In accord with self-similar mean dynamics, these two features remain invariant across the inertial domain. Data from direct numerical simulations and higher Reynolds number experiments are presented and discussed relative to the self-similar geometric structure indicated by the analysis, and in particular the

  8. Here's looking at you: Visual similarity exacerbates the Moses illusion for semantically similar celebrities.

    PubMed

    Davis, Danielle K; Abrams, Lise

    2016-01-01

    When people read questions like "How many animals of each kind did Moses take on the ark?", many mistakenly answer "2" despite knowing that Noah sailed the ark. This "Moses illusion" occurs when names share semantic features. Two experiments examined whether shared visual concepts (facial features) exacerbate Moses illusions for celebrity names. Questions contained an unrelated distractor name or a semantic distractor name that was visually similar or dissimilar to the correct target name. Both experiments revealed more Moses illusions occurred for questions containing a visually similar semantic distractor compared with either visually dissimilar or unrelated distractors. Furthermore, presenting a picture of the target (Experiment 1) or the visually similar distractor (Experiment 2) before the question increased accurate detection of the illusion, independent of distractor type. Results challenge theoretical explanations of the Moses illusion as resulting from purely shallow semantic processing and demonstrate the importance of visual information in processing proper names, even when presented in written form. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26147668

  9. NASA's In-Situ Resource Utilization Project: Current Accomplishments and Exciting Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Sanders, Gerald B.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of Space resources has been identified in publications for over 40 years for its potential as a "game changing" technology for the human exploration of Space. It is called "game changing" because of the mass leverage possible when local resources at the exploration destination arc used to reduce or even eliminate resources that are brought from the Earth. NASA, under the Exploration Technology Development Program has made significant investments in the development of Space resource utilization technologies as a part of the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project. Over the last four years, the ISRU project has taken what was essentially an academic topic with lots of experimentation but little engineering and produced near-full-scale systems that have been demonstrated. In 2008 & again in early 2010, systems that could produce oxygen from lunar soils (or their terrestrial analogs) were tested at a lunar analog site on a volcano in Hawaii. These demonstrations included collaborations with International Partners that made significant contributions to the tests. The proposed federal budget for Fiscal Year 2011 encourages the continued development and demonstration of ISRU. However it goes beyond what the project is currently doing and directs that the scope of the project be expanded to cover destinations throughout the inner solar system with the potential for night demonstrations. This paper will briefly cover the past accomplishments of the ISRU project then move to a di scussion of the plans for the project's future as NASA moves to explore a new paradigm for Space Exploration that includes orbital fuel depots and even refueling on other planetary bodies in the solar system.

  10. U.S. Spacesuit Knowledge Capture Accomplishments in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Oliva, Vladenka R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA U.S. Spacesuit Knowledge Capture (KC) program has existed since the beginning of 2008. The program was designed to augment engineers and other technical team members with historical spacesuit information to add to their understanding of the spacesuit, its evolution, its limitations, and its capabilities. Over 40 seminars have captured spacesuit history and knowledge over the last six years of the program's existence. Subject matter experts have provided lectures and some were interviewed to help bring the spacesuit to life so that lessons learned will never be lost. As well, the program concentrated in reaching out to the public and industry by making the recorded events part of the public domain through the NASA technical library through YouTube media. The U.S. Spacesuit KC topics have included lessons learned from some of the most prominent spacesuit experts and spacesuit users including current and former astronauts. The events have enriched the spacesuit legacy knowledge from Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle and International Space Station Programs. As well, expert engineers and scientists have shared their challenges and successes to be remembered. Based on evidence by the thousands of people who have viewed the recordings online, the last few years have been some of the most successful years of the KC program's life with numerous digital recordings and public releases. This paper reviews the events accomplished and archived over Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 and highlights a few of the most memorable ones. This paper also communicates ways to access the events that are available internally on the NASA domain as well as those released on the public domain.

  11. Cardiovascular Outcomes According to Systolic Blood Pressure in Patients With and Without Diabetes: An ACCOMPLISH Substudy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael A; Bloch, Michael; Bakris, George L; Weir, Matthew R; Zappe, Dion H; Dahlof, Bjorn; Velazquez, Eric J; Pitt, Bertram; Basile, Jan N; Jamerson, Kenneth; Hua, Tsushung A

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of achieved systolic blood pressure (SBP) during treatment on cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, the authors measured event rates of a composite primary endpoint (CV death or nonfatal myocardial infarction or stroke) at on-treatment SBPs of ≥140 mm Hg and the 10 mm Hg intervals of <140 mm Hg, <130 mm Hg, and <120 mm Hg in 6459 patients with diabetes (mean age, 67) and 4246 patients without diabetes (mean age, 69) from the Avoiding Cardiovascular Events in Combination Therapy in Patients Living With Systolic Hypertension (ACCOMPLISH) trial. In the diabetic cohort, the primary endpoint was 49% lower (P<.001) at <140 mm Hg than at ≥140 mm Hg, and the separate components of this endpoint were also significantly reduced. Further SBP reductions did not improve outcomes, and at <120 mm Hg they were no longer different (except for stroke) from ≥140 mm Hg. In contrast, in the nondiabetic cohort, the primary endpoint event rate fell steadily (although not significantly) through the decreasing SBP categories until it was reduced by 45% (P=.0413) at <120 mm Hg. Total stroke rates for both the diabetic (-56%, P=.0120) and nondiabetic (-68%, P=.0067) cohorts were lowest at <120 mm Hg, and adverse renal events (serum creatinine increase ≥50%) were significantly lowest in the range of 130 mm Hg to 139 mm Hg for both cohorts. Diabetic patients (<140 mm Hg or <130 mm Hg) and nondiabetic patients (<120 mm Hg) may require different SBP targets for optimal CV protection, although stroke and renal considerations should also influence the selection of blood pressure targets. PMID:27060568

  12. Documents Similarity Measurement Using Field Association Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlam, El-Sayed; Fuketa, M.; Morita, K.; Aoe, Jun-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of text analysis and information retrieval and measurement of document similarity focuses on a new text manipulation system called FA (field association)-Sim that is useful for retrieving information in large heterogeneous texts and for recognizing content similarity in text excerpts. Discusses recall and precision, automatic indexing…

  13. Perceived Similarity, Proactive Adjustment, and Organizational Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammeyer-Mueller, John D.; Livingston, Beth A.; Liao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores how perceived demographic and attitudinal similarity can influence proactive behavior among organizational newcomers. We propose that newcomers who perceive themselves as similar to their co-workers will be more willing to seek new information or build relationships, which in turn will lead to better long-term…

  14. Attitude Similarity, Topic Importance, and Psychotherapeutic Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Thomas

    1975-01-01

    The effect of attitude similarity and topic importance on attraction was studied by exposing 75 prison inmates, incarcerated for public intoxication, to varying attitudes of a psychotherapist. Subjects were more attracted to the therapist after receiving alcohol items regardless of degree of similarity expressed. (Author)

  15. Observational Learning and the Effects of Model-Observer Similarity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braaksma, Martine A. H.; Rijlaarsdam, Gert; van den Bergh, Huub

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the effects of similarity in competence between model and observer on the effectiveness of observational learning in argumentative writing. Results are consistent with the similarity hypothesis: weak learners learn more from focusing their observations on weak models, whereas better learners learn more from focusing on good…

  16. Sample selection in foreign similarity regions for multicrop experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, J. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The selection of sample segments in the U.S. foreign similarity regions for development of proportion estimation procedures and error modeling for Argentina, Australia, Brazil, and USSR in AgRISTARS is described. Each sample was chosen to be similar in crop mix to the corresponding indicator region sample. Data sets, methods of selection, and resulting samples are discussed.

  17. Similarity and Reciprocity in the Friendships of Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M. L.; Drewry, Debra L.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated the effect of similarity and reciprocity on dyadic friendship choices in third- and sixth-grade students. Reciprocal (mutual) friendships were more similar in proximity, popularity, and self-concept than those in nonreciprocal (nonmutual) dyads. Results are discussed in relation to the interpersonal attraction theories. (Author/DST)

  18. Similarity is closeness: Metaphorical mapping in a conceptual task.

    PubMed

    Boot, Inge; Pecher, Diane

    2010-05-01

    The conceptual metaphor theory states that abstract concepts are represented by image schemas from concrete domains. In the present study we investigated the mapping for SIMILARITY IS CLOSENESS using tasks with nonlinguistic materials. In Experiments 1 and 2 participants decided whether two squares were similar or dissimilar in colour. The spatial distance between the squares was varied. Performance to similar colours was better at shorter distances, whereas performance to dissimilar colours was better at longer distances. In Experiments 3 and 4 participants made distance decisions to similar and dissimilar colours squares. Performance was not affected by similarity. These results show that metaphorical mappings can be found even beyond the context of linguistic metaphors and that the mapping between SIMILARITY and CLOSENESS is asymmetrical. PMID:19731189

  19. Similarity-based global optimization of buildings in urban scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Quansheng; Zhang, Jing; Jiang, Wanshou

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, an approach for the similarity-based global optimization of buildings in urban scene is presented. In the past, most researches concentrated on single building reconstruction, making it difficult to reconstruct reliable models from noisy or incomplete point clouds. To obtain a better result, a new trend is to utilize the similarity among the buildings. Therefore, a new similarity detection and global optimization strategy is adopted to modify local-fitting geometric errors. Firstly, the hierarchical structure that consists of geometric, topological and semantic features is constructed to represent complex roof models. Secondly, similar roof models can be detected by combining primitive structure and connection similarities. At last, the global optimization strategy is applied to preserve the consistency and precision of similar roof structures. Moreover, non-local consolidation is adapted to detect small roof parts. The experiments reveal that the proposed method can obtain convincing roof models and promote the reconstruction quality of 3D buildings in urban scene.

  20. Perceptual similarity of regional dialects of American English

    PubMed Central

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Levi, Susannah V.; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on the perception of dialect variation has measured the perceptual similarity of talkers based on regional dialect using only indirect methods. In the present study, a paired comparison similarity ratings task was used to obtain direct measures of perceptual similarity. Naive listeners were asked to make explicit judgments about the similarity of a set of talkers based on regional dialect. The talkers represented four regional varieties of American English and both genders. Results revealed an additive effect of gender and dialect on mean similarity ratings and two primary dimensions of perceptual dialect similarity: geography (northern versus southern varieties) and dialect markedness (many versus few characteristic properties). The present findings are consistent with earlier research on the perception of dialect variation, as well as recent speech perception studies which demonstrate the integral role of talker gender in speech perception. PMID:16454310

  1. Criteria for dynamic similarity in bouncing gaits.

    PubMed

    Bullimore, Sharon R; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2008-01-21

    Animals of different sizes tend to move in a dynamically similar manner when travelling at speeds corresponding to equal values of a dimensionless parameter (DP) called the Froude number. Consequently, the Froude number has been widely used for defining equivalent speeds and predicting speeds of locomotion by extinct species and on other planets. However, experiments using simulated reduced gravity have demonstrated that equality of the Froude number does not guarantee dynamic similarity. This has cast doubt upon the usefulness of the Froude number in locomotion research. Here we use dimensional analysis of the planar spring-mass model, combined with Buckingham's Pi-Theorem, to demonstrate that four DPs must be equal for dynamic similarity in bouncing gaits such as trotting, hopping and bipedal running. This can be reduced to three DPs by applying the constraint of maintaining a constant average speed of locomotion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that all of these DPs are important for predicting dynamic similarity. We show that the reason humans do not run in a dynamically similar manner at equal Froude number in different levels of simulated reduced gravity is that dimensionless leg stiffness decreases as gravity increases. The reason that the Froude number can predict dynamic similarity in Earth gravity is that dimensionless leg stiffness and dimensionless vertical landing speed are both independent of size. In conclusion, although equal Froude number is not sufficient for dynamic similarity, it is a necessary condition. Therefore, to detect fundamental differences in locomotion, animals of different sizes should be compared at equal Froude number, so that they can be as close to dynamic similarity as possible. More generally, the concept of dynamic similarity provides a powerful framework within which similarities and differences in locomotion can be interpreted. PMID:17983630

  2. Exploring similarities among many species distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmerman, Scott; Wang, Jingyuan; Osborne, James; Shook, Kimberly; Huang, Jian; Godsoe, William; Simons, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    Collecting species presence data and then building models to predict species distribution has been long practiced in the field of ecology for the purpose of improving our understanding of species relationships with each other and with the environment. Due to limitations of computing power as well as limited means of using modeling software on HPC facilities, past species distribution studies have been unable to fully explore diverse data sets. We build a system that can, for the first time to our knowledge, leverage HPC to support effective exploration of species similarities in distribution as well as their dependencies on common environmental conditions. Our system can also compute and reveal uncertainties in the modeling results enabling domain experts to make informed judgments about the data. Our work was motivated by and centered around data collection efforts within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park that date back to the 1940s. Our findings present new research opportunities in ecology and produce actionable field-work items for biodiversity management personnel to include in their planning of daily management activities.

  3. Genetic and 'cultural' similarity in wild chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Langergraber, Kevin E; Boesch, Christophe; Inoue, Eiji; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Mitani, John C; Nishida, Toshisada; Pusey, Anne; Reynolds, Vernon; Schubert, Grit; Wrangham, Richard W; Wroblewski, Emily; Vigilant, Linda

    2011-02-01

    The question of whether animals possess 'cultures' or 'traditions' continues to generate widespread theoretical and empirical interest. Studies of wild chimpanzees have featured prominently in this discussion, as the dominant approach used to identify culture in wild animals was first applied to them. This procedure, the 'method of exclusion,' begins by documenting behavioural differences between groups and then infers the existence of culture by eliminating ecological explanations for their occurrence. The validity of this approach has been questioned because genetic differences between groups have not explicitly been ruled out as a factor contributing to between-group differences in behaviour. Here we investigate this issue directly by analysing genetic and behavioural data from nine groups of wild chimpanzees. We find that the overall levels of genetic and behavioural dissimilarity between groups are highly and statistically significantly correlated. Additional analyses show that only a very small number of behaviours vary between genetically similar groups, and that there is no obvious pattern as to which classes of behaviours (e.g. tool-use versus communicative) have a distribution that matches patterns of between-group genetic dissimilarity. These results indicate that genetic dissimilarity cannot be eliminated as playing a major role in generating group differences in chimpanzee behaviour. PMID:20719777

  4. DDE Transposases: Structural Similarity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nesmelova, Irina V.; Hackett, Perry B.

    2010-01-01

    DNA transposons are mobile DNA elements that can move from one DNA molecule to another and thereby deliver genetic information into human chromosomes in order to confer a new function or replace a defective gene. This process requires a transposase enzyme. During transposition DD[E/D]-transposases undergo a series of conformational changes. We summarize the structural features of DD[E/D]-transposases for which three-dimensional structures are available and that relate to transposases, which are being developed for use in mammalian cells. Similar to other members of the polynucleotidyl transferase family, the catalytic domains of DD[E/D]-transposases share a common feature: an RNase H-like fold that draws three catalytically active residues, the DDE motif, into close proximity. Beyond this fold, the structures of catalytic domains vary considerably, and the DD[E/D]-transposases display marked structural diversity within their DNA-binding domains. Yet despite such structural variability, essentially the same end result is achieved. PMID:20615441

  5. Popularity, similarity, and the network extraversion bias.

    PubMed

    Feiler, Daniel C; Kleinbaum, Adam M

    2015-05-01

    Using the emergent friendship network of an incoming cohort of students in an M.B.A. program, we examined the role of extraversion in shaping social networks. Extraversion has two important implications for the emergence of network ties: a popularity effect, in which extraverts accumulate more friends than introverts do, and a homophily effect, in which the more similar are two people's levels of extraversion, the more likely they are to become friends. These effects result in a systematic network extraversion bias, in which people's social networks will tend to be overpopulated with extraverts and underpopulated with introverts. Moreover, the most extraverted people have the greatest network extraversion bias, and the most introverted people have the least network extraversion bias. Our finding that social networks were systematically misrepresentative of the broader social environment raises questions about whether there is a societal bias toward believing other people are more extraverted than they actually are and whether introverts are better socially calibrated than extraverts. PMID:25838113

  6. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mollgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H.; Lehmann, Sune; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals a transition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively low weight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest links. We finally analyze the overlap between layers in the network for different levels of acquaintanceships. PMID:27300084

  7. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks.

    PubMed

    Mollgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H; Lehmann, Sune; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals a transition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively low weight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest links. We finally analyze the overlap between layers in the network for different levels of acquaintanceships. PMID:27300084

  8. International space station accomplishments update: Scientific discovery, advancing future exploration, and benefits brought home to earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Tracy; Robinson, Julie A.; Alleyne, Camille; Hasbrook, Pete; Mayo, Susan; Buckley, Nicole; Johnson-Green, Perry; Karabadzhak, George; Kamigaichi, Shigeki; Umemura, Sayaka; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Istasse, Eric; Sabbagh, Jean; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2014-10-01

    Throughout the history of the International Space Station (ISS), crews on board have conducted a variety of scientific research and educational activities. Well into the second year of full utilization of the ISS laboratory, the trend of scientific accomplishments and educational opportunities continues to grow. More than 1500 investigations have been conducted on the ISS since the first module launched in 1998, with over 700 scientific publications. The ISS provides a unique environment for research, international collaboration and educational activities that benefit humankind. This paper will provide an up to date summary of key investigations, facilities, publications, and benefits from ISS research that have developed over the past year. Discoveries in human physiology and nutrition have enabled astronauts to return from ISS with little bone loss, even as scientists seek to better understand the new puzzle of “ocular syndrome” affecting the vision of up to half of astronauts. The geneLAB campaign will unify life sciences investigations to seek genomic, proteomic and metabolomics of the effect of microgravity on life as a whole. Combustion scientists identified a new “cold flame” phenomenon that has the potential to improve models of efficient combustion back on Earth. A significant number of instruments in Earth remote sensing and astrophysics are providing new access to data or nearing completion for launch, making ISS a significant platform for understanding of the Earth system and the universe. In addition to multidisciplinary research, the ISS partnership conducts a myriad of student led research investigations and educational activities aimed at increasing student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Over the past year, the ISS partnership compiled new statistics of the educational impact of the ISS on students around the world. More than 43 million students, from kindergarten to graduate school, with more than 28

  9. International Space Station Accomplishments Update: Scientific Discovery, Advancing Future Exploration, and Benefits Brought Home to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thumm, Tracy; Robinson, Julie A.; Alleyne, Camille; Hasbrook, Pete; Mayo, Susan; Johnson-Green, Perry; Buckley, Nicole; Karabadzhak, George; Kamigaichi, Shigeki; Umemura, Sayaka; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Istasse, Eric; Sabbagh, Jean; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the history of the International Space Station (ISS), crews on board have conducted a variety of scientific research and educational activities. Well into the second year of full utilization of the ISS laboratory, the trend of scientific accomplishments and educational opportunities continues to grow. More than 1500 investigations have been conducted on the ISS since the first module launched in 1998, with over 700 scientific publications. The ISS provides a unique environment for research, international collaboration and educational activities that benefit humankind. This paper will provide an up to date summary of key investigations, facilities, publications, and benefits from ISS research that have developed over the past year. Discoveries in human physiology and nutrition have enabled astronauts to return from ISS with little bone loss, even as scientists seek to better understand the new puzzle of "ocular syndrome" affecting the vision of up to half of astronauts. The geneLAB campaign will unify life sciences investigations to seek genomic, proteomic, and metabolomics of the effect of microgravity on life as a whole. Combustion scientists identified a new "cold flame" phenomenon that has the potential to improve models of efficient combustion back on Earth. A significant number of instruments in Earth remote sensing and astrophysics are providing new access to data or nearing completion for launch, making ISS a significant platform for understanding of the Earth system and the universe. In addition to multidisciplinary research, the ISS partnership conducts a myriad of student led research investigations and educational activities aimed at increasing student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Over the past year, the ISS partnership compiled new statistics of the educational impact of the ISS on students around the world. More than 43 million students, from kindergarten to graduate school, with more than 28 million

  10. Interpersonal attraction and personality: what is attractive--self similarity, ideal similarity, complementarity or attachment security?

    PubMed

    Klohnen, Eva C; Luo, Shanhong

    2003-10-01

    Little is known about whether personality characteristics influence initial attraction. Because adult attachment differences influence a broad range of relationship processes, the authors examined their role in 3 experimental attraction studies. The authors tested four major attraction hypotheses--self similarity, ideal-self similarity, complementarity, and attachment security--and examined both actual and perceptual factors. Replicated analyses across samples, designs, and manipulations showed that actual security and self similarity predicted attraction. With regard to perceptual factors, ideal similarity, self similarity, and security all were significant predictors. Whereas perceptual ideal and self similarity had incremental predictive power, perceptual security's effects were subsumed by perceptual ideal similarity. Perceptual self similarity fully mediated actual attachment similarity effects, whereas ideal similarity was only a partial mediator. PMID:14561124

  11. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980–2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories. PMID:27137462

  12. Evaluating Similarity Measures for Brain Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Razlighi, Q. R.; Kehtarnavaz, N.; Yousefi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of similarity measures for image registration is a challenging problem due to its complex interaction with the underlying optimization, regularization, image type and modality. We propose a single performance metric, named robustness, as part of a new evaluation method which quantifies the effectiveness of similarity measures for brain image registration while eliminating the effects of the other parts of the registration process. We show empirically that similarity measures with higher robustness are more effective in registering degraded images and are also more successful in performing intermodal image registration. Further, we introduce a new similarity measure, called normalized spatial mutual information, for 3D brain image registration whose robustness is shown to be much higher than the existing ones. Consequently, it tolerates greater image degradation and provides more consistent outcomes for intermodal brain image registration. PMID:24039378

  13. Similarity Theory of Withdrawn Water Temperature Experiment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Selective withdrawal from a thermal stratified reservoir has been widely utilized in managing reservoir water withdrawal. Besides theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, model test was also necessary in studying the temperature of withdrawn water. However, information on the similarity theory of the withdrawn water temperature model remains lacking. Considering flow features of selective withdrawal, the similarity theory of the withdrawn water temperature model was analyzed theoretically based on the modification of governing equations, the Boussinesq approximation, and some simplifications. The similarity conditions between the model and the prototype were suggested. The conversion of withdrawn water temperature between the model and the prototype was proposed. Meanwhile, the fundamental theory of temperature distribution conversion was firstly proposed, which could significantly improve the experiment efficiency when the basic temperature of the model was different from the prototype. Based on the similarity theory, an experiment was performed on the withdrawn water temperature which was verified by numerical method. PMID:26065020

  14. HYPOTHESIS TESTING WITH THE SIMILARITY INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mulltilocus DNA fingerprinting methods have been used extensively to address genetic issues in wildlife populations. Hypotheses concerning population subdivision and differing levels of diversity can be addressed through the use of the similarity index (S), a band-sharing coeffic...

  15. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada; Vollmer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980-2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories. PMID:27137462

  16. Similarity and singularity in adhesive elastohydrodynamic touchdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of an elastic sheet as it starts to adhere to a wall, a process that is limited by the viscous squeeze flow of the intervening liquid. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory allows us to derive a partial differential equation coupling the elastic deformation of the sheet, the microscopic van der Waals adhesion, and viscous thin film flow. We use a combination of numerical simulations of the governing equation and a scaling analysis to describe the self-similar touchdown of the sheet as it approaches the wall. An analysis of the equation in terms of similarity variables in the vicinity of the touchdown event shows that only the fundamental similarity solution is observed in the time-dependent numerical simulations, consistent with the fact that it alone is stable. Our analysis generalizes similar approaches for rupture in capillary thin film hydrodynamics and suggests experimentally verifiable predictions for a new class of singular flows linking elasticity, hydrodynamics, and adhesion.

  17. Media segmentation using self-similarity decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Jonathan T.; Cooper, Matthew L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a framework for analyzing the structure of digital media streams. Though our methods work for video, text, and audio, we concentrate on detecting the structure of digital music files. In the first step, spectral data is used to construct a similarity matrix calculated from inter-frame spectral similarity.The digital audio can be robustly segmented by correlating a kernel along the diagonal of the similarity matrix. Once segmented, spectral statistics of each segment are computed. In the second step,segments are clustered based on the self-similarity of their statistics. This reveals the structure of the digital music in a set of segment boundaries and labels. Finally, the music is summarized by selecting clusters with repeated segments throughout the piece. The summaries can be customized for various applications based on the structure of the original music.

  18. Self-similarity in Laplacian growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark; Zabrodin, Anton; Abanov, Artem

    2008-01-01

    We consider Laplacian Growth of self-similar domains in different geometries. Self-similarity determines the analytic structure of the Schwarz function of the moving boundary. The knowledge of this analytic structure allows us to derive the integral equation for the conformal map. It is shown that solutions to the integral equation obey also a second-order differential equation which is the 1D Schroedinger equation with the sinh{sup -2}-potential. The solutions, which are expressed through the Gauss hypergeometric function, characterize the geometry of self-similar patterns in a wedge. We also find the potential for the Coulomb gas representation of the self-similar Laplacian growth in a wedge and calculate the corresponding free energy.

  19. Self-similarity in active colloid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, Colin; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    The self-similarity of displacements among randomly evolving systems has been used to describe the foraging patterns of animals and predict the growth of financial systems. At micron scales, the motion of colloidal particles can be analyzed by sampling their spatial displacement in time. For self-similar systems in equilibrium, the mean squared displacement increases linearly in time. However, external forces can take the system out of equilibrium, creating active colloidal systems, and making this evolution more complex. A moment scaling spectrum of the distribution of particle displacements quantifies the degree of self-similarity in the colloid motion. We will demonstrate that, by varying the temporal and spatial characteristics of the external forces, one can control the degree of self-similarity in active colloid motion.

  20. Interpersonal Congruency, Attitude Similarity, and Interpersonal Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touhey, John C.

    1975-01-01

    As no experimental study has examined the effects of congruency on attraction, the present investigation orthogonally varied attitude similarity and interpersonal congruency in order to compare the two independent variables as determinants of interpersonal attraction. (Author/RK)

  1. Similarity to the self influences cortical recruitment during impression formation.

    PubMed

    Leshikar, Eric D; Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2016-04-01

    Prior work has shown that whether or not someone is similar to the self influences person memory--a type of self-reference effect for others. In this study, we were interested in understanding the neural regions supporting the generation of impressions and subsequent memory for targets who vary in similarity to the self. Participants underwent fMRI scanning while forming positive or negative impressions of face-behavior pairs. We tested participants' memory for their generated impressions and then back-sorted the impression trials (encoding) into different levels of self-similarity (high, medium, low) using a self-similarity posttest that came after recognition. Extending prior behavioral work, our data confirmed our hypothesis that memory would be highest for self-similar others and lowest for self-dissimilar others. Dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity increased with self-similarity (high > medium > low) to targets, regardless of later memory for them. An analysis of regions supporting impression memory revealed a double dissociation within medial temporal lobe regions: for similar others, amygdala recruitment supported memory, whereas for dissimilar others, hippocampal activation supported memory. These results suggest that self-similarity influences evaluation and memory for targets but also affects the underlying neural resources engaged when thinking about others who vary in self-similarity. PMID:26558615

  2. Privacy-preserving matching of similar patients.

    PubMed

    Vatsalan, Dinusha; Christen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The identification of similar entities represented by records in different databases has drawn considerable attention in many application areas, including in the health domain. One important type of entity matching application that is vital for quality healthcare analytics is the identification of similar patients, known as similar patient matching. A key component of identifying similar records is the calculation of similarity of the values in attributes (fields) between these records. Due to increasing privacy and confidentiality concerns, using the actual attribute values of patient records to identify similar records across different organizations is becoming non-trivial because the attributes in such records often contain highly sensitive information such as personal and medical details of patients. Therefore, the matching needs to be based on masked (encoded) values while being effective and efficient to allow matching of large databases. Bloom filter encoding has widely been used as an efficient masking technique for privacy-preserving matching of string and categorical values. However, no work on Bloom filter-based masking of numerical data, such as integer (e.g. age), floating point (e.g. body mass index), and modulus (numbers wrap around upon reaching a certain value, e.g. date and time), which are commonly required in the health domain, has been presented in the literature. We propose a framework with novel methods for masking numerical data using Bloom filters, thereby facilitating the calculation of similarities between records. We conduct an empirical study on publicly available real-world datasets which shows that our framework provides efficient masking and achieves similar matching accuracy compared to the matching of actual unencoded patient records. PMID:26707453

  3. Predicting Odor Perceptual Similarity from Odor Structure

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Tali; Frumin, Idan; Khan, Rehan M.; Sobel, Noam

    2013-01-01

    To understand the brain mechanisms of olfaction we must understand the rules that govern the link between odorant structure and odorant perception. Natural odors are in fact mixtures made of many molecules, and there is currently no method to look at the molecular structure of such odorant-mixtures and predict their smell. In three separate experiments, we asked 139 subjects to rate the pairwise perceptual similarity of 64 odorant-mixtures ranging in size from 4 to 43 mono-molecular components. We then tested alternative models to link odorant-mixture structure to odorant-mixture perceptual similarity. Whereas a model that considered each mono-molecular component of a mixture separately provided a poor prediction of mixture similarity, a model that represented the mixture as a single structural vector provided consistent correlations between predicted and actual perceptual similarity (r≥0.49, p<0.001). An optimized version of this model yielded a correlation of r = 0.85 (p<0.001) between predicted and actual mixture similarity. In other words, we developed an algorithm that can look at the molecular structure of two novel odorant-mixtures, and predict their ensuing perceptual similarity. That this goal was attained using a model that considers the mixtures as a single vector is consistent with a synthetic rather than analytical brain processing mechanism in olfaction. PMID:24068899

  4. Initial eye movements during face identification are optimal and similar across cultures

    PubMed Central

    Or, Charles C.-F.; Peterson, Matthew F.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2015-01-01

    Culture influences not only human high-level cognitive processes but also low-level perceptual operations. Some perceptual operations, such as initial eye movements to faces, are critical for extraction of information supporting evolutionarily important tasks such as face identification. The extent of cultural effects on these crucial perceptual processes is unknown. Here, we report that the first gaze location for face identification was similar across East Asian and Western Caucasian cultural groups: Both fixated a featureless point between the eyes and the nose, with smaller between-group than within-group differences and with a small horizontal difference across cultures (8% of the interocular distance). We also show that individuals of both cultural groups initially fixated at a slightly higher point on Asian faces than on Caucasian faces. The initial fixations were found to be both fundamental in acquiring the majority of information for face identification and optimal, as accuracy deteriorated when observers held their gaze away from their preferred fixations. An ideal observer that integrated facial information with the human visual system's varying spatial resolution across the visual field showed a similar information distribution across faces of both races and predicted initial human fixations. The model consistently replicated the small vertical difference between human fixations to Asian and Caucasian faces but did not predict the small horizontal leftward bias of Caucasian observers. Together, the results suggest that initial eye movements during face identification may be driven by brain mechanisms aimed at maximizing accuracy, and less influenced by culture. The findings increase our understanding of the interplay between the brain's aims to optimally accomplish basic perceptual functions and to respond to sociocultural influences. PMID:26382003

  5. Accomplishments of the Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) RBCC Project at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, J. Craig (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    and parametrics were performed at NASA / Glenn Research Center (GRC) and NASA / Langley Research Center (LaRC) for both the Aerojet and Rocketdyne concepts. LaRC conducted an Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle (ABLV) study for several vehicle concepts with RBCC propulsion systems. LaRC is also performing a CFD analysis of the ramjet mode for both flowpaths based on GASL test conditions. A study was performed in 1999 to investigate the feasibility of performing an RBCC flight test on the NASA / Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) SR-71 aircraft. Academia involvement in the ART project includes parametric RBCC flowpath testing by Pennsylvania State University (PSU). In addition to thrust and wall static pressure measurements, PSU is also using laser diagnostics to analyze the flowfield in the test rig. MSFC is performing CFD analysis of the PSU rig at select test conditions for model baseline and validation. Also, Georgia Institute of Technology (GT) conducted a vision vehicle study using the Aerojet RBCC concept. Overall, the ART project has been very successful in advancing RBCC technology. Along the way, several major milestones were achieved and "firsts" accomplished. For example, under the ART project, the first dynamic trajectory simulation testing was performed and the Rocketdyne engine A5 logged over one hour of accumulated test time. The next logical step is to develop and demonstrate a flight-weight RBCC engine system.

  6. Merits of a Locality Sample for Accomplishing Mars Exploration Goals: The First Sample Return Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, D. S.; Bogard, D. D.; Agee, C. B.; McKay, G. A.; Jones, J. H.

    2002-05-01

    A major stumbling block to a Mars sample return (MSR) mission is the seemingly prohibitive cost of maximizing sample diversity. The use of rovers, sophisticated on-board instrumentation, and various sample selection techniques are perceived by some to be necessary to maximize the scientific return by making it possible to acquire as diverse a suite of samples as possible. Here, we argue that many key science goals of the Mars Exploration Program may be accomplished by returning only a "locality sample" at a well-chosen landing site. A locality sample would be local regolith consisting of soil, windblown fines, and lithic fragments (plus Martian atmosphere). We argue that even the simplest sample return mission could revolutionize our understanding of the planet, without requiring the large outlays for technology development currently envisioned. By the time a MSR mission could realistically be flown, it is reasonable to expect that information from the Mars Odyssey, Mars Express, 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers, and 2005 Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will be sufficient to make a good choice of landing site. Returned samples of Martian regolith have the potential to answer key questions of fundamental importance to the Mars Exploration Program: The search for life; understanding the role and history of water and other volatiles; helping to interpret remotely-sensed spectral data; and understanding the planet as a system. The value of such samples has been studied exhaustively for decades and detailed in publications dating back at least to 1974. A locality sample can further the search for life by identifying, among other things, trace quantities of surface organics, biogenic elements and their isotopic compositions, evidence for water in the form of hydrous minerals and/or cements, the nature of the Martian soil oxidant, trace biomarkers, and evidence for clay-forming processes. The role of water will be better understood by revealing, in addition, whether interactions

  7. Florida's Adult Education Programs: Challenges and Accomplishments. A Report for Fiscal Year 1991 [and] Fiscal Year 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Daniel L.

    These two reports outline accomplishments and challenges faced by Florida's AE program in FY91 and FY92 in the following areas: adult literacy, social participation, career development, special needs of the AE program's diverse identified target groups, high school completion, General Educational Development, workplace literacy, networking,…

  8. The First Use of the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP) in Prekindergarten Head Start 1976-1977. Report Number 77137.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silbermann, David J.

    Prekindergarten Head Start teachers were trained to administer the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP), an objective check list of development in seven areas: gross motor, fine motor manipulation and writing, social, self help, cognitive, and language skills. Data were collected from separate groups of 3, 4, and 5-year old children to ascertain…

  9. TERRA FIRMA. Threshold of Educational Reform Restructuring Agriculture for Inner City Related Motivation and Accomplishments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, John L.

    The report describes the first year (1974-75) activities and accomplishments of a project to provide a cooperative-based vocational agriculture program for secondary students in Anniston, Alabama. The overall objectives were to provide instruction in livestock production and horticulture, leadership training, participatory experience on a real…

  10. "He Talks to You, Not at You": Attending to Learners' Perspectives to Enhance Understanding of Accomplished Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriewaldt, Jeana

    2009-01-01

    The voices of students can make a significant contribution to understanding what constitutes accomplished teaching (Flutter, 2007). Young people give cogent and significant views about their learning, providing important insights for improving teaching (Rudduck, McIntyre, & ESRC Teaching and Learning Programme., 2007). Using a qualitative…

  11. SB08 212 Legislative Update Report: Colorado's Achievement Plan for Kids (CAP4K) 2010 Goals and Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper serves as the Colorado Department of Education's (CDE's) third annual update on the progress and plan for the implementation of the Colorado Achievement Plan for Kids (CAP4K). Enclosed within this report is a narrative that documents accomplishments to date with respect to key deliverables, as well as supporting appendices, including…

  12. Advancing computational toxicology in a regulatory setting: A selected review of the accomplishments of Gilman D. Veith (1944-2013)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gilman Veith joined the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and its Office of Research and Development, in 1972. Spanning 30 years of public service with EPA through 2003, Gil’s accomplishments in leading multidisciplinary research teams to successfully address a broad spe...

  13. When Social Support Is Uncomfortable. The Communicative Accomplishment of Support as a Cultural Term in a Youth Intervention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, James S.; Mattson, Marifran

    1999-01-01

    Expands understanding of social support by addressing the communicative use of support in a community program for troubled teens. Presents the ways in which the organization accomplishes and constructs support. Identifies and explores two novel aspects of supportive communication: supportive communication that may be perceived as uncomfortable and…

  14. Investing in the Improvement of Mathematics and Science Education in Rural Appalachia: Ten Years of ARSI and Its Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inverness Research Associates, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report provides the reader with a summary of the rationale, design strategies, and major accomplishments of the Appalachian Rural Systemic Initiative (ARSI). Drawing upon both the data collected directly in Appalachia by Inverness Research Associates, as well as knowledge gained by working with many other rural initiatives, this summary…

  15. Similarity Metrics for Closed Loop Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Yang, Lee C.; Bedrossian, Naz; Hall, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent and in what ways can two closed-loop dynamic systems be said to be "similar?" This question arises in a wide range of dynamic systems modeling and control system design applications. For example, bounds on error models are fundamental to the controller optimization with modern control design methods. Metrics such as the structured singular value are direct measures of the degree to which properties such as stability or performance are maintained in the presence of specified uncertainties or variations in the plant model. Similarly, controls-related areas such as system identification, model reduction, and experimental model validation employ measures of similarity between multiple realizations of a dynamic system. Each area has its tools and approaches, with each tool more or less suited for one application or the other. Similarity in the context of closed-loop model validation via flight test is subtly different from error measures in the typical controls oriented application. Whereas similarity in a robust control context relates to plant variation and the attendant affect on stability and performance, in this context similarity metrics are sought that assess the relevance of a dynamic system test for the purpose of validating the stability and performance of a "similar" dynamic system. Similarity in the context of system identification is much more relevant than are robust control analogies in that errors between one dynamic system (the test article) and another (the nominal "design" model) are sought for the purpose of bounding the validity of a model for control design and analysis. Yet system identification typically involves open-loop plant models which are independent of the control system (with the exception of limited developments in closed-loop system identification which is nonetheless focused on obtaining open-loop plant models from closed-loop data). Moreover the objectives of system identification are not the same as a flight test and

  16. A New Semantic Functional Similarity over Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Cheol; Chen, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Identifying functionally similar or closely related genes and gene products has significant impacts on biological and clinical studies as well as drug discovery. In this paper, we propose an effective and practically useful method measuring both gene and gene product similarity by integrating the topology of gene ontology, known functional domains and their functional annotations. The proposed method is comprehensively evaluated through statistical analysis of the similarities derived from sequence, structure and phylogenetic profiles, and clustering analysis of disease genes clusters. Our results show that the proposed method clearly outperforms other conventional methods. Furthermore, literature analysis also reveals that the proposed method is both statistically and biologically promising for identifying functionally similar genes or gene products. In particular, we demonstrate that the proposed functional similarity metric is capable of discoverying new disease related genes or gene products. PMID:26357220

  17. Average is Boring: How Similarity Kills a Meme's Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscia, Michele

    2014-09-01

    Every day we are exposed to different ideas, or memes, competing with each other for our attention. Previous research explained popularity and persistence heterogeneity of memes by assuming them in competition for limited attention resources, distributed in a heterogeneous social network. Little has been said about what characteristics make a specific meme more likely to be successful. We propose a similarity-based explanation: memes with higher similarity to other memes have a significant disadvantage in their potential popularity. We employ a meme similarity measure based on semantic text analysis and computer vision to prove that a meme is more likely to be successful and to thrive if its characteristics make it unique. Our results show that indeed successful memes are located in the periphery of the meme similarity space and that our similarity measure is a promising predictor of a meme success.

  18. Distributed efficient similarity search mechanism in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Khandakar; Gregory, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The Wireless Sensor Network similarity search problem has received considerable research attention due to sensor hardware imprecision and environmental parameter variations. Most of the state-of-the-art distributed data centric storage (DCS) schemes lack optimization for similarity queries of events. In this paper, a DCS scheme with metric based similarity searching (DCSMSS) is proposed. DCSMSS takes motivation from vector distance index, called iDistance, in order to transform the issue of similarity searching into the problem of an interval search in one dimension. In addition, a sector based distance routing algorithm is used to efficiently route messages. Extensive simulation results reveal that DCSMSS is highly efficient and significantly outperforms previous approaches in processing similarity search queries. PMID:25751081

  19. Average is boring: how similarity kills a meme's success.

    PubMed

    Coscia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Every day we are exposed to different ideas, or memes, competing with each other for our attention. Previous research explained popularity and persistence heterogeneity of memes by assuming them in competition for limited attention resources, distributed in a heterogeneous social network. Little has been said about what characteristics make a specific meme more likely to be successful. We propose a similarity-based explanation: memes with higher similarity to other memes have a significant disadvantage in their potential popularity. We employ a meme similarity measure based on semantic text analysis and computer vision to prove that a meme is more likely to be successful and to thrive if its characteristics make it unique. Our results show that indeed successful memes are located in the periphery of the meme similarity space and that our similarity measure is a promising predictor of a meme success. PMID:25257730

  20. Distributed Efficient Similarity Search Mechanism in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khandakar; Gregory, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The Wireless Sensor Network similarity search problem has received considerable research attention due to sensor hardware imprecision and environmental parameter variations. Most of the state-of-the-art distributed data centric storage (DCS) schemes lack optimization for similarity queries of events. In this paper, a DCS scheme with metric based similarity searching (DCSMSS) is proposed. DCSMSS takes motivation from vector distance index, called iDistance, in order to transform the issue of similarity searching into the problem of an interval search in one dimension. In addition, a sector based distance routing algorithm is used to efficiently route messages. Extensive simulation results reveal that DCSMSS is highly efficient and significantly outperforms previous approaches in processing similarity search queries. PMID:25751081

  1. Escaping the avalanche collapse in self-similar multiplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles Serrano, M.; Buzna, Ľuboš; Boguñá, Marián

    2015-05-01

    We deduce and discuss the implications of self-similarity for the robustness to failure of multiplexes, depending on interlayer degree correlations. First, we define self-similarity of multiplexes and we illustrate the concept in practice using the configuration model ensemble. Circumscribing robustness to survival of the mutually percolated state, we find a new explanation based on self-similarity both for the observed fragility of interconnected systems of networks and for their robustness to failure when interlayer degree correlations are present. Extending the self-similarity arguments, we show that interlayer degree correlations can change completely the global connectivity properties of self-similar multiplexes, so that they can even recover a zero percolation threshold and a continuous transition in the thermodynamic limit, qualitatively exhibiting thus the ordinary percolation properties of noninteracting networks. We confirm these results with numerical simulations.

  2. Average is Boring: How Similarity Kills a Meme's Success

    PubMed Central

    Coscia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Every day we are exposed to different ideas, or memes, competing with each other for our attention. Previous research explained popularity and persistence heterogeneity of memes by assuming them in competition for limited attention resources, distributed in a heterogeneous social network. Little has been said about what characteristics make a specific meme more likely to be successful. We propose a similarity-based explanation: memes with higher similarity to other memes have a significant disadvantage in their potential popularity. We employ a meme similarity measure based on semantic text analysis and computer vision to prove that a meme is more likely to be successful and to thrive if its characteristics make it unique. Our results show that indeed successful memes are located in the periphery of the meme similarity space and that our similarity measure is a promising predictor of a meme success. PMID:25257730

  3. Efficient Video Similarity Measurement and Search

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, S-C S

    2002-12-19

    The amount of information on the world wide web has grown enormously since its creation in 1990. Duplication of content is inevitable because there is no central management on the web. Studies have shown that many similar versions of the same text documents can be found throughout the web. This redundancy problem is more severe for multimedia content such as web video sequences, as they are often stored in multiple locations and different formats to facilitate downloading and streaming. Similar versions of the same video can also be found, unknown to content creators, when web users modify and republish original content using video editing tools. Identifying similar content can benefit many web applications and content owners. For example, it will reduce the number of similar answers to a web search and identify inappropriate use of copyright content. In this dissertation, they present a system architecture and corresponding algorithms to efficiently measure, search, and organize similar video sequences found on any large database such as the web.

  4. Earthquake detection through computationally efficient similarity search

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Clara E.; O’Reilly, Ossian; Bergen, Karianne J.; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Seismology is experiencing rapid growth in the quantity of data, which has outpaced the development of processing algorithms. Earthquake detection—identification of seismic events in continuous data—is a fundamental operation for observational seismology. We developed an efficient method to detect earthquakes using waveform similarity that overcomes the disadvantages of existing detection methods. Our method, called Fingerprint And Similarity Thresholding (FAST), can analyze a week of continuous seismic waveform data in less than 2 hours, or 140 times faster than autocorrelation. FAST adapts a data mining algorithm, originally designed to identify similar audio clips within large databases; it first creates compact “fingerprints” of waveforms by extracting key discriminative features, then groups similar fingerprints together within a database to facilitate fast, scalable search for similar fingerprint pairs, and finally generates a list of earthquake detections. FAST detected most (21 of 24) cataloged earthquakes and 68 uncataloged earthquakes in 1 week of continuous data from a station located near the Calaveras Fault in central California, achieving detection performance comparable to that of autocorrelation, with some additional false detections. FAST is expected to realize its full potential when applied to extremely long duration data sets over a distributed network of seismic stations. The widespread application of FAST has the potential to aid in the discovery of unexpected seismic signals, improve seismic monitoring, and promote a greater understanding of a variety of earthquake processes. PMID:26665176

  5. Earthquake detection through computationally efficient similarity search.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Clara E; O'Reilly, Ossian; Bergen, Karianne J; Beroza, Gregory C

    2015-12-01

    Seismology is experiencing rapid growth in the quantity of data, which has outpaced the development of processing algorithms. Earthquake detection-identification of seismic events in continuous data-is a fundamental operation for observational seismology. We developed an efficient method to detect earthquakes using waveform similarity that overcomes the disadvantages of existing detection methods. Our method, called Fingerprint And Similarity Thresholding (FAST), can analyze a week of continuous seismic waveform data in less than 2 hours, or 140 times faster than autocorrelation. FAST adapts a data mining algorithm, originally designed to identify similar audio clips within large databases; it first creates compact "fingerprints" of waveforms by extracting key discriminative features, then groups similar fingerprints together within a database to facilitate fast, scalable search for similar fingerprint pairs, and finally generates a list of earthquake detections. FAST detected most (21 of 24) cataloged earthquakes and 68 uncataloged earthquakes in 1 week of continuous data from a station located near the Calaveras Fault in central California, achieving detection performance comparable to that of autocorrelation, with some additional false detections. FAST is expected to realize its full potential when applied to extremely long duration data sets over a distributed network of seismic stations. The widespread application of FAST has the potential to aid in the discovery of unexpected seismic signals, improve seismic monitoring, and promote a greater understanding of a variety of earthquake processes. PMID:26665176

  6. Exact score distribution computation for ontological similarity searches

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Semantic similarity searches in ontologies are an important component of many bioinformatic algorithms, e.g., finding functionally related proteins with the Gene Ontology or phenotypically similar diseases with the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO). We have recently shown that the performance of semantic similarity searches can be improved by ranking results according to the probability of obtaining a given score at random rather than by the scores themselves. However, to date, there are no algorithms for computing the exact distribution of semantic similarity scores, which is necessary for computing the exact P-value of a given score. Results In this paper we consider the exact computation of score distributions for similarity searches in ontologies, and introduce a simple null hypothesis which can be used to compute a P-value for the statistical significance of similarity scores. We concentrate on measures based on Resnik's definition of ontological similarity. A new algorithm is proposed that collapses subgraphs of the ontology graph and thereby allows fast score distribution computation. The new algorithm is several orders of magnitude faster than the naive approach, as we demonstrate by computing score distributions for similarity searches in the HPO. It is shown that exact P-value calculation improves clinical diagnosis using the HPO compared to approaches based on sampling. Conclusions The new algorithm enables for the first time exact P-value calculation via exact score distribution computation for ontology similarity searches. The approach is applicable to any ontology for which the annotation-propagation rule holds and can improve any bioinformatic method that makes only use of the raw similarity scores. The algorithm was implemented in Java, supports any ontology in OBO format, and is available for non-commercial and academic usage under: https://compbio.charite.de/svn/hpo/trunk/src/tools/significance/ PMID:22078312

  7. Similar biotherapeutic products: overview and reflections.

    PubMed

    Desanvicente-Celis, Zayrho; Gomez-Lopez, Arley; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-12-01

    Biotherapeutic products (BPs) have revolutionized medicine, changing the way we treat several pathologies such as autoimmune diseases and cancer, among others. Herein, we present an overview of similar BPs (SBPs), also called biosimilars, including the manufacturing process and regulatory aspects involved. The objective of developing an SBP is to manufacture a molecule that is highly similar to a reference BP by conducting a comparability exercise (CE) that can demonstrate similar safety and efficacy. This CE consists of quality, as well as nonclinical and clinical evaluation. A case-by-case analysis approach guided by scientific and objective standards must be the foundation for the SBP approval process. The establishment of a balance between a comprehensive CE for SBPs and their reference BPs, and the design of costeffective strategies to provide better access to BPs, should be the key goal for national regulatory authorities. PMID:23240752

  8. Similarity issues of confluence of fuzzy relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Tomas; Vychodil, Vilem

    2012-04-01

    We study similarity issues of confluence and related properties of fuzzy relations. The ordinary notions of divergence, convergence, convertibility, and confluence are essential properties of relations which appear in abstract rewriting systems. In a graded setting, we can introduce analogous notions related to the idea of approximate rewriting. This paper is a continuation of our previous paper (Belohlavek et al. 2010), where we have introduced such notions using residuated structures of truth degrees, leaving the ordinary notions a particular case when the underlying structure of truth degrees is the two-valued Boolean algebra. In this paper, we focus on similarity issues of confluence and present formulas which provide approximations of degrees of confluence and related properties based on similarity of the original fuzzy relations.

  9. Quantifying the similarity of seismic polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Joshua P.; Eaton, David W.; Caffagni, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Assessing the similarities of seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low signal-to-noise (S/N) signals and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values or known seismic sources. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in S/N ratio. Measuring polarization similarity allows easy identification of site noise and sensor misalignment and can help identify coherent noise and emergent or low S/N phase arrivals. Dissimilar azimuths during phase arrivals indicate misaligned horizontal components, dissimilar incidence angles during phase arrivals indicate misaligned vertical components and dissimilar linear polarization may indicate a secondary noise source. Using records of the Mw = 8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake, from Canadian National Seismic Network broad-band sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and a vertical borehole array at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Time-frequency polarization similarities of borehole data suggest that a coherent noise source may have persisted above 8 Hz several months after peak resource extraction from a `flowback' type hydraulic fracture.

  10. MODIS Validation, Data Merger and Other Activities Accomplished by the SIMBIOS Project: 2002-2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide current documentation of the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities, satellite data processing, and data product validation. This documentation is necessary to ensure that critical information is related to the scientific community and NASA management. This critical information includes the technical difficulties and challenges of validating and combining ocean color data from an array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. This technical report focuses on the SIMBIOS Project s efforts in support of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra platform (similar evaluations of MODIS/Aqua are underway). This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational project.

  11. Some more similarities between Peirce and Skinner.

    PubMed

    Moxley, Roy A

    2002-01-01

    C. S. Peirce is noted for pioneering a variety of views, and the case is made here for the similarities and parallels between his views and B. F. Skinner's radical behaviorism. In addition to parallels previously noted, these similarities include an advancement of experimental science, a behavioral psychology, a shift from nominalism to realism, an opposition to positivism, a selectionist account for strengthening behavior, the importance of a community of selves, a recursive approach to method, and the probabilistic nature of truth. Questions are raised as to the extent to which Skinner's radical behaviorism, as distinguished from his S-R positivism, may be seen as an extension of Peirce's pragmatism. PMID:22478387

  12. Some more similarities between Peirce and Skinner

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2002-01-01

    C. S. Peirce is noted for pioneering a variety of views, and the case is made here for the similarities and parallels between his views and B. F. Skinner's radical behaviorism. In addition to parallels previously noted, these similarities include an advancement of experimental science, a behavioral psychology, a shift from nominalism to realism, an opposition to positivism, a selectionist account for strengthening behavior, the importance of a community of selves, a recursive approach to method, and the probabilistic nature of truth. Questions are raised as to the extent to which Skinner's radical behaviorism, as distinguished from his S-R positivism, may be seen as an extension of Peirce's pragmatism. PMID:22478387

  13. Investigation of psychophysical similarity measures for selection of similar images in the diagnosis of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Schmidt, Robert; Shiraishi, Junji; Doi, Kunio

    2008-12-15

    coefficient between the gold standard and the psychophysical similarity measure through the use of seven features was relatively high (r=0.71) and was comparable to the correlation coefficients between the ratings by one radiologist and the average ratings by nine radiologists (r=0.69{+-}0.07). The correlation coefficient was improved compared to that of a distance-based method (r=0.58). The result indicated that similar images selected by the psychophysical similarity measure may be useful to radiologists in the diagnosis of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms.

  14. Representational Similarity of Body Parts in Human Occipitotemporal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bracci, Stefania; Caramazza, Alfonso; Peelen, Marius V

    2015-09-23

    Regions in human lateral and ventral occipitotemporal cortices (OTC) respond selectively to pictures of the human body and its parts. What are the organizational principles underlying body part responses in these regions? Here we used representational similarity analysis (RSA) of fMRI data to test multiple possible organizational principles: shape similarity, physical proximity, cortical homunculus proximity, and semantic similarity. Participants viewed pictures of whole persons, chairs, and eight body parts (hands, arms, legs, feet, chests, waists, upper faces, and lower faces). The similarity of multivoxel activity patterns for all body part pairs was established in whole person-selective OTC regions. The resulting neural similarity matrices were then compared with similarity matrices capturing the hypothesized organizational principles. Results showed that the semantic similarity model best captured the neural similarity of body parts in lateral and ventral OTC, which followed an organization in three clusters: (1) body parts used as action effectors (hands, feet, arms, and legs), (2) noneffector body parts (chests and waists), and (3) face parts (upper and lower faces). Whole-brain RSA revealed, in addition to OTC, regions in parietal and frontal cortex in which neural similarity was related to semantic similarity. In contrast, neural similarity in occipital cortex was best predicted by shape similarity models. We suggest that the semantic organization of body parts in high-level visual cortex relates to the different functions associated with the three body part clusters, reflecting the unique processing and connectivity demands associated with the different types of information (e.g., action, social) different body parts (e.g., limbs, faces) convey. Significance statement: While the organization of body part representations in motor and somatosensory cortices has been well characterized, the principles underlying body part representations in visual cortex

  15. Estimating the self-similar exponent of broad-sense self-similar processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Guijun; Tong, Changqing

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm about the self-similar exponent of self-similar processes is introduced which is used to explore long memory in financial time series. This method can work for more general broad-sense self-similar processes. We prove that this algorithm performs much better than the classical methods.

  16. A Short Survey of Document Structure Similarity Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, D

    2004-02-27

    This paper provides a brief survey of document structural similarity algorithms, including the optimal Tree Edit Distance algorithm and various approximation algorithms. The approximation algorithms include the simple weighted tag similarity algorithm, Fourier transforms of the structure, and a new application of the shingle technique to structural similarity. We show three surprising results. First, the Fourier transform technique proves to be the least accurate of any of approximation algorithms, while also being slowest. Second, optimal Tree Edit Distance algorithms may not be the best technique for clustering pages from different sites. Third, the simplest approximation to structure may be the most effective and efficient mechanism for many applications.

  17. Annular self-similar solutions in ideal magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, R. M.; Mestel, A. J.

    2008-08-01

    We consider the possibility of self-similar solutions describing the implosion of hollow cylindrical annuli driven by an azimuthal magnetic field, in essence a self-similar imploding liner z-pinch. We construct such solutions for gasdynamics, for ideal ‘β=0’ plasma and for ideal magnetogasdynamics (MGD). In the latter two cases some quantities are singular at the annular boundaries. Numerical solutions of the full ideal MGD initial value problem indicate that the self-similar solutions are not attractive for arbitrary initial conditions, possibly as a result of flux-freezing.

  18. An integrative approach for measuring semantic similarities using gene ontology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene Ontology (GO) provides rich information and a convenient way to study gene functional similarity, which has been successfully used in various applications. However, the existing GO based similarity measurements have limited functions for only a subset of GO information is considered in each measure. An appropriate integration of the existing measures to take into account more information in GO is demanding. Results We propose a novel integrative measure called InteGO2 to automatically select appropriate seed measures and then to integrate them using a metaheuristic search method. The experiment results show that InteGO2 significantly improves the performance of gene similarity in human, Arabidopsis and yeast on both molecular function and biological process GO categories. Conclusions InteGO2 computes gene-to-gene similarities more accurately than tested existing measures and has high robustness. The supplementary document and software are available at http://mlg.hit.edu.cn:8082/. PMID:25559943

  19. Predicting spatial similarity of freshwater fish biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Azaele, Sandro; Muneepeerakul, Rachata; Maritan, Amos; Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    A major issue in modern ecology is to understand how ecological complexity at broad scales is regulated by mechanisms operating at the organismic level. What specific underlying processes are essential for a macroecological pattern to emerge? Here, we analyze the analytical predictions of a general model suitable for describing the spatial biodiversity similarity in river ecosystems, and benchmark them against the empirical occurrence data of freshwater fish species collected in the Mississippi–Missouri river system. Encapsulating immigration, emigration, and stochastic noise, and without resorting to species abundance data, the model is able to reproduce the observed probability distribution of the Jaccard similarity index at any given distance. In addition to providing an excellent agreement with the empirical data, this approach accounts for heterogeneities of different subbasins, suggesting a strong dependence of biodiversity similarity on their respective climates. Strikingly, the model can also predict the actual probability distribution of the Jaccard similarity index for any distance when considering just a relatively small sample. The proposed framework supports the notion that simplified macroecological models are capable of predicting fundamental patterns—a theme at the heart of modern community ecology. PMID:19359481

  20. Explaining Sibling Similarities: Perceptions of Sibling Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined older siblings' influence on their younger brothers and sisters by assessing the connections between youth's perceptions of sibling influence and sibling similarities in four domains: Risky behavior, peer competence, sports interests, and art interests. Participants included two adolescent-age siblings (firstborn age M=17.34;…

  1. Similarity of Experience and Empathy in Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Mark A.

    The present study examined the role of similarity of experience in young children's affective reactions to others. Some preschoolers played one of two games (Puzzle Board or Buckets) and were informed that they had either failed or succeeded; others merely observed the games being played and were given no evaluative feedback. Subsequently, each…

  2. Using Similarity to Find Length and Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandefur, James T.

    1994-01-01

    Shows a way in which algebra and geometry can be used together to find the lengths and areas of spirals. This method develops better understanding of shapes, similarity, and mathematical connections in students. Discusses spirals embedded in triangles and squares, the Pythagorean theorem, and the area of regular polygons. (MKR)

  3. 7 CFR 51.1997 - Similar type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Similar type. 51.1997 Section 51.1997 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF...

  4. Similarity of Science Textbooks: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Michael

    1973-01-01

    Studied the similarity of the astronomy portion in five science textbooks at the fourth through sixth grade levels by comparing students' responses to text authors' requirements. Concluded that the texts had more in common across grade levels than within grade levels. (CC)

  5. Measuring the Perceptual Similarity of Pitch Contours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermes, Dik J.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of four different methods for measuring the similarity of pitch contours. The correlation coefficient between two normalized contours was the best method; however, if pitch range is important, the mean distance and the root-mean-square distance should be considered first in automatic training in…

  6. Great Apes' Capacities to Recognize Relational Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun, Daniel B. M.; Call, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing relational similarity relies on the ability to understand that defining object properties might not lie in the objects individually, but in the relations of the properties of various object to each other. This aptitude is highly relevant for many important human skills such as language, reasoning, categorization and understanding…

  7. The Case of the Similar Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rochelle Wilson

    1982-01-01

    A possible logical flaw based on similar triangles is discussed with the Sherlock Holmes mystery, "The Muskgrave Ritual." The possible flaw has to do with the need for two trees to have equal growth rates over a 250-year period in order for the solution presented to work. (MP)

  8. Black hole physics: More similar than knot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, José L.

    2016-08-01

    The detection of a discrete knot of particle emission from the active galaxy M81* reveals that black hole accretion is self-similar with regard to mass, producing the same knotty jets irrespective of black hole mass and accretion rate.

  9. Self-similar solitary waves in Bessel optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Siliu; Liang Jianchu; Yi Lin

    2010-01-15

    An analytical solitary wave solution to the generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) with varying coefficients in Bessel optical lattices is obtained based on the self-similar method. Our results indicate that a new family of Bessel (BSL) self-similar spatial solitons can be formed in the Kerr nonlinear media in the confined cylindrical symmetric geometry in sizes. These soliton profiles are rather stable, independent of propagation distance.

  10. Constructing lncRNA functional similarity network based on lncRNA-disease associations and disease semantic similarity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Luo, Cai; Ji, Wen; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that plenty of lncRNAs play important roles in many critical biological processes. Developing powerful computational models to construct lncRNA functional similarity network based on heterogeneous biological datasets is one of the most important and popular topics in the fields of both lncRNAs and complex diseases. Functional similarity network construction could benefit the model development for both lncRNA function inference and lncRNA-disease association identification. However, little effort has been attempted to analysis and calculate lncRNA functional similarity on a large scale. In this study, based on the assumption that functionally similar lncRNAs tend to be associated with similar diseases, we developed two novel lncRNA functional similarity calculation models (LNCSIM). LNCSIM was evaluated by introducing similarity scores into the model of Laplacian Regularized Least Squares for LncRNA-Disease Association (LRLSLDA) for lncRNA-disease association prediction. As a result, new predictive models improved the performance of LRLSLDA in the leave-one-out cross validation of various known lncRNA-disease associations datasets. Furthermore, some of the predictive results for colorectal cancer and lung cancer were verified by independent biological experimental studies. It is anticipated that LNCSIM could be a useful and important biological tool for human disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. PMID:26061969

  11. Constructing lncRNA functional similarity network based on lncRNA-disease associations and disease semantic similarity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Clarence Yan, Chenggang; Luo, Cai; Ji, Wen; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that plenty of lncRNAs play important roles in many critical biological processes. Developing powerful computational models to construct lncRNA functional similarity network based on heterogeneous biological datasets is one of the most important and popular topics in the fields of both lncRNAs and complex diseases. Functional similarity network consturction could benefit the model development for both lncRNA function inference and lncRNA-disease association identification. However, little effort has been attempted to analysis and calculate lncRNA functional similarity on a large scale. In this study, based on the assumption that functionally similar lncRNAs tend to be associated with similar diseases, we developed two novel lncRNA functional similarity calculation models (LNCSIM). LNCSIM was evaluated by introducing similarity scores into the model of Laplacian Regularized Least Squares for LncRNA–Disease Association (LRLSLDA) for lncRNA-disease association prediction. As a result, new predictive models improved the performance of LRLSLDA in the leave-one-out cross validation of various known lncRNA-disease associations datasets. Furthermore, some of the predictive results for colorectal cancer and lung cancer were verified by independent biological experimental studies. It is anticipated that LNCSIM could be a useful and important biological tool for human disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. PMID:26061969

  12. A Longitudinal Examination of Serious Adolescent Offenders’ Perceptions of Chances for Success and Engagement in Behaviors Accomplishing Goals

    PubMed Central

    Iselin, Anne-Marie R.; Mulvey, Edward P.; Loughran, Thomas A.; Chung, He Len; Schubert, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined antisocial adolescents’ perceptions of the importance of and their ability to accomplish positive life outcomes (e.g., employment) and avoid negative ones (e.g., arrests) during their transition from adolescence to young adulthood. Participants were 1,354 adolescents from the Pathways to Desistance project, a multisite longitudinal study of seriously antisocial adolescents. Participants’ perceptions of the importance and likelihood of accomplishing positive adult goals at one age uniquely predicted how often they engaged in behaviors that were consistent with these goals the following year. Our findings suggest that among serious adolescent offenders aspirations to achieve positive goals are related to engaging in behaviors that bring adolescents’ current selves more in line with their aspired-to future selves. We discuss the implications of these findings for prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:21881855

  13. Gait Recognition Using Image Self-Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenAbdelkader, Chiraz; Cutler, Ross G.; Davis, Larry S.

    2004-12-01

    Gait is one of the few biometrics that can be measured at a distance, and is hence useful for passive surveillance as well as biometric applications. Gait recognition research is still at its infancy, however, and we have yet to solve the fundamental issue of finding gait features which at once have sufficient discrimination power and can be extracted robustly and accurately from low-resolution video. This paper describes a novel gait recognition technique based on the image self-similarity of a walking person. We contend that the similarity plot encodes a projection of gait dynamics. It is also correspondence-free, robust to segmentation noise, and works well with low-resolution video. The method is tested on multiple data sets of varying sizes and degrees of difficulty. Performance is best for fronto-parallel viewpoints, whereby a recognition rate of 98% is achieved for a data set of 6 people, and 70% for a data set of 54 people.

  14. Selection of USSR foreign similarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disler, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The similarity regions in the United States and Canada were selected to parallel the conditions that affect labeling and classification accuracies in the U.S.S.R. indicator regions. In addition to climate, a significant condition that affects labeling and classification accuracies in the U.S.S.R. is the proportion of barley and wheat grown in a given region (based on sown areas). The following regions in the United States and Canada were determined to be similar to the U.S.S.R. indicator regions: (1) Montana agrophysical unit (APU) 104 corresponds to the Belorussia high barley region; (2) North Dakota and Minnesota APU 20 and secondary region southern Manitoba and Saskatchewan correspond to the Ural RSFSR barley and spring wheat region; (3) Montana APU 23 corresponds to he North Caucasus barley and winter wheat region. Selection criteria included climates, crop type, crop distribution, growth cycles, field sizes, and field shapes.

  15. Category-based induction from similarity of neural activation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Matthew J; Osherson, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The idea that similarity might be an engine of inductive inference dates back at least as far as David Hume. However, Hume's thesis is difficult to test without begging the question, since judgments of similarity may be infected by inferential processes. We present a one-parameter model of category-based induction that generates predictions about arbitrary statements of conditional probability over a predicate and a set of items. The prediction is based on the unconditional probabilities and similarities that characterize that predicate and those items. To test Hume's thesis, we collected brain activation from various regions of the ventral visual stream during a categorization task that did not invite comparison of categories. We then calculated the similarity of those activation patterns using a simple measure of vectorwise similarity and supplied those similarities to the model. The model's outputs correlated well with subjects' judgments of conditional probability. Our results represent a promising first step toward confirming Hume's thesis; similarity, assessed without reference to induction, may well drive inductive inference. PMID:24254747

  16. Classification of similar medical images in the lifting domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallee, Chad W.; Tashakkori, Rahman

    2002-03-01

    In this paper lifting is used for similarity analysis and classification of sets of similar medical images. The lifting scheme is an invertible wavelet transform that maps integers to integers. Lifting provides efficient in-place calculation of transfer coefficients and is widely used for analysis of similar image sets. Images of a similar set show high degrees of correlation with one another. The inter-set redundancy can be exploited for the purposes of prediction, compression, feature extraction, and classification. This research intends to show that there is a higher degree of correlation between images of a similar set in the lifting domain than in the pixel domain. Such a high correlation will result in more accurate classification and prediction of images in a similar set. Several lifting schemes from Calderbank-Daubechies-Fauveue's family were used in this research. The research shows that some of these lifting schemes decorrelates the images of similar sets more effectively than others. The research presents the statistical analysis of the data in scatter plots and regression models.

  17. Similarity solutions for phase-change problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, D.; Davis, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    A modification of Ivantsov's (1947) similarity solutions is proposed which can describe phase-change processes which are limited by diffusion. The method has application to systems that have n-components and possess cross-diffusion and Soret and Dufour effects, along with convection driven by density discontinuities at the two-phase interface. Local thermal equilibrium is assumed at the interface. It is shown that analytic solutions are possible when the material properties are constant.

  18. Self-similar relativistic disks with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.

    1989-09-01

    Solutions for disks in equilibrium specified by a constant velocity of rotation and constant velocity dispersions are found. The fluid is not perfect because the stress tensor is anisotropic. These disks are self-similar if they are of infinite extent. The solutions are exact when an equal number of particles move in each sense of rotation so that there is no dragging of the inertial frames. For disks rotating with a small velocity a WKB approximation is used to obtain solutions.

  19. The Olympia Proceedings. Section VII: Synthesis of Olympia Conference. Olympia Synthesis Paper: What Have We Accomplished?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trachtman, Gilbert M.

    1982-01-01

    In a personal response to the proceedings as a future-oriented, proactive, problem-solving experience, it is suggested that the participants may have learned more than is realized and that time will determine conference results. (Author/CM)

  20. Wind Turbine Experiments at Full Dynamic Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark; Kiefer, Janik; Westergaard, Carsten; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Performing experiments with scaled-down wind turbines has traditionally been difficult due to the matching requirements of the two driving non-dimensional parameters, the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR) and the Reynolds number. Typically, full-size turbines must be used to provide the baseline cases for engineering models and computer simulations where flow similarity is required. We present a new approach to investigating wind turbine aerodynamics at full dynamic similarity by employing a high-pressure wind tunnel at Princeton University known as the High Reynolds number Test Facility (or HRTF). This facility allows for Reynolds numbers of up to 3 million (based on chord and velocity at the tip) while still matching the TSR, on a geometrically similar, small-scale model. The background development of this project is briefly presented including the design and manufacture of a model turbine. Following this the power, thrust and wake data are discussed, in particular the scaling dependence on the Reynolds number. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1435254 (program manager Gregory Rorrer).