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  1. International Research Results and Accomplishments From the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, Tara M.; Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy; Perkins, Nekisha; Cohen, Luchino; Marcil, Isabelle; Heppener, Marc; Hatton, Jason; Tasaki, Kazuyuki; Umemura, Sayaka; Karabadzhak, Georgy; Sorokin, Igor V.; Cotronei, Vittorio; Sabbagh, Jean

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, the International Space Station (ISS) partnership published the first-ever compilation of international ISS research publications resulting from research performed on the ISS through 2011. The International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results From 2000-2011 is a collection of summaries of over 1,200 journal publications that describe ISS research in the areas of biology and biotechnology; Earth and space science; educational activities and outreach; human research; physical sciences; technology development and demonstration; and, results from ISS operations. This paper will summarize the ISS results publications obtained through 2011 on behalf of the ISS Program Science Forum that is made up of senior science representatives across the international partnership. NASA's ISS Program Science office maintains an online experiment database (www.nasa.gov/issscience) that tracks and communicates ISS research activities across the entire ISS partnership, and it is continuously updated. It captures ISS experiment summaries and results and includes citations to the journals, conference proceedings, and patents as they become available. The International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results From 2000-2011 is a testament to the research that was underway even as the ISS laboratory was being built. It reflects the scientific knowledge gained from ISS research, and how it impact the fields of science in both space and traditional science disciplines on Earth. Now, during a time when utilization is at its busiest, and with extension of the ISS through at least 2024, the ISS partners work together to track the accomplishments and the new knowledge gained in a way that will impact humanity like no laboratory on Earth. The ISS Program Science Forum will continue to capture and report on these results in the form of journal publications, conference proceedings, and patents. We anticipate that successful ISS research will

  2. Apollo experience report: Electronic systems test program accomplishments and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohnesorge, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    A chronological record is presented of the Electronic Systems Test Program from its conception in May 1963 to December 1969. The original concept of the program, which was primarily a spacecraft/Manned Space Flight Network communications system compatibility and performance evaluation, is described. The evolution of these concepts to include various levels of test detail, as well as systems level design verification testing, is discussed. Actual implementation of these concepts is presented, and the facility to support the program is described. Test results are given, and significant contributions to the lunar landing mission are underlined. Plans for modifying the facility and the concepts, based on Apollo experience, are proposed.

  3. International Research Results and Accomplishments From the International Space Station - A New Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, Tara; Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy; Perkins, Nekisha; Cohen, Luchino; Marcil, Isabelle; Heppener, Marc; Hatton, Jason; Tasaki, Kazuyuki; Umemura, Sayaka; Karabadzhak, Georgy; Sorokin, Igor V.; Cotronei, Vittorio; Jean, Sabbagh

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, the International Space Station (ISS) partnership published the first-ever compilation of international ISS research publications resulting from research performed on the ISS through 2011 (Expeditions 0 through 30). International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results. From 2000-2011 is a collection of over 1,200 journal publications that describe ISS research in the areas of biology and biotechnology; Earth and space science; educational activities and outreach; human research; physical sciences; technology development and demonstration; and, results from ISS operations. This paper will summarize the ISS results publications obtained through 2011 on behalf of the ISS Program Science Forum that is made up of senior science representatives across the international partnership. NASA's ISS Program Science office maintains an online experiment database (www.nasa.gov/iss- science) that tracks and communicates ISS research activities across the entire ISS partnership, and it is continuously updated by cooperation and linking with the results tracking activities of each partner. It captures ISS experiment summaries and results and includes citations to the journals, conference proceedings, and patents as they become available. This content is obtained through extensive and regular journal and patent database searches, and input provided by the ISS international partners ISS scientists themselves. The International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results From 2000-2011 is a testament to the research that was underway even as the ISS laboratory was being built. It rejects the scientific knowledge gained from ISS research, and how it impact the fields of science in both space and traditional science disciplines on Earth. Now, during a time when utilization is at its busiest, and with extension of the ISS through at least 2024, the ISS partners work together to track the accomplishments and the new knowledge gained in a

  4. Military medical advances resulting from the conflict in Korea, Part II: Historic clinical accomplishments.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael S

    2012-04-01

    Throughout the recorded history of civilization, there has been armed conflict. Warfare has been associated with advances in care for the wounded. Many of these advances when shown effective on the battlefield become incorporated into civilian health care. It is a laboratory where there is unfortunately much clinical material and presents opportunity for the creative, curious, and innovative. This article reviews the medical advances that resulted from the Korean War. There were notable advances in neurosurgery, vascular surgery, and plastic surgery. Tools from prior wars were rediscovered, dusted off, and used to stop combat losses from psychiatric trauma. A treatment was developed for cleft lip by a plastic surgeon, thus giving hope to young lives. War is a disruptive, destructive, and harrowing experience--but can lead to improvements in care for the wounded and these developments can improve the lives of people everywhere.

  5. First drilling in the Ust' Lensky Rift Zone, Laptev Sea: accomplishment and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiletov, I. P.; Shakhova, N. E.; Dudarev, O.; Kosmach, D.; Tumskoy, V.; Charkin, A.; Samarkin, V.; Kholodov, A.; Grigoriev, M.; Nicolsky, D.; Bukhanov, B.; Krukhmalev, A.

    2011-12-01

    hydrocarbons, and free hydrogen were found. The temperature along the borehole increased from ~ -0.7-0.8C in the sediment upper boundary layer to -0.3-0.4C down by depth. Linear or exponential approximation of available temperature data suggests that the top of the sub-sea permafrost might be found at a depth of ~170m (linear extrapolation), but the existence of sub-sea permafrost at this particular site is questionable. In any case, preliminary data indicate that the seabed at this site functions as a pathway by which volatile gas components are able to migrate upward. The numerical modeling also demonstrated that in areas affected by the inflow of warm water (such as the Lena River plume), the permafrost can significantly degrade from the top down in addition to the "geothermal" down-top thawing ; this may explain both our drilling result, finding no subsea permafrost at a depth >>53 m.

  6. Accomplishments '70.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Center for Research and Development in Teaching.

    This annual report examines the accomplishments during 1970 of three programs. The first program was to improve the organizational and administrative environment for teaching. Its subsidiary projects were 1) the organizational context of teaching; 2) professional socialization of the teacher; 3) attitudes of teachers toward their occupation; 4)…

  7. International Space Station Science Research Accomplishments During the Assembly Years: An Analysis of Results from 2000-2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy; Thumm, Tracy; Crespo-Richey, Jessica; Baumann, David; Rhatigan, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes research accomplishments on the International Space Station (ISS) through the first 15 Expeditions. When research programs for early Expeditions were established, five administrative organizations were executing research on ISS: bioastronautics research, fundamental space biology, physical science, space product development, and space flight. The Vision for Space Exploration led to changes in NASA's administrative structures, so we have grouped experiments topically by scientific themes human research for exploration, physical and biological sciences, technology development, observing the Earth, and educating and inspiring the next generation even when these do not correspond to the administrative structure at the time at which they were completed. The research organizations at the time at which the experiments flew are preserved in the appendix of this document. These investigations on the ISS have laid the groundwork for research planning for Expeditions to come. Humans performing scientific investigations on ISS serve as a model for the goals of future Exploration missions. The success of a wide variety of investigations is an important hallmark of early research on ISS. Of the investigations summarized here, some are completed with results released, some are completed with preliminary results, and some remain ongoing.

  8. Similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    In this 'Project Mathematics! series, sponsored by the California Institute for Technology (CalTech), the mathematical concept of similarity is presented. he history of and real life applications are discussed using actual film footage and computer animation. Terms used and various concepts of size, shape, ratio, area, and volume are demonstrated. The similarity of polygons, solids, congruent triangles, internal ratios, perimeters, and line segments using the previous mentioned concepts are shown.

  9. TEG® and ROTEM® in trauma: similar test but different results?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Transfusion in trauma is often empiric or based on traditional lab tests. Viscoelastic tests such as thromboelastography (TEG®) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM®) have been proposed as superior to traditional lab tests. Due to the similarities between the two tests, general opinion seems to consider them equivalent with interchangeable interpretations. However, it is not clear whether the results can be similarly interpreted. This review evaluates the comparability between TEG and ROTEM and performs a descriptive review of the parameters utilized in each test in adult trauma patients. Methods PUBMED database was reviewed using the keywords “thromboelastography” and “compare”, between 2000 and 2011. Original studies directly comparing TEG® with ROTEM® in any area were retrieved. To verify the individual test parameter used in studies involving trauma patients, we further performed a review using the keywords “thromboelastography” and “trauma” in the PUBMED database. Results Only 4 studies directly compared TEG® with ROTEM®. One in liver transplantation found that transfusion practice could differ depending on the device in use. Another in cardiac surgery concluded that all measurements are not completely interchangeable. The third article using commercially available plasma detected clinically significant differences in the results from the two devices. The fourth one was a head-to-head comparison of the technical aspects. The 24 articles reporting the use of viscoelastic tests in trauma patients, presented considerable heterogeneity. Conclusion Both tests are potentially useful as means to rapidly diagnose coagulopathy, guide transfusion and determine outcome in trauma patients. Differences in the activators utilized in each device limit the direct comparability. Standardization and robust clinical trials comparing the two technologies are needed before these tests can be widely recommended for clinical use in trauma. PMID

  10. Why different gas flux velocity parameterizations result in so similar flux results in the North Atlantic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; Wróbel, Iwona

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is a crucial region for both ocean circulation and the carbon cycle. Most of ocean deep waters are produced in the basin making it a large CO2 sink. The region, close to the major oceanographic centres has been well covered with cruises. This is why we have performed a study of net CO2 flux dependence upon the choice of gas transfer velocity k parameterization for this very region: the North Atlantic including European Arctic Seas. The study has been a part of a ESA funded OceanFlux GHG Evolution project and, at the same time, a PhD thesis (of I.W) funded by Centre of Polar Studies "POLAR-KNOW" (a project of the Polish Ministry of Science). Early results have been presented last year at EGU 2015 as a PICO presentation EGU2015-11206-1. We have used FluxEngine, a tool created within an earlier ESA funded project (OceanFlux Greenhouse Gases) to calculate the North Atlantic and global fluxes with different gas transfer velocity formulas. During the processing of the data, we have noticed that the North Atlantic results for different k formulas are more similar (in the sense of relative error) that global ones. This was true both for parameterizations using the same power of wind speed and when comparing wind squared and wind cubed parameterizations. This result was interesting because North Atlantic winds are stronger than the global average ones. Was the flux result similarity caused by the fact that the parameterizations were tuned to the North Atlantic area where many of the early cruises measuring CO2 fugacities were performed? A closer look at the parameterizations and their history showed that not all of them were based on North Atlantic data. Some of them were tuned to the South Ocean with even stronger winds while some were based on global budgets of 14C. However we have found two reasons, not reported before in the literature, for North Atlantic fluxes being more similar than global ones for different gas transfer velocity parametrizations

  11. Fewer Doses of HPV Vaccine Result in Immune Response Similar to Three-Dose Regimen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Releases NCI News Note Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose ... that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody ...

  12. Wind Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Wind Program

    2012-05-24

    This fact sheet describes some of the accomplishments of DOE's Wind Program through its investments in technology development and market barrier reduction, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using the United States' abundant wind resources.

  13. Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose regimen

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen.

  14. Partners in Accomplished Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, Arlington, VA.

    This report describes Partners in Accomplished Teaching, a project of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) designed to help increase the number of teachers achieving National Board Certification. It focuses on efforts in St. Paul, Minnesota; Mississippi; North Carolina; and San Antonio, Texas. The St. Paul program is a…

  15. The Spacelab Accomplishments Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emond, J. (Editor); Bennett, N. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Murphy, K. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a record of the Spacelab Accomplishments Forum held in March 1999. Presentations made at the Forum covered the design, engineering, utilization, and science associated with Spacelab, as well as the international associations and impact of Spacelab and its use in the design and utilization of the International Space Station. Topics included Earth observations, space science, life science, commercial uses, microgravity science, and international participation.

  16. Life sciences accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    From its inception, the main charter of Life Sciences has been to define biomedical requirements for the design and development of spacecraft systems and to participate in NASA's scientific exploration of the universe. The role of the Life Sciences Division is to: (1) assure the health, well being and productivity of all individuals who fly in space; (2) study the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the universe; and (3) to utilize the space environment as a tool for research in biology and medicine. The activities, programs, and accomplishments to date in the efforts to achieve these goals are detailed and the future challenges that face the division as it moves forward from the shuttle era to a permanent manned presence in space space station's are examined.

  17. A Uniqueness Result for Self-Similar Profiles to Smoluchowski's Coagulation Equation Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niethammer, B.; Throm, S.; Velázquez, J. J. L.

    2016-07-01

    In this note we indicate how to correct the proof of a uniqueness result in [6] for self-similar solutions to Smoluchowski's coagulation equation for kernels K=K(x,y) that are homogeneous of degree zero and close to constant in the sense that begin{aligned} -\\varepsilon le K(x,y)-2 le \\varepsilon Big ( Big (x/yBig )^{α } + Big (y/xBig )^{α }Big ) for α in [0,1/2). Under the additional assumption, in comparison to [6], that K has an analytic extension to mathbb {C}{setminus } (-infty ,0] and that the precise asymptotic behaviour of K at the origin is prescribed, we prove that self-similar solutions with given mass are unique if \\varepsilon is sufficiently small. The complete details of the proof are available in [4]. In addition, we give here the proof of a uniqueness result for a related but simpler problem that appears in the description of self-similar solutions for x → infty.

  18. Life Sciences Accomplishments 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnell, Mary Lou (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    proposals for ground-based and flight research for all programs. Areas of particular interest to NASA were defined Proposals due April 29, 1994, will be peer reviewed - externally for scientific merit. This annual NRA process is now the mechanism for recruiting both extramural and intramural investigations. As an overview of LBSAD activities in 1993, this accomplishments document covers each of the major organizational components of the Division and the accomplishments of each. The second section is a review of the Space Life Sciences Research programs Space Biology, Space Physiology and Countermeasures, Radiation Health, Environmental Health, Space Human Factors, Advanced Life Support, and Global Monitoring and Disease Prediction, The third section, Research in Space Flight, describes the substantial contributions of the Spacelab Life Sciences 2 (SLS-2) mission to life sciences research and the significant contributions of the other missions flown in 1993, along with plans for future missions. The Division has greatly expanded and given high priority to its Education and Outreach Programs, which are presented in the fourth section. The fifth and final section, Partners for Space, shows the Divisions Cooperative efforts with other national and international agencies to achieve common goals, along with the accomplishments of joint research and analysis programs.

  19. EFRC CMSNF Major Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hurley; Todd R. Allen

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) has been to develop a first-principles-based understanding of thermal transport in the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2, in the presence of defect microstructure associated with radiation environments. The overarching goal within this mission was to develop an experimentally validated multiscale modeling capability directed toward a predictive understanding of the impact of radiation and fission-product induced defects and microstructure on thermal transport in nuclear fuel. Implementation of the mission was accomplished by integrating the physics of thermal transport in crystalline solids with microstructure science under irradiation through multi institutional experimental and computational materials theory teams from Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Purdue University, the University of Florida, the University of Wisconsin, and the Colorado School of Mines. The Center’s research focused on five major areas: (i) The fundamental aspects of anharmonicity in UO2 crystals and its impact on thermal transport; (ii) The effects of radiation microstructure on thermal transport in UO2; (iii) The mechanisms of defect clustering in UO2 under irradiation; (iv) The effect of temperature and oxygen environment on the stoichiometry of UO2; and (v) The mechanisms of growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation. The Center has made important progress in each of these areas, as summarized below.

  20. Transmutation Fuels Campaign FY-09 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year 2009 (FY-08) accomplishments for the Transmutation Fuels Campaign (TFC). The emphasis is on the accomplishments and relevance of the work. Detailed description of the methods used to achieve the highlighted results and the associated support tasks are not included in this report.

  1. Implantation of peritoneal catheters by laparotomy: nephrologists obtained similar results to general surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Cesar A; Buitrago, Carlos Alberto; Holguin, Cielo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the complications and costs of minilaparotomies performed by a nephrologist (group A) compared with conventional laparotomies performed by a surgeon (group B) for peritoneal catheter implantation. Setting Two university hospitals (Santa Sofia and Caldas) in Manizales, Caldas, Colombia. Methods The study included stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients, with indication of renal replacement therapy, who were candidates for peritoneal dialysis and gave informed consent for a peritoneal catheter implant. Minilaparotomies were performed by a nephrologist in a minor surgery room under local anesthesia. Conventional laparotomies were performed by a surgeon in an operating room under general anesthesia. Results Two nephrologists inserted 157 peritoneal catheters, and seven general surgeons inserted 185 peritoneal catheters. The groups had similar characteristics: the mean age was 55 years, 49.5% were men, and the primary diagnoses were diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephropathy, and unknown etiology. The implant was successful for 98.09% of group A and 99.46% of group B. There was no procedure-related mortality. The most frequent complications in the first 30 days postsurgery in group A versus group B, respectively, were: peritonitis (6.37% versus 3.78%), exit-site infection (3.82% versus 2.16%), tunnel infection (0% versus 0.54%), catheter entrapment by omentum (1.27% versus 3.24%), peritoneal effluent spillover (1.91% versus 2.16%), draining failure (4.46% versus 6.49%), hematoma (0% versus 1.08%), catheter migration with kinking (3.18% versus 2.70%), hemoperitoneum (1.27% versus 0%), and hollow viscera accidental puncture (1.91% versus 0.54%). There were no statistically significant differences in the number of complications between groups. In 2013, the cost of a surgeon-implanted peritoneal dialysis catheter in Colombia was US $366 (666,000 COP), whereas the cost of a nephrologist-implanted catheter was US $198 (356,725 COP). Conclusion

  2. Support and Technology Transfer: Results and Accomplishments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Natick’s Soldiers Center 2.2 Product and Preparation Description 2.2.1 Formulation The composite UGA- Tennessee Egg Formula was used for the...Brookfield model DV-I, spindle #3, 20 rpm) Density: 0.95 gr/cc Micro Test: Salmonella : Negative 2.3 Packaging Description All pouches were

  3. Similar herpes zoster incidence across Europe: results from a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Herpes zoster (HZ) is caused by reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and mainly affects individuals aged ≥50 years. The forthcoming European launch of a vaccine against HZ (Zostavax®) prompts the need for a better understanding of the epidemiology of HZ in Europe. Therefore the aim of this systematic review was to summarize the available data on HZ incidence in Europe and to describe age-specific incidence. Methods The Medline database of the National Library of Medicine was used to conduct a comprehensive literature search of population-based studies of HZ incidence published between 1960 and 2010 carried out in the 27 member countries of the European Union, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. The identified articles were reviewed and scored according to a reading grid including various quality criteria, and HZ incidence data were extracted and presented by country. Results The search identified 21 studies, and revealed a similar annual HZ incidence throughout Europe, varying by country from 2.0 to 4.6/1 000 person-years with no clearly observed geographic trend. Despite the fact that age groups differed from one study to another, age-specific HZ incidence rates seemed to hold steady during the review period, at around 1/1 000 children <10 years, around 2/1 000 adults aged <40 years, and around 1–4/1 000 adults aged 40–50 years. They then increased rapidly after age 50 years to around 7–8/1 000, up to 10/1 000 after 80 years of age. Our review confirms that in Europe HZ incidence increases with age, and quite drastically after 50 years of age. In all of the 21 studies included in the present review, incidence rates were higher among women than men, and this difference increased with age. This review also highlights the need to identify standardized surveillance methods to improve the comparability of data within European Union Member States and to monitor the impact of VZV immunization on the epidemiology of HZ. Conclusions

  4. NASA space biology accomplishments, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W.; Pleasant, L. G.

    1983-01-01

    Summaries of NASA's Space Biology Program projects are provided. The goals, objectives, accomplishments, and future plans of each project are described in this publication as individual technical summaries.

  5. Hipparcos: mission accomplished

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-08-01

    During the last few months of its life, as the high radiation environment to which the satellite was exposed took its toll on the on-board system, Hipparcos was operated with only two of the three gyroscopes normally required for such a satellite, following an ambitious redesign of the on-board and on-ground systems. Plans were in hand to operate the satellite without gyroscopes at all, and the first such "gyro- less" data had been acquired, when communication failure with the on-board computers on 24 June 1993 put an end to the relentless flow of 24000 bits of data that have been sent down from the satellite each second, since launch. Further attempts to continue operations proved unsuccessful, and after a short series of sub-systems tests, operations were terminated four years and a week after launch. An enormous wealth of scientific data was gathered by Hipparcos. Even though data analysis by the scientific teams involved in the programme is not yet completed, it is clear that the mission has been an overwhelming success. "The ESA advisory bodies took a calculated risk in selecting this complex but fundamental programme" said Dr. Roger Bonnet, ESA's Director of Science, "and we are delighted to have been able to bring it to a highly successful conclusion, and to have contributed unique information that will take a prominent place in the history and development of astrophysics". Extremely accurate positions of more than one hundred thousand stars, precise distance measurements (in most cases for the first time), and accurate determinations of the stars' velocity through space have been derived. The resulting HIPPARCOS Star Catalogue, expected to be completed in 1996, will be of unprecedented accuracy, achieving results some 10-100 times more accurate than those routinely determined from ground-based astronomical observatories. A further star catalogue, the Thyco Star Catalogue of more than a million stars, is being compiled from additional data accumulated by the

  6. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties

    PubMed Central

    Weids, Alan J.; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J.; Grant, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved. PMID:27086931

  7. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties.

    PubMed

    Weids, Alan J; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J; Grant, Chris M

    2016-04-18

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved.

  8. Similarities and differences in couples' grief reactions following a miscarriage: results from a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Beutel, M; Willner, H; Deckardt, R; Von Rad, M; Weiner, H

    1996-03-01

    Recent studies have documented grief and depressive reactions in women after a miscarriage. However, the men's reactions to their partner's experience have been neglected. In a controlled follow-up study, 56 couples were studied shortly after the miscarriage, and 6 (N = 47) and 12 months later (N = 45). The participants completed standardized questionnaires for depression, physical complaints, anxiety, and grief. Contrary to commonly held beliefs, men do grieve, but less intensely and enduringly than their partners. The manner in which they experience their grief is similar to that of the women, except that the men cry less and feel less need to talk about it. Unlike the women they do not react with an increased depressive reaction (compared to age- and sex-matched community control groups). Giving up their personal expectations, hopes for, and fantasies about the unborn child is a major source of grieving for both. Some men feel burdened by their wives' grief or depressive reactions. Conflicting reactions may affect the couples' interactions and promote depressive reactions in the women.

  9. Accomplishments of South Platte Watershed

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Accomplishments of the South Platte Watershed of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  10. Pollution Prevention Accomplishments Hanford Site FY2001

    SciTech Connect

    COENENBERG, J.G.

    2001-12-01

    In Fiscal Year 2001, the Hanford Site Prime Contractors, Bechtel Hanford Inc. (BHI), CH2M Hill hanford Group (CHG), Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) achieved over $32 million in cost savings/avoidance. The total cost savings/avoidance includes accomplishments reported to DOE Headquarters and additional accomplishments achieved on the Hanford Site. This accomplishment report highlights the major successes totaling over $5.5 million in cost savings/avoidance. The following summarizes the FY 2001 waste reduced, and cost savings/avoidance by waste category for accomplishments documented in this report. Additionally, this accomplishment report documents the hanford site Return on Investment (ROI) projects completed or in progress during FY 2001. The ROI projects continue to show excellent results this past year. The ROI program funds waste minimization projects that provide a high return on investment. The funding is available to all Hanford contractors for pollution prevention projects. This accomplishment report highlights 7 ROI projects implemented and 6 projects that were in progress during FY 2001. The annual cost savings of the ROI projects completed and in progress is over $53.5 million. The Hanford Site continues to be the leader in pollution prevention and waste minimization across the DOE complex. This was evidenced by meeting aggressive Hanford Site waste generation goals and operating an outstanding recycling program. Additionally, waste streams are continuously evaluated and reduced through effective analysis and implementation via Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments.

  11. ADVANCED FUELS CAMPAIGN 2013 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2013-10-01

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This includes development of a state-of-the art Research and Development (R&D) infrastructure to support the use of “goal-oriented science-based approach.” In support of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program, AFC is responsible for developing advanced fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY) 2013 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section.

  12. Subduction in fancy: stripping young slabs as a result of similar crust-mantle rheologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, Philippe; Yamato, Philippe; Soret, Mathieu; Prigent, Cécile; Guillot, Stéphane; Plunder, Alexis; Dubacq, Benoît; Monié, Patrick; Chauvet, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Understanding subduction rheology in both space and time has been a challenge since the advent of plate tectonics. We herein focus on "subduction infancy", which corresponds to the first ~0-2 My immediately following subduction nucleation, when a newly born slab penetrates into the overriding plate mantle and heats up. The only remnants of this critical, yet elusive, geodynamic step are thin metamorphic soles, commonly found beneath pristine, 100-1000 km long portions of oceanic lithosphere emplaced on top of continents (i.e., ophiolites). In this study, we show how, during subduction infancy, transient mechanical properties of both the mantle and crust across the subduction plate interface (during ~100s ky) control and hinder the penetration of tectonic plates into the mantle, and how this results in strong peaks of resistance and even slicing of their surface - leaving behind thin, chopped-off metamorphic slivers (i.e., metamorphic soles). These findings constrain the mechanical behaviour of the subduction plate interface (with implications for coupling processes and earthquake generation) as well as the properties of the crust and mantle. They also highlight the role of fluids in enabling subduction to overcome this early resistance.

  13. Joint Winter Runway Friction Program Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Wambold, James C.; Henry, John J.; Andresen, Arild; Bastian, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The major program objectives are: (1) harmonize ground vehicle friction measurements to report consistent friction value or index for similar contaminated runway conditions, for example, compacted snow, and (2) establish reliable correlation between ground vehicle friction measurements and aircraft braking performance. Accomplishing these objectives would give airport operators better procedures for evaluating runway friction and maintaining acceptable operating conditions, providing pilots information to base go/no go decisions, and would contribute to reducing traction-related aircraft accidents.

  14. The Joint Accomplishment of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Gresalfi, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Identity has become a central concept in the analysis of learning from social perspectives. In this article, we draw on a situative perspective to conceptualize identity as a "joint accomplishment" between individuals and their interactions with norms, practices, cultural tools, relationships, and institutional and cultural contexts.…

  15. Infant Mortality: 1989 Research Accomplishments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Collected in this document are reports of the National Institutes of Health's 1989 accomplishments in research on the problem of infant mortality. Reports are provided by the: (1) National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; (2) National Cancer Institute; (3) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; (4) National Institute of…

  16. Advanced Fuels Campaign 2012 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2012-11-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is responsible for developing fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The fiscal year 2012 (FY 2012) accomplishments are highlighted below. Kemal Pasamehmetoglu is the National Technical Director for AFC.

  17. Space Biophysics: Accomplishments, Trends, Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Physics and biology are inextricably linked. All the chemical and biological processes of life are dutifully bound to follow the rules and laws of physics. In space, these physical laws seem to turn on their head and biological systems, from microbes to humans, adapt and evolve in myriad ways to cope with the changed physical influences of the space environment. Gravity is the most prominent change in space that influences biology. In microgravity, the physical processes of sedimentation, density-driven convective flow, influence of surface tension and fluid pressure profoundly influence biology at the molecular and cellular level as well as at the whole-body level. Gravity sensing mechanisms are altered, structural and functional components of biology (such as bone and muscle) are reduced and changes in the way fluids and gasses behave also drive the way microbial systems and biofilms grow as well as the way plants and animals adapt. The radiation environment also effects life in space. Solar particle events and high energy cosmic radiation can cause serious damage to DNA and other biomolecules. The results can cause mutation, cellular damage or death, leading to health consequences of acute radiation damage or long-term health consequences such as increased cancer risk. Space Biophysics is the study and utilization of physical changes in space that cause changes in biological systems. The unique physical environment in space has been used successfully to grow high-quality protein crystals and 3D tissue cultures that could not be grown in the presence of unidirectional gravitational acceleration here on Earth. All biological processes that change in space have their root in a biophysical alteration due to microgravity and/or the radiation environment of space. In order to fully-understand the risks to human health in space and to fully-understand how humans, plants, animals and microbes can safely and effectively travel and eventually live for long periods beyond

  18. Fewer doses of HPV vaccine result in immune response similar to three-dose regimen | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that two doses of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, trademarked as Cervarix, resulted in similar serum antibody levels against two of the most carcinogenic types of HPV (16 and 18), compared to a standard three dose regimen. Among women who received only one dose, antibody levels were also high and remained stable four years after vaccination. The results suggest that fewer doses of an HPV vaccine may confer necessary long-term protection against new infection and appeared Nov. 4, 2013, in Cancer Prevention Research... |

  19. Near-wall similarity in the three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers. III - Shear-driven flow results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, F. J.; Mcallister, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ten of eleven proposed three-dimensional similarity models identified in the literature are evaluated with direct wall shear, velocity field, and pressure gradient data from a three-dimensional shear-driven boundary layer flow. Results define an upper limit on velocity vector skewing for each model's predictive ability. When combined with earlier results for pressure-driven flows, each model's predictive ability with and without pressure gradients is summarized. The utility of some two-dimensional type indirect wall shear measurement methods and wall shear inference methods from near-wall velocity measurements for three-dimensional flows is also discussed.

  20. Activities and Accomplishments of ICAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief historical background on establishing the Institute for Computational and Applied Mechanics (ICAM) is presented and basic goals and objectives are discussed. It is emphasized that the goal of the ICAM has been to develop and maintain a self-sustaining center of excellence in computational methods at Old Dominion University (ODU). Information is provided on funding sources and budget disposition, recent activities and accomplishments, list of graduate students supported on the program, and number of students who received graduate degrees (M.S. as well as Ph.D.). Information is also provided on research coordination with various scientists and engineers, and on different reports specifically written for ICAM. ICAM has been supported, in part, by NASA Langley Research Center through Grant NAG-1-363. This report constitutes the final report for ICAM for the period ending December 1996. The grant has been monitored by the University Affairs Officers at NASA Langley.

  1. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2011 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01

    One of the major research and development (R&D) areas under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is advanced fuels development. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has the responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY 20) 2011 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section. The order of the accomplishments in this report is consistent with the AFC work breakdown structure (WBS).

  2. FY005 Accomplishments for Colony Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Inglett, T; Tauferner, A

    2005-07-05

    The Colony Project is developing operating system and runtime system technology to enable efficient general purpose environments on tens of thousands of processors. To accomplish this, we are investigating memory management techniques, fault management strategies, and parallel resource management schemes. Recent results show promising findings for scalable strategies based on processor virtualization, in-memory checkpointing, and parallel aware modifications to full featured operating systems.

  3. NASA total quality management 1989 accomplishments report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Described here are the accomplishments of NASA as a result of the use of Total Quality Management (TQM). The principles in practice which led to these process refinements are important cultural elements to any organization's productivity and quality efforts. The categories of TQM discussed here are top management leadership and support, strategic planning, focus on the customer, employee training and recognition, employee empowerment and teamwork, measurement and analysis, and quality assurance.

  4. Photovoltaics: electricity from sunlight. FY 1985 accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    This summary of FY 1985 accomplishments contains the technical highlights of SERI's program in photovoltaic research and development and a bibliography of technical publications. Also included are several management highlights. Selected accomplishments are categorized according to research tasks identified in the DOE National PV Program's Five-Year Research Plan. The DOE task areas appearing here are Single-Junction Thin Films, High-Efficiency Multijunction Concepts, Innovative Concepts, Flat-Plate Collectors, and System Experiments. Subcontract program categories include amorphous thin films, high-efficiency concepts, polycrystalline thin films, crystalline silicon, and innovative concepts, which are further subdivided into new ideas, the University Participation Program, and photoelectrochemical cells. SERI's internal PV task areas are PV Devices and Measurements, Solid State Research, Insolation Resource Assessment, Advanced PV Systems Research, and solar electric research activities. The bibliography is a compilation of the technical publications resulting from all of SERI's research during FY 1984 and FY 1985. The entries are listed alphabetically by author.

  5. Basic Energy Sciences: Summary of Accomplishments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1990-05-01

    For more than four decades, the Department of Energy, including its predecessor agencies, has supported a program of basic research in nuclear- and energy-related sciences, known as Basic Energy Sciences. The purpose of the program is to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user'' facilities necessary for conducting basic research. Its technical interests span the range of scientific disciplines: physical and biological sciences, geological sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences. Its products and facilities are essential to technology development in many of the more applied areas of the Department's energy, science, and national defense missions. The accomplishments of Basic Energy Sciences research are numerous and significant. Not only have they contributed to Departmental missions, but have aided significantly the development of technologies which now serve modern society daily in business, industry, science, and medicine. In a series of stories, this report highlights 22 accomplishments, selected because of their particularly noteworthy contributions to modern society. A full accounting of all the accomplishments would be voluminous. Detailed documentation of the research results can be found in many thousands of articles published in peer-reviewed technical literature.

  6. Basic energy sciences: Summary of accomplishments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-05-01

    For more than four decades, the Department of Energy, including its predecessor agencies, has supported a program of basic research in nuclear- and energy related sciences, known as Basic Energy Sciences. The purpose of the program is to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user facilities necessary for conducting basic research. Its technical interests span the range of scientific disciplines: physical and biological sciences, geological sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences. Its products and facilities are essential to technology development in many of the more applied areas of the Department's energy, science, and national defense missions. The accomplishments of Basic Energy Sciences research are numerous and significant. Not only have they contributed to Departmental missions, but have aided significantly the development of technologies which now serve modern society daily in business, industry, science, and medicine. In a series of stories, this report highlights 22 accomplishments, selected because of their particularly noteworthy contributions to modern society. A full accounting of all the accomplishments would be voluminous. Detailed documentation of the research results can be found in many thousands of articles published in peer-reviewed technical literature.

  7. A blended design in acute care training: similar learning results, less training costs compared with a traditional format.

    PubMed

    Dankbaar, Mary E W; Storm, Diana J; Teeuwen, Irene C; Schuit, Stephanie C E

    2014-09-01

    Introduction There is a demand for more attractive and efficient training programmes in postgraduate health care training. This retrospective study aims to show the effectiveness of a blended versus traditional face-to-face training design. For nurses in postgraduate Acute and Intensive Care training, the effectiveness of a blended course design was compared with a traditional design. Methods In a first pilot study 57 students took a traditional course (2-h lecture and 2-h workshop) and 46 students took a blended course (2-h lecture and 2-h online self-study material). Test results were compared for both groups. After positive results in the pilot study, the design was replicated for the complete programme in Acute and Intensive Care. Now 16 students followed the traditional programme (11 days face-to-face education) and 31 students did the blended programme (7 days face-to-face and 40 h online self-study). An evaluation was done after the pilot and course costs were calculated. Results Results show that the traditional and blended groups were similar regarding the main characteristics and did not differ in learning results for both the pilot and the complete programme. Student evaluations of both designs were positive; however, the blended group were more confident that they had achieved the learning objectives. Training costs were reduced substantially. Conclusion The blended training design offers an effective and attractive training solution, leading to a significant reduction in costs.

  8. Near-wall similarity in three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers. I - Model review. II - Pressure-driven flow results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, F. J.; Mcallister, J. E.; Tennant, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    Eleven proposed models for near-wall similarity for three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer flows are reviewed. Six of these models are comparatively simple scalar models and five are more complex and/or two-component vector models. Ten of the models can be tested as to their validity or predictive capability with the aid of measured mean velocity field, wall pressure field, and direct wall shear stress field (magnitude and direction) data. One of the models cannot be tested owing to its dependence on two parameters that are at present extremely difficult (if not impossible) to measure. Ten three-dimensional near-wall similarity models are then evaluated with direct wall shear, velocity field, and pressure gradient data from a three-dimensional pressure-driven boundary layer flow. In a primary focus of the interval where y+ is between 50 and 300, graphical results suggest that six simpler models and the freestream component of one complex model are adequate for profiles with monotone increasing skew up to about 15 deg.

  9. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions Resulting as Picometer Interactions with Similarity to K-Shell Electron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Li, X. Z.; Kelly, J. C.; Osman, F.

    2006-02-01

    Since the appeal by Brian Josephson at the meeting of the Nobel Laureates July 2004, it seems to be indicated to summarize the following serious, reproducible and confirmed observations on reactions of protons or deuterons incorporated in host metals such as palladium. Some reflections to Rutherford's discovery of nuclear physics, the Cockroft-Oliphant discovery of anomalous low-energy fusion reactions and the chemist Hahn's discovery of fission had to be included. Using gaseous atmosphere or discharges between palladium targets, rather significant results were seen e.g. from the "life after death" heat production of such high values per host atom that only nuclear reactions can be involved. This supports the earlier evaluation of neutron generation in fully reversible experiments with gas discharges hinting that a reasonable screening effect - preferably in the swimming electron layer - may lead to reactions at nuclear distances d of picometers with reaction probability times U of about megaseconds similar to the K-shell capture radioactivity. Further electrolytic experiments led to low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) where the involvement of pollution could be excluded from the appearance of very seldom rare earth elements. A basically new theory for DD cross-sections is used to confirm the picometer-megasecond reactions of cold fusion. Other theoretical aspects are given from measured heavy element distributions similar to the standard abundance distribution, SAD, in the Universe with consequences on endothermic heavy nuclei generation, magic numbers and to quark-gluon plasmas.

  10. Chest Press Exercises With Different Stability Requirements Result in Similar Muscle Damage Recovery in Resistance-Trained Men.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Diogo V; Ferreira-Júnior, João B; Soares, Saulo R S; Cadore, Eduardo L; Izquierdo, Mikel; Brown, Lee E; Bottaro, Martim

    2017-01-01

    Ferreira, DV, Ferreira-Júnior, JB, Soares, SRS, Cadore, EL, Izquierdo, M, Brown, LE, and Bottaro, M. Chest press exercises with different stability requirements result in similar muscle damage recovery in resistance trained men. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 71-79, 2017-This study investigated the time course of 96 hours of muscle recovery after 3 different chest press exercises with different stability requirements in resistance-trained men. Twenty-seven men (23.5 ± 3.8 years) were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups: (a) Smith machine bench press; (b) barbell bench press; or (c) dumbbell bench press. Participants performed 8 sets of 10 repetition maximum with 2 minutes rest between sets. Muscle thickness, peak torque (PT), and soreness were measured pre, post, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after exercise. There were no differences in the time course of PT or muscle thickness values of the pectoralis major (p = 0.98 and p = 0.91, respectively) or elbow extensors (p = 0.07 and p = 0.86, respectively) between groups. Muscle soreness of the pectoralis major was also not different between groups (p > 0.05). However, the Smith machine and barbell groups recovered from triceps brachii muscle soreness by 72 hours after exercise (p > 0.05), whereas the dumbbell group did not present any triceps brachii muscle soreness after exercise (p > 0.05). In conclusion, resistance-trained men experience similar muscle damage recovery after Smith machine, barbell, and dumbbell chest press exercise. However, muscle soreness of the elbow extensors takes a longer time to recover after using a barbell chest press exercise.

  11. Technical Report --Final Work Accomplishment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun Heui

    2007-11-19

    The main goal of this project was to understand the solution structure of nonlinear boundary value problems arising in self-similar solutions of nonlinear systems of multidimensional conservation laws. This project further extended to study on biocomplex systems including Morphogen gradients systems (reaction-diffusion systems) and tumor growth and its treatment model problems (free boundary, conservation of mass and reaction-diffusion systems). The list of publications and the summary of those publications are listed.

  12. Two Measurement Methods of Leaf Dry Matter Content Produce Similar Results in a Broad Range of Species

    PubMed Central

    Vaieretti, María Victoria; Díaz, Sandra; Vile, Denis; Garnier, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf dry matter content (LDMC) is widely used as an indicator of plant resource use in plant functional trait databases. Two main methods have been proposed to measure LDMC, which basically differ in the rehydration procedure to which leaves are subjected after harvesting. These are the ‘complete rehydration’ protocol of Garnier et al. (2001, Functional Ecology 15: 688–695) and the ‘partial rehydration’ protocol of Vendramini et al. (2002, New Phytologist 154: 147–157). Methods To test differences in LDMC due to the use of different methods, LDMC was measured on 51 native and cultivated species representing a wide range of plant families and growth forms from central-western Argentina, following the complete rehydration and partial rehydration protocols. Key Results and Conclusions The LDMC values obtained by both methods were strongly and positively correlated, clearly showing that LDMC is highly conserved between the two procedures. These trends were not altered by the exclusion of plants with non-laminar leaves. Although the complete rehydration method is the safest to measure LDMC, the partial rehydration procedure produces similar results and is faster. It therefore appears as an acceptable option for those situations in which the complete rehydration method cannot be applied. Two notes of caution are given for cases in which different datasets are compared or combined: (1) the discrepancy between the two rehydration protocols is greatest in the case of high-LDMC (succulent or tender) leaves; (2) the results suggest that, when comparing many studies across unrelated datasets, differences in the measurement protocol may be less important than differences among seasons, years and the quality of local habitats. PMID:17353207

  13. Conventional physical therapy and physical therapy based on reflex stimulation showed similar results in children with myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Carolina Y P; Morales, Mariana P; Lundberg, Carolina; Moura, Maria Clara D Soares de; Pinto, Fernando C G; Voos, Mariana C; Hasue, Renata H

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to investigate whether infants with myelomeningocele would improve their motor ability and functional independence after ten sessions of physical therapy and compare the outcomes of conventional physical therapy (CPT) to a physical therapy program based on reflex stimulation (RPT). Twelve children were allocated to CPT (n = 6, age 18.3 months) or RPT (n = 6, age 18.2 months). The RPT involved proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation. Children were assessed with the Gross Motor Function Measure and the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory before and after treatment. Mann-Whitney tests compared the improvement on the two scales of CPT versus RPT and the Wilcoxon test compared CPT to RPT (before vs. after treatment). Possible correlations between the two scales were tested with Spearman correlation coefficients. Both groups showed improvement on self-care and mobility domains of both scales. There were no differences between the groups, before, or after intervention. The CPT and RPT showed similar results after ten weeks of treatment.

  14. Rheumatic Heart Disease and Myxomatous Degeneration: Differences and Similarities of Valve Damage Resulting from Autoimmune Reactions and Matrix Disorganization

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Carlo de Oliveira; Demarchi, Lea; Ferreira, Frederico Moraes; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Brandao, Carlos; Sampaio, Roney Orismar; Spina, Guilherme Sobreira; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune inflammatory reactions leading to rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) result from untreated Streptococcus pyogenes throat infections in individuals who exhibit genetic susceptibility. Immune effector mechanisms have been described that lead to heart tissue damage culminating in mitral and aortic valve dysfunctions. In myxomatous valve degeneration (MXD), the mitral valve is also damaged due to non-inflammatory mechanisms. Both diseases are characterized by structural valve disarray and a previous proteomic analysis of them has disclosed a distinct profile of matrix/structural proteins differentially expressed. Given their relevance in organizing valve tissue, we quantitatively evaluated the expression of vimentin, collagen VI, lumican, and vitronectin as well as performed immunohistochemical analysis of their distribution in valve tissue lesions of patients in both diseases. We identified abundant expression of two isoforms of vimentin (45 kDa, 42 kDa) with reduced expression of the full-size protein (54 kDa) in RHD valves. We also found increased vitronectin expression, reduced collagen VI expression and similar lumican expression between RHD and MXD valves. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated disrupted patterns of these proteins in myxomatous degeneration valves and disorganized distribution in rheumatic heart disease valves that correlated with clinical manifestations such as valve regurgitation or stenosis. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed a diverse pattern of distribution of collagen VI and lumican into RHD and MXD valves. Altogether, these results demonstrated distinct patterns of altered valve expression and tissue distribution/organization of structural/matrix proteins that play important pathophysiological roles in both valve diseases. PMID:28121998

  15. BEAUTY: an enhanced BLAST-based search tool that integrates multiple biological information resources into sequence similarity search results.

    PubMed

    Worley, K C; Wiese, B A; Smith, R F

    1995-09-01

    BEAUTY (BLAST enhanced alignment utility) is an enhanced version of the NCBI's BLAST data base search tool that facilitates identification of the functions of matched sequences. We have created new data bases of conserved regions and functional domains for protein sequences in NCBI's Entrez data base, and BEAUTY allows this information to be incorporated directly into BLAST search results. A Conserved Regions Data Base, containing the locations of conserved regions within Entrez protein sequences, was constructed by (1) clustering the entire data base into families, (2) aligning each family using our PIMA multiple sequence alignment program, and (3) scanning the multiple alignments to locate the conserved regions within each aligned sequence. A separate Annotated Domains Data Base was constructed by extracting the locations of all annotated domains and sites from sequences represented in the Entrez, PROSITE, BLOCKS, and PRINTS data bases. BEAUTY performs a BLAST search of those Entrez sequences with conserved regions and/or annotated domains. BEAUTY then uses the information from the Conserved Regions and Annotated Domains data bases to generate, for each matched sequence, a schematic display that allows one to directly compare the relative locations of (1) the conserved regions, (2) annotated domains and sites, and (3) the locally aligned regions matched in the BLAST search. In addition, BEAUTY search results include World-Wide Web hypertext links to a number of external data bases that provide a variety of additional types of information on the function of matched sequences. This convenient integration of protein families, conserved regions, annotated domains, alignment displays, and World-Wide Web resources greatly enhances the biological informativeness of sequence similarity searches. BEAUTY searches can be performed remotely on our system using the "BCM Search Launcher" World-Wide Web pages (URL is < http:/ /gc.bcm.tmc.edu:8088/ search-launcher/launcher.html > ).

  16. Rheumatic Heart Disease and Myxomatous Degeneration: Differences and Similarities of Valve Damage Resulting from Autoimmune Reactions and Matrix Disorganization.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlo de Oliveira; Demarchi, Lea; Ferreira, Frederico Moraes; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Brandao, Carlos; Sampaio, Roney Orismar; Spina, Guilherme Sobreira; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Guilherme, Luiza

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune inflammatory reactions leading to rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) result from untreated Streptococcus pyogenes throat infections in individuals who exhibit genetic susceptibility. Immune effector mechanisms have been described that lead to heart tissue damage culminating in mitral and aortic valve dysfunctions. In myxomatous valve degeneration (MXD), the mitral valve is also damaged due to non-inflammatory mechanisms. Both diseases are characterized by structural valve disarray and a previous proteomic analysis of them has disclosed a distinct profile of matrix/structural proteins differentially expressed. Given their relevance in organizing valve tissue, we quantitatively evaluated the expression of vimentin, collagen VI, lumican, and vitronectin as well as performed immunohistochemical analysis of their distribution in valve tissue lesions of patients in both diseases. We identified abundant expression of two isoforms of vimentin (45 kDa, 42 kDa) with reduced expression of the full-size protein (54 kDa) in RHD valves. We also found increased vitronectin expression, reduced collagen VI expression and similar lumican expression between RHD and MXD valves. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated disrupted patterns of these proteins in myxomatous degeneration valves and disorganized distribution in rheumatic heart disease valves that correlated with clinical manifestations such as valve regurgitation or stenosis. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed a diverse pattern of distribution of collagen VI and lumican into RHD and MXD valves. Altogether, these results demonstrated distinct patterns of altered valve expression and tissue distribution/organization of structural/matrix proteins that play important pathophysiological roles in both valve diseases.

  17. Benefits from living together? Clades whose species use similar habitats may persist as a result of eco-evolutionary feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Prinzing, Andreas; Ozinga, Wim A; Brändle, Martin; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Hennion, Françoise; Labandeira, Conrad; Parisod, Christian; Pihain, Mickael; Bartish, Igor V

    2017-01-01

    Contents 66 I. 67 II. 68 III. 69 IV. 70 V. 73 VI. 75 VII. 77 78 References 78 SUMMARY: Recent decades have seen declines of entire plant clades while other clades persist despite changing environments. We suggest that one reason why some clades persist is that species within these clades use similar habitats, because such similarity may increase the degree of co-occurrence of species within clades. Traditionally, co-occurrence among clade members has been suggested to be disadvantageous because of increased competition and enemy pressure. Here, we hypothesize that increased co-occurrence among clade members promotes mutualist exchange, niche expansion or hybridization, thereby helping species avoid population decline from environmental change. We review the literature and analyse published data for hundreds of plant clades (genera) within a well-studied region and find major differences in the degree to which species within clades occupy similar habitats. We tentatively show that, in clades for which species occupy similar habitats, species tend to exhibit increased co-occurrence, mutualism, niche expansion, and hybridization - and rarely decline. Consistently, throughout the geological past, clades whose species occupied similar habitats often persisted through long time-spans. Overall, for many plant species, the occupation of similar habitats among fellow clade members apparently reduced their vulnerability to environmental change. Future research should identify when and how this previously unrecognized eco-evolutionary feedback operates.

  18. Selection Indices and Multivariate Analysis Show Similar Results in the Evaluation of Growth and Carcass Traits in Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Brito Lopes, Fernando; da Silva, Marcelo Corrêa; Magnabosco, Cláudio Ulhôa; Goncalves Narciso, Marcelo; Sainz, Roberto Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This research evaluated a multivariate approach as an alternative tool for the purpose of selection regarding expected progeny differences (EPDs). Data were fitted using a multi-trait model and consisted of growth traits (birth weight and weights at 120, 210, 365 and 450 days of age) and carcass traits (longissimus muscle area (LMA), back-fat thickness (BF), and rump fat thickness (RF)), registered over 21 years in extensive breeding systems of Polled Nellore cattle in Brazil. Multivariate analyses were performed using standardized (zero mean and unit variance) EPDs. The k mean method revealed that the best fit of data occurred using three clusters (k = 3) (P < 0.001). Estimates of genetic correlation among growth and carcass traits and the estimates of heritability were moderate to high, suggesting that a correlated response approach is suitable for practical decision making. Estimates of correlation between selection indices and the multivariate index (LD1) were moderate to high, ranging from 0.48 to 0.97. This reveals that both types of indices give similar results and that the multivariate approach is reliable for the purpose of selection. The alternative tool seems very handy when economic weights are not available or in cases where more rapid identification of the best animals is desired. Interestingly, multivariate analysis allowed forecasting information based on the relationships among breeding values (EPDs). Also, it enabled fine discrimination, rapid data summarization after genetic evaluation, and permitted accounting for maternal ability and the genetic direct potential of the animals. In addition, we recommend the use of longissimus muscle area and subcutaneous fat thickness as selection criteria, to allow estimation of breeding values before the first mating season in order to accelerate the response to individual selection. PMID:26789008

  19. Gene Flow Results in High Genetic Similarity between Sibiraea (Rosaceae) Species in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Peng-Cheng; Gao, Qing-Bo; Zhang, Fa-Qi; Xing, Rui; Wang, Jiu-Li; Liu, Hai-Rui; Chen, Shi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Studying closely related species and divergent populations provides insight into the process of speciation. Previous studies showed that the Sibiraea complex's evolutionary history on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) was confusing and could not be distinguishable on the molecular level. In this study, the genetic structure and gene flow of Sibiraea laevigata and Sibiraea angustata on the QTP was examined across 45 populations using 8 microsatellite loci. Microsatellites revealed high genetic diversity in Sibiraea populations. Most of the variance was detected within populations (87.45%) rather than between species (4.39%). We found no significant correlations between genetic and geographical distances among populations. Bayesian cluster analysis grouped all individuals in the sympatric area of Sibiraea into one cluster and other individuals of S. angustata into another. Divergence history analysis based on the approximate Bayesian computation method indicated that the populations of S. angustata at the sympatric area derived from the admixture of the 2 species. The assignment test assigned all individuals to populations of their own species rather than its congeneric species. Consistently, intraspecies were detected rather than interspecies first-generation migrants. The bidirectional gene flow in long-term patterns between the 2 species was asymmetric, with more from S. angustata to S. laevigata. In conclusion, the Sibiraea complex was distinguishable on the molecular level using microsatellite loci. We found that the high genetic similarity of the complex resulted from huge bidirectional gene flow, especially on the sympatric area where population admixtures occurred. This study sheds light on speciation with gene flow in the QTP. PMID:27826314

  20. Selection Indices and Multivariate Analysis Show Similar Results in the Evaluation of Growth and Carcass Traits in Beef Cattle.

    PubMed

    Brito Lopes, Fernando; da Silva, Marcelo Corrêa; Magnabosco, Cláudio Ulhôa; Goncalves Narciso, Marcelo; Sainz, Roberto Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This research evaluated a multivariate approach as an alternative tool for the purpose of selection regarding expected progeny differences (EPDs). Data were fitted using a multi-trait model and consisted of growth traits (birth weight and weights at 120, 210, 365 and 450 days of age) and carcass traits (longissimus muscle area (LMA), back-fat thickness (BF), and rump fat thickness (RF)), registered over 21 years in extensive breeding systems of Polled Nellore cattle in Brazil. Multivariate analyses were performed using standardized (zero mean and unit variance) EPDs. The k mean method revealed that the best fit of data occurred using three clusters (k = 3) (P < 0.001). Estimates of genetic correlation among growth and carcass traits and the estimates of heritability were moderate to high, suggesting that a correlated response approach is suitable for practical decision making. Estimates of correlation between selection indices and the multivariate index (LD1) were moderate to high, ranging from 0.48 to 0.97. This reveals that both types of indices give similar results and that the multivariate approach is reliable for the purpose of selection. The alternative tool seems very handy when economic weights are not available or in cases where more rapid identification of the best animals is desired. Interestingly, multivariate analysis allowed forecasting information based on the relationships among breeding values (EPDs). Also, it enabled fine discrimination, rapid data summarization after genetic evaluation, and permitted accounting for maternal ability and the genetic direct potential of the animals. In addition, we recommend the use of longissimus muscle area and subcutaneous fat thickness as selection criteria, to allow estimation of breeding values before the first mating season in order to accelerate the response to individual selection.

  1. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2010 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase

    2010-12-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Accomplishment Report documents the high-level research and development results achieved in fiscal year 2010. The AFC program has been given responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. The science-based approach combines theory, experiments, and multi-scale modeling and simulation aimed at a fundamental understanding of the fuel fabrication processes and fuel and clad performance under irradiation. The scope of the AFC includes evaluation and development of multiple fuel forms to support the three fuel cycle options described in the Sustainable Fuel Cycle Implementation Plan4: Once-Through Cycle, Modified-Open Cycle, and Continuous Recycle. The word “fuel” is used generically to include fuels, targets, and their associated cladding materials. This document includes a brief overview of the management and integration activities; but is primarily focused on the technical accomplishments for FY-10. Each technical section provides a high level overview of the activity, results, technical points of contact, and applicable references.

  2. How similar are the changes in neural activity resulting from mindfulness practice in contrast to spiritual practice?

    PubMed

    Barnby, Joseph M; Bailey, Neil W; Chambers, Richard; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-11-01

    Meditation and spiritual practices are conceptually similar, eliciting similar subjective experiences, and both appear to provide similar benefits to the practicing individuals. However, no research has examined whether the mechanism of action leading to the beneficial effects is similar in both practices. This review examines the neuroimaging research that has focused on groups of meditating individuals, groups who engage in religious/spiritual practices, and research that has examined groups who perform both practices together, in an attempt to assess whether this may be the case. Differences in the balance of activity between the parietal and prefrontal cortical activation were found between the three groups. A relative prefrontal increase was reflective of mindfulness, which related to decreased anxiety and improved well-being. A relative decrease in activation of the parietal cortex, specifically the inferior parietal cortex, appears to be reflective of spiritual belief, whether within the context of meditation or not. Because mindful and spiritual practices differ in focus regarding the 'self' or 'other' (higher being), these observations about neurological components that reflect spirituality may continue work towards understanding how the definition of 'self' and 'other' is represented in the brain, and how this may be reflected in behaviour. Future research can begin to use cohorts of participants in mindfulness studies which are controlled for using the variable of spirituality to explicitly examine how functional and structural similarities and differences may arise.

  3. A tale of two pectins: Diverse fine structures can result from identical processive PME treatments on similar high DM subtrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of a processive pectin-methylesterase treatment on two different pectins, both possessing a high degree of methylesterification, were investigated. While the starting samples were purportedly very similar in fine structure, and even though the sample-averaged degree of methylesterificati...

  4. Rice- or pork-based diets with similar calorie and content result in different rat gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaozhe; Xu, Wentao; Guo, Mingzhang; Chen, Siyuan; Liu, Yifei; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun

    2017-03-20

    Rice is the most important food crop, and pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world. In this study, we compared the gut microbiota of the rats fed with rice or pork mixed diets, which have similar caloric contents. The physiological indices (body weights, hematology, serum chemistry, organ weights and histopathology) of two groups were all within the normal range. Two diets did not induce difference in the diversity of gut bacteria. However, Firmicutes were significantly higher in rice diet group, while Bacteroidetes were enriched in pork diet group. Butyrate and the bacteria enzymes β-glucuronidase, β-glucosidase and nitroreductase in the feces were all drastically higher in pork diet group. This study indicates that different diets with similar calorie and nutritional composition could change the community structure but not the diversity of rat fecal microbiota.

  5. Moderate-intensity intermittent work in the heat results in similar low-level dehydration in young and older males.

    PubMed

    Wright, Heather E; Larose, Joanie; McLellan, Tom M; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-01-01

    Older individuals may be more susceptible to the negative thermal and cardiovascular consequences of dehydration during intermittent work in the heat. This study examined the hydration, thermal, and cardiovascular responses to intermittent exercise in the heat in 14 Young (Y, Mean ± SE; 25.8 ± 0.8 years), Middle-age (MA, 43.6 ± 0.9 years), and Older (O, 57.2 ± 1.5 years) healthy, non-heat acclimated males matched for height, mass, body surface area, and percent body fat. Rectal temperature (Tre), heart rate (HR), local sweat rate (LSR), and hydration indices were measured during 4 × 15-min moderate to heavy cycling bouts at 400 W heat production, each followed by a 15-min rest period, in Warm/Dry (35°C, 20% relative humidity [RH]) and Warm/Humid (35°C, 60% RH) heat. No differences were observed between the age groups for Tre, Tre change, HR, LSR, mass change, urine specific gravity, and plasma protein concentration in either condition, irrespective of the greater level of thermal and cardiovascular strain experienced in the Warm/Humid environment. Plasma volume changes (Dry Y: -5.4 ± 0.7, MA: -6.2 ± 0.9, O: -5.7 ± 0.9%, Humid Y: -7.3 ± 1.0, MA: -7.9 ± 0.8, O: -8.4 ± 1.0%) were similar between groups, as were urine specific gravity and plasma protein concentrations. Thus, physically active Young, Middle-age, and Older males demonstrate similar hydration, thermal, and cardiovascular responses during moderate- to high-intensity intermittent exercise in the heat.

  6. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Cameron J; McGregor, Robin A; D'Souza, Randall F; Thorstensen, Eric B; Markworth, James F; Fanning, Aaron C; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-10-21

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring (13)C₆ phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

  7. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  8. Prepubertal goat oocytes from large follicles result in similar blastocyst production and embryo ploidy than those from adult goats.

    PubMed

    Romaguera, R; Moll, X; Morató, R; Roura, M; Palomo, M J; Catalá, M G; Jiménez-Macedo, A R; Hammami, S; Izquierdo, D; Mogas, T; Paramio, M T

    2011-07-01

    Developmental competence of oocytes from prepubertal females is lower than those from adult females. Oocyte development competence is positively related to follicular diameter. Most of the follicles of prepubertal goat ovaries are smaller than 3 mm. The aim of this study was to compare oocytes of two follicle sizes (< 3 mm and ≥ 3 mm) from prepubertal goats with oocytes from adult goats in relation to their in vitro production and quality of blastocysts. Oocytes from prepubertal goats were obtained from slaughterhouse ovaries and selected according to the follicle diameter whereas oocytes from adult goats were recovered in vivo by LOPU technique without prior selection of follicle size. COCs were IVM for 27 h, IVF at the conventional conditions with fresh semen and presumptive zygotes were cultured in SOF medium for 8 days. Blastocysts obtained were vitrified and after warming their blastocoele re-expansion and the ploidy by FISH technique were assessed. We found significant differences between blastocysts yield of oocytes recovered from follicles smaller than 3 mm of prepubertal goats compared to those from adult goats (5.45% vs 20. 83%, respectively) however, these differences disappear if oocytes were recovered form large follicles (18.07%). A total of 28 blastocysts were analysed and 96.43% showed mixoploidy. Age did not affect the number of embryos with abnormal ploidy or blastocyst re-expansion after warming. Furthermore, the percentage of diploid blastomeres per embryo was similar in the 3 groups studied, adult, prepubertal from follicles ≥ 3 mm and < 3 mm (68.6%, 80.8% and 73.6%, respectively). In conclusion, IVP of blastocysts coming from follicles larger than 3 mm of goats 45 days old were not different to the blastocysts produced from adult goats, both in terms of quantity and quality.

  9. Memories of traumatic events in childhood fade after experiencing similar less stressful events: results from two natural experiments.

    PubMed

    Weems, Carl F; Russell, Justin D; Banks, Donice M; Graham, Rebecca A; Neill, Erin L; Scott, Brandon G

    2014-10-01

    The long-term stability of youth reports of traumatic events is largely unknown. Translational animal research suggests that there may be an alteration of memories for traumatic events via memory reconsolidation processes, whereas clinical research suggests memory alteration may occur through augmentation by negative emotions. In this report, 2 natural experiments test reconsolidation model and augmentation model predictions about the course of traumatic memories in youth. Data are from 2 prospective studies that assessed reports of an initial traumatic event (Hurricane Katrina) and tested recall both pre and post a similar event (Hurricane Gustav). In the 1st (Sample 1; n = 94, initial Grade 9 followed to 11), youth were assessed at 4 time points: Times 1-3 were 13, 20, and 26 months post-Katrina and then Time 4 was 5 months post-Hurricane Gustav. In the 2nd (Sample 2; n = 141, Grades 4 through 8), youth were assessed at 12 months pre-Gustav (Time 1; 24 months post-Katrina) and then again at 1 month (Time 2) and 8 months (Time 3) post-Gustav. Those with relatively high Gustav exposure showed more stability in their reports of Katrina exposure events, whereas in those with low Gustav exposure, reports of Katrina events decreased. Time spans between recall, age, gender, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, or cognitive/learning ability did not explain changes in the reports. The study provides the 1st long-term data on the consistency of youth reports of disaster-related experiences and provides initial evidence for the ecological validity of memory reconsolidation theory applied to traumatic events in youth.

  10. Life-extending dietary restriction and ovariectomy result in similar feeding rates but different physiologic responses in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Drewry, M D; Williams, J M; Hatle, J D

    2011-10-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) and reduced reproduction each extend life span in many species. Females undergoing DR typically experience a reduction in their fecundity, which raises the question of whether the two treatments are actually extending life span in overlapping ways. Life span in lubber grasshoppers has been shown to be increased by DR, and separately by ovariectomy (OVX). Here, we test the combination of these on life span. If life extension by the two treatments are additive, it would suggest that they likely act through separate pathways. The experimental groups were: fully reproductive and fully fed (ShamFD); ovariectomized and fully fed (OVXFD); fully reproductive and restricted diet (ShamDR); and ovariectomized and restricted diet (OVXDR). The median life spans of these groups were: ShamFD=245 d, OVXFD=285 d, ShamDR=286 d, and OVXDR=322 d. Feeding rate for the OVXFD group was 64% of ad libitum, similar to the 70% of ad libitum that was used for ShamDR. We also measured hemolymph parameters of physiology in these same individuals. Hemolymph levels of vitellogenin (the egg yolk-precursor protein) were increased 5-fold by OVX, but were not affected by DR. In addition, hemolymph total anti-oxidant activity (per μg protein) was significantly reduced by OVX, but was not affected by DR. We show that OVX and DR produce different physiological responses in grasshoppers, despite life extensions and feeding levels that were not significantly different. These data suggest that OVX and DR might extend life span via distinct pathways.

  11. Correlation Between Geometric Similarity of Ice Shapes and the Resulting Aerodynamic Performance Degradation: A Preliminary Investigation Using WIND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Chung, James

    1999-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance calculations were performed using WIND on ten experimental ice shapes and the corresponding ten ice shapes predicted by LEWICE 2.0. The resulting data for lift coefficient and drag coefficient are presented. The difference in aerodynamic results between the experimental ice shapes and the LEWICE ice shapes were compared to the quantitative difference in ice shape geometry presented in an earlier report. Correlations were generated to determine the geometric features which have the most effect on performance degradation. Results show that maximum lift and stall angle can be correlated to the upper horn angle and the leading edge minimum thickness. Drag coefficient can be correlated to the upper horn angle and the frequency-weighted average of the Fourier coefficients. Pitching moment correlated with the upper horn angle and to a much lesser extent to the upper and lower horn thicknesses.

  12. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  13. Accomplishments of Science by the Year 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Current and projected accomplishments in science and technology are examined from a social and political perspective. It is observed that the present level of research and development in the United States is inadequate for many possible advancements to occur.

  14. Acute leukemias of different lineages have similar MLL gene fusions encoding related chimeric proteins resulting from chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, J.; Forster, A.; Thompson, S.; Rabbitts, T.H. ); Lampert, F. ); Kaneko, Y. ); Slater, R.; Kroes, W.G. ); Van Der Schoot, C.E. ); Ludwig, W.D. ); Karpas, A. ); Pocock, C.; Cotter, F. )

    1993-09-15

    The MLL gene, on human chromosome 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation in acute leukemias, resulting in gene fusion with AF4 (chromosome 4) and ENL (chromosome 19). The authors report here translocation of MLL with nine different chromosomes and two paracentric chromosome 11 deletions in early B cell, B- or T-cell lineage, or nonlymphocytic acute leukemias. The mRNA translocation junction from 22t(4;11) patients, including six adult leukemias, and nine t(11;19) tumors reveals a remarkable conservation of breakpoints within MLL, AF4, or ENL genes, irrespective of tumor phenotype. Typically, the breakpoints are upstream of the zinc-finger region of MLL, and deletion of this region can accompany translocation, supporting the der(11) chromosome as the important component in leukemogenesis. Partial sequence of a fusion between MLL and the AFX1 gene from chromosome X shows the latter to be rich in Ser/Pro codons, like the ENL mRNA. These data suggest that the heterogeneous 11q23 abnormalities might cause attachment of Ser/Pro-rich segments to the NH[sub 2] terminus of MLL, lacking the zinc-finger region, and that translocation occurs in early hematopoietic cells, before commitment to distinct lineages. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  15. A small spacecraft mission with large accomplishments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Mason, Glenn M.; Mazur, Joseph E.

    2012-08-01

    A remarkable era of space research will end soon when, after 20 years of space-based observations, the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft will reenter Earth's atmosphere. This will result from the resurgence of the Sun's activity and the related increase of atmospheric drag produced by increasing solar ultraviolet radiation. The best estimate is that SAMPEX will succumb to drag forces (and burn up on reentry) in late September 2012, but this could occur as early as August or as late as December 2012 [see Baker et al., 2012]. SAMPEX has been a pacesetting mission since its inception. It was selected in 1989 for flight as NASA's first spacecraft in the "Small Explorer" (SMEX) program [Baker et al., 1993]. The SMEX program was intended both to accomplish forefront science (at a very affordable cost) as well as to provide a training ground in the best space development practices for a new generation of scientists, engineers, and managers. As its full name suggests, SAMPEX was always intended to perform multiple duties and was geared toward making measurements in space of moderate to very high energy particles [see Baker et al., 1993]. A few of the key contributions made by the SAMPEX program are summarized below.

  16. Engineering Accomplishments in the Construction of NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    G. H. Neilson; P.J. Heitzenroeder; B.E. Nelson; W.T. Reiersen; A. Brooks; T.G. Brown; J.H. Chrzanowski; M.J. Cole; F. Dahlgren; T. Dodson; L.E. Dudek; R.A. Ellis; H.M. Fan; P.J. Fogarty; K.D. Freudenberg; P.L. Goranson; J.H. Harris; M.R. Kalish; G. Labik; J.F. Lyon; N. Pomphrey; C.D. Priniski; S. Raftopoulos; D.J. Rej; W.R. Sands; R.T. Simmons; B.E. Stratton; R.L. Strykowsky; M.E. Viola; D.E. Williamson; M.C. Zarnstorff

    2008-09-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test a compact, quasiaxisymmetric stellarator configuration. Flexibility and accurate realization of its complex 3D geometry were key requirements affecting the design and construction. While the project was terminated before completing construction, there were significant engineering accomplishments in design, fabrication, and assembly. The design of the stellarator core device was completed. All of the modular coils, toroidal field coils, and vacuum vessel sectors were fabricated. Critical assembly steps were demonstrated. Engineering advances were made in the application of CAD modeling, structural analysis, and accurate fabrication of complex-shaped components and subassemblies. The engineering accomplishments of the project are summarized

  17. Accomplished Teachers Implementation of Quality Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Weiyun; Hammond-Bennett, Austin; Upton, Ashely; Mason, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how accomplished teachers implement the quality of teaching practices in their daily lessons. The participants were four elementary physical education teachers (one male, three female). The data sources consisted of videotape of the teachers teaching 12 lessons, transcription of the taped lessons,…

  18. Accomplishing Multiple Goals through Community Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Jody

    2007-01-01

    With schools being asked to accomplish more and more, it is increasingly important to, whenever possible, address multiple goals in teaching. Educating the whole child dictates that we find ways to ensure our graduates are well-rounded, independent thinkers capable of becoming well-adjusted, contributing adults. Thus community service has become a…

  19. Acoustics Division recent accomplishments and research plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. R.; Morgan, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The research program currently being implemented by the Acoustics Division of NASA Langley Research Center is described. The scope, focus, and thrusts of the research are discussed and illustrated for each technical area by examples of recent technical accomplishments. Included is a list of publications for the last two calendar years. The organization, staff, and facilities are also briefly described.

  20. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Full Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE’s) Biomass Program works with industry, academia and its national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This document provides Program accomplishments for 2007.

  1. Developing Professional Standards for Accomplished Language Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Federation of Modern Language Teachers Associations (AFMLTA) has recently developed a set of professional standards for accomplished language teachers. Standards of teaching are statements of values about the processes of teaching, learning, and knowing, and of the practices of those who teach languages and cultures. These standards…

  2. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Report Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE’s) Biomass Program works with industry, academia and its national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This document provides the introduction to the 2007 Program Accomplishments Report.

  3. Navajo Health Authority: Accomplishments--Future Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    Accomplishments of the Navajo Health Authority (NHA) since it began in 1972 are presented in synopsis form in a report of programs underway at Window Rock and Shiprock, along with NHA goals: to promote development of Navajo Health manpower, preventive medicine, health education, and native healing sciences. After a brief review of executive and…

  4. Constructing a Clear Path to Accomplished Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jill Harrison

    2010-01-01

    Given the importance of quality teaching for student success, it is clear that every child needs to be able to receive instruction from a teacher who possesses the knowledge and skills for quality teaching--an accomplished teacher. It is less clear, however, how current teacher development policies and practices can ensure that all students will…

  5. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2014 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Braase, Lori; May, W. Edgar

    2014-10-01

    accident conditions than traditional fuel systems. AFC management and integration activities included continued support for international collaborations, primarily with France, Japan, the European Union, Republic of Korea, and China, as well as various working group and expert group activities in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Three industry-led Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) and two university-led Integrated Research Projects (IRPs), funded in 2013, made significant progress in fuels and materials development. All are closely integrated with AFC and Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) research. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY) 2014 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the lead technical contact is provided for each section.

  6. 2014 Survey of States: Initiatives, Trends, and Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyyan, Vitaliy; Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the fourteenth survey of states by the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) at the University of Minnesota. Results are presented for the 50 regular states and eight of the 11 unique states. The purpose of this report is to provide a snapshot of the new initiatives, trends, accomplishments, and emerging issues…

  7. Enhanced surveillance program FY1998 accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, J

    1998-10-01

    This report highlights the accomplishments of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP), the highest-priority research and development effort in stockpile management today. This is volume one of eleven, the unclassified summary of selected program highlights. These highlights fall into the following focus areas: pits, high explosives, organics, dynamics, diagnostics, systems, secondaries, materials-aging models, non-nuclear components, and routine surveillance testing system upgrades. Principal investigators from around the DOE complex contributed to this report.

  8. NASA total quality management 1990 accomplishments report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's efforts in Total Quality Management are based on continuous improvement and serve as a foundation for NASA's present and future endeavors. Given here are numerous examples of quality strategies that have proven effective and efficient in a time when cost reduction is critical. These accomplishment benefit our Agency and help to achieve our primary goal, keeping American in the forefront of the aerospace industry.

  9. Significant Accomplishments in Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of a symposium on significant accomplishments in science and technology are presented. The symposium was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center in December 1973. The subjects discussed are as follows: (1) cometary physics, (2) X-ray and gamma ray astronomy, (3) solar and terrestrial physics, (4) spacecraft technology, (5) Earth Resources Technology Satellite, (6) earth and ocean physics, (6) communications and navigation, (7) mission operations and data systems, and (8) networks systems and operations.

  10. Loss of Niemann-Pick C1 or C2 protein results in similar biochemical changes suggesting that these proteins function in a common lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Sayali S; Jadot, Michel; Sohar, Istvan; Sleat, David E; Stock, Ann M; Lobel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and other lipids in the endolysosomal system. NPC disease results from a defect in either of two distinct cholesterol-binding proteins: a transmembrane protein, NPC1, and a small soluble protein, NPC2. NPC1 and NPC2 are thought to function closely in the export of lysosomal cholesterol with both proteins binding cholesterol in vitro but they may have unrelated lysosomal roles. To investigate this possibility, we compared biochemical consequences of the loss of either protein. Analyses of lysosome-enriched subcellular fractions from brain and liver revealed similar decreases in buoyant densities of lysosomes from NPC1 or NPC2 deficient mice compared to controls. The subcellular distribution of both proteins was similar and paralleled a lysosomal marker. In liver, absence of either NPC1 or NPC2 resulted in similar alterations in the carbohydrate processing of the lysosomal protease, tripeptidyl peptidase I. These results highlight biochemical alterations in the lysosomal system of the NPC-mutant mice that appear secondary to lipid storage. In addition, the similarity in biochemical phenotypes resulting from either NPC1 or NPC2 deficiency supports models in which the function of these two proteins within lysosomes are linked closely.

  11. Molecular similarity and property similarity.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Frédérique; Horvath, Dragos

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the main efforts undertaken up to date in order to understand, rationalize and apply the similarity principle (similar compounds=>similar properties) as a computational tool in modern drug discovery. The best suited mathematical expression of this classical working hypothesis of medicinal chemistry needs to be carefully chosen (out of the virtually infinite possible implementations in terms of molecular descriptors and molecular similarity metrics), in order to achieve an optimal validation of the hypothesis that molecules that are neighbors in the Structural Space will also display similar properties. This overview will show why no single "absolute" measure of molecular similarity can be conceived, and why molecular similarity scores should be considered tunable tools that need to be adapted to each problem to solve.

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathryn A.

    2015-02-01

    Welcome to the 2014 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Accomplishments Report, covering research and development highlights from 2014. The LWRS Program is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development program to inform and support the long-term operation of our nation’s commercial nuclear power plants. The research uses the unique facilities and capabilities at the Department of Energy national laboratories in collaboration with industry, academia, and international partners. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants is essential to supporting our nation’s base load energy infrastructure, as well as reaching the Administration’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The purpose of the LWRS Program is to provide technical results for plant owners to make informed decisions on long-term operation and subsequent license renewal, reducing the uncertainty, and therefore the risk, associated with those decisions. In January 2013, 104 nuclear power plants operated in 31 states. However, since then, five plants have been shut down (several due to economic reasons), with additional shutdowns under consideration. The LWRS Program aims to minimize the number of plants that are shut down, with R&D that supports long-term operation both directly (via data that is needed for subsequent license renewal), as well indirectly (with models and technology that provide economic benefits). The LWRS Program continues to work closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to ensure that the body of information needed to support SLR decisions and actions is available in a timely manner. This report covers selected highlights from the three research pathways in the LWRS Program: Materials Aging and Degradation, Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization, and Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies, as well as a look-ahead at planned activities for 2015. If you

  13. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2015 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Braase, Lori Ann; Carmack, William Jonathan

    2015-10-29

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This report is a compilation of technical accomplishment summaries for FY-15. Emphasis is on advanced accident-tolerant LWR fuel systems, advanced transmutation fuels technologies, and capability development.

  14. Sandia technology engineering and science accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Sandia is a DOE multiprogram engineering and science laboratory with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California, and a test range near Tonapah, Nevada. We have major research and development responsibilities for nuclear weapons, arms control, energy, the environment, economic competitiveness, and other areas of importance to the needs of the nation. Our principal mission is to support national defense policies by ensuring that the nuclear weapon stockpile meets the highest standards of safety, reliability, security, use control, and military performance. Selected unclassified technical activities and accomplishments are reported here. Topics include advanced manufacturing technologies, intelligent machines, computational simulation, sensors and instrumentation, information management, energy and environment, and weapons technology.

  15. NASA total quality management 1989 accomplishments report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Betty P. (Editor); Stewart, Lynne M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    NASA and contractor employees achieved many notable improvements in 1989. The highlights of those improvements, described in this seventh annual Accomplishments Report, demonstrate that the people who support NASA's activities are getting more involved in quality and continuous improvement efforts. Their gains solidly support NASA's and this Nation's goal to remain a leader in space exploration and in world-wide market competition, and, when communicated to others through avenues such as this report, foster improvement efforts across government and industry. The principles in practice which led to these process refinements are important cultural elements to any organization's productivity and quality efforts. The categories in this report reflect NASA principles set forth in the 1980's and are more commonly known today as Total Quality Management (TQM): top management leadership and support; strategic planning; focus on the customer; employee training and recognition; employee empowerment and teamwork; measurement and analysis; and quality assurance.

  16. Health and Environmental Research. Summary of Accomplishments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1984-04-01

    This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  17. Low Cost Methods to Accomplish Aeronomy Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Accomplishment of aeronomy science using low cost methods involves a number of innovative considerations. These methods will be discussed. They include making broad use of internet to control and operate distributed sensors. Sensor controls should be simple and most important reliable. Imagers are a common sensor for optical systems and include common computer interfaces and menu driven operations which often don't require special software or engineering development. Small, inexpensive but reliable satellite systems are evolving in the Cubesat community. Effective use of students is invaluable, giving them responsibility to operate instrumentation and to routinely archive the data. Management of students is especially important in the early phase of their training to insure quality performance. These ideas will be elaborated on, and most importantly, the science motive is the most important driver for what is done.

  18. Health and environmental research. Summary of accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  19. Fort Collins Science Center: 2006 Accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2007-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 2006 (FY06), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) continued research vital to U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) science and management needs and associated USGS programmatic goals. FORT work also supported the science needs of other governmental departments and agencies as well as private cooperators. Specifically, FORT scientific research and technical assistance focused on client and partner agency needs and goals in the areas of biological information management, fisheries and aquatic systems, invasive species, status and trends of biological resources, terrestrial ecosystems, and wildlife resources. Highlights of FORT project accomplishments are described below under the USGS science program area with which each task is most closely associated.2 The work of FORT’s five branches (in 2006: Aquatic Systems and Technology Applications, Ecosystem Dynamics, Invasive Species Science, Policy Analysis and Science Assistance, and Species and Habitats of Federal Interest) often involves major partnerships with other agencies or cooperation with other USGS disciplines (Geology, Geography, Water Resources).

  20. Region 6's 2016 Strategic Plan and 2015 Accomplishment Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA Region 6 Strategic Plan highlights the goals we have set out to accomplish in 2016 based on each of our priorities. areas. Our Accomplishment Report summarizes our work in meeting these priorities during the prior year.

  1. Some History and Accomplishments of the IUSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Hartemink, Alfred E.

    2013-04-01

    Urban Soils) and three standing committees (Committee on awards and prizes, Committee on budget and finances, and Committee on statutes and byelaws). Membership in ISSS/IUSS increased from around 550 after WWII to over 60,000 today. The IUSS also provides Honorary Membership to soil scientists who have significant accomplishments in the field; to date 87 soil scientists have been so recognized from all over the globe. The IUSS is the most important global link to the world's leading soil science and soil scientists.

  2. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration Through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Lunabotics Mining Competition is designed to promote the development of interest in space activities and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. The competition uses excavation, a necessary first step towards extracting resources from the regolith and building bases on the moon. The unique physical properties of lunar regolith and the reduced 1/6th gravity, vacuum environment make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The competition is conducted annually by NASA at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The teams that can use telerobotic or autonomous operation to excavate a lunar regolith geotechnical simulant, herein after referred to as Black Point-1 (or BP-1) and score the most points (calculated as an average of two separate 10-minute timed competition attempts) will eam points towards the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence and the scores will reflect ranking in the on-site mining category of the competition. The minimum excavation requirement is 10.0 kg during each competition attempt and the robotic excavator, referred to as the "Lunabot", must meet all specifications. This paper will review the achievements of the Lunabotics Mining Competition in 2010 and 2011, and present the new rules for 2012. By providing a framework for robotic design and fabrication, which culminates in a live competition event, university students have been able to produce sophisticated lunabots which are tele-operated. Multi-disciplinary teams are encouraged and the extreme sense of accomplishment provides a unique source of inspiration to the participating students, which has been shown to translate into increased interest in STEM careers. Our industrial sponsors (Caterpillar, Newmont Mining, Harris, Honeybee Robotics) have all stated that there is a strong need for skills in the workforce related

  3. APPLYING SIMPLE TECHNOLOGY ACCOMPLISHES VISUAL INSPECTION CHALLENGES

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, C

    2007-07-21

    This paper discusses the successful implementation of simple video technologies at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to perform complex visual inspection, monitoring, and surveillance tasks. Because SRS facilities are similar to those of an industrial plant, the environmental and accessibility considerations for remote viewing are the primary determining factors in the selection of technology. The constraints and challenges associated with remote viewing are discussed, and examples of applications are given.

  4. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska: Accomplishments during 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coonrad, Warren L.

    1982-01-01

    This report of accomplishments of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska during 1980 contains summary and topical accounts of results of studies in a wide range of topics of economic and scientific interest. In addition, many more detailed maps and reports are included in the lists of references cited for each article and in the appended compilations of 297 reports on Alaska published by the U.S. Geological Survey and of 177 reports by U.S. Geological Survey authors in various other scientific publications.

  5. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska: Accomplishments during 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coonrad, Warren L.; Elliot, Raymond L.

    1984-01-01

    This report of accomplishments of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska during 1981 contains summary and topical accounts of the results of studies on a wide range of topics of economic and scientific interest. In addition, many more detailed maps and reports are included in the lists of references cited for each article and in the appended compilations of 277 reports on Alaska published by the U.S. Geological Survey and of 103 reports, by U.S. Geological Survey authors in various other scientific publications.

  6. The mastodon mitochondrial genome: a mammoth accomplishment.

    PubMed

    Roca, Alfred L

    2008-02-01

    The mitochondrial genome of an American mastodon was recently sequenced and used to root a phylogenetic analysis that included full mitochondrial genome sequences from woolly mammoths and the two living elephant genera. The study definitively established that mammoth and Asian elephant mitochondrial DNA lineages are more closely related than either is to African elephants. However, it also suggests that a complex evolutionary picture could ultimately emerge and points to similarities between the early evolution of the Elephantidae and that of the gorilla-human-chimpanzee clade.

  7. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Program Accomplishments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    CASTING SOLIDIFICATION PROCESS. 0 TEST CASTINGS WERE FABRICATED AT BLAW - KNOX . SIMULATION RESULTS WERE FOUND TO BE IN GOOD AGREEMENT WITH TEST RESULTS. 0...EVALUATE A CYLINDRICAL GRINDING RPic cow CONTROL PROCESS Wh" RPMFied Changing RESULTS Wvhe Was, Rate Uncon.trolled Controlled Wheel S.urfate VgoCntV

  8. Material Recovery and Waste Form Development FY 2015 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Terry Allen; Braase, Lori Ann

    2015-11-01

    The Material Recovery and Waste Form Development (MRWFD) Campaign under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is responsible for developing advanced separation and waste form technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The FY 2015 Accomplishments Report provides a highlight of the results of the research and development (R&D) efforts performed within the MRWFD Campaign in FY-14. Each section contains a high-level overview of the activities, results, technical point of contact, applicable references, and documents produced during the fiscal year. This report briefly outlines campaign management and integration activities, but primarily focuses on the many technical accomplishments made during FY-15. The campaign continued to utilize an engineering driven-science-based approach to maintain relevance and focus. There was increased emphasis on development of technologies that support near-term applications that are relevant to the current once-through fuel cycle.

  9. Impacting Teachers' Understanding of Geometric Similarity: Results from Field Testing of the Learning and Teaching Geometry Professional Development Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seago, Nanette M.; Jacobs, Jennifer K.; Heck, Daniel J.; Nelson, Courtney L.; Malzahn, Kristen A.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the Learning and Teaching Geometry project is to build professional development materials that provide opportunities for teachers to learn about mathematical similarity through the use of videocases, in which specific and increasingly complex mathematical ideas are presented within the dynamics of classroom practice. The central…

  10. Mixed Multifractal Analysis for Functions: General Upper Bound and Optimal Results for Vectors of Self-Similar or Quasi-Self of Functions and Their Superpositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Slimane, Mourad; Ben Mabrouk, Anouar; Aouidi, Jamil

    2016-08-01

    Mixed multifractal analysis for functions studies the Hölder pointwise behavior of more than one single function. For a vector F = (f1,…,fL) of L functions, with L ≥ 2, we are interested in the mixed Hölder spectrum, which is the Hausdorff dimension of the set of points for which each function fl has exactly a given value αl of pointwise Hölder regularity. We will conjecture a formula which relates the mixed Hölder spectrum to some mixed averaged wavelet quantities of F. We will prove an upper bound valid for any vector of uniform Hölder functions. Then we will prove the validity of the conjecture for self-similar vectors of functions, quasi-self-similar vectors and their superpositions. These functions are written as the superposition of similar structures at different scales, reminiscent of some possible modelization of turbulence or cascade models. Their expressions look also like wavelet decompositions.

  11. Progress Cleaning the Air: Voluntary Partnership Program Accomplishments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA voluntary clean air partnership programs work in tandem with regulatory programs to protect public health and the environment. This page highlights accomplishments of selected partnership programs.

  12. JOVE: Program Accomplishments and Research Continuation Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hmelo, Anthony B.

    1997-01-01

    We designed and constructed a centrifuge for high gravity materials science research. One Master's theses project on the directional solidification of Pb-Sn alloys demonstrated effects of high gravity on the fluid flow at the solid-liquid interface during processing. These results were published. Another investigation applied flow visualization techniques to image flow patterns in a water cell. This activity supported our research proposal for aqueous growth of L-Anginin Phosphate Single Crystals in a high gravity environment. This proposal was well reviewed but ultimately denied funding.

  13. Recent NASA research accomplishments aboard the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; North, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    The activation of the US Laboratory Module "Destiny" on the International Space Station (ISS) in February 2001 launched a new era in microgravity research. Destiny provides the environment to conduct long-term microgravity research utilizing human intervention to assess, report, and modify experiments real time. As the only available pressurized space platform, ISS maximizes today's scientific resources and substantially increases the opportunity to obtain much longed-for answers on the effects of microgravity and long-term exposure to space. In addition, it evokes unexpected questions and results while experiments are still being conducted, affording time for changes and further investigation. While building and outfitting the ISS is the main priority during the current ISS assembly phase, seven different space station crews have already spent more than 2000 crew hours on approximately 80 scientific investigations, technology development activities, and educational demonstrations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Recent NASA research accomplishments aboard the ISS.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Neal R; North, Regina M

    2004-01-01

    The activation of the US Laboratory Module "Destiny" on the International Space Station (ISS) in February 2001 launched a new era in microgravity research. Destiny provides the environment to conduct long-term microgravity research utilizing human intervention to assess, report, and modify experiments real time. As the only available pressurized space platform, ISS maximizes today's scientific resources and substantially increases the opportunity to obtain much longed-for answers on the effects of microgravity and long-term exposure to space. In addition, it evokes unexpected questions and results while experiments are still being conducted, affording time for changes and further investigation. While building and outfitting the ISS is the main priority during the current ISS assembly phase, seven different space station crews have already spent more than 2000 crew hours on approximately 80 scientific investigations, technology development activities, and educational demonstrations.

  15. Cooperative Public Outreach - It can be Accomplished

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, K. W.; Carpenter, K. D.; Davis, S. L.; Smith, C. F.; Washburne, J. C.; Woodard, G. C.

    2002-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (Santa Catalina Ranger District of the Coronado National Forest), the U.S. Geological Survey (Water Resources Discipline, Arizona District), and the National Science Foundation sponsored Science and Technology Center (Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas) have created a series of exhibits on the hydrology of Sabino Creek, an ephemeral stream within the Sonoran Desert (USA) visited by over 1 million people annually. A clear set of educational objectives established at the beginning of the process and interagency cooperation resulted in a cohesive grouping of exhibits while minimizing single agency dominance. The multimedia exhibits are a collection of visual displays along with a touch-screen kiosk that has animations and other links that expand along many avenues to educate people on ephemeral streams, sky islands, siltation, and ground-water recharge within the Sonoran Desert. In addition, the exhibit incorporates real-time climate and streamflow data collected by four science agencies. The real-time data incorporated into the kiosk and linking web page is used to educate visitors about the natural environment within Sabino Canyon and inform them about flash-flooding and fire dangers. Thus, before entering the canyon, a visitor can view the exhibit and readily determine the air and water temperature, stream activity, and several other current and historical environmental variables. In summary, the cooperative efforts between the agencies resulted in a series of exhibits that are far more beneficial to the public than if the efforts had been attempted separately.

  16. Expanding the results of a high throughput screen against an isochorismate-pyruvate lyase to enzymes of a similar scaffold or mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Kathleen M.; Luo, Qianyi; Riley, Andrew P.; Taylor, Byron; Roy, Anuradha; Stein, Ross L.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing health concern, and new avenues of antimicrobial drug design are being actively sought. One suggested pathway to be targeted for inhibitor design is that of iron scavenging through siderophores. Here we present a high throughput screen to the isochorismate-pyruvate lyase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an enzyme required for the production of the siderophore pyochelin. Compounds identified in the screen are high nanomolar to low micromolar inhibitors of the enzyme and produce growth inhibition in PAO1 P. aeruginosa in the millimolar range under iron-limiting conditions. The identified compounds were also tested for enzymatic inhibition of E. coli chorismate mutase, a protein of similar fold and similar chemistry, and of Y. enterocolitica salicylate synthase, a protein of differing fold but catalyzing the same lyase reaction. In both cases, subsets of the inhibitors from the screen were found to be inhibitory to enzymatic activity (mutase or synthase) in the micromolar range and capable of growth inhibition in their respective organisms (E. coli or Y. enterocolitica). PMID:25282647

  17. Expanding the results of a high throughput screen against an isochorismate-pyruvate lyase to enzymes of a similar scaffold or mechanism.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Luo, Qianyi; Riley, Andrew P; Taylor, Byron; Roy, Anuradha; Stein, Ross L; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Lamb, Audrey L

    2014-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing health concern, and new avenues of antimicrobial drug design are being actively sought. One suggested pathway to be targeted for inhibitor design is that of iron scavenging through siderophores. Here we present a high throughput screen to the isochorismate-pyruvate lyase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an enzyme required for the production of the siderophore pyochelin. Compounds identified in the screen are high nanomolar to low micromolar inhibitors of the enzyme and produce growth inhibition in PAO1 P. aeruginosa in the millimolar range under iron-limiting conditions. The identified compounds were also tested for enzymatic inhibition of Escherichia coli chorismate mutase, a protein of similar fold and similar chemistry, and of Yersinia enterocolitica salicylate synthase, a protein of differing fold but catalyzing the same lyase reaction. In both cases, subsets of the inhibitors from the screen were found to be inhibitory to enzymatic activity (mutase or synthase) in the micromolar range and capable of growth inhibition in their respective organisms (E. coli or Y. enterocolitica).

  18. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Space Mining for resources such as water ice, and regolith, which contain many elements in the form of metals, minerals, volatiles and other compounds, is a necessary step in Space Resource Utilization. One of the primary goals is to extract propellants from the regolith such as oxygen and hydrogen which could then be used for in-space transportation. In addition, the space mining system can be used for various construction tasks that can benefit human and robotic exploration as well as scientific investigations based on the exposed topography. The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) Lunabotics Mining Competition is a university-level competition designed to engage and retain students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload. The challenge is for students to design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 15 minutes. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the lunar simulant, the weight and size limitations of the lunabot, and the ability to control the lunabot from a remote control center or operate autonomously. This paper will present an update of the results and lessons learned during the first and second annual Lunabotics Mining Competitions held in May 2010 and May 2011. It will also preview the 2012 competition with a review of the revised rules. In 2010,22 United States (US) universities competed, and in May 2011 the competition was opened to international participation. In 2011, 36 teams actually competed from 26 USA states and 4 foreign countries (India, Bangladesh, Colombia and Canada). This combined total directly inspired an

  19. Overview and accomplishments of the Borexino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranucci, G.; Agostini, M.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    The Borexino experiment is running at the Laboratori del Gran Sasso in Italy since 2007. Its technical distinctive feature is the unprecedented ultralow background of the inner scintillating core, which is the basis of the outstanding achievements accumulated by the experiment. In this talk, after recalling the main features of the detector, the impressive solar data gathered so far by the experiment will be summarized, with special emphasis to the most recent and prominent result concerning the detection of the fundamental pp solar neutrino flux, which is the direct probe of the engine mechanism powering our star. Such a milestone measurement puts Borexino in the unique situation of being the only experiment able to do solar neutrino spectroscopy over the entire solar spectrum; the counterpart of this peculiar status in the oscillation interpretation of the data is the capability of Borexino alone to perform the full validation across the solar energy range of the MSW-LMA paradigm. The talk will be concluded highlighting the perspectives for the final stage of the solar program of the experiment, centered on the goal to fully complete the solar spectroscopy with the missing piece of the CNO neutrinos. If successful, such a measurement would represent the final crowning of the long quest of Borexino to unravel all the properties of the neutrinos from the Sun.

  20. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1894 and accomplishments for FY 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    The Objectives, Expected Results, Approach, and Fiscal Year FY 1984 Milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division's research programs are examined. The FY 1983 Accomplishments are presented where applicable.

  1. Research Progress and Accomplishments on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Lesa B.; Uri, John J.

    2002-01-01

    The first research payloads reached the International Space Station (ISS) more than two years ago, with research operating continuously since March 2001. Seven research racks are currently on-orbit, with three more arriving soon to expand science capabilities. Through the first five expeditions, 60 unique NASA-managed investigations from 11 nations have been supported, many continuing into later missions. More than 90,000 experiment hours have been completed, and more than 1,000 hours of crew time have been dedicated to research, numbers that grow daily. The multidisciplinary program includes research in life sciences, physical sciences, biotechnology, Earth sciences, technology demonstrations as well as commercial endeavors and educational activities. The Payload Operations and Integration Center monitors the onboard activities around the clock, working with numerous Principal Investigators and Payload Developers at their remote sites. Future years will see expansion of the station with research modules provided by the European Space Agency and Japan, which will be outfitted with additional research racks. The first research payloads arrived at ISS more than two years ago, and continuous science has been ongoing for more than one and a half years. During this time, the research capabilities have been tremendously increased, even as assembly of the overall platform continues. Despite significant challenges along the way, ISS continues to successfully support a large number of investigations in a variety of research disciplines. The results of some of the early investigations are reaching the publication stage. The near future looms with new challenges, but experience to date and dedicated efforts give reason to be optimistic that the challenges will be overcome and that new and greater successes will be added to past ones.

  2. Marine hydrogeology: recent accomplishments and future opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.

    2005-03-01

    Marine hydrogeology is a broad-ranging scientific discipline involving the exploration of fluid-rock interactions below the seafloor. Studies have been conducted at seafloor spreading centers, mid-plate locations, and in plate- and continental-margin environments. Although many seafloor locations are remote, there are aspects of marine systems that make them uniquely suited for hydrologic analysis. Newly developed tools and techniques, and the establishment of several multidisciplinary programs for oceanographic exploration, have helped to push marine hydrogeology forward over the last several decades. Most marine hydrogeologic work has focused on measurement or estimation of hydrogeologic properties within the shallow subsurface, but additional work has emphasized measurements of local and global fluxes, fluid source and sink terms, and quantitative links between hydrogeologic, chemical, tectonic, biological, and geophysical processes. In addition to summarizing selected results from a small number of case studies, this paper includes a description of several new experiments and programs that will provide outstanding opportunities to address fundamental hydrogeologic questions within the seafloor during the next 20-30 years. L'hydrogéologie marine est une large discipline scientifique impliquant l' exploration des interactions entre les fluides et les roches sous les fonds marins. Des études ont été menées dans les différents environnements sous-marins (zone abyssale, plaque océanique, marges continentales). Bien que de nombreux fonds marins soient connus, il existe des aspects des systèmes marins qui les rendent inadaptés à l'analyse hydrologique. De nouveaux outils et techniques, et la mise en oeuvre de nombreux programmes multidisciplinaires d'exploration océanographique, ont aidé à pousser en avant l'hydrogéologie marine ces dix dernières années. La plus part des études hydrogéologiques se sont concentrées jusqu'à présent sur la mesure ou

  3. OTEC mooring system development: recent accomplishments. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.M.; Wood, W.A.

    1981-10-01

    The mooring system for a floating OTEC platform consists of a seafloor foundation, a platform foundation, and a connecting line. This paper introduces the OTEC mooring system with a brief historical overview, reviews developmental work accomplished during the past year, and then presents a new look at life cycle costs for an example mooring system. Since June 1980, a significant effort within the OTEC Program has been directed toward the further development of mooring systems. The effort has included work leading to a better understanding of anchoring capabilities and problems, refinement of an existing mooring analytical model, a review of OTEC past mooring designs, and the production of a mooring system technology development plan. A major finding of the past year was a new upward estimate of mooring system lifetime costs as a result of downward-revised estimates of wire rope service life.

  4. Space directorate research and technology accomplishments for FY 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The major accomplishments and test highlights for FY 1988 that occurred in the Space Dirctorate are given. Accomplishments and test highlights are presented by Division and Branch. The presented information will be useful in program coordination with government organizations, universities, and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  5. Outcomes and Accomplishments of The Circles of Care Planing Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duclos, Christine W.; Phillips, Mary; LeMaster, Pamela L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents outcomes and accomplishments of the first round of participating individuals, communities, and grantees of the Circles of Care program (CoC). While accomplishing all CoC program goals, the initiative supported grantees in developing individual service delivery system models and positioned each grantee advantageously for…

  6. E. Paul Torrance: His Life, Accomplishments, and Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Thomas P.; Cramond, Bonnie; Spiers Neumeister,Kristie L.; Millar, Garnet; Silvian, Alice F.

    2002-01-01

    E. P. Torrance: His Life, Accomplishments, and Legacy is a tribute to the renowned creativity researcher, university teacher, and mentor to numerous individuals throughout the world. This monograph is presented in three sections which include a discussion of Torrance's life, followed by an overview of his accomplishments, including his creativity…

  7. Space directorate research and technology accomplishments for fiscal year 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    The major accomplishments and test highlights of the Space Directorate of NASA Langley Research Center for FY87 are presented. Accomplishments and test highlights are listed by Division and Branch. This information should be useful in coordinating programs with government organizations, universities, and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  8. A similarity analysis of the droplet trajectory equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    A procedure is established to reduce the number of similarity parameters in the trajectory equation for particles in a moving fluid. This is accomplished by the use of an approximate sphere drag law to derive a new trajectory scaling parameter. The modified inertia parameter proposed by Langmuir specifically for the aircraft icing problem is analyzed and for the first time a closed-form solution is obtained. Both experimental and analytical results are presented to verify this new trajectory scaling parameter.

  9. X-RAY SELECTED AGN HOST GALAXIES ARE SIMILAR TO INACTIVE GALAXIES OUT TO z = 3: RESULTS FROM CANDELS/CDF-S

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Wuyts, S.; Nandra, K.; Mozena, M.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Koekemoer, A.; Ferguson, H.; Grogin, N.; McGrath, E.; Hathi, N. P.; Dekel, A.; Donley, J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Giavalisco, M.; Guo, Y.; Kocevski, D. D.; Laird, E.; Rangel, C.; Newman, J.; and others

    2013-01-20

    We use multi-band spatially resolved photometry from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South to explore the nuclear and extended colors, color gradients, and stellar populations of the host galaxies of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) out to z = 3. Based on a study of their central light, we develop X-ray based criteria to exclude objects with strong AGN contamination. We use stellar masses from the FIREWORKS database to understand and account for stellar mass selection effects and carefully study, for the first time, the resolved host galaxy properties of AGNs at z {approx} 2 in their rest-frame optical light without substantial nuclear contamination. AGN hosts span a sizable range of stellar masses, colors, and color gradients at these redshifts. Their colors, color gradients, and stellar population properties are very similar to inactive galaxies of the same stellar mass. At z {approx} 1, we find a slightly narrower range in host colors compared to inactive galaxies, as well as hints of more recent star formation. These differences are weaker or non-existent among AGN hosts at z {approx} 2. We discuss the importance of AGN-driven feedback in the quenching of galaxies at z {approx}> 1 and speculate on possible evolution in the relationship between black hole accretion and the host galaxy toward high redshifts.

  10. Marking Student Programs Using Graph Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, Kevin A.; Greyling, Jean H.; Vogts, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel approach to the automated marking of student programming assignments. Our technique quantifies the structural similarity between unmarked student submissions and marked solutions, and is the basis by which we assign marks. This is accomplished through an efficient novel graph similarity measure ("AssignSim"). Our experiments…

  11. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S.

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  12. The Gender Similarities Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2005-01-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses…

  13. Characterization modeling to support the hanford 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds remediation design solution: two differing approaches with similar results

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, S.C.; Nolan, L.M.

    2007-07-01

    Two different approaches were applied to characterization modeling of the waste in the 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds. The results were compared and it was found that the independent approaches validate each other. The 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds, located on the Hanford site in Washington state, received primarily radioactive laboratory waste in the 1950's and 60's; however, disposal records from burial activities have since been destroyed. North Wind Inc. (NWI) is completing a technology demonstration project, funded by DOE Headquarters to develop methodology for remediation of the vertical pipe units and develop supporting documentation. Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) is developing a design solution for remediation of the 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds, including the development of a characterization model and estimates of radioactivity and waste volumes present. Each company independently developed their characterization models and radionuclide inventories, using a different methodology; however, the results of each model revealed only a two to five percent difference, which is significant given the complexity of the waste matrices, the high dose rates of the waste when disposed, and relatively high levels of transuranic radionuclides projected. (authors)

  14. Fibrinogen geneva II: a new congenitally abnormal fibrinogen alpha chain (Gly17Asp) with a review of similar mutations resulting in abnormal knob A.

    PubMed

    Casini, Alessandro; De Maistre, Emmanuel; Casini-Stuppi, Virginie; Fontana, Pierre; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; de Moerloose, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Congenital dysfibrinogenemias are characterized by biosynthesis of a structurally abnormal fibrinogen molecule that exhibits reduced functional levels compared with the level of fibrinogen antigen. To date a large number of mutations have been identified in patients with dysfibrinogenemia. Mutations occurring at the thrombin cleavage site (Arg16-Gly17 in the mature alpha-chain) at the amino-terminal end of the fibrinogen alpha chain are a common cause of the disease. These mutations causing abnormal fibrin polymerization are associated with different phenotypes. Here, we report the identification of a novel heterozygous missense mutation of Glycine 17 (Gly17Asp) in a female patient with mild bleeding manifestations, and compare it with other previously reported mutations also resulting in abnormal knob A.

  15. A new brace treatment similar for adolescent scoliosis and kyphosis based on restoration of thoracolumbar lordosis. Radiological and subjective clinical results after at least one year of treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Study design A prospective treatment study with a new brace was conducted Objective. To evaluate radiological and subjective clinical results after one year conservative brace treatment with pressure onto lordosis at the thoracolumbar joint in children with scoliosis and kyphosis. Summary of background data Conservative brace treatment of adolescent scoliosis is not proven to be effective in terms of lasting correction. Conservative treatment in kyphotic deformities may lead to satisfactory correction. None of the brace or casting techniques is based on sagittal forces only applied at the thoracolumbar spine (TLI= thoracolumbar lordotic intervention). Previously we showed in patients with scoliosis after forced lordosis at the thoracolumbar spine a radiological instantaneous reduction in both coronal curves of double major scoliosis. Methods A consecutive series of 91 children with adolescent scoliosis and kyphosis were treated with a modified symmetric 30 degrees Boston brace to ensure only forced lordosis at the thoracolumbar spine. Scoliosis was defined with a Cobb angle of at least one of the curves [greater than or equal to] 25 degrees and kyphosis with or without a curve <25 degrees in the coronal plane. Standing radiographs were made i) at start, ii) in brace at beginning and iii) after one year treatment without brace. Results Before treatment start ‘in brace’ radiographs showed a strong reduction of the Cobb angles in different curves in kyphosis and scoliosis groups (sagittal n = 5 all p < 0.001, pelvic obliquity p < 0.001). After one year of brace treatment in scoliosis and kyphosis group the measurements on radiographs made without brace revealed an improvement in 3 Cobb angles each. Conclusion Conservative treatment using thoracolumbar lordotic intervention in scoliotic and kyphotic deformities in adolescence demonstrates a marked improvement after one year also in clinical and postural criteria. An effect not obtained with current brace techniques

  16. E-cigarette use results in suppression of immune and inflammatory-response genes in nasal epithelial cells similar to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elizabeth M; Clapp, Phillip W; Rebuli, Meghan E; Pawlak, Erica A; Glista-Baker, Ellen; Benowitz, Neal L; Fry, Rebecca C; Jaspers, Ilona

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is known to result in impaired host defense responses and immune suppressive effects. However, the effects of new and emerging tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, on the immune status of the respiratory epithelium are largely unknown. We conducted a clinical study collecting superficial nasal scrape biopsies, nasal lavage, urine, and serum from nonsmokers, cigarette smokers, and e-cigarette users and assessed them for changes in immune gene expression profiles. Smoking status was determined based on a smoking history and a 3- to 4-wk smoking diary and confirmed using serum cotinine and urine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) levels. Total RNA from nasal scrape biopsies was analyzed using the nCounter Human Immunology v2 Expression panel. Smoking cigarettes or vaping e-cigarettes resulted in decreased expression of immune-related genes. All genes with decreased expression in cigarette smokers (n = 53) were also decreased in e-cigarette smokers. Additionally, vaping e-cigarettes was associated with suppression of a large number of unique genes (n = 305). Furthermore, the e-cigarette users showed a greater suppression of genes common with those changed in cigarette smokers. This was particularly apparent for suppressed expression of transcription factors, such as EGR1, which was functionally associated with decreased expression of 5 target genes in cigarette smokers and 18 target genes in e-cigarette users. Taken together, these data indicate that vaping e-cigarettes is associated with decreased expression of a large number of immune-related genes, which are consistent with immune suppression at the level of the nasal mucosa.

  17. Enhanced surveillance program FY97 accomplishments. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauzy, A.; Laake, B.

    1997-10-01

    This annual report is one volume of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) FY97 Accomplishments. The complete accomplishments report consists of 11 volumes. Volume 1 includes an ESP overview and a summary of selected unclassified FY97 program highlights. Volume 1 specifically targets a general audience, reflecting about half of the tasks conducted in FY97 and emphasizing key program accomplishments and contributions. The remaining volumes of the accomplishments report are classified, organized by program focus area, and present in technical detail the progress achieved in each of the 104 FY97 program tasks. Focus areas are as follows: pits; high explosives; organics; dynamics; diagnostics; systems; secondaries; nonnuclear materials; nonnuclear components; and Surveillance Test Program upgrades.

  18. Idaho National Laboratory Mission Accomplishments, Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Todd Randall; Wright, Virginia Latta

    2015-09-01

    A summary of mission accomplishments for the research organizations at the Idaho National Laboratory for FY 2015. Areas include Nuclear Energy, National and Homeland Security, Science and Technology Addressing Broad DOE Missions; Collaborations; and Stewardship and Operation of Research Facilities.

  19. Process development accomplishments: Waste and hazard minimization, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, D.A.

    1991-11-04

    This report summarizes significant technical accomplishments of the Mound Waste and Hazard Minimization Program for FY 1991. The accomplishments are in one of eight major areas: environmentally responsive cleaning program; nonhalogenated solvent trials; substitutes for volatile organic compounds; hazardous material exposure minimization; nonhazardous plating development; explosive processing waste reduction; tritium capture without conversion to water; and robotic assembly. Program costs have been higher than planned.

  20. The gender similarities hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2005-09-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses support the gender similarities hypothesis. Gender differences can vary substantially in magnitude at different ages and depend on the context in which measurement occurs. Overinflated claims of gender differences carry substantial costs in areas such as the workplace and relationships.

  1. National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center project accomplishments: highlights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holl, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) has invested more than $20M since 2008 to put cutting-edge climate science research in the hands of resource managers across the Nation. With NCCWSC support, more than 25 cooperative research initiatives led by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers and technical staff are advancing our understanding of habitats and species to provide guidance to managers in the face of a changing climate. Projects focus on quantifying and predicting interactions between climate, habitats, species, and other natural resources such as water. Spatial scales of the projects range from the continent of North America, to a regional scale such as the Pacific Northwest United States, to a landscape scale such as the Florida Everglades. Time scales range from the outset of the 20th century to the end of the 21st century. Projects often lead to workshops, presentations, publications and the creation of new websites, computer models, and data visualization tools. Partnership-building is also a key focus of the NCCWSC-supported projects. New and on-going cooperative partnerships have been forged and strengthened with resource managers and scientists at Federal, tribal, state, local, academic, and non-governmental organizations. USGS scientists work closely with resource managers to produce timely and relevant results that can assist managers and policy makers in current resource management decisions. This fact sheet highlights accomplishments of five NCCWSC projects.

  2. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  3. The 1985-86 NASA space/gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Individual Technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space/Gravitational Biology Program are presented. This Program is concerned with using the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on Earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a listing of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  4. The 1987-1988 NASA space/gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Individual technical summaries of research projects of the NASA Space/Gravitational Biology Program, for research conducted during the period January 1987 to April 1988 are presented. This Program is concerned with using the characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  5. The 1986-87 NASA space/gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space/Gravitational Biology program, for research conducted during the period January 1986 to April 1987. This program utilizes the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on Earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  6. The 1988-1989 NASA Space/Gravitational Biology Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's space/gravitational biology program, for research conducted during the period May 1988 to April 1989. This program is concerned with using the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on Earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  7. The 1989-1990 NASA space biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Individual technical summaries of research projects on NASA's Space Biology Program for research conducted during the period May 1989 to April 1990 are presented. This program is concerned with using the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance the following: (1) knowledge in the biological sciences; (2) understanding of how gravity has shaped and affected life on the Earth; and (3) understanding of how the space environment affects both plants and animals. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  8. Working Together: California Indians and the Forest Service. Accomplishment Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station.

    This report describes accomplishments of the Forest Services's Tribal Relations Program in California, highlighting coordinated efforts with tribal governments and Native American communities throughout California's national forests. The regional office provided intensive training on federal-tribal relations to key staff throughout the region, and…

  9. FAMILY GOALS AND SOME FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THEIR ACCOMPLISHMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSTON, RUPERT BERNARD

    GOALS OF FARM FAMILIES WERE ANALYZED AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THEIR ACCOMPLISHMENT STUDIED. DATA ON FARM GOALS, FARM AND HOME RESOURCES, AND INCOME WERE OBTAINED FROM 112 FAMILIES IN 18 MISSISSIPPI COUNTIES, IN WHICH THERE WERE THREE DIFFERENT COUNTY EXTENSION STAFFING PLANS. GOALS WERE CLASSIFIED IN GOUPS SUCH AS HOME AND GROUNDS, HOME…

  10. Marine Corps Transition Team Program in Iraq: Mission Accomplished

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-02

    to Mission Accomplishment.. .................................................................... 21 Figures Figure 1. MATIS Score Improvement...CORPS ADVISOR TRAINING IMPACT SYSTEM ( MATIS ) The Interaction Research Institute (IRI), a private company, conducted a study that measured advisor...study specifically focused on I Marine Expeditionary Force sourced transition teams who deployed to OIF from October 2007- September 2009. The : MATIS

  11. Women in History--Abigail Adams: Life, Accomplishments, and Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenan, Sharon K.

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles the life, accomplishments, and ideas of Abigail Adams. Born in 1944, Adams lacked a formal education, but she more than made up for that shortcoming with her love of reading, especially literature, and her interests in politics and events surrounding the young colonies. Adams was supportive of the advancement of women. She…

  12. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF...

  13. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID TO STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE,...

  14. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF...

  15. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF...

  16. Final report on technical work accomplished under contract NASw-2953

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A report is given on the technical work accomplished in the area of plasma physics. The subjects covered are: (1) oblique whistler instabilities, (2) current-limited electron beam injection, (3) three-dimensional ion sound turbulence, (4) theoretical aspects of sounder antenna operation and (5) whistler modes in bow shock structures.

  17. Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic Standardized Assessment (LAP-D).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, David; Lobman, Marcia; Oremland, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic Standardized Assessment, a standardized norm-referenced developmental assessment tool for children between the ages of 30 to 72 months. The test assesses fine motor skills, language skills, cognitive ability, and gross motor development. Its administration, standardization,…

  18. Colorado Certificate of Accomplishment. Level 1 ABE Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kenya

    This resource guide contains learning activities designed to complement existing ABE curricula or become the cornerstone of an ABE curriculum integrating reading, writing, and math skills with practical life knowledge. The guide begins with an introduction, acknowledgments, and an overview of Colorado's Certificate of Accomplishment program, which…

  19. The 1990-1991 NASA space biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space Biology Program, for research conducted during the period May 1990 through May 1991. This program includes both plant and animal research, and is dedicated to understanding the role of gravity and other environmental factors on biological systems and to using the microgravity of the space environment as a tool to advance fundamental scientific knowledge in the biological sciences to improve the quality of life on Earth and contribute to NASA's goal of manned exploration of space. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  20. The 1992-1993 NASA Space Biology Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space Biology Program, for research conducted during the calendar years of 1992 and 1993. This program includes both plant and animal research, and is dedicated to understanding the role of gravity and the effects of microgravity on biological processes; determining the effects of the interaction of gravity and other environmental factors on biological systems; and using the microgravity of the space environment as a tool to advance fundamental scientific knowledge in the biological sciences to improve the quality of life on Earth and contribute to NASA's goal of manned exploration of space. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  1. FY 1995 research highlights: PNL accomplishments in OER programs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducts fundamental and applied research in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) core missions in science and technology, environmental quality, energy resources, and national security. Much of this research is funded by the program offices of DOE`s Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER), primarily the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), and by PNL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This document is a collection of research highlights that describe PNL`s accomplishments in DOE-ER funded programs during Fiscal Year 1995. Included are accomplishments in research funded by OHER`s Analytical Technologies, Environmental Research, Health Effects, General Life Sciences, and Carbon Dioxide Research programs; BES`s Materials Science, Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geoscience, and Applied Mathematical Sciences programs; and PNL`s LDRD Program. Summaries are given for 70 projects.

  2. Abstract and research accomplishments of University Coal Research Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their respective projects in time for distribution at a conference on June 13--14, 1995 at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to that request. For convenience, the 70 grants reported in this book are stored into eight technical areas, Coal Science, Coal Surface Science, Reaction Chemistry, Advanced Process Concepts, Engineering Fundamentals and Thermodynamics, Environmental Science, high Temperature Phenomena, and Special topics. Indexes are provided for locating projects by subject, principal investigators, and contracting organizations. Each extended abstract describes project objectives, work accomplished, significance to the Fossil Energy Program, and plans for the next year.

  3. Chemical Research Projects Office: Functions, accomplishments, and programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose, technical accomplishments, and related activities of the Chemical Research Project Group are outlined. Data cover efforts made to: (1) identify chemical research and technology required for solutions to problems of national urgency, synchronous with aeronautics and space effort; (2) conduct basic and applied interdisciplinary research on chemical problems in the areas of macromolecular science and fire research, and (3) provide productive liason with the engineering community and effective transfer of technology to other agencies and industry.

  4. The eighth NASA total quality management accomplishments report, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The eighth annual accomplishments report provides numerous examples of quality strategies that have proven effective and efficient in a time when cost reduction is critical. NASA's continuous improvement efforts can provide insight for others to succeed in their own endeavors. The report covers: top management leadership and support, strategic planning, focus on the customer, employee training and recognition, employee empowerment and teamwork, measurement and analysis, and quality assurance.

  5. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  6. Accomplishments in 2008 in the Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Daniel; Blay, Jean-Yves; Blanke, Charles

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Overview of the Disease ProcessIncidencePrognosisPredictive MarkersCurrent General Therapy Standards in North America and EuropeLocalized or Potentially Resectable DiseaseUnresectable or Metastatic DiseaseAccomplishments During the YearTherapySurgical Issues and Perioperative TherapyImatinibSunitinibNew DrugsBiomarkersBasic and Other Translational ScienceWhat Needs to Be DoneFuture DirectionsComments on ResearchObstacles to Progress PMID:20011569

  7. Evaluating the Accomplishments of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    the expertise to develop a nuclear capability. This thesis explores four competing perspectives in the United States on the accomplishments of the... United States to effectively monitor and accurately assess the contributions of the program, and the expansion of the program to include projects that do...effectively pursued if the United States enhanced the quality of the CTR and worked cooperatively with Russia to address the full spectrum of common interests

  8. Abstracts and research accomplishments of university coal research projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their projects in time for distribution at a grantees conference. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to the request. Abstracts discuss the following area: coal science, coal surface science, reaction chemistry, advanced process concepts, engineering fundamentals and thermodynamics, environmental science.

  9. Health and Environmental Research: Summary of Accomplishments. Volume 2

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through "snapshots" - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  10. Fort Collins Science Center-Fiscal year 2011 science accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2012-01-01

    The Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) is a multi-disciplinary research and development center of the U.S. Geological Survey located in Fort Collins, Colorado. FORT research focuses on the needs of land- and water-management bureaus within the U.S. Department of the Interior, other Federal agencies, and State, Tribal, and non-government organizations. We emphasize a multi-disciplinary science approach to provide information for natural resource management decisionmaking. Our vision is to maintain and continuously improve the integrated, collaborative, world-class research needed to inform effective, science-based land management. The 2011 science accomplishments report provides an executive summary highlighting key achievements, an appendix of 68 one-page accomplishment descriptions organized by U.S. Geological Survey Mission Area, and a complete list of publications and other products generated in FY2011. The executive summary includes a table cross-referencing all major FY11 accomplishments with the various Mission Areas each supports.

  11. Health and Environmental Research: summary of accomplishments. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through ''snapshots'' - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  12. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  13. Applied research and development private sector accomplishments. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Beskid, N.J.; Devgun, J.S.; Zielke, M.M.; Erickson, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    Because of the nature of most US Department of Energy (DOE) operations, contamination at DOE sites presents complex problems. DOE sites may have radioactive, hazardous, or mixed contamination. The major contaminants include radionuclides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and heavy metals. The contamination exists in soils, groundwater, and buildings and materials. DOE`s special problems in site remediation have created a need for better and less costly technologies. Thus, DOE has implemented several initiatives for developing new technologies. This report describes the results of the first set of procurement contracts in this area. Similar research and development (R&D) activities are currently managed for DOE by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center.

  14. Space robotics: Recent accomplishments and opportunities for future research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Dorsey, John T.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Lallman, Frederick J.; Moerder, Daniel D.; Scott, Michael A.; Troutman, Patrick; Williams, Robert L., II

    1992-01-01

    The Langley Guidance, Navigation, and Control Technical Committee (GNCTC) was one of six technical committees created in 1991 by the Chief Scientist, Dr. Michael F. Card. During the kickoff meeting Dr. Card charged the chairmen to: (1) establish a cross-Center committee; (2) support at least one workshop in a selected discipline; and (3) prepare a technical paper on recent accomplishments in the discipline and on opportunities for future research. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control Committee was formed and selected for focus on the discipline of Space robotics. This report is a summary of the committee's assessment of recent accomplishments and opportunities for future research. The report is organized as follows. First is an overview of the data sources used by the committee. Next is a description of technical needs identified by the committee followed by recent accomplishments. Opportunities for future research ends the main body of the report. It includes the primary recommendation of the committee that NASA establish a national space facility for the development of space automation and robotics, one element of which is a telerobotic research platform in space. References 1 and 2 are the proceedings of two workshops sponsored by the committee during its June 1991, through May 1992 term. The focus of the committee for the June 1992 - May 1993 term will be to further define to the recommended platform in space and to add an additional discipline which includes aircraft related GN&C issues. To the latter end members performing aircraft related research will be added to the committee. (A preliminary assessment of future opportunities in aircraft-related GN&C research has been included as appendix A.)

  15. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the "Seed Money" program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  16. 2008 Accomplishments for CEV Parachute Assembly System (CPAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is responsible for the design, development, fabrication, qualification and delivery of the CEV parachute system to support the Orion pad/ascent flight tests and the first three orbital flight tests (including the first human mission). This article will discuss the technical and research achievements accomplished in calendar year 2008, broken into three key categories: prototype testing and analysis (also referred to as the Generation 1 design), system requirements definition and design of the flight engineering development unit, and support for the Orion vehicle flight testing (primarily Pad-Abort 1).

  17. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the ''Seed Money'' program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  18. Environmental Measurements Laboratory fiscal year 1998: Accomplishments and technical activities

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) is government-owned, government-operated, and programmatically under the DOE Office of Environmental Management. The Laboratory is administered by the Chicago Operations Office. EML provides program management, technical assistance and data quality assurance for measurements of radiation and radioactivity relating to environmental restoration, global nuclear nonproliferation, and other priority issues for the Department of Energy, as well as for other government, national, and international organizations. This report presents the technical activities and accomplishments of EML for Fiscal Year 1998.

  19. Personalized medicine: CCO's vision, accomplishments and future plans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jennifer; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Rutherford, Michael; Hart, Jennifer; Melamed, Saul; Pollett, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a rapidly expanding field, with the potential to improve patient care. Its benefits include increasing efficiency in cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment through early detection, targeted therapy and identifying individuals with an underlying genetic risk for cancer or adverse outcomes. Through the work of Cancer Care Ontario (CCO)'s Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Program, a number of initiatives have been undertaken to support developments in personalized medicine. In keeping with the momentum of recent accomplishments, CCO has led the formation of the Personalized Medicine Steering Committee to develop a comprehensive provincial genetics strategy for the future of cancer care.

  20. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i) similar effect direction and (ii) similar effect magnitude. Methods 7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR) and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD) with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph. Results Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected. Conclusion Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials. PMID:26168274

  1. Fort Collins Science Center fiscal year 2010 science accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2011-01-01

    The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Fort Collins Science Center (FORT), apply their diverse ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise to investigate complicated ecological problems confronting managers of the Nation's biological resources. FORT works closely with U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) agency scientists, the academic community, other USGS science centers, and many other partners to provide critical information needed to help answer complex natural-resource management questions. In Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), FORT's scientific and technical professionals conducted ongoing, expanded, and new research vital to the science needs and management goals of DOI, other Federal and State agencies, and nongovernmental organizations in the areas of aquatic systems and fisheries, climate change, data and information integration and management, invasive species, science support, security and technology, status and trends of biological resources (including the socioeconomic aspects), terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, and wildlife resources, including threatened and endangered species. This report presents selected FORT science accomplishments for FY10 by the specific USGS mission area or science program with which each task is most closely associated, though there is considerable overlap. The report also includes all FORT publications and other products published in FY10, as well as staff accomplishments, appointments, committee assignments, and invited presentations.

  2. Accomplishing Transformative Research in a Challenging Fiscal Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Bust, G.

    2014-12-01

    The shift in funding is forcing scientists to promise transformative research for a pittance. To accomplish this, researchers need to transform their methodology to include societal buy-in, use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology, and cross-discipline platform usage. As the cutting edge of research expands to view the system on the global scale with extremely fine resolution, fiscally reasonable budgets present a challenge to be met. Consider how do we measure a specific variable over 45-degrees of latitude in an isolated and hostile region of Earth - the total electron count over the South Pole? This work examines this transformative research using hosted payloads on buoys, balloons, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). We will show cutting edge research occurring simultaneous with education and public outreach, offering societal buy-in through interactive websites and student-built hosted payloads. These interactions provide a vision to the public and a new database to the scientists. The use of COTS technology and cross-discipline (oceanography and space) platforms keep the cost low. We will discuss a general methodology for accomplishing transformative research in a challenging fiscal environment through integration of COTS technology, assimilative and first principle models, and observing systems simulation experiments (OSSEs).

  3. Similarity transformed semiclassical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Voorhis, Troy; Heller, Eric J.

    2003-12-01

    In this article, we employ a recently discovered criterion for selecting important contributions to the semiclassical coherent state propagator [T. Van Voorhis and E. J. Heller, Phys. Rev. A 66, 050501 (2002)] to study the dynamics of many dimensional problems. We show that the dynamics are governed by a similarity transformed version of the standard classical Hamiltonian. In this light, our selection criterion amounts to using trajectories generated with the untransformed Hamiltonian as approximate initial conditions for the transformed boundary value problem. We apply the new selection scheme to some multidimensional Henon-Heiles problems and compare our results to those obtained with the more sophisticated Herman-Kluk approach. We find that the present technique gives near-quantitative agreement with the the standard results, but that the amount of computational effort is less than Herman-Kluk requires even when sophisticated integral smoothing techniques are employed in the latter.

  4. CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND RELEVANCE TO THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H.; Langton, C.; Flach, G.; Kosson, D.

    2010-11-15

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was initiated to reduce risk and uncertainties in the performance assessments that directly impact U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup and closure programs. The CBP is supported by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) and has been specifically addressing the following critical EM program needs: (i) the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities and (ii) increased understanding of contaminant transport behavior within cementitious barrier systems to support the development and deployment of adequate closure technologies. To accomplish this, the CBP has two initiatives: (1) an experimental initiative to increase understanding of changes in cementitious materials over long times (> 1000 years) over changing conditions and (2) a modeling initiative to enhance and integrate a set of computational tools validated by laboratory and field experimental data to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and waste forms used in nuclear applications. In FY10, the CBP developed the initial phase of an integrated modeling tool that would serve as a screening tool which could help in making decisions concerning disposal and tank closure. The CBP experimental programs are underway to validate this tool and provide increased understanding of how CM changes over time and under changing conditions. These initial CBP products that will eventually be enhanced are anticipated to reduce the uncertainties of current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increase the consistency and transparency of the DOE assessment process. These tools have application to low activity waste forms, high level waste tank closure, D&D and entombment of major nuclear facilities, landfill waste acceptance criteria, and in-situ grouting and immobilization of vadose zone contamination. This paper summarizes

  5. Fiscal Year 2005 Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Gotseff, P.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Anderberg, M.; Kay, B.; Bowen, A.

    2005-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiometry and Metrology task provides traceable optical radiometric calibrations and measurements to photovoltaic (PV) researchers and the PV industry. Traceability of NREL solar radiometer calibrations to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) was accomplished during Pyrheliometer Comparison at NREL in October 2004. Ten spectral and more than 200 broadband radiometers for solar measurements were calibrated this year. We measured detailed spectral distributions of the NREL and PV industry Pulsed Solar Simulators and are analyzing the influence of environmental variables on radiometer uncertainty. New systems for indoor and outdoor solar radiometer calibrations and ultraviolet (UV) spectral measurements and UV radiometer calibrations were purchased and tested. Optical metrology functions support the NREL Measurement and Characterization Task effort for ISO 17025 accreditation of NREL Solar Reference Cell Calibrations and have been integrated into the NREL quality system and audited for ISO17025 compliance.

  6. Fort Collins Science Center - Fiscal Year 2008 Science Accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2009-01-01

    Public land and natural resource managers in the United States are confronted with increasingly complex decisions that have important ramifications for both ecological and human systems. The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) contribute a unique blend of ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise to investigating complicated ecological problems that address critical management questions. In Fiscal Year 2008 (FY08), FORT's scientific and technical professionals continued research vital to the science and management needs of U.S. Department of the Interior agencies and other entities. This annual report describes select FY08 accomplishments in research and technical assistance involving biological information management and delivery; aquatic, riparian, and managed-river ecosystems; invasive species; status and trends of biological resources (including human dimensions and social science); terrestrial ecosystems; and fish and wildlife resources.

  7. Recent Accomplishments in Laser-Photovoltaic Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John C.; Henley, Mark W.; Mankins, John C.; Howell, Joe T.; Fork, Richard L.; Cole, Spencer T.; Skinner, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Wireless power transmission can be accomplished over long distances using laser power sources and photovoltaic receivers. Recent research at AMOS has improved our understanding of the use of this technology for practical applications. Research by NASA, Boeing, the University of Alabama-Huntsville, the University of Colorado, Harvey Mudd College, and the Naval Postgraduate School has tested various commercial lasers and photovoltaic receiver configurations. Lasers used in testing have included gaseous argon and krypton, solid-state diodes, and fiber optic sources, at wavelengths ranging from the visible to the near infra-red. A variety of Silicon and Gallium Arsenide photovoltaic have been tested with these sources. Safe operating procedures have been established, and initial tests have been conducted in the open air at AMOS facilities. This research is progressing toward longer distance ground demonstrations of the technology and practical near-term space demonstrations.

  8. Accomplishments at NASA Langley Research Center in rotorcraft aerodynamics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the development of aerodynamic technology for rotorcraft has continued successfully at NASA LaRC. Though the NASA Langley Research Center is not the lead NASA center in this area, the activity was continued due to facilities and individual capabilities which are recognized as contributing to helicopter research needs of industry and government. Noteworthy accomplishments which contribute to advancing the state of rotorcraft technology in the areas of rotor design, airfoil research, rotor aerodynamics, and rotor/fuselage interaction aerodynamics are described. Rotor designs were defined for current helicopters and evaluated in wind tunnel testing. These designs have incorporated advanced airfoils defined analytically and also proven in wind tunnel tests. A laser velocimetry system has become a productive tool for experimental definition of rotor inflow/wake and is providing data for rotorcraft aerodynamic code validation.

  9. Geothermal materials development: FY 1990 accomplishments and current activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in the development of hydrothermally stable materials, the commercial availabilities of which are considered essential for the attainment of the Geothermal Division's (GD) Hydrothermal Category Objectives, continue to be made. Fiscal year 1990 R D was focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs, energy conversion costs, and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}-resistant lightweight cements and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant linear systems have reached the final development stages. In addition, field tests to determine the feasibility for the use of polymer cement liners to mitigate HCl-induced corrosion at the Geysers were performed. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools such as drillpipe protectors and rotating head seals were continued under Geothermal Drilling Organization sponsorship. Recent accomplishments and ongoing work on each of these activities are described in the paper. 8 refs.

  10. Separations and Waste Forms Research and Development FY 2013 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2013-12-01

    The Separations and Waste Form Campaign (SWFC) under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is responsible for developing advanced separation and waste form technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The fiscal year (FY) 2013 accomplishments report provides a highlight of the results of the research and development (R&D) efforts performed within SWFC in FY 2013. Each section contains a high-level overview of the activities, results, technical point of contact, applicable references, and documents produced during the fiscal year. This report briefly outlines campaign management and integration activities, but the intent of the report is to highlight the many technical accomplishments made during FY 2013.

  11. FY 2006 Accomplishment Colony - "Services and Interfaces to Support Large Numbers of Processors"

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Tauferner, A; Inglett, T

    2006-06-30

    The Colony Project is developing operating system and runtime system technology to enable efficient general purpose environments on tens of thousands of processors. To accomplish this, we are investigating memory management techniques, fault management strategies, and parallel resource management schemes. Recent results show promising findings for scalable strategies based on processor virtualization, in-memory checkpointing, and parallel aware modifications to full featured operating systems.

  12. NASA Intelligent Systems Project: Results, Accomplishments and Impact on Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coughlan, Joseph C.

    2005-01-01

    The Intelligent Systems Project was responsible for much of NASA's programmatic investment in artificial intelligence and advanced information technologies. IS has completed three major project milestones which demonstrated increased capabilities in autonomy, human centered computing, and intelligent data understanding. Autonomy involves the ability of a robot to place an instrument on a remote surface with a single command cycle. Human centered computing supported a collaborative, mission centric data and planning system for the Mars Exploration Rovers and data understanding has produced key components of a terrestrial satellite observation system with automated modeling and data analysis capabilities. This paper summarizes the technology demonstrations and metrics which quantify and summarize these new technologies which are now available for future Nasa missions.

  13. Project ALERT Accomplishments by Objectives. Final Performance Report. Three-Year Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI. Coll. of Education.

    Project ALERT (Adult Literacy Enhanced & Redefined through Training) was a 3-year effort to develop and deploy a number of innovative approaches to delivering workplace literacy programs to business partners, including manufacturers and unions. The project designed, developed, and implemented workplace literacy programs tailored to the…

  14. Combat Ration Network for Technology Implementation. CORANET Demonstration Site: Results and Accomplishments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Pouch Heat Bar Sealer Wrapade X Check Weigher HiSpeed X Vertical Pouch Sealer Fresco X Retorting Stock 1100/1 Retort Stock...efforts was the qualification of Fresco for the military Institutional Pouch. The Demonstration facility was also used by combat ration producers to

  15. Biosimilar Insulins: How Similar is Similar?

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Hompesch, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Biosimilar insulins (BIs) are viewed as commercially attractive products by a number of companies. In order to obtain approval in the European Union or the United States, where there is not a single BI currently on the market, a manufacturer needs to demonstrate that a given BI has a safety and efficacy profile that is similar to that of the “original” insulin formulation that is already on the market. As trivial as this may appear at first glance, it is not trivial at all for a good number of reasons that will be discussed in this commentary. As with protein manufacturing, modifications in the structure of the insulin molecule can take place (which can have serious consequences for the biological effects induced), so a rigid and careful assessment is absolutely necessary. The example of Marvel's failed application with the European Medicines Agency provides insights into the regulatory and clinical challenges surrounding the matter of BI. Although a challenging BI approval process might be regarded as a hurdle to keep companies out of certain markets, it is fair to say that the potential safety and efficacy issues surrounding BI are substantial and relevant and do warrant a careful and evidence-driven approval process. PMID:21722590

  16. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2011-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of chemical space. Although all three concepts - molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemical space - are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations that are of the same mathematical form into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another. An expanded account of the material on chemical spaces presented in the first edition of this book is also provided. It includes a discussion of the topography of activity landscapes and the role that activity cliffs in these landscapes play in structure-activity studies.

  17. Molecular similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Maggiora, Gerald M; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2004-01-01

    Molecular similarity is a pervasive concept in chemistry. It is essential to many aspects of chemical reasoning and analysis and is perhaps the fundamental assumption underlying medicinal chemistry. Dissimilarity, the complement of similarity, also plays a major role in a growing number of applications of molecular diversity in combinatorial chemistry, high-throughput screening, and related fields. How molecular information is represented, called the representation problem, is important to the type of molecular similarity analysis (MSA) that can be carried out in any given situation. In this work, four types of mathematical structure are used to represent molecular information: sets, graphs, vectors, and functions. Molecular similarity is a pairwise relationship that induces structure into sets of molecules, giving rise to the concept of a chemistry space. Although all three concepts molecular similarity, molecular representation, and chemistry space are treated in this chapter, the emphasis is on molecular similarity measures. Similarity measures, also called similarity coefficients or indices, are functions that map pairs of compatible molecular representations, that is, representations of the same mathematical form, into real numbers usually, but not always, lying on the unit interval. This chapter presents a somewhat pedagogical discussion of many types of molecular similarity measures, their strengths and limitations, and their relationship to one another.

  18. EarthScope Education and Outreach: Accomplishments and Emerging Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S.; Ellins, K. K.; Semken, S. C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2014-12-01

    EarthScope's Education and Outreach (E&O) program aims to increase public awareness of Earth science and enhance geoscience education at the K-12 and college level. The program is distinctive among major geoscience programs in two ways. First, planning for education and public engagement occurred in tandem with planning for the science mission. Second, the NSF EarthScope program includes funding support for education and outreach. In this presentation, we highlight key examples of the program's accomplishments and identify emerging E&O opportunities. E&O efforts have been collaboratively led by the EarthScope National Office (ESNO), IRIS, UNAVCO, the EarthScope Education and Outreach Subcommittee (EEOSC) and PI-driven EarthScope projects. Efforts by the EEOSC, guided by an EarthScope Education and Outreach Implementation Plan that is periodically updated, focus EarthScope E&O. EarthScope demonstrated early success in engaging undergraduate students (and teachers) in its mission through their involvement in siting USArray across the contiguous U.S. Funded E&O programs such as TOTLE, Illinois EarthScope, CEETEP (for K-12), InTeGrate and GETSI (for undergraduates) foster use of freely available EarthScope data and research findings. The Next Generation Science Standards, which stress science and engineering practices, offer an opportunity for alignment with existing EarthScope K-12 educational resources, and the EEOSC recommends focusing efforts on this task. The EEOSC recognizes the rapidly growing use of mobile smart devices by the public and in formal classrooms, which bring new opportunities to connect with the public and students. This will capitalize on EarthScope's already prominent social media presence, an effort that developed to accomplish one of the primary goals of the EarthScope E&O Implementation Plan to "Create a high-profile public identity for EarthScope" and to "Promote science literacy and understanding of EarthScope among all audiences through

  19. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with social participation of older adults: association with quality of life and best correlates

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Johanne; Whiteneck, Gale

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to (1) explore whether quality of life (QOL) is more associated with satisfaction with social participation (SP) than with level of accomplishment in SP and (2) examine respective correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP. Methods A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 155 older adults (mean age = 73.7; 60% women) having various levels of activity limitations. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP (dependent variables) were estimated with the social roles items of the assessment of life habits. Potential correlates were human functioning components. Results Correlations between QOL and accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP did not differ (P = 0.71). However, best correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP were different. Higher accomplishment level of SP was best explained by younger age, activity level perceived as stable, no recent stressing event, better well-being, higher activity level, and fewer obstacles in “Physical environment and accessibility” (R2 = 0.79). Greater satisfaction with SP was best explained by activity level perceived as stable, better self-perceived health, better well-being, higher activity level, and more facilitators in “Social support and attitudes” (R2 = 0.51). Conclusion With some exceptions, these best correlates may be positively modified and thus warrant special attention in rehabilitation interventions. PMID:20237957

  20. Bengt Liliequist: life and accomplishments of a true renaissance man.

    PubMed

    Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2017-02-01

    In the 1970s, the membrane of Liliequist became the accepted name for a small band of arachnoid membrane separating the interpeduncular and chiasmatic cisterns, making it one of the most recent of the universally accepted medical eponyms. The story of its discovery, however, cannot be told without a thorough understanding of the man responsible and his contribution to the growth of a specialty. Bengt Liliequist lived during what many would consider the Golden Age of neuroradiology. With his colleagues at the Serafimer Hospital in Stockholm, he helped set the standard for appropriate imaging of the CNS and contributed to more accurate localization of intracerebral as well as spinal lesions. The pneumoencephalographic discovery of the membrane that was to bear his name serves merely as a starting point for a career that spanned five decades and included the defense of two separate doctoral theses, the last of which occurred after his 80th birthday. Although the recognition of neuroradiology as a subspecialty did not occur in his home country of Sweden until after his retirement, and technological progress saw the obsolescence of the procedure that he had mastered, Dr. Liliequist's accomplishments and his contributions to the current understanding of neuroanatomy merit our continued praise.

  1. The Vasimr Engine: Project Status and Recent Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ChangDiaz, Franklin R.; Squire, Jared P.; Bering, Edgar A., III; Baitty, F. Wally; Goulding, Richard H.; Bengtson, Roger D.

    2004-01-01

    The development of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) was initiated in the late 1970s to address a critical requirement for fast, high-power interplanetary space transportation. While not being a fusion rocket, it nevertheless borrows heavily from that technology and takes advantage of the natural topology of open-ended magnetic systems. In addition to its high power density and high exhaust velocity, VASIMR is capable of "constant power throttling" a feature, which allows in-flight mission-optimization of thrust and specific impulse to enhance performance and reduce trip time. A NASA-led, research team, involving industry, academia and government facilities is pursuing the development of this concept in the United States. The technology can be validated, in the near term, in venues such as the International Space Station, where it can also serve as both a drag compensation device and a plasma contactor for the orbital facility. Other near-Earth applications in the commercial and scientific satellite sectors are also envisioned. This presentation covers the evolution of the VASIMR concept to its present status, as well as recent accomplishments in our understanding of the physics. Approaches and collaborative programs addressing the major technical challenges will also be presented.

  2. Fort Collins Science Center: Fiscal Year 2007 Accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 2007 (FY07), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) continued research vital to U.S. Department of the Interior science and management needs and associated USGS programmatic goals. FORT work also supported the science needs of other government agencies as well as private cooperators. Specifically, FORT scientific research and technical assistance focused on client and partner needs and goals in the areas of biological information management, fisheries and aquatic systems, invasive species, status and trends of biological resources, terrestrial ecosystems, and wildlife resources. In addition, FORT's 5-year strategic plan was refined to incorporate focus areas identified in the USGS strategic science plan, including ecosystem-landscape analysis, global climate change, and energy and mineral resource development. As a consequence, several science projects initiated in FY07 were either entirely new research dor amplifications of existing work. Highlights of FORT project accomplishments are described below under the USGS science program with which each task is most closely associated. The work of FORT's 6 branches (Aquatic Systems and Technology Applications, Ecosystem Dynamics, Information Science, Invasive Species Science, Policy Analysis and Science Assistance, and Species and Habitats of Federal Interest) often involves major partnerships with other agencies or cooperation with other USGS disciplines (Geology, Geography, Water Resources) and the Geospatial Information Office.

  3. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  4. Astrobiology at Arizona State University: An Overview of Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack

    2005-01-01

    During our five years as an NAI charter member, Arizona State University sponsored a broadly-based program of research and training in Astrobiology to address the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Solar System. With such a large, diverse and active team, it is not possible in a reasonable space, to cover all details of progress made over the entire five years. The following paragraphs provide an overview update of the specific research areas pursued by the Arizona State University (ASU) Astrobiology team at the end of Year 5 and at the end of the 4 month and subsequent no cost month extensions. for a more detailed review, the reader is referred to the individual annual reports (and Executive Summaries) submitted to the NAI at the end of each of our five years of membership. Appended in electronic form is our complete publication record for all five years, plus a tabulation of undergraduates, graduate students and post-docs supported by our program during this time. The overarching theme of ASU s Astrobiology program was "Exploring the Living Universe: Studies of the Origin, Evolution and Distribution of Life in the Solar System". The NAi-funded research effort was organized under three basic sub- themes: 1. Origins of the Basic Building Blocks of Life. 2. Early Biosphere Evolution. and 3. Exploring for Life in the Solar System. These sub-theme areas were in turn, subdivided into Co-lead research modules. In the paragraphs that follow, accomplishments for individual research modules are briefly outlined, and the key participants presented in tabular form. As noted, publications for each module are appended in hard copy and digital formats, under the name(s) of lead co-Is.

  5. An Evaluation of State Energy Program Accomplishments: 2002 Program Year

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.

    2005-07-13

    SEP activities performed by the states during the 2002 program year, based on primary data provided by the states themselves. This is the second systematic evaluation of SEP accomplishments performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE. A report documenting the findings of the first study was published in January 2003 (Schweitzer et.al., 2003).

  6. Magnus expansion and in-medium similarity renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, T. D.; Parzuchowski, N. M.; Bogner, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    We present an improved variant of the in-medium similarity renormalization group (IM-SRG) based on the Magnus expansion. In the new formulation, one solves flow equations for the anti-Hermitian operator that, upon exponentiation, yields the unitary transformation of the IM-SRG. The resulting flow equations can be solved using a first-order Euler method without any loss of accuracy, resulting in substantial memory savings and modest computational speedups. Since one obtains the unitary transformation directly, the transformation of additional operators beyond the Hamiltonian can be accomplished with little additional cost, in sharp contrast to the standard formulation of the IM-SRG. Ground state calculations of the homogeneous electron gas (HEG) and 16O nucleus are used as test beds to illustrate the efficacy of the Magnus expansion.

  7. The Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Peter V.; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within…

  8. Glycolic Acid Peels/Azelaic Acid 20% Cream Combination and Low Potency Triple Combination Lead to Similar Reduction in Melasma Severity in Ethnic Skin: Results of a Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Rahul; Kanwar, Amrinder Jit; Parsad, Davinder; Kumaran, Muthu Sendhil; Sharma, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous therapeutic options have been tried in the management of melasma. Aims and Objectives: This prospective randomized study was planned to assess the efficacy of low potency triple combination (TC) cream (TC-hydroquinone 2%/tretinoin 0.05%/fluocinolone 0.01%) versus glycolic acid (GA) peels/azelaic acid (AA) 20% cream (GA/AA) combination in melasma. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with melasma were recruited into this study and randomized into two groups. Group A consisting 20 patients received TC cream once a day for night time application for 3 months. Group B comprising of 20 patients received GA/AA 20% cream combination for 3 months. The disease severity was monitored with digital photography, melasma area and severity index (MASI) score, which was calculated at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks, and visual analog scale (VAS) score, which was calculated at baseline and 12 weeks. Results: Of 40 patients, 38 were completed the study. A significant reduction in MASI and VAS was recorded after 6 weeks and 12 weeks of treatment in both groups A and B (P = 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the mean MASI scores between the two groups at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Similarly, there was no difference in the mean VAS scores between the two groups at baseline and 12 weeks. Four patients in group A and 3 in group B experienced adverse effects such as irritation, dryness, and photosensitivity. Conclusion: Both low potency TC cream and GA/AA 20% cream combination are effective in treating melasma among Indian patients. PMID:25814702

  9. Towards personalized medicine: leveraging patient similarity and drug similarity analytics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) provides a comprehensive source for exploratory and predictive analytic to support clinical decision-making. In this paper, we investigate how to utilize EHR to tailor treatments to individual patients based on their likelihood to respond to a therapy. We construct a heterogeneous graph which includes two domains (patients and drugs) and encodes three relationships (patient similarity, drug similarity, and patient-drug prior associations). We describe a novel approach for performing a label propagation procedure to spread the label information representing the effectiveness of different drugs for different patients over this heterogeneous graph. The proposed method has been applied on a real-world EHR dataset to help identify personalized treatments for hypercholesterolemia. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and suggest that the combination of appropriate patient similarity and drug similarity analytics could lead to actionable insights for personalized medicine. Particularly, by leveraging drug similarity in combination with patient similarity, our method could perform well even on new or rarely used drugs for which there are few records of known past performance.

  10. Renewing the respect for similarity.

    PubMed

    Edelman, Shimon; Shahbazi, Reza

    2012-01-01

    In psychology, the concept of similarity has traditionally evoked a mixture of respect, stemming from its ubiquity and intuitive appeal, and concern, due to its dependence on the framing of the problem at hand and on its context. We argue for a renewed focus on similarity as an explanatory concept, by surveying established results and new developments in the theory and methods of similarity-preserving associative lookup and dimensionality reduction-critical components of many cognitive functions, as well as of intelligent data management in computer vision. We focus in particular on the growing family of algorithms that support associative memory by performing hashing that respects local similarity, and on the uses of similarity in representing structured objects and scenes. Insofar as these similarity-based ideas and methods are useful in cognitive modeling and in AI applications, they should be included in the core conceptual toolkit of computational neuroscience. In support of this stance, the present paper (1) offers a discussion of conceptual, mathematical, computational, and empirical aspects of similarity, as applied to the problems of visual object and scene representation, recognition, and interpretation, (2) mentions some key computational problems arising in attempts to put similarity to use, along with their possible solutions, (3) briefly states a previously developed similarity-based framework for visual object representation, the Chorus of Prototypes, along with the empirical support it enjoys, (4) presents new mathematical insights into the effectiveness of this framework, derived from its relationship to locality-sensitive hashing (LSH) and to concomitant statistics, (5) introduces a new model, the Chorus of Relational Descriptors (ChoRD), that extends this framework to scene representation and interpretation, (6) describes its implementation and testing, and finally (7) suggests possible directions in which the present research program can be

  11. Renewing the respect for similarity

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Shimon; Shahbazi, Reza

    2012-01-01

    In psychology, the concept of similarity has traditionally evoked a mixture of respect, stemming from its ubiquity and intuitive appeal, and concern, due to its dependence on the framing of the problem at hand and on its context. We argue for a renewed focus on similarity as an explanatory concept, by surveying established results and new developments in the theory and methods of similarity-preserving associative lookup and dimensionality reduction—critical components of many cognitive functions, as well as of intelligent data management in computer vision. We focus in particular on the growing family of algorithms that support associative memory by performing hashing that respects local similarity, and on the uses of similarity in representing structured objects and scenes. Insofar as these similarity-based ideas and methods are useful in cognitive modeling and in AI applications, they should be included in the core conceptual toolkit of computational neuroscience. In support of this stance, the present paper (1) offers a discussion of conceptual, mathematical, computational, and empirical aspects of similarity, as applied to the problems of visual object and scene representation, recognition, and interpretation, (2) mentions some key computational problems arising in attempts to put similarity to use, along with their possible solutions, (3) briefly states a previously developed similarity-based framework for visual object representation, the Chorus of Prototypes, along with the empirical support it enjoys, (4) presents new mathematical insights into the effectiveness of this framework, derived from its relationship to locality-sensitive hashing (LSH) and to concomitant statistics, (5) introduces a new model, the Chorus of Relational Descriptors (ChoRD), that extends this framework to scene representation and interpretation, (6) describes its implementation and testing, and finally (7) suggests possible directions in which the present research program can be

  12. Research on the International Space Station: Understanding Future Potential from Current Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    In November 2007, the International Space Station (ISS) will have supported seven years of continuous presence in space, with 15 Expeditions completed. These years have been characterized by the numerous technical challenges of assembly as well as operational and logistical challenges related to the availability of transportation by the Space Shuttle. During this period, an active set of early research objectives have also been accomplished alongside the assembly. This paper will review the research accomplishments on ISS to date, with the objective of drawing insights on the potential of future research following completion of ISS assembly. By the end of Expedition 15, an expected 121 U.S.-managed investigations will have been conducted on ISS, with 91 of these completed. Many of these investigations include multiple scientific objectives, with an estimated total of 334 scientists served. Through February 2007, 101 scientific publications have been identified. Another 184 investigations have been sponsored by ISS international partners, which independently track their scientists served and results publication. Through this survey of U.S. research completed on ISS, three different themes will be addressed: (1) How have constraints on transportation of mass to orbit affected the types of research successfully completed on the ISS to date? What lessons can be learned for increasing the success of ISS as a research platform during the period following the retirement of the Space Shuttle? (2) How have constraints on crew time for research during assembly and the active participation of crewmembers as scientists affected the types of research successfully completed on the ISS to date? What lessons can be learned for optimizing research return following the increase in capacity from 3 to 6 crewmembers (planned for 2009)? What lessons can be learned for optimizing research return after assembly is complete? (3) What do early research results indicate about the various

  13. Similar enzymes, different structures

    PubMed Central

    Tarasev, Michael; Kaddis, Catherine S.; Yin, Sheng; Loo, Joseph A.; Burgner, John; Ballou, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Phthalate dioxygenase (PDO) is a member of a class of bacterial oxygenases that contain both Rieske [2Fe-2S] and Fe(II) mononuclear centers. Recent crystal structures of several Rieske dioxygenases showed that they exist as α3β3 multimers with subunits arranged head-to-tail in α and β stacked planar consists of only α-subunits, remains to be solved. Although similar to other Rieske dioxygenases in many aspects, PDO was shown to differ in the mechanism of catalysis. Gel filtration and analytical centrifugation experiments, supplemented with mass spectrometric analysis (both ESI-MS and ESI-GEMMA), in this work showed a hexameric arrangement of subunits in the PDO multimer. Our proposed model for the subunit arrangement in PDO postulates two α3 planar rings one on top the other, similar to the α3β3 arrangement in other Rieske dioxygenases. Unlike other Rieske dioxygenases, this arrangement brings two Rieske and two mononuclear centers, all on separate subunits, into proximity, allowing their cooperation for catalysis. Potential reasons necessitating this unusual structural arrangement are discussed. PMID:17764654

  14. Accomplishments and Compromises in Prediction Research for World Records and Best Performances in Track and Field and Swimming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuanlong; Paul, Stanley; Fu, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    The conductors of this study reviewed prediction research and studied the accomplishments and compromises in predicting world records and best performances in track and field and swimming. The results of the study showed that prediction research only promises to describe the historical trends in track and field and swimming performances, to study…

  15. What difference reveals about similarity.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Eyal; Gentner, Dedre; Lovett, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Detecting that two images are different is faster for highly dissimilar images than for highly similar images. Paradoxically, we showed that the reverse occurs when people are asked to describe how two images differ--that is, to state a difference between two images. Following structure-mapping theory, we propose that this disassociation arises from the multistage nature of the comparison process. Detecting that two images are different can be done in the initial (local-matching) stage, but only for pairs with low overlap; thus, "different" responses are faster for low-similarity than for high-similarity pairs. In contrast, identifying a specific difference generally requires a full structural alignment of the two images, and this alignment process is faster for high-similarity pairs. We described four experiments that demonstrate this dissociation and show that the results can be simulated using the Structure-Mapping Engine. These results pose a significant challenge for nonstructural accounts of similarity comparison and suggest that structural alignment processes play a significant role in visual comparison.

  16. Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project: Phase I accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeier, S.E.; Walters, B.G.; Crawford, D.C.

    1997-01-15

    The authors present the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase I efforts. The rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include decisions to use Echelon LonWorks networking protocol and Microsoft Access for the data system needs, a preliminary design for the plutonium canning system glovebox, identification of facilities and materials available for the demonstration, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, and a preliminary list of available sensor technologies. Recently imposed changes in the overall project schedule and scope are also discussed and budgetary requirements for competition of Phase II presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase I deliverables.

  17. Supporting and Rewarding Accomplished Teaching: Insights from Austin, Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lussier, David F.; Forgione, Pascal D., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the strategic compensation efforts of the Austin Independent School District (AISD) in Texas, which is piloting a system of supports and rewards for teachers and administrators. The article highlights the key components of this system, what it took to put a 4-year pilot program in place, and what results are emerging from…

  18. Some innovations and accomplishments of Ames Research Center since its inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The innovations and accomplishments of Ames Research Center from 1940 through 1966 are summarized and illustrated. It should be noted that a number of accomplishments were begun at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility before that facility became part of the Ames Research Center. Such accomplishments include the first supersonic flight, the first hypersonic flight, the lunar landing research vehicle, and the first digital fly-by-wire aircraft.

  19. [What does conservative therapy of "idiopathic" facial paresis accomplish?].

    PubMed

    Oeken, F W; Görisch, I; Weilepp, M

    1978-09-01

    The results of conservative therapy in 160 patients with so-called idiopathic facial paralysis are reported. In 94.2% of the patients a complete or far extending normalisation took place. In incomplete paralysis the number of patients restored to health was about 96.1%, and 93.3% incomplete paralysis. We treated with salicyl-pyrazon-dervatives or combined with corticosteroids and with antibiotics resp. sulfonamids combined with corticosteroids. Physical therapy was applicated additionally in every case. Recovery did not depend from the sort of medicaments which were chosen.

  20. Laparoscopic colonic surgery--mission accomplished or work in progress?

    PubMed

    Kehlet, H; Kennedy, R H

    2006-07-01

    Laparoscopic colonic resection may facilitate early postoperative recovery due to reduced surgical stress, pain and ileus. However, large randomised studies have only shown marginal improvements in outcome compared with open surgery, reporting a median hospital stay of about 5-7 days. Concomitant with these developments multimodal rehabilitation, which involves a revision of general postoperative care principles, improved pain relief with epidural analgesia and early oral nutrition and mobilization, has demonstrated greater improvements in recovery after open surgery, resulting in a median hospital stay of about 2-4 days. Recent single centre, randomised studies where laparoscopic and open colonic resection are combined with multimodal rehabilitation have not resolved the debate regarding which is the optimal operative technique. Therefore, new strategies are required to integrate laparoscopy with multimodal rehabilitation in order to establish its advantages, cost effectiveness and indications in specific groups of patients or colorectal procedures, thus justifying widespread application of the laparoscopic technique.

  1. The Accomplishments of the CESR/CLEO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Sheldon

    2008-04-01

    The CLEO experiment, that uses the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR), took data from Nov. 1979 to April 2008. Both the machine and the detector have gone through several different major phases caused by implementing new technologies, mostly locally developed. The improved sensitivities usually resulted in major discoveries. Many particles were first seen at CLEO and many important decay modes were first seen, or measured with far more accuracy than done before. Discoveries include the first observations of the υ(3S), υ(4S), B^0, B^- DS, υ(1D) and DSJ(2460) mesons, and the σc^+, σc^*+, σc^*++, σc^*0, ξc^0, ξc^*0, and ξc^*+ baryons. First observations of new processes include b-quark semileptonic decays, including the rare semileptonic decay b->ulν, the ``Penguin'' process b->sγ, and the important exclusive decays B->J/ψKS , and D^+->&+circ;ν. Recently, the decay rates for DS^+->&+circ;ν and DS^+->&+circ;ν have been measured with unprecedented accuracy, posing a challenge to Lattice QCD calculations. New accelerator and detector technologies have also had an impact on ensuing particle physics experiments and detectors in other fields. Decreasing the size of the CESR beams in the interaction region (so called micro-beta sizes) led to a large increases in instantaneous luminosity. Multi-bunch schemes, where many particle bunches and bunch trains are are brought into collision also increased the luminosity. In a parallel effort, CESR has maintained a cutting edge synchrotron radiation facility that has produced many interesting results. Pioneering detector technologies were implemented in the areas of electromagnetic calorimetry, tracking, vertexing and particle identification. For example, in calorimetry, CLEO developed a system using CsI crystals with photodiode read-out inside a 1.5 T magnetic field, that provides excellent energy resolution as well as accurate measurements of photon positions and angles. Particle identification has a long history

  2. NASA's Heliophysics Theory Program - Accomplishments in Life Cycle Ending 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Heliophysics Theory Program (HTP) is now into a new triennial cycle of funded research, with new research awards beginning in 2011. The theory program was established by the (former) Solar Terrestrial Division in 1980 to redress a weakness of support in the theory area. It has been a successful, evolving scientific program with long-term funding of relatively large "critical mass groups" pursuing theory and modeling on a scale larger than that available within the limits of traditional NASA Supporting Research and Technology (SR&T) awards. The results of the last 3 year funding cycle, just ended, contributed to ever more cutting edge theoretical understanding of all parts of the Sun-Earth Connection chain. Advances ranged from the core of the Sun out into the corona, through the solar wind into the Earth's magnetosphere and down to the ionosphere and lower atmosphere, also contributing to understanding the environments of other solar system bodies. The HTP contributions were not isolated findings but continued to contribute to the planning and implementation of NASA spacecraft missions and to the development of the predictive computer models that have become the workhorses for analyzing satellite and ground-based measurements.

  3. The International Space Station Research Opportunities and Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alleyne, Camille W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the International Space Station (ISS) construction and assembly was completed to become a world-class scientific research laboratory. We are now in the era of utilization of this unique platform that facilitates ground-breaking research in the microgravity environment. There are opportunities for NASA-funded research; research funded under the auspice of the United States National Laboratory; and research funded by the International Partners - Japan, Europe, Russia and Canada. The ISS facilities offer an opportunity to conduct research in a multitude of disciplines such as biology and biotechnology, physical science, human research, technology demonstration and development; and earth and space science. The ISS is also a unique resource for educational activities that serve to motivate and inspire students to pursue careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Even though we have just commenced full utilization of the ISS as a science laboratory, early investigations are yielding major results that are leading to such things as vaccine development, improved cancer drug delivery methods and treatment for debilitating diseases, such as Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy. This paper

  4. Redox conditions in deep groundwater: recent accomplishments and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioka, Seiichiro; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Sakai, Toshiaki; Ishijima, Yoji

    Redox potential (Eh) is one of the most important physico-chemical properties of groundwater. Groundwater Eh have been studied in terms of safety of high-level radioactive waste disposals, water resource management and so on. As the results, it is getting clear that redox potential of deep groundwater in sedimentary and crystalline rocks have a remarkable variability. For example, some reported Eh values of deep groundwater decrease with increasing depth, i.e. with residence time. However, there are few reports showing data measured in situ. Only some Eh values of deep groundwater measured from research borehole drilled at crystalline rocks in Japan and Sweden have been reported. Between 200 and 1000m depth, the Eh values of the deep groundwater range from about 0 to -400mV. This essay first briefly summarizes methodology for Eh measurement and reports Eh values of deep groundwater. Then, it discusses the remaining issues of Eh measurement that are to develop of measurement technology applicable for various geological environments and to understand the redox evolution process through the groundwater flow system.

  5. An Overview of SIMBIOS Program Activities and Accomplishments. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    The SIMBIOS Program was conceived in 1994 as a result of a NASA management review of the agency's strategy for monitoring the bio-optical properties of the global ocean through space-based ocean color remote sensing. At that time, the NASA ocean color flight manifest included two data buy missions, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Earth Observing System (EOS) Color, and three sensors, two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS) and the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), scheduled for flight on the EOS-Terra and EOS-Aqua satellites. The review led to a decision that the international assemblage of ocean color satellite systems provided ample redundancy to assure continuous global coverage, with no need for the EOS Color mission. At the same time, it was noted that non-trivial technical difficulties attended the challenge (and opportunity) of combining ocean color data from this array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. Thus, it was announced at the October 1994 EOS Interdisciplinary Working Group meeting that some of the resources budgeted for EOS Color should be redirected into an intercalibration and validation program (McClain et al., 2002).

  6. What the Philosophical Interpretation of Quantum Theory Can Accomplish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Martin

    I argue that philosophical reflection can contribute to a better understanding of physical theories by performing conceptual clarification, epistemological analysis and ontological exploration. I begin by reconstructing early ontological interpretations of quantum theory, i.e., by explaining Copenhagen instrumentalism and the shift toward a quantum realism. I turn to entanglement, whose chief philosophical challenge is to understand which deeper property of nature it reveals. The trouble is that the EPR-correlations it gives rise to are not produced by common causation. Conceptual analysis shows that this failure is due to the violation of separability in quantum theory. In entangled states, it is the composite state that is primary since it cannot be neatly divided into two states that unambiguously pertain to the partial systems. As a result, total states are not produced by an interaction among the parts. This feature can be interpreted in ontological terms as suggesting a holist picture of nature. Another question of philosophical import concerns the quantum measurement problem and the contribution decoherence makes to its solution. The conceptual point is what, precisely, this problem amounts to and what we require considering it settled. The issue that divides the philosophical factions is whether a solution needs to show that superpositions are actually destroyed or whether it suffices to demonstrate that superpositions become unobservable.

  7. Sandia Technology: Engineering and science accomplishments, February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is one of the Department of Energy`s primary research and development laboratories. Our essential mission is to support the national interests of the US in defense, energy, and the environment. Managed by Martin Marietta Corporation for DOE, Sandia focuses its resources on problems of national interest that require the integration of science and technology for their solution. We all hope that this period of sweeping alterations in international affairs will result in a successful transition from the Cold War to a period of sustainable global security and prosperity. In the meantime, our nation`s interests are best served by continued commitment to Sandia`s traditional responsibilities. Nonetheless, as momentous developments are reshaping the world, Sandia is also changing from its beginning as a closed operation concentrating on classified defense programs, Sandia has become a more accessible resource that focuses on research and development partnerships with industry and universities as a way to ensure continued success in DOE`s evolving core mission area of nuclear weapons, energy, environment, and the basis sciences. Through these collaborative efforts, Sandia and its partners are also benefiting the economic competitiveness of our nation. Sandia places a special emphasis on working with small businesses as both technology transfer partners and suppliers of goods and services. We are also reaching out the the larger community surrounding Sandia, striving to provide technological solution and accurate information to meet community needs. We believe that the dialogue we are creating will benefit Sandia, the community, and the nation. Our goal is to render `` exceptional service in the national interest`` by returning maximum value on the investment in the labs. As you review this document, look for new ways in which Sandia can contribute to the solution of problems facing our nation.

  8. Accomplishments in free-piston stirling tests at NASA GRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Skupinski, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    A power system based on the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) has been identified for potential use on deep space missions, as well as for Mars rovers that may benefit from extended operation. The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for developing the generator and the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is supporting DOE in this effort. The generator is based on a free-piston Stirling power convertor that has been developed by the Stirling Technology Company (STC) under contract to DOE. The generator would be used as a high-efficiency alternative to the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) that have been used on many previous missions. The increased efficiency leads to a factor of 3 to 4 reduction in the inventory of plutonium required to heat the generator. GRC has been involved in the development of Stirling power conversion technology for over 25 years. The support provided to this project by GRC has many facets and draws upon the lab's scientists and engineers that have gained experience in applying their skills to the previous Stirling projects. This has created a staff with an understanding of the subtleties involved in applying their expertise to Stirling systems. Areas include materials, structures, tribology, controls, electromagnetic interference, permanent magnets, alternator analysis, structural dynamics, and cycle performance. One of the key areas of support to the project is in the performance testing of the free-piston Stirling convertors. Since these power convertors are the smallest, lowest power Stirling machines that have been tested at GRC, a new laboratory was equipped for this project. Procedures and test plans have been created, instrumentation and data systems developed, and Stirling convertors have been tested. This paper will describe the GRC test facility, the test procedures that are used, present some of the test results and outline plans for the future. .

  9. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Mark B.; Kapustin, Anton N.; Schwarz, John Henry; Carroll, Sean; Ooguri, Hirosi; Gukov, Sergei; Preskill, John; Hitlin, David G.; Porter, Frank C.; Patterson, Ryan B.; Newman, Harvey B.; Spiropulu, Maria; Golwala, Sunil; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-08-26

    of activity include: CDMS II data analysis, contributions to SuperCDMS Soudan operations and analysis, R&D towards SuperCDMS SNOLAB, development of a novel screener for radiocontamination (the BetaCage), and development of new WIMP detector concepts. Ren-Yuan Zhu leads the HEP crystal laboratory for the advanced detector R&D effort. The crystal lab is involved in development of novel scintillating crystals and has proposed several crystal based detector concepts for future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers. Its current research effort is concentrated on development of fast crystal scintillators with good radiation hardness and low cost. II) THEORETICAL PHYSICS The main theme of Sergei Gukov's current research is the relation between the geometry of quantum group invariants and their categorification, on the one hand, and the physics of supersymmetric gauge theory and string theory, on the other. Anton Kapustin's research spans a variety of topics in non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory (QFT). His main areas of interest are supersymmetric gauge theories, non-perturbative dualities in QFT, disorder operators, Topological Quantum Field Theory, and non-relativistic QFT. He is also interested in the foundations and possible generalizations of Quantum Mechanics. Hirosi Ooguri's current research has two main components. One is to find exact results in Calabi-Yau compactification of string theory. Another is to explore applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence. He also plans to continue his project with Caltech postdoctoral fellows on BPS spectra of supersymmetric gauge theories in diverse dimensions. John Preskill works on quantum information science. This field may lead to important future technologies, and also lead to new understanding of issues in fundamental physics John Schwarz has been exploring a number of topics in superstring theory/M-theory, supersymmetric gauge theory, and their AdS/CFT relationships. Much of the motivation for these

  10. Summaries of 1984-85 NASA space-gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W. (Compiler); Dutcher, F. R. (Compiler); Pleasant, L. G. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space/Gravitational Biology Program are presented. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a listing of the accomplishments, and an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments. Bibliographies for each project are also included.

  11. Materials Division research and technology accomplishments for FY 87 and plans for FY 88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkley, Kay L.

    1988-01-01

    The research program of the Materials Division is presented as FY 87 accomplishments and FY 88 plans. The accomplishments for each Branch are highlighted and plans are outlined. Publications of the Division are included by Branch. This material will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations, universities, and industries in areas of mutual interest.

  12. The Role of Planned Professional Learning in Becoming an Accomplished Teacher: The Queensland Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Sherryl

    2009-01-01

    The role of planned professional learning in being an accomplished languages and cultures teacher has never been so important. Professional learning that focuses on "becoming" an accomplished practitioner as part of an ongoing professional learning experience rather than a process of detailing deficiencies is to be applauded. Indeed, the…

  13. Materials Division research and technology accomplishments for FY 89 and plans for FY 90

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkley, Kay L.

    1990-01-01

    The research program of the Materials Division is presented as FY-89 accomplishments and FY-90 plans. The accomplishments for each Branch are highlighted and plans are outlined. Publications of the Division are included by Branch. This material will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations, universities, and industries in areas of mutual interest.

  14. 29 CFR 779.218 - Methods to accomplish “unified operation.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methods to accomplish âunified operation.â 779.218 Section... Coverage Unified Operation Or Common Control § 779.218 Methods to accomplish “unified operation.” There are... case the activities are performed through “unified operation” and have the effect of creating a...

  15. 29 CFR 779.218 - Methods to accomplish “unified operation.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methods to accomplish âunified operation.â 779.218 Section... Coverage Unified Operation Or Common Control § 779.218 Methods to accomplish “unified operation.” There are... case the activities are performed through “unified operation” and have the effect of creating a...

  16. 29 CFR 779.218 - Methods to accomplish “unified operation.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methods to accomplish âunified operation.â 779.218 Section... Coverage Unified Operation Or Common Control § 779.218 Methods to accomplish “unified operation.” There are... case the activities are performed through “unified operation” and have the effect of creating a...

  17. 29 CFR 779.218 - Methods to accomplish “unified operation.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methods to accomplish âunified operation.â 779.218 Section... Coverage Unified Operation Or Common Control § 779.218 Methods to accomplish “unified operation.” There are... case the activities are performed through “unified operation” and have the effect of creating a...

  18. 29 CFR 779.218 - Methods to accomplish “unified operation.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methods to accomplish âunified operation.â 779.218 Section... Coverage Unified Operation Or Common Control § 779.218 Methods to accomplish “unified operation.” There are... case the activities are performed through “unified operation” and have the effect of creating a...

  19. Working Memory and Short-Term Memory Abilities in Accomplished Multilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biedron, Adriana; Szczepaniak, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The role of short-term memory and working memory in accomplished multilinguals was investigated. Twenty-eight accomplished multilinguals were compared to 36 mainstream philology students. The following instruments were used in the study: three memory subtests of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale (Digit Span, Digit-Symbol Coding, and Arithmetic,…

  20. Predicting College Student Success: A Historical and Predictive Examination of High School Activities and Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Carla Mae

    2010-01-01

    According to generational theorists, the interests and experiences of incoming students have fluctuated over time, with Millennial students being more engaged and accomplished than their predecessors. This project explored data from 1974-2007 to determine the actual trends in engagement and accomplishments for three generations of students. Over…

  1. Does an evidence-based healthy relationships program for 9th graders show similar effects for 7th and 8th graders? Results from 57 schools randomized to intervention.

    PubMed

    Crooks, C V; Scott, K L; Broll, R; Zwarych, S; Hughes, R; Wolfe, D A

    2015-06-01

    Integrating social and emotional learning (SEL) programming throughout curricula to support the development of healthy behaviors and prevent violence is critical for a comprehensive approach to school health. This study used a post-test comparison design to evaluate a healthy relationships program for eighth grade students that applies a SEL approach. The program was adapted from the Fourth R, an evidence-based program for ninth graders, but matches the curriculum and developmental context for eighth graders. Surveys were collected post-intervention from 1012 students within 57 schools randomized to intervention or control conditions. Multivariate multilevel analysis accounted for the nested nature of students within schools. There were significant group differences on three of four outcomes following intervention, including improved knowledge about violence, critical thinking around the impact of violence, and identification of more successful coping strategies. There was no group difference on general acceptance of violence. Overall, students learned relevant information and strategies and were able to apply that knowledge to demonstrate critical thinking, suggesting that adapting an evidence-based approach for use with younger students provided similar benefits. These findings build a case for 2 years of consecutive evidence-based healthy relationships programming in grades 8 and 9, consistent with best practice guidelines.

  2. Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) efforts have greatly advanced the state of the art of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies—making significant progress toward overcoming many of the key challenges to widespread commercialization. DOE has also made major advances by demonstrating and validating the technologies under real-world conditions, supporting early markets through Recovery Act deployments, and leveraging domestic and international partnerships to advance the pace of commercialization.

  3. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  4. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-06-18

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method.

  5. The goal of locomotion: Separating the fundamental task from the mechanisms that accomplish it.

    PubMed

    Croft, James L; Schroeder, Ryan T; Bertram, John E A

    2017-01-13

    Human locomotion has been well described but is still not well understood. This is largely true because the observable aspects of locomotion-neuromuscular activity that generates forces and motions-relate to both the task solution and the problem being solved. Identifying the fundamental task achieved in locomotion makes it possible to critically evaluate the motor control strategy used to accomplish the task goal. We contend that the readily observed movements and activities of locomotion should be considered mechanism(s). Our proposal is that the fundamental task of walking and running is analogous to flight, and should be defined in terms of the interaction of the individual's mass with the medium in which it moves: a low-density fluid for flight, or the supporting substrate for legged locomotion. A rigorous definition of the fundamental task can help identify the constraints and opportunities that influence its solution and guide the selection of appropriate mechanisms to accomplish the task effectively. The results from robotics-based modeling studies have demonstrated how the interaction of the mass and substrate can be optimized, making the goal of movement a defined trajectory of the individual's mass. We assessed these concepts by evaluating the ground reaction forces generated by an optimization model that satisfies the task but uses none of the mechanisms that are available to the human leg. Then we compared this model to normal human walking. Although it is obvious that the specific task of locomotion changes with a variety of movement challenges, clearly identifying the fundamental task of locomotion puts all other features in an interpretable context.

  6. Perceived Similarity With Gay Men Mediates the Effect of Antifemininity on Heterosexual Men's Antigay Prejudice.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Carmen; Vázquez, Carolina; Falomir-Pichastor, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the hypothesis that heterosexual men's motivation to differentiate themselves from gay men mediates the relationship between the antifemininity norm of masculinity and antigay prejudice. We assessed masculinity through three concepts: status, thoughness, and antifemininity. Participants then reported their perceived similarity with gay men and their antigay prejudice. The results showed that antifemininity was the best predictor of both perceived similarity and antigay prejudice: The more people endorsed the antifemininity norm, the more they perceived themselves as dissimilar from gay men and showed antigay prejudice. More important, perceived similarity mediated the effect of antifemininity on antigay prejudice. These findings provide direct evidence for the link between masculinity and the motivation to differentiate oneself from gay men, and they suggest that antigay prejudice accomplishes the identity function of maintaining unambiguous gender boundaries.

  7. Accomplishments of the Trustees and laboratory staff of the Biological Stain Commission, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Dapson, R W

    2014-08-01

    During the 12 years from 2002 to 2013, the Trustees and laboratory personnel of the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) can claim many accomplishments. These accomplishments are itemized under 11 categories: continuous publication of the official journal, Biotechnic & Histochemistry; production of four special issues of Biotechnic & Histochemistry devoted to specific dyes or stains; standardization of staining and dye purity; mechanisms of staining and prediction of dye behavior; publication of books or book chapters; effects of fixation and processing on staining; cancer research; immunohistochemistry; BSC Laboratory activities; miscellaneous publications; and administrative accomplishments.

  8. Path similarity skeleton graph matching.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a novel framework to for shape recognition based on object silhouettes. The main idea is to match skeleton graphs by comparing the shortest paths between skeleton endpoints. In contrast to typical tree or graph matching methods, we completely ignore the topological graph structure. Our approach is motivated by the fact that visually similar skeleton graphs may have completely different topological structures. The proposed comparison of shortest paths between endpoints of skeleton graphs yields correct matching results in such cases. The skeletons are pruned by contour partitioning with Discrete Curve Evolution, which implies that the endpoints of skeleton branches correspond to visual parts of the objects. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to produce correct results in the presence of articulations, stretching, and occlusion.

  9. [About the accomplishment of translator in standardized English translation of TCM].

    PubMed

    He, Yang

    2007-07-01

    The accomplishment of translator in standardized English translation of TCM should be paid more attention, since it cannot but influence the foreign academic inter-communion and quality of transmission of TCM.

  10. The genetics of music accomplishment: evidence for gene-environment correlation and interaction.

    PubMed

    Hambrick, David Z; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2015-02-01

    Theories of skilled performance that emphasize training history, such as K. Anders Ericsson and colleagues' deliberate-practice theory, have received a great deal of recent attention in both the scientific literature and the popular press. Twin studies, however, have demonstrated evidence for moderate-to-strong genetic influences on skilled performance. Focusing on musical accomplishment in a sample of over 800 pairs of twins, we found evidence for gene-environment correlation, in the form of a genetic effect on music practice. However, only about one quarter of the genetic effect on music accomplishment was explained by this genetic effect on music practice, suggesting that genetically influenced factors other than practice contribute to individual differences in music accomplishment. We also found evidence for gene-environment interaction, such that genetic effects on music accomplishment were most pronounced among those engaging in music practice, suggesting that genetic potentials for skilled performance are most fully expressed and fostered by practice.

  11. Fiscal Year 2013 Office of Environmental Information (OEI) Tribal Accomplishments Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report is a compilation of EPA’s Office of Environmental Information tribal accomplishments that details efforts and activities conducted in support of the OEI Tribal Strategy during fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  12. What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

  13. Reshaping American Energy - A Look Back at BETO's Accomplishments in 2013

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    For more than a decade, BETO has been shaping the bioenergy industry. BETO helps transform the nation's renewable biomass resources into high-performance biofuels, biopower, and bioproducts. This fact sheet outlines some of our biggest accomplishments in 2013.

  14. WISM - A Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurement: Past Accomplishments, Current Status, and Path Forward

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonds, Quenton; Racette, Paul; Durham, Tim (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    Presented are the prior accomplishments, current status and path forward for GSFC's Wideband Instrument for Snow Measurement (WISM). This work is a high level overview of the project, presented via Webinar to the IEEE young professionals.

  15. Fiscal Year 2012 Office of Environmental Information (OEI) Tribal Accomplishments Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report is a compilation of EPA’s Office of Environmental Information tribal accomplishments that details efforts and activities conducted in support of the OEI Tribal Strategy during fiscal year (FY) 2012.

  16. Report: Congressional Request on Updating Fiscal 2003 EPA Enforcement Resources and Accomplishments Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2004-S-00002, August 3, 2004. A partial response to the March 30, 2004, letter requesting that we provide certain information related to our October 10, 2003, report, Congressional Request on EPA Enforcement Resources and Accomplishments.

  17. NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY - AN ANNUAL REPORT OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Annual Report showcases some of the research activities of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in various health and environmental effects research areas. The report is an indicator of the examples of progress and accomplishments that ...

  18. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1993 and plans for FY 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynne, Eleanor C.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for F.Y. 1993 and research plans for F.Y. 1994. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5-year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  19. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1985 and plans for FY 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    The Langley Research Center Loads and Aeroelasticity Division's research accomplishments for FY85 and research plans for FY86 are presented. The rk under each branch (technical area) will be described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  20. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1989 and plans for FY 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jacqueline G.; Gardner, James E.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for FY 1989 and research plans for FY 1990. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  1. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1987 and plans for FY 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, S. C.; Gardner, James E.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the Loads and Aeroelasticity Division's research accomplishments for FY87 and research plans for FY88. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to five year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  2. Use of Stable Isotope Technologies to Accomplish In-Situ Biological Remediation of Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-30

    Use of Stable Isotope Technologies to Accomplish In-Situ Biological Remediation of Explosives Eleanor M. Jennings, Ph.D. Dennis Clark URS...30 MAR 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of Stable Isotope Technologies to Accomplish In...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Introduction to Isotopic Carbon  Carbon comes in different weights  12C and 13C are most common isotopes

  3. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1988 and plans for FY 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, James E.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for FY 1988 and research plans for FY 1989. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and plans for the current year as they relate to five-year plans for each area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  4. Loads and Aeroelasticity Division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1984 and plans for FY 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Dixon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The loads and aeroelasticity divisions research accomplishments are presented. The work under each branch or technical area, described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5 year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  5. Quality management at Argonne National Laboratory: Status, accomplishments, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    In April 1992, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) launched the implementation of quality management (QM) as an initiative of the Laboratory Director. The goal of the program is to seek ways of improving Laboratory performance and effectiveness by drawing from the realm of experiences in the global total quality management movement. The Argonne QM initiative began with fact finding and formulating a strategy for implementation; the emphasis is that the underlying principles of QM should be an integral part of how the Laboratory is managed and operated. A primary theme that has guided the Argonne QM initiative is to consider only those practices that offer the potential for real improvement, make sense, fit the culture, and would be credible to the broad population. In October 1993, the Laboratory began to pilot a targeted set of QM activities selected to produce outcomes important to the Laboratory--strengthening the customer focus, improving work processes, enhancing employee involvement and satisfaction, and institutionalizing QM. This report describes the results of the just-concluded QM development and demonstration phase in terms of detailed strategies, accomplishments, and lessons learned. These results are offered as evidence to support the conclusion that the Argonne QM initiative has achieved value-added results and credibility and is well positioned to support future deployment across the entire Laboratory as an integrated management initiative. Recommendations for follow-on actions to implement future deployment are provided separately.

  6. Recognition of similar objects using simulated prosthetic vision.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Xia, Peng; Gu, Chaochen; Qi, Jin; Li, Sheng; Peng, Yinghong

    2014-02-01

    Due to the limitations of existing techniques, even the most advanced visual prostheses, using several hundred electrodes to transmit signals to the visual pathway, restrict sensory function and visual information. To identify the bottlenecks and guide prosthesis designing, psychophysics simulations of a visual prosthesis in normally sighted individuals are desirable. In this study, psychophysical experiments of discriminating objects with similar profiles were used to test the effects of phosphene array parameters (spatial resolution, gray scale, distortion, and dropout rate) on visual information using simulated prosthetic vision. The results showed that the increase in spatial resolution and number of gray levels and the decrease in phosphene distortion and dropout rate improved recognition performance, and the accuracy is 78.5% under the optimum condition (resolution: 32 × 32, gray level: 8, distortion: k = 0, dropout: 0%). In combined parameter tests, significant facial recognition accuracy was achieved for all the images with k = 0.1 distortion and 10% dropout. Compared with other experiments, we find that different objects do not show specific sensitivity to the changes of parameters and visual information is not nearly enough even under the optimum condition. The results suggests that higher spatial resolution and more gray levels are required for visual prosthetic devices and further research on image processing strategies to improve prosthetic vision is necessary, especially when the wearers have to accomplish more than simple visual tasks.

  7. Phylogenetically related and ecologically similar carnivores harbour similar parasite assemblages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R P; Stephens, Patrick R; Gittleman, John L; Altizer, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    Most parasites infect multiple hosts, but what factors determine the range of hosts a given parasite can infect? Understanding the broad scale determinants of parasite distributions across host lineages is important for predicting pathogen emergence in new hosts and for estimating pathogen diversity in understudied host species. In this study, we used a new data set on 793 parasite species reported from free-ranging populations of 64 carnivore species to examine the factors that influence parasite sharing between host species. Our results showed that parasites are more commonly shared between phylogenetically related host species pairs. Additionally, host species with higher similarity in biological traits and greater geographic range overlap were also more likely to share parasite species. Of three measures of phylogenetic relatedness considered here, the number divergence events that separated host species pairs most strongly influenced the likelihood of parasite sharing. We also showed that viruses and helminths tend to infect carnivore hosts within more restricted phylogenetic ranges than expected by chance. Overall, our results underscore the importance of host evolutionary history in determining parasite host range, even when simultaneously considering other factors such as host ecology and geographic distribution.

  8. Learning similarity with multikernel method.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Li, Xuelong

    2011-02-01

    In the field of machine learning, it is a key issue to learn and represent similarity. This paper focuses on the problem of learning similarity with a multikernel method. Motivated by geometric intuition and computability, similarity between patterns is proposed to be measured by their included angle in a kernel-induced Hilbert space. Having noticed that the cosine of such an included angle can be represented by a normalized kernel, it can be said that the task of learning similarity is equivalent to learning an appropriate normalized kernel. In addition, an error bound is also established for learning similarity with the multikernel method. Based on this bound, a boosting-style algorithm is developed. The preliminary experiments validate the effectiveness of the algorithm for learning similarity.

  9. Similarity Learning of Manifold Data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si-Bao; Ding, Chris H Q; Luo, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Without constructing adjacency graph for neighborhood, we propose a method to learn similarity among sample points of manifold in Laplacian embedding (LE) based on adding constraints of linear reconstruction and least absolute shrinkage and selection operator type minimization. Two algorithms and corresponding analyses are presented to learn similarity for mix-signed and nonnegative data respectively. The similarity learning method is further extended to kernel spaces. The experiments on both synthetic and real world benchmark data sets demonstrate that the proposed LE with new similarity has better visualization and achieves higher accuracy in classification.

  10. Comparison of similarity measures for rigid-body CT/Dual X-ray image registrations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkoo; Li, Shidong; Pradhan, Deepak; Hammoud, Rabih; Chen, Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Yang; Kim, Jae Ho; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    A set of experiments were conducted to evaluate six similarity measures for intensity-based rigid-body 3D/2D image registration. Similarity measure is an index that measures the similarity between a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) and an x-ray planar image. The registration is accomplished by maximizing the sum of the similarity measures between biplane x-ray images and the corresponding DRRs in an iterative fashion. We have evaluated the accuracy and attraction ranges of the registrations using six different similarity measures on phantom experiments for head, thorax, and pelvis. The images were acquired using Varian Medial System On-Board Imager. Our results indicated that normalized cross correlation and entropy of difference showed a wide attraction range (62 deg and 83 mm mean attraction range, omega(mean)), but the worst accuracy (4.2 mm maximum error, e(max)). The gradient-based similarity measures, gradient correlation and gradient difference, and the pattern intensity showed sub-millimeter accuracy, but narrow attraction ranges (omega(mean)=29 deg, 31 mm). Mutual information was in-between of these two groups (e(max)=2.5 mm, omega(mean)= 48 deg, 52 mm). On the data of 120 x-ray pairs from eight IRB approved prostate patients, the gradient difference showed the best accuracy. In the clinical applications, registrations starting with the mutual information followed by the gradient difference may provide the best accuracy and the most robustness.

  11. Interneurons targeting similar layers receive synaptic inputs with similar kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cossart, Rosa; Petanjek, Zdravko; Dumitriu, Dani; Hirsch, June C; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons play diverse and important roles in controlling neuronal network dynamics. They are characterized by an extreme heterogeneity morphologically, neurochemically, and physiologically, but a functionally relevant classification is still lacking. Present taxonomy is essentially based on their postsynaptic targets, but a physiological counterpart to this classification has not yet been determined. Using a quantitative analysis based on multidimensional clustering of morphological and physiological variables, we now demonstrate a strong correlation between the kinetics of glutamate and GABA miniature synaptic currents received by CA1 hippocampal interneurons and the laminar distribution of their axons: neurons that project to the same layer(s) receive synaptic inputs with similar kinetics distributions. In contrast, the kinetics distributions of GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic events received by a given interneuron do not depend upon its somatic location or dendritic arborization. Although the mechanisms responsible for this unexpected observation are still unclear, our results suggest that interneurons may be programmed to receive synaptic currents with specific temporal dynamics depending on their targets and the local networks in which they operate.

  12. Innovative Partnerships Program Accomplishments: 2009-2010 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makufka, David

    2010-01-01

    This document reports on the accomplishments of the Innovative Partnerships Program during the two years of 2009 and 2010. The mission of the Innovative Partnerships Program is to provide leveraged technology alternatives for mission directorates, programs, and projects through joint partnerships with industry, academia, government agencies, and national laboratories. As outlined in this accomplishments summary, the IPP at NASA's Kennedy Space Center achieves this mission via two interdependent goals: (1) Infusion: Bringing external technologies and expertise into Kennedy to benefit NASA missions, programs, and projects (2) Technology Transfer: Spinning out space program technologies to increase the benefits for the nation's economy and humanity

  13. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1992 and plans for FY 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynne, Eleanor C.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the Structural Dynamics Division's research accomplishments for F.Y. 1992 and research plans for F.Y. 1993. The work under each Branch (technical area) is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5-year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  14. Structural mechanics division research and technology accomplishments for CY 1992 and plans for CY 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, John B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the Structural Mechanics Division's research accomplishments for C.Y. 1992 and plans for C.Y. 1993. The technical mission and goals of the division and its constituent research branches are described. The work under each branch is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and plans for the current year as they relate to branch long range goals. This information is useful in program coordination with other government organizations, universities, and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  15. Discuss Similarity Using Visual Intuition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Dana C.; Lo, Jane-Jane

    2012-01-01

    The change in size from a smaller shape to a larger similar shape (or vice versa) is created through continuous proportional stretching or shrinking in every direction. Students cannot solve similarity tasks simply by iterating or partitioning a composed unit, strategies typically used on numerical proportional tasks. The transition to thinking…

  16. Dynamic similarity in erosional processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheidegger, A.E.

    1963-01-01

    A study is made of the dynamic similarity conditions obtaining in a variety of erosional processes. The pertinent equations for each type of process are written in dimensionless form; the similarity conditions can then easily be deduced. The processes treated are: raindrop action, slope evolution and river erosion. ?? 1963 Istituto Geofisico Italiano.

  17. Guaranteed classification via regularized similarity learning.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zheng-Chu; Ying, Yiming

    2014-03-01

    Learning an appropriate (dis)similarity function from the available data is a central problem in machine learning, since the success of many machine learning algorithms critically depends on the choice of a similarity function to compare examples. Despite many approaches to similarity metric learning that have been proposed, there has been little theoretical study on the links between similarity metric learning and the classification performance of the resulting classifier. In this letter, we propose a regularized similarity learning formulation associated with general matrix norms and establish their generalization bounds. We show that the generalization error of the resulting linear classifier can be bounded by the derived generalization bound of similarity learning. This shows that a good generalization of the learned similarity function guarantees a good classification of the resulting linear classifier. Our results extend and improve those obtained by Bellet, Habrard, and Sebban (2012). Due to the techniques dependent on the notion of uniform stability (Bousquet & Elisseeff, 2002), the bound obtained there holds true only for the Frobenius matrix-norm regularization. Our techniques using the Rademacher complexity (Bartlett & Mendelson, 2002) and its related Khinchin-type inequality enable us to establish bounds for regularized similarity learning formulations associated with general matrix norms, including sparse L1-norm and mixed (2,1)-norm.

  18. Mining Diagnostic Assessment Data for Concept Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madhyastha, Tara; Hunt, Earl

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a method for mining multiple-choice assessment data for similarity of the concepts represented by the multiple choice responses. The resulting similarity matrix can be used to visualize the distance between concepts in a lower-dimensional space. This gives an instructor a visualization of the relative difficulty of concepts…

  19. Structural Mechanics Division research and technology plans for FY 1990 and accomplishments for FY 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Kay S.

    1990-01-01

    The Objectives, FY 1990 Plans, Approach, and FY 1990 Milestones for the Structural Mechanics Division's research programs are presented. FY 1989 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  20. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1988 and accomplishments for FY 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Kay S.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are the Objectives, FY 1988 Plans, Approach, and FY 1988 Milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division (Langley Research Center) research programs. FY 1987 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  1. ERIC Annual Report--1991. Summarizing the Accomplishments of the Educational Resources Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert L.; And Others

    This report, which covers fiscal years 1990 and 1991, is the fourth in a series summarizing the activities and accomplishments of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) program, which is funded and managed by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement in the U.S. Department of Education. Highlights of the 2 years include a…

  2. NREL PV Module Reliability and Performance R&D Status and Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during Fiscal Year (FY)2004 of the Photovoltaic (PV) Module Reliability and Performance R&D Subtask, which is part of the PV Module Reliability R&D Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).

  3. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1985 and accomplishments for FY 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives, FY 1985 plans, approach, and FY 1985 milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division's research programs are presented. The FY 1984 accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other government organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  4. The Early Learning Accomplishment Profile (Early LAP) Examiner's Manual and Reliability and Validity Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Belinda J.; Peisner-Feinberg, Ellen S.

    The Early Learning Accomplishment Profile (Early LAP) provides a systematic method for observing children's functioning in the birth to 36-month age range in order to assist teachers, clinicians, and parents in assessing individual skills development in six developmental domains: gross motor, fine motor, cognition, language, self-help, and social…

  5. Technical summary of accomplishments made in preparation for the USSR barley exploratory experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. M.; Dailey, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    The highlights of the work accomplished under each subcomponent of the U.S.S.R. Barley Pilot Experiment, which is scheduled for completion in 1984, are summarized. A significant amount of developmental system implementation activity was in the final stages of preparation prior to the rescoping of project tasks. Unpublished materials which are significant to this exploratory experiment are incorporated into the appendixes.

  6. Empowering Adult Learners. NIF Literacy Program Helps ABE Accomplish Human Development Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Mary E.

    1991-01-01

    The National Issues Forum's Literacy Program uses study circles and group discussion to promote empowerment and enhance adult literacy through civic education. The program has helped the Westonka (Minnesota) Adult Basic Education project accomplish its mission and has expanded the staff's view of adult learning. (SK)

  7. A Study of Parents' Attitudes Toward Supplemental Report Cards Which Identify Objectives Accomplished by ISCS Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardsley, Harry Vincent, Jr.

    The study was designed to measure attitude change of parents of Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) students by providing supplemental reports which assessed the behavioral objectives accomplished by the students. The population involved in the study consisted of 385 seventh-grade ISCS students at Roosevelt Junior High School,…

  8. Loads and aeroelasticity division research and technology accomplishments for FY 1982 and plans for FY 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Accomplishments of the past year and plans for the coming year are highlighted as they relate to five year plans and the objectives of the following technical areas: aerothermal loads; multidisciplinary analysis and optimization; unsteady aerodynamics; and configuration aeroelasticity. Areas of interest include thermal protection system concepts, active control, nonlinear aeroelastic analysis, aircraft aeroelasticity, and rotorcraft aeroelasticity and vibrations.

  9. ERIC Annual Report-1988. Summarizing the Accomplishments of the Educational Resources Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krekeler, Nancy A.; Stonehill, Robert M.; Thomas, Robert L.

    This is the second in a series of annual reports summarizing the activities and accomplishments of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) program, which is funded and managed by the Office of Educational Resources and Improvement in the U.S. Department of Education. The report begins by presenting background information on ERIC's…

  10. Definition and Measurement in the Affective Domain: Appreciation of Human Accomplishments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Paul B.; Beers, Joan S.

    The first three levels of the taxonomy in the affective domain guided the development of two inventories--the Pennsylvania Inventory of Cultural Appreciations (PICA) for 11th graders and Things People Do (TPD) for 5th graders--to measure appreciation of human accomplishments in seven areas: politics, sciences, sports, literature, visual arts,…

  11. Activities and Accomplishments in Various Domains: Relationships with Creative Personality and Creative Motivation in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined relationships between five personal traits and adolescents' creative activities and accomplishments in five domains--music, visual arts, creative writing, science, and technology. Participants were 439 tenth graders (220 males and 219 females) in China. The relationships were examined using confirmatory factor analysis.…

  12. Investigating Essential Factors on Students' Perceived Accomplishment and Enjoyment and Intention to Learn in Web Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yulei; Dang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Web development is an important component in the curriculum of computer science and information systems areas. However, it is generally considered difficult to learn among students. In this study,we examined factors that could influence students' perceptions of accomplishment and enjoyment and their intention to learn in the web development…

  13. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  14. Choosing Communication Portfolios to Accomplish Tasks: The Effects of Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chei Sian; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian; Chua, Alton Y. K; Luyt, Brendan

    2009-01-01

    The myriad of information communication technologies (ICTs) available today has changed the way students choose and use them. Specifically, individuals are increasingly relying on a mix of ICTs for communication to accomplish tasks. Yet, past studies on ICT use has largely assumed that people use a single ICT per task. We attempt to address this…

  15. Research and technology plans for FY 1989 and accomplishments for FY 1988. [Structural Mechanics Division

    SciTech Connect

    Bales, K.S.

    1989-04-01

    The Objectives, FY 1989 Plans, Approach, and FY 1989 Milestones for the Structural Mechanics Division's research programs are presented. Fiscal year 1988 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  16. Skylab experiments. Volume 6: Mechanics. [Skylab program accomplishments for high school level education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab program activities are presented in a form adapted to instruction of high school students. The overall goals of the program are discussed. The specific accomplishments of the mechanics investigations are described. The subjects involved are as follows: (1) evaluation of mobility aids, (2) mass measurement devices, and (3) space guidance crew/vehicle disturbances.

  17. ERIC Annual Report, 2002: Summarizing the Recent Accomplishments of the Educational Resources Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smarte, Lynn; Starcher, Heather

    This ERIC Annual Report presents both accomplishments and historical perspectives, as 2001 marks 35 years of ERIC service in delivering educational research and information to the public. This annual report describes the developments in the database of educational literature, the growing variety of ERIC Web-based products and user services, and…

  18. Young Volunteers in Action. Goal Accomplishment and Perceived Outcomes Evaluation. Supplemental Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of an evaluation of goal accomplishment at Young Volunteers in Action (YVA) projects at three sites: ALexander City, Alabama; Gainesville, Florida; and New Orleans, Louisiana. First, a brief introduction describes the YVA program and discusses the evaluation approach. The next three sections present case studies…

  19. E. Paul Torrance: His Life, Accomplishments, and Legacy. Research Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Thomas P.; Cramond, Bonnie; Neumeister, Kristie L. Speirs; Millar, Garnet; Silvian, Alice F.

    This monograph is designed to be a tribute to E. Paul Torrance, a renowned creativity researcher, university teacher, and mentor. It is presented in three sections, the first of which is a discussion of Torrance's life. It reviews his childhood in rural Georgia, his academic accomplishments, the emergence of his interest in creativity and the…

  20. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1986 and accomplishments for FY 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    Presented are the Objectives, FY 1986 Plans, Approach, and FY 1986 Milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division's research programs. FY 1985 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  1. Structures and Dynamics Division research and technology plans for FY 1987 and accomplishments for FY 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Kay S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the Objectives, FY 1987 Plans, Approach, and FY 1987 Milestones for the Structures and Dynamics Division's research programs. FY 1986 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  2. Accomplishing Marginalization in Bilingual Interaction: Relational Work as a Resource for the Intersubjective Construction of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Holly R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the use of impoliteness by Spanish-English bilingual pre-adolescents as a resource for accomplishing identities in spontaneous conversational interactions in an elementary school setting. The theoretical approach employed integrates the concept of relational work (Locher 2004; Locher and Watts 2005), which is based on Goffman's…

  3. Longitudinal Pathways from Math Intrinsic Motivation and Achievement to Math Course Accomplishments and Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Adele Eskeles; Marcoulides, George A.; Gottfried, Allen W.; Oliver, Pamella H.

    2013-01-01

    Across 20 years, pathways from math intrinsic motivation and achievement (ages 9-17) to high school math course accomplishments and educational attainment (age 29) were analyzed. Academic intrinsic motivation was the theoretical foundation. To determine how initial status and change in motivation and achievement related to course accomplishments…

  4. Assembling the "Accomplished" Teacher: The Performativity and Politics of Professional Teaching Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Set within the socio-political context of standards-based education reform, this article explores the constitutive role of teaching standards in the production of the practice and identity of the "accomplished" teacher. It contrasts two idioms for thinking about and studying these standards, the representational and the performative. Utilising the…

  5. Research and technology plans for FY 1989 and accomplishments for FY 1988. [Structural Mechanics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Kay S.

    1989-01-01

    The Objectives, FY 1989 Plans, Approach, and FY 1989 Milestones for the Structural Mechanics Division's research programs are presented. Fiscal year 1988 Accomplishments are presented where applicable. This information is useful in program coordination with other governmental organizations in areas of mutual interest.

  6. Dual Outcomes of Psychology Assignments: Perceived Learning and Feelings of Prideful Accomplishment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, Harvey A.; Larkin, Judith E.; Murray, Molly P.

    2016-01-01

    Two studies explored properties of psychology assignments from an atypical perspective: students' own perceptions of what they learned and their emotional reactions to the assignments, specifically feelings of pride in their work. Study 1 showed that assignments vary in their likelihood of generating prideful accomplishment and identified three…

  7. ROS homeostasis as a prerequisite for the accomplishment of plant cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Livanos, Pantelis; Galatis, Basil; Quader, Hartmut; Apostolakos, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are emerging players in several biological processes. The present work investigates their potential involvement in plant cytokinesis by the application of reagents disturbing ROS homeostasis in root-tip cells of Triticum turgidum. In particular, the NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium, the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine, and menadione that leads to ROS overproduction were used. The effects on cytokinetic cells were examined using light, fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. ROS imbalance had a great impact on the cytokinetic process including the following: (a) formation of atypical "phragmoplasts" incapable of guiding vesicles to the equatorial plane, (b) inhibition of the dictyosomal and/or endosomal vesicle production that provides the developing cell plates with membranous and matrix polysaccharidic material, (c) disturbance of the fusion processes between vesicles arriving on the cell plate plane, (d) disruption of endocytic vesicle production that mediates the removal of the excess membrane material from the developing cell plate, and (e) the persistence of large callose depositions in treated cell plates. Consequently, either elevated or low ROS levels in cytokinetic root-tip cells resulted in a total inhibition of cell plate assembly or the formation of aberrant cell plates, depending on the stage of the affected cytokinetic cells. The latter failed to expand towards cell cortex and hence to give rise to complete daughter cell wall. These data revealed for the first time the necessity of ROS homeostasis for accomplishment of plant cytokinesis, since it seems to be a prerequisite for almost every aspect of this process.

  8. Self-similar aftershock rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Jörn; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise—an intermittent avalanchelike relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes—the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is particularly true for the case of seismicity, and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high-resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing particularly clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved framework for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting.

  9. Self-similar aftershock rates.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Jörn; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise-an intermittent avalanchelike relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes-the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is particularly true for the case of seismicity, and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high-resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing particularly clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved framework for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting.

  10. Similarity of the Velocity Profile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    su x (with 0 constantb = ) is the empirically derived velocity scale developed by Zagarola and Smits [5] for turbulent boundary layer flow...Zagarola and Smits and others have shown that the velocity scaling factor given by Eq. 5 with sδ as the boundary layer thickness can collapse certain...and Smits , it is important to point out that the fact that the similarity length scale factor and the similarity velocity scale factor must follow

  11. Activity-relevant similarity values for fingerprints and implications for similarity searching

    PubMed Central

    Jasial, Swarit; Hu, Ye; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A largely unsolved problem in chemoinformatics is the issue of how calculated compound similarity relates to activity similarity, which is central to many applications. In general, activity relationships are predicted from calculated similarity values. However, there is no solid scientific foundation to bridge between calculated molecular and observed activity similarity. Accordingly, the success rate of identifying new active compounds by similarity searching is limited. Although various attempts have been made to establish relationships between calculated fingerprint similarity values and biological activities, none of these has yielded generally applicable rules for similarity searching. In this study, we have addressed the question of molecular versus activity similarity in a more fundamental way. First, we have evaluated if activity-relevant similarity value ranges could in principle be identified for standard fingerprints and distinguished from similarity resulting from random compound comparisons. Then, we have analyzed if activity-relevant similarity values could be used to guide typical similarity search calculations aiming to identify active compounds in databases. It was found that activity-relevant similarity values can be identified as a characteristic feature of fingerprints. However, it was also shown that such values cannot be reliably used as thresholds for practical similarity search calculations. In addition, the analysis presented herein helped to rationalize differences in fingerprint search performance. PMID:27127620

  12. Quantifying Similarity in Seismic Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W. S.; Jones, J. P.; Caffagni, E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring similarity in seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low S/N signals, and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via. computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Using records of the Mw=8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake from CNSN broadband sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and vertical borehole array data from a monitoring experiment at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Because histogram distance metrics are bounded by [0 1], clustering allows empirical time-frequency separation of seismic phase arrivals on single-station three-component records. Array processing for automatic seismic phase classification may be possible using subspace clustering of polarization similarity, but efficient algorithms are required to reduce the dimensionality.

  13. Nuclear markers reveal that inter-lake cichlids' similar morphologies do not reflect similar genealogy.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Daud; Seki, Shingo; Horic, Michio; Yamaoka, Kosaku

    2006-08-01

    The apparent inter-lake morphological similarity among East African Great Lakes' cichlid species/genera has left evolutionary biologists asking whether such similarity is due to sharing of common ancestor or mere convergent evolution. In order to answer such question, we first used Geometric Morphometrics, GM, to quantify morphological similarity and then subsequently used Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism, AFLP, to determine if similar morphologies imply shared ancestry or convergent evolution. GM revealed that not all presumed morphological similar pairs were indeed similar, and the dendrogram generated from AFLP data indicated distinct clusters corresponding to each lake and not inter-lake morphological similar pairs. Such results imply that the morphological similarity is due to convergent evolution and not shared ancestry. The congruency of GM and AFLP generated dendrograms imply that GM is capable of picking up phylogenetic signal, and thus GM can be potential tool in phylogenetic systematics.

  14. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on.

  15. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  16. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-04

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on.

  17. Feature matching algorithm based on spatial similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenjing; Hao, Yanling; Zhao, Yuxin; Li, Ning

    2008-10-01

    The disparities of features that represent the same real world entities from disparate sources usually occur, thus the identification or matching of features is crutial to the map conflation. Motivated by the idea of identifying the same entities through integrating known information by eyes, the feature matching algorithm based on spatial similarity is proposed in this paper. Total similarity is obtained by integrating positional similarity, shape similarity and size similarity with a weighted average algorithm, then the matching entities is achieved according to the maximum total similarity. The matching of areal features is analyzed in detail. Regarding the areal feature as a whole, the proposed algorithm identifies the same areal features by their shape-center points in order to calculate their positional similarity, and shape similarity is given by the function of describing the shape, which ensures its precision not be affected by interferes and avoids the loss of shape information, furthermore the size of areal features is measured by their covered areas. Test results show the stability and reliability of the proposed algorithm, and its precision and recall are higher than other matching algorithm.

  18. Naturally fractured reservoirs: Optimized E and P strategies using a reaction-transport-mechanical simulator in an integrated approach. Summary of project accomplishments; Final report, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Sundberg, K.R.; Hoak, T.E.

    1998-12-01

    Major accomplishments of this project occurred in three primary categories: (1) fractured reservoir location and characteristics prediction for exploration and production planning; (2) implications of geologic data analysis and synthesis for exploration and development programs; and (3) fractured reservoir production modeling. The results in each category will be discussed in turn. Seven detailed reports have been processed separately.

  19. Comparison of hydrological similarity measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Maura; Ridolfi, Elena; Manciola, Piergiorgio; Napolitano, Francesco; Russo, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The use of a traditional at site approach for the statistical characterization and simulation of spatio-temporal precipitation fields has a major recognized drawback. Indeed, the weakness of the methodology is related to the estimation of rare events and it involves the uncertainty of the at-site sample statistical inference, because of the limited length of records. In order to overcome the lack of at-site observations, regional frequency approach uses the idea of substituting space for time to estimate design floods. The conventional regional frequency analysis estimates quantile values at a specific site from multi-site analysis. The main idea is that homogeneous sites, once pooled together, have similar probability distribution curves of extremes, except for a scaling factor. The method for pooling groups of sites can be based on geographical or climatological considerations. In this work the region of influence (ROI) pooling method is compared with an entropy-based one. The ROI is a flexible pooling group approach which defines for each site its own "region" formed by a unique set of similar stations. The similarity is found through the Euclidean distance metric in the attribute space. Here an alternative approach based on entropy is introduced to cluster homogeneous sites. The core idea is that homogeneous sites share a redundant (i.e. similar) amount of information. Homogeneous sites are pooled through a hierarchical selection based on the mutual information index (i.e. a measure of redundancy). The method is tested on precipitation data in Central Italy area.

  20. What Difference Reveals about Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagi, Eyal; Gentner, Dedre; Lovett, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Detecting that two images are different is faster for highly dissimilar images than for highly similar images. Paradoxically, we showed that the reverse occurs when people are asked to describe "how" two images differ--that is, to state a difference between two images. Following structure-mapping theory, we propose that this…

  1. Phylogenetic metrics of community similarity.

    PubMed

    Ives, Anthony R; Helmus, Matthew R

    2010-11-01

    We derive a new metric of community similarity that takes into account the phylogenetic relatedness among species. This metric, phylogenetic community dissimilarity (PCD), can be partitioned into two components, a nonphylogenetic component that reflects shared species between communities (analogous to Sørensen' s similarity metric) and a phylogenetic component that reflects the evolutionary relationships among nonshared species. Therefore, even if a species is not shared between two communities, it will increase the similarity of the two communities if it is phylogenetically related to species in the other community. We illustrate PCD with data on fish and aquatic macrophyte communities from 59 temperate lakes. Dissimilarity between fish communities associated with environmental differences between lakes often has a phylogenetic component, whereas this is not the case for macrophyte communities. With simulations, we then compare PCD with two other metrics of phylogenetic community similarity, II(ST) and UniFrac. Of the three metrics, PCD was best at identifying environmental drivers of community dissimilarity, showing lower variability and greater statistical power. Thus, PCD is a statistically powerful metric that separates the effects of environmental drivers on compositional versus phylogenetic components of community structure.

  2. Assessing the Parameters for Determining Mission Accomplishment of the Philippine Marine Corps in Internal Security Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    the Philippine Marine Corps in Internal Security Operations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT...It is worthy to note that the Marine Corps perceive" s ISO primarily as a mere force on force employment (combat operations) against armed internal ...Virginia 22134-5068 MASTERS OF MILITARY STUDIES ASSESSING THE PARAMETERS FOR DETERMINING MISSION ACCOMPLISHMENT 011 THE PHILIPPINE MARINE CORPS IN INTERNAL

  3. Brain Structure-Function Couplings: Year 2 Accomplishments and Programmatic Plans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    performance through individual-specific neurotechnologies and enhance Soldier protection technologies to minimize neural injury. The long-term vision of this...envision pathways that enable our basic science accomplishments to foster development of revolutionary Soldier neurotechnologies and Soldier protection...improve Soldier-system performance with Soldier-specific neurotechnologies . We expect mid-term impact with models linking structure and function that can

  4. What causes similarity in catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    One of the biggest issues in hydrology is how to handle the heterogeneity of catchment properties at different scales. But is this really such a big issue? Is this problem not merely the consequence of how we conceptualise and how we model catchments? Is there not far more similarity than we observe. Maybe we are not looking at the right things or at the right scale to see the similarity. The identity of catchments is largely determined by: the landscape, the ecosystem living on the landscape, and the geology, in that order. Soils, which are often seen as a crucial aspect of hydrological behaviour, are far less important, as will be demonstrated. The main determinants of hydrological behaviour are: the landscape composition, the rooting depth and the phenology. These determinants are a consequence of landscape and ecosystem evolution, which, in turn, are the manifestations of entropy production. There are striking similarities between catchments. The different runoff processes from hillslopes are linked and similar in different environments (McDonnell, 2013). Wetlands behave similarly all over the world. The key is to classify landscapes and to link the ecosystems living on them to climate. The ecosystem then is the main controller of hydrological behaviour. Besides phenology, the rooting depth is key in determining runoff behaviour. Both are strongly linked to climate and much less to soil properties. An example is given of how rooting depth is determined by climate, and how rooting depth can be predicted without calibration, providing a strong constraints on the prediction of rainfall partitioning and catchment runoff.

  5. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alard, C.

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  6. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  7. Mental Institutions and Similar Phenomena Called Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Ronald W.

    1971-01-01

    Mental institutions and public schools appear to have many similarities, and they often operate in ways that would seem contradictory to their philosophy. This article explores certain atrocities to the self" that result from programs that are intended to be beneficial but, in reality, often result in dehumanization. (Author)

  8. Three-dimensional object recognition using similar triangles and decision trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    A system, TRIDEC, that is capable of distinguishing between a set of objects despite changes in the objects' positions in the input field, their size, or their rotational orientation in 3D space is described. TRIDEC combines very simple yet effective features with the classification capabilities of inductive decision tree methods. The feature vector is a list of all similar triangles defined by connecting all combinations of three pixels in a coarse coded 127 x 127 pixel input field. The classification is accomplished by building a decision tree using the information provided from a limited number of translated, scaled, and rotated samples. Simulation results are presented which show that TRIDEC achieves 94 percent recognition accuracy in the 2D invariant object recognition domain and 98 percent recognition accuracy in the 3D invariant object recognition domain after training on only a small sample of transformed views of the objects.

  9. Fort Collins Science Center: science accomplishments for fiscal years 2012 and 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.; Hamilton, David B.

    2014-01-01

    The Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) is a multi-disciplinary research and development center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) located in Fort Collins, Colorado. Organizationally, FORT is within the USGS Southwest Region, although our work extends across the Nation and into several other countries. FORT research focuses on needs of the land- and water-management bureaus within the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), other Federal agencies, and those of State and non-government organizations. As a Science Center, we emphasize a multi-disciplinary science approach to provide information for resource-management decisionmaking. FORT’s vision is to maintain and continuously improve the integrated, collaborative, world-class research needed to inform effective, science-based land and resource management. Our science and technological development activities and unique capabilities support all USGS scientific Mission Areas and contribute to successful, collaborative science efforts across the USGS and DOI. We organized our report into an Executive Summary, a cross-reference table, and an appendix. The executive summary provides brief highlights of some key FORT accomplishments for each Mission Area. The table cross-references all major FY2012 and FY2013 science accomplishments with the various Mission Areas that each supports. The one-page accomplishment descriptions in the appendix are organized by USGS Mission Area and describe the many and diverse ways in which our science is applied to resource issues. As in prior years, lists of all FY2012 and FY2013 publications and other product types also are appended.

  10. Methods to Calculate Spectrum Similarity.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Şule; Vandermarliere, Elien; Martens, Lennart

    2017-01-01

    Scoring functions that assess spectrum similarity play a crucial role in many computational mass spectrometry algorithms. These functions are used to compare an experimentally acquired fragmentation (MS/MS) spectrum against two different types of target MS/MS spectra: either against a theoretical MS/MS spectrum derived from a peptide from a sequence database, or against another, previously acquired MS/MS spectrum. The former is typically encountered in database searching, while the latter is used in spectrum clustering and spectral library searching. The comparison between acquired versus theoretical MS/MS spectra is most commonly performed using cross-correlations or probability derived scoring functions, while the comparison of two acquired MS/MS spectra typically makes use of a normalized dot product, especially in spectrum library search algorithms. In addition to these scoring functions, Pearson's or Spearman's correlation coefficients, mean squared error, or median absolute deviation scores can also be used for the same purpose. Here, we describe and evaluate these scoring functions with regards to their ability to assess spectrum similarity for theoretical versus acquired, and acquired versus acquired spectra.

  11. Mechanisms for similarity based cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, A.

    2008-06-01

    Cooperation based on similarity has been discussed since Richard Dawkins introduced the term “green beard” effect. In these models, individuals cooperate based on an aribtrary signal (or tag) such as the famous green beard. Here, two different models for such tag based cooperation are analysed. As neutral drift is important in both models, a finite population framework is applied. The first model, which we term “cooperative tags” considers a situation in which groups of cooperators are formed by some joint signal. Defectors adopting the signal and exploiting the group can lead to a breakdown of cooperation. In this case, conditions are derived under which the average abundance of the more cooperative strategy exceeds 50%. The second model considers a situation in which individuals start defecting towards others that are not similar to them. This situation is termed “defective tags”. It is shown that in this case, individuals using tags to cooperate exclusively with their own kind dominate over unconditional cooperators.

  12. Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

    2012-10-01

    The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

  13. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) Development Activities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center - 2006 Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005-06, the Prometheus program funded a number of tasks at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to support development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system for future manned exploration missions. These tasks include the following: 1. NTP Design Develop Test & Evaluate (DDT&E) Planning 2. NTP Mission & Systems Analysis / Stage Concepts & Engine Requirements 3. NTP Engine System Trade Space Analysis and Studies 4. NTP Engine Ground Test Facility Assessment 5. Non-Nuclear Environmental Simulator (NTREES) 6. Non-Nuclear Materials Fabrication & Evaluation 7. Multi-Physics TCA Modeling. This presentation is a overview of these tasks and their accomplishments

  14. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  15. The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center report of its activities and accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, D.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories is a resource provided by the US Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Program. Its major objectives are to accelerate the use of solar thermal systems through (a) direct technical assistance to users, (b) cooperative test, evaluation, and development efforts with private industry, and (c) educational outreach activities. This report outlines the major activities and accomplishments of the STDAC in Fiscal Year 1993. The report also contains a comprehensive list of persons who contacted the STDAC by telephone for information or technical consulting.

  16. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development Phase 2 (AMTD-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  17. Personal Accomplishment, Mentoring, and Creative Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Creative Work Involvement: The Moderating Role of Positive and Negative Affect.

    PubMed

    Bang, Hyejin; Reio, Thomas G

    2017-02-17

    This research explores the relationships among personal accomplish- ment, mentoring, affect, creative self-efficacy, and creative involvement. With a sample of working adults (N = 242), structural equation modeling results revealed that the data fit the theoretical model well in that creative self-efficacy fully mediated the relationships between personal accomplishment and creative work involvement and between mentoring and creative work involvement. Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that positive affect moderated the relationship between personal accomplishment and creative self-efficacy but negative affect did not, signifying that positive affect may be a necessary situational factor to optimize the personal accomplishment-creative self-efficacy link. In contrast, negative but not positive affect moderated the link between mentoring experiences and creative self-efficacy, suggesting that mentoring experiences associated with negative affect situationally may have been likely to have a significant consequence in weakening creative self-efficacy. The findings expand upon self-efficacy and mentoring theories by highlighting the importance of employing theoretically relevant moderating and mediating variables in research investigating the etiology of possible variables associated with vital workplace outcomes.

  18. Creating Birds of Similar Feathers: Leveraging Similarity to Improve Teacher-Student Relationships and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehlbach, Hunter; Brinkworth, Maureen E.; King, Aaron M.; Hsu, Laura M.; McIntyre, Joseph; Rogers, Todd

    2016-01-01

    When people perceive themselves as similar to others, greater liking and closer relationships typically result. In the first randomized field experiment that leverages actual similarities to improve real-world relationships, we examined the affiliations between 315 9th grade students and their 25 teachers. Students in the treatment condition…

  19. Federal and state forestry cost-share assistance programs: Structure, accomplishments, and future outlook. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, T.

    1995-09-01

    Cost-share assistance programs have been an effective policy mechanism for increasing productivity on nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) lands. In light of reduced harvests from Federal lands, timber productivity on these lands has become increasingly important to ensure sufficient timber supplies in the future. Productivity of other forest resources has also been enhanced through these programs. Four Federal programs, the Forestry Incentives Program, the Agricultural Conservation Program, the Stewardship Incentives program, and the Conservation Reserve Program, provided cost-share assistance for tree planting on 467,000 acres in 1993. During the course of this study, the provisions of the individual State programs, funding levels, accomplishments, and outlook for continuation or expansion, were examined. Federal programs were reviewed as well, with respect to their interaction with State-level programs. The results of the study are presented in this paper.

  20. Semantic similarity between ontologies at different scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingpeng; Haglin, David J.

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, existing and new knowledge and datasets has been encoded in different ontologies for semantic web and biomedical research. The size of ontologies is often very large in terms of number of concepts and relationships, which makes the analysis of ontologies and the represented knowledge graph computational and time consuming. As the ontologies of various semantic web and biomedical applications usually show explicit hierarchical structures, it is interesting to explore the trade-offs between ontological scales and preservation/precision of results when we analyze ontologies. This paper presents the first effort of examining the capability of this idea via studying the relationship between scaling biomedical ontologies at different levels and the semantic similarity values. We evaluate the semantic similarity between three Gene Ontology slims (Plant, Yeast, and Candida, among which the latter two belong to the same kingdom—Fungi) using four popular measures commonly applied to biomedical ontologies (Resnik, Lin, Jiang-Conrath, and SimRel). The results of this study demonstrate that with proper selection of scaling levels and similarity measures, we can significantly reduce the size of ontologies without losing substantial detail. In particular, the performance of Jiang-Conrath and Lin are more reliable and stable than that of the other two in this experiment, as proven by (a) consistently showing that Yeast and Candida are more similar (as compared to Plant) at different scales, and (b) small deviations of the similarity values after excluding a majority of nodes from several lower scales. This study provides a deeper understanding of the application of semantic similarity to biomedical ontologies, and shed light on how to choose appropriate semantic similarity measures for biomedical engineering.

  1. Sigma Team for Advanced Actinide Recycle FY2015 Accomplishments and Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A.

    2015-09-30

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Recycle (STAAR) has made notable progress in FY 2015 toward the overarching goal to develop more efficient separation methods for actinides in support of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) objective of sustainable fuel cycles. Research in STAAR has been emphasizing the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MAs) to enable closed nuclear fuel recycle options, mainly within the paradigm of aqueous reprocessing of used oxide nuclear fuel dissolved in nitric acid. Its major scientific challenge concerns achieving selectivity for trivalent actinides vs lanthanides. Not only is this challenge yielding to research advances, but technology concepts such as ALSEP (Actinide Lanthanide Separation) are maturing toward demonstration readiness. Efforts are organized in five task areas: 1) combining bifunctional neutral extractants with an acidic extractant to form a single process solvent, developing a process flowsheet, and demonstrating it at bench scale; 2) oxidation of Am(III) to Am(VI) and subsequent separation with other multivalent actinides; 3) developing an effective soft-donor solvent system for An(III) selective extraction using mixed N,O-donor or all-N donor extractants such as triazinyl pyridine compounds; 4) testing of inorganic and hybrid-type ion exchange materials for MA separations; and 5) computer-aided molecular design to identify altogether new extractants and complexants and theory-based experimental data interpretation. Within these tasks, two strategies are employed, one involving oxidation of americium to its pentavalent or hexavalent state and one that seeks to selectively complex trivalent americium either in the aqueous phase or the solvent phase. Solvent extraction represents the primary separation method employed, though ion exchange and crystallization play an important role. Highlights of accomplishments include: Confirmation of the first-ever electrolytic oxidation of Am(III) in a

  2. Overview and Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development Phase 2 (AMTD-2) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD Phase 1 completed all of its goals and accomplished all of its milestones. AMTD Phase 2 started in 2014. Key accomplishments include deriving primary mirror engineering specifications from science requirements; developing integrated modeling tools and using those tools to perform parametric design trades; and demonstrating new mirror technologies via sub-scale fabrication and test. AMTD-1 demonstrated the stacked core technique by making a 43-cm diameter 400 mm thick 'biscuit-cut' of a 4-m class mirror. AMTD-2 is demonstrating lateral scalability of the stacked core method by making a 1.5 meter 1/3rd scale model of a 4-m class mirror.

  3. American-Russian remote monitoring transparency program accomplishments during the past year

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, R.L.; Croessmann, D.; Sazhnev, M.

    1997-08-01

    During the past year, Sandia National Laboratories and Kurchatov Institute have continued collaborations under the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program (RMTP). The emphasis has been on promoting the concept of remote monitoring within the Russian Federation along with some hands-on technical training of Kurchatov personnel. The program has progressed in the direction to include the participation of Kurchatov personnel in the promotion, design, and implementation of Remote Monitoring Systems (RMS). The program has evolved from a system that was completely designed and implemented by Sandia (system that is currently installed at the Kurchatov gas plant) to a functional demonstration RMS that was designed and implemented by Kurchatov personnel with guidance and assistance from Sandia. This paper will present a brief history on the remote monitoring collaborations between Sandia and Kurchatov with an emphasis on the activities/accomplishments of the past year. The major accomplishments include a Remote Monitoring Workshop in Moscow organized by Kurchatov; integration of Russian sensors into the existing gas plant system; feedback from Kurchatov on the operation of the existing system; a training course conducted by Echelon Corporation in Albuquerque for Kurchatov and Sandia developers on the sensor network technology currently utilized in remote monitoring applications; an International Remote Monitoring Project (IRMP) technical workshop in Albuquerque organized by Sandia on software tools and development that included the participation of Kurchatov personnel; the development of a functional lab-based RMS by Kurchatov utilizing current technology; and the development of a remote monitoring Web homepage at Kurchatov.

  4. Life paths and accomplishments of mathematically precocious males and females four decades later.

    PubMed

    Lubinski, David; Benbow, Camilla P; Kell, Harrison J

    2014-12-01

    Two cohorts of intellectually talented 13-year-olds were identified in the 1970s (1972-1974 and 1976-1978) as being in the top 1% of mathematical reasoning ability (1,037 males, 613 females). About four decades later, data on their careers, accomplishments, psychological well-being, families, and life preferences and priorities were collected. Their accomplishments far exceeded base-rate expectations: Across the two cohorts, 4.1% had earned tenure at a major research university, 2.3% were top executives at "name brand" or Fortune 500 companies, and 2.4% were attorneys at major firms or organizations; participants had published 85 books and 7,572 refereed articles, secured 681 patents, and amassed $358 million in grants. For both males and females, mathematical precocity early in life predicts later creative contributions and leadership in critical occupational roles. On average, males had incomes much greater than their spouses', whereas females had incomes slightly lower than their spouses'. Salient sex differences that paralleled the differential career outcomes of the male and female participants were found in lifestyle preferences and priorities and in time allocation.

  5. Overview and accomplishments of advanced mirror technology development phase 2 (AMTD-2) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-09-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD Phase 1 completed all of its goals and accomplished all of its milestones. AMTD Phase 2 started in 2014. Key accomplishments include deriving primary mirror engineering specifications from science requirements; developing integrated modeling tools and using those tools to perform parametric design trades; and demonstrating new mirror technologies via sub-scale fabrication and test. AMTD-1 demonstrated the stacked core technique by making a 43-cm diameter 400 mm thick `biscuit-cut' of a 4-m class mirror. AMTD-2 is demonstrating lateral scalability of the stacked core method by making a 1.5 meter 1/3rd scale model of a 4-m class mirror

  6. Simpler images, better results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  7. Similarity Based Semantic Web Service Match

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hui; Niu, Wenjia; Huang, Ronghuai

    Semantic web service discovery aims at returning the most matching advertised services to the service requester by comparing the semantic of the request service with an advertised service. The semantic of a web service are described in terms of inputs, outputs, preconditions and results in Ontology Web Language for Service (OWL-S) which formalized by W3C. In this paper we proposed an algorithm to calculate the semantic similarity of two services by weighted averaging their inputs and outputs similarities. Case study and applications show the effectiveness of our algorithm in service match.

  8. Dreaming and waking: similarities and differences revisited.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Tracey L; LaBerge, Stephen P

    2011-09-01

    Dreaming is often characterized as lacking high-order cognitive (HOC) skills. In two studies, we test the alternative hypothesis that the dreaming mind is highly similar to the waking mind. Multiple experience samples were obtained from late-night REM sleep and waking, following a systematic protocol described in Kahan (2001). Results indicated that reported dreaming and waking experiences are surprisingly similar in their cognitive and sensory qualities. Concurrently, ratings of dreaming and waking experiences were markedly different on questions of general reality orientation and logical organization (e.g., the bizarreness or typicality of the events, actions, and locations). Consistent with other recent studies (e.g., Bulkeley & Kahan, 2008; Kozmová & Wolman, 2006), experiences sampled from dreaming and waking were more similar with respect to their process features than with respect to their structural features.

  9. Self-Similar Compressible Free Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonEllenrieder, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lie group methods are used to find both exact and numerical similarity solutions for compressible perturbations to all incompressible, two-dimensional, axisymmetric vortex reference flow. The reference flow vorticity satisfies an eigenvalue problem for which the solutions are a set of two-dimensional, self-similar, incompressible vortices. These solutions are augmented by deriving a conserved quantity for each eigenvalue, and identifying a Lie group which leaves the reference flow equations invariant. The partial differential equations governing the compressible perturbations to these reference flows are also invariant under the action of the same group. The similarity variables found with this group are used to determine the decay rates of the velocities and thermodynamic variables in the self-similar flows, and to reduce the governing partial differential equations to a set of ordinary differential equations. The ODE's are solved analytically and numerically for a Taylor vortex reference flow, and numerically for an Oseen vortex reference flow. The solutions are used to examine the dependencies of the temperature, density, entropy, dissipation and radial velocity on the Prandtl number. Also, experimental data on compressible free vortex flow are compared to the analytical results, the evolution of vortices from initial states which are not self-similar is discussed, and the energy transfer in a slightly-compressible vortex is considered.

  10. Predicting missing links via structural similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Guo-Dong; Fan, Chang-Jun; Yu, Lian-Fei; Xiu, Bao-Xin; Zhang, Wei-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Predicting missing links in networks plays a significant role in modern science. On the basis of structural similarity, our paper proposes a new node-similarity-based measure called biased resource allocation (BRA), which is motivated by the resource allocation (RA) measure. Comparisons between BRA and nine well-known node-similarity-based measures on five real networks indicate that BRA performs no worse than RA, which was the best node-similarity-based index in previous researches. Afterwards, based on localPath (LP) and Katz measure, we propose another two improved measures, named Im-LocalPath and Im-Katz respectively. Numerical results show that the prediction accuracy of both Im-LP and Im-Katz measure improve compared with the original LP and Katz measure. Finally, a new path-similarity-based measure and its improved measure, called LYU and Im-LYU measure, are proposed and especially, Im-LYU measure is shown to perform more remarkably than other mentioned measures.

  11. Geometric similarity between protein-RNA interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Zou, Jianwei; Tian, Feifei; Shang, Zhicai

    2009-12-01

    A new method is described to measure the geometric similarity between protein-RNA interfaces quantitatively. The method is based on a procedure that dissects the interface geometry in terms of the spatial relationships between individual amino acid nucleotide pairs. Using this technique, we performed an all-on-all comparison of 586 protein-RNA interfaces deposited in the current Protein Data Bank, as the result, an interface-interface similarity score matrix was obtained. Based upon this matrix, hierarchical clustering was carried out which yielded a complete clustering tree for the 586 protein-RNA interfaces. By investigating the organizing behavior of the clustering tree and the SCOP classification of protein partners in complexes, a geometrically nonredundant, diverse data set (representative data set) consisting of 45 distinct protein-RNA interfaces was extracted for the purpose of studying protein-RNA interactions, RNA regulations, and drug design. We classified protein-RNA interfaces into three types. In type I, the families and interface structural classes of the protein partners, as well as the interface geometries are all similar. In type II, the interface geometries and the interface structural classes are similar, whereas the protein families are different. In type III, only the interface geometries are similar but the protein families and the interface structural classes are distinct. Furthermore, we also show two new RNA recognition themes derived from the representative data set.

  12. Extending Synthetic Validation Methodology to Assess Occupational Similarities Within Job Sets and to Select Classification Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    objective of the project was accomplished in two ways: (1) by using a paper-and-pencil job analysis questionnaire and developing a PC-based technology ...evaluation of methodologies for achieving two distinct sub- objectives: Developing technology to cluster similar jobs or quantify the similarity...Radio Operator (SYNVAL) 310 Moble Subscr Equip Transmasn $yet Op (SYIIVAL) 41C Fire Control Instrument RepaLrer (JSURT) 453 Small Arma Repairer (JSRRT

  13. Quantifying Visual Similarity in Clinical Iconic Graphics

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R.O.; Starren, Justin B.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The use of icons and other graphical components in user interfaces has become nearly ubiquitous. The interpretation of such icons is based on the assumption that different users perceive the shapes similarly. At the most basic level, different users must agree on which shapes are similar and which are different. If this similarity can be measured, it may be usable as the basis to design better icons. Design: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel method for categorizing the visual similarity of graphical primitives, called Presentation Discovery, in the domain of mammography. Six domain experts were given 50 common textual mammography findings and asked to draw how they would represent those findings graphically. Nondomain experts sorted the resulting graphics into groups based on their visual characteristics. The resulting groups were then analyzed using traditional statistics and hypothesis discovery tools. Strength of agreement was evaluated using computational simulations of sorting behavior. Measurements: Sorter agreement was measured at both the individual graphical and concept-group levels using a novel simulation-based method. “Consensus clusters” of graphics were derived using a hierarchical clustering algorithm. Results: The multiple sorters were able to reliably group graphics into similar groups that strongly correlated with underlying domain concepts. Visual inspection of the resulting consensus clusters indicated that graphical primitives that could be informative in the design of icons were present. Conclusion: The method described provides a rigorous alternative to intuitive design processes frequently employed in the design of icons and other graphical interface components. PMID:15684136

  14. The Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program: Scientific and Engineering Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torrez, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this project was to assist in the creation of the appendix for the book being written about the Space Shuttle that is titled The Legacy of the Space Shuttle Program: Scientific and Engineering Accomplishments. The specific responsibility of the intern was the creation of the human health and performance (life sciences) and space biology sections of the appendix. This included examining and finalizing the list of flights with life sciences and space biology experiments flown aboard them, researching the experiments performed, synopsizing each experiment into two sentences, and placing the synopses into an appendix template. Overall, approximately 70 flights had their experiments synopsized and a good method for researching and construction of the template was established this summer.

  15. NASA/Army Rotorcraft Transmission Research, a Review of Recent Significant Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    1994-01-01

    A joint helicopter transmission research program between NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Research Lab has existed since 1970. Research goals are to reduce weight and noise while increasing life, reliability, and safety. These research goals are achieved by the NASA/Army Mechanical Systems Technology Branch through both in-house research and cooperative research projects with university and industry partners. Some recent significant technical accomplishments produced by this cooperative research are reviewed. The following research projects are reviewed: oil-off survivability of tapered roller bearings, design and evaluation of high contact ratio gearing, finite element analysis of spiral bevel gears, computer numerical control grinding of spiral bevel gears, gear dynamics code validation, computer program for life and reliability of helicopter transmissions, planetary gear train efficiency study, and the Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission (ART) program.

  16. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project: overview and year four accomplishments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-07-01

    The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort initiated in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, to mature toward the next Technology Readiness Level (TRL) critical technologies required to enable 4-m-or-larger monolithic or segmented ultraviolet, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) space telescope primary-mirror assemblies for general astrophysics and ultra-high-contrast observations of exoplanets. Key hardware accomplishments of 2015/16 are the successful low-temperature fusion of a 1.5-meter diameter ULE mirror that is a 1/3rd scale model of a 4-meter mirror and the initiation of polishing of a 1.2-meter Extreme-Lightweight Zerodur mirror. Critical to AMTD's success is an integrated team of scientists, systems engineers, and technologists; and a science-driven systems engineering approach.

  17. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) program. Compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments FY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven {open_quotes}Vision Industries{close_quotes} that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. These are: (1) Aluminum; (2) Chemical; (3) Forest Products; (4) Glass; (5) Metal Casting; (6) Refineries; and (7) Steel. This report is a compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments on materials.

  18. Recent Accomplishments and Future Directions in US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Petti; Brad J. Merrill; Phillip Sharpe; L. C. Cadwallader; L. El-Guebaly; S. Reyes

    2006-07-01

    The US fusion program has long recognized that the safety and environmental (S&E) potential of fusion can be attained by prudent materials selection, judicious design choices, and integration of safety requirements into the design of the facility. To achieve this goal, S&E research is focused on understanding the behavior of the largest sources of radioactive and hazardous materials in a fusion facility, understanding how energy sources in a fusion facility could mobilize those materials, developing integrated state of the art S&E computer codes and risk tools for safety assessment, and evaluating S&E issues associated with current fusion designs. In this paper, recent accomplishments are reviewed and future directions outlined.

  19. Space Shuttle Program Primary Avionics Software System (PASS) Success Legacy -Major Accomplishments and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, James K.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation has shown the accomplishments of the PASS project over three decades and highlighted the lessons learned. Over the entire time, our goal has been to continuously improve our process, implement automation for both quality and increased productivity, and identify and remove all defects due to prior execution of a flawed process in addition to improving our processes following identification of significant process escapes. Morale and workforce instability have been issues, most significantly during 1993 to 1998 (period of consolidation in aerospace industry). The PASS project has also consulted with others, including the Software Engineering Institute, so as to be an early evaluator, adopter, and adapter of state-of-the-art software engineering innovations.

  20. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) Project: Overview and Year 4 Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort initiated in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, to mature toward the next Technology Readiness Level (TRL) critical technologies required to enable 4-m-or-larger monolithic or segmented ultraviolet, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) space telescope primary-mirror assemblies for general astrophysics and ultra-high-contrast observations of exoplanets. Key hardware accomplishments of 2015/16 are the successful low-temperature fusion of a 1.5-meter diameter ULE mirror that is a 1/3rd scale model of a 4-meter mirror and the initiation of polishing of a 1.2-meter Extreme-Lightweight Zerodur mirror. Critical to AMTD's success is an integrated team of scientists, systems engineers, and technologists; and a science-driven systems engineering approach.

  1. Accomplishing the Visions for Teacher Education Programs Advocated in the National Science Education Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Hakan; Yager, Robert

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the advantages of an approach to instruction using current problems and issues as curriculum organizers and illustrating how teaching must change to accomplish real learning. The study sample consisted of 41 preservice science teachers (13 males and 28 females) in a model science teacher education program. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used to determine success with science discipline-specific “Societal and Educational Applications” courses as one part of a total science teacher education program at a large Midwestern university. Students were involved with idea generation, consideration of multiple points of views, collaborative inquiries, and problem solving. All of these factors promoted grounded instruction using constructivist perspectives that situated science with actual experiences in the lives of students.

  2. Status of selected ion flow tube MS: accomplishments and challenges in breath analysis and other areas.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2016-06-01

    This article reflects our observations of recent accomplishments made using selected ion flow tube MS (SIFT-MS). Only brief descriptions are given of SIFT-MS as an analytical method and of the recent extensions to the underpinning analytical ion chemistry required to realize more robust analyses. The challenge of breath analysis is given special attention because, when achieved, it renders analysis of other air media relatively straightforward. Brief overviews are given of recent SIFT-MS breath analyses by leading research groups, noting the desirability of detection and quantification of single volatile biomarkers rather than reliance on statistical analyses, if breath analysis is to be accepted into clinical practice. A 'strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats' analysis of SIFT-MS is made, which should help to increase its utility for trace gas analysis.

  3. An accomplished teacher's use of scaffolding during a second-grade unit on designing games.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyun; Rovegno, Inez; Cone, Stephen L; Cone, Theresa P

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how an accomplished teacher taught second-grade students to design games that integrated movement and mathematics content. The participants were one physical education teacher; a classroom teacher, and an intact class of 20 second-grade students. Qualitative data were gathered through videotaping of all lessons, descriptions of 20 children's responses to all lesson segments, and interviews with all participants. In keeping with constructivist principles, the teacher used a progression of tasks and multiple instructional techniques to scaffold the design process allowing children to design games that were meaningful to them. Contrary to descriptions of scaffolding fading across a unit, in this study the scaffolding was a function of the interaction between learners' needs and task content.

  4. Affordability as a discursive accomplishment in a changing National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jill; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2012-12-01

    Health systems worldwide face the challenges of rationing. The English National Health Service (NHS) was founded on three core principles: universality, comprehensiveness, and free at the point of delivery. Yet patients are increasingly hearing that some treatments are unaffordable on the NHS. We considered affordability as a social accomplishment and sought to explore how those charged with allocating NHS resources achieved this in practice. We undertook a linguistic ethnography to examine the work practices of resource allocation committees in three Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) in England between 2005 and 2012, specifically deliberations over 'individual funding requests' (IFRs)--requests by patients and their doctors for the PCT to support a treatment not routinely funded. We collected and analysed a diverse dataset comprising policy documents, legal judgements, audio recordings, ethnographic field notes and emails from PCT committee meetings, interviews and a focus group with committee members. We found that the fundamental values of universality and comprehensiveness strongly influenced the culture of these NHS organisations, and that in this context, accomplishing affordability was not easy. Four discursive practices served to confer legitimacy on affordability as a guiding value of NHS health care: (1) categorising certain treatments as only eligible for NHS funding if patients could prove 'exceptional' circumstances; (2) representing resource allocation decisions as being not (primarily) about money; (3) indexical labelling of affordability as an ethical principle, and (4) recontextualising legal judgements supporting refusal of NHS treatment on affordability grounds as 'rational'. The overall effect of these discursive practices was that denying treatment to patients became reasonable and rational for an organisation even while it continued to espouse traditional NHS values. We conclude that deliberations about the funding of treatments at the margins of NHS

  5. International Space Station Research: Accomplishments and Pathways for Exploration and Fundamental Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning with the launch of the European Columbus module planned for December 2007, we approach a transition in the assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) that is of great importance for the sciences. During the following 18 months, we will operate the first experiments in Columbus physical science resource facilities and also launch and commission the Japanese Kibo module. In addition, two Multi-purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) flights will deliver the U.S. Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) and Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) along with their first science experiments. These facilities provide significant new capabilities for basic and applied physical science research in microgravity. New life support technologies will come online throughout 2008, and we will reach the milestone of a 6-person crew planned for April 2009. A larger crew enables significant more scientific use of all the facilities for the life of ISS. Planning for the use of the International Space Station as a national laboratory is also maturing as we near the completion of assembly, enabling access to ISS as a research platform for other government agencies and the private sector. The latest updates on National Laboratory implementation will also be provided in this presentation. At the same time as these significant increases in scientific capability, there have been significant ongoing accomplishments in NASA's early ISS research both exploration related and fundamental research. These accomplishments will be reviewed in context as harbingers of the capabilities of the International Space Station when assembly is complete. The Vision for Space Exploration serves to focus NASA's applied investigations in the physical sciences. However, the broader capability of the space station as a National Laboratory and as a nexus for international collaboration will also influence the study of gravity-dependent processes by researchers around the world.

  6. Development of encephalopathic features similar to Reye syndrome in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, E S; Olson, G; Jabbour, J T; Solomon, S S; Heimberg, M; Sabesin, S; Griffith, J F

    1984-01-01

    The progression of neurological abnormalities through four or five clinically distinguishable levels of deepening coma and the development of a fatty liver are the hallmarks of Reye syndrome. A number of animal models have been described that result in fatty liver formation with minimal, static, or catastrophic neurological changes. In this study, we attempted to produce neurological features in rabbits that reflected a rostral-caudal progression of abnormalities that could be categorized into clinically distinguishable levels reminiscent of Reye syndrome. This was accomplished by the intracisternal administration of 0.5-25 mg of 11,14-icosadienoic acid (20:2 omega 6) suspended in a mixture of rabbit serum and isotonic saline solution. A reproducible, dose-titratable spectrum of at least four levels of deepening coma could be produced at will. Increases in serum glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and creatine kinase and changes in serum glucose resulted 1-2 hr after the neurological abnormalities were evoked. Other unsaturated fatty acids produced similar responses. Those tested included 18:1 omega 9, 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, 20:3 omega 6, 20:4 omega 6, and 22:4 omega 6 fatty acids. Saturated fatty acids, including 6:0, 8:0, 16:0, 18:0, and 20:0, failed to elicit these effects. The abnormalities were sustained for 30-120 min after a single dose. Full recovery was observed in some animals that had not reached the fourth level of our grading system for coma. Pretreatment of the rabbits with aspirin modulated the neurological abnormalities. Twenty micrograms of bee venom melittin, which activates endogenous phospholipase A2, administered intracisternally into rabbits also produced signs of level 3 (our grading system) coma for several hours. These findings suggest a possible role for polyunsaturated fatty acids in the development of Reye syndrome and offer a means of producing the neurological components of that syndrome in a laboratory animal. Images PMID:6592608

  7. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for fiscal year 1990 and plans for fiscal year 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynne, Eleanor C.

    1991-01-01

    The research accomplishments of the Structural Dynamics Division for F.Y. 1991 are presented. The work is discussed in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and plans for the current year as they relate to 5-year plans and the objectives of each technical area. Included is research on unsteady aerodynamics, helicopter rotors, computational fluid dynamics, oscillations of leading edge flaps of a delta wing, and aircraft wing loads.

  8. Similarly shaped letters evoke similar colors in grapheme-color synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brang, David; Rouw, Romke; Ramachandran, V S; Coulson, Seana

    2011-04-01

    Grapheme-color synesthesia is a neurological condition in which viewing numbers or letters (graphemes) results in the concurrent sensation of color. While the anatomical substrates underlying this experience are well understood, little research to date has investigated factors influencing the particular colors associated with particular graphemes or how synesthesia occurs developmentally. A recent suggestion of such an interaction has been proposed in the cascaded cross-tuning (CCT) model of synesthesia, which posits that in synesthetes connections between grapheme regions and color area V4 participate in a competitive activation process, with synesthetic colors arising during the component-stage of grapheme processing. This model more directly suggests that graphemes sharing similar component features (lines, curves, etc.) should accordingly activate more similar synesthetic colors. To test this proposal, we created and regressed synesthetic color-similarity matrices for each of 52 synesthetes against a letter-confusability matrix, an unbiased measure of visual similarity among graphemes. Results of synesthetes' grapheme-color correspondences indeed revealed that more similarly shaped graphemes corresponded with more similar synesthetic colors, with stronger effects observed in individuals with more intense synesthetic experiences (projector synesthetes). These results support the CCT model of synesthesia, implicate early perceptual mechanisms as driving factors in the elicitation of synesthetic hues, and further highlight the relationship between conceptual and perceptual factors in this phenomenon.

  9. Towards accomplished practice in learning skills for science (LSS): the synergy between design and evaluation methodology in a reflective CPD programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherz, Zahava; Bialer, Liora; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2011-04-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of continuous professional development (CPD) programmes following a CPD model aimed at promoting 'accomplished practice' involving: pedagogical knowledge, content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and scholarship of teaching. Teachers were asked to bring evidence about their practice. The context was related to the 'Learning Skills for Science' (LSS) programme, which advocates the explicit incorporation of high-order learning skills into science school curricula. The main goal of the study was to test the evidence-based LSS CPD model by investigating the impact of its related CPD programmes on participating teachers. The impact relates to teachers' perceptions about teaching learning skills, teachers' LSS practice, and their professional influence in the educational system. As part of the evaluation method, we developed a criterion-based diagnostic tool and a visual representation, designed to assess a teacher's professional profile and progression according to dimensions of 'accomplished practice'. The diagnostic tool can be adjusted and tailored to different CPD domains. Results indicated that requiring teachers to bring evidence from practice and students' learning enabled us to follow teachers' progress and succeeded to improve their performances towards accomplished LSS practice. The results exemplify a synergy between CPD designed activities and the ongoing evaluation of its impact.

  10. Professional conceptualisation and accomplishment of patient safety in mental healthcare: an ethnographic approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study seeks to broaden current understandings of what patient safety means in mental healthcare and how it is accomplished. We propose a qualitative observational study of how safety is produced or not produced in the complex context of everyday professional mental health practice. Such an approach intentionally contrasts with much patient safety research which assumes that safety is achieved and improved through top-down policy directives. We seek instead to understand and articulate the connections and dynamic interactions between people, materials, and organisational, legal, moral, professional and historical safety imperatives as they come together at particular times and places to perform safe or unsafe practice. As such we advocate an understanding of patient safety 'from the ground up'. Methods/Design The proposed project employs a six-phase data collection framework in two mental health settings: an inpatient unit and a community team. The first four phases comprise multiple modes of focussed, unobtrusive observation of professionals at work, to enable us to trace the conceptualisation and enactment of safety as revealed in dialogue and narrative, use of artefacts and space, bodily activity and patterns of movement, and in the accomplishment of specific work tasks. An interview phase and a social network analysis phase will subsequently be conducted to offer comparative perspectives on the observational data. This multi-modal and holistic approach to studying patient safety will complement existing research, which is dominated by instrumentalist approaches to discovering factors contributing to error, or developing interventions to prevent or manage adverse events. Discussion This ethnographic research framework, informed by the principles of practice theories and in particular actor-network ideas, provides a tool to aid the understanding of patient safety in mental healthcare. The approach is novel in that it seeks to articulate an 'anatomy

  11. Explosion Source Similarity Analysis via SVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, Matthew; Ben Horin, Yochai; Margrave, Gary

    2016-04-01

    An important seismological ingredient for establishing a regional seismic nuclear discriminant is the similarity analysis of a sequence of explosion sources. To investigate source similarity, we are fortunate to have access to a sequence of 1805 three-component recordings of quarry blasts, shot from March 2002 to January 2015. The centroid of these blasts has an estimated location 36.3E and 29.9N. All blasts were detonated by JPMC (Jordan Phosphate Mines Co.) All data were recorded at the Israeli NDC, HFRI, located at 30.03N and 35.03E. Data were first winnowed based on the distribution of maximum amplitudes in the neighborhood of the P-wave arrival. The winnowed data were then detrended using the algorithm of Cleveland et al (1990). The detrended data were bandpass filtered between .1 to 12 Hz using an eighth order Butterworth filter. Finally, data were sorted based on maximum trace amplitude. Two similarity analysis approaches were used. First, for each component, the entire suite of traces was decomposed into its eigenvector representation, by employing singular-valued decomposition (SVD). The data were then reconstructed using 10 percent of the singular values, with the resulting enhancement of the S-wave and surface wave arrivals. The results of this first method are then compared to the second analysis method based on the eigenface decomposition analysis of Turk and Pentland (1991). While both methods yield similar results in enhancement of data arrivals and reduction of data redundancy, more analysis is required to calibrate the recorded data to charge size, a quantity that was not available for the current study. References Cleveland, R. B., Cleveland, W. S., McRae, J. E., and Terpenning, I., Stl: A seasonal-trend decomposition procedure based on loess, Journal of Official Statistics, 6, No. 1, 3-73, 1990. Turk, M. and Pentland, A., Eigenfaces for recognition. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 3(1), 71-86, 1991.

  12. Similarity Neighbourhoods of Words in Young Children's Lexicons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles-Luce, Jan; Luce, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    Similarity neighborhoods for words in young children's lexicons were investigated using three computerized databases. Results revealed that words in five- and seven-year-olds' lexicons have many fewer similar neighbors. (Author/CB)

  13. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. Boston University is active in seven principal areas: (1) Task A: Colliding Beams -- physics of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {anti p}p collisions; (2) Task C: MACRO Experiment -- search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; (3) Task D: Proton Decay -- search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; (4) Tasks E, J, and N: Particle Theory -- theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; (5) Task F: Muon G-2 -- measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; (6) Task K: SSCintcal -- calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; (7) Task L: Muon Detectors for the GEM Experiment. The body of the proposal is devoted to detailed discussions of each of the tasks. The total budget request for the program appears in a summary chapter that includes a general budget discussion and individual budget requests and explanations for each of the tasks.

  14. Accomplishments of the Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program and Future Research Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Woodson, Shawn H.; Chambers, Joseph R.

    2003-01-01

    The Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program has addressed the problem of uncommanded lateral motions, such as wing drop and wing rock, at transonic speeds. The genesis of this Program was the experience of the F/A-18E/F Program in the late 199O's, when wing drop was discovered in the heart of the maneuver envelope for the pre-production aircraft. While the F/A-18E/F problem was subsequently corrected by a leading-edge flap scheduling change and the addition of a porous door to the wing fold fairing, the AWS Program was initiated as a national response to the lack of technology readiness available at the time of the F/A-18E/F Development Program. The AWS Program objectives were to define causal factors for the F/A-18E/F experience, to gain insights into the flow physics associated with wing drop, and to develop methods and analytical tools so that future programs could identify this type of problem before going to flight test. The paper reviews, for the major goals of the AWS Program, the status of the technology before the program began, the program objectives, accomplishments, and impacts. Lessons learned are presented for the benefit of future programs that must assess whether a vehicle will have uncommanded lateral motions before going to flight test. Finally, recommended future research needs are presented in light of the AWS Program experience.

  15. Serving two (or more) masters: accomplishing autonomous nursing practice in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Kimpson, Sally; Purkis, Mary E

    2011-07-01

    The concept of professional autonomy has figured prominently in literature that addresses nursing's project of professionalization. Nursing's capacity to determine the nature and scope of its practice is related in important ways to the location of practice. Within highly structured environments such as acute-care hospitals, nurses' professional autonomy has frequently been contested yet is often implicated by nursing's elite as a necessary condition in the construction of quality work environments. Professional concerns and management practices related to retaining experienced nurses to support sustainability in healthcare delivery systems' impact on the ability of nurses to practice autonomously. Our paper focuses on the emerging field of practice of chronic disease management. We describe the complex relationships negotiated by a nurse in a theoretically autonomous practice setting as she seeks to fulfil both the requirements of a research protocol designed by physician experts representing the specialty of renal medicine, and her professional obligations to respond to the expressed needs of patients with early-stage renal disease. We utilize a case study approach to explore particular contemporary concerns that nurses in practice confront as they attempt to accomplish professional relationships with patients central to achieving prescribed medical outcomes where nursing practice, as an element of the achievement of those outcomes, is constituted as absent or unacknowledged by the medical researchers leading the project. Implications for nursing's discourses on the professional project of autonomy will be discussed.

  16. The ICES Working Group on Zooplankton Ecology: Accomplishments of the first 25 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Peter H.; Harris, Roger; Gislason, Astthor; Margonski, Piotr; Skjoldal, Hein Rune; Benfield, Mark; Hay, Steve; O'Brien, Todd; Valdés, Luis

    2016-02-01

    The ICES Study Group on Zooplankton Ecology was created in 1991 to address issues of current and future concern within the field of zooplankton ecology. Within three years it became the ICES Working Group on Zooplankton Ecology (ICES WGZE) and this unique group in the world's oceanographic community has now been active for 25 years. This article reviews and synthesizes the products, and major accomplishments of the group. Achievements of the group, including the Zooplankton Methodology Manual, the Zooplankton Status Reports, and the International Zooplankton Symposia, have had an important impact on the wider field. Among the future issues that remain to be addressed by the group are the assessment of exploratory fisheries on zooplankton and micronekton species; further development of the zooplankton time-series; compilation and integration of allometric relationships for zooplankton species, and evaluation of new methodologies for the study of zooplankton distribution, abundance, physiology, and genetics. Marine science is an increasingly global undertaking and groups such as the ICES WGZE will continue to be essential to the advancement of understanding of zooplankton community structure and population dynamics in the world's oceans.

  17. Accomplishing professional jurisdiction in intensive care: An ethnographic study of three units.

    PubMed

    Xyrichis, Andreas; Lowton, Karen; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2017-03-24

    This paper reports an ethnographic study examining health professional jurisdictions within three intensive care units (ICUs) in order to draw out the social processes through which ICU clinicians organised and delivered life-saving care to critically ill patients. Data collection consisted of 240 h observation of actual practice and 27 interviews with health professionals. The research was conducted against a backdrop of international political and public pressure for national healthcare systems to deliver safe, quality and efficient healthcare. As in many Western health systems, for the English Department of Health the key to containing these challenges was a reconfiguration of responsibilities for clinicians in order to break down professional boundaries and encourage greater interprofessional working under the guise of workforce modernisation. In this paper, through the analysis of health professional interaction, we examine the properties and conditions under which professional jurisdiction was negotiated and accomplished in day-to-day ICU practice. We discuss how staff seniority influenced the nature of professional interaction and how jurisdictional boundaries were reproduced and reconfigured under conditions of routine and urgent work. Consequently, we question theorisation that treats individual professions as homogenous groups and overlooks fluctuation in the flow and intensity of work; and conclude that in ICU, urgency and seniority have a part to play in shaping jurisdictional boundaries at the level of day-to-day practice.

  18. Task III: UCSD/DIII-D/Textor FY-97-98 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Boedo, J.A.

    2000-09-05

    OAK (B204) Task III: UCSD/DIII-D/Textor FY-97-98 Accomplishments. A comprehensive report on the physics of pump limiters and particularly, the characterization of ALT-II, was published in Nuclear Fusion, bringing the project to a closure. The performance of the toroidal pump limiter was characterized under full auxiliary heating of 7 MW of NBI and ICRH and full pumping, as stated in the project milestones. Relevant highlights are: (1) Pumping with ALT-II allows for density control. (2) The achieved exhaust efficiency is 4% during NBI operation and near 2% during OH or ICRH operation. (3) We have shown that an exhaust efficiency of 2% is sufficient to satisfy the ash removal requirements of fusion reactors. (4) The plasma particle efflux and the pumped flux both increase with density and heating power. (5) The particle confinement time is less than the energy confinement time by a factor of 4. In summary, pumped belt limiters could provide the density control and ash exhaust requirements of fusion reactors.

  19. International Space Station Research for the Next Decade: International Coordination and Research Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thumm, Tracy L.; Robinson, Julie A.; Johnson-Green, Perry; Buckley, Nicole; Karabadzhak, George; Nakamura, Tai; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Sabbagh, Jean

    2011-01-01

    During 2011, the International Space Station reached an important milestone in the completion of assembly and the shift to the focus on a full and continuous utilization mission in space. The ISS partnership itself has also met a milestone in the coordination and cooperation of utilization activities including research, technology development and education. We plan and track all ISS utilization activities jointly and have structures in place to cooperate on common goals by sharing ISS assets and resources, and extend the impacts and efficiency of utilization activities. The basic utilization areas on the ISS include research, technology development and testing, and education/outreach. Research can be categorized as applied research for future exploration, basic research taking advantage of the microgravity and open space environment, and Industrial R&D / commercial research focused at industrial product development and improvement. Technology development activities range from testing of new spacecraft systems and materials to the use of ISS as an analogue for future exploration missions to destinations beyond Earth orbit. This presentation, made jointly by all ISS international partners, will highlight the ways that international cooperation in all of these areas is achieved, and the overall accomplishments that have come as well as future perspectives from the cooperation. Recently, the partnership has made special efforts to increase the coordination and impact of ISS utilization that has humanitarian benefits. In this context the paper will highlight tentative ISS utilization developments in the areas of Earth remote sensing, medical technology transfer, and education/outreach.

  20. Task V of the IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Program: Implementing Accomplishments and Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Ward

    1999-06-10

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) is an energy forum for 24 industrialized countries and was established in 1974 as an autonomous body within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) program implementing agreement was signed in 1993, and renewed for another five years in 1998. Twenty-two countries are collaborating under the auspices of the IEA in the PVPS to address common technical and informational barriers that often limit the rate at which photovoltaic technologies advance into the markets. Task V of the IEA PVPS is entitled "Grid Interconnection of Building-Integrated and Other Dispersed Photovoltaic Power Systems." The task sponsored a workshop in September 1997 on grid-interconnection of photovoltaic systems and is planning a second workshop to address impacts of more penetration of dispersed systems into the utility grid. This paper will summarize the accomplishments of Task V over the last five years and will detail the planned work for the next three years.

  1. Accounting for abortion: Accomplishing transnational reproductive governance through post-abortion care in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Suh, Siri

    2017-03-13

    Reproductive governance operates through calculating demographic statistics that offer selective truths about reproductive practices, bodies, and subjectivities. Post-abortion care, a global reproductive health intervention, represents a transnational reproductive regime that establishes motherhood as women's primary legitimate reproductive status. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Senegal between 2010 and 2011, I illustrate how post-abortion care accomplishes reproductive governance in a context where abortion is prohibited altogether and the US is the primary bilateral donor of population aid. Reproductive governance unfolds in hospital gynecological wards and the national health information system through the mobilization and interpretation of post-abortion care data. Although health workers search women's bodies and behavior for signs of illegal abortion, they minimize police intervention in the hospital by classifying most post-abortion care cases as miscarriage. Health authorities deploy this account of post-abortion care to align the intervention with national and global maternal health policies that valorize motherhood. Although post-abortion care offers life-saving care to women with complications of illegal abortion, it institutionalizes abortion stigma by scrutinizing women's bodies and masking induced abortion within and beyond the hospital. Post-abortion care reinforces reproductive inequities by withholding safe, affordable obstetric care from women until after they have resorted to unsafe abortion.

  2. U.S. Spacesuit Knowledge Capture Accomplishments in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Oliva, Vladenka R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA U.S. spacesuit knowledge capture (KC) program has been in operations since the beginning 2008. The program was designed to augment engineers and others with information about spacesuits in a historical way. A multitude of seminars have captured spacesuit history and knowledge over the last six years of the programs existence. Subject matter experts have provided lectures and were interviewed to help bring the spacesuit to life so that lessons learned will never be lost. As well, the program concentrated in reaching out to the public and industry by making the recorded events part of the public domain through the NASA technical library via You Tube media. The U.S. spacesuit KC topics have included lessons learned from some of the most prominent spacesuit experts and spacesuit users including current and former astronauts. The events have enriched the spacesuit legacy knowledge from Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle and International Space Station Programs. As well, expert engineers and scientists have shared their challenges and successes to be remembered. The last few years have been some of the most successful years of the KC program program's life with numerous recordings and releases to the public. It is evidenced by the thousands that have view the recordings online. This paper reviews the events accomplished and archived over Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 and highlights a few of the most memorable ones. This paper also communicates ways to access the events that are available internally to NASA as well as in the public domain.

  3. Fifteen Years of Earth Observations from MODIS: What Has Been Accomplished?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, M. D.; Running, S. W.; Platnick, S. E.; Franz, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was developed by NASA and launched onboard the Terra spacecraft on December 18, 1999 and Aqua spacecraft on May 4, 2002. It achieved its final orbit and began Earth observations on February 24, 2000 for Terra and June 24, 2002 for Aqua. Among the remote sensing algorithms developed and applied to this sensor for nearly 15 years of Earth observations are spectral and spatial distribution of albedo and surface reflectance, snow and sea ice mapping, land cover and vegetation index, fire products, including burn scars, cloud amount, cloud and aerosol optical properties, sea surface temperature, and ocean color. The archived products from these algorithms have applications in climate change studies, climate modeling, numerical weather prediction, biogeochemistry studies, and fundamental atmospheric research. A sampling of what has been accomplished and the breadth of new, often unanticipated, applications will be highlighted and discussed. Many of the MODIS products have already been adopted by agencies concerned with natural resource and environmental management.

  4. An Overview of SIMBIOS Project Activities and Accomplishments During FY00. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    In FY00, the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project brought a number of activities to fruition and laid the groundwork for new initiatives in FY01 of particular importance was ensuring that the SIMBIOS program was renewed and a new science team selected in FY00. With Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) continuing to perform well, the Terra platform and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) being launched in December 1999, and several other global missions scheduled for launch (e.g., the Aqua platform with a second MODIS (2001), the ENVISAT mission with the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (2001), and Advanced Earth Observing Satellite-2 with GLI and Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER)), the first real opportunities to merge global data sets can be pursued. NASA Headquarters did approve a three-year continuation of the science team under an NASA Research Announcement (NRA) and the Project Office. As it is taking some time for the MODIS team to work through the initial on-orbit processing issues, merger activities within the Project Office have been a low priority with most of the emphasis being on other program objectives which will provide a broader foundation and capabilities for working with multiple global data sets in the future. These activities and accomplishments are described.

  5. AIRS Science Accomplishments Version 4.0/Plans for Version 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut; Elliott, Denis; Granger, Stephanie; Kahn, Brain; Eldering, Annmarie; Irion, Bill; Fetzer, Eric; Olsen, Ed; Lee, Sung-Yung; Okonek, Sharon; Friedman, Steve; Fishbein, Evan; Gaiser, Steve

    2006-01-01

    This talk is about accomplishments with AIRS data and what we have learned from almost three years of data what part of this is emerging in Version 4.0 what part we would like to see filtering into Version 5.0 and what part constitute limitations in the AIRS requirements, such as spectral and spatial resolution, which have to be deferred to the wish list for the next generation hyperspectral sounder. The AIRS calibration accuracy at the 1OOmK and stability at the 6 mK/year level are amazing. It establishes the unique capability of a cooled grating array spectrometer in Earth orbit for climate research. Data which are sufficiently clear to match the radiometric accuracy of the instrument, have a yield of less than 1%. This is OK for calibration. The 2616/cm window channel combined with the RTG.SST for tropical ocean allow excellent assessment radiometric calibration accuracy and stability. For absolute calibration verification 100mK is the limit due to cloud contamination. The 10 micron window channels can be used for stability assessment, but accuracy is limited at 300mK due to water continuum absorption uncertainties.

  6. From compliance to concordance: barriers to accomplishing a re-framed model of health care interactions.

    PubMed

    Bissell, Paul; May, Carl R; Noyce, Peter R

    2004-02-01

    As a framework for organising health care interactions, compliance and adherence have come in for increasing criticism in recent years. It has been suggested that interactions with patients should not be viewed simply as opportunities to reinforce instructions around treatment: rather, they should be seen as a space where the expertise of patients and health professionals can be pooled to arrive at mutually agreed goals. This concept-known as concordance-is attracting increasing interest in health services research within the UK. In this paper, we seek to empirically explore the relevance of a re-framed consultation through qualitative interviews with a small group of English speaking patients of Pakistani origin with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. We suggest that the focus of many respondents in this study on material and structural factors limiting diabetic regimen integration and the emphasis on a 'doctor-centred' model of health care interactions represent distinct problems for the accomplishment of the concordance project. However, given that some patients sought greater understanding and appreciation by health professionals of the subjective aspects of living with diabetes, if it is evaluated at the level of health care relationships, rather than health outcomes (such as improved compliance) concordance may well be a significant development for those who suggest that respect for the patients agenda is a fundamental aspect of health care.

  7. Relations between premise similarity and inductive strength.

    PubMed

    Heit, Evan; Feeney, Aidan

    2005-04-01

    According to the diversity principle, diverse evidence is strong evidence. There has been considerable evidence that people respect this principle in inductive reasoning. However, exceptions may be particularly informative. Medin, Coley, Storms, and Hayes (2003) introduced a relevance theory of inductive reasoning and used this theory to predict exceptions, including the nondiversity-by-property-reinforcement effect. A new experiment in which this phenomenon was investigated is reported here. Subjects made inductive strength judgments and similarity judgments for stimuli from Medin et al. (2003). The inductive strength judgments showed the same pattern as that in Medin et al. (2003); however, the similarity judgments suggested that the pattern should be interpreted as a diversity effect, rather than as a nondiversity effect. It is concluded that the evidence regarding the predicted nondiversity-by-property-reinforcement effect does not give distinctive support for relevance theory, although this theory does address other results.

  8. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of the Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Large Aperture UVOIR Space Telescopes Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Per Astro2010, a new, larger UVO telescope is needed to answer fundamental scientific questions, such as: is there life on Earth-like exoplanets; how galaxies assemble stellar populations; how baryonic matter interacts with intergalactic medium; and how solar systems form and evolve. And, present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVO concept. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a funded SAT project. Our objective is to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. We have assembled an outstanding team from academia, industry, and government with extensive expertise in astrophysics and exoplanet characterization, and in the design/manufacture of monolithic and segmented space telescopes. One of our key accomplishments is that we have derived engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicle and its inherent mass and volume constraints. We defined and initiated a program to mature 6 key technologies required to fabricate monolithic and segmented space mirrors.

  9. Electroless nickel bath recycle. Project accomplishment summary for DOE Technology Transfer Initiative project 93-Y12P-086-C1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-22

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems plating group has decades of experience in electroless nickel plating. The group conceived of, established the validity of, and patented the ENVIRO-CP process for plating bath rejuvenation, which eliminates the generation of hazardous waste from plating processes. Fidelity Chemical Products Corporation supplies chemicals to and has knowledge of the plating industry. A second partner (CRADA identity protected) conducts production plating. The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project was to transfer the ENVIRO-CP process to the plating industry. Energy Systems personnel were to evaluate and modify the general process so that it could be used for a specific plating process, working in concert with the partner. Technical results/accomplishments: the plating solutions and the ENVIRO-CP process were analyzed and modified for direct use in the partner`s plating facility. An engineering flowsheet and pilot plant production-scale equipment were designed. Some pilot-scale equipment was fabricated; the balance will be procured and the system tested when the partner is able to budget for purchase of the remaining equipment.

  10. The Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project: A Documentation of its History and Accomplishments: 1999-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    The Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling (ASMM) Project was one of the projects within NASA s Aviation Safety Program from 1999 through 2005. The objective of the ASMM Project was to develop the technologies to enable the aviation industry to undertake a proactive approach to the management of its system-wide safety risks. The ASMM Project entailed four interdependent elements: (1) Data Analysis Tools Development - develop tools to convert numerical and textual data into information; (2) Intramural Monitoring - test and evaluate the data analysis tools in operational environments; (3) Extramural Monitoring - gain insight into the aviation system performance by surveying its front-line operators; and (4) Modeling and Simulations - provide reliable predictions of the system-wide hazards, their causal factors, and their operational risks that may result from the introduction of new technologies, new procedures, or new operational concepts. This report is a documentation of the history of this highly successful project and of its many accomplishments and contributions to improved safety of the aviation system.

  11. Sense of Accomplishment Is Modulated by a Proper Level of Instruction and Represented in the Brain Reward System

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Tomoya; Nakatani, Hironori; Hosoda, Chihiro; Nonaka, Yulri; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Problem-solving can be facilitated with instructions or hints, which provide information about given problems. The proper amount of instruction that should be provided for learners is controversial. Research shows that tasks with intermediate difficulty induce the largest sense of accomplishment (SA), leading to an intrinsic motivation for learning. To investigate the effect of instructions, we prepared three instruction levels (No hint, Indirect hint, and Direct hint) for the same insight-problem types. We hypothesized that indirect instructions impose intermediate difficulty for each individual, thereby inducing the greatest SA per person. Based on previous neuroimaging studies that showed involvement of the bilateral caudate in learning and motivation, we expected SA to be processed in this reward system. We recruited twenty-one participants, and investigated neural activations during problem solving by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We confirmed that the Indirect hint, which imposed intermediate difficulty, induced the largest SA among the three instruction types. Using fMRI, we showed that activations in the bilateral caudate and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were significantly modulated by SA. In the bilateral caudate, the indirect hint induced the largest activation, while the ACC seemed to reflect the difference between correct and incorrect trials. Importantly, such activation pattern was independent of notations (number or letter). Our results indicate that SA is represented in the reward system, and that the Indirect instruction effectively induces such sensation. PMID:28052091

  12. NASA's In-Situ Resource Utilization Project: Current Accomplishments and Exciting Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Sanders, Gerald B.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of Space resources has been identified in publications for over 40 years for its potential as a "game changing" technology for the human exploration of Space. It is called "game changing" because of the mass leverage possible when local resources at the exploration destination arc used to reduce or even eliminate resources that are brought from the Earth. NASA, under the Exploration Technology Development Program has made significant investments in the development of Space resource utilization technologies as a part of the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project. Over the last four years, the ISRU project has taken what was essentially an academic topic with lots of experimentation but little engineering and produced near-full-scale systems that have been demonstrated. In 2008 & again in early 2010, systems that could produce oxygen from lunar soils (or their terrestrial analogs) were tested at a lunar analog site on a volcano in Hawaii. These demonstrations included collaborations with International Partners that made significant contributions to the tests. The proposed federal budget for Fiscal Year 2011 encourages the continued development and demonstration of ISRU. However it goes beyond what the project is currently doing and directs that the scope of the project be expanded to cover destinations throughout the inner solar system with the potential for night demonstrations. This paper will briefly cover the past accomplishments of the ISRU project then move to a di scussion of the plans for the project's future as NASA moves to explore a new paradigm for Space Exploration that includes orbital fuel depots and even refueling on other planetary bodies in the solar system.

  13. U.S. Spacesuit Knowledge Capture Accomplishments in Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Oliva, Vladenka R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA U.S. Spacesuit Knowledge Capture (KC) program has existed since the beginning of 2008. The program was designed to augment engineers and other technical team members with historical spacesuit information to add to their understanding of the spacesuit, its evolution, its limitations, and its capabilities. Over 40 seminars have captured spacesuit history and knowledge over the last six years of the program's existence. Subject matter experts have provided lectures and some were interviewed to help bring the spacesuit to life so that lessons learned will never be lost. As well, the program concentrated in reaching out to the public and industry by making the recorded events part of the public domain through the NASA technical library through YouTube media. The U.S. Spacesuit KC topics have included lessons learned from some of the most prominent spacesuit experts and spacesuit users including current and former astronauts. The events have enriched the spacesuit legacy knowledge from Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle and International Space Station Programs. As well, expert engineers and scientists have shared their challenges and successes to be remembered. Based on evidence by the thousands of people who have viewed the recordings online, the last few years have been some of the most successful years of the KC program's life with numerous digital recordings and public releases. This paper reviews the events accomplished and archived over Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013 and highlights a few of the most memorable ones. This paper also communicates ways to access the events that are available internally on the NASA domain as well as those released on the public domain.

  14. Optimal dynamic discrimination of similar quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baiqing

    2005-07-01

    The techniques for identifying and separating similar molecules have always been very important to chemistry and other branches of science and engineering. Similar quantum systems share comparable Hamiltonians, so their eigenenergy levels, transition dipole moments, and therefore their ordinary observable properties are alike. Traditional analytical methods have mostly been restricted by working with the subtle differences in the physical and chemical properties of the similar species. Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) aims at magnifying the dissimilarity of the agents by actively controlling their quantum evolution, drawing on the extremely rich information embedded in their dynamics. ODD is developed based on the tremendous flexibility of Optimal Control Theory (OCT) and on the practical implementation of closed-loop learning control, which has become a more and more indispensable tool for controlling quantum processes. The ODD experimental paradigm is designed to combat a number of factors that are detrimental to the discrimination of similar molecules: laser pulse noise, signal detection errors, finite time resolution in the signals, and environmental decoherence effects. It utilizes either static signals or time series signal, the latter capable of providing more information. Simulations are performed in this dissertation progressing from the wave function to the density matrix formulation, in order to study the decoherence effects. Analysis of the results reveals the roles of the adverse factors, unravels the underlying mechanisms of ODD, and provides insights on laboratory implementation. ODD emphasizes the incorporation of algorithmic development and laboratory design, and seeks to bridge the gap between theoretical/computational chemistry and experimental chemistry, with the help from applied mathematics and computer science.

  15. Quantification of Health by Scaling Similarity Judgments

    PubMed Central

    Arons, Alexander M. M.; Krabbe, Paul F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective A new methodology is introduced to scale health states on an interval scale based on similarity responses. It could be well suited for valuation of health states on specific regions of the health continuum that are problematic when applying conventional valuation techniques. These regions are the top-end, bottom-end, and states around ‘dead’. Methods Three samples of approximately 500 respondents were recruited via an online survey. Each sample received a different judgmental task in which similarity data were elicited for the top seven health states in the dementia quality of life instrument (DQI). These states were ‘111111’ (no problems on any domain) and six others with some problems (level 2) on one domain. The tasks presented two (dyads), three (triads), or four (quads) DQI health states. Similarity data were transformed into interval-level scales with metric and non-metric multidimensional scaling algorithms. The three response tasks were assessed for their feasibility and comprehension. Results In total 532, 469, and 509 respondents participated in the dyads, triads, and quads tasks respectively. After the scaling procedure, in all three response tasks, the best health state ‘111111’ was positioned at one end of the health-state continuum and state ‘111211’ was positioned at the other. The correlation between the metric scales ranged from 0.73 to 0.95, while the non-metric scales ranged from 0.76 to 1.00, indicating strong to near perfect associations. There were no apparent differences in the reported difficulty of the response tasks, but the triads had the highest number of drop-outs. Discussion Multidimensional scaling proved to be a feasible method to scale health-state similarity data. The dyads and especially the quads response tasks warrant further investigation, as these tasks provided the best indications of respondent comprehension. PMID:24586520

  16. Beyond Literal Similarity. Technical Report No. 105.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortony, Andrew

    Hitherto, theories of similarity have restricted themselves to judgments of what might be called literal similarity. A central thesis of this paper is that a complete account of similarity needs also to be sensitive to nonliteralness, or metaphoricity, an aspect of similarity statements that is most evident in similes, but that actually underlies…

  17. Similarities between decapod and insect neuropeptidomes.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropeptides are important regulators of physiological processes and behavior. Although they tend to be generally well conserved, recent results using trancriptome sequencing on decapod crustaceans give the impression of significant differences between species, raising the question whether such differences are real or artefacts. Methods. The BLAST+ program was used to find short reads coding neuropeptides and neurohormons in publicly available short read archives. Such reads were then used to find similar reads in the same archives, and the DNA assembly program Trinity was employed to construct contigs encoding the neuropeptide precursors as completely as possible. Results. The seven decapod species analyzed in this fashion, the crabs Eriocheir sinensis, Carcinus maenas and Scylla paramamosain, the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, the lobster Homarus americanus, the fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and the crayfish Procambarus clarkii had remarkably similar neuropeptidomes. Although some neuropeptide precursors could not be assembled, in many cases individual reads pertaining to the missing precursors show unambiguously that these neuropeptides are present in these species. In other cases, the tissues that express those neuropeptides were not used in the construction of the cDNA libraries. One novel neuropeptide was identified: elongated PDH (pigment dispersing hormone), a variation on PDH that has a two-amino-acid insertion in its core sequence. Hyrg is another peptide that is ubiquitously present in decapods and is likely a novel neuropeptide precursor. Discussion. Many insect species have lost one or more neuropeptide genes, but apart from elongated PDH and hyrg all other decapod neuropeptides are present in at least some insect species, and allatotropin is the only insect neuropeptide missing from decapods. This strong similarity between insect and decapod neuropeptidomes makes it possible to predict the receptors for decapod neuropeptides

  18. Similarities between decapod and insect neuropeptidomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropeptides are important regulators of physiological processes and behavior. Although they tend to be generally well conserved, recent results using trancriptome sequencing on decapod crustaceans give the impression of significant differences between species, raising the question whether such differences are real or artefacts. Methods. The BLAST+ program was used to find short reads coding neuropeptides and neurohormons in publicly available short read archives. Such reads were then used to find similar reads in the same archives, and the DNA assembly program Trinity was employed to construct contigs encoding the neuropeptide precursors as completely as possible. Results. The seven decapod species analyzed in this fashion, the crabs Eriocheir sinensis, Carcinus maenas and Scylla paramamosain, the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, the lobster Homarus americanus, the fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and the crayfish Procambarus clarkii had remarkably similar neuropeptidomes. Although some neuropeptide precursors could not be assembled, in many cases individual reads pertaining to the missing precursors show unambiguously that these neuropeptides are present in these species. In other cases, the tissues that express those neuropeptides were not used in the construction of the cDNA libraries. One novel neuropeptide was identified: elongated PDH (pigment dispersing hormone), a variation on PDH that has a two-amino-acid insertion in its core sequence. Hyrg is another peptide that is ubiquitously present in decapods and is likely a novel neuropeptide precursor. Discussion. Many insect species have lost one or more neuropeptide genes, but apart from elongated PDH and hyrg all other decapod neuropeptides are present in at least some insect species, and allatotropin is the only insect neuropeptide missing from decapods. This strong similarity between insect and decapod neuropeptidomes makes it possible to predict the receptors for decapod neuropeptides

  19. Tsunamis and meteorological tsunamis: similarities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, A. B.; Monserrat, S.

    2003-04-01

    Destructive seiche oscillations occasionally generated in certain bays and inlets are mainly associated with two natural forcing phenomena: Seismic activity (tsunamis), and atmospheric disturbances (meteotsunamis). Despite their different origin, both types are modified and amplified by topography in a similar way and produce similar catastrophic effects in coastal areas. Due to these similarities, it is often difficult to distinguish between these two phenomena without knowing the exact source characteristics. Recognition and separation of these phenomena is important for the revision/improvement of existing tsunami catalogues but also to better understand the generation mechanism and mitigate their possible catastrophic effects. To investigate this problem and to compare seismic and meteorological tsunamis, we assembled a number of cases when both phenomena had been recorded at the same place. In particular, our findings included Alicante (Mediterranean coast of Spain), Malokurilsk and Krabovaya bays (Shikotan Island, Russia), and Tofino, Winter Harbour, Bamfield, Port Hardy, and Victoria (British Columbia, Canada). We also used the results of the LAST-97 hydrophysical experiment when eight bottom pressure stations were deployed on the shelf and in the inlets of Menorca Island (Western Meditterranean, Spain) and three precise microbarographs were working on the coast. Our analysis is based on the assumption that both tsunamis and meteotsunamis are formed by the combined effects of external forcing and topography. So, for different events recorded at the same site, the similarities are related to topography and the differences to the forcing. On the contrary, for the same event recorded at different stations, similarities are mainly associated with the forcing and the differences with specific local topographic features. Analysis of the spectral distributions and comparison with background noise enabled us to reconstruct the topographic transfer functions for all

  20. International Space Station Accomplishments Update: Scientific Discovery, Advancing Future Exploration, and Benefits Brought Home to Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thumm, Tracy; Robinson, Julie A.; Alleyne, Camille; Hasbrook, Pete; Mayo, Susan; Johnson-Green, Perry; Buckley, Nicole; Karabadzhak, George; Kamigaichi, Shigeki; Umemura, Sayaka; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Istasse, Eric; Sabbagh, Jean; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the history of the International Space Station (ISS), crews on board have conducted a variety of scientific research and educational activities. Well into the second year of full utilization of the ISS laboratory, the trend of scientific accomplishments and educational opportunities continues to grow. More than 1500 investigations have been conducted on the ISS since the first module launched in 1998, with over 700 scientific publications. The ISS provides a unique environment for research, international collaboration and educational activities that benefit humankind. This paper will provide an up to date summary of key investigations, facilities, publications, and benefits from ISS research that have developed over the past year. Discoveries in human physiology and nutrition have enabled astronauts to return from ISS with little bone loss, even as scientists seek to better understand the new puzzle of "ocular syndrome" affecting the vision of up to half of astronauts. The geneLAB campaign will unify life sciences investigations to seek genomic, proteomic, and metabolomics of the effect of microgravity on life as a whole. Combustion scientists identified a new "cold flame" phenomenon that has the potential to improve models of efficient combustion back on Earth. A significant number of instruments in Earth remote sensing and astrophysics are providing new access to data or nearing completion for launch, making ISS a significant platform for understanding of the Earth system and the universe. In addition to multidisciplinary research, the ISS partnership conducts a myriad of student led research investigations and educational activities aimed at increasing student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Over the past year, the ISS partnership compiled new statistics of the educational impact of the ISS on students around the world. More than 43 million students, from kindergarten to graduate school, with more than 28 million

  1. International space station accomplishments update: Scientific discovery, advancing future exploration, and benefits brought home to earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumm, Tracy; Robinson, Julie A.; Alleyne, Camille; Hasbrook, Pete; Mayo, Susan; Buckley, Nicole; Johnson-Green, Perry; Karabadzhak, George; Kamigaichi, Shigeki; Umemura, Sayaka; Sorokin, Igor V.; Zell, Martin; Istasse, Eric; Sabbagh, Jean; Pignataro, Salvatore

    2014-10-01

    Throughout the history of the International Space Station (ISS), crews on board have conducted a variety of scientific research and educational activities. Well into the second year of full utilization of the ISS laboratory, the trend of scientific accomplishments and educational opportunities continues to grow. More than 1500 investigations have been conducted on the ISS since the first module launched in 1998, with over 700 scientific publications. The ISS provides a unique environment for research, international collaboration and educational activities that benefit humankind. This paper will provide an up to date summary of key investigations, facilities, publications, and benefits from ISS research that have developed over the past year. Discoveries in human physiology and nutrition have enabled astronauts to return from ISS with little bone loss, even as scientists seek to better understand the new puzzle of “ocular syndrome” affecting the vision of up to half of astronauts. The geneLAB campaign will unify life sciences investigations to seek genomic, proteomic and metabolomics of the effect of microgravity on life as a whole. Combustion scientists identified a new “cold flame” phenomenon that has the potential to improve models of efficient combustion back on Earth. A significant number of instruments in Earth remote sensing and astrophysics are providing new access to data or nearing completion for launch, making ISS a significant platform for understanding of the Earth system and the universe. In addition to multidisciplinary research, the ISS partnership conducts a myriad of student led research investigations and educational activities aimed at increasing student interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Over the past year, the ISS partnership compiled new statistics of the educational impact of the ISS on students around the world. More than 43 million students, from kindergarten to graduate school, with more than 28

  2. Main Reasons for Registration Application Refusal of Generic and Similar Pharmaceutical Drug Products by the Brazilian Health Regulatory Agency (ANVISA)

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo, Ana Cerúlia Moraes; Piras, Stefânia Schimaneski; Rocha, Nayrton Flávio Moura

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The marketing authorization of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products involves the analysis of proposing company's administrative aspects as well as drug product technical description and scientific evaluations. This study evaluated the main reasons for registration refusal of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products in Brazil. The aim is to help future applicants to better organize the proposal. Methods. A retrospective search of drug products registration processes was performed on the Brazilian Government Official Gazette from January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2015. Results. Drug product quality control, drug product stability study, deadline accomplishment, API quality control made by drug manufacturer, active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and production report were the main reasons for marketing authorization application refusal of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products in 2015. Conclusion. Disclosure of the reasons behind failed applications is a step forward on regulatory transparency. Sharing of experiences is essential to international regulatory authorities and organizations to improve legislation requirements for the marketing authorization of generic and similar pharmaceutical drug products. PMID:28280742

  3. Similarity Rules for Scaling Solar Sail Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen L.; Peddieson, John; Garbe, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Future science missions will require solar sails on the order of 200 square meters (or larger). However, ground demonstrations and flight demonstrations must be conducted at significantly smaller sizes, due to limitations of ground-based facilities and cost and availability of flight opportunities. For this reason, the ability to understand the process of scalability, as it applies to solar sail system models and test data, is crucial to the advancement of this technology. This paper will approach the problem of scaling in solar sail models by developing a set of scaling laws or similarity criteria that will provide constraints in the sail design process. These scaling laws establish functional relationships between design parameters of a prototype and model sail that are created at different geometric sizes. This work is applied to a specific solar sail configuration and results in three (four) similarity criteria for static (dynamic) sail models. Further, it is demonstrated that even in the context of unique sail material requirements and gravitational load of earth-bound experiments, it is possible to develop appropriate scaled sail experiments. In the longer term, these scaling laws can be used in the design of scaled experimental tests for solar sails and in analyzing the results from such tests.

  4. A Representational Similarity Analysis of the Dynamics of Object Processing Using Single-Trial EEG Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, Blair; Perreau Guimaraes, Marcos; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Norcia, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of object categories is effortlessly accomplished in everyday life, yet its neural underpinnings remain not fully understood. In this electroencephalography (EEG) study, we used single-trial classification to perform a Representational Similarity Analysis (RSA) of categorical representation of objects in human visual cortex. Brain responses were recorded while participants viewed a set of 72 photographs of objects with a planned category structure. The Representational Dissimilarity Matrix (RDM) used for RSA was derived from confusions of a linear classifier operating on single EEG trials. In contrast to past studies, which used pairwise correlation or classification to derive the RDM, we used confusion matrices from multi-class classifications, which provided novel self-similarity measures that were used to derive the overall size of the representational space. We additionally performed classifications on subsets of the brain response in order to identify spatial and temporal EEG components that best discriminated object categories and exemplars. Results from category-level classifications revealed that brain responses to images of human faces formed the most distinct category, while responses to images from the two inanimate categories formed a single category cluster. Exemplar-level classifications produced a broadly similar category structure, as well as sub-clusters corresponding to natural language categories. Spatiotemporal components of the brain response that differentiated exemplars within a category were found to differ from those implicated in differentiating between categories. Our results show that a classification approach can be successfully applied to single-trial scalp-recorded EEG to recover fine-grained object category structure, as well as to identify interpretable spatiotemporal components underlying object processing. Finally, object category can be decoded from purely temporal information recorded at single electrodes. PMID

  5. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware.

  6. Horton Law in Self-Similar Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovchegov, Yevgeniy; Zaliapin, Ilya

    2016-04-01

    Self-similarity of random trees is related to the operation of pruning. Pruning ℛ cuts the leaves and their parental edges and removes the resulting chains of degree-two nodes from a finite tree. A Horton-Strahler order of a vertex v and its parental edge is defined as the minimal number of prunings necessary to eliminate the subtree rooted at v. A branch is a group of neighboring vertices and edges of the same order. The Horton numbers 𝒩k[K] and 𝒩ij[K] are defined as the expected number of branches of order k, and the expected number of order-i branches that merged order-j branches, j > i, respectively, in a finite tree of order K. The Tokunaga coefficients are defined as Tij[K] = 𝒩ij[K]/𝒩j[K]. The pruning decreases the orders of tree vertices by unity. A rooted full binary tree is said to be mean-self-similar if its Tokunaga coefficients are invariant with respect to pruning: Tk := Ti,i+k[K]. We show that for self-similar trees, the condition limsupk→∞Tk1/k < ∞ is necessary and sufficient for the existence of the strong Horton law: 𝒩k[K]/𝒩1[K] → R1-k, as K →∞ for some R > 0 and every k ≥ 1. This work is a step toward providing rigorous foundations for the Horton law that, being omnipresent in natural branching systems, has escaped so far a formal explanation.

  7. A Distance and Angle Similarity Measure Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin; Korfhage, Robert R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses similarity measures that are used in information retrieval to improve precision and recall ratios and presents a combined vector-based distance and angle measure to make similarity measurement more scientific and accurate. Suggests directions for future research. (LRW)

  8. Disambiguating the similar: the dentate gyrus and pattern separation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Brandy; Marrone, Diano F; Markus, Etan J

    2012-01-01

    The human hippocampus supports the formation of episodic memory without confusing new memories with old ones. To accomplish this, the brain must disambiguate memories (i.e., accentuate the differences between experiences). There is convergent evidence linking pattern separation to the dentate gyrus. Damage to the dentate gyrus reduces an organism's ability to differentiate between similar objects. The dentate gyrus has tenfold more principle cells than its cortical input, allowing for a divergence in information flow. Dentate gyrus granule neurons also show a very different pattern of representing the environment than "classic" place cells in CA1 and CA3, or grid cells in the entorhinal cortex. More recently immediate early genes have been used to "timestamp" activity of individual cells throughout the dentate gyrus. These data indicate that the dentate gyrus robustly differentiates similar situations. The degree of differentiation is non-linear, with even small changes in input inducing a near maximal response in the dentate. Furthermore this differentiation occurs throughout the dentate gyrus longitudinal (dorsal-ventral) axis. Conversely, the data point to a divergence in information processing between the dentate gyrus suprapyramidal and infrapyramidal blades possibly related to differences in organization within these regions. The accumulated evidence from different approaches converges to support a role for the dentate gyrus in pattern separation. There are however inconsistencies that may require incorporation of neurogenesis and hippocampal microcircuits into the currents models. They also suggest different roles for the dentate gyrus suprapyramidal and infrapyramidal blades, and the responsiveness of CA3 to dentate input.

  9. Similarity and scale in catchment storm response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric F.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Beven, Keith

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, very little progress had been made in understanding the relationship between small-scale variability of topography, soil, and rainfalls and the storm response seen at the catchment scale. The work reviewed here represents the first attempt at a systematic theoretical framework for such understanding in the context of surface runoff generation by different processes. The parameterization of hydrological processes over a range of scales is examined, and the concept of the 'representative elementary area' (REA) is introduced. The REA is a fundamental scale for catchment modeling at which continuum assumptions can be applied for the spatially variable controls and parameters, and spatial patterns no longer have to be considered explicitly. The investigation of scale leads into the concept of hydrologic similarity in which the effects of the environmental controls on runoff generation and flood frequency response be investigated independently of catchment scale. The paper reviews the authors' initial results and hopefully will motivate others to also investigate the issues of hydrologic scale and similarity.

  10. Accomplished the task of production of primary and secondary mirrors of Devasthal Optical Telescope under the project ARIES (India, Belgium, Russia): fabrication features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Alexander P.

    2012-09-01

    Basing on the contract with firm AMOS LZOS, JSC has accomplished the manufacturing works of the Primary and Secondary Mirrors of Devasthal Optical Telescope (DOT) for Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES). The Primary mirror specifications is as follows: diameter 3700 mm, vertex radius 14639 mm (F/1.96), conical constant -1.03296, asphericity 111 microns. The Secondary mirror specifications is as follows: diameter 980 mm, vertex radius 4675 mm (F/1.78), conical constant -2.79561, asphericity 47 microns. The results of works under this project are presented in this paper.

  11. Summary of activities and accomplishments. Volume IV. A proposal to develop a method for the detection of HE employing chemiluminescence reactions. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    This is the final and fourth quarter report for the study of high explosive (HE) detection by coupling the chemistry of HE with that of luminol reaction, a well-known chemiluminescence (CL) reaction. Our accomplishments include: success in coupling HE and CL chemistry reliably; the capability to use a micellized solvent to concentrate HE; and the basis for design instrumentation that may exhibit better sensitivity and lower levels of detection than that exhibited by the laboratory apparatus used for this study. On the basis of these results we are prepared to recommend further study.

  12. Community health worker integration into the health care team accomplishes the triple aim in a patient-centered medical home: a Bronx tale.

    PubMed

    Findley, Sally; Matos, Sergio; Hicks, April; Chang, Ji; Reich, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Community health workers are ideally suited to the care coordination niche within the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) team, but there are few case studies detailing how to accomplish this integration. This qualitative study documents how community health workers (CHWs) were integrated into a PCMH in South Bronx, New York. Results show that integration was linked to clear definition of their care coordination role within the care team, meticulous recruitment, training and supervision by a senior CHW, shared leadership of the care management team, and documented value for money. By helping the team understand patients' backgrounds, constraints, and preferences, they helped everyone genuinely focus on the patient.

  13. Accomplishments of the Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) RBCC Project at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, J. Craig (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    and parametrics were performed at NASA / Glenn Research Center (GRC) and NASA / Langley Research Center (LaRC) for both the Aerojet and Rocketdyne concepts. LaRC conducted an Air-Breathing Launch Vehicle (ABLV) study for several vehicle concepts with RBCC propulsion systems. LaRC is also performing a CFD analysis of the ramjet mode for both flowpaths based on GASL test conditions. A study was performed in 1999 to investigate the feasibility of performing an RBCC flight test on the NASA / Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) SR-71 aircraft. Academia involvement in the ART project includes parametric RBCC flowpath testing by Pennsylvania State University (PSU). In addition to thrust and wall static pressure measurements, PSU is also using laser diagnostics to analyze the flowfield in the test rig. MSFC is performing CFD analysis of the PSU rig at select test conditions for model baseline and validation. Also, Georgia Institute of Technology (GT) conducted a vision vehicle study using the Aerojet RBCC concept. Overall, the ART project has been very successful in advancing RBCC technology. Along the way, several major milestones were achieved and "firsts" accomplished. For example, under the ART project, the first dynamic trajectory simulation testing was performed and the Rocketdyne engine A5 logged over one hour of accumulated test time. The next logical step is to develop and demonstrate a flight-weight RBCC engine system.

  14. Thematic Relations Affect Similarity via Commonalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golonka, Sabrina; Estes, Zachary

    2009-01-01

    Thematic relations are an important source of perceived similarity. For instance, the "rowing" theme of boats and oars increases their perceived similarity. The mechanism of this effect, however, has not been specified previously. The authors investigated whether thematic relations affect similarity by increasing commonalities or by…

  15. Advancing computational toxicology in a regulatory setting: A selected review of the accomplishments of Gilman D. Veith (1944-2013)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gilman Veith joined the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and its Office of Research and Development, in 1972. Spanning 30 years of public service with EPA through 2003, Gil’s accomplishments in leading multidisciplinary research teams to successfully address a broad spe...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.255 - How must occupant evacuation or relocation be accomplished when there is immediate danger to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... danger to persons or property, such as fire, explosion or the discovery of an explosive device (not... immediate danger to persons or property, such as fire, explosion or the discovery of an explosive device... evacuation or relocation be accomplished when there is immediate danger to persons or property, such as...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.255 - How must occupant evacuation or relocation be accomplished when there is immediate danger to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... danger to persons or property, such as fire, explosion or the discovery of an explosive device (not... immediate danger to persons or property, such as fire, explosion or the discovery of an explosive device... evacuation or relocation be accomplished when there is immediate danger to persons or property, such as...

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.255 - How must occupant evacuation or relocation be accomplished when there is immediate danger to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... danger to persons or property, such as fire, explosion or the discovery of an explosive device (not... immediate danger to persons or property, such as fire, explosion or the discovery of an explosive device... evacuation or relocation be accomplished when there is immediate danger to persons or property, such as...

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.255 - How must occupant evacuation or relocation be accomplished when there is immediate danger to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... danger to persons or property, such as fire, explosion or the discovery of an explosive device (not... immediate danger to persons or property, such as fire, explosion or the discovery of an explosive device... evacuation or relocation be accomplished when there is immediate danger to persons or property, such as...

  20. "He Talks to You, Not at You": Attending to Learners' Perspectives to Enhance Understanding of Accomplished Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriewaldt, Jeana

    2009-01-01

    The voices of students can make a significant contribution to understanding what constitutes accomplished teaching (Flutter, 2007). Young people give cogent and significant views about their learning, providing important insights for improving teaching (Rudduck, McIntyre, & ESRC Teaching and Learning Programme., 2007). Using a qualitative…

  1. TERRA FIRMA. Threshold of Educational Reform Restructuring Agriculture for Inner City Related Motivation and Accomplishments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, John L.

    The report describes the first year (1974-75) activities and accomplishments of a project to provide a cooperative-based vocational agriculture program for secondary students in Anniston, Alabama. The overall objectives were to provide instruction in livestock production and horticulture, leadership training, participatory experience on a real…

  2. A Longitudinal Examination of Serious Adolescent Offenders' Perceptions of Chances for Success and Engagement in Behaviors Accomplishing Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iselin, Anne-Marie R.; Mulvey, Edward P.; Loughran, Thomas A.; Chung, He Len; Schubert, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined antisocial adolescents' perceptions of the importance of and their ability to accomplish positive life outcomes (e.g., employment) and avoid negative ones (e.g., arrests) during their transition from adolescence to young adulthood. Participants were 1,354 adolescents from the Pathways to Desistance project, a multisite longitudinal…

  3. Quasi-Experimental Study: Head Start Preschoolers' Cognitive Development as Assessed by the Learning Accomplishment Profile--Diagnostic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Jeanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Preschoolers' cognitive abilities were assessed each year as part of the Head Start Program requirements. The Head Start PK-4 Center evaluated preschoolers' cognition by administering the Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic (LAP-D), as a pretest and posttest measure. The LAP-D study used archival data collected from the 2009-2010…

  4. Investing in the Improvement of Mathematics and Science Education in Rural Appalachia: Ten Years of ARSI and Its Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inverness Research Associates, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report provides the reader with a summary of the rationale, design strategies, and major accomplishments of the Appalachian Rural Systemic Initiative (ARSI). Drawing upon both the data collected directly in Appalachia by Inverness Research Associates, as well as knowledge gained by working with many other rural initiatives, this summary…

  5. The First Use of the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP) in Prekindergarten Head Start 1976-1977. Report Number 77137.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silbermann, David J.

    Prekindergarten Head Start teachers were trained to administer the Learning Accomplishment Profile (LAP), an objective check list of development in seven areas: gross motor, fine motor manipulation and writing, social, self help, cognitive, and language skills. Data were collected from separate groups of 3, 4, and 5-year old children to ascertain…

  6. Modeling listener perception of speaker similarity in dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Lansford, Kaitlin L; Berisha, Visar; Utianski, Rene L

    2016-06-01

    The current investigation contributes to a perceptual similarity-based approach to dysarthria characterization by utilizing an innovative statistical approach, multinomial logistic regression with sparsity constraints, to identify acoustic features underlying each listener's impressions of speaker similarity. The data-driven approach also permitted an examination of the effect of clinical experience on listeners' impressions of similarity. Listeners, irrespective of level of clinical experience, were found to rely on similar acoustic features during the perceptual sorting task, known as free classification. Overall, the results support the continued advancement of a similarity-based approach to characterizing the communication disorders associated with dysarthria.

  7. Determination of subjective similarity for pairs of masses and pairs of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms: Comparison of similarity ranking scores and absolute similarity ratings

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Schmidt, Robert A.; Shiraishi, Junji; Suzuki, Kenji; Newstead, Gillian M.; Doi, Kunio

    2007-07-15

    very high (0.92 and 0.96), which implies that the observers were able to compare the similarity of a mass pair with that of a calcification pair consistently. These results provide evidence that the concept of similarity for pairs of images is robust, even across different lesion types, and that radiologists are able to reliably determine subjective similarity for pairs of breast lesions.

  8. Summary of Recent Research Accomplishment Onboard the International Space Station—Within the United States Orbital Segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jules, Kenol; Istasse, Eric; Stenuit, Hilde; Murakami, Keiji; Yoshizaki, Izumi; Johnson-Green, Perry

    2011-06-01

    November 20, 2010, marked a significant milestone in the annals of human endeavors in space since it was the twelfth anniversary of one of the most challenging and complex construction projects ever attempted by humans away from our planet: The construction of the International Space Stations. On November 20, 1998, the Zarya Control Module was launched. With this simple, almost unnoticed launch in the science community, the construction of a continuously staffed research platform, in Low Earth Orbit, was underway. This paper discusses the research that was performed by many occupants of this research platform during the year celebrating its twelfth anniversary. The main objectives of this paper are fourfold: (1) to discuss the integrated manner in which science planning/replanning and prioritization during the execution phase of an increment is carried out across the United States Orbital Segment since that segment is made of four independent space agencies; (2) to discuss and summarize the research that was performed during increments 16 and 17 (October 2007 to October 2008). The discussion for these two increments is primarily focused on the main objectives of each investigation and its associated hypotheses that were investigated. Whenever available and approved, preliminary research results are also discussed for each of the investigations performed during these two increments; (3) to compare the planned research portfolio for these two increments versus what was actually accomplished during the execution phase in order to discuss the challenges associated with planning and performing research in a space laboratory located over 240 miles up in space, away from the ground support team; (4) to briefly touch on the research portfolio of increments 18 and 19/20 as the International Space Station begins its next decade in Low Earth Orbit.

  9. 3-D heterogeneous field data versus 2-D simulations. How can it be accomplished in a sedimentary porous formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvini, G.; Salandin, P.

    2009-12-01

    To analyze the impact of the hydraulic conductivity K spatial variability in a real field case (as an example to delimitate a well catchment), numerical simulations can be reasonably developed in a two-dimensional vertical average context. Nevertheless the plume evolution is a consequence of a more complex three-dimensional heterogeneous structure whose vertical variability dominates the dispersion phenomena at local scale. In larger domains, the effect of the vertical heterogeneity combines itself with that one due to the horizontal variability of K, and only when the plume has travelled a large number of (horizontal) integral scales, its evolution can be analyzed in a regional context, under the hypothesis that the transmissivity spatial distribution prevails. Until this limit is reached, the vertical and horizontal variability of K are combined to give a fully 3-D dispersion process. In all these situations, to successfully accomplish the 3-D heterogeneous structure of the aquifer in 2-D simulations, more than the planimetric depth-averaged variability of K must be accounted for. To define the uncertainty related to the use of different planimetric schematizations of the real hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution, we present here the results of some numerical experiments that compare the 3-D plume evolution with 2-D simulations developed by tacking into account different hydraulic conductivity distribution schematization, by considering a hierarchical architecture of media also. This description of a sedimentary formation combined with the finite size of the plume requires theoretical and numerical tools able to take into account the flow field inhomogeneity and the ergodicity lack that characterize the transport phenomena. Following this way it will be possible to quantify / reduce the uncertainty related to a 2-D schematization in a large number of real cases where the domain spans between the local and the regional scale and whose dimension may lead to

  10. Popularity, similarity, and the network extraversion bias.

    PubMed

    Feiler, Daniel C; Kleinbaum, Adam M

    2015-05-01

    Using the emergent friendship network of an incoming cohort of students in an M.B.A. program, we examined the role of extraversion in shaping social networks. Extraversion has two important implications for the emergence of network ties: a popularity effect, in which extraverts accumulate more friends than introverts do, and a homophily effect, in which the more similar are two people's levels of extraversion, the more likely they are to become friends. These effects result in a systematic network extraversion bias, in which people's social networks will tend to be overpopulated with extraverts and underpopulated with introverts. Moreover, the most extraverted people have the greatest network extraversion bias, and the most introverted people have the least network extraversion bias. Our finding that social networks were systematically misrepresentative of the broader social environment raises questions about whether there is a societal bias toward believing other people are more extraverted than they actually are and whether introverts are better socially calibrated than extraverts.

  11. Self-similar dynamics of bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamsaad, Waipot; Khompurngson, Kannika

    2012-12-01

    Colonies of bacteria grown on thin agar plate exhibit fractal patterns as a result of adaptation to their environments. The bacterial colony pattern formation is regulated crucially by chemotaxis, the movement of cells along a chemical concentration gradient. Here, the dynamics of pattern formation in a bacterial colony is investigated theoretically through a continuum model that considers chemotaxis. In the case of the gradient sensed by the bacterium is nearly uniform, the bacterial colony patterns are self-similar, which means they look the same at every scale. The scaling law of the bacterial colony growth has been revealed explicitly. Chemotaxis biases the movement of the bacterial population in colony to trend toward the chemical attractant. Moreover, the bacterial colonies evolve for a long time as the traveling wave with a sharp front.

  12. Generalized entropies and the similarity of texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Dias, Laércio; Gerlach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    We show how generalized Gibbs–Shannon entropies can provide new insights on the statistical properties of texts. The universal distribution of word frequencies (Zipf’s law) implies that the generalized entropies, computed at the word level, are dominated by words in a specific range of frequencies. Here we show that this is the case not only for the generalized entropies but also for the generalized (Jensen–Shannon) divergences, used to compute the similarity between different texts. This finding allows us to identify the contribution of specific words (and word frequencies) for the different generalized entropies and also to estimate the size of the databases needed to obtain a reliable estimation of the divergences. We test our results in large databases of books (from the google n-gram database) and scientific papers (indexed by Web of Science).

  13. Social values as arguments: similar is convincing

    PubMed Central

    Maio, Gregory R.; Hahn, Ulrike; Frost, John-Mark; Kuppens, Toon; Rehman, Nadia; Kamble, Shanmukh

    2014-01-01

    Politicians, philosophers, and rhetors engage in co-value argumentation: appealing to one value in order to support another value (e.g., “equality leads to freedom”). Across four experiments in the United Kingdom and India, we found that the psychological relatedness of values affects the persuasiveness of the arguments that bind them. Experiment 1 found that participants were more persuaded by arguments citing values that fulfilled similar motives than by arguments citing opposing values. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated this result using a wider variety of values, while finding that the effect is stronger among people higher in need for cognition and that the effect is mediated by the greater plausibility of co-value arguments that link motivationally compatible values. Experiment 4 extended the effect to real-world arguments taken from political propaganda and replicated the mediating effect of argument plausibility. The findings highlight the importance of value relatedness in argument persuasiveness. PMID:25147529

  14. Investigating materials for breast nodules simulation by using segmentation and similarity analysis of digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Paula N.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Schiabel, Homero

    2015-03-01

    The task of identifying the malignancy of nodular lesions on mammograms becomes quite complex due to overlapped structures or even to the granular fibrous tissue which can cause confusion in classifying masses shape, leading to unnecessary biopsies. Efforts to develop methods for automatic masses detection in CADe (Computer Aided Detection) schemes have been made with the aim of assisting radiologists and working as a second opinion. The validation of these methods may be accomplished for instance by using databases with clinical images or acquired through breast phantoms. With this aim, some types of materials were tested in order to produce radiographic phantom images which could characterize a good enough approach to the typical mammograms corresponding to actual breast nodules. Therefore different nodules patterns were physically produced and used on a previous developed breast phantom. Their characteristics were tested according to the digital images obtained from phantom exposures at a LORAD M-IV mammography unit. Two analysis were realized the first one by the segmentation of regions of interest containing the simulated nodules by an automated segmentation technique as well as by an experienced radiologist who has delineated the contour of each nodule by means of a graphic display digitizer. Both results were compared by using evaluation metrics. The second one used measure of quality Structural Similarity (SSIM) to generate quantitative data related to the texture produced by each material. Although all the tested materials proved to be suitable for the study, the PVC film yielded the best results.

  15. An Evolutionary Psychological Perspective on Gender Similarities and Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Alastair P. C.; Shackelford, Todd K.

    2006-01-01

    Comments on the article by J. S. Hyde (see record EJ733581), which reviewed the results of 46 meta-analyses of studies investigating gender differences and produced results that supported the gender similarities hypothesis that men and women are similar along most psychological traits. The current authors agree with the gender similarities…

  16. MODIS Validation, Data Merger and Other Activities Accomplished by the SIMBIOS Project: 2002-2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide current documentation of the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project activities, satellite data processing, and data product validation. This documentation is necessary to ensure that critical information is related to the scientific community and NASA management. This critical information includes the technical difficulties and challenges of validating and combining ocean color data from an array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. This technical report focuses on the SIMBIOS Project s efforts in support of the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra platform (similar evaluations of MODIS/Aqua are underway). This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational project.

  17. HMMER web server: interactive sequence similarity searching.

    PubMed

    Finn, Robert D; Clements, Jody; Eddy, Sean R

    2011-07-01

    HMMER is a software suite for protein sequence similarity searches using probabilistic methods. Previously, HMMER has mainly been available only as a computationally intensive UNIX command-line tool, restricting its use. Recent advances in the software, HMMER3, have resulted in a 100-fold speed gain relative to previous versions. It is now feasible to make efficient profile hidden Markov model (profile HMM) searches via the web. A HMMER web server (http://hmmer.janelia.org) has been designed and implemented such that most protein database searches return within a few seconds. Methods are available for searching either a single protein sequence, multiple protein sequence alignment or profile HMM against a target sequence database, and for searching a protein sequence against Pfam. The web server is designed to cater to a range of different user expertise and accepts batch uploading of multiple queries at once. All search methods are also available as RESTful web services, thereby allowing them to be readily integrated as remotely executed tasks in locally scripted workflows. We have focused on minimizing search times and the ability to rapidly display tabular results, regardless of the number of matches found, developing graphical summaries of the search results to provide quick, intuitive appraisement of them.

  18. Similarity increases altruistic punishment in humans.

    PubMed

    Mussweiler, Thomas; Ockenfels, Axel

    2013-11-26

    Humans are attracted to similar others. As a consequence, social networks are homogeneous in sociodemographic, intrapersonal, and other characteristics--a principle called homophily. Despite abundant evidence showing the importance of interpersonal similarity and homophily for human relationships, their behavioral correlates and cognitive foundations are poorly understood. Here, we show that perceived similarity substantially increases altruistic punishment, a key mechanism underlying human cooperation. We induced (dis)similarity perception by manipulating basic cognitive mechanisms in an economic cooperation game that included a punishment phase. We found that similarity-focused participants were more willing to punish others' uncooperative behavior. This influence of similarity is not explained by group identity, which has the opposite effect on altruistic punishment. Our findings demonstrate that pure similarity promotes reciprocity in ways known to encourage cooperation. At the same time, the increased willingness to punish norm violations among similarity-focused participants provides a rationale for why similar people are more likely to build stable social relationships. Finally, our findings show that altruistic punishment is differentially involved in encouraging cooperation under pure similarity vs. in-group conditions.

  19. Surface-Based Protein Binding Pocket Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Protein similarity comparisons may be made on a local or global basis and may consider sequence information or differing levels of structural information. We present a local 3D method that compares protein binding site surfaces in full atomic detail. The approach is based on the morphological similarity method which has been widely applied for global comparison of small molecules. We apply the method to all-by-all comparisons two sets of human protein kinases, a very diverse set of ATP-bound proteins from multiple species, and three heterogeneous benchmark protein binding site data sets. Cases of disagreement between sequence-based similarity and binding site similarity yield informative examples. Where sequence similarity is very low, high pocket similarity can reliably identify important binding motifs. Where sequence similarity is very high, significant differences in pocket similarity are related to ligand binding specificity and similarity. Local protein binding pocket similarity provides qualitatively complementary information to other approaches, and it can yield quantitative information in support of functional annotation. PMID:21769944

  20. Generalized Similarity for Accretion/Decretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-10-01

    Decretion (or external) disks are gas disks freely expanding to large radii due to their internal stresses. They are expected to naturally arise in tidal disruption events, around Be stars, in mass-losing post-main-sequence binaries, as a result of supernova fallback, etc. Their evolution is theoretically understood in two regimes: when the central object does not exert torque on the disk (a standard assumption for conventional accretion disks) or when no mass inflow (or outflow) occurs at the disk center. However, many astrophysical objects—circumbinary disks, Be stars, neutron stars accreting in a propeller regime, etc.—feature non-zero torque simultaneously with the non-zero accretion (or ejection of mass) at the disk center. We provide a general description for the evolution of such disks (both linear and nonlinear) in the self-similar regime, to which the disk should asymptotically converge with time. We identify a similarity parameter λ, which is uniquely related to the degree, to which the central mass accretion is suppressed by the non-zero central torque. The known decretion disk solutions correspond to the two discrete values of λ, while our new solutions cover a continuum of its physically allowed values, corresponding to either accretion or mass ejection by the central object. A direct relationship between λ and central \\dot{M} and torque is also established. We describe the time evolution of the various disk characteristics for different λ, and show that the observable properties (spectrum and luminosity evolution) of the decretion disks, in general, are different from the standard accretion disks with no central torque.

  1. Lipschitz equivalence of self-similar sets with touching structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Huo-Jun; Wang, Yang; Xi, Li-Feng

    2014-06-01

    Lipschitz equivalence of self-similar sets is an important area in the study of fractal geometry. It is known that two dust-like self-similar sets with the same contraction ratios are always Lipschitz equivalent. However, when self-similar sets have touching structures the problem of Lipschitz equivalence becomes much more challenging and intriguing at the same time. So far, all the known results only cover self-similar sets in {R} with no more than three branches. In this study we establish results for the Lipschitz equivalence of self-similar sets with touching structures in {R} with arbitrarily many branches. Key to our study is the introduction of a geometric condition for self-similar sets called substitutable.

  2. Exploring perceptually similar cases with multi-dimensional scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Yongyi; Wernick, Miles N.; Nishikawa, Robert M.

    2014-03-01

    Retrieving a set of known lesions similar to the one being evaluated might be of value for assisting radiologists to distinguish between benign and malignant clustered microcalcifications (MCs) in mammograms. In this work, we investigate how perceptually similar cases with clustered MCs may relate to one another in terms of their underlying characteristics (from disease condition to image features). We first conduct an observer study to collect similarity scores from a group of readers (five radiologists and five non-radiologists) on a set of 2,000 image pairs, which were selected from 222 cases based on their images features. We then explore the potential relationship among the different cases as revealed by their similarity ratings. We apply the multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) technique to embed all the cases in a 2-D plot, in which perceptually similar cases are placed in close vicinity of one another based on their level of similarity. Our results show that cases having different characteristics in their clustered MCs are accordingly placed in different regions in the plot. Moreover, cases of same pathology tend to be clustered together locally, and neighboring cases (which are more similar) tend to be also similar in their clustered MCs (e.g., cluster size and shape). These results indicate that subjective similarity ratings from the readers are well correlated with the image features of the underlying MCs of the cases, and that perceptually similar cases could be of diagnostic value for discriminating between malignant and benign cases.

  3. Notions of similarity for systems biology models.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Ron; Hoehndorf, Robert; Kacprowski, Tim; Knüpfer, Christian; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Waltemath, Dagmar

    2016-10-14

    Systems biology models are rapidly increasing in complexity, size and numbers. When building large models, researchers rely on software tools for the retrieval, comparison, combination and merging of models, as well as for version control. These tools need to be able to quantify the differences and similarities between computational models. However, depending on the specific application, the notion of 'similarity' may greatly vary. A general notion of model similarity, applicable to various types of models, is still missing. Here we survey existing methods for the comparison of models, introduce quantitative measures for model similarity, and discuss potential applications of combined similarity measures. To frame model comparison as a general problem, we describe a theoretical approach to defining and computing similarities based on a combination of different model aspects. The six aspects that we define as potentially relevant for similarity are underlying encoding, references to biological entities, quantitative behaviour, qualitative behaviour, mathematical equations and parameters and network structure. We argue that future similarity measures will benefit from combining these model aspects in flexible, problem-specific ways to mimic users' intuition about model similarity, and to support complex model searches in databases.

  4. Similarity effects in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong V; Lee, Hyejin J; Asaad, Anthony; Remington, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Perceptual similarity is an important property of multiple stimuli. Its computation supports a wide range of cognitive functions, including reasoning, categorization, and memory recognition. It is important, therefore, to determine why previous research has found conflicting effects of inter-item similarity on visual working memory. Studies reporting a similarity advantage have used simple stimuli whose similarity varied along a featural continuum. Studies reporting a similarity disadvantage have used complex stimuli from either a single or multiple categories. To elucidate stimulus conditions for similarity effects in visual working memory, we tested memory for complex stimuli (faces) whose similarity varied along a morph continuum. Participants encoded 3 morphs generated from a single face identity in the similar condition, or 3 morphs generated from different face identities in the dissimilar condition. After a brief delay, a test face appeared at one of the encoding locations for participants to make a same/different judgment. Two experiments showed that similarity enhanced memory accuracy without changing the response criterion. These findings support previous computational models that incorporate featural variance as a component of working memory load. They delineate limitations of models that emphasize cortical resources or response decisions.

  5. The Influence of Contour on Similarity Perception of Star Glyphs.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Johannes; Isenberg, Petra; Bezerianos, Anastasia; Fischer, Fabian; Bertini, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    We conducted three experiments to investigate the effects of contours on the detection of data similarity with star glyph variations. A star glyph is a small, compact, data graphic that represents a multi-dimensional data point. Star glyphs are often used in small-multiple settings, to represent data points in tables, on maps, or as overlays on other types of data graphics. In these settings, an important task is the visual comparison of the data points encoded in the star glyph, for example to find other similar data points or outliers. We hypothesized that for data comparisons, the overall shape of a star glyph--enhanced through contour lines--would aid the viewer in making accurate similarity judgments. To test this hypothesis, we conducted three experiments. In our first experiment, we explored how the use of contours influenced how visualization experts and trained novices chose glyphs with similar data values. Our results showed that glyphs without contours make the detection of data similarity easier. Given these results, we conducted a second study to understand intuitive notions of similarity. Star glyphs without contours most intuitively supported the detection of data similarity. In a third experiment, we tested the effect of star glyph reference structures (i.e., tickmarks and gridlines) on the detection of similarity. Surprisingly, our results show that adding reference structures does improve the correctness of similarity judgments for star glyphs with contours, but not for the standard star glyph. As a result of these experiments, we conclude that the simple star glyph without contours performs best under several criteria, reinforcing its practice and popularity in the literature. Contours seem to enhance the detection of other types of similarity, e. g., shape similarity and are distracting when data similarity has to be judged. Based on these findings we provide design considerations regarding the use of contours and reference structures on star

  6. Laplacian Eigenmaps From Sparse, Noisy Similarity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Keith; Lyzinski, Vince

    2017-04-01

    Manifold learning and dimensionality reduction techniques are ubiquitous in science and engineering, but can be computationally expensive procedures when applied to large data sets or when similarities are expensive to compute. To date, little work has been done to investigate the tradeoff between computational resources and the quality of learned representations. We present both theoretical and experimental explorations of this question. In particular, we consider Laplacian eigenmaps embeddings based on a kernel matrix, and explore how the embeddings behave when this kernel matrix is corrupted by occlusion and noise. Our main theoretical result shows that under modest noise and occlusion assumptions, we can (with high probability) recover a good approximation to the Laplacian eigenmaps embedding based on the uncorrupted kernel matrix. Our results also show how regularization can aid this approximation. Experimentally, we explore the effects of noise and occlusion on Laplacian eigenmaps embeddings of two real-world data sets, one from speech processing and one from neuroscience, as well as a synthetic data set.

  7. A Longitudinal Examination of Serious Adolescent Offenders’ Perceptions of Chances for Success and Engagement in Behaviors Accomplishing Goals

    PubMed Central

    Iselin, Anne-Marie R.; Mulvey, Edward P.; Loughran, Thomas A.; Chung, He Len; Schubert, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined antisocial adolescents’ perceptions of the importance of and their ability to accomplish positive life outcomes (e.g., employment) and avoid negative ones (e.g., arrests) during their transition from adolescence to young adulthood. Participants were 1,354 adolescents from the Pathways to Desistance project, a multisite longitudinal study of seriously antisocial adolescents. Participants’ perceptions of the importance and likelihood of accomplishing positive adult goals at one age uniquely predicted how often they engaged in behaviors that were consistent with these goals the following year. Our findings suggest that among serious adolescent offenders aspirations to achieve positive goals are related to engaging in behaviors that bring adolescents’ current selves more in line with their aspired-to future selves. We discuss the implications of these findings for prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:21881855

  8. Documents Similarity Measurement Using Field Association Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlam, El-Sayed; Fuketa, M.; Morita, K.; Aoe, Jun-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of text analysis and information retrieval and measurement of document similarity focuses on a new text manipulation system called FA (field association)-Sim that is useful for retrieving information in large heterogeneous texts and for recognizing content similarity in text excerpts. Discusses recall and precision, automatic indexing…

  9. Structure Mapping in Analogy and Similarity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Dedre; Markman, Arthur B.

    1997-01-01

    It is suggested that both similarity and analogy involve a process of structural alignment and mapping. The structure mapping process is described as it has been worked out for analogy, and this view is then extended to similarity and used to generate new predictions. (SLD)

  10. Perceived Similarity, Proactive Adjustment, and Organizational Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammeyer-Mueller, John D.; Livingston, Beth A.; Liao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores how perceived demographic and attitudinal similarity can influence proactive behavior among organizational newcomers. We propose that newcomers who perceive themselves as similar to their co-workers will be more willing to seek new information or build relationships, which in turn will lead to better long-term…

  11. Structural dynamics division research and technology accomplishments for F.Y. 1991 and plans for F.Y. 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynne, Eleanor C.

    1992-01-01

    The work under each technical area is described in terms of highlights of accomplishments during the past year and highlights of plans for the current year as they relate to 5 year plans for each technical area. This information will be useful in program coordination with other government organizations and industry in areas of mutual interest. The structural dynamics division consist of the following branches: configuration aeroelasticity; unsteady aerodynamics; aeroservoelasticity; landing and impact dynamics; and spacecraft dynamics.

  12. Criteria for dynamic similarity in bouncing gaits.

    PubMed

    Bullimore, Sharon R; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2008-01-21

    Animals of different sizes tend to move in a dynamically similar manner when travelling at speeds corresponding to equal values of a dimensionless parameter (DP) called the Froude number. Consequently, the Froude number has been widely used for defining equivalent speeds and predicting speeds of locomotion by extinct species and on other planets. However, experiments using simulated reduced gravity have demonstrated that equality of the Froude number does not guarantee dynamic similarity. This has cast doubt upon the usefulness of the Froude number in locomotion research. Here we use dimensional analysis of the planar spring-mass model, combined with Buckingham's Pi-Theorem, to demonstrate that four DPs must be equal for dynamic similarity in bouncing gaits such as trotting, hopping and bipedal running. This can be reduced to three DPs by applying the constraint of maintaining a constant average speed of locomotion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that all of these DPs are important for predicting dynamic similarity. We show that the reason humans do not run in a dynamically similar manner at equal Froude number in different levels of simulated reduced gravity is that dimensionless leg stiffness decreases as gravity increases. The reason that the Froude number can predict dynamic similarity in Earth gravity is that dimensionless leg stiffness and dimensionless vertical landing speed are both independent of size. In conclusion, although equal Froude number is not sufficient for dynamic similarity, it is a necessary condition. Therefore, to detect fundamental differences in locomotion, animals of different sizes should be compared at equal Froude number, so that they can be as close to dynamic similarity as possible. More generally, the concept of dynamic similarity provides a powerful framework within which similarities and differences in locomotion can be interpreted.

  13. Phonological similarity effect is abolished by a silent mouthing task.

    PubMed

    Saito, S

    1993-04-01

    This experiment was designed to examine the effect of silent mouthing on the phonological similarity effect. 16 undergraduates were tested for serial recall of visually presented letter sequences that were either phonologically similar or dissimilar. The letter sequences had to be remembered under two conditions, a control condition and a silent mouthing condition in which subjects had to articulate irrelevant words silently during the study period. Analysis showed the clear advantage of the dissimilar sequence over the similar one in the control condition. In contrast, this phonological similarity effect disappeared in the silent mouthing condition. This result is consistent with the working memory model.

  14. Performance as Promised: How the Chandra X-ray Observatory Accomplished One of Nasa's Most Challenging Missions for Billions of Dollars Less than Originally Planned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Greg; Hefner, Keith

    2004-01-01

    As the nation looks toward bold new ventures in space, the Chandra X-ray Observatory program offers an example of how billion-dollar missions can be successfully developed within tightening fiscal constraints. Chandra experienced many of challenges facing bold space programs (state-of-the-art technical requirements and budget-induced slips and restructurings), and yet the Chandra team achieved nearly all the originally envisioned performance for dramatically lower cost. This was accomplished by a combination of team- work, systems engineering, advanced technology insertion, and effective approaches for program implementation. A thorough tradeoff of science utility vs. cost led to the selection of a highly elliptical orbit with uncrewed robotic delivery, deployment, and maintenance. Progressive, focused technology demonstrations were accomplished prior to commitment of major resources to critical elements of the system design, such as the high resolution mirror assembly (HRMA). Pathfinder hardware was developed to reduce risks. A variety of schedule risk reduction measures were implemented and resulted in the X-ray calibration taking place exactly within five days of its originally planned date after after five years of development. The team worked together in an effective manner to contain requirements creep. reductions such as the ACIS-2 chip device. It is estimated that the above combination of measures achieved the avoidance of over $4B in costs, while enabling a highly successful mission.

  15. Positive Psychology Interventions Addressing Pleasure, Engagement, Meaning, Positive Relationships, and Accomplishment Increase Well-Being and Ameliorate Depressive Symptoms: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Online Study.

    PubMed

    Gander, Fabian; Proyer, René T; Ruch, Willibald

    2016-01-01

    Seligman (2002) suggested three paths to well-being, the pursuit of pleasure, the pursuit of meaning, and the pursuit of engagement, later adding two more, positive relationships and accomplishment, in his 2011 version. The contribution of these new components to well-being has yet to be addressed. In an online positive psychology intervention study, we randomly assigned 1624 adults aged 18-78 (M = 46.13; 79.2% women) to seven conditions. Participants wrote down three things they related to either one of the five components of Seligman's Well-Being theory (Conditions 1-5), all of the five components (Condition 6) or early childhood memories (placebo control condition). We assessed happiness (AHI) and depression (CES-D) before and after the intervention, and 1-, 3-, and 6 months afterwards. Additionally, we considered moderation effects of well-being levels at baseline. Results confirmed that all interventions were effective in increasing happiness and most ameliorated depressive symptoms. The interventions worked best for those in the middle-range of the well-being continuum. We conclude that interventions based on pleasure, engagement, meaning, positive relationships, and accomplishment are effective strategies for increasing well-being and ameliorating depressive symptoms and that positive psychology interventions are most effective for those people in the middle range of the well-being continuum.

  16. Positive Psychology Interventions Addressing Pleasure, Engagement, Meaning, Positive Relationships, and Accomplishment Increase Well-Being and Ameliorate Depressive Symptoms: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Online Study

    PubMed Central

    Gander, Fabian; Proyer, René T.; Ruch, Willibald

    2016-01-01

    Seligman (2002) suggested three paths to well-being, the pursuit of pleasure, the pursuit of meaning, and the pursuit of engagement, later adding two more, positive relationships and accomplishment, in his 2011 version. The contribution of these new components to well-being has yet to be addressed. In an online positive psychology intervention study, we randomly assigned 1624 adults aged 18–78 (M = 46.13; 79.2% women) to seven conditions. Participants wrote down three things they related to either one of the five components of Seligman's Well-Being theory (Conditions 1–5), all of the five components (Condition 6) or early childhood memories (placebo control condition). We assessed happiness (AHI) and depression (CES-D) before and after the intervention, and 1-, 3-, and 6 months afterwards. Additionally, we considered moderation effects of well-being levels at baseline. Results confirmed that all interventions were effective in increasing happiness and most ameliorated depressive symptoms. The interventions worked best for those in the middle-range of the well-being continuum. We conclude that interventions based on pleasure, engagement, meaning, positive relationships, and accomplishment are effective strategies for increasing well-being and ameliorating depressive symptoms and that positive psychology interventions are most effective for those people in the middle range of the well-being continuum. PMID:27242600

  17. The integration of similar clinical research data collection instruments.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Dorothy B; Frawley, Sandra J; Shifman, Mark A; Miller, Perry L; Brandt, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    We devised an algorithm for integrating similar clinical research data collection instruments to create a common measurement instrument. We tested this algorithm using questions from several similar surveys. We encountered differing levels of granularity among questions and responses across surveys resulting in either the loss of granularity or data. This algorithm may make survey integration more systematic and efficient.

  18. Sample selection in foreign similarity regions for multicrop experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, J. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The selection of sample segments in the U.S. foreign similarity regions for development of proportion estimation procedures and error modeling for Argentina, Australia, Brazil, and USSR in AgRISTARS is described. Each sample was chosen to be similar in crop mix to the corresponding indicator region sample. Data sets, methods of selection, and resulting samples are discussed.

  19. Streamline similarity analysis using bag-of-features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifei; Wang, Chaoli; Shene, Ching-Kuang

    2013-12-01

    Streamline similarity comparison has become an active research topic recently. We present a novel streamline similarity comparison method inspired by the bag-of-features idea from computer vision. Our approach computes a feature vector, spatially sensitive bag-of-features, for each streamline as its signature. This feature vector not only encodes the statistical distribution of combined features (e.g., curvature and torsion), it also contains the information on the spatial relationship among different features. This allows us to measure the similarity between two streamlines in an efficient and accurate way: the similarity between two streamlines is defined as the weighted Manhattan distance between their feature vectors. Compared with previous distribution based streamline similarity metrics, our method is easier to understand and implement, yet producing even better results. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by considering two common tasks in flow field exploration: streamline similarity query and streamline clustering.

  20. Perceptual similarity of regional dialects of American English

    PubMed Central

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Levi, Susannah V.; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on the perception of dialect variation has measured the perceptual similarity of talkers based on regional dialect using only indirect methods. In the present study, a paired comparison similarity ratings task was used to obtain direct measures of perceptual similarity. Naive listeners were asked to make explicit judgments about the similarity of a set of talkers based on regional dialect. The talkers represented four regional varieties of American English and both genders. Results revealed an additive effect of gender and dialect on mean similarity ratings and two primary dimensions of perceptual dialect similarity: geography (northern versus southern varieties) and dialect markedness (many versus few characteristic properties). The present findings are consistent with earlier research on the perception of dialect variation, as well as recent speech perception studies which demonstrate the integral role of talker gender in speech perception. PMID:16454310

  1. DDE Transposases: Structural Similarity and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Nesmelova, Irina V.; Hackett, Perry B.

    2010-01-01

    DNA transposons are mobile DNA elements that can move from one DNA molecule to another and thereby deliver genetic information into human chromosomes in order to confer a new function or replace a defective gene. This process requires a transposase enzyme. During transposition DD[E/D]-transposases undergo a series of conformational changes. We summarize the structural features of DD[E/D]-transposases for which three-dimensional structures are available and that relate to transposases, which are being developed for use in mammalian cells. Similar to other members of the polynucleotidyl transferase family, the catalytic domains of DD[E/D]-transposases share a common feature: an RNase H-like fold that draws three catalytically active residues, the DDE motif, into close proximity. Beyond this fold, the structures of catalytic domains vary considerably, and the DD[E/D]-transposases display marked structural diversity within their DNA-binding domains. Yet despite such structural variability, essentially the same end result is achieved. PMID:20615441

  2. Similarity and discrimination learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Noguera, M; Grau, M; Peris, J M; Barbería, I; Chamizo, V D

    2008-10-01

    In an experiment involving a new behavioural preparation the role played by similarity in discrimination learning was examined using visual patterns (i.e., paintings) that might share common elements (specifically, A, BC, and ABC). A-C were small stars of three specific colours (target colours), which were intermixed with other stars of two different colours (distracting colours). The target colours were balanced through A-C. Students received discrimination training in which a fictitious painter was the author of paintings A and BC, while paintings ABC were assigned to a second fictitious painter. During training, the students had to make a choice, in the presence of each pattern, between two response keys, each of them indicating one of the painters. The time taken to respond was also measured. Feedback was always given after each key-press. The results showed that while at times the A+ ABC- discrimination was acquired more readily than was the BC+ ABC- discrimination, on other occasions the reverse was also true, the critical factor being the way in which the colours were combined.

  3. Exploring similarities among many species distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmerman, Scott; Wang, Jingyuan; Osborne, James; Shook, Kimberly; Huang, Jian; Godsoe, William; Simons, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    Collecting species presence data and then building models to predict species distribution has been long practiced in the field of ecology for the purpose of improving our understanding of species relationships with each other and with the environment. Due to limitations of computing power as well as limited means of using modeling software on HPC facilities, past species distribution studies have been unable to fully explore diverse data sets. We build a system that can, for the first time to our knowledge, leverage HPC to support effective exploration of species similarities in distribution as well as their dependencies on common environmental conditions. Our system can also compute and reveal uncertainties in the modeling results enabling domain experts to make informed judgments about the data. Our work was motivated by and centered around data collection efforts within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park that date back to the 1940s. Our findings present new research opportunities in ecology and produce actionable field-work items for biodiversity management personnel to include in their planning of daily management activities.

  4. Fracking in Tight Shales: What Is It, What Does It Accomplish, and What Are Its Consequences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, J. Quinn; Turcotte, Donald L.; Moores, Eldridge M.; Brodsky, Emily E.; Rundle, John B.

    2016-06-01

    Fracking is a popular term referring to hydraulic fracturing when it is used to extract hydrocarbons. We distinguish between low-volume traditional fracking and the high-volume modern fracking used to recover large volumes of hydrocarbons from shales. Shales are fine-grained rocks with low granular permeabilities. During the formation of oil and gas, large fluid pressures are generated. These pressures result in natural fracking, and the resulting fracture permeability allows oil and gas to escape, reducing the fluid pressures. These fractures may subsequently be sealed by mineral deposition, resulting in tight shale formations. The objective of modern fracking is to reopen these fractures and/or create new fractures on a wide range of scales. Modern fracking has had a major impact on the availability of oil and gas globally; however, there are serious environmental objections to modern fracking, which should be weighed carefully against its benefits.

  5. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mollgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H.; Lehmann, Sune; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals a transition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively low weight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest links. We finally analyze the overlap between layers in the network for different levels of acquaintanceships. PMID:27300084

  6. Ignore Similarity If You Can: A Computational Exploration of Exemplar Similarity Effects on Rule Application

    PubMed Central

    Brumby, Duncan P.; Hahn, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    It is generally assumed that when making categorization judgments the cognitive system learns to focus on stimuli features that are relevant for making an accurate judgment. This is a key feature of hybrid categorization systems, which selectively weight the use of exemplar- and rule-based processes. In contrast, Hahn et al. (2010) have shown that people cannot help but pay attention to exemplar similarity, even when doing so leads to classification errors. This paper tests, through a series of computer simulations, whether a hybrid categorization model developed in the ACT-R cognitive architecture (by Anderson and Betz, 2001) can account for the Hahn et al. dataset. This model implements Nosofsky and Palmeri’s (1997) exemplar-based random walk model as its exemplar route, and combines it with an implementation of Nosofsky et al. (1994) rule-based model RULEX. A thorough search of the model’s parameter space showed that while the presence of an exemplar-similarity effect on response times was associated with classification errors it was possible to fit both measures to the observed data for an unsupervised version of the task (i.e., in which no feedback on accuracy was given). Difficulties arose when the model was applied to a supervised version of the task in which explicit feedback on accuracy was given. Modeling results show that the exemplar-similarity effect is diminished by feedback as the model learns to avoid the error-prone exemplar-route, taking instead the accurate rule-route. In contrast to the model, Hahn et al. found that people continue to exhibit robust exemplar-similarity effects even when given feedback. This work highlights a challenge for understanding how and why people combine rules and exemplars when making categorization decisions. PMID:28377739

  7. History and Accomplishments of USDA-ARS Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-Agricultural Research Service Avian Disease and Oncology Laboratory (ADOL) in East Lansing, Michigan, formerly known as Regional Poultry Research Laboratory, was dedicated on August 8, 1939. Its establishment was the result of joint efforts by the Agricultural Experiment Stations of the Nor...

  8. Structures and Dynamics Division: Research and technology plans for FY 1983 and accomplishments for FY 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives, expected results, approach, and milestones for research projects of the IPAD Project Office and the impact dynamics, structural mechanics, and structural dynamics branches of the Structures and Dynamics Division are presented. Research facilities are described. Topics covered include computer aided design; general aviation/transport crash dynamics; aircraft ground performance; composite structures; failure analysis, space vehicle dynamics; and large space structures.

  9. Standards of Professional Practice for Accomplished Teaching in Australian Classrooms. A National Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Coll. of Education, Curtin.

    This discussion paper provides a rationale for the development of professional teaching standards in Australia. It is the result of a 2000 national forum on professional teaching standards held in Melbourne, Australia, which included 150 educators who explored contemporary issues associated with such standards and constructed a framework for…

  10. Humans and Insects Decide in Similar Ways

    PubMed Central

    Louâpre, Philippe; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral ecologists assume that animals use a motivational mechanism for decisions such as action selection and time allocation, allowing the maximization of their fitness. They consider both the proximate and ultimate causes of behavior in order to understand this type of decision-making in animals. Experimental psychologists and neuroeconomists also study how agents make decisions but they consider the proximate causes of the behavior. In the case of patch-leaving, motivation-based decision-making remains simple speculation. In contrast to other animals, human beings can assess and evaluate their own motivation by an introspection process. It is then possible to study the declared motivation of humans during decision-making and discuss the mechanism used as well as its evolutionary significance. In this study, we combine both the proximate and ultimate causes of behavior for a better understanding of the human decision-making process. We show for the first time ever that human subjects use a motivational mechanism similar to small insects such as parasitoids [1] and bumblebees [2] to decide when to leave a patch. This result is relevant for behavioral ecologists as it supports the biological realism of this mechanism. Humans seem to use a motivational mechanism of decision making known to be adaptive to a heterogeneously distributed resource. As hypothesized by Hutchinson et al. [3] and Wilke and Todd [4], our results are consistent with the evolutionary shaping of decision making because hominoids were hunters and gatherers on food patches for more than two million years. We discuss the plausibility of a neural basis for the motivation mechanism highlighted here, bridging the gap between behavioral ecology and neuroeconomy. Thus, both the motivational mechanism observed here and the neuroeconomy findings are most likely adaptations that were selected for during ancestral times. PMID:21170378

  11. Initial eye movements during face identification are optimal and similar across cultures

    PubMed Central

    Or, Charles C.-F.; Peterson, Matthew F.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2015-01-01

    Culture influences not only human high-level cognitive processes but also low-level perceptual operations. Some perceptual operations, such as initial eye movements to faces, are critical for extraction of information supporting evolutionarily important tasks such as face identification. The extent of cultural effects on these crucial perceptual processes is unknown. Here, we report that the first gaze location for face identification was similar across East Asian and Western Caucasian cultural groups: Both fixated a featureless point between the eyes and the nose, with smaller between-group than within-group differences and with a small horizontal difference across cultures (8% of the interocular distance). We also show that individuals of both cultural groups initially fixated at a slightly higher point on Asian faces than on Caucasian faces. The initial fixations were found to be both fundamental in acquiring the majority of information for face identification and optimal, as accuracy deteriorated when observers held their gaze away from their preferred fixations. An ideal observer that integrated facial information with the human visual system's varying spatial resolution across the visual field showed a similar information distribution across faces of both races and predicted initial human fixations. The model consistently replicated the small vertical difference between human fixations to Asian and Caucasian faces but did not predict the small horizontal leftward bias of Caucasian observers. Together, the results suggest that initial eye movements during face identification may be driven by brain mechanisms aimed at maximizing accuracy, and less influenced by culture. The findings increase our understanding of the interplay between the brain's aims to optimally accomplish basic perceptual functions and to respond to sociocultural influences. PMID:26382003

  12. Accomplishing American Strategic Goals in the Middle East through Persistent Special Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Indonesia in the early 1970s and spread throughout Malaysia , the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, as well as Australia and Pakistan. 77 JI founders...through Southeast Asia and Afghanistan. Fleeing imprisonment by the Indonesian government, Ba‘asyir and Sungkar travelled to Malaysia in 1985; they...disrepair, and that the AFP lacked adequate security and basic infantry skills, and some operational failures were the result of corruption in AFP ranks

  13. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980–2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories. PMID:27137462

  14. Similarities between catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M; Qato, M; Whalen, R; Glomb, S

    1989-01-01

    Cytosolic epoxide hydrolase, measured as trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase activity, was isolated and purified from human and guinea pig liver cytosol. Antiserum to the guinea pig liver preparation reacted strongly with bovine liver catalase. We determined that this lack of selectivity of the antiserum was due to catalase contamination of the epoxide hydrolase preparation. We also determined that several commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with cytosolic epoxide hydrolase. Our human epoxide hydrolase preparation contained no detectable catalase contamination, yet antiserum to this protein also cross-reacted slightly with catalase, indicating some intrinsic similarity between the two enzymes. We conclude that catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase contain some similar immunogenic epitopes, and we surmise that similarities between the subunits of these two enzymes may lead to their partial copurification. Functional similarities between the two enzymes are also demonstrated, as several compounds that inhibit catalase are also shown to inhibit cytosolic epoxide hydrolase activity in the same concentration range and rank order.

  15. Evaluating Similarity Measures for Brain Image Registration.

    PubMed

    Razlighi, Q R; Kehtarnavaz, N; Yousefi, S

    2013-10-01

    Evaluation of similarity measures for image registration is a challenging problem due to its complex interaction with the underlying optimization, regularization, image type and modality. We propose a single performance metric, named robustness, as part of a new evaluation method which quantifies the effectiveness of similarity measures for brain image registration while eliminating the effects of the other parts of the registration process. We show empirically that similarity measures with higher robustness are more effective in registering degraded images and are also more successful in performing intermodal image registration. Further, we introduce a new similarity measure, called normalized spatial mutual information, for 3D brain image registration whose robustness is shown to be much higher than the existing ones. Consequently, it tolerates greater image degradation and provides more consistent outcomes for intermodal brain image registration.

  16. Self-similarity in Laplacian growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark; Zabrodin, Anton; Abanov, Artem

    2008-01-01

    We consider Laplacian Growth of self-similar domains in different geometries. Self-similarity determines the analytic structure of the Schwarz function of the moving boundary. The knowledge of this analytic structure allows us to derive the integral equation for the conformal map. It is shown that solutions to the integral equation obey also a second-order differential equation which is the 1D Schroedinger equation with the sinh{sup -2}-potential. The solutions, which are expressed through the Gauss hypergeometric function, characterize the geometry of self-similar patterns in a wedge. We also find the potential for the Coulomb gas representation of the self-similar Laplacian growth in a wedge and calculate the corresponding free energy.

  17. Heat transfer in geometrically similar cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riekert, P; Held, A

    1941-01-01

    The power and heat-stress conditions of geometrically similar engines are discussed. The advantages accruing from smaller cylinder dimensions are higher specific horsepower, lower weight per horsepower, lower piston temperature, and less frontal area, with reduced detonation tendency.

  18. Self-similarity in active colloid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, Colin; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    The self-similarity of displacements among randomly evolving systems has been used to describe the foraging patterns of animals and predict the growth of financial systems. At micron scales, the motion of colloidal particles can be analyzed by sampling their spatial displacement in time. For self-similar systems in equilibrium, the mean squared displacement increases linearly in time. However, external forces can take the system out of equilibrium, creating active colloidal systems, and making this evolution more complex. A moment scaling spectrum of the distribution of particle displacements quantifies the degree of self-similarity in the colloid motion. We will demonstrate that, by varying the temporal and spatial characteristics of the external forces, one can control the degree of self-similarity in active colloid motion.

  19. HYPOTHESIS TESTING WITH THE SIMILARITY INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mulltilocus DNA fingerprinting methods have been used extensively to address genetic issues in wildlife populations. Hypotheses concerning population subdivision and differing levels of diversity can be addressed through the use of the similarity index (S), a band-sharing coeffic...

  20. Privacy-preserving matching of similar patients.

    PubMed

    Vatsalan, Dinusha; Christen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The identification of similar entities represented by records in different databases has drawn considerable attention in many application areas, including in the health domain. One important type of entity matching application that is vital for quality healthcare analytics is the identification of similar patients, known as similar patient matching. A key component of identifying similar records is the calculation of similarity of the values in attributes (fields) between these records. Due to increasing privacy and confidentiality concerns, using the actual attribute values of patient records to identify similar records across different organizations is becoming non-trivial because the attributes in such records often contain highly sensitive information such as personal and medical details of patients. Therefore, the matching needs to be based on masked (encoded) values while being effective and efficient to allow matching of large databases. Bloom filter encoding has widely been used as an efficient masking technique for privacy-preserving matching of string and categorical values. However, no work on Bloom filter-based masking of numerical data, such as integer (e.g. age), floating point (e.g. body mass index), and modulus (numbers wrap around upon reaching a certain value, e.g. date and time), which are commonly required in the health domain, has been presented in the literature. We propose a framework with novel methods for masking numerical data using Bloom filters, thereby facilitating the calculation of similarities between records. We conduct an empirical study on publicly available real-world datasets which shows that our framework provides efficient masking and achieves similar matching accuracy compared to the matching of actual unencoded patient records.

  1. On distributional assumptions and whitened cosine similarities.

    PubMed

    Loog, Marco

    2008-06-01

    Recently, an interpretation of the whitened cosine similarity measure as a Bayes decision rule was proposed (C. Liu, "The Bayes Decision Rule Induced Similarity Measures,'' IEEE Trans. Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 29, no. 6, pp. 1086-1090, June 2007. This communication makes the observation that some of the distributional assumptions made to derive this measure are very restrictive and, considered simultaneously, even inconsistent.

  2. Interlinguistic similarity and language death dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mira, J.; Paredes, Á.

    2005-03-01

    We analyze the time evolution of a system of two coexisting languages (Castillian Spanish and Galician, both spoken in northwest Spain) in the framework of a model given by Abrams and Strogatz (Nature 424 (2003) 900). It is shown that, contrary to the model's initial prediction, a stable bilingual situation is possible if the languages in competition are similar enough. Similarity is described with a simple parameter, whose value can be estimated from fits of the data.

  3. Similarity searching in large combinatorial chemistry spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rarey, Matthias; Stahl, Martin

    2001-06-01

    We present a novel algorithm, called Ftrees-FS, for similarity searching in large chemistry spaces based on dynamic programming. Given a query compound, the algorithm generates sets of compounds from a given chemistry space that are similar to the query. The similarity search is based on the feature tree similarity measure representing molecules by tree structures. This descriptor allows handling combinatorial chemistry spaces as a whole instead of looking at subsets of enumerated compounds. Within few minutes of computing time, the algorithm is able to find the most similar compound in very large spaces as well as sets of compounds at an arbitrary similarity level. In addition, the diversity among the generated compounds can be controlled. A set of 17 000 fragments of known drugs, generated by the RECAP procedure from the World Drug Index, was used as the search chemistry space. These fragments can be combined to more than 1018 compounds of reasonable size. For validation, known antagonists/inhibitors of several targets including dopamine D4, histamine H1, and COX2 are used as queries. Comparison of the compounds created by Ftrees-FS to other known actives demonstrates the ability of the method to jump between structurally unrelated molecule classes.

  4. Distorting limb design for dynamically similar locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    Bullimore, Sharon R.; Burn, Jeremy F.

    2004-01-01

    Terrestrial mammals of different sizes tend to move in a dynamically similar manner when travelling at speeds corresponding to equal values of the Froude number. This means that certain dimensionless locomotor parameters, including peak vertical ground reaction force relative to body weight, stride length relative to leg length and duty factor, are independent of animal size. The Froude number is consequently used to define equivalent speeds for mammals of different sizes. However, most musculoskeletal-tissue properties, including tendon elastic modulus, do not scale in a dynamically similar manner. Therefore, mammals could not be completely dynamically similar, even if perfectly geometrically similar. We argue that, for mammals to move in a dynamically similar manner, they must exhibit systematic 'distortions' of limb structure with size that compensate for the size independence of the tendon elastic modulus. An implication of this is that comparing mammals at equal Froude numbers cannot remove all size-dependent effects. We show that the previously published allometry of limb moment arms is sufficient to compensate for size-independent tendon properties. This suggests that it is an important factor in allowing mammals of different sizes to move in a dynamically similar manner. PMID:15058440

  5. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and work-related accomplishment as predictors of general health and medical utilization among Special Operations Forces personnel.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Craig J; Stephenson, James A; Morrow, Chad E; Staal, Mark; Haskell, Jeremy

    2014-02-01

    Research has established clear links among posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), somatic symptoms, and general health among conventional force military personnel. It is possible that the same relationships exist among Special Operations Force (SOF) personnel, but there are very few, if any, studies that examine these relationships. This study investigated correlates of general health and medical visits among SOF personnel and found that the interaction of somatic and PTSD symptoms was associated with worse health and more frequent medical visits. Follow-up analyses indicated that the interaction of avoidance symptoms with somatic symptoms was significantly associated with worse health, whereas the interaction of emotional numbing with somatic symptoms significantly contributed to increased medical visits. In addition, the results suggest that a sense of accomplishment among SOF personnel may serve as a protective factor against poor health. The results suggest developing interactions among SOF personnel that promote a sense of achievement to ultimately improve the health of the force.

  6. Can genetic engineering of lignin deposition be accomplished without an unacceptable yield penalty?

    PubMed

    Bonawitz, Nicholas D; Chapple, Clint

    2013-04-01

    The secondary cell wall polymer lignin impedes the extraction of fermentable sugars from biomass, and has been one of the major impediments in the development of cost-effective biofuel technologies. Unfortunately, attempts to genetically engineer lignin biosynthesis frequently result in dwarfing or developmental abnormalities of unknown cause, thus limiting the benefits of increased fermentable sugar yield. In this brief review, we explore some of the possible mechanisms that could underlie this poorly understood phenomenon, with the expectation that an understanding of the cause of dwarfing in lignin biosynthetic mutants and transgenic plants could lead to new strategies for the development of improved bioenergy feedstocks.

  7. Perceptual similarity affects the learning curve (but not necessarily learning).

    PubMed

    Wifall, Tim; McMurray, Bob; Hazeltine, Eliot

    2014-02-01

    What role does item similarity play in motor skill acquisition? To examine this question, we used a modified version of the chord learning task (Seibel, 1963) that entails producing simultaneous finger key presses, similar to playing a chord on a piano. In Experiment 1, difficulty, as indexed by response time (RT) to a particular chord on the first session, was held constant, and chords that were similar to other chords had longer RTs after practice than dissimilar chords. In Experiment 2, we used chords that produced different initial RTs to show that similarity affected asymptotic RT rather than the size of RT decrement achieved with practice. In Experiment 3, we eliminated differences in perceptual similarity by using Chinese characters for stimuli while retaining differences in motoric similarity, which resulted in nearly identical asymptotes for similar and dissimilar chords. Thus, the density effect observed in Experiments 1 and 2 appears to stem from competition triggered by similar stimuli. Because performance differences were immediately re-established when stimulus similarity was introduced in Experiment 3 during transfer sessions, competition appears to emerge among learned, central representations that can be coactivated by multiple stimuli.

  8. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishment, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. R.; Phelps, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) represents the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) ever flown and the only human-rated solid motor. High reliability of the RSRM has been the result of challenges addressed and lessons learned. Advancements have resulted by applying attention to process control, testing, and postflight through timely and thorough communication in dealing with all issues. A structured and disciplined approach was taken to identify and disposition all concerns. Careful consideration and application of alternate opinions was embraced. Focus was placed on process control, ground test programs, and postflight assessment. Process control is mandatory for an SRM, because an acceptance test of the delivered product is not feasible. The RSRM maintained both full-scale and subscale test articles, which enabled continuous improvement of design and evaluation of process control and material behavior. Additionally RSRM reliability was achieved through attention to detail in post flight assessment to observe any shift in performance. The postflight analysis and inspections provided invaluable reliability data as it enables observation of actual flight performance, most of which would not be available if the motors were not recovered. RSRM reusability offered unique opportunities to learn about the hardware. NASA is moving forward with the Space Launch System that incorporates propulsion systems that takes advantage of the heritage Shuttle and Ares solid motor programs. These unique challenges, features of the RSRM, materials and manufacturing issues, and design improvements will be discussed in the paper.

  9. Aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel investigations using the active flexible wing model - Status and recent accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Perry, Boyd, III; Tiffany, Sherwood; Cole, Stanley; Buttrill, Carey; Adams, William, Jr.; Houck, Jacob; Srinathkumar, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the joint NASA/Rockwell Active Flexible Wing Wind-Tunnel Test Program. The objectives of the program are to develop and validate the analysis, design and test methodologies required to apply multifunction active control technology for improving aircraft performance and stability. Major tasks of the program include designing digital multiinput/multioutput flutter-suppression and rolling-maneuver-load-alleviation concepts for a flexible full-span wind-tunnel model, obtaining an experimental data base for the basic model and each control concept, and providing comparisons between experimental and analytical results to validate the methodologies. This program is also providing the opportunity to improve real-time simulation techniques and to gain practical experience with digital control law implementation procedures.

  10. Great Lakes restoration success through science: U.S. Geological Survey accomplishments 2010 through 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Tracking progress and working with partners. As of August 2013, the GLRI had funded more than 1,500 projects and programs of the highest priority to meet immediate cleanup, restoration, and protection needs. These projects use scientific analyses as the basis for identifying the restoration needs and priorities for the GLRI. Results from the science, monitoring, and other on-the-ground actions by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provide the scientific information needed to help guide the Great Lakes restoration efforts. This document highlights a selection of USGS projects for each of the five focus areas through 2013, demonstrating the importance of science for restoration success. Additional information for these and other USGS projects that are important for Great Lakes restoration is available at http://cida.usgs.gov/glri/glri-catalog/.

  11. Accomplishments of the American-Polish program for elimination of low emissions in Krakow

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.; Pierce, B.

    1998-12-31

    Since 1990 the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been involved in a program aimed at reducing air pollution caused by small, coal-fired sources in Poland. The activity is focused on the city of Cracow, Poland with the intention that results will be applicable and extendable to the entire region. The effort under this program has been focused into 5 main areas of interest as follows: (1) energy conservation and extension of central station district heating; (2) replacement of coal- and coke-fired boilers with natural gas-fired boilers; (3) replacement of coal-fired home stoves with electric heating appliances; (4) reduction of emissions from stoker-fired boiler houses; and (5) reduction of emissions from coal-fired home heating stoves.

  12. NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Projects Propulsion Technology Phase I Overview and Highlights of Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Delaat, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project is focused on developing and demonstrating integrated systems technologies to TRL 4-6 by 2020 that enable reduced fuel burn, emissions, and noise for futuristic air vehicles. The specific goals aim to simultaneously reduce fuel burn by 50%, reduce Landing and Take-off Nitrous Oxides emissions by 75% relative to the CAEP 6 guidelines, and reduce cumulative noise by 42 Decibels relative to the Stage 4 guidelines. These goals apply to the integrated vehicle and propulsion system and are based on a reference mission of 3000nm flight of a Boeing 777-200 with GE90 engines. This paper will focus primarily on the ERA propulsion technology portfolio, which consists of advanced combustion, propulsor, and core technologies to enable these integrated air vehicle systems goals. An overview of the ERA propulsion technologies will be described and highlights of the results obtained during the first phase of ERA will be presented.

  13. Science Accomplishments from a Decade of Aura OMI/MLS Tropospheric Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Jerald R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Joiner, Joanna; Duncan, Bryan N.; Olsen, Mark A.; Oman, Luke D.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Liu, X.; Wargan, K.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Strahan, Susan E.; Pawson, Steven; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Newman, Paul A.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Cooper, Owen R.; Haffner, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of tropospheric ozone from combined Aura OMI and MLS instruments have yielded a large number of new and important science discoveries over the last decade. These discoveries have generated a much greater understanding of biomass burning, lightning NO, and stratosphere-troposphere exchange sources of tropospheric ozone, ENSO dynamics and photochemistry, intra-seasonal variability-Madden-Julian Oscillation including convective transport, radiative forcing, measuring ozone pollution from space, improvements to ozone retrieval algorithms, and evaluation of chemical-transport and chemistry-climate models. The OMI-MLS measurements have been instrumental in giving us better understanding of the dynamics and chemistry involving tropospheric ozone and the many drivers affecting the troposphere in general. This discussion will provide an overview focusing on our main science results.

  14. Aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel investigations using the Active Flexible Wing Model: Status and recent accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Perry, Boyd, III; Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Cole, Stanley R.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Adams, William M., Jr.; Houck, Jacob A.; Srinathkumar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1989-01-01

    The status of the joint NASA/Rockwell Active Flexible Wing Wind-Tunnel Test Program is described. The objectives are to develop and validate the analysis, design, and test methodologies required to apply multifunction active control technology for improving aircraft performance and stability. Major tasks include designing digital multi-input/multi-output flutter-suppression and rolling-maneuver-load alleviation concepts for a flexible full-span wind-tunnel model, obtaining an experimental data base for the basic model and each control concept and providing comparisons between experimental and analytical results to validate the methodologies. The opportunity is provided to improve real-time simulation techniques and to gain practical experience with digital control law implementation procedures.

  15. Highlights of Project Accomplishments (2000-2004): Redshift Dependence of the Interaction-Activity Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borne, Kirk D.

    2004-01-01

    We completed this project by developing the new galaxy-galaxy collision simulation code that we originally proposed. We included star formation heuristically, along with gas recycling and energetic feedback into the interstellar medium of the galaxies. We ran several test simulations. And we finally validated the code by running models to emulate the double-ring galaxy AM 0644-741. Most of the exotic and unique features of this collisional ring galaxy were matched by our models, thereby validating our algorithm, which may now be used by us and by the community for additional dynamic studies of galaxies. A paper has been submitted to the Astrophysical Journal describing our algorithm and the results of the AM 0644-741 modeling.

  16. [Stellar Occultation Studies of Small Bodies in the Outer Solar System: Accomplishments, Status, and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, James

    2005-01-01

    Bodies residing in the outer solar system exhibit unique physical processes, and some of the lessons learned from them can be applied to understanding what occurred in the outer solar system during its formation and early evolution. Pluto, the largest known Kuiper Belt object (KBO), and its near twin Triton--an ex-KBO that has been captured by Neptune--have nitrogen atmospheres that are in vapor-pressure equilibrium with surface ice. These atmospheres are most sensitively probed from Earth by the technique of Stellar occultations, which can provide the temperature and pressure profiles of these atmospheres at a spatial resolution of a few kilometers. Recent results from occultations show that the surface pressure of Triton's atmosphere has been increasing and that the shape of the atmosphere deviates from its expected spherical figure. With the occultation technique we can also learn the sizes of smaller bodies that have formed in the outer solar system: Charon, the Centaurs, and KBOs. Our proposed program involves identifying occultation candidates, predicting occultations, observing occultations, analysis of the data, and synthesis of the occultation results with other data. The main goals for our proposed work are to (i) further observe occultations by Triton with the objectives of understanding its pressure changes, distortion, and enigmatic thermal structure (ii) determine whether the abrupt drop in Pluto's stellar occultation light curve is caused by a sharp thermal gradient near its surface or by atmospheric haze, (iii) further observations to characterize the potential collapse of Pluto's atmosphere as it recedes from the sun (information that should be of interest to the Pluto-Kuiper Express), ( iv ) determine Charon's radius more accurately than can be done with the mutual events to derive a better estimate of Charon's density, and ( v ) directly determine the size (and albedo) of Centaurs with the goal of more accurately estimating the sizes of KBOS.

  17. Similarities between cysteinesulphinate transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Recasens, M; Mandel, P

    1979-01-01

    A method for the purification of two cysteinesulphinate transaminases, A and B (EC 2.6.1), is described. These enzymes catalyse the conversion of cysteinesulphinic acid to beta-sulphinyl pyruvate. The final preparations are homogeneous by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectrofocusing. The molecular weight of the subunits is 41 000 for cysteinesulphinate transaminase A and 43 400 for B. Both enzymes are unspecific, as L-asparate, L-glutamate and L-cysteic acid serve as substrates in addition to L-cysteinesulphinic acid. Cysteinesulphinate transaminase A has a Km of 9.8 mM for cysteinesulphinic acid and 0.25 mM for aspartic acid, whereas the B enzyme has a Km of 6.5 mM for cysteinesulphinic acid and 1.4 mM for aspartic acid. The Vmax values of the A and B enzymes are respectively 7.1 and 6.2 mmol h-1 mg-1 protein for aspartic acid and 45 and 9.3 mmol h-1 mg-1 protein for cysteinesulphinic acid. Both enzymes exhibit maximum activity at pH 8.6. A high specific activity is found in optimal conditions for these two transaminases, the pI values being 9.06 and 5.70 for cysteinesulphinate transaminase A and B respectively. These results have been compared with those already obtained for purified aspartate aminotransferase. Similarities in the pathways of taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism are discussed.

  18. Improving structural similarity based virtual screening using background knowledge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Virtual screening in the form of similarity rankings is often applied in the early drug discovery process to rank and prioritize compounds from a database. This similarity ranking can be achieved with structural similarity measures. However, their general nature can lead to insufficient performance in some application cases. In this paper, we provide a link between ranking-based virtual screening and fragment-based data mining methods. The inclusion of binding-relevant background knowledge into a structural similarity measure improves the quality of the similarity rankings. This background knowledge in the form of binding relevant substructures can either be derived by hand selection or by automated fragment-based data mining methods. Results In virtual screening experiments we show that our approach clearly improves enrichment factors with both applied variants of our approach: the extension of the structural similarity measure with background knowledge in the form of a hand-selected relevant substructure or the extension of the similarity measure with background knowledge derived with data mining methods. Conclusion Our study shows that adding binding relevant background knowledge can lead to significantly improved similarity rankings in virtual screening and that even basic data mining approaches can lead to competitive results making hand-selection of the background knowledge less crucial. This is especially important in drug discovery and development projects where no receptor structure is available or more frequently no verified binding mode is known and mostly ligand based approaches can be applied to generate hit compounds. PMID:24341870

  19. Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE): Overview, Accomplishments and Future Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Pippin, Gary; Jenkins, Philip P.; Walters, Robert J.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Palusinski, Iwona; Lorentzen, Justin R.

    2014-01-01

    8, yielding long-duration space environmental performance and durability data that enable material validation, processing recertification and space qualification; improved predictions of materials and component lifetimes in space; model verification and development; and correlation factors between space-exposure and ground-facilities enabling more accurate in-space performance predictions based on ground-laboratory testing. A few of the many experiment results and observations, and their impacts, are provided. Those highlighted include examples on improved understanding of atomic oxygen scattering mechanisms, LEO coating durability results, and polymer erosion yields and their impacts on spacecraft design. The MISSE 2 Atomic Oxygen Scattering Chamber Experiment discovered that the peak flux of scattered AO was determined to be 45 deg from normal incidence, not the model predicted cosine dependence. In addition, the erosion yield (E(sub y)) of Kapton H for AO scattered off oxidized-Al is 22% of the E(sub y) of direct AO impingement. These results were used to help determine the degradation mechanism of a cesium iodide detector within the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph Experiment. The MISSE 6 Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) Degradation Experiment measured surface electrical resistance of ram and wake ITO coated samples. The data confirmed that ITO is a stable AO protective coating, and the results validated the durability of ITO conductive coatings for solar arrays for the Atmosphere-Space Transition 2 Explorer program. The MISSE 2, 6 and 7 Polymer Experiments have provided LEO AO Ey data on over 120 polymer and composites samples. The flight E(sub y) values were found to range from 3.05 x 10(exp -26) cu cm/atom for the AO resistant polymer CORIN to 9.14 x 10(exp -26) cu cm/atom for polyoxymethylene (POM). In addition, flying the same polymers on different missions has advanced the understanding of the AO E(sub y) dependency on solar exposure for polymers

  20. An Examination of Rebuild America Partnership Accomplishments and the Factors Influencing Them

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.

    2003-10-16

    The Rebuild America program was established in 1994 to accelerate the adoption of energy efficiency measures and practices in existing public facilities, commercial buildings, and multifamily housing units. More recently, the program has expanded to include new construction as well. The program encourages the formation of partnerships involving state and local governments, private businesses, and other organizations to help identify and solve problems related to energy use in buildings. Rebuild America does not directly fund actual building improvements. Instead, it provides the Rebuild Partners with the technical tools and assistance they need to plan and implement building projects and stimulates other entities to make substantial investments in energy efficiency. At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory studied the Rebuild America program for the purpose of identifying key factors associated with successful operations. Substantial amounts of data were collected directly from Rebuild America partnerships concerning the results achieved by each of their individual projects, both committed and completed. In addition, data were collected from secondary sources on a limited number of factors describing partnership setting and characteristics. By combining these two data sets, we were able to perform statistical analyses testing the potential relationship between each partnership characteristic and each of four key results measures. The influences on successful partnership performance also were determined in another way, which allowed a broader examination of potentially important factors. Telephone interviews were conducted with representatives from 61 high-performing Rebuild America partnerships throughout the United States. The respondents were asked to identify the most important factors influencing good performance and the types of Rebuild America products, services