Science.gov

Sample records for accomplishing expanded civilian

  1. Winds of Change: Expanding the Frontiers of Flight. Langley Research Center's 75 Years of Accomplishment, 1917-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, James

    1992-01-01

    This commemorative volume highlights in pictures and text seventy five years of accomplishments of the Langley Research Center. The introductory matter features wind tunnels and their contribution to the development of aeronautics. A chronological survey details four different periods in Langley's history. The first period, 1917-1939, is subtitled 'Perfecting the Plane' which details Langley's contribution to early aeronautics with examples from specific aircraft. The second period, 1940-1957, focuses on the development of military aircraft during and after World War II. The third period, 1958-1969, tells the story of Langley's involvement with NASA and the satellite and Apollo era. The fourth period, entitled 'Charting New Courses: 1970-1992 and Beyond', treats various new topics from aerospace planes to Mars landing, as well as older topics such as the Space Shuttle and research spinoffs.

  2. Accomplishments '70.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Center for Research and Development in Teaching.

    This annual report examines the accomplishments during 1970 of three programs. The first program was to improve the organizational and administrative environment for teaching. Its subsidiary projects were 1) the organizational context of teaching; 2) professional socialization of the teacher; 3) attitudes of teachers toward their occupation; 4)…

  3. Replacing Military Personnel in Support Positions With Civilian Employees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Employees Congressional Budget Office Washington DC United States Congressional Budget Office Washington DC United States A = Approved For Public...Civilian Employees DECEMBER 2015 CBO Notes Unless otherwise specified, all years referred to in this report are federal fiscal years, which run from...Effects of the Options? 3 Potential to Expand the Role of DoD’s Civilian Employees 3 DoD’s Policies on the Mix of Military and Civilian Personnel 4

  4. RPVs - Exploring civilian applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.; Bailey, R. O.; Nelms, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    Discussion of the civilian application possibilities for remotely piloted vehicle (RPV) systems. Following a listing of all possible desert, coastal, forest, agricultural, and urban RPV missions, a thorough examination is presented of such possible RPV aircraft applications as those of forest-fire detection and mapping. Some of the major obstacles to such civilian missions are also reviewed.

  5. Life Sciences Accomplishments 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnell, Mary Lou (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    proposals for ground-based and flight research for all programs. Areas of particular interest to NASA were defined Proposals due April 29, 1994, will be peer reviewed - externally for scientific merit. This annual NRA process is now the mechanism for recruiting both extramural and intramural investigations. As an overview of LBSAD activities in 1993, this accomplishments document covers each of the major organizational components of the Division and the accomplishments of each. The second section is a review of the Space Life Sciences Research programs Space Biology, Space Physiology and Countermeasures, Radiation Health, Environmental Health, Space Human Factors, Advanced Life Support, and Global Monitoring and Disease Prediction, The third section, Research in Space Flight, describes the substantial contributions of the Spacelab Life Sciences 2 (SLS-2) mission to life sciences research and the significant contributions of the other missions flown in 1993, along with plans for future missions. The Division has greatly expanded and given high priority to its Education and Outreach Programs, which are presented in the fourth section. The fifth and final section, Partners for Space, shows the Divisions Cooperative efforts with other national and international agencies to achieve common goals, along with the accomplishments of joint research and analysis programs.

  6. Wind Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Wind Program

    2012-05-24

    This fact sheet describes some of the accomplishments of DOE's Wind Program through its investments in technology development and market barrier reduction, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using the United States' abundant wind resources.

  7. Civilian PTSD Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapinsky, Alicia C.; Rapport, Lisa J.; Henderson, Melinda J.; Axelrod, Bradley N.

    2005-01-01

    Strong associations between civilian posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) scales and measures of general psychological distress suggest that the scales are nonspecific to PTSD. Three common PTSD scales were administered to 122 undergraduates who had experienced an emotionally salient, nontraumatic event: a college examination. Results indicated…

  8. Advanced Civilian Aeronautical Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    1996-01-01

    Paper discusses alternatives to currently deployed systems which could provide revolutionary improvements in metrics applicable to civilian aeronautics. Specific missions addressed include subsonic transports, supersonic transports and personal aircraft. These alternative systems and concepts are enabled by recent and envisaged advancements in electronics, communications, computing and Designer Fluid Mechanics in conjunction with a design approach employing extensive synergistic interactions between propulsion, aerodynamics and structures.

  9. AgSTAR Accomplishments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Showcases AgSTAR's accomplishments reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the agriculture sector. Through outreach, education, training, and other tools, AgSTAR continues to help evaluate, construct, and maintain anaerobic digesters on livestock farms.

  10. A military-civilian resource-sharing agreement.

    PubMed

    Duffy, R; Baker, A M

    1998-02-01

    A first-of-its-kind resource-sharing agreement between the US Department of Defense and a civilian hospital was undertaken with resounding success. This article discusses how Sacred Heart Medical Center, Spokane, Wash, and the 92nd Medical Group at Fairchild Air Force Base, Spokane, Wash, developed the project and accomplished the integration, which continues to benefit each organization.

  11. Civilian Human Resource Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-07

    freezes and outsourcing in Department of Defense (D0D). The lack of skills and abilities needed to replace the aging workforce and the huge gap... outsourcing , Reduction-In-Force (RIF) procedures created another gap that all but eliminated young civilian workers in DoD creating serious concerns on how...in offices that are obsolete, or employees whose work is being outsourced . Careful planning is required to assure that agencies manage the incentives

  12. Science accomplishments report.

    Treesearch

    Valerie. Rapp

    2003-01-01

    Today, as in the past, complex forces of nature intersect with communities and society. Fire, climate change, invasive species, and large-scale shifts in forest cover and use are some of the key issues society currently faces. This accomplishment report encapsulates a year’s work from our scientists. This work is often interdisciplinary, long term, geographically broad...

  13. Partners in Accomplished Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, Arlington, VA.

    This report describes Partners in Accomplished Teaching, a project of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) designed to help increase the number of teachers achieving National Board Certification. It focuses on efforts in St. Paul, Minnesota; Mississippi; North Carolina; and San Antonio, Texas. The St. Paul program is a…

  14. Military-Civilian Working Relationships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    mod comeieting andl re, ewwng the cOlleCtio fi ci nformation. Seeia comments reying fuiq the den uitmatt or any othier atpec of thr, Co. ~ of infomatin ...analyze some of the differences between civilians who have civilian supervisors and civilians who have military supervisors. Data from FY88 Biennial...and general satisfaction. A two-stage data analysis process is used. Analyses of variance are performed to focus on promising dependent variables. The

  15. The Spacelab Accomplishments Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emond, J. (Editor); Bennett, N. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Murphy, K. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    This document is a record of the Spacelab Accomplishments Forum held in March 1999. Presentations made at the Forum covered the design, engineering, utilization, and science associated with Spacelab, as well as the international associations and impact of Spacelab and its use in the design and utilization of the International Space Station. Topics included Earth observations, space science, life science, commercial uses, microgravity science, and international participation.

  16. Analysis of the Possibility of Military Applications of Civilian Remote Sensing Satellite Imagery,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-12

    With the end of the Cold War and the changing of the world order, the market for civilian remote sensing satellite imagery is taking shape and...expanding. More and more civilian remote sensing reconnaissance-grade satellite systems are going into service one after the other. Exchanges of satellite

  17. Vascular Shunts in Civilian Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Abou Ali, Adham N.; Salem, Karim M.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Bauza, Graciela; Pikoulis, Emmanuel; Chaer, Rabih A.; Avgerinos, Efthymios D.

    2017-01-01

    Experience with temporary intravascular shunts (TIVS) for vessel injury comes from the military sector and while the indications might be clear in geographically isolated and under resourced war zones, this may be an uncommon scenario in civilian trauma. Data supporting TIVS use in civilian trauma have been extrapolated from the military literature where it demonstrated improved life and limb salvage. Few non-comparative studies from the civilian literature have also revealed similar favorable outcomes. Still, TIVS placement in civilian vascular injuries is uncommon and by some debatable given the absence of clear indications for placement, the potential for TIVS-related complications, the widespread resources for immediate and definitive vascular repair, and the need for curtailing costs and optimizing resources. This article reviews the current evidence and the role of TIVS in contemporary civilian trauma management. PMID:28775985

  18. Life sciences accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    From its inception, the main charter of Life Sciences has been to define biomedical requirements for the design and development of spacecraft systems and to participate in NASA's scientific exploration of the universe. The role of the Life Sciences Division is to: (1) assure the health, well being and productivity of all individuals who fly in space; (2) study the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the universe; and (3) to utilize the space environment as a tool for research in biology and medicine. The activities, programs, and accomplishments to date in the efforts to achieve these goals are detailed and the future challenges that face the division as it moves forward from the shuttle era to a permanent manned presence in space space station's are examined.

  19. EFRC CMSNF Major Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Hurley; Todd R. Allen

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) has been to develop a first-principles-based understanding of thermal transport in the most widely used nuclear fuel, UO2, in the presence of defect microstructure associated with radiation environments. The overarching goal within this mission was to develop an experimentally validated multiscale modeling capability directed toward a predictive understanding of the impact of radiation and fission-product induced defects and microstructure on thermal transport in nuclear fuel. Implementation of the mission was accomplished by integrating the physics of thermal transport in crystalline solids with microstructure science under irradiation through multi institutional experimental and computational materials theory teams from Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Purdue University, the University of Florida, the University of Wisconsin, and the Colorado School of Mines. The Center’s research focused on five major areas: (i) The fundamental aspects of anharmonicity in UO2 crystals and its impact on thermal transport; (ii) The effects of radiation microstructure on thermal transport in UO2; (iii) The mechanisms of defect clustering in UO2 under irradiation; (iv) The effect of temperature and oxygen environment on the stoichiometry of UO2; and (v) The mechanisms of growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation. The Center has made important progress in each of these areas, as summarized below.

  20. [Civilian-military coordination].

    PubMed

    de Montravel, G

    2002-01-01

    Current humanitarian emergencies create complex, mutidimensional situations that stimulate simultaneous responses from a wide variety of sources including governments, non-governmental organizations (NGO), United Nations agencies, and private individuals. As a result, it has become essential to establish a coherent framework in which each actor can contribute promptly and effectively to the overall effort. This is the role of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Regardless of the circumstances and level of coordination, cooperation and collaboration between humanitarian and military personnel, it is necessary to bear in mind their objectives. The purpose of humanitarian action is to reduce human suffering. The purpose of military intervention is to stop warfare. The author of this article will discuss the three major obstacles to civilian-military coordination (strategic, tactical, and operational). Operations cannot be conducted smoothly and differences cannot be ironed out without mutual respect between the two parties, an explicit definition of their respective duties and responsibilities, a clear understanding of their cultural differences, and the presence of an organization and facilities for coordination and arbitrage by a neutral referee.

  1. NASA space biology accomplishments, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, T. W.; Pleasant, L. G.

    1983-01-01

    Summaries of NASA's Space Biology Program projects are provided. The goals, objectives, accomplishments, and future plans of each project are described in this publication as individual technical summaries.

  2. Management of civilian ballistic fractures.

    PubMed

    Seng, V S; Masquelet, A C

    2013-12-01

    The management of ballistic fractures, which are open fractures, has often been studied in wartime and has benefited from the principles of military surgery with debridement and lavage, and the use of external fixation for bone stabilization. In civilian practice, bone stabilization of these fractures is different and is not performed by external fixation. Fifteen civilian ballistic fractures, Gustilo II or IIIa, two associated with nerve damage and none with vascular damage, were reviewed. After debridement and lavage, ten internal fixations and five conservative treatments were used. No superficial or deep surgical site infection was noted. Fourteen of the 15 fractures (93%) healed without reoperation. Eleven of the 15 patients (73%) regained normal function. Ballistic fractures have a bad reputation due to their many complications, including infections. In civilian practice, the use of internal fixation is not responsible for excessive morbidity, provided debridement and lavage are performed. Civilian ballistic fractures, when they are caused by low-velocity firearms, differ from military ballistic fractures. Although the principle of surgical debridement and lavage remains the same, bone stabilization is different and is similar to conventional open fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department of... civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. Requests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Naval Investigative Service Command, or other Federal civilian investigative agencies to...

  4. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department of... civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. Requests by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Naval Investigative Service Command, or other Federal civilian investigative agencies to...

  5. Accomplishments of South Platte Watershed

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Accomplishments of the South Platte Watershed of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership (UWFP) reconnects urban communities with their waterways by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led efforts.

  6. Drone Strikes in Pakistan: Reasons to Assess Civilian Casualties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    photo: An MQ-9 Reaper, armed with GB U-12 Paveway II laser guided munitions and AGM-114 Hellfire missiles, piloted by Col. Lex Turner flies a combat...campaign. v \\Te observe that drone strikes in Pakistan were more likely to cause civilian casualties on av- erage than drone stiikes by military forces in...T11e Times (London) ,July 26, 2012. V \\!hilc not accomplished with a drone strike, that raid represents one end of a spectnnn with regard to trading

  7. The Joint Accomplishment of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Gresalfi, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Identity has become a central concept in the analysis of learning from social perspectives. In this article, we draw on a situative perspective to conceptualize identity as a "joint accomplishment" between individuals and their interactions with norms, practices, cultural tools, relationships, and institutional and cultural contexts.…

  8. Advanced Fuels Campaign 2012 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2012-11-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is responsible for developing fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The fiscal year 2012 (FY 2012) accomplishments are highlighted below. Kemal Pasamehmetoglu is the National Technical Director for AFC.

  9. Infant Mortality: 1989 Research Accomplishments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Collected in this document are reports of the National Institutes of Health's 1989 accomplishments in research on the problem of infant mortality. Reports are provided by the: (1) National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; (2) National Cancer Institute; (3) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; (4) National Institute of…

  10. The Joint Accomplishment of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Gresalfi, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Identity has become a central concept in the analysis of learning from social perspectives. In this article, we draw on a situative perspective to conceptualize identity as a "joint accomplishment" between individuals and their interactions with norms, practices, cultural tools, relationships, and institutional and cultural contexts.…

  11. Psychological Correlates of Civilian Preparedness for Conflicts.

    PubMed

    Bodas, Moran; Siman-Tov, Maya; Kreitler, Shulamith; Peleg, Kobi

    2017-08-01

    Preparedness for emergencies and disasters is imperative for public resilience. Previous studies have revealed low levels of civilian preparedness for conflicts. Classic behavioral models prove inapt in describing preparedness patterns in victimized populations chronically exposed to this threat. In an effort to expand this perspective, we hypothesized that other psychological constructs are correlated with preparedness. A cross-sectional, Internet-based study was performed in Israel in early 2016. A sociodemographically diverse sample included 385 participants, Jews and Arabs. The tools included a preparedness index, sense of preparedness questionnaire, Trait Anxiety Inventory, Life Orientation Test, Behavioral Inhibition & Activation System scales, and ego defenses. The results suggested that optimistic and rational individuals reported significantly higher levels of preparedness, whereas those who scored highly on the trait anxiety scale and those with a tendency to use denial coping mechanisms reported significantly lower levels of preparedness. The findings suggest that additional constructs, other than classic threat perception components, might play a key role in governing preparedness behavior. In particular, psychological manipulation of dispositional optimism or optimistic thinking might be effective in motivating preparedness behavior. Future research should explore such innovative ways to promoting preparedness. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:451-459).

  12. Reducing and Mitigating Civilian Casualties: Enduring Lessons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-12

    was not completely resolved: later in the conflict, Multinational Forces – Iraq ( MNF -I) 2 Off...Target: The Conduct of the War and Civilian Casualties in Iraq, report, Human Rights Watch, December 2003. 3 Though Multinational Forces-Iraq ( MNF ...I) did not establish a dedicated tracking cell for civilian casualties (CIVCAS) as did ISAF, the MNF -I Headquarters (HQ) tracked these casualties

  13. Recurring Reports of Civilian Employment and Payrolls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-11

    DARPA)* 7. Office of Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (OCHAMPUS)* 8. Defense Medical Support Activity ( DMSA )* 9...Agency (DARPA)* 7. Office of Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (OCHAMPUS)* 8. Defense Medical Support Activity ( DMSA )* 9...Support Activity ( DMSA )* 9. Washington Headquarters Services (WHS)* 10. Office of Economic Adjustment (OEA)* 11. Defense Legal Services Agency (DLSA

  14. Career satisfaction and professional accomplishments.

    PubMed

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Kowitt, Benjamin; Doria, Cataldo; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2010-10-01

    Research on doctor career satisfaction has often focused on factors such as income, specialty, gender, work hours, autonomy, patient load, lifestyle preferences, work environment, and insurance regulations. Other educational, personal and professional factors have not received sufficient empirical attention. This study was designed to test the following five hypotheses that doctors' career satisfaction is associated with: (i) Higher satisfaction with their undergraduate medical education; (ii) Greater academic and clinical competence; (iii) More involvement in teaching and research activities; (iv) Higher orientation toward lifelong learning; and (v) Increased professional accomplishments. A survey was mailed in 2006 to a national sample of 5349 doctors in the United States who graduated from Jefferson Medical College between 1975 and 2000; 3170 (59%) returned completed surveys. Based on responses to a career satisfaction question, doctors were classified into three groups: Highly satisfied (top third, n=1078); moderately satisfied (middle third, n=1031); and least satisfied (bottom third, n=1061). These groups were compared on a number of variables. All five research hypotheses were confirmed. Additionally, no significant association was observed between career satisfaction, age, years in practice, gender, or ethnicity; however, career satisfaction was associated with doctors' specialties. The findings suggest that factors such as satisfaction with medical education, medical school class rank, assessments of clinical competence, teaching, and research activities, orientation toward lifelong learning, and professional accomplishments should be considered for a more comprehensive understanding of doctors' career satisfaction. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  15. Thermal expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junying; Shen, Xiangying; Jiang, Chaoran; Wu, Zuhui; Huang, Jiping

    2017-08-01

    One type of thermal device, named as thermal expander, is proposed and verified through both simulation and experiment. The thermal expander performs an efficient way to expand a heat flow of line-shape front. Moreover, the thermal expander shows an advantage in rectifying a heat flow from crooked front to line-shape front, which indicates that the thermal expander could act as an efficient point-to-line heat source convertor. We suggest that the thermal expander would be of help to energy saving and emission reduction, especially in thermal circuits and thermal management.

  16. Advanced Fuels Campaign 2016 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Kate M.

    2016-11-01

    AFC management and integration activities in FY-16 included continued support for international collaborations, primarily with France, Japan, the European Union, Republic of Korea, and China, as well as various working group and expert group activities in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Three industry-led Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) and two university-led Integrated Research Projects (IRPs) funded in 2013, made significant progress in fuels and materials development. All are closely integrated with AFC and accident-tolerant fuels (ATF) research. Accomplishments made during FY-16 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results.

  17. Activities and Accomplishments of ICAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief historical background on establishing the Institute for Computational and Applied Mechanics (ICAM) is presented and basic goals and objectives are discussed. It is emphasized that the goal of the ICAM has been to develop and maintain a self-sustaining center of excellence in computational methods at Old Dominion University (ODU). Information is provided on funding sources and budget disposition, recent activities and accomplishments, list of graduate students supported on the program, and number of students who received graduate degrees (M.S. as well as Ph.D.). Information is also provided on research coordination with various scientists and engineers, and on different reports specifically written for ICAM. ICAM has been supported, in part, by NASA Langley Research Center through Grant NAG-1-363. This report constitutes the final report for ICAM for the period ending December 1996. The grant has been monitored by the University Affairs Officers at NASA Langley.

  18. ADVANCED FUELS CAMPAIGN 2013 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2013-10-01

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This includes development of a state-of-the art Research and Development (R&D) infrastructure to support the use of “goal-oriented science-based approach.” In support of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program, AFC is responsible for developing advanced fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY) 2013 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section.

  19. AFMC Civilian Retention: Forecasting Policy on the Future of the Civilian Workforce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    younger employees in DOD’s civilian workforce. The problems stated above are the reasons why DOD needs to re-evaluate its policy on civilian... focuses solely on policy within the DOD, AFMC’s human capital management approach to the long term career progressions of civilian employees . When...assumptions, (b) invented, discovered, or developed by a given group, (c) as it learns to cope with its problems of external adaptation and

  20. 46 CFR 168.10-5 - Civilian nautical school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civilian nautical school. 168.10-5 Section 168.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 168.10-5 Civilian nautical school. The term civilian...

  1. OCRWM annual report to Congress FY 1999 [USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    2000-05-01

    During Fiscal Year 1999, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) continued to make significant progress in its characterization of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, candidate geologic repository site. Although OCRWM's appropriation for Fiscal Year 1999 was lower than requested, the Program accomplished all three success measures in the Secretary's Fiscal Year 1999 Performance Agreement with the President and completed important work in many other areas. This Annual Report reviews this work and looks toward future activities.

  2. Military Versus Civilian Murder-Suicide.

    PubMed

    Patton, Christina L; McNally, Matthew R; Fremouw, William J

    2015-07-03

    Previous studies have implicated significant differences between military members and civilians with regard to violent behavior, including suicide, domestic violence, and harm to others, but none have examined military murder-suicide. This study sought to determine whether there were meaningful differences between military and civilian murder-suicide perpetrators. Using data from the Center for Disease Control's (CDC) National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS), military (n = 259) and civilian (n = 259) murder-suicide perpetrators were compared on a number of demographic, psychological, and contextual factors using chi-square analyses. Logistic regression was used to determine which variables predicted membership to the military or civilian perpetrator groups. Military murder-suicide perpetrators were more likely to be older, have physical health problems, be currently or formerly married, less likely to abuse substances, and to exhibit significantly different motives than civilian perpetrators. Logistic regression revealed that membership to the military, rather than the civilian, perpetrator group was predicted by age, physical health problems, and declining heath motive-reflecting the significance of a more than 15-year difference in mean age between the two groups. Findings point to the need to tailor suicide risk assessments to include questions specific to murder-suicide, to assess attitudes toward murder-suicide, and to the importance of assessing suicide and violence risk in older adult military populations.

  3. Space Biophysics: Accomplishments, Trends, Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    the protective environment of Earth, the biophysical properties underlying these changes must be studied, characterized and understood. This lecture reviews the current state of NASA biophysics research accomplishments and identifies future trends and challenges for biophysics research on the International Space Station and beyond.

  4. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department of... SUBPOENAS; PRODUCTION OF OFFICIAL RECORDS Delivery of Personnel § 720.11 Interviewing servicemembers or...

  5. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department of... SUBPOENAS; PRODUCTION OF OFFICIAL RECORDS Delivery of Personnel § 720.11 Interviewing servicemembers or...

  6. 32 CFR 720.11 - Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interviewing servicemembers or civilian employees by Federal civilian investigative agencies. 720.11 Section 720.11 National Defense Department of... SUBPOENAS; PRODUCTION OF OFFICIAL RECORDS Delivery of Personnel § 720.11 Interviewing servicemembers or...

  7. Military and civilian media coverage of suicide.

    PubMed

    Edwards-Stewart, Amanda; Kinn, Julie T; June, Jennifer D; Fullerton, Nicole R

    2011-01-01

    Military suicide has increased over the past decade and reports of Service Member and Veteran suicides receive media attention. Some methods of reporting suicide appear to cause a "media contagion" effect, potentially increasing suicide. This effect is explored in relation to media reports of both military and civilian suicides. To reduce possible contagion, recommendations for media reporting of suicides were adapted by the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC). We assessed 240 military and civilian newspaper reports of suicide from 15 different sources for compliance with the SPRC guidelines. Nearly all reviewed articles violated at least one guideline. Results highlighted military news articles regarding Service Members included more pejorative language and discussion of failed psychological treatment. Conversely, civilian articles romanticized the victim and provided more details regarding the suicide. Further exploration of military suicide reporting bias is discussed as a need in future research.

  8. Civilian Surge. Key to Complex Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Marshall Plan was in full flower . In Japan, about 2,000 Army Civil Affairs personnel were used, and civilians numbered about 200. In both countries...is a key reason why the NDAA called for a Civilian Reserve Corps ( CRC ) of 2,000 personnel. But are 2,000 reserv- ists enough to execute the missions...personnel should be backed up by a reserve force of 4,500 personnel, not 2,000. It further suggests that an active/standby CRC of 5,000 personnel

  9. Civilian use of night vision goggles.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Guillermo; Temme, Leonard; Antonio, J Charles

    2003-01-01

    Civil aviation operators have expressed an increased interest in conducting night operations with night vision imaging systems. The development of special operational concepts, hardware requirements, training requirements, and regulatory change and oversight is necessary to control for the known performance constraints associated with these devices. In 2001, the Aerospace Medical Association initiated an internal request to review the human factors issues concerning the use of night vision goggles (NVGs) in civilian flight operations. This paper provides some basic information on night vision imaging systems to highlight the Association's position for supporting the appropriate use of NVGs in civilian aviation while concurrently expressing the need for a judicious and studied approach to their deployment.

  10. Defense Spending and the Civilian Economy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    1980s. We are now once again in a period of substantially declining military expenditure . Although not perfectly correlated with total defense spending ...AD-A257 677 - IIIIIIIIIII11liiIll/I l///ll III1II lllI! A RAND NOTE Defense Spending and the Civilian Economy DTIC C. R. Neu S ELECTE r• DEC 01...NOTE N-3083-PCT Defense Spending and the Civilian Economy C. R. Neu October 1990 Accesion For Supported by the NTlSCRA.. Pew Charitable Trusts TA

  11. 32 CFR 727.9 - Referrals to civilian lawyers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approval, it should be one of the first items discussed to avoid later misunderstandings and eliminate... civilian lawyers so as to avoid embarrassment or misunderstanding between the client and his civilian...

  12. 8. VIEW EAST, CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP PARSONS GARAGE, MODERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW EAST, CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP PARSONS GARAGE, MODERN SHED, CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP PARSONS BLACKSMITH SHOP, AND MODERN SHED. - Parsons Nursery, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  13. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  14. Counterinsurgency and Beyond: Operationalizing the Civilian Surge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    as civil engineers , city planners and managers, agronomists , business administra- tors, conservationists, and hospital administrators, exist at the...mation, economic, and governance efforts have failed to fulfill stability operations and reconstruction requirements . Ad hoc military organizations...not have a national-level police force providing an expeditionary, sustainable, professional civilian law enforcement capability for use in a

  15. Chasing Success: Air Force Efforts to Reduce Civilian Harm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    AIR UNIVERSITY AIR FORCE RESEARCH INSTITUTE Chasing Success Air Force Efforts to Reduce Civilian Harm Sarah B. Sewall Air University Press Air...Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Sewall, Sarah B. Chasing success : Air Force efforts to reduce civilian harm / Sarah B. Sewall. pages cm ISBN...Civilian Casualty Prevention 175 7 Success 191 Abbreviations 195 Bibliography 199 Index 223 v Foreword Discussions concerning civilian

  16. Transmutation Fuels Campaign FY-09 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year 2009 (FY-08) accomplishments for the Transmutation Fuels Campaign (TFC). The emphasis is on the accomplishments and relevance of the work. Detailed description of the methods used to achieve the highlighted results and the associated support tasks are not included in this report.

  17. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated to... under civilian workmen's compensation laws in that hospitalization is usually completed prior to...

  18. 78 FR 21826 - Defense Support of Civilian Law Enforcement Agencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 182 Defense Support of Civilian Law Enforcement Agencies AGENCY... assigns responsibilities with respect to DoD support provided to Federal, State, and local civilian law... statutory requirements for the Department of Defense support of civilian law enforcement agencies. This...

  19. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition to...

  20. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition to...

  1. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition to...

  2. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition to...

  3. 46 CFR 173.052 - Civilian nautical school ships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Civilian nautical school ships. 173.052 Section 173.052... PERTAINING TO VESSEL USE School Ships § 173.052 Civilian nautical school ships. Each civilian nautical school ship must comply with part 171 of this subchapter as though it were a passenger vessel. In addition to...

  4. Operations Guide for Civilian Manpower Costing. Part 2. Detailed Instructions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    133 at this time. Past experience indicates that this P3 will. become a key P33 at a later date (formerly this wms PAD 605). A gay F3D Analysis Form...retain Civilian 839997 retain Military 839999 retain Civilian 839999 retain Civilian low F’s for Porn Cycle 840495 Military 840496 Military 840497

  5. 32 CFR 727.9 - Referrals to civilian lawyers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Referrals to civilian lawyers. 727.9 Section 727... ASSISTANCE § 727.9 Referrals to civilian lawyers. (a) General. If it is determined that the legal assistance... the assistance requested, the client should be referred to a civilian lawyer. When the client does...

  6. Winds of War: Enhancing Civilian and Military Partnerships to Assure Readiness: White Paper.

    PubMed

    Schwab, C William

    2015-08-01

    This White Paper summarizes the state of readiness of combat surgeons and provides action recommendations that address the problems of how to train, sustain, and retain them for future armed conflicts. As the basis for the 2014 Scudder Oration, I explored how to secure an improved partnership between military and civilian surgery, which would optimize learning platforms and embed military trauma personnel at America's academic medical universities for trauma combat casualty care (TCCC). To craft and validate these recommendations, I conducted an integrative and iterative process of literature reviews, interviews of military and civilian leaders, and a survey of military-affiliated surgeons. The recommended action points advance the training of combat surgeons and their trauma teams by creating an expanded network of TCCC training sites and sourcing the cadre of combat-seasoned surgeons currently populating our civilian and military teaching hospitals and universities. The recommendation for the establishment of a TCCC readiness center or command within the Medical Health System of the Department of Defense includes a military and civilian advisory board, with the reformation of a think tank of content experts to address high-level solutions for military medicine, readiness, and TCCC. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Personalized medicine: CCO's vision, accomplishments and future plans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jennifer; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Rutherford, Michael; Hart, Jennifer; Melamed, Saul; Pollett, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a rapidly expanding field, with the potential to improve patient care. Its benefits include increasing efficiency in cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment through early detection, targeted therapy and identifying individuals with an underlying genetic risk for cancer or adverse outcomes. Through the work of Cancer Care Ontario (CCO)'s Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Program, a number of initiatives have been undertaken to support developments in personalized medicine. In keeping with the momentum of recent accomplishments, CCO has led the formation of the Personalized Medicine Steering Committee to develop a comprehensive provincial genetics strategy for the future of cancer care.

  8. Accomplishments of Science by the Year 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Current and projected accomplishments in science and technology are examined from a social and political perspective. It is observed that the present level of research and development in the United States is inadequate for many possible advancements to occur.

  9. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  10. Pollution Prevention Accomplishments Hanford Site FY2001

    SciTech Connect

    COENENBERG, J.G.

    2001-12-01

    In Fiscal Year 2001, the Hanford Site Prime Contractors, Bechtel Hanford Inc. (BHI), CH2M Hill hanford Group (CHG), Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) achieved over $32 million in cost savings/avoidance. The total cost savings/avoidance includes accomplishments reported to DOE Headquarters and additional accomplishments achieved on the Hanford Site. This accomplishment report highlights the major successes totaling over $5.5 million in cost savings/avoidance. The following summarizes the FY 2001 waste reduced, and cost savings/avoidance by waste category for accomplishments documented in this report. Additionally, this accomplishment report documents the hanford site Return on Investment (ROI) projects completed or in progress during FY 2001. The ROI projects continue to show excellent results this past year. The ROI program funds waste minimization projects that provide a high return on investment. The funding is available to all Hanford contractors for pollution prevention projects. This accomplishment report highlights 7 ROI projects implemented and 6 projects that were in progress during FY 2001. The annual cost savings of the ROI projects completed and in progress is over $53.5 million. The Hanford Site continues to be the leader in pollution prevention and waste minimization across the DOE complex. This was evidenced by meeting aggressive Hanford Site waste generation goals and operating an outstanding recycling program. Additionally, waste streams are continuously evaluated and reduced through effective analysis and implementation via Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments.

  11. Emerging Options and Opportunities in Civilian Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the major problems/issues with civilian aeronautics going forward, the contextual ongoing technology revolutions, the several emerging civilian aeronautical "Big Ideas" and associated enabling technological approaches. The ongoing IT Revolution is increasingly providing, as 5 senses virtual presence/reality becomes available, along with Nano/Molecular Manufacturing, virtual alternatives to Physical transportation for both people and goods. Paper examines the potential options available to aeronautics to maintain and perhaps grow "market share" in the context of this evolving competition. Many of these concepts are not new, but the emerging technology landscape is enhancing their viability and marketability. The concepts vary from the "interesting" to the truly revolutionary and all require considerable research. Paper considers the speed range from personal/general aviation to supersonic transports and technologies from energetics to fabrication.

  12. Discriminating military and civilian traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Reid, Matthew W; Velez, Carmen S

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs at higher rates among service members than civilians. Explosions from improvised explosive devices and mines are the leading cause of TBI in the military. As such, TBI is frequently accompanied by other injuries, which makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. In addition to postconcussion symptoms, those who sustain a TBI commonly report chronic pain and posttraumatic stress symptoms. This combination of symptoms is so typical they have been referred to as the "polytrauma clinical triad" among injured service members. We explore whether these symptoms discriminate civilian occurrences of TBI from those of service members, as well as the possibility that repeated blast exposure contributes to the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Traumatic Brain Injury'.

  13. Self-Expanding, Tough Biodegradable Elastomers for Wound Stasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    the civilian setting, with no effective therapies available at point of injury. We previously reported that a self- expanding polyurethane foam...setting, with no effective therapies available at point of injury. We previously reported that a self-expanding polyurethane foam significantly...externalized percutaneously. Routine abdominal fascial closure was performed using #1 Nylon suture (Ethicon). Retraction of the cutting wire in a sawing

  14. Department of Defense Civilian Personnel Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) international staff; and h. Individuals excluded from coverage under other applicable law. C. DEFINITIONS 1...In Reply Refer To: Your Reference: JAN 3 I 1996 Diane M. Disney Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Civilian Personnel Policy) 4000 Defense...Pentagon Washington, D.C. 20301-4000 Dear Ms. Disney : This letter is in response to your request of January 26,1996, for approval of a new

  15. Civilian gas gangrene: a clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Rekha, Arcot; Gopalan, T R

    2007-06-01

    Gas gangrene due to clostridia infections is commonly seen in war injuries and is much less commonly seen in civilian life. When such problems do occur, they present a challenge to the surgeon due to the associated high morbidity and mortality associated. A case is presented where a patient developed gas gangrene in a limb consequent to trauma that had been treated surgically. It is vital to make a correct diagnosis at the earliest to limit disease progression and to avoid complications.

  16. Military-Civilian Health Services Partnership Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-22

    personnel, not covered by 10 U.S.C. 1089 , and other resources supporting that provider to the same extent as is usual and customary in civilian practice...Agreement Model 4. External Partnership Agreement Model 6 Oct 22, 87 6010.12 (Encl 1) REFERENCES, continued (e) Title 10, United States Code, Sections 1089 ...agreement. 6. Support Personnel. Non-DoD personnel, not covered by 10 U.S.C. 1089 , directly supporting a health care provider under a partnership agreement

  17. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1988-08-01

    This is the fifth Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report covers the activities and expenditures of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987, which ended on September 30, 1987. The activities and accomplishments of OCRWM during fiscal year 1987 are discussed in chapters 1 through 9 of this report. The audited financial statements of the Nuclear Waste Fund are provided in chapter 10. Since the close of the fiscal year, a number of significant events have occurred. Foremost among them was the passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (Amendments Act) on December 21, 1987, nearly 3 months after the end of the fiscal year covered by this report. As a result, some of the plans and activities discussed in chapters 1 through 9 are currently undergoing significant change or are being discontinued. Most prominent among the provisions of the Amendments Act is the designation of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the only candidate first repository site to be characterized. Therefore, the site characterization plans for Deaf Smith, Texas, and Hanford, Washington, discussed in chapter 3, will not be issued. The refocusing of the waste management program under the Amendments Act is highlighted in the epilogue, chapter 11. 68 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Historical civilian nuclear accident based Nuclear Reactor Condition Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Kaylyn Marie

    There are significant challenges to successfully monitoring multiple processes within a nuclear reactor facility. The evidence for this observation can be seen in the historical civilian nuclear incidents that have occurred with similar initiating conditions and sequences of events. Because there is a current lack within the nuclear industry, with regards to the monitoring of internal sensors across multiple processes for patterns of failure, this study has developed a program that is directed at accomplishing that charge through an innovation that monitors these systems simultaneously. The inclusion of digital sensor technology within the nuclear industry has appreciably increased computer systems' capabilities to manipulate sensor signals, thus making the satisfaction of these monitoring challenges possible. One such manipulation to signal data has been explored in this study. The Nuclear Reactor Condition Analyzer (NRCA) program that has been developed for this research, with the assistance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Graduate Fellowship, utilizes one-norm distance and kernel weighting equations to normalize all nuclear reactor parameters under the program's analysis. This normalization allows the program to set more consistent parameter value thresholds for a more simplified approach to analyzing the condition of the nuclear reactor under its scrutiny. The product of this research provides a means for the nuclear industry to implement a safety and monitoring program that can oversee the system parameters of a nuclear power reactor facility, like that of a nuclear power plant.

  19. Overseas organ donation during wartime operations: Benchmarking military performance against civilian practice.

    PubMed

    Oh, John S; Malinoski, Darren; Martin, Kathleen D; De La Cruz, J Salvador; Zonies, David

    2017-08-01

    Over the past 15 years of war, eligible U.S. military members donated organs overseas in Germany. Our hypothesis was that outcomes at a military treatment facility were comparable to a civilian cohort. Military donors were matched 1:3 with a donor cohort from the U.S. United Network for Organ Sharing. Data were compared using univariate and multivariate analysis. Significance set at p < 0.05. Forty military organ donors were compared with 116 civilian matched donors. The military cohort conversion rate was 75.5% and recovered more organs per donor (4.6 vs. 4.0, p = 0.02) with more transplants (4.2 vs 3.5, p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis controlling for sex, age, and type of organ donation showed no difference in odds of total organs donated in the military versus civilian cohort (odds ratio 2.1, 95% CI 0.87-5.24, p = 0.10). Organ donation at a military treatment facility overseas can be accomplished successfully. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Engineering Accomplishments in the Construction of NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    G. H. Neilson; P.J. Heitzenroeder; B.E. Nelson; W.T. Reiersen; A. Brooks; T.G. Brown; J.H. Chrzanowski; M.J. Cole; F. Dahlgren; T. Dodson; L.E. Dudek; R.A. Ellis; H.M. Fan; P.J. Fogarty; K.D. Freudenberg; P.L. Goranson; J.H. Harris; M.R. Kalish; G. Labik; J.F. Lyon; N. Pomphrey; C.D. Priniski; S. Raftopoulos; D.J. Rej; W.R. Sands; R.T. Simmons; B.E. Stratton; R.L. Strykowsky; M.E. Viola; D.E. Williamson; M.C. Zarnstorff

    2008-09-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test a compact, quasiaxisymmetric stellarator configuration. Flexibility and accurate realization of its complex 3D geometry were key requirements affecting the design and construction. While the project was terminated before completing construction, there were significant engineering accomplishments in design, fabrication, and assembly. The design of the stellarator core device was completed. All of the modular coils, toroidal field coils, and vacuum vessel sectors were fabricated. Critical assembly steps were demonstrated. Engineering advances were made in the application of CAD modeling, structural analysis, and accurate fabrication of complex-shaped components and subassemblies. The engineering accomplishments of the project are summarized

  1. Expanded Dengue.

    PubMed

    Kadam, D B; Salvi, Sonali; Chandanwale, Ajay

    2016-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has coined the term expanded dengue to describe cases which do not fall into either dengue shock syndrome or dengue hemorrhagic fever. This has incorporated several atypical findings of dengue. Dengue virus has not been enlisted as a common etiological agent in several conditions like encephalitis, Guillain Barre syndrome. Moreover it is a great mimic of co-existing epidemics like Malaria, Chikungunya and Zika virus disease, which are also mosquito-borne diseases. The atypical manifestations noted in dengue can be mutisystemic and multifacetal. In clinical practice, the occurrence of atypical presentation should prompt us to investigate for dengue. Knowledge of expanded dengue helps to clinch the diagnosis of dengue early, especially during ongoing epidemics, avoiding further battery of investigations. Dengue has proved to be the epidemic with the ability to recur and has a diverse array of presentation as seen in large series from India, Srilanka, Indonesia and Taiwan. WHO has given the case definition of dengue fever in their comprehensive guidelines. Accordingly, a probable case is defined as acute febrile illness with two or more of any findings viz. headache, retro-orbital pain, myalgia, arthralgia, rash, hemorrhagic manifestations, leucopenia and supportive serology. There have been cases of patients admitted with fever, altered mentation with or without neck stiffness and pyramidal tract signs. Some had seizures or status epilepticus as presentation. When they were tested for serology, dengue was positive. After ruling out other causes, dengue remained the only culprit. We have come across varied presentations of dengue fever in clinical practice and the present article throws light on atypical manifestations of dengue. © Journal of the Association of Physicians of India 2011.

  2. Improving Access to Military Aircraft During Civilian Wildfires

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    timely response to civilian wildfires by DOD aircraft?” The current system is complicated and confusing, involving federal laws, such as the Economy and...civilian wildfires, and that (2) the Economy and Stafford acts be modified to improve the efficiency with which military aircraft respond to civilian...wildfires. 14. SUBJECT TERMS wildfire, aircraft, The Economy Act, The Stafford Act, Department of Defense, National Interagency Fire Center

  3. THE PREDICTION OF ACADEMIC AND NONACADEMIC ACCOMPLISHMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HOLLAND, JOHN L.

    METHODS OF (1) DISTINGUISHING AN ORIGINAL AND CREATIVE PERSON, (2) PREDICTING CREATIVE BEHAVIOR, AND (3) DEFINING CREATIVITY WERE DEVELOPED USING LISTS OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN THE CREATIVE ARTS AND THE SCIENCES AS A SCALED INSTRUMENT TO RATE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. CREATIVITY OCCURS MORE FREQUENTLY AMONG STUDENTS WHO ARE INDEPENDENT, INTELLECTUAL,…

  4. Constructing a Clear Path to Accomplished Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jill Harrison

    2010-01-01

    Given the importance of quality teaching for student success, it is clear that every child needs to be able to receive instruction from a teacher who possesses the knowledge and skills for quality teaching--an accomplished teacher. It is less clear, however, how current teacher development policies and practices can ensure that all students will…

  5. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Full Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE’s) Biomass Program works with industry, academia and its national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This document provides Program accomplishments for 2007.

  6. Accomplishing Multiple Goals through Community Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Jody

    2007-01-01

    With schools being asked to accomplish more and more, it is increasingly important to, whenever possible, address multiple goals in teaching. Educating the whole child dictates that we find ways to ensure our graduates are well-rounded, independent thinkers capable of becoming well-adjusted, contributing adults. Thus community service has become a…

  7. Biomass Program 2007 Accomplishments - Report Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-10-27

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE’s) Biomass Program works with industry, academia and its national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. This document provides the introduction to the 2007 Program Accomplishments Report.

  8. Navajo Health Authority: Accomplishments--Future Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    Accomplishments of the Navajo Health Authority (NHA) since it began in 1972 are presented in synopsis form in a report of programs underway at Window Rock and Shiprock, along with NHA goals: to promote development of Navajo Health manpower, preventive medicine, health education, and native healing sciences. After a brief review of executive and…

  9. Accomplishing Multiple Goals through Community Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Jody

    2007-01-01

    With schools being asked to accomplish more and more, it is increasingly important to, whenever possible, address multiple goals in teaching. Educating the whole child dictates that we find ways to ensure our graduates are well-rounded, independent thinkers capable of becoming well-adjusted, contributing adults. Thus community service has become a…

  10. Acoustics Division recent accomplishments and research plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. R.; Morgan, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The research program currently being implemented by the Acoustics Division of NASA Langley Research Center is described. The scope, focus, and thrusts of the research are discussed and illustrated for each technical area by examples of recent technical accomplishments. Included is a list of publications for the last two calendar years. The organization, staff, and facilities are also briefly described.

  11. Navajo Health Authority: Accomplishments--Future Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    Accomplishments of the Navajo Health Authority (NHA) since it began in 1972 are presented in synopsis form in a report of programs underway at Window Rock and Shiprock, along with NHA goals: to promote development of Navajo Health manpower, preventive medicine, health education, and native healing sciences. After a brief review of executive and…

  12. Rocky Mountain Research Station: 2009 Research Accomplishments

    Treesearch

    Rick Fletcher

    2010-01-01

    Here we are again in a new year and it is time to reflect on our accomplishments and progress in 2009. Last year was marked with exciting advances in our science discovery, applications, and integration. Those advances were attained almost entirely with the aid of our partners and stakeholders. We continue to focus on communicating our science findings to land managers...

  13. Developing Professional Standards for Accomplished Language Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The Australian Federation of Modern Language Teachers Associations (AFMLTA) has recently developed a set of professional standards for accomplished language teachers. Standards of teaching are statements of values about the processes of teaching, learning, and knowing, and of the practices of those who teach languages and cultures. These standards…

  14. Accomplished Teachers Implementation of Quality Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Weiyun; Hammond-Bennett, Austin; Upton, Ashely; Mason, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how accomplished teachers implement the quality of teaching practices in their daily lessons. The participants were four elementary physical education teachers (one male, three female). The data sources consisted of videotape of the teachers teaching 12 lessons, transcription of the taped lessons,…

  15. Civilian Surge: Key to Complex Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    initially employed for this purpose, and civilians numbered about 1,400 during the years in which the Marshall Plan was in full flower . In Japan, about...Returns for Alternative Force Sizes Strategic Payoffs High Low Med Small Med Large Size of CRC Posture Option 3 (7500) Option 2 (5000) Option 1 (2250...up by a reserve force of 4,500 personnel, not 2,000. It further suggests that an active/standby CRC of 5,000 personnel should be backed up by a

  16. 2. CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS ENROLLERS MARCHING IN THE KAMEHAMEHA DAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS ENROLLERS MARCHING IN THE KAMEHAMEHA DAY PARADE IN HILO. FROM SUPERINTENDENT'S MONTHLY REPORT, JUNE 1934. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Roads, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  17. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2011 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01

    One of the major research and development (R&D) areas under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is advanced fuels development. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has the responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY 20) 2011 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section. The order of the accomplishments in this report is consistent with the AFC work breakdown structure (WBS).

  18. Photovoltaics: electricity from sunlight. FY 1985 accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    This summary of FY 1985 accomplishments contains the technical highlights of SERI's program in photovoltaic research and development and a bibliography of technical publications. Also included are several management highlights. Selected accomplishments are categorized according to research tasks identified in the DOE National PV Program's Five-Year Research Plan. The DOE task areas appearing here are Single-Junction Thin Films, High-Efficiency Multijunction Concepts, Innovative Concepts, Flat-Plate Collectors, and System Experiments. Subcontract program categories include amorphous thin films, high-efficiency concepts, polycrystalline thin films, crystalline silicon, and innovative concepts, which are further subdivided into new ideas, the University Participation Program, and photoelectrochemical cells. SERI's internal PV task areas are PV Devices and Measurements, Solid State Research, Insolation Resource Assessment, Advanced PV Systems Research, and solar electric research activities. The bibliography is a compilation of the technical publications resulting from all of SERI's research during FY 1984 and FY 1985. The entries are listed alphabetically by author.

  19. NASA total quality management 1989 accomplishments report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Described here are the accomplishments of NASA as a result of the use of Total Quality Management (TQM). The principles in practice which led to these process refinements are important cultural elements to any organization's productivity and quality efforts. The categories of TQM discussed here are top management leadership and support, strategic planning, focus on the customer, employee training and recognition, employee empowerment and teamwork, measurement and analysis, and quality assurance.

  20. NASA total quality management 1990 accomplishments report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's efforts in Total Quality Management are based on continuous improvement and serve as a foundation for NASA's present and future endeavors. Given here are numerous examples of quality strategies that have proven effective and efficient in a time when cost reduction is critical. These accomplishment benefit our Agency and help to achieve our primary goal, keeping American in the forefront of the aerospace industry.

  1. Joint Winter Runway Friction Program Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Wambold, James C.; Henry, John J.; Andresen, Arild; Bastian, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The major program objectives are: (1) harmonize ground vehicle friction measurements to report consistent friction value or index for similar contaminated runway conditions, for example, compacted snow, and (2) establish reliable correlation between ground vehicle friction measurements and aircraft braking performance. Accomplishing these objectives would give airport operators better procedures for evaluating runway friction and maintaining acceptable operating conditions, providing pilots information to base go/no go decisions, and would contribute to reducing traction-related aircraft accidents.

  2. FY005 Accomplishments for Colony Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Inglett, T; Tauferner, A

    2005-07-05

    The Colony Project is developing operating system and runtime system technology to enable efficient general purpose environments on tens of thousands of processors. To accomplish this, we are investigating memory management techniques, fault management strategies, and parallel resource management schemes. Recent results show promising findings for scalable strategies based on processor virtualization, in-memory checkpointing, and parallel aware modifications to full featured operating systems.

  3. Enhanced surveillance program FY1998 accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, J

    1998-10-01

    This report highlights the accomplishments of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP), the highest-priority research and development effort in stockpile management today. This is volume one of eleven, the unclassified summary of selected program highlights. These highlights fall into the following focus areas: pits, high explosives, organics, dynamics, diagnostics, systems, secondaries, materials-aging models, non-nuclear components, and routine surveillance testing system upgrades. Principal investigators from around the DOE complex contributed to this report.

  4. Significant Accomplishments in Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings of a symposium on significant accomplishments in science and technology are presented. The symposium was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center in December 1973. The subjects discussed are as follows: (1) cometary physics, (2) X-ray and gamma ray astronomy, (3) solar and terrestrial physics, (4) spacecraft technology, (5) Earth Resources Technology Satellite, (6) earth and ocean physics, (6) communications and navigation, (7) mission operations and data systems, and (8) networks systems and operations.

  5. Empowering Adult Learners. NIF Literacy Program Helps ABE Accomplish Human Development Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Mary E.

    1991-01-01

    The National Issues Forum's Literacy Program uses study circles and group discussion to promote empowerment and enhance adult literacy through civic education. The program has helped the Westonka (Minnesota) Adult Basic Education project accomplish its mission and has expanded the staff's view of adult learning. (SK)

  6. Empowering Adult Learners. NIF Literacy Program Helps ABE Accomplish Human Development Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Mary E.

    1991-01-01

    The National Issues Forum's Literacy Program uses study circles and group discussion to promote empowerment and enhance adult literacy through civic education. The program has helped the Westonka (Minnesota) Adult Basic Education project accomplish its mission and has expanded the staff's view of adult learning. (SK)

  7. Basic Energy Sciences: Summary of Accomplishments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1990-05-01

    For more than four decades, the Department of Energy, including its predecessor agencies, has supported a program of basic research in nuclear- and energy-related sciences, known as Basic Energy Sciences. The purpose of the program is to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user'' facilities necessary for conducting basic research. Its technical interests span the range of scientific disciplines: physical and biological sciences, geological sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences. Its products and facilities are essential to technology development in many of the more applied areas of the Department's energy, science, and national defense missions. The accomplishments of Basic Energy Sciences research are numerous and significant. Not only have they contributed to Departmental missions, but have aided significantly the development of technologies which now serve modern society daily in business, industry, science, and medicine. In a series of stories, this report highlights 22 accomplishments, selected because of their particularly noteworthy contributions to modern society. A full accounting of all the accomplishments would be voluminous. Detailed documentation of the research results can be found in many thousands of articles published in peer-reviewed technical literature.

  8. Basic energy sciences: Summary of accomplishments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-05-01

    For more than four decades, the Department of Energy, including its predecessor agencies, has supported a program of basic research in nuclear- and energy related sciences, known as Basic Energy Sciences. The purpose of the program is to explore fundamental phenomena, create scientific knowledge, and provide unique user facilities necessary for conducting basic research. Its technical interests span the range of scientific disciplines: physical and biological sciences, geological sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences. Its products and facilities are essential to technology development in many of the more applied areas of the Department's energy, science, and national defense missions. The accomplishments of Basic Energy Sciences research are numerous and significant. Not only have they contributed to Departmental missions, but have aided significantly the development of technologies which now serve modern society daily in business, industry, science, and medicine. In a series of stories, this report highlights 22 accomplishments, selected because of their particularly noteworthy contributions to modern society. A full accounting of all the accomplishments would be voluminous. Detailed documentation of the research results can be found in many thousands of articles published in peer-reviewed technical literature.

  9. Fort Collins Science Center fiscal year 2010 science accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2011-01-01

    The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Fort Collins Science Center (FORT), apply their diverse ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise to investigate complicated ecological problems confronting managers of the Nation's biological resources. FORT works closely with U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) agency scientists, the academic community, other USGS science centers, and many other partners to provide critical information needed to help answer complex natural-resource management questions. In Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10), FORT's scientific and technical professionals conducted ongoing, expanded, and new research vital to the science needs and management goals of DOI, other Federal and State agencies, and nongovernmental organizations in the areas of aquatic systems and fisheries, climate change, data and information integration and management, invasive species, science support, security and technology, status and trends of biological resources (including the socioeconomic aspects), terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, and wildlife resources, including threatened and endangered species. This report presents selected FORT science accomplishments for FY10 by the specific USGS mission area or science program with which each task is most closely associated, though there is considerable overlap. The report also includes all FORT publications and other products published in FY10, as well as staff accomplishments, appointments, committee assignments, and invited presentations.

  10. Accomplishing Transformative Research in a Challenging Fiscal Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Bust, G.

    2014-12-01

    The shift in funding is forcing scientists to promise transformative research for a pittance. To accomplish this, researchers need to transform their methodology to include societal buy-in, use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology, and cross-discipline platform usage. As the cutting edge of research expands to view the system on the global scale with extremely fine resolution, fiscally reasonable budgets present a challenge to be met. Consider how do we measure a specific variable over 45-degrees of latitude in an isolated and hostile region of Earth - the total electron count over the South Pole? This work examines this transformative research using hosted payloads on buoys, balloons, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). We will show cutting edge research occurring simultaneous with education and public outreach, offering societal buy-in through interactive websites and student-built hosted payloads. These interactions provide a vision to the public and a new database to the scientists. The use of COTS technology and cross-discipline (oceanography and space) platforms keep the cost low. We will discuss a general methodology for accomplishing transformative research in a challenging fiscal environment through integration of COTS technology, assimilative and first principle models, and observing systems simulation experiments (OSSEs).

  11. Do Military Veteran and Civilian Students Function Differently in College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James G.; Vilhauer, Ruvanee P.; Chafos, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to assess military veterans' functioning in college by comparing their experience with that of civilian students. Participants: The study, conducted from April 2012 to February 2013, included 445 civilian and 61 student service member/veteran (SSM/V) undergraduates, drawn from a community college and two 4-year…

  12. 75 FR 81547 - Defense Support of Civilian Law Enforcement Agencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 182 Defense Support of Civilian Law Enforcement Agencies AGENCY... civilian law enforcement efforts, including responses to civil disturbances. DATES: Comments must be... priorities, or the principles set forth in this Executive Order. Section 202, Public Law 104-4,...

  13. Reading Grade Levels of Air Force Civilian Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Randy H.; Mathews, John J.

    A study was conducted to examine the reading levels of United States Air Force civilian employees according to occupational groupings and grade structure. Approximately 1,050 Air Force civilian subjects were tested on the Nelson-Denny Reading Test or the California Reading Test. Subjects were selected from eight Air Force bases representing the…

  14. Do Military Veteran and Civilian Students Function Differently in College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James G.; Vilhauer, Ruvanee P.; Chafos, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to assess military veterans' functioning in college by comparing their experience with that of civilian students. Participants: The study, conducted from April 2012 to February 2013, included 445 civilian and 61 student service member/veteran (SSM/V) undergraduates, drawn from a community college and two 4-year…

  15. 32 CFR 727.9 - Referrals to civilian lawyers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Referrals to civilian lawyers. 727.9 Section 727.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL LEGAL ASSISTANCE § 727.9 Referrals to civilian lawyers. (a) General. If it is determined that the legal assistance...

  16. International Cooperation and Competition in Civilian Space Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report assesses the state of international competition in civilian space activities, explores United States civilian objectives in space, and suggests alternative options for enhancing the overall U.S. position in space technologies. It also investigated past, present, and projected international cooperative arrangements for space activities…

  17. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION Compensation for Work-Related Physical Impairment or Death § 301.318 Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated...

  18. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION Compensation for Work-Related Physical Impairment or Death § 301.318 Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated...

  19. Are Armed Forces infants more at risk than civilian infants?

    PubMed

    Yoong, S Y; Miles, D; McKinney, P A; Feltbower, R G; Spencer, N

    2000-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the health status of Armed Forces and civilian infants, accounting for social class. In a prospective cohort study, demographic data were obtained from mothers of liveborn infants from 436 civilian and 162 Armed Forces families. Birth details were taken from hospital maternity and child health systems. A six month follow-up was completed by health visitors. Standard social class classification, based on occupation, was used for civilian families and a new equivalent scheme for military personnel. No significant differences were found between civilian and military infants for birthweight, prematurity and failure to thrive. Military infants had significantly more hospital admissions (P=0.015) and accident and emergency attendances (P=0.002) mainly accounted for by the 'manual' social classes of the Armed Forces. Infant health status of civilian and military babies did not differ overall. Increased uptake of hospital services by military families can be explained by local circumstances.

  20. A Study of Army Civilian Entry Level and Mid-Level Program Management Leadership Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-08

    civilian leaders pertained to attending or receiving credit for Civilian Education Courses. The participants chosen were the Program Executive...civilian leaders pertained to attending or receiving credit for Civilian Education Courses. Only 42.8% of the civilian respondents identified...LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT 23 as having completed or being credited for the Civilian Education System’s Advanced Course, and only 39.3% identified

  1. Civilian blast-related burn injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J.N.; Tan, A.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is limited English literature describing the experience of a civilian hospital managing blast-related burn injuries. As the largest regional burn unit, we reviewed our cases with the aim of identifying means to improve current management. A 6-year retrospective analysis of all patients coded as sustaining blast-related burns was conducted through the unit’s burns database. Medical case notes were reviewed for information on burn demographics, management and outcomes. 42 patients were identified. Male to female ratio was 37:5. Age range was 12-84 years, (mean=33 years). Total body surface area (%TBSA) burn ranged from 0.25% to 60%, (median=1%). The most common burn injury was flame (31/42, 73.8%). Gas explosions were the most common mechanism of injury (19 cases; 45.2%). 7/42 cases (16.7%) had full ATLS management pre-transfer to the burns unit. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 0-43 (median=2). 17/42 (40.4%) patients required admission. 37/36 (88.1%) patients were managed conservatively of which 1 patient later required surgery due to deeper burns. 5/42 (11.9%) patients required surgical management at presentation and these were noted to be burns with >15% TBSA requiring resuscitation. One case required emergency escharotomies and finger amputations. All patients survived their burn injuries. Blast-related burn injuries are generally uncommon in the civilian setting. Following proper assessment, most of these cases can be deemed as minor injuries and managed conservatively. Improvement in burns management education and training at local emergency departments would provide efficient patient care and avoid unnecessary referrals to a burns unit. PMID:27857651

  2. Sandia technology engineering and science accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Sandia is a DOE multiprogram engineering and science laboratory with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California, and a test range near Tonapah, Nevada. We have major research and development responsibilities for nuclear weapons, arms control, energy, the environment, economic competitiveness, and other areas of importance to the needs of the nation. Our principal mission is to support national defense policies by ensuring that the nuclear weapon stockpile meets the highest standards of safety, reliability, security, use control, and military performance. Selected unclassified technical activities and accomplishments are reported here. Topics include advanced manufacturing technologies, intelligent machines, computational simulation, sensors and instrumentation, information management, energy and environment, and weapons technology.

  3. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2015 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Braase, Lori Ann; Carmack, William Jonathan

    2015-10-29

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This report is a compilation of technical accomplishment summaries for FY-15. Emphasis is on advanced accident-tolerant LWR fuel systems, advanced transmutation fuels technologies, and capability development.

  4. Civilian Corporate Fitness in the Department of the Army: The Newest Dimension of Civilian Personnel Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-23

    and military support for civilian corporate fitness. DA health promotion activities and new centers of excellence such as the Army Physical Fitness...Research Institute Center, Soldier Physical Fitness School, the West Point program, US Army Research Institute of Environmental 2 %% %. b ] Medicine...military speakers described programs that were primarily designed for military. Colonel Frederick Drews from the Army War College’s Army Physical

  5. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2010 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lori Braase

    2010-12-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Accomplishment Report documents the high-level research and development results achieved in fiscal year 2010. The AFC program has been given responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. The science-based approach combines theory, experiments, and multi-scale modeling and simulation aimed at a fundamental understanding of the fuel fabrication processes and fuel and clad performance under irradiation. The scope of the AFC includes evaluation and development of multiple fuel forms to support the three fuel cycle options described in the Sustainable Fuel Cycle Implementation Plan4: Once-Through Cycle, Modified-Open Cycle, and Continuous Recycle. The word “fuel” is used generically to include fuels, targets, and their associated cladding materials. This document includes a brief overview of the management and integration activities; but is primarily focused on the technical accomplishments for FY-10. Each technical section provides a high level overview of the activity, results, technical points of contact, and applicable references.

  6. Civilian Police: Future of the Military Police Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-20

    Station Security Allison Choike, a reporter with Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri’s The Guidon , writes that the concept of hiring civilians to fill the law...6 Allison Choike, “Fort Leonard Wood Trains DA Installation Civilian Police,” The Guidon , 5 June 2008, <www.myguidon.com/index2.php?option...Bibliography Choike, Allison. “Fort Leonard Wood Trains DA Installation Civilian Police.” The Guidon . 5 June 2008. <http://www.myguidon.com/index2.php

  7. Health and Environmental Research. Summary of Accomplishments

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1984-04-01

    This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  8. NASA total quality management 1989 accomplishments report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Betty P. (Editor); Stewart, Lynne M. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    NASA and contractor employees achieved many notable improvements in 1989. The highlights of those improvements, described in this seventh annual Accomplishments Report, demonstrate that the people who support NASA's activities are getting more involved in quality and continuous improvement efforts. Their gains solidly support NASA's and this Nation's goal to remain a leader in space exploration and in world-wide market competition, and, when communicated to others through avenues such as this report, foster improvement efforts across government and industry. The principles in practice which led to these process refinements are important cultural elements to any organization's productivity and quality efforts. The categories in this report reflect NASA principles set forth in the 1980's and are more commonly known today as Total Quality Management (TQM): top management leadership and support; strategic planning; focus on the customer; employee training and recognition; employee empowerment and teamwork; measurement and analysis; and quality assurance.

  9. Health and environmental research. Summary of accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This is a short account of a 40-year-old health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Under the sponsorship of the federal agencies that were consecutively responsible for the national energy mission, this research program has contributed to the understanding of the human health and environmental effects of emergining energy technologies. In so doing, it has also evolved several nuclear techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of human ills. The form of this presentation is through examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of these areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  10. Low Cost Methods to Accomplish Aeronomy Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    Accomplishment of aeronomy science using low cost methods involves a number of innovative considerations. These methods will be discussed. They include making broad use of internet to control and operate distributed sensors. Sensor controls should be simple and most important reliable. Imagers are a common sensor for optical systems and include common computer interfaces and menu driven operations which often don't require special software or engineering development. Small, inexpensive but reliable satellite systems are evolving in the Cubesat community. Effective use of students is invaluable, giving them responsibility to operate instrumentation and to routinely archive the data. Management of students is especially important in the early phase of their training to insure quality performance. These ideas will be elaborated on, and most importantly, the science motive is the most important driver for what is done.

  11. Civilian Aeronautical Futures - The Responsibly Imaginable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1940 Aeronautics has had an immense impact upon Global Human lifestyles and affairs - in both the Civilian and Military arenas. During this period Long distance Train and Ship passenger transport were largely supplanted by Air Travel and Aviation assumed a dominant role in warfare. The early 1940 s to the mid 1970 s was a particularly productive period in terms of Aeronautical Technology. What is interesting is that, since the mid 1970 s, the rate of Aeronautical Technological Progress has been far slower, the basic technology in nearly all of our current Aero Systems dates from the mid 70 s or earlier. This is especially true in terms of Configuration Aerodynamics, Aeronautics appears to have "settled" on the 707, double delta and rotary wing as the approach of choice for Subsonic long haul, supersonic cruise and VTOL respectively. Obviously there have been variants and some niche digression from this/these but in the main Aeronautics, particularly civilian Aeronautics, has become a self-professed "mature", Increasingly "Commodity", Industry. The Industry is far along an existing/deployed technology curve and focused, now for decades, on incremental/evolutionary change - largely Appliers vs. developers of technology. This is, of course, in sharp contrast to the situation in the early-to-later 20th century where Aeronautics was viewed as A Major Technological Engine, much the way IT/Bio/Nano/Energetics/Quantum Technologies are viewed today. A search for Visionary Aeronautical "Futures" papers/projections indicates a decided dearth thereof over the last 20 plus years compared to the previous quarter Century. Aeronautics is part of Aerospace and Aerospace [including Aeronautics] has seen major cutbacks over the last decades. Some numbers for the U.S. Aerospace Industry serve as examples. Order of 600,000 jobs lost, with some 180,000 more on the block over the next 10 years. Approximately 25% of the Aerospace workforce is eligible to retire and the average

  12. Cyber Norms for Civilian Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Spirito, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    The international community agrees that the safe operation of civilian nuclear infrastructure is in every population’s best interest. One challenge each government must address is defining and agreeing to a set of acceptable norms of behavior in cyberspace as they relate to these facilities. The introduction of digital systems and networking technologies into these environments has led to the possibility that control and supporting computer systems are now accessible and exploitable, especially where interconnections to global information and communications technology (ICT) networks exist. The need for norms of behavior in cyberspace includes what is expected of system architects and cyber defenders as well as adversaries who should abide by rules of engagement even while conducting acts that violate national and international laws. The goal of this paper is to offer three behavioral cyber norms to improve the overall security of the ICT and Operational Technology (OT) networks and systems that underlie the operations of nuclear facilities. These norms of behavior will be specifically defined with the goals of reducing the threats associated to the theft of nuclear materials, accidental release of radiation and sabotage of nuclear processes. These norms would also include instances where an unwitting attacker or intelligence collection entity inadvertently makes their way into a nuclear facility network or system and can recognize they are in a protected zone and an approach to ensuring that these zones are not exploitable by bad actors to place their sensitive cyber effect delivery systems.

  13. Acute renal failure following blunt civilian trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Matas, A J; Payne, W D; Simmons, R L; Buselmeier, T J; Kjellstrand, C M

    1977-01-01

    Renal failure developed in 20 patients following blunt civilian trauma. Ten recovered normal renal function; 8 currently survive. Survivors and nonsurvivors did not differ in age, time from trauma to anuria, mean blood urea nitrogen or creatinine level prior to the first or to subsequent dialyses. However, there was an increased incidence of sepsis and liver failure in those who died. When outcome was related to site of injury, patients with closed head injury and/or intra-abdominal injury had a worse prognosis than those with thoracic or extremity injury only. Only 2 patients with perforated bowel survived; both had peritoneal dialysis combined with peritoneal lavage with antibiotic solutions. Mortality in patients with posttraumatic renal failure remains high; however, death is usually a result of associated complications rather than a result of the renal failure. Aggressive management of other complications of the trauma, especially sepsis or potential sepsis, is necessary. We recommend peritoneal dialysis combined with peritoneal antibiotic lavage where there is a potential for posttraumatic intra-abdominal sepsis associated with renal failure. PMID:843128

  14. Behavioral and health implications of civilian spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Wichman, Harvey A

    2005-06-01

    The current enthusiasm over the prospect of space tourism and the belief among many that such civilian spaceflight is imminent are characterized herein. There are many concerns about screening and certifying passengers for future spaceflight. Efforts by several organizations to propose such screening are cited. The problem with some of these proposals, which treat all types of spaceflight the same, is that they are so restrictive that too few people would be eligible for space travel to have a viable tourism industry. However, not all types of spaceflight are the same, so the distinctions between them need to be clarified. Of the five types of spaceflight described, one is proposed as the most likely to be the first significant phase of space tourism: long-term microgravity flight in low Earth orbit. But because of human problems with long-term exposure to microgravity, this phase requires rather conservative screening and extensive training. However, prior to discussing the passenger issues related to this early phase of space tourism, the reasons why Earth-like gravity, as well as microgravity, must be made available to spacefarers before space tourism can take place on a grand scale need to be explained. Finally, major passenger medical and behavioral issues of the first phase of orbital space tourism-long-term microgravity flight-are discussed.

  15. Leadership Development in the Civilian Work Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-17

    targeted for preparing future managers with the requisite leadership skills to succeed in the job. Although the corporations may use different...approaches to accomplish leadership development, each corporation has a lucid and systematic program for developing its leaders. In contrast, the Department...The company "cul- ture" at both corporations was distinctly different. The "culture" at Texas Instruments was decidedly "Texas" in its orientation. A

  16. Detail of plate and gears on center pivot. From civilian ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of plate and gears on center pivot. From civilian land. Looking north. - Naval Supply Annex Stockton, Daggett Road Bridge, Daggett Road traversing Burns Cut Off, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  17. Do military veteran and civilian students function differently in college?

    PubMed

    Smith, James G; Vilhauer, Ruvanee P; Chafos, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    The authors sought to assess military veterans' functioning in college by comparing their experience with that of civilian students. The study, conducted from April 2012 to February 2013, included 445 civilian and 61 student service member/veteran (SSM/V) undergraduates, drawn from a community college and two 4-year Catholic colleges, in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York. Participants completed anonymous online surveys. Six areas of functioning in transition to college were examined: Health, Fitting In, Emotional Adjustment, Productivity, Perceived Career Support, and Social Engagement. Students, both SSM/V and civilian, with past exposure to a potentially traumatic event fit in worse than students without such exposure. Past exposure to trauma was associated with poorer emotional adjustment in civilian students, but not in SSM/V. Implications of results were discussed.

  18. 14. VIEW OF CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS WORK; CHECK, DROP AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW OF CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS WORK; CHECK, DROP AND TURNOUT IN LATERAL 22 OFF OF THE ARIZONA CANAL Photographer: unknown. January 1937 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. 15. VIEW OF CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS WORK; CHECK, DROP AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS WORK; CHECK, DROP AND TURNOUT IN LATERAL 14.5 OFF OF THE ARIZONA CANAL Photographer: unknown. March 1937 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 37. PRATER CANYON AND CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP SITE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. PRATER CANYON AND CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS CAMP SITE FROM PRATER GRADE, FACING E. SAME CAMERA LOCATION AS No. 35 AND No. 36. - Mesa Verde National Park Main Entrance Road, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  1. Calling for an end to attacks on Syrian civilians and expanded humanitarian access.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Royce, Edward R. [R-CA-39

    2014-03-14

    House - 04/30/2014 Ordered to be Reported in the Nature of a Substitute (Amended) by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Expectations and Integration of Organizational Military and Civilian Cultures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington...NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...resides as the senior leader. For example, in an activity run by a civilian, civilian work practices often prevail. Likewise, a military leader

  3. Civilian Contractors Providing Logistics and Support on the Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-19

    compensated by contractors who are able to fill in and complete the tasks required for the mission. -Colonel Ronda G. Urey US Army...have continued to support 1 Colonel Ronda G. Urey , USAWC Strategy Research Project, Civilian...Contractors Killed in Iraq.” Associated Press, 23 Feb 2007 Urey , Ronda G., Colonel, USA. “Civilian Contractors on the 15 Battlefield.” (USAWC

  4. Underground storage tanks/efficient separations accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, C.P.; Hunt, R.D.

    1993-09-01

    Efficient Separation-Integrated Program (ESP-IP) and the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID). This paper reviews the accomplishments and future directions of the programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five major ESP-IP projects are (1) the sludge washing and dissolution of ORNL Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) Waste, (2) the aluminum removal from washed sludge, (3) the formation of colloids in sludge washing, (4) the alkaline-side extraction of actinides and technetium from tank waste using crown ethers and other extractants, and (5) integrated program coordinator support. The five principal UST-ID projects are (1) the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process, (2) the comprehensive demonstration of sludge and supernate processing, (3) the technical interchange with the Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique (CEA), (4) the TRUEX data collection and model validation, and (5) the Waste Processing and Disposal Program (WPDP). Finally, a planned Request for Expression of Interest (REI) on organic destruction is discussed.

  5. A small spacecraft mission with large accomplishments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Mason, Glenn M.; Mazur, Joseph E.

    2012-08-01

    A remarkable era of space research will end soon when, after 20 years of space-based observations, the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft will reenter Earth's atmosphere. This will result from the resurgence of the Sun's activity and the related increase of atmospheric drag produced by increasing solar ultraviolet radiation. The best estimate is that SAMPEX will succumb to drag forces (and burn up on reentry) in late September 2012, but this could occur as early as August or as late as December 2012 [see Baker et al., 2012]. SAMPEX has been a pacesetting mission since its inception. It was selected in 1989 for flight as NASA's first spacecraft in the "Small Explorer" (SMEX) program [Baker et al., 1993]. The SMEX program was intended both to accomplish forefront science (at a very affordable cost) as well as to provide a training ground in the best space development practices for a new generation of scientists, engineers, and managers. As its full name suggests, SAMPEX was always intended to perform multiple duties and was geared toward making measurements in space of moderate to very high energy particles [see Baker et al., 1993]. A few of the key contributions made by the SAMPEX program are summarized below.

  6. Fort Collins Science Center: 2006 Accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2007-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 2006 (FY06), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) continued research vital to U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) science and management needs and associated USGS programmatic goals. FORT work also supported the science needs of other governmental departments and agencies as well as private cooperators. Specifically, FORT scientific research and technical assistance focused on client and partner agency needs and goals in the areas of biological information management, fisheries and aquatic systems, invasive species, status and trends of biological resources, terrestrial ecosystems, and wildlife resources. Highlights of FORT project accomplishments are described below under the USGS science program area with which each task is most closely associated.2 The work of FORT’s five branches (in 2006: Aquatic Systems and Technology Applications, Ecosystem Dynamics, Invasive Species Science, Policy Analysis and Science Assistance, and Species and Habitats of Federal Interest) often involves major partnerships with other agencies or cooperation with other USGS disciplines (Geology, Geography, Water Resources).

  7. Civilian control of professionalizing militaries: implications of the Venezuelan case

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Highly professionalized militaries whose focus is internal security and national development have been shown to be prone to active, directive involvement in politics. In Latin America, this phenomenon has been most notably evident in Brazil since 1964 and Peru between 1968 and 1980. The Venezuelan military offers a case of a more moderately professionalized military which was exposed to the widely disseminated internal security doctrine of the 1960s but, on the surface, exhibited declining levels of militarism. This study examines the varying levels of civilian control in Venezuela between 1945 and 1979 in the context of increasing military professionalization, and seeks to clarify the theoretical relationship between the two variables by using a unique, if not deviant, case. After developing a theoretical definition of the general concept of control, the study derives a definition of civilian control which employs civilian and military behavior, civilian and military attitudes, and military motivations. Application of this definition to the Venezuelan case indicates that civilian control has been more tenuous than more superficial observation would indicate. The study shows that increases in professionalization led to strains on the consolidation of civilian control, while also showing that limits on the level and content of professionalization enabled Venezuela to avoid authoritarian consequences.

  8. Health indicators for military, veteran, and civilian women.

    PubMed

    Lehavot, Keren; Hoerster, Katherine D; Nelson, Karin M; Jakupcak, Matthew; Simpson, Tracy L

    2012-05-01

    Women who have served in the military are a rapidly growing population. No previous studies have compared directly their health status to that of civilians. To provide estimates of several leading U.S. health indicators by military service status among women. Data were obtained from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, a U.S. population-based study. Health outcomes were compared by military status using multivariable logistic regression among the female participants (274,399 civilians, 4221 veterans, 661 active duty, and 995 National Guard or Reserves [NG/R]). Data were analyzed in August 2011. Veterans reported poorer general health and greater incidence of health risk behaviors, mental health conditions, and chronic health conditions than civilian women. Active duty women reported better access to health care, better physical health, less engagement in health risk behaviors, and greater likelihood of having had a recent Pap than civilian women. Women from the NG/R were comparable to civilians across most health domains, although they had a greater likelihood of being overweight or obese and reporting a depressive and anxiety disorder. Compared with civilian women, NG/R women rated their health and access to health care similarly and active duty women rated theirs better on several domains, but veterans consistently reported poorer health. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Marine power - Accomplishments of the 1970s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, W. R.

    Progress made in the 1970s toward power production using marine power systems is discussed, noting that all renewable systems have a low intensity source. Consideration has been given to tidal, ocean current, kelp biomass, wave, salinity gradient, thermal gradient, and wind energy systems. Tidal plants delivering 240 MWe and 400 kWe are operating in France and Russia, respectively, and China is operating 90 small plants generating around 7 MW. Kelp growth rates were found to be lower than necessary for economic methane conversion. Experimentation in compressed air wave energy conversion is being pursued in Japan, and small programs are being conducted to study salinity gradients in the U.S. and Sweden. A 10 kW OTEC plant was operated successfully in Hawaii and the Japanese are testing a 100 kW plant. Offshore windpower is projected as the most likely marine system to succeed, both as a power producer and as a supplemental power system for ships. Near term efforts are expected to be in small facilities to expand the data base, gain experience in construction and operations, and to make evaluations.

  10. Region 6's 2016 Strategic Plan and 2015 Accomplishment Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA Region 6 Strategic Plan highlights the goals we have set out to accomplish in 2016 based on each of our priorities. areas. Our Accomplishment Report summarizes our work in meeting these priorities during the prior year.

  11. Fire, Fuel, and Smoke Science Program: 2012 Research Accomplishments

    Treesearch

    Diane M. Smith; Colin C. Hardy

    2012-01-01

    In 2012, the nation experienced one of the largest wildland fire seasons in US history. More than 9 million acres burned, overwhelming fire-suppression budgets, burning homes and other structures, and taking the lives of both firefighters and civilians around the country. In Montana alone, 1.1 million acres burned, resulting in the largest wildfire year since 1910. As...

  12. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration Through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Lunabotics Mining Competition is designed to promote the development of interest in space activities and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. The competition uses excavation, a necessary first step towards extracting resources from the regolith and building bases on the moon. The unique physical properties of lunar regolith and the reduced 1/6th gravity, vacuum environment make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The competition is conducted annually by NASA at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The teams that can use telerobotic or autonomous operation to excavate a lunar regolith geotechnical simulant, herein after referred to as Black Point-1 (or BP-1) and score the most points (calculated as an average of two separate 10-minute timed competition attempts) will eam points towards the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence and the scores will reflect ranking in the on-site mining category of the competition. The minimum excavation requirement is 10.0 kg during each competition attempt and the robotic excavator, referred to as the "Lunabot", must meet all specifications. This paper will review the achievements of the Lunabotics Mining Competition in 2010 and 2011, and present the new rules for 2012. By providing a framework for robotic design and fabrication, which culminates in a live competition event, university students have been able to produce sophisticated lunabots which are tele-operated. Multi-disciplinary teams are encouraged and the extreme sense of accomplishment provides a unique source of inspiration to the participating students, which has been shown to translate into increased interest in STEM careers. Our industrial sponsors (Caterpillar, Newmont Mining, Harris, Honeybee Robotics) have all stated that there is a strong need for skills in the workforce related

  13. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2014 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Braase, Lori; May, W. Edgar

    2014-10-01

    accident conditions than traditional fuel systems. AFC management and integration activities included continued support for international collaborations, primarily with France, Japan, the European Union, Republic of Korea, and China, as well as various working group and expert group activities in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Three industry-led Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) and two university-led Integrated Research Projects (IRPs), funded in 2013, made significant progress in fuels and materials development. All are closely integrated with AFC and Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) research. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY) 2014 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the lead technical contact is provided for each section.

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathryn A.

    2015-02-01

    Welcome to the 2014 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Accomplishments Report, covering research and development highlights from 2014. The LWRS Program is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development program to inform and support the long-term operation of our nation’s commercial nuclear power plants. The research uses the unique facilities and capabilities at the Department of Energy national laboratories in collaboration with industry, academia, and international partners. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants is essential to supporting our nation’s base load energy infrastructure, as well as reaching the Administration’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The purpose of the LWRS Program is to provide technical results for plant owners to make informed decisions on long-term operation and subsequent license renewal, reducing the uncertainty, and therefore the risk, associated with those decisions. In January 2013, 104 nuclear power plants operated in 31 states. However, since then, five plants have been shut down (several due to economic reasons), with additional shutdowns under consideration. The LWRS Program aims to minimize the number of plants that are shut down, with R&D that supports long-term operation both directly (via data that is needed for subsequent license renewal), as well indirectly (with models and technology that provide economic benefits). The LWRS Program continues to work closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to ensure that the body of information needed to support SLR decisions and actions is available in a timely manner. This report covers selected highlights from the three research pathways in the LWRS Program: Materials Aging and Degradation, Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization, and Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies, as well as a look-ahead at planned activities for 2015. If you

  15. Some History and Accomplishments of the IUSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Hartemink, Alfred E.

    2013-04-01

    Urban Soils) and three standing committees (Committee on awards and prizes, Committee on budget and finances, and Committee on statutes and byelaws). Membership in ISSS/IUSS increased from around 550 after WWII to over 60,000 today. The IUSS also provides Honorary Membership to soil scientists who have significant accomplishments in the field; to date 87 soil scientists have been so recognized from all over the globe. The IUSS is the most important global link to the world's leading soil science and soil scientists.

  16. Research Progress and Accomplishments on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Lesa B.; Uri, John J.

    2002-01-01

    The first research payloads reached the International Space Station (ISS) more than two years ago, with research operating continuously since March 2001. Seven research racks are currently on-orbit, with three more arriving soon to expand science capabilities. Through the first five expeditions, 60 unique NASA-managed investigations from 11 nations have been supported, many continuing into later missions. More than 90,000 experiment hours have been completed, and more than 1,000 hours of crew time have been dedicated to research, numbers that grow daily. The multidisciplinary program includes research in life sciences, physical sciences, biotechnology, Earth sciences, technology demonstrations as well as commercial endeavors and educational activities. The Payload Operations and Integration Center monitors the onboard activities around the clock, working with numerous Principal Investigators and Payload Developers at their remote sites. Future years will see expansion of the station with research modules provided by the European Space Agency and Japan, which will be outfitted with additional research racks. The first research payloads arrived at ISS more than two years ago, and continuous science has been ongoing for more than one and a half years. During this time, the research capabilities have been tremendously increased, even as assembly of the overall platform continues. Despite significant challenges along the way, ISS continues to successfully support a large number of investigations in a variety of research disciplines. The results of some of the early investigations are reaching the publication stage. The near future looms with new challenges, but experience to date and dedicated efforts give reason to be optimistic that the challenges will be overcome and that new and greater successes will be added to past ones.

  17. Cooperative Public Outreach - It can be Accomplished

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, K. W.; Carpenter, K. D.; Davis, S. L.; Smith, C. F.; Washburne, J. C.; Woodard, G. C.

    2002-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (Santa Catalina Ranger District of the Coronado National Forest), the U.S. Geological Survey (Water Resources Discipline, Arizona District), and the National Science Foundation sponsored Science and Technology Center (Sustainability of semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas) have created a series of exhibits on the hydrology of Sabino Creek, an ephemeral stream within the Sonoran Desert (USA) visited by over 1 million people annually. A clear set of educational objectives established at the beginning of the process and interagency cooperation resulted in a cohesive grouping of exhibits while minimizing single agency dominance. The multimedia exhibits are a collection of visual displays along with a touch-screen kiosk that has animations and other links that expand along many avenues to educate people on ephemeral streams, sky islands, siltation, and ground-water recharge within the Sonoran Desert. In addition, the exhibit incorporates real-time climate and streamflow data collected by four science agencies. The real-time data incorporated into the kiosk and linking web page is used to educate visitors about the natural environment within Sabino Canyon and inform them about flash-flooding and fire dangers. Thus, before entering the canyon, a visitor can view the exhibit and readily determine the air and water temperature, stream activity, and several other current and historical environmental variables. In summary, the cooperative efforts between the agencies resulted in a series of exhibits that are far more beneficial to the public than if the efforts had been attempted separately.

  18. Satisfaction with civilian family medicine residency training

    PubMed Central

    Wolfrom, Brent; Hodgetts, Geoff; Kotecha, Jyoti; Pollock, Emily; Martin, Mary; Han, Han; Morissette, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate satisfaction with civilian residency training programs among serving general duty medical officers within the Canadian Armed Forces. Design A 23-item, cross-sectional survey face-validated by the office of the Surgeon General of the Canadian Armed Forces. Setting Canada. Participants General duty medical officers serving in the Canadian Armed Forces as of February 2014 identified through the Directorate of Health Services Personnel of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group Headquarters. Main outcome measures Satisfaction with and time spent in 7 domains of training: trauma, critical care, emergency medicine, psychiatry, occupational health, sports medicine, and base clinic training. Overall preparedness for leading a health care team, caring for a military population, working in isolated and challenging environments, and being deployed were evaluated on a 5-point Likert scale. Results Among the survey respondents (n = 135, response rate 54%), 77% agreed or strongly agreed that their family medicine residency training was relevant to their role as a general duty medical officer. Most respondents were either satisfied or very satisfied with their emergency medicine training (77%) and psychiatry training (63%), while fewer were satisfied or very satisfied with their sports medicine (47%), base clinic (41%), and critical care (43%) training. Even fewer respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their trauma (26%) and occupational health (12%) training. Regarding overall preparedness, 57% believed that they were adequately prepared to care for a military patient population, and 52% of respondents believed they were prepared for their first posting. Fewer respondents (38%) believed they were prepared to work in isolated, austere, or challenging environments, and even fewer (32%) believed that residency training prepared them to lead a health care team. Conclusion General duty medical officers were satisfied with many aspects of

  19. Military and Civilian Collaboration: The Power of Numbers.

    PubMed

    Stinner, Daniel J; Wenke, Joseph C; Ficke, James R; Gordon, Wade; Toledano, James; Carlini, Anthony R; Scharfstein, Daniel O; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Bosse, Michael J; Hsu, Joseph R

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the number and types of extremity injuries treated at civilian trauma centers (CIV CENs) versus military treatment facilities (MTFs) participating in the Major Extremity Trauma Research Consortium (METRC) and to investigate the potential benefits of a clinical research network that includes both civilian trauma centers and MTFs. Two analyses were performed. First, registry data collected on all surgically treated fractures at four core MTFs and 21 CIV CENs over one year were compared. Second, actual numbers and distribution of patients by type of injury enrolled in three METRC studies were compared. While MTFs demonstrated higher percentages of severe injuries including open fractures, traumatic amputations, vascular injuries, contamination, and injuries with bone, muscle, and skin loss when compared to CIV CENS, the CIV CENs treated a substantially higher number and, more importantly, enrolled patients in almost all categories. Comparison of service members to civilians was challenged by several differences between the two patient populations including mechanism of injury, the medical care environment, and confounding factors such as age, social setting and co-morbidities. Despite these limitations, in times without active military conflict, clinical trials will likely rely on civilian trauma centers for patient enrollment; only when numbers are pooled across a large number of centers can requisite sample sizes be met. These data demonstrate the benefits of maintaining a military-civilian partnership to address the major gaps in research defined by the Military.

  20. Colonic trauma: modern civilian management and military surgical doctrine.

    PubMed Central

    Royle, C A

    1995-01-01

    Colonic trauma, traditionally the domain of the military surgeon, has become commonplace in many parts of the world, where civilian surgeons have developed considerable experience with this complex type of injury. The author highlights the differences between military and civilian management concluding with an overview of current military research into battlefield colonic trauma. This paper reviews military surgical doctrine and summarizes the evolution in civilian surgical practice since the Second World War. South African management is discussed with reference to the author's travelling fellowship visit in 1993. Colonic trauma has been the subject of a military surgical research project, since 1992, with preliminary studies establishing an anastomotic technique suitable for use in the field. This work is summarized with an outline of the research programme. PMID:8537949

  1. Caring for Active Duty Military Personnel in the Civilian Sector

    PubMed Central

    Waitzkin, Howard; Noble, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Due to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the unmet medical and psychological needs of military personnel are creating major challenges. Increasingly, active duty military personnel are seeking physical and mental health services from civilian professionals. The Civilian Medical Resources Network attempts to address these unmet needs. Participants in the Network include primary care and mental health practitioners in all regions of the country. Network professionals provide independent assessments, clinical interventions in acute situations, and documentation that assists GIs in obtaining reassignment or discharge. Most clients who use Network services come from low-income backgrounds and manifest psychological rather than physical disorders. Qualitative themes in professional-client encounters have focused on ethical conflicts, the impact of violence without meaning (especially violence against civilians), and perceived problems in military health and mental health policies. Unmet needs of active duty military personnel deserve more concerted attention from medical professionals and policy makers. PMID:21339846

  2. Complex sequelae of psychological trauma among Kosovar civilian war victims.

    PubMed

    Morina, Nexhmedin; Ford, Julian D

    2008-09-01

    The impact of war trauma on civilians may include, but also extend beyond, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to include complex sequelae such as those described by the syndrome of Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified (DESNOS). In the present study, 102 civilian war victims were interviewed in Kosovo, assessing traumatic life events, PTSD, DESNOS, and depression. Full DESNOS rarely occurred (2% prevalence), however, clinically significant DESNOS symptoms of somatization, altered relationships, and altered systems of meaning were reported by between 24-42% of respondents. Although DESNOS symptoms were correlated with PTSD symptoms, DESNOS symptoms were associated with poorer overall psychological functioning, self-evaluations, satisfaction with life, and social support independent of the effects of PTSD. The findings suggest that DESNOS warrants attention in addition to PTSD in the assessment and treatment of civilians who have been exposed to war and genocide.

  3. Reporting Iraqi civilian fatalities in a time of war

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In February, 2007, the Associated Press (AP) conducted a poll of 1,002 adults in the United States about their attitudes towards the war in Iraq. Respondents were remarkably accurate estimating the current death toll of US soldiers, yet were grossly inaccurate in estimating the current death toll of Iraqi civilians. We conducted a search of newspapers reports to determine the extent of the discrepancy between reporting Coalition and Iraqi civilian deaths, hypothesizing that there would be an over-representation of Coalition deaths compared to Iraqi civilian deaths. Methods We examined 11 U.S. newspapers and 5 non-U.S. newspapers using electronic databases or newspaper web-archives, to record any reports between March 2003 and March 2008 of Coalition and Iraqi deaths that included a numeric indicator. Reports were described as "events" where they described a specific occurrence involving fatalities and "tallies" when they mentioned the number of deaths over a period of time. We recorded the number of events and tallies related to Coalition deaths, Iraqi civilian deaths, and Iraqi combatant deaths Results U.S. newspapers report more events and tallies related to Coalition deaths than Iraqi civilian deaths, although there are substantially different proportions amongst the different U.S. newspapers. In four of the five non-US newspapers, the pattern was reversed. Conclusion This difference in reporting trends may partly explain the discrepancy in how well people are informed about U.S. and Iraqi civilian fatalities in Iraq. Furthermore, this calls into question the role of the media in reporting and sustaining armed conflict, and the extent to which newspaper and other media reports can be used as data to assess fatalities or trends in the time of war. PMID:19895676

  4. Military to civilian nurse: Personal and professional reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Brenda; Chargualaf, Katie A; Patterson, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    To examine and describe the transition process of military nurses from military nursing practice to civilian nursing practice. A second aim was to identify challenges and facilitators to this transition. Serving in the military, and embodying its values, can have a major impact on a person's worldview. These individuals serve not only as nurses but also as part of a larger military culture with a mission to protect. The decision to separate from the military and transition into the civilian workforce carries many challenges capable of influencing nurses' personal and professional identities. Qualitative descriptive. Semi-structured interviews of 10 nurse veterans were conducted in 2015-2016. Data were collected until saturation was reached. The transition includes four major phases from military to civilian nurse: Separating from Military Life, Conflict and Chaos, Shifting Sands and Personal and Professional Reconstruction. Duration and progress through each phase varied slightly for individual nurses. Both work-role and personal identity transition occur when a nurse leaves the military and enters civilian practice. Military and civilian organisations, in both the USA and other countries, can implement supports to aid these nurses during this personal and professional change. Recommendations from the study group are provided. The global nursing profession, as well as healthcare organisations that employ nurse veterans, has a commitment and obligation to understand the transition process of nurses who practise within the scope of military nursing and later in civilian nursing environments so that they may be supported and used to the extent of their prior experience. Lessons learned and advice from this group of nurses may positively aid others in their transition experience. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Kouts

    2006-05-10

    The CRD addresses the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3-Change 1, ''Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets'', by providing the Secretarial Acquisition Executive (Level 0) scope baseline and the Program-level (Level 1) technical baseline. The Secretarial Acquisition Executive approves the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) critical decisions and changes against the Level 0 baseline; and in turn, the OCRWM Director approves all changes against the Level 1 baseline. This baseline establishes the top-level technical scope of the CRMWS and its three system elements, as described in section 1.3.2. The organizations responsible for design, development, and operation of system elements described in this document must therefore prepare subordinate project-level documents that are consistent with the CRD. Changes to requirements will be managed in accordance with established change and configuration control procedures. The CRD establishes requirements for the design, development, and operation of the CRWMS. It specifically addresses the top-level governing laws and regulations (e.g., ''Nuclear Waste Policy Act'' (NWPA), 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 63, 10 CFR Part 71, etc.) along with specific policy, performance requirements, interface requirements, and system architecture. The CRD shall be used as a vehicle to incorporate specific changes in technical scope or performance requirements that may have significant program implications. Such may include changes to the program mission, changes to operational capability, and high visibility stakeholder issues. The CRD uses a systems approach to: (1) identify key functions that the CRWMS must perform, (2) allocate top-level requirements derived from statutory, regulatory, and programmatic sources, and (3) define the basic elements of the system architecture and operational concept. Project-level documents address CRD requirements by further

  6. Waging War with Civilians: Asking the Unanswered Questions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    traditional DOD employees and contracted civilians?22 After  meeting  the  provisions  of  the  US legal   system , we may not solve many difficul­ ties...soldier? Will the current US  legal system  allow the presence of civilians in com­ bat  but  prevent  their  suing  the  US  govern­ ment at every

  7. The importance of civilian nursing organizations: integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Santos, James Farley Estevam Dos; Santos, Regina Maria Dos; Costa, Laís de Miranda Crispim; Almeida, Lenira Maria Wanderley Santos de; Macêdo, Amanda Cavalcante de; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco

    2016-06-01

    to identify and analyze evidence from studies about the importance of civilian nursing organizations. an integrative literature review, for which searches were conducted in the databases LILACS, PubMed/MEDLINE, SciELO, BDENF, and Scopus. sixteen articles published between the years 2004-2013 were selected, 68.75% of which were sourced from Brazilian journals and 31.25% from American journals. civilian nursing organizations are important and necessary, because they have collaborated decisively in nursing struggles in favor of the working class and society in general, and these contributions influence different axes of professional performance.

  8. Civilian Agency Industry Working Group EVM World Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerby, Jerald

    2013-01-01

    Objectives include: Promote the use of standards ]based, objective, and quantitative systems for managing projects and programs in the federal government. Understand how civilian agencies in general, manage their projects and programs. Project management survey expected to go out soon to civilian agencies. Describe how EVM and other best practices can be applied by the government to better manage its project and programs irrespective of whether work is contracted out or the types of contracts employed. Develop model policies aimed at project and program managers that are transportable across the government.

  9. Leak detection with expandable coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Developed and evaluated is a system for leak detection that can be easily applied over separable connectors and that expands into a bubble or balloon if a leak is present. This objective is accomplished by using thin films of Parafilm tape wrapped over connectors, which are then overcoated with a special formulation. The low yield strength and the high elongation of the envelope permit bubble formation if leakage occurs. This system is appropriate for welds and other hardware besides separable connectors. The practical limit of this system appears to be for leaks exceeding 0.000001 cc/sec. If this envelope is used to trap gases for mass spectrometer inspection, leaks in the range of ten to the minus 8th power cc/sec. may be detectable.

  10. Progress Cleaning the Air: Voluntary Partnership Program Accomplishments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA voluntary clean air partnership programs work in tandem with regulatory programs to protect public health and the environment. This page highlights accomplishments of selected partnership programs.

  11. Barriers to Veterans' Employment Presented by Civilian Licensure and Certification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DynCorp, Reston, VA.

    A study examined the extent to which military training and experience adequately prepared individuals for civilian credentialing (licensure and certification), first in the healthcare and aircraft maintenance fields and then in a variety of other fields. The survey relied on information about occupational credentialing requirements from the…

  12. Civilian Social Work: Serving the Military and Veteran Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savitsky, Laura; Illingworth, Maria; DuLaney, Megan

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses social work practice areas for civilian social workers who provide services to military service members, veterans, and their families. These practice areas include education, child welfare, domestic violence, mental health, health care, substance abuse, and criminal justice. The authors examine the impact of the contemporary…

  13. HEADSTONES OF BERNARD AND MICHAEL JODD, FATHERANDSON CIVILIANS RESPONSIBLE FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HEADSTONES OF BERNARD AND MICHAEL JODD, FATHER-AND-SON CIVILIANS RESPONSIBLE FOR CONSTRUCTION OF BRICK PERIMETER WALL WHO DIED OF YELLOW FEVER DURING WALL CONSTRUCTION. VIEW TO WEST. - Baton Rouge National Cemetery, 220 North 19th Street, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA

  14. The DoD Civilian Workforce: An Undervalued Resource

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-08

    functions at the strategic level. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Professional Development, Drawdown, Downsizing , Expeditionary Workforce 16. SECURITY...38 KEY TERMS: Professional Development, Drawdown, Downsizing , Expeditionary Workforce CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified The DoD civilian...Learned from Previous Drawdowns DoD must learn from the past as it contemplates another large scale downsizing . Great care must be taken not to

  15. Portrait view of STS 41-G crew in civilian clothes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Portrait view of STS 41-G crew in civilian clothes. Bottom row (l.-r.) Payload specialists Marc Garneau and Paul Scully-Power, crew commander Robert Crippen. Second row (l-.r-) Pilot Jon McBride, and Mission Specialists David Leestma and Sally Ride. At very top is Mission Specialist Kathryn Sullivan.

  16. 32 CFR 161.20 - Benefits for civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...., civilian employee, DoD contractor, Red Cross employee) is specific to each benefit set described. (1... with the host country as defined in Volume 1231 of DoD Instruction 1400.25. They are entered into DEERS... non-uniformed full-time paid personnel of the Red Cross assigned to duty with the uniformed...

  17. Military and Civilian Undergraduates: Attitudes toward Women, Masculinity, and Authoritarianism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson; Lucart, A. Leigh

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed students at the U.S. Naval Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy, Reserve Officer Training Corp, and a civilian university about attitudes toward gender roles and authoritarianism. Military students had the most traditional authoritarian beliefs and gender role attitudes, with Naval Academy males holding the most traditional attitudes toward…

  18. 32 CFR 719.138 - Fees of civilian witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL Miscellaneous Matters § 719.138 Fees of civilian witnesses. (a... by one of the following: (1) Trial counsel or assistant trial counsel of the court-martial; (2) Summary court officer; (3) Counsel for the court in a court of inquiry; (4) Recorder or junior member of a...

  19. Civilian Social Work: Serving the Military and Veteran Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savitsky, Laura; Illingworth, Maria; DuLaney, Megan

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses social work practice areas for civilian social workers who provide services to military service members, veterans, and their families. These practice areas include education, child welfare, domestic violence, mental health, health care, substance abuse, and criminal justice. The authors examine the impact of the contemporary…

  20. DOD-Wide Civilian Career Program for Procurement Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The manual, which supersedes the August 4, 1966 manual, is designed to aid in program improvement for career development and advancement opportunities of Department of Defense (DOD) civilian procurement personnel. Program elements covered include: career patterns, career counseling and appraisal, training and development, registration, referral…

  1. Civilian Technical Employees' Work Attitudes toward Military Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lee Ann; Chu, Lily

    1989-01-01

    A survey questionnaire followed by an interview was used to assess the work attitudes of 25 civilian technical employees toward their employers in a military setting over 2 years. Results showed a general distrust of management and counselors in the personnel office. (Author/TE)

  2. The Civilian Conservation Corps as Educational Technology, 1933-1942

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisneros, Jes Raul

    2010-01-01

    This historical study examined the Civilian Conservation Corps as an educational endeavor during the New Deal era. Specifically, it considered the CCC as an organization which utilized educational technologies of the day, while also serving as a mass medium to communicate what was possible through the New Deal to the American public at large. In…

  3. Civilian First Responder Decontamination Equipment Characteristics Survey Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    EQUIPMENT CHARACTERISTICS SURVEY RESULTS Scott Kooistra Shawn Bowen John Walther PROGRAM INTEGRATION DIRECTORATE Michael B. DeZearn ENGINEERING...COVERED (From - To) Mar 2007-Feb 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Civilian First Responder Decontamination Equipment Characteristics Survey Results 5a...determine important characteristics of first responder decontamination equipment . The DAT created a survey with questions in 10 areas relating to

  4. Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery: Validation for Civilian Occupations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    18 Activities to Enhance the Chances for a Greater Employer Response ...................................................... 19... activities of this initial ASVAB • civilian validation study. II. DEVELOPING THE SAMPLING DESIGN PLAN _ Overview Phase 1 of the validation study...mathematics. 3. requires keeping data organized. 4. requires ability to find patterns . 5. does not consist mainly of social or interpersonal interactions

  5. Civilian spinal cord injuries due to terror explosions.

    PubMed

    Zeilig, G; Weingarden, H P; Zwecker, M; Rubin-Asher, D; Ratner, A; Ohry, A

    2010-11-01

    Retrospective analysis of civilians with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) due to terror explosions. To analyze and describe the clinical characteristics and rehabilitation outcomes of civilians with SCI due to explosions admitted for in-patient rehabilitation from 2000-2004. SCI rehabilitation service, Tel Hashomer, Israel. Retrospective chart review. Civilians with SCI due to terror-related gunshot wounds (GSWs) served as a control group. Eleven civilians with SCI caused by penetrating atypical foreign objects (PAFOs) and eight with GSWs were identified. The male-to-female ratio was approximately 2:1. Foreign objects were present within the spinal canal in seven patients, causing bone injury without canal penetration in three, and one patient had both bone injury and canal penetration. The most common level of injury was thoracic. Seven had complete motor SCI. Three individuals improved in American Spinal Injury Association status: one individual improved from B to C (cervical); one from C to D (thoracic); and the third from D to E (lumbar). Despite the similar acute hospital length of stay and functional independence measure (FIM) scores on admission, the PAFO group had a shorter rehabilitation length of stay with higher FIM scores and higher FIM efficiency at discharge. Although the pathophysiology of PAFO blast injuries is similar to the high-velocity GSWs or the high-energy military munition injuries, better rehabilitation outcomes were seen, with slightly higher FIM efficiency and efficacy at discharge. This result is likely to be caused by less neurological tissue damage at impact.

  6. Senior Service College: A Pillar of Civilian Senior Leader Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-16

    1 DOD’s Role in National Security...component of DOD’s long-term strategy. DOD’s Role in National Security DOD bears the major burden for successful realization of the NSS’ security...of its flagship role in the achievement of national security goals, the maximization of DOD civilian leadership potential is a non-negotiable

  7. 32 CFR 719.138 - Fees of civilian witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL Miscellaneous Matters § 719.138 Fees of civilian witnesses. (a... by one of the following: (1) Trial counsel or assistant trial counsel of the court-martial; (2... Regulations, vol. 2, chap. 6), and by a certified copy of the order appointing the court-martial, court of...

  8. 32 CFR 719.138 - Fees of civilian witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL Miscellaneous Matters § 719.138 Fees of civilian witnesses. (a... by one of the following: (1) Trial counsel or assistant trial counsel of the court-martial; (2... Regulations, vol. 2, chap. 6), and by a certified copy of the order appointing the court-martial, court of...

  9. 32 CFR 719.138 - Fees of civilian witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTING THE MANUAL FOR COURTS-MARTIAL Miscellaneous Matters § 719.138 Fees of civilian witnesses. (a... by one of the following: (1) Trial counsel or assistant trial counsel of the court-martial; (2... Regulations, vol. 2, chap. 6), and by a certified copy of the order appointing the court-martial, court of...

  10. The Civilian Conservation Corps as Educational Technology, 1933-1942

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisneros, Jes Raul

    2010-01-01

    This historical study examined the Civilian Conservation Corps as an educational endeavor during the New Deal era. Specifically, it considered the CCC as an organization which utilized educational technologies of the day, while also serving as a mass medium to communicate what was possible through the New Deal to the American public at large. In…

  11. Portrait view of STS 41-G crew in civilian clothes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Portrait view of STS 41-G crew in civilian clothes. Bottom row (l.-r.) Payload specialists Marc Garneau and Paul Scully-Power, crew commander Robert Crippen. Second row (l-.r-) Pilot Jon McBride, and Mission Specialists David Leestma and Sally Ride. At very top is Mission Specialist Kathryn Sullivan.

  12. Department of Defense Curricula: Information Concerning Conversion for Civilian Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forgione, Pascal D., Jr.; Orth, Mollie N.

    Designed to assist in the selection of national priorities for the conversion of military curricula to civilian use, a study selected curricula pertinent to occupations with high growth potential and evaluated them against criteria important for curriculum conversion decisions. Procedures consisted of identification of priority occupational areas…

  13. 32 CFR 727.10 - Fees, compensation, solicitation, and representation in civilian courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... representation in civilian courts. (a) General. Active duty military personnel and civilian employees of the Navy... official capacity. (b) Solicitation. Active duty military personnel, civilian employees of the Navy and Marine Corps, and inactive reservists, acting in an official capacity, are prohibited from soliciting,...

  14. 32 CFR 884.14 - Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.14 Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members. (a) The Air... court of competent jurisdiction, unless noncompliance is legally justified. Air Force civilian employees...

  15. 32 CFR 884.14 - Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.14 Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members. (a) The Air... court of competent jurisdiction, unless noncompliance is legally justified. Air Force civilian employees...

  16. 32 CFR 884.14 - Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.14 Compliance with court orders by civilian employees and family members. (a) The Air... court of competent jurisdiction, unless noncompliance is legally justified. Air Force civilian employees...

  17. Determination of Research Priorities and Documentation of Information Sources for Army Civilian Personnel Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Research and Applications Corporation Sabra Woolley Caliber Associates for Leadership and Motivation Technical Area Robert F. Holz, Chiefo Manpower and... motivational productivity, military-civilian relation- ships, civilian functions, and future civilian workforce needs. Given the size of this set of...workforce, including: 3. Developing supervisory and non-supervisory personnel 4. Motivating personnel S. Maximizing the efficiency of policies

  18. 45 CFR 506.1 - “Civilian American citizen” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false âCivilian American citizenâ defined. 506.1 Section 506.1 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT... American Citizens § 506.1 “Civilian American citizen” defined. Civilian American citizen means any person...

  19. 45 CFR 506.1 - “Civilian American citizen” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false âCivilian American citizenâ defined. 506.1 Section 506.1 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT... American Citizens § 506.1 “Civilian American citizen” defined. Civilian American citizen means any person...

  20. 32 CFR 727.10 - Fees, compensation, solicitation, and representation in civilian courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... representation in civilian courts. (a) General. Active duty military personnel and civilian employees of the Navy... duties. Reserve judge advocates on inactive duty are prohibited from accepting or receiving any fee or... official capacity. (b) Solicitation. Active duty military personnel, civilian employees of the Navy and...

  1. 32 CFR 727.10 - Fees, compensation, solicitation, and representation in civilian courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... representation in civilian courts. (a) General. Active duty military personnel and civilian employees of the Navy... duties. Reserve judge advocates on inactive duty are prohibited from accepting or receiving any fee or... official capacity. (b) Solicitation. Active duty military personnel, civilian employees of the Navy and...

  2. Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontal Disease Among Civilian Pilots.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xie, Lu; Liu, Yang; Chen, Duanjing; Yu, Qing; Gan, Xueqi; Yu, Haiyang

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities that can affect civilian pilots' health. Its prevalence and the correlation with periodontal disease (PD) among pilots had not been previously reported. The aim of the study was to determine MetS and PD status, and to reveal their relationship in a representative sample of Chinese civilian pilots. We investigated 303 civilian pilots (mean age 34.92 ± 7.66 yr). General information as well as blood and saliva samples were collected. Diagnostic criteria for MetS were based on the joint interim statements of several medical organizations. Periodontal status was evaluated by Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Measurements included body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), concentration of serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), saliva matrix metalloproteinase-8, and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). Of the subjects, 38.28% showed MetS and 23.10% showed periodontitis. Significant differences were found between the MetS and non-MetS pilots in total flying hours, CPI, WC, BP, TG, HDL-C, FPG, BMI, and TIMP-1. Significant relationships were found between MetS and CPI, BMI, and TIMP-1. The odds ratios were 3.378 (95%CI: 1.889-5924) for CPI, 1.269 (95%CI: 1.101-1.463) for BMI, and 0.600 (95%CI: 0.399-0.904) for TIMP-1. The prevalence of MetS was sufficiently high to be a matter of medical concern, and was associated with PD among civilian pilots.Chen X, Xie L, Liu Y, Chen D, Yu Q, Gan X, Yu H. Metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease among civilian pilots. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(12):1016-1020.

  3. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    PubMed

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  4. Outcomes and Accomplishments of The Circles of Care Planing Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duclos, Christine W.; Phillips, Mary; LeMaster, Pamela L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents outcomes and accomplishments of the first round of participating individuals, communities, and grantees of the Circles of Care program (CoC). While accomplishing all CoC program goals, the initiative supported grantees in developing individual service delivery system models and positioned each grantee advantageously for…

  5. Gender-Role Orientation, Creative Accomplishments and Cognitive Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hittner, James B.; Daniels, Jennifer R.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the association of gender-role orientation to creative accomplishments and cognitive styles in 127 college students. Results indicated that the gender role orientation of instrumentality was positively associated with creative accomplishments in the business venture domain and that androgynous, versus non-androgynous,…

  6. E. Paul Torrance: His Life, Accomplishments, and Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Thomas P.; Cramond, Bonnie; Spiers Neumeister,Kristie L.; Millar, Garnet; Silvian, Alice F.

    2002-01-01

    E. P. Torrance: His Life, Accomplishments, and Legacy is a tribute to the renowned creativity researcher, university teacher, and mentor to numerous individuals throughout the world. This monograph is presented in three sections which include a discussion of Torrance's life, followed by an overview of his accomplishments, including his creativity…

  7. Accomplishments in 2007 in the Management of Advanced Gastroesophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmoll, Hans-Joachim

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Overview of the Disease Process IncidencePrognostic or Predictive FactorsCurrent General Therapy Standards Regional VariationsEvidence for Individual AgentsAccomplishments During the Year TherapyBiomarkersBasic ScienceWhat Needs To Be Done Applications of the AccomplishmentsControversies and DisagreementsSpecial PopulationsFuture Directions Comments on ResearchObstacles to Progress PMID:19352469

  8. Space directorate research and technology accomplishments for FY 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The major accomplishments and test highlights for FY 1988 that occurred in the Space Dirctorate are given. Accomplishments and test highlights are presented by Division and Branch. The presented information will be useful in program coordination with government organizations, universities, and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  9. Space directorate research and technology accomplishments for fiscal year 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    The major accomplishments and test highlights of the Space Directorate of NASA Langley Research Center for FY87 are presented. Accomplishments and test highlights are listed by Division and Branch. This information should be useful in coordinating programs with government organizations, universities, and industry in areas of mutual interest.

  10. Global Comparison of Warring Groups in 2002–2007: Fatalities from Targeting Civilians vs. Fighting Battles

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Madelyn Hsiao-Rei; Lee, Uih Ran; Sundberg, Ralph; Spagat, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Warring groups that compete to dominate a civilian population confront contending behavioral options: target civilians or battle the enemy. We aimed to describe degrees to which combatant groups concentrated lethal behavior into intentionally targeting civilians as opposed to engaging in battle with opponents in contemporary armed conflict. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified all 226 formally organized state and non-state groups (i.e. actors) that engaged in lethal armed conflict during 2002–2007: 43 state and 183 non-state. We summed civilians killed by an actor's intentional targeting with civilians and combatants killed in battles in which the actor was involved for total fatalities associated with each actor, indicating overall scale of armed conflict. We used a Civilian Targeting Index (CTI), defined as the proportion of total fatalities caused by intentional targeting of civilians, to measure the concentration of lethal behavior into civilian targeting. We report actor-specific findings and four significant trends: 1.) 61% of all 226 actors (95% CI 55% to 67%) refrained from targeting civilians. 2.) Logistic regression showed actors were more likely to have targeted civilians if conflict duration was three or more years rather than one year. 3.) In the 88 actors that targeted civilians, multiple regressions showed an inverse correlation between CTI values and the total number of fatalities. Conflict duration of three or more years was associated with lower CTI values than conflict duration of one year. 4.) When conflict scale and duration were accounted for, state and non-state actors did not differ. We describe civilian targeting by actors in prolonged conflict. We discuss comparable patterns found in nature and interdisciplinary research. Conclusions/Significance Most warring groups in 2002–2007 did not target civilians. Warring groups that targeted civilians in small-scale, brief conflict concentrated more lethal behavior into

  11. Maxillofacial Gunshot Injuries: A Comparison of Civilian and Military Data.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Carlo; Pirgousis, Phillip; Steinberg, Barry

    2016-04-01

    To compare military with civilian gunshot wounds (GSWs) in the maxillofacial region in order to establish differences in presentation, morbidity, and surgical management. A cross-sectional study design was used. The University of Florida at Jacksonville oral and maxillofacial surgery operating room census and hospital trauma registry were both reviewed to identify maxillofacial GSW cases from 2005 through 2011. Military GSW data (2005 through 2011) were obtained from the US Department of Defense (DOD). The predictor variables were civilian versus military GSW events. The outcome variables of interest included the region of the face involved, race, gender, death during admission, hospital length of stay, and number of days in the intensive care unit (ICU). Descriptive statistics were computed. The sample was divided into military maxillofacial GSWs (n = 412) and civilian maxillofacial GSWs (n = 287 treated of 2,478 presented). A significant difference was measured between study groups regarding the region of the face involved (P = .0451), gender (P ≤ .0001), and race (P ≤ .0001). No significant relationship was measured regarding deaths during admission (P = .6510) for either study group. No standard deviation values for hospital length of stay or number of ICU days were provided by the DOD. The mean hospital length of stay for the military group was within the 95% confidence interval of the civilian group findings (6.0-7.6). The mean number of ICU days for the military group was not within the civilian group's 95% confidence interval (1.9-2.9). These data showed important differences in anatomic location, gender, and race distribution of maxillofacial GSWs between military and civilian populations. Limited analysis of hospital length of stay and number of ICU days might indicate no meaningful difference in hospital length of stay, although there was a statistical difference in the number of ICU days between the 2 populations. Future research comparing

  12. Evaluating the Special Needs of The Military for Radiation Biodosimetry for Tactical Warfare Against Deployed Troops: Comparing Military to Civilian Needs for Biodosimetry Methods.

    PubMed

    Flood, Ann Barry; Ali, Arif N; Boyle, Holly K; Du, Gaixin; Satinsky, Victoria A; Swarts, Steven G; Williams, Benjamin B; Demidenko, Eugene; Schreiber, Wilson; Swartz, Harold M

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to delineate characteristics of biodosimetry most suitable for assessing individuals who have potentially been exposed to significant radiation from a nuclear device explosion when the primary population targeted by the explosion and needing rapid assessment for triage is civilians vs. deployed military personnel. The authors first carry out a systematic analysis of the requirements for biodosimetry to meet the military's needs to assess deployed troops in a warfare situation, which include accomplishing the military mission. Then the military's special capabilities to respond and carry out biodosimetry for deployed troops in warfare are compared and contrasted systematically, in contrast to those available to respond and conduct biodosimetry for civilians who have been targeted by terrorists, for example. Then the effectiveness of different biodosimetry methods to address military vs. civilian needs and capabilities in these scenarios was compared and, using five representative types of biodosimetry with sufficient published data to be useful for the simulations, the number of individuals are estimated who could be assessed by military vs. civilian responders within the timeframe needed for triage decisions. Analyses based on these scenarios indicate that, in comparison to responses for a civilian population, a wartime military response for deployed troops has both more complex requirements for and greater capabilities to use different types of biodosimetry to evaluate radiation exposure in a very short timeframe after the exposure occurs. Greater complexity for the deployed military is based on factors such as a greater likelihood of partial or whole body exposure, conditions that include exposure to neutrons, and a greater likelihood of combined injury. These simulations showed, for both the military and civilian response, that a very fast rate of initiating the processing (24,000 d) is needed to have at least some methods capable of

  13. Strengthening the nuclear nonproliferation regime : focus on the civilian nuclear fuel cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Saltiel, David H.; Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2005-04-01

    the century and could increase even more quickly. Much of the new demand will come from the rapidly expanding economies in China and India, but much of the developing world stands poised to follow the same path. This growth in demand is paralleled by concerns about global warming and the long-term reliability of carbon-based fuel supplies, concerns which expanded use of nuclear power can help to address. For these reasons and others, many countries in Asia have already clearly signaled that nuclear energy will play a key role for years to come. Numerous proposals have been made in the last two years for reducing the proliferation risk of the civilian nuclear fuel cycle. These range from a ban on export of enrichment and reprocessing technology to countries not already possessing operational capabilities to multinational management of the nuclear fuel cycle and strengthening existing monitoring and security mechanisms. The need for international willingness to enforce nonproliferation commitments and norms has also been emphasized. Some of these proposals could significantly impact the production of nuclear energy. Because the successful strengthening of the nonproliferation regime and the expansion of nuclear energy are so closely related, any successful approach to resolving these issues will require the creative input of experts from both the nuclear energy and nonproliferation communities. Against this backdrop, Sandia National Laboratories organized its 14th International Security Conference (ISC) around the theme: Strengthening the Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime: Focus on the Civilian Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The goal of the conference was to begin a constructive dialogue between the nuclear energy and nuclear nonproliferation communities. The conference was held in Chantilly, Virginia, just outside Washington, D.C. on April 4-6, 2005, and was attended by approximately 125 participants from fifteen countries. The ISC agenda was structured to produce a systematic

  14. Almonte's great train disaster: Shaping nurses' roles and the civilian use of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Toman, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    Blood transfusion was initially a small-scale, labour-intensive therapy administered by physicians. Through the first decades of the 20th century, transfusion comprised a "last resort" measure used and tested primarily in the context of war. Media accounts of the Almonte train disaster on the night of 27 December 1942 linked survival to the newly established blood bank located 42 km east in Ottawa, Ontario. This event did not constitute a "first time" occurrence or a "great discovery" in the history of blood. But it did illustrate in a very visible and public manner that blood transfusion technology was now readily available for use in general hospitals and civilian populations. Canada had an infrastructure for the collection, processing, storage, and transportation of blood products, and for the recruitment of blood donors by the mid-1940s. As the need for blood declined toward the end of World War II, transfusion became a technology in need of application. The extension of transfusion to civilian populations, however, would require a ready source of labour-increased numbers of health care workers who were available continuously with the necessary knowledge and skills to assume the responsibility. Nurses were well situated for this technological role by a convergence of scientific, economic, labour, gender, professional, and educational influences that both facilitated and constrained blood transfusion as a nursing competency. This paper examines how the expanded use of one medical technology shaped related roles for nurses. Transfusion ultimately influenced nurses' work and the composition of the workforce as the first medical act "delegated" to nurses in Ontario (1947), setting a precedent for the delegation of further technologies over the next four decades.

  15. Replacing Military Personnel in Some Support Positions With Federal Civilians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-03

    2CONGRESS IONAL  BUDGET  OFFICE Transferring to civilians certain jobs  currently  held by military personnel could  reduce  costs  and increase DoD’s focus...analysis compares all  current   and future  costs  of hiring a service  member to those of hiring a civilian. Because some of those  costs  are borne by...types of  positions that it might make sense to  transfer. 4CONGRESS IONAL  BUDGET  OFFICE CBO also estimated possible  cost  savings  for DoD and the

  16. Systems analysis of decontamination options for civilian vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this project, which was supported by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Chemical and Biological Division (CBD), was to investigate options for the decontamination of the exteriors and interiors of vehicles in the civilian setting in order to restore those vehicles to normal use following the release of a highly toxic chemical. The decontamination of vehicles is especially challenging because they often contain sensitive electronic equipment, multiple materials some of which strongly adsorb chemical agents, and in the case of aircraft, have very rigid material compatibility requirements (i.e., they cannot be exposed to reagents that may cause even minor corrosion). A systems analysis approach was taken examine existing and future civilian vehicle decontamination capabilities.

  17. Security for whom? Stabilisation and civilian protection in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Elhawary, Samir

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on three periods of stabilisation in Colombia: the Alliance for Progress (1961-73) that sought to stem the threat of communist revolution in Latin America; Plan Colombia and President Alvaro Uribe's 'democratic security' policy (2000-07) aimed at defeating the guerrillas and negotiating a settlement with the paramilitaries; and the current 'integrated approach', adopted from 2007, to consolidate more effectively the state's control of its territory.(1) The paper assesses the extent to which these stabilisation efforts have enhanced the protection of civilians and ultimately finds that in all three periods there has been a disconnect between the discourse and the practice of stabilisation. While they have all sought to enhance security, in actual fact, they have privileged the security of the state and its allies at the expense of the effective protection of the civilian population. This has not only led to widespread human rights abuses but also has undermined the long-term stability being pursued.

  18. The application of NAVSTAR differential GPS in the civilian community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beser, J.; Parkinson, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS), currently being developed by the DOD, is a space based navigation system that will provide the user with precise position, velocity, and time information on a 24 hour basis, in all weather conditions and at any point on the globe. The baseline GPS system will provide guaranteed high accuracy to only a limited number of users, mostly the military. The civilian community has to devise a variation of this system to allow for an assured, uninterrupted level of accuracy. Differential GPS provides such a capability. In connection with the conceived possibility of the use of GPS by an enemy, it is found to be necessary to implement a selective availability technical capability. Differential GPS provides an approach for the civilian community to have a guaranteed level of accuracy better than the 250 meters presently planned for GPS.

  19. Suicide Prevention: Suicide Prevention for Department of the Army Civilians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    TG 325D December 2009 SUICIDE PREVENTION SUICIDE PREVENTION FOR DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CIVILIANS PREPARED BY THE U. S. ARMY...CENTER FOR HEALTH PROMOTION AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...Suicide Prevention 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT

  20. The Civilian Work Force in Military Organizations: An Annotated Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    promotion planning. Findings and conclusions are discussed. 18. Bretton, G . E., Dockstader, S. L., Nebeker, D. M., & Shumate, E. C . A werformance-continent...that wages for employees are comparable to the private sector. A-17 105. Pritchard, R. D., Bigby, D. G ., Beiting, M., Coverdale, S., & Morgan, C ...Ratliff, F. R., & Toedt, D. C . Research in support of a civilian appraisal system. In G . A. Berry (Chair), Psychology in the Department of Defense

  1. Enhancing Civilian Protection in Peace Operations: Insights from Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    most succumb to disease and the effects of malnutrition , a significant number are slaughtered.4 Since 1990, the Uppsala Conflict Data Program has...and appointed a special advisor on the matter.24 The principle has also become part of the working language of international engagement with...force should be at least the size of the largest indigenous armed force.45 Using both these measures, recent missions to protect civilians in Sudan

  2. Exploring the Complexities of Army Civilians and the Army Profession

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    as the province of practitioners of a profession. For a fiduciary relationship , a profession manifests when the nature of the services provided...9. 94 “5 CFR 2636.305 - Compensation and Other Restrictions Relating to Professions Involving a Fiduciary Relationship ,” linked from The Legal...operations.9 The symbiotic relationship and necessity for Army civilians is apparent in generating land combat power and providing support for

  3. Extremity gunshot wound and gunshot fracture in civilian practice.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, M J; Banks, H H; Leach, R B; Quigley, T B

    1976-01-01

    The civilian gunshot wound is a low velocity injury. Temporary cavitation does not occur in the low velocity wound and damage is confined to the projectile pathway. Extensive debridement is not indicated for this injury. Surgical cleansing is used to convert the open, contaminated wound to a clean, closed wound. Reparative and definitive reconstruction then follow to restore form and function with minimized patient hazard.

  4. Reducing the Size of the Federal Civilian Work Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    33 Hiring Freezes 39 Early Retirement 48 vi REDUCING THE SIZE OF THE FEDERAL CIVILIAN WORK FORCE December 1993 FIVE USE OF SEPARATION INCENTIVES AT...Cash Costs and Savings of Early Retirement 22 11. Near-Term Costs and Savings of Offering Employees Cash Incentives to Separate 24 viii REDUCING THE...Changes in U.S. Postal Service Employment, 1992-1993 55 22. Effect of Incentives on Regular and Early Retirement at the U.S. Postal Service and

  5. Simulating Civilians for Military Training: A Canadian Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-202 5 - 1 Simulating Civilians for Military Training: A Canadian Perspective Jérôme Levesque, François Cazzolato Defence R & D... Canada , Centre for Operational Research and Analysis Ottawa, Ontario CANADA Corresponding author: jerome.levesque@drdc-rddc.gc.ca Robin Harrap...Dept. of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Queen’s University Kingston, Ontario CANADA ABSTRACT The contemporary operations

  6. Integration of Training Civilian and Military Disaster Responders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    TRAINING CIVILIAN AND MILITARY DISASTER RESPONDERS by Leonard H. Guercia, Jr. September 2011 Thesis Advisor: Sam Clovis Second Reader...Guercia, Jr. Approved by: Sam Clovis Thesis Advisor William Austin Second Reader Harold A. Trinkunas, PhD Chair, Department...admiration. Their efforts transformed me from a tentative new student to a well-written professional. I want to extend a special thanks to Dr. Clovis

  7. Civil-Military Relations in Indonesia: Towards Civilian Supremacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR...Argentina in the period between 1930 and 1989, where Constantine P. Danopoulos and Cyntia Watson state that, ―civilian control over military was, for...of civil-military relations can be identified: (1) authoritarian-personal control , (2) authoritarian-mass party, (3) democratic competitive and

  8. Civilian Substitution for Military Personnel: An Analysis of the Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    years [Ref. 2: p. 296-298]. Therefore, Beltramo says that "costs budgeted by an agency for a particular year do not completely represent the...over time and across the federal bureaucracy of a decision to fill a hypothetical billet with either a member of the military or a civilian. As Beltramo ...Comp. 100 SPECIAL CONGRESSIONAL FUNDING Unfunded Retirement Liability 750 TOTAL 6,265 750 SOURCE: M. N. Beltramo , Considering the Cost of DoD Personnel

  9. Program summary for the Civilian Reactor Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    1982-07-01

    This Civilian Reactor Development Program document has the prime purpose of summarizing the technical programs supported by the FY 1983 budget request. This section provides a statement of the overall program objectives and a general program overview. Section II presents the technical programs in a format intended to show logical technical interrelationships, and does not necessarily follow the structure of the formal budget presentation. Section III presents the technical organization and management structure of the program.

  10. The Fate of the Civilian Surge in a Changing Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    www.carlisle.army.mil/ Carlisle Barracks, PA and UNITED STATES ARMY WAR COLLEGE PRESS This Publication PSKOI Website ISBN: 978-0-9861865-9-2 PKSOI PAPER THE...sacrifice, as our nation did after Vietnam. This paper explores the extent to which civilian agencies have managed to retain latent R&S capabili- ties...next time such capabilities are needed. This paper is based on a literature review and in- terviews with more than 20 subject-matter experts from

  11. The Great American Divide: The Military-Civilian Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-14

    DIVIDE: THE MILITARY-CIVILIAN GAP “We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice , insure domestic...Court justices are Ivy League alumni, and with the exception of 1964, there has been at least one Ivy League alumnus on either the Republican or...ages of 18 and 24 qualify for military service due to physical issues, moral issues (e.g., criminal record, drug dependency etc.), or failure to

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Mission Accomplishments, Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Todd Randall; Wright, Virginia Latta

    2015-09-01

    A summary of mission accomplishments for the research organizations at the Idaho National Laboratory for FY 2015. Areas include Nuclear Energy, National and Homeland Security, Science and Technology Addressing Broad DOE Missions; Collaborations; and Stewardship and Operation of Research Facilities.

  13. Enhanced surveillance program FY97 accomplishments. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mauzy, A.; Laake, B.

    1997-10-01

    This annual report is one volume of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) FY97 Accomplishments. The complete accomplishments report consists of 11 volumes. Volume 1 includes an ESP overview and a summary of selected unclassified FY97 program highlights. Volume 1 specifically targets a general audience, reflecting about half of the tasks conducted in FY97 and emphasizing key program accomplishments and contributions. The remaining volumes of the accomplishments report are classified, organized by program focus area, and present in technical detail the progress achieved in each of the 104 FY97 program tasks. Focus areas are as follows: pits; high explosives; organics; dynamics; diagnostics; systems; secondaries; nonnuclear materials; nonnuclear components; and Surveillance Test Program upgrades.

  14. Accomplishments Report for the National Strategy for Electronics Stewardship

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page holds the NSES report, which charts the progress and accomplishments of the NSES in addressing sustainable management of electronics and highlights the benefits of continued leadership from the federal government.

  15. Audiometric profile of civilian pilots according to noise exposure

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Taiana Pacheco; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Schütz, Gabriel Eduardo; Mello, Márcia Gomide da Silva; Câmara, Volney de Magalhães

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the audiometric profile of civilian pilots according to the noise exposure level. METHODS This observational cross-sectional study evaluated 3,130 male civilian pilots aged between 17 and 59 years. These pilots were subjected to audiometric examinations for obtaining or revalidating the functional capacity certificate in 2011. The degree of hearing loss was classified as normal, suspected noise-induced hearing loss, and no suspected hearing loss with other associated complications. Pure-tone air-conduction audiometry was performed using supra-aural headphones and acoustic stimulus of the pure-tone type, containing tone thresholds of frequencies between 250 Hz and 6,000 Hz. The independent variables were professional categories, length of service, hours of flight, and right or left ear. The dependent variable was pilots with suspected noise-induced hearing loss. The noise exposure level was considered low/medium or high, and the latter involved periods > 5,000 flight hours and > 10 years of flight service. RESULTS A total of 29.3% pilots had suspected noise-induced hearing loss, which was bilateral in 12.8% and predominant in the left ear (23.7%). The number of pilots with suspected hearing loss increased as the noise exposure level increased. CONCLUSIONS Hearing loss in civilian pilots may be associated with noise exposure during the period of service and hours of flight. PMID:25372170

  16. Epidemiological patterns of suicide terrorism in the civilian Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Junaid Ahmad; Mehmood, Amber; Shahid, Muhammad; Bhatti, Sajjad Akbar; Akhtar, Umbreen; Razzak, Junaid Abdul

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we assessed the epidemiological patterns of suicide terrorism in the civilian population of Pakistan. Information about suicide terrorism-related events, deaths and injuries was extracted from the South-Asian Terrorism Portal (SATP) for the period from 2002 to October 2009. Of 198 events, civilians were involved in 194 events. Civilians accounted for 74.1% (N = 2017) of those who died and 93.8% (N = 6129) of those who were injured. In nine districts, mortality rates were more than one death per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The yearly trend showed a shift of attack targets from foreigners and sectarian targets in 2002-2005 to security forces or general public in 2006-2009. Attacks on public installations (mosques) or political gatherings resulted in a significantly greater (P ≤ 0.02) number of deaths (22 vs. 8) and injuries (59 vs. 24) per event compared with security installations. These results show that prevention might focus on political negotiation with armed groups and that appropriate measures should be taken to protect mosques and political gatherings.

  17. Fresh Whole Blood Transfusion: Military and Civilian Implications.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Carl W; Tranberg, John W; Boyer, Phillip; Silvestri, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage and exsanguination are the leading cause of preventable death, and resuscitative therapy is a critical component for survival. In various combinations, fresh whole blood, blood components, colloids, and crystalloids have all been staples of trauma care. The use of fresh whole blood is a well-established military practice that has saved the lives of thousands of American and coalition military personnel. Civilian use of fresh whole blood is far less established owing to the wide availability of individual blood components. However, this highly tailored blood supply is vulnerable to both natural and man-made disasters. In the event of such disruption, such as a major hurricane, it may be necessary for civilian hospitals to rapidly enact a fresh whole blood program. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the current use of blood therapy for trauma resuscitation, the US military's approach to fresh whole blood, and how maintaining a civilian capacity for fresh whole blood collection in the event of future man-made and natural disasters is key to promoting survival from trauma. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. [Psychological distress among civilian police: A gender-based analysis].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edinilsa Ramos; Franco, Letícia Gastão; Meireles, Camila de Carvalho; Ferreira, Vanessa Tokunaga; Dos Santos, Nilton César

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate potential psychological distress among members of the civilian police force, based on gender differences. It analyzes data from previous research on work, health conditions, and quality of life in the civilian police using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The study included and tested data from the questionnaire applied to a statistically representative sample of 2,746 civilian police (80.8% males and 19.2% females) from the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, according to gender variables and position in the police force (administrative, technical, and operational law enforcement). The study presents an overview of social and economic characteristics, job conditions, health problems, and quality of life, highlighting the areas of information where gender appears as an important factor. The Self-Reported Questionnaire (SRQ-20) was used to investigate psychological distress comparing males and females. The results did not show gender differences in psychological distress, but did identify significant differences in some items in the scale. Female police, especially in technical positions, showed a higher proportion than males. The conclusions corroborate some previous research.

  19. Audiometric profile of civilian pilots according to noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Taiana Pacheco; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Schütz, Gabriel Eduardo; Mello, Márcia Gomide da Silva; Câmara, Volney de Magalhães

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the audiometric profile of civilian pilots according to the noise exposure level. This observational cross-sectional study evaluated 3,130 male civilian pilots aged between 17 and 59 years. These pilots were subjected to audiometric examinations for obtaining or revalidating the functional capacity certificate in 2011. The degree of hearing loss was classified as normal, suspected noise-induced hearing loss, and no suspected hearing loss with other associated complications. Pure-tone air-conduction audiometry was performed using supra-aural headphones and acoustic stimulus of the pure-tone type, containing tone thresholds of frequencies between 250 Hz and 6,000 Hz. The independent variables were professional categories, length of service, hours of flight, and right or left ear. The dependent variable was pilots with suspected noise-induced hearing loss. The noise exposure level was considered low/medium or high, and the latter involved periods > 5,000 flight hours and > 10 years of flight service. A total of 29.3% pilots had suspected noise-induced hearing loss, which was bilateral in 12.8% and predominant in the left ear (23.7%). The number of pilots with suspected hearing loss increased as the noise exposure level increased. Hearing loss in civilian pilots may be associated with noise exposure during the period of service and hours of flight.

  20. Civilian applications of MTP technology and integrated systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, M.

    1986-01-01

    There are several potential civilian applications of defense energy systems. The multimegawatt terrestrial power plant is an example of a military facility of great potential value in certain civilian settings. Such plants would almost certainly be installed primarily for the production of electricity, but they could also have other important uses. One advantage of such a close-in facility could be its ability to provide cogenerated heat for industrial processing or space heating. In all cases, the use of nuclear power to replace fossil fuels - especially coal - will provide a source of energy that is far superior in terms of environmental protection and human health and safety. Another major benefit to society associated with the use of small nuclear plants will be the familiarization more citizens experience with the use of nuclear power. Finally, the development and use of 10-MW(d) nuclear power facilities will provide experience for the design and construction of larger commercial plants with similar characteristics for civilian use in the near future.

  1. Military Report More Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use than Civilians

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Bernadette P.; Finch, Michael D.; Bray, Robert M.; Williams, Thomas V.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Hadden, Louise S.; Colleran, Heather L.; Jonas, Wayne B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objective was to estimate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among active duty military and compare data with civilian use. Design A global survey on CAM use in the 12 previous months was conducted. Final participants (16,146) were stratified by gender, service, region, and pay grade. Analysis included prevalence of CAM use, demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Results Approximately 45% of respondents reported using at least one type of CAM therapy. Most commonly used therapies were as follows: prayer for one's own health (24.4%), massage therapy (14.1%), and relaxation techniques (10.8%). After exclusion of prayer for one's own health, adjusting to the 2000 U.S. census, overall CAM use in the military (44.5%) was higher than that in comparable civilian surveys (36.0% and 38.3%). Conclusions Military personnel reported using three CAM stress-reduction therapies at 2.5–7 times the rate of civilians. Among the military, high utilization of CAM practices that reduce stress may serve as markers for practitioners assessing an individual's health and well-being. PMID:23323682

  2. Process development accomplishments: Waste and hazard minimization, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, D.A.

    1991-11-04

    This report summarizes significant technical accomplishments of the Mound Waste and Hazard Minimization Program for FY 1991. The accomplishments are in one of eight major areas: environmentally responsive cleaning program; nonhalogenated solvent trials; substitutes for volatile organic compounds; hazardous material exposure minimization; nonhazardous plating development; explosive processing waste reduction; tritium capture without conversion to water; and robotic assembly. Program costs have been higher than planned.

  3. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  4. Expanding the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Leedjärv, Laurits; Tempel, Elmo

    2011-12-01

    Proceedings of the International Conference EXPANDING THE UNIVERSE, On the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the Tartu Observatory, Tartu, Estonia 2011 April 27-29. C. Sterken, L. Leedjarv, E. Tempel (Eds.)

  5. Politics, Police Accountability, and Public Health: Civilian Review in Newark, New Jersey.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alecia

    2016-04-01

    Police brutality, a longstanding civil rights issue, has returned to the forefront of American public debate. A growing body of public health research shows that excessive use of force by police and racial profiling have adverse effects on health for African Americans and other marginalized groups. Yet, interventions to monitor unlawful policing have been met with fierce opposition at the federal, state, and local levels. On April 30, 2015, the mayor of Newark, New Jersey signed an executive order establishing a Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB) to monitor the Newark Police Department (NPD). Using a mixed-methods approach, this study examined how advocates and government actors accomplished this recent policy change in the face of police opposition and after a 50-year history of unsuccessful attempts in Newark. Drawing on official public documents, news media, and interviews conducted in April and May 2015, I propose that: (1) a Department of Justice investigation of the NPD, (2) the activist background of the Mayor and his relationships with community organizations, and (3) the momentum provided by the national Black Lives Matter movement were pivotal in overcoming political obstacles to reform. Examining the history of CCRB adoption in Newark suggests when and where advocates may intervene to promote policing reforms in other US cities.

  6. The 1986-87 NASA space/gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space/Gravitational Biology program, for research conducted during the period January 1986 to April 1987. This program utilizes the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on Earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  7. The 1987-1988 NASA space/gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Individual technical summaries of research projects of the NASA Space/Gravitational Biology Program, for research conducted during the period January 1987 to April 1988 are presented. This Program is concerned with using the characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  8. The 1985-86 NASA space/gravitational biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Individual Technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space/Gravitational Biology Program are presented. This Program is concerned with using the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on Earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a listing of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  9. The 1988-1989 NASA Space/Gravitational Biology Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's space/gravitational biology program, for research conducted during the period May 1988 to April 1989. This program is concerned with using the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance knowledge in the biological sciences; understanding how gravity has shaped and affected life on Earth; and understanding how the space environment affects both plant and animal species. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  10. The 1989-1990 NASA space biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Individual technical summaries of research projects on NASA's Space Biology Program for research conducted during the period May 1989 to April 1990 are presented. This program is concerned with using the unique characteristics of the space environment, particularly microgravity, as a tool to advance the following: (1) knowledge in the biological sciences; (2) understanding of how gravity has shaped and affected life on the Earth; and (3) understanding of how the space environment affects both plants and animals. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  11. A Comparative Analysis of Student Service Member/Veteran and Civilian Student Drinking Motives.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, Shawn D; Barry, Adam E

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the nature and correlates of 252 student service members'/military veteran and civilian college students' drinking motivations. Data was collected via electronic survey. Results revealed no differences between military affiliated and civilian students in mean levels of alcohol motivations. However, the links between alcohol motives and problem drinking differed for these two groups of students. Specifically, coping motivations were linked to problem drinking for student service members/veterans but not civilian students.

  12. A civilian perspective on ballistic trauma and gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gun violence is on the rise in some European countries, however most of the literature on gunshot injuries pertains to military weaponry and is difficult to apply to civilians, due to dissimilarities in wound contamination and wounding potential of firearms and ammunition. Gunshot injuries in civilians have more focal injury patterns and should be considered distinct entities. Methods A search of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health MEDLINE database was performed using PubMed. Results Craniocerebral gunshot injuries are often lethal, especially after suicide attempts. The treatment of non space consuming haematomas and the indications for invasive pressure measurement are controversial. Civilian gunshot injuries to the torso mostly intend to kill; however for those patients who do not die at the scene and are hemodynamically stable, insertion of a chest tube is usually the only required procedure for the majority of penetrating chest injuries. In penetrating abdominal injuries there is a trend towards non-operative care, provided that the patient is hemodynamically stable. Spinal gunshots can also often be treated without operation. Gunshot injuries of the extremities are rarely life-threatening but can be associated with severe morbidity. With the exception of craniocerebral, bowel, articular, or severe soft tissue injury, the use of antibiotics is controversial and may depend on the surgeon's preference. Conclusion The treatment strategy for patients with gunshot injuries to the torso mostly depends on the hemodynamic status of the patient. Whereas hemodynamically unstable patients require immediate operative measures like thoracotomy or laparotomy, hemodynamically stable patients might be treated with minor surgical procedures (e.g. chest tube) or even conservatively. PMID:20565804

  13. Tourniquet use for peripheral vascular injuries in the civilian setting.

    PubMed

    Passos, Edward; Dingley, Brittany; Smith, Andrew; Engels, Paul T; Ball, Chad G; Faidi, Samir; Nathens, Avery; Tien, Homer

    2014-03-01

    Haemorrhage in peripheral vascular injuries may cause life-threatening exsanguination. Tourniquets are used extensively by the military, with increased interest in the civilian setting to prevent deaths. This is a retrospective study of trauma patients at two large Canadian trauma centres with arterial injury after isolated extremity trauma. We hypothesized that tourniquet use may decrease mortality rate and transfusion requirements if applied early. The study group was all adult patients at two Level 1 Trauma Centres in two Canadian cities in Canada, who had arterial injuries from extremity trauma. The study period was from January 2001 to December 2010. We excluded patients with significant associated injuries. The intervention in this study was prehospital tourniquet use. The main outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were length of stay, compartment syndrome, amputation, and blood product transfusion. 190 patients were included in the study, and only 4 patients had a prehospital tourniquet applied. They arrived directly from the scene of injury, had improvised tourniquets by police or bystanders, and showed a trend to be more hypotensive and acidotic. Four other patients had tourniquets applied in the trauma bay within 1h of injury. There were no differences in age, sex, injury severity or physiologic presentation between patients who had an early tourniquet applied and those who died without a tourniquet. However, six patients died without a tourniquet, and all bled to death. Of the eight patients who had early tourniquets applied, none died. Tourniquets may prevent exsanguination in the civilian setting for patients suffering either blunt or penetrating trauma to the extremity. Future studies will help determine the utility of deploying tourniquets in the civilian setting, given the rarity of exsanguinating haemorrhage from isolated extremity trauma in this setting. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A civilian perspective on ballistic trauma and gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Lichte, Philipp; Oberbeck, Reiner; Binnebösel, Marcel; Wildenauer, Rene; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Kobbe, Philipp

    2010-06-17

    Gun violence is on the rise in some European countries, however most of the literature on gunshot injuries pertains to military weaponry and is difficult to apply to civilians, due to dissimilarities in wound contamination and wounding potential of firearms and ammunition. Gunshot injuries in civilians have more focal injury patterns and should be considered distinct entities. A search of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health MEDLINE database was performed using PubMed. Craniocerebral gunshot injuries are often lethal, especially after suicide attempts. The treatment of non space consuming haematomas and the indications for invasive pressure measurement are controversial. Civilian gunshot injuries to the torso mostly intend to kill; however for those patients who do not die at the scene and are hemodynamically stable, insertion of a chest tube is usually the only required procedure for the majority of penetrating chest injuries. In penetrating abdominal injuries there is a trend towards non-operative care, provided that the patient is hemodynamically stable. Spinal gunshots can also often be treated without operation. Gunshot injuries of the extremities are rarely life-threatening but can be associated with severe morbidity.With the exception of craniocerebral, bowel, articular, or severe soft tissue injury, the use of antibiotics is controversial and may depend on the surgeon's preference. The treatment strategy for patients with gunshot injuries to the torso mostly depends on the hemodynamic status of the patient. Whereas hemodynamically unstable patients require immediate operative measures like thoracotomy or laparotomy, hemodynamically stable patients might be treated with minor surgical procedures (e.g. chest tube) or even conservatively.

  15. Training forward surgical teams: do military-civilian collaborations work?

    PubMed

    Schulman, Carl I; Graygo, Jill; Wilson, Katherine; Robinson, Donald B; Garcia, George; Augenstein, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The US Army and the Ryder Trauma Center (Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida) teamed up to provide a training environment (ie, the Army Trauma Training Center) in which forward surgical teams can attend to gain critical teamwork and trauma technical skills to prepare for deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. The purpose of this study was to gather trainee reactions to the military-civilian collaboration provided at ATTC after deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan. Survey respondents were 135 US Army personnel (an approximately 50% response rate) who participated in the ATTC 2-week team training program between January 2005 and June 2007. The survey asked questions pertaining to their experience in the resuscitation unit and patient contact at the trauma center. Over 90% of participants agreed or strongly agreed that training in the resuscitation area was beneficial. A majority of participants also agreed or strongly agreed that the patient contact experience was sufficient (78.5%), was a good learning opportunity (90%), and that the experience was a good opportunity to apply what they had learned in their classroom training (over 80%). Areas of suggested improvement included the importance of clarifying roles between the ATTC trainees and the Ryder Trauma Center residents and interns. Trainees would have preferred an extension of the training as a whole, as they felt it was rushed in order to fit all training opportunities into the 2 weeks that they were in Miami. Finally, trainees noted the lack of injuries admitted to the trauma center which replicate injuries caused by blasts (ie, improvised explosive devices). The results of our efforts indicate that military-civilian collaborations do in fact work and are beneficial to both military and civilian medical providers. The opportunity to perform as a team in their respective roles, to respond to a variety of actual trauma patients, and access to civilian medical providers were beneficial. As mentioned, such

  16. Management of civilian and military vascular trauma: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tony; Kalish, Jeffrey; Woodson, Jonathan

    2010-12-01

    Management of vascular trauma has evolved tremendously since the turn of the 20(th) century. The lessons from each major military conflict over the past 100 years have refined our understanding of how to care for soldiers and civilians with vascular injuries. The recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have likewise improved our strategy for treating victims of vascular trauma. Understanding the principles that guide management of vascular injuries will result in preservation of life and limb. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective markets and design concepts for civilian remotely piloted aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelms, W. P., Jr.; Gregory, T. J.; Aderhold, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper summarizes a study that examines the technical, economic, and environmental aspects of remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs) in the civil environment. A market survey was conducted in which 35 civil applications of RPVs were identified. For a number of these uses, vehicle and system concepts were defined, benefit and cost comparisons were made with present methods, and the influence of safety and environmental implications was assessed. The results suggest a sizable potential demand for the use of RPVs in the civil sector, and some of the applications show promising cost savings over established methods. A focussed technology effort could provide the safety assurances needed for routine civilian operation of RPVs.

  18. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    This sixth Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) describes activities and expenditures of the Office during fiscal year 1988. An epilogue chapter reports significant events from the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 1988 through March 1989. The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPA) of 1987 made significant changes to the NWPA relating to repository siting and monitored retrievable storage and added new provisions for the establishment of several institutional entities with which OCRWM will interact. Therefore, a dominant theme throughout this report is the implementation of the policy focus and specific provisions of the Amendments Act. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. EU Civilian Crisis Management: The Record So Far

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    R ® is a registered trademark. © Copyright 2010...Ap r – 03 Ju l–0 3 Oc t– 03 Ja n– 04 Ap r – 04 Ju l–0 4 Oc t– 04 Ja n– 05 Ap r – 05 Ju l–0 5 Oc t– 05 Ja n– 06 Ap r – 06 Ju l–0 6 Oc t– 06 Ja n– 07 Ap r ...07 Ju l–0 7 Oc t– 07 Ja n– 08 Ja n– 09 Ap r – 08 Ju l–0 8 Oc t– 08 The European Union’s Civilian-Military Capabilities 11 Table 2.1 EU

  20. Depression in Viet Nam veterans and civilian controls.

    PubMed

    Helzer, J E; Robins, L N; Wish, E; Hesselbrock, M

    1979-04-01

    In order to investigate the long-term psychological consequences of Viet Nam combat, the authors located and personally interviewed a group of 571 randomly selected Viet Nam veterans and 284 matched civilian controls 3 years after the veterans returned to the United States. In the veterans they found a weak association between combat and subsequent depressive symptoms, but the association did not persist after controlling for preservice factors. The incidence of depressive symptoms and syndromes was similar when veterans were compared with nonveterans. Results are contrasted with a 12-month follow-up study of the same veterans in which a stronger association between combat and later depression was found.

  1. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    PubMed

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  2. National Test Facility civilian agency use of supercomputers not feasible

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Based on interviews with civilian agencies cited in the House report (DOE, DoEd, HHS, FEMA, NOAA), none would be able to make effective use of NTF`s excess supercomputing capabilities. These agencies stated they could not use the resources primarily because (1) NTF`s supercomputers are older machines whose performance and costs cannot match those of more advanced computers available from other sources and (2) some agencies have not yet developed applications requiring supercomputer capabilities or do not have funding to support such activities. In addition, future support for the hardware and software at NTF is uncertain, making any investment by an outside user risky.

  3. Soldiers’ Perceptions of the Usefulness of Civilian and Military Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    INFORMATION EXCHANGE, * MASS MEDIA , ARMY PERSONNEL, SOCIAL COMMUNICATION, THESES, RADIO BROADCASTING, FEASIBILITY STUDIES, SURVEYS, PUBLIC RELATIONS, CIVILIAN PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION(PSYCHOLOGY), NEWSPAPERS.

  4. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  5. Accomplishments under the Airport Improvement Program: Fiscal Year 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    EQUIPMENT. CONSTRUCT ACCESS ROAD (PRIMARY) FORT HUACHUCA/ SIERRA VISTA OS $300.000 EXPAND TERMINAL BUILDING LIBBY AAF/ SIERRA VISTA MUNICIPAL (MULTI-YEAR...GRANT AGREEMENT - FISCAL YEAR f991 LOCATION AND PROJECT FEDERAL NAME OF AIRPORT NUMBER FUNDS DESCRIPTION OF WORK C A L I F 0 R N I A (CONTINUED0 MODESTO ...12 S136.890 RECONSTRUCT. STRENGTHEN AND EXPAND MODESTO CITY-COUNTY ARPT-HARRY SHAM FLO APRON [PRIMARY) 13 $62.370 CONDUCT MASTER PLAN UPDATE

  6. 2008 Science Accomplishments Report of the Pacific Northwest Research Station

    Treesearch

    Rhonda Mazza

    2009-01-01

    This report highlights significant research findings and accomplishments by scientists at the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Research Station during fiscal year 2008. The mission of the PNW Research Station is to generate and communicate scientific knowledge that helps people understand and make informed choices about people, natural resources, and the environment. The work...

  7. 2009 Science Accomplishments Report of the Pacific Northwest Research Station

    Treesearch

    Rhonda Mazza

    2010-01-01

    This report highlights significant research findings and accomplishments by scientists at the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Research Station during fiscal year 2009. The mission of the PNW Research Station is to generate and communicate scientific knowledge that helps people understand and make informed choices about people, natural resources...

  8. 2014 Survey of States: Initiatives, Trends, and Accomplishments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyyan, Vitaliy; Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the fourteenth survey of states by the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) at the University of Minnesota. Results are presented for the 50 regular states and eight of the 11 unique states. The purpose of this report is to provide a snapshot of the new initiatives, trends, accomplishments, and emerging issues…

  9. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS...

  10. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID TO STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF...

  11. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS...

  12. 38 CFR 39.120 - Documentation of grant accomplishments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Documentation of grant accomplishments. 39.120 Section 39.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AID FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS...

  13. Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic Standardized Assessment (LAP-D).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, David; Lobman, Marcia; Oremland, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Learning Accomplishment Profile-Diagnostic Standardized Assessment, a standardized norm-referenced developmental assessment tool for children between the ages of 30 to 72 months. The test assesses fine motor skills, language skills, cognitive ability, and gross motor development. Its administration, standardization,…

  14. 5 CFR 3301.102 - Procedure for accomplishing disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... disqualification. 3301.102 Section 3301.102 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SUPPLEMENTAL STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY § 3301.102 Procedure for accomplishing... 2635.402(c), to disqualify himself from participation in a particular matter to which he has been...

  15. Working Together: California Indians and the Forest Service. Accomplishment Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Berkeley, CA. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station.

    This report describes accomplishments of the Forest Services's Tribal Relations Program in California, highlighting coordinated efforts with tribal governments and Native American communities throughout California's national forests. The regional office provided intensive training on federal-tribal relations to key staff throughout the region, and…

  16. 2013 Science Accomplishments Report of the Pacific Northwest Research Station

    Treesearch

    Rhonda Mazza

    2014-01-01

    Communicating the scientific knowledge generated by the Pacific Northwest Research Station is integral to our mission. The 2013 Science Accomplishments reports highlights the breadth of the station’s research, the relevance of our science findings, and the application of these findings. The photographs throughout the report showcase the region where we work and how...

  17. 2014 Science Accomplishments Report of the Pacific Northwest Research Station

    Treesearch

    Rhonda Mazza

    2015-01-01

    Communicating the scientific knowledge generated by the Pacific Northwest Research Station is integral to our mission. The 2014 Science Accomplishments reports highlights the breadth of the station’s research, the relevance of our science findings, and the application of these findings. The photographs throughout the report showcase the region where we work and how...

  18. Marine Corps Transition Team Program in Iraq: Mission Accomplished

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-02

    to Mission Accomplishment.. .................................................................... 21 Figures Figure 1. MATIS Score Improvement...CORPS ADVISOR TRAINING IMPACT SYSTEM ( MATIS ) The Interaction Research Institute (IRI), a private company, conducted a study that measured advisor...study specifically focused on I Marine Expeditionary Force sourced transition teams who deployed to OIF from October 2007- September 2009. The : MATIS

  19. Final report on technical work accomplished under contract NASw-2953

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A report is given on the technical work accomplished in the area of plasma physics. The subjects covered are: (1) oblique whistler instabilities, (2) current-limited electron beam injection, (3) three-dimensional ion sound turbulence, (4) theoretical aspects of sounder antenna operation and (5) whistler modes in bow shock structures.

  20. FAMILY GOALS AND SOME FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THEIR ACCOMPLISHMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSTON, RUPERT BERNARD

    GOALS OF FARM FAMILIES WERE ANALYZED AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THEIR ACCOMPLISHMENT STUDIED. DATA ON FARM GOALS, FARM AND HOME RESOURCES, AND INCOME WERE OBTAINED FROM 112 FAMILIES IN 18 MISSISSIPPI COUNTIES, IN WHICH THERE WERE THREE DIFFERENT COUNTY EXTENSION STAFFING PLANS. GOALS WERE CLASSIFIED IN GOUPS SUCH AS HOME AND GROUNDS, HOME…

  1. Women in History--Abigail Adams: Life, Accomplishments, and Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenan, Sharon K.

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles the life, accomplishments, and ideas of Abigail Adams. Born in 1944, Adams lacked a formal education, but she more than made up for that shortcoming with her love of reading, especially literature, and her interests in politics and events surrounding the young colonies. Adams was supportive of the advancement of women. She…

  2. Women in History--Abigail Adams: Life, Accomplishments, and Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenan, Sharon K.

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles the life, accomplishments, and ideas of Abigail Adams. Born in 1944, Adams lacked a formal education, but she more than made up for that shortcoming with her love of reading, especially literature, and her interests in politics and events surrounding the young colonies. Adams was supportive of the advancement of women. She…

  3. Colorado Certificate of Accomplishment. Level 1 ABE Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kenya

    This resource guide contains learning activities designed to complement existing ABE curricula or become the cornerstone of an ABE curriculum integrating reading, writing, and math skills with practical life knowledge. The guide begins with an introduction, acknowledgments, and an overview of Colorado's Certificate of Accomplishment program, which…

  4. CIVILIAN VASCULAR INJURIES IN AN URBAN AFRICAN REFERRAL INSTITUTION.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, P O; Salami, M A; Oyemolade, T A; Adegboye, V O

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the pattern of civilian vascular injuries, demonstrate any change in pattern and document management challenges in a resource challenged environment. A retrospective study. The division of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery of University College Hospital a major referral centre, not only for south-west Nigeria but for the whole country. All patients presenting with vascular injury through the division during the study period were recruited. There were no exclusion criteria. Males accounted for 85% of the study group. Mean age was 31.98 years (± 14.94 S.D.) with peak in 20-29 years group (28.3%). Stab and gunshot injury were responsible in 36.7% and 30% respectively. Upper limb vessels were involved in 58.3%. Delayed presentation (> 4 hrs postinjury) occurred in 58.3% and presentation-operation interval was four to six hours in 55% of cases. Specific diagnostic investigation was required in only 20%. Morbidity, amputation and mortality rates were 10.1, 3 and 6.7% respectively. Penetrating vascular injuries are on the increase amongst civilian population. Poor transportation and lack of organised referral system contribute to delay in surgical intervention. Prompt evaluation for hard signs of vascular injury is of immense value in deciding for surgery in our environment where patients have financial challenges and resources are limited.

  5. Expanding Views on Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, Jeanne B.; Correa, Vivian I.

    1996-01-01

    This position paper proposes an expanded definition of transition, based on common components of early childhood and secondary perspectives. It advocates for a seamless model of transition service delivery for students with disabilities, including program planning, from birth through age 21. The model addresses curriculum, location of services,…

  6. Expanded Roles for HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on expanded roles for human resource development (HRD). "The Roles of Consultants in Gainsharing Firms: Empirical Results" (Eunsang Cho, Gary N. McLean) reports findings that consultants are moderately involved at the separation, preparation, evaluation, and design stages and have low…

  7. Expand Your Hiring Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leske, Lucy Apthorp; Archer-Martin, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    To succeed in recruiting development officers, colleges and universities must use more aggressive methods to reach alumni, people with ties to the campus, and local business people; expand their selection criteria, perhaps including candidates with little or no experience; streamline the hiring process; and train new professionals. (MSE)

  8. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  9. The 1992-1993 NASA Space Biology Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space Biology Program, for research conducted during the calendar years of 1992 and 1993. This program includes both plant and animal research, and is dedicated to understanding the role of gravity and the effects of microgravity on biological processes; determining the effects of the interaction of gravity and other environmental factors on biological systems; and using the microgravity of the space environment as a tool to advance fundamental scientific knowledge in the biological sciences to improve the quality of life on Earth and contribute to NASA's goal of manned exploration of space. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  10. FY 1995 research highlights: PNL accomplishments in OER programs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducts fundamental and applied research in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) core missions in science and technology, environmental quality, energy resources, and national security. Much of this research is funded by the program offices of DOE`s Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER), primarily the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), and by PNL`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This document is a collection of research highlights that describe PNL`s accomplishments in DOE-ER funded programs during Fiscal Year 1995. Included are accomplishments in research funded by OHER`s Analytical Technologies, Environmental Research, Health Effects, General Life Sciences, and Carbon Dioxide Research programs; BES`s Materials Science, Chemical Sciences, Engineering and Geoscience, and Applied Mathematical Sciences programs; and PNL`s LDRD Program. Summaries are given for 70 projects.

  11. Abstract and research accomplishments of University Coal Research Projects

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their respective projects in time for distribution at a conference on June 13--14, 1995 at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to that request. For convenience, the 70 grants reported in this book are stored into eight technical areas, Coal Science, Coal Surface Science, Reaction Chemistry, Advanced Process Concepts, Engineering Fundamentals and Thermodynamics, Environmental Science, high Temperature Phenomena, and Special topics. Indexes are provided for locating projects by subject, principal investigators, and contracting organizations. Each extended abstract describes project objectives, work accomplished, significance to the Fossil Energy Program, and plans for the next year.

  12. The 1990-1991 NASA space biology accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halstead, Thora W. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This report consists of individual technical summaries of research projects of NASA's Space Biology Program, for research conducted during the period May 1990 through May 1991. This program includes both plant and animal research, and is dedicated to understanding the role of gravity and other environmental factors on biological systems and to using the microgravity of the space environment as a tool to advance fundamental scientific knowledge in the biological sciences to improve the quality of life on Earth and contribute to NASA's goal of manned exploration of space. The summaries for each project include a description of the research, a list of the accomplishments, an explanation of the significance of the accomplishments, and a list of publications.

  13. Material Recover and Waste Form Development--2016 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Terry A.; Vienna, John; Paviet, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    The Material Recovery and Waste Form Development (MRWFD) Campaign under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is responsible for developing advanced separation and waste form technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress (April 2010). This MRWFD accomplishments report summarizes the results of the research and development (R&D) efforts performed within MRWFD in Fiscal Year (FY) 2016. Each section of the report contains an overview of the activities, results, technical point of contact, applicable references, and documents produced during the FY. This report briefly outlines campaign management and integration activities but primarily focuses on the many technical accomplishments of FY 2016. The campaign continued to use an engineering-driven, science-based approach to maintain relevance and focus.

  14. The Military Connection or Civilian-Military Common Interests in Higher Education,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    their colleges) and (2) the civilian colleges and universities. The military is both a consumer of civilian higher education and a producer through its...this fact. There should be more interaction between the two sectors because higher education and the all volunteer force compete for the same resource -- the eighteen year old.

  15. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel...

  16. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel...

  17. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel...

  18. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel...

  19. 46 CFR 9.1 - Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel. 9.1 Section 9.1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC EXTRA COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICES § 9.1 Extra compensation; Coast Guard civilian personnel...

  20. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Behavioral Trust Inventory ( BTI ; Gillespie, 2003) were used to assess superior, peer, and subordinate trust among Army civilians:  23% of civilians...of senior leaders (GO and SES level) in the ATLDP study reported that from their vantage point supervisors and managers resist supporting leader

  1. Are injuries from terror and war similar? A comparison study of civilians and soldiers.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Kobi; Jaffe, Dena H

    2010-08-01

    To compare injuries and hospital utilization and outcomes from terror and war for civilians and soldiers. Injuries from terror and war are not necessarily comparable, especially among civilians and soldiers. For example, civilians have less direct exposure to conflict and are unprepared for injury, whereas soldiers are psychologically and physically prepared for combat on battlefields that are often far from trauma centers. Evidence-based studies distinguishing and characterizing differences in injuries according to conflict type and population group are lacking. A retrospective study was performed using hospitalization data from the Israel National Trauma Registry (10/2000-12/2006). Terror and war accounted for trauma hospitalizations among 1784 civilians and 802 soldiers. Most civilians (93%) were injured in terror and transferred to trauma centers by land, whereas soldiers were transferred by land and air. Critical injuries and injuries to multiple body regions were more likely in terror than war. Soldiers tended to present with less severe injuries from war than from terror. Rates of first admission to orthopedic surgery were greater for all casualties with the exception of civilians injured in terror who were equally likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit. In-hospital mortality was higher among terror (7%) than war (2%) casualties, and particularly among civilians. This study provides evidence that substantial differences exist in injury characteristics and hospital resources required to treat civilians and soldiers injured in terror and war. Hospital preparedness and management should focus on treating combat injuries that result from specific causes-terror or war.

  2. 32 CFR 705.36 - Government transportation of civilians for public affairs purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Government transportation of civilians for....36 Government transportation of civilians for public affairs purposes. (a) General policy. (1... between an airport (or other transportation center) and the command. Cars and buses within the resources...

  3. Building Civilian Interagency Capacity for Missions Abroad: Key Proposals and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-23

    cadre, to meet rapidly developing additional human resource and skill requirements. (pp. 216-271) RAND/AAD 2008 Substantially Increase the number of...responses, with each agency operating independently and to civilian agencies’ reluctance to divert scarce resources , including personnel, from their...45 Appendix C. Proposals to Enhance Civilian Authority, Institutional Arrangements, and Resources for Interagency Missions Abroad

  4. Comparison of military and civilian reporting rates for smallpox vaccine adverse events.

    PubMed

    McMahon, A W; Zinderman, C; Ball, R; Gupta, G; Braun, M M

    2007-06-01

    US smallpox vaccination (SMA) started most recently in December 2002. Military and civilian personnel report adverse events (AEs) to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a surveillance system that relies on spontaneous reports. Although reported rates of probable myo/pericarditis after SMA in the literature are similar between military personnel and civilian healthcare workers, some civilian AE reporting rates after SMA appeared higher than those in the military. Determine if SMA-associated reporting rates are different in civilians than in the military, considering age, sex, seriousness, and expectedness of the AE, as well as self-reporting. Numerators were SMA reports in VAERS from 12/12/02 to 3/1/04. Limitations of VAERS include underreporting and lack of diagnostic confirmation. Denominators were number of military and civilian vaccinees. Reporting rates stratified by age and sex of serious and non-serious AEs were significantly higher in civilian than military personnel ages <55 years (rate ratios 4-27). These rate ratios decreased with increasing age. Reporting rates in VAERS differed significantly and substantially in civilians compared to military personnel <55 years of age. Differences in stimulated passive surveillance systems, and AE reporting practices, including the 'threshold' for reporting most likely explain these findings. These results suggest that in the case of smallpox vaccine AEs, there may be systematic differences in reporting completeness between the civilian and military sectors, and that passive surveillance data should be interpreted with caution. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. 5 CFR 792.210 - What is the definition of civilian employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the definition of civilian employee? 792.210 Section 792.210 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Legislation and to Whom Does It Apply? § 792.210 What is the definition of civilian employee? The term...

  6. A Comparative Analysis of Student Service Member/Veteran and Civilian Student Drinking Motives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteman, Shawn D.; Barry, Adam E.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the nature and correlates of 252 student service members'/military veteran and civilian college students' drinking motivations. Data was collected via electronic survey. Results revealed no differences between military affiliated and civilian students in mean levels of alcohol motivations; however, the links between…

  7. Military and Civilian L2 Instructors: Decoding Perceptions of U.S. Service Academy Cadets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Zachary F.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether cadets at a U.S. service academy perceived attitudinal differences toward their military and civilian L2 instructors along three variables: foreign language expertise, communicative anxiety, and relatability. Cadets' proficiency levels (divided by beginning and intermediate classes) and current instructor (civilian or…

  8. Military and Civilian L2 Instructors: Decoding Perceptions of U.S. Service Academy Cadets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Zachary F.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether cadets at a U.S. service academy perceived attitudinal differences toward their military and civilian L2 instructors along three variables: foreign language expertise, communicative anxiety, and relatability. Cadets' proficiency levels (divided by beginning and intermediate classes) and current instructor (civilian or…

  9. Live-Virtual-Constructive Accomplishments and Challenges: A Corporate View

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-14

    1 Live-Virtual-Constructive Accomplishments and Challenges: A Corporate View Dr. John B. Foulkes Director Test Resource Management Center Office of...be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE JAN 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009

  10. Evaluating the Accomplishments of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    the expertise to develop a nuclear capability. This thesis explores four competing perspectives in the United States on the accomplishments of the... United States to effectively monitor and accurately assess the contributions of the program, and the expansion of the program to include projects that do...effectively pursued if the United States enhanced the quality of the CTR and worked cooperatively with Russia to address the full spectrum of common interests

  11. Accomplishments in 2008 in the Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Daniel; Blay, Jean-Yves; Blanke, Charles

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Overview of the Disease ProcessIncidencePrognosisPredictive MarkersCurrent General Therapy Standards in North America and EuropeLocalized or Potentially Resectable DiseaseUnresectable or Metastatic DiseaseAccomplishments During the YearTherapySurgical Issues and Perioperative TherapyImatinibSunitinibNew DrugsBiomarkersBasic and Other Translational ScienceWhat Needs to Be DoneFuture DirectionsComments on ResearchObstacles to Progress PMID:20011569

  12. The eighth NASA total quality management accomplishments report, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The eighth annual accomplishments report provides numerous examples of quality strategies that have proven effective and efficient in a time when cost reduction is critical. NASA's continuous improvement efforts can provide insight for others to succeed in their own endeavors. The report covers: top management leadership and support, strategic planning, focus on the customer, employee training and recognition, employee empowerment and teamwork, measurement and analysis, and quality assurance.

  13. Abstracts and research accomplishments of university coal research projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The Principal Investigators of the grants supported by the University Coal Research Program were requested to submit abstracts and highlight accomplishments of their projects in time for distribution at a grantees conference. This book is a compilation of the material received in response to the request. Abstracts discuss the following area: coal science, coal surface science, reaction chemistry, advanced process concepts, engineering fundamentals and thermodynamics, environmental science.

  14. NGNP Process Heat Applications: Hydrogen Production Accomplishments for FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V Park

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes FY10 accomplishments of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Engineering Process Heat Applications group in support of hydrogen production technology development. This organization is responsible for systems needed to transfer high temperature heat from a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) reactor (being developed by the INL NGNP Project) to electric power generation and to potential industrial applications including the production of hydrogen.

  15. Chemical Research Projects Office: Functions, accomplishments, and programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose, technical accomplishments, and related activities of the Chemical Research Project Group are outlined. Data cover efforts made to: (1) identify chemical research and technology required for solutions to problems of national urgency, synchronous with aeronautics and space effort; (2) conduct basic and applied interdisciplinary research on chemical problems in the areas of macromolecular science and fire research, and (3) provide productive liason with the engineering community and effective transfer of technology to other agencies and industry.

  16. Health and Environmental Research: Summary of Accomplishments. Volume 2

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through "snapshots" - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  17. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  18. Fort Collins Science Center-Fiscal year 2011 science accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2012-01-01

    The Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) is a multi-disciplinary research and development center of the U.S. Geological Survey located in Fort Collins, Colorado. FORT research focuses on the needs of land- and water-management bureaus within the U.S. Department of the Interior, other Federal agencies, and State, Tribal, and non-government organizations. We emphasize a multi-disciplinary science approach to provide information for natural resource management decisionmaking. Our vision is to maintain and continuously improve the integrated, collaborative, world-class research needed to inform effective, science-based land management. The 2011 science accomplishments report provides an executive summary highlighting key achievements, an appendix of 68 one-page accomplishment descriptions organized by U.S. Geological Survey Mission Area, and a complete list of publications and other products generated in FY2011. The executive summary includes a table cross-referencing all major FY11 accomplishments with the various Mission Areas each supports.

  19. When Lightning Strikes Twice: Profoundly Gifted, Profoundly Accomplished.

    PubMed

    Makel, Matthew C; Kell, Harrison J; Lubinski, David; Putallaz, Martha; Benbow, Camilla P

    2016-07-01

    The educational, occupational, and creative accomplishments of the profoundly gifted participants (IQs ⩾ 160) in the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) are astounding, but are they representative of equally able 12-year-olds? Duke University's Talent Identification Program (TIP) identified 259 young adolescents who were equally gifted. By age 40, their life accomplishments also were extraordinary: Thirty-seven percent had earned doctorates, 7.5% had achieved academic tenure (4.3% at research-intensive universities), and 9% held patents; many were high-level leaders in major organizations. As was the case for the SMPY sample before them, differential ability strengths predicted their contrasting and eventual developmental trajectories-even though essentially all participants possessed both mathematical and verbal reasoning abilities far superior to those of typical Ph.D. recipients. Individuals, even profoundly gifted ones, primarily do what they are best at. Differences in ability patterns, like differences in interests, guide development along different paths, but ability level, coupled with commitment, determines whether and the extent to which noteworthy accomplishments are reached if opportunity presents itself. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. The History and Accomplishments of the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance.

    PubMed

    Mathews-Bradshaw, Beth; Johnson, Rebecca; Kaplan, Stuart; Craddock, Kelli; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon

    2011-03-01

    This article outlines the history, background, and accomplishments of the LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance. The LIVESTRONG Young Adult Alliance, a program of the Lance Armstrong Foundation, was developed as a vehicle for a strategic plan designed to implement the Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Progress Review Group (AYAO PRG) recommendations. The AYAO PRG was co-sponsored by Lance Armstrong Foundation and the National Cancer Institute (NCI); both LIVESTRONG and NCI provide strategic oversight and guidance to the Alliance. Highlights and accomplishments: The Alliance accomplishments include the publication of disease-specific retrospective analyses, funding of an AYA cohort study and biorepository proposal, publication of two position statements on guidelines for care of AYAs with cancer and training for AYA oncology health professionals, promotion of an international charter of rights for AYA cancer patients, creation and distribution of a survey to college health professionals, creation and implementation of a Cancer Centers Working Group and Institutional Review Board Toolkit, and continued growth and collaboration through an annual meeting. The growth and success of the Alliance has coincided with the growth of AYA oncology as a field. The collaborative environment of the Alliance draws together a diverse group of individuals united in the effort to increase survival rates and improve the quality of life for adolescents and young adults diagnosed with cancer.

  1. Health and Environmental Research: summary of accomplishments. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    This is an account of some of the accomplishments of the health and environmental research program performed in national laboratories, universities, and research institutes. Both direct and indirect societal benefits emerged from the new knowledge provided by the health and environmental research program. In many cases, the private sector took this knowledge and applied it well beyond the mission of supporting the defense and energy needs of the Nation. Industrial and medical applications, for example, have in several instances provided annual savings to society of $100 million or more. The form of this presentation is, in fact, through ''snapshots'' - examples of significant, tangible accomplishments in each of the areas at certain times to illustrate the role and impact of the research program. The program's worth is not necessarily confined to such accomplishments; it extends, rather, to its ability to identify and help solve potential health and environmental problems before they become critical. This anticipatory mission has been pursued with an approach that combines applied problem solving with a commitment to fundamental research that is long-term and high-risk. The narrative of this research program concludes with a perspective of its past and a prospectus on its future.

  2. Violent Deaths of Iraqi Civilians, 2003–2008: Analysis by Perpetrator, Weapon, Time, and Location

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Madelyn Hsiao-Rei; Dardagan, Hamit; Guerrero Serdán, Gabriela; Bagnall, Peter M.; Sloboda, John A.; Spagat, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Armed violence is a major public health and humanitarian problem in Iraq. In this descriptive statistical analysis we aimed to describe for the first time Iraqi civilian deaths caused by perpetrators of armed violence during the first 5 years of the Iraq war: over time; by weapon used; by region (governorate); and by victim demographics. Methods and Findings We analyzed the Iraq Body Count database of 92,614 Iraqi civilian direct deaths from armed violence occurring from March 20, 2003 through March 19, 2008, of which Unknown perpetrators caused 74% of deaths (n = 68,396), Coalition forces 12% (n = 11,516), and Anti-Coalition forces 11% (n = 9,954). We analyzed the subset of 60,481 civilian deaths from 14,196 short-duration events of lethal violence to link individual civilian deaths to events involving perpetrators and their methods. One-third of civilian violent death was from extrajudicial executions by Unknown perpetrators; quadratic regression shows these deaths progressively and disproportionately increased as deaths from other forms of violence increased across Iraq's governorates. The highest average number of civilians killed per event in which a civilian died were in Unknown perpetrator suicide bombings targeting civilians (19 per lethal event) and Coalition aerial bombings (17 per lethal event). In temporal analysis, numbers of civilian deaths from Coalition air attacks, and woman and child deaths from Coalition forces, peaked during the invasion. We applied a Woman and Child “Dirty War Index” (DWI), measuring the proportion of women and children among civilian deaths of known demographic status, to the 22,066 civilian victims identified as men, women, or children to indicate relatively indiscriminate perpetrator effects. DWI findings suggest the most indiscriminate effects on women and children were from Unknown perpetrators using mortar fire (DWI  = 79) and nonsuicide vehicle bombs (DWI  = 54) and from Coalition air

  3. Violent deaths of Iraqi civilians, 2003-2008: analysis by perpetrator, weapon, time, and location.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Madelyn Hsiao-Rei; Dardagan, Hamit; Guerrero Serdán, Gabriela; Bagnall, Peter M; Sloboda, John A; Spagat, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Armed violence is a major public health and humanitarian problem in Iraq. In this descriptive statistical analysis we aimed to describe for the first time Iraqi civilian deaths caused by perpetrators of armed violence during the first 5 years of the Iraq war: over time; by weapon used; by region (governorate); and by victim demographics. We analyzed the Iraq Body Count database of 92,614 Iraqi civilian direct deaths from armed violence occurring from March 20, 2003 through March 19, 2008, of which Unknown perpetrators caused 74% of deaths (n = 68,396), Coalition forces 12% (n = 11,516), and Anti-Coalition forces 11% (n = 9,954). We analyzed the subset of 60,481 civilian deaths from 14,196 short-duration events of lethal violence to link individual civilian deaths to events involving perpetrators and their methods. One-third of civilian violent death was from extrajudicial executions by Unknown perpetrators; quadratic regression shows these deaths progressively and disproportionately increased as deaths from other forms of violence increased across Iraq's governorates. The highest average number of civilians killed per event in which a civilian died were in Unknown perpetrator suicide bombings targeting civilians (19 per lethal event) and Coalition aerial bombings (17 per lethal event). In temporal analysis, numbers of civilian deaths from Coalition air attacks, and woman and child deaths from Coalition forces, peaked during the invasion. We applied a Woman and Child "Dirty War Index" (DWI), measuring the proportion of women and children among civilian deaths of known demographic status, to the 22,066 civilian victims identified as men, women, or children to indicate relatively indiscriminate perpetrator effects. DWI findings suggest the most indiscriminate effects on women and children were from Unknown perpetrators using mortar fire (DWI  = 79) and nonsuicide vehicle bombs (DWI  = 54) and from Coalition air attacks (DWI  = 69). Coalition

  4. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  5. Grazing incidence beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkapeddi, P. R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V. K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  6. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  7. Discovering the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry; Bieri, Lydia; Sandage, Foreword by Allan

    2009-03-01

    Acknowledgments; Foreword; 1. Introduction; 2. Cosmological concepts at the end of the Middle Ages; 3. Nebulae as a new astronomical phenomenon; 4. On the construction of the Heavens; 5. Island universes turn into astronomical facts: a universe of galaxies; 6. The early cosmology of Einstein and de Sitter; 7. The dynamical universe of Friedmann; 8. Redshifts: how to reconcile Slipher and de Sitter?; 9. Lemaître discovers the expanding universe; 10. Hubble's contribution of 1929; 11. The breakthrough for the expanding universe; 12. Hubble's anger about de Sitter; 13. Robertson and Tolman join the game; 14. The Einstein-de Sitter universe; 15. Are Sun and Earth older than the universe?; 16. In search of alternative tracks; 17. The seed for the Big Bang; 18. Summary and Postscript; Appendix; References; Index.

  8. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Johanna

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  9. Military Exceptionalism or Tobacco Exceptionalism: How Civilian Health Leaders' Beliefs May Impede Military Tobacco Control Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    Smoking impairs the readiness and performance of military personnel, yet congressional opposition has thwarted military tobacco control initiatives. Involvement of civilian organizations might alter this political dynamic. We interviewed 13 leaders of national civilian public health and tobacco control organizations to explore their perspectives on military tobacco control, inductively analyzing data for themes. Leaders believed that military tobacco use was problematic but lacked specific knowledge. Most supported smoke-free policies and prohibiting smoking in uniform; however, they opposed banning tobacco use, arguing that it would violate smokers’ rights. Most leaders inappropriately applied civilian models of policy development to the military context. A tobacco-free military is unlikely to be achieved without military–civilian partnerships that include educating civilian health leaders about military policy development and implementation. PMID:23409898

  10. Thermophotovoltaic systems for civilian and industrial applications in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugami, Hiroo; Sasa, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2003-05-01

    The potential market for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications has been studied for civilian and industrial sectors in Japan. Comparing the performance of gas engines or turbines, as well as the underdeveloped power generation technologies such as fuel cells or chemical batteries, we have discussed the feasible application field of TPV systems to compete with those power generations. From the point of view of applicability for TPV systems in Japan, portable generators, co-generation systems and solar power plants are selected for our system analysis. The cost and performance targets of TPV systems for co-generation are also discussed by assuming a typical daily profile of electricity and hot water demands in Japanese homes. A progress report on the recent TPV research activities is given as well as a feasibility study concerning such TPV systems in Japan.

  11. Transportation functions of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Attaway, C.R.; Pope, R.B. ); Best, R.E.; Danese, F.L. ); Dixon, L.D. , Martinez, GA ); Jones, R.H. , Los Gatos, CA ); Klimas, M.J. ); Peterson, R.W

    1992-03-01

    Within the framework of Public Law 97.425 and provisions specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10 Part 961, the US Department of Energy has the responsibility to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from various organizations which have entered into a contract with the federal government in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers. In implementing these requirements, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has, among other things, supported the identification of functions that must be performed by a transportation system (TS) that will accept the waste for transport to a federal facility for storage and/or disposal. This document, through the application of system engineering principles, identifies the functions that must be performed to transport waste under this law.

  12. Community Resilience of Civilians at War: A New Perspective.

    PubMed

    Eshel, Yohanan; Kimhi, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    A new concept of community resilience pertaining to the community's post adversity strength to vulnerability ratio was associated with five determinants: individual resilience, national resilience, well-being, community size, and sense of coherence. The data was collected four months after Israel's war in the Gaza Strip in 2014. Participants were 251 adult civilians living in southern Israel who have recently been threatened by massive missile attacks, and 259 adults living in northern Israel, which has not been under missile fire recently. The investigated variables predicted community resilience, and their effects were mediated by sense of coherence. Results which were similar for both samples were discussed in terms of the nature of resilience and in terms of proximal and distal exposure to war.

  13. 2010 Science Accomplishments Report of the Pacific Northwest Research Station

    Treesearch

    Rhonda Mazza

    2010-01-01

    In 2010, station researchers provided land managers and policymakers with critical information related to ecological processes, environmental threats, forest management, and use of natural resources. The station also capitalized on opportunities to expand its research in these arenas. The 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was one such opportunity that has...

  14. Military trauma training at civilian centers: a decade of advancements.

    PubMed

    Thorson, Chad M; Dubose, Joseph J; Rhee, Peter; Knuth, Thomas E; Dorlac, Warren C; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Garcia, George D; Ryan, Mark L; Van Haren, Robert M; Proctor, Kenneth G

    2012-12-01

    In the late 1990s, a Department of Defense subcommittee screened more than 100 civilian trauma centers according to the number of admissions, percentage of penetrating trauma, and institutional interest in relation to the specific training missions of each of the three service branches. By the end of 2001, the Army started a program at University of Miami/Ryder Trauma Center, the Navy began a similar program at University of Southern California/Los Angeles County Medical Center, and the Air Force initiated three Centers for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (C-STARS) at busy academic medical centers: R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland (C-STARS Baltimore), Saint Louis University (C-STARS St. Louis), and The University Hospital/University of Cincinnati (C-STARS Cincinnati). Each center focuses on three key areas, didactic training, state-of-the-art simulation and expeditionary equipment training, as well as actual clinical experience in the acute management of trauma patients. Each is integral to delivering lifesaving combat casualty care in theater. Initially, there were growing pains and the struggle to develop an effective curriculum in a short period. With the foresight of each trauma training center director and a dynamic exchange of information with civilian trauma leaders and frontline war fighters, there has been a continuous evolution and improvement of each center's curriculum. Now, it is clear that the longest military conflict in US history and the first of the 21st century has led to numerous innovations in cutting edge trauma training on a comprehensive array of topics. This report provides an overview of the decade-long evolutionary process in providing the highest-quality medical care for our injured heroes.

  15. Military and civilian penetrating eye trauma: anesthetic implications.

    PubMed

    Biehl, J W

    2001-02-01

    In 20th century warfare, wounds from fragmentation weapons have become the number 1 cause of military hospital admissions during combat. Specifically, grenades, landmines, mortars, and artillery weapons have replaced guns and bullets. Consequently, penetrating eye injuries and maxillofacial injuries in the military have escalated dramatically. In the civilian sector, pipe bombs, explosive bottles used in gang warfare, and terrorist bombs, which are all fragmentation weapons, have generated new studies in the care of patients with penetrating eye injury. This change in the wounding pattern is, documented internationally in military-medical literature and in civilian-medical literature of relief agencies such as the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Red Crescent. The anesthetic management of open eye injuries has been a running controversy for 40 years in terms of the use of muscle relaxants. Nondepolarizing agents carry the risk of aspiration and increased intraocular pressure when trauma patients are intubated prematurely during rapid-sequence induction for "full stomachs." Succinylcholine would be the logical relaxant of choice for a rapid-sequence induction, but succinylcholine raises intraocular pressure. In many cases, the literature specifically contraindicates succinylcholine in the open eye injury for fear of extruding the content of the eye. A review of the vital assessment for the patient with a penetrating eye injury, as well as a comparative analysis of the literature, is presented. The conclusion favors pretreatment with a nondepolarizing agent and the use of succinylcholine during rapid-sequence induction. The eye injury itself is not the primary concern of this article. The primary concern is that open eye injuries serve as hallmarks for for more dangerous injuries. Penetrating open eye injuries merit extensive clinical assessment that can be life saving.

  16. Civilian radioactive waste management program plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This revision of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan describes the objectives of the Civilian Radioactive Waste management Program (Program) as prescribed by legislative mandate, and the technical achievements, schedule, and costs planned to complete these objectives. The Plan provides Program participants and stakeholders with an updated description of Program activities and milestones for fiscal years (FY) 1998 to 2003. It describes the steps the Program will undertake to provide a viability assessment of the Yucca Mountain site in 1998; prepare the Secretary of Energy`s site recommendation to the President in 2001, if the site is found to be suitable for development as a repository; and submit a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 2002 for authorization to construct a repository. The Program`s ultimate challenge is to provide adequate assurance to society that an operating geologic repository at a specific site meets the required standards of safety. Chapter 1 describes the Program`s mission and vision, and summarizes the Program`s broad strategic objectives. Chapter 2 describes the Program`s approach to transform strategic objectives, strategies, and success measures to specific Program activities and milestones. Chapter 3 describes the activities and milestones currently projected by the Program for the next five years for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project; the Waste Acceptance, Storage and Transportation Project; ad the Program Management Center. The appendices present information on the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the history of the Program; the Program`s organization chart; the Commission`s regulations, Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in geologic Repositories; and a glossary of terms.

  17. Review of military and civilian trauma registries: Does consensus matter?

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Thijs T C F; de Graaf, Johan; Huizinga, Eelco P; Champion, Howard R; Hoencamp, Rigo; Leenen, Luke P H

    2017-03-01

    Structural collection of data from combat injuries is important to improve provided care and the outcome of (combat) casualties. Trauma registries are used in civilian and military health care systems for systematic administration of injury data. However, these registries often use different methods of data management, compromising international comparison of trauma systems. The aim of this review is to aid in reaching international (coalition-wide) consensus for compatible data collection methods with uniform definitions, which is needed for transnational research and subsequent improvement of medical support organizations. In this descriptive review, we analyzed different data sets from trauma systems within the American-European context, and included data variables from civilian and military trauma registries. These data sets were analyzed to identify a core set of variables fundamental to describing the tactical context, epidemiology, injury mechanism, injury severity, key treatment, and outcome. A total of 1,672 unique variables, of which 536 military specific, were identified and divided in 11 elemental categories of medical care (patient info, incident info, injury diagnoses, prehospital care, emergency department, imaging, surgical treatment, intensive care, ward, discharge and outcome) and three military-specific categories (forward medical evacuation, prehospital medical treatment facility, and discharge out of theater). A total of 203 key variables were identified and considered fundamental for effective (military) trauma research. Well-established and reliable trauma registries and databases are fundamental in (military) trauma care. We recommend implementation of a (concurrent) UN/NATO wide registry system with a track and follow-up system to further improve the quality of care and registration of casualties. Further research should focus on real time aids available on the battlefield and direct storage/upload in trauma databases in theater. Ultimately

  18. Contemporary management of civilian penetrating cervicothoracic arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jordan A; Moore, Andrew H; Magnotti, Louis J; Teague, Rebecca J; Ward, Tyler A; Wasmund, Joshua B; Lamb, Elena M P; Schroeppel, Thomas J; Savage, Stephanie A; Minard, Gayle; Maish, George O; Croce, Martin A; Fabian, Timothy C

    2016-08-01

    The management of arterial injury at the thoracic outlet has long hinged on the fundamental principles of extensile exposure and vascular anastomosis. Nonetheless, treatment options for such injuries have evolved to include both endovascular stent placement and temporary vascular shunts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our recent experience with penetrating cervicothoracic arterial injuries in light of these developments in trauma care. Patients with penetrating injuries to the innominate, carotid, subclavian, or axillary arteries managed at a single civilian trauma center between 2000 and 2013 were categorized as the modern era (ME) cohort. The management strategies and outcomes pertaining to the ME group were compared to those of previously reported experience (PE) concerning injuries to the innominate, carotid, subclavian, or axillary arteries at the same institution from 1974 to 1988. Over the two eras, there were 202 patients: 110 in the ME group and 92 in the PE group. Most of the injuries in both groups were managed with primary repair (45% vs. 46%; p = 0.89). A similar proportion of injuries in each group was managed with anticoagulation alone (14% vs. 10%; p = 0.40). In the ME group, two cases were managed with temporary shunt placement, and endovascular stent placement was performed in 12 patients. Outcomes were similar between the groups (bivariate comparison): mortality (ME, 15% vs. PE, 14%; p = 0.76), amputation following subclavian or axillary artery injury (ME, 5% vs. PE, 4%; p = 0.58), and posttreatment stroke following carotid injury (ME, 2% vs. PE, 6%; p = 0.57). Experience with penetrating arterial cervicothoracic injuries at a high-volume urban trauma center remained remarkably similar with respect to both anatomic distribution of injury and treatment. Conventional operative exposure and repair remain the cornerstone of treatment for most civilian cervicothoracic arterial injuries. Therapeutic study, level V.

  19. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media... personnel as the Secretary of the Navy may authorize can act as correspondents for civilian media. (b...

  20. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media. (a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news...

  1. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media. (a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news...

  2. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media. (a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news...

  3. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media. (a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news...

  4. Space robotics: Recent accomplishments and opportunities for future research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Dorsey, John T.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Lallman, Frederick J.; Moerder, Daniel D.; Scott, Michael A.; Troutman, Patrick; Williams, Robert L., II

    1992-01-01

    The Langley Guidance, Navigation, and Control Technical Committee (GNCTC) was one of six technical committees created in 1991 by the Chief Scientist, Dr. Michael F. Card. During the kickoff meeting Dr. Card charged the chairmen to: (1) establish a cross-Center committee; (2) support at least one workshop in a selected discipline; and (3) prepare a technical paper on recent accomplishments in the discipline and on opportunities for future research. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control Committee was formed and selected for focus on the discipline of Space robotics. This report is a summary of the committee's assessment of recent accomplishments and opportunities for future research. The report is organized as follows. First is an overview of the data sources used by the committee. Next is a description of technical needs identified by the committee followed by recent accomplishments. Opportunities for future research ends the main body of the report. It includes the primary recommendation of the committee that NASA establish a national space facility for the development of space automation and robotics, one element of which is a telerobotic research platform in space. References 1 and 2 are the proceedings of two workshops sponsored by the committee during its June 1991, through May 1992 term. The focus of the committee for the June 1992 - May 1993 term will be to further define to the recommended platform in space and to add an additional discipline which includes aircraft related GN&C issues. To the latter end members performing aircraft related research will be added to the committee. (A preliminary assessment of future opportunities in aircraft-related GN&C research has been included as appendix A.)

  5. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the "Seed Money" program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  6. Accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seed Money program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    In 1974, a modest program for funding new, innovative research was initiated at ORNL. It was called the ''Seed Money'' program and has become part of a larger program, called Exploratory R and D, which is being carried out at all DOE national laboratories. This report highlights 12 accomplishments of the Seed Money Program: nickel aluminide, ion implantation, laser annealing, burn meter, Legionnaires' disease, whole-body radiation counter, the ANFLOW system, genetics and molecular biology, high-voltage equipment, microcalorimeter, positron probe, and atom science. (DLC)

  7. 2008 Accomplishments for CEV Parachute Assembly System (CPAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is responsible for the design, development, fabrication, qualification and delivery of the CEV parachute system to support the Orion pad/ascent flight tests and the first three orbital flight tests (including the first human mission). This article will discuss the technical and research achievements accomplished in calendar year 2008, broken into three key categories: prototype testing and analysis (also referred to as the Generation 1 design), system requirements definition and design of the flight engineering development unit, and support for the Orion vehicle flight testing (primarily Pad-Abort 1).

  8. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska: Accomplishments during 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coonrad, Warren L.

    1982-01-01

    This report of accomplishments of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska during 1980 contains summary and topical accounts of results of studies in a wide range of topics of economic and scientific interest. In addition, many more detailed maps and reports are included in the lists of references cited for each article and in the appended compilations of 297 reports on Alaska published by the U.S. Geological Survey and of 177 reports by U.S. Geological Survey authors in various other scientific publications.

  9. The United States Geological Survey in Alaska: Accomplishments during 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coonrad, Warren L.; Elliot, Raymond L.

    1984-01-01

    This report of accomplishments of the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska during 1981 contains summary and topical accounts of the results of studies on a wide range of topics of economic and scientific interest. In addition, many more detailed maps and reports are included in the lists of references cited for each article and in the appended compilations of 277 reports on Alaska published by the U.S. Geological Survey and of 103 reports, by U.S. Geological Survey authors in various other scientific publications.

  10. Environmental Measurements Laboratory fiscal year 1998: Accomplishments and technical activities

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) is government-owned, government-operated, and programmatically under the DOE Office of Environmental Management. The Laboratory is administered by the Chicago Operations Office. EML provides program management, technical assistance and data quality assurance for measurements of radiation and radioactivity relating to environmental restoration, global nuclear nonproliferation, and other priority issues for the Department of Energy, as well as for other government, national, and international organizations. This report presents the technical activities and accomplishments of EML for Fiscal Year 1998.

  11. Military and civilian emergency aeromedical services: common goals and different approaches.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, R A

    1997-01-01

    Military and civilian organizations in the U.S. operate separate but parallel emergency aeromedical services. Despite common origins, military and civilian approaches and methods have diverged. This article compares and contrasts the capabilities, priorities, safety, equipment, training and personnel of the largest military service, the U.S. Army, to civilian rotary wing (helicopter) emergency aeromedical programs. The different successes of military and civilian emergency aeromedical programs can be considered for use to improve the services of each. In general, Army programs operate larger aircraft and utilize two pilots per aircraft. Safety is a high priority and the Army aeromedical safety record is excellent. The Army also places a high degree of emphasis on crashworthiness and protective gear for the crew. Most civilian air Emergency Medical Service (EMS) programs operate small to moderate-sized aircraft flying with a single pilot. The recent safety record has improved dramatically. Civilian programs may add to their safety by considering two pilots and incorporating the crashworthy and protective advancements made by the military. Civilian programs fly with two highly trained medical technicians, nurses or physicians, equipped with state-of-the-art medical equipment. Army helicopters fly with one lesser-trained medical crewmember and less equipment. Improved combat casualty care and battlefield survival may be possible by increasing both the number and training of the medical attendants on Army aircraft.

  12. The Best of Both Worlds: Psychiatry Training at Combined Civilian-Military Programs.

    PubMed

    Welton, Randon S; Hamaoka, Derrick A; Broderick, Pamela J; Schillerstrom, Jason E

    2015-08-01

    Air Force psychiatry faces the task of training competent military psychiatrists in an era of continuing reductions. Beginning in the 1980s, the Air Force started collaborating with University partners to create hybrid training programs, civilian-military psychiatry residencies. These mergers provide stability for Air Force psychiatry training in the face of increased operational missions and uncertain military recruiting. As a result of these combined programs, Air Force psychiatry residents gain access to a broader range of civilian clinical experience and expertise while maintaining a focus on distinctive military requirements. The combining of programs opens up options for academic activities which may not have otherwise existed. Both military and civilian residents benefit from the occupational psychiatry experiences available within military clinical sites. These programs give civilian residents a chance to assist active duty members and their families and provide insight into the military "lifecycle." These collaborations benefit the universities by providing access to a larger pool of residents and faculty. The synthesis of the military and civilian programs raises some ongoing obstacles such as civilian residents' ability to gain access to military resources. The programs must also accommodate separate mechanisms for selecting residents (the National Residency Matching Program versus the Joint Selection Board for Graduate Medical Education). Military residents must also comply with military standards and requirements while maintaining the universities' standards of conduct and professionalism. Merging military training programs into university programs creates a vibrant opportunity to create exceptional military and civilian psychiatrists.

  13. A Historical Look at Alcohol Abuse Trends in Army and Civilian Populations, 1980–1995

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Katy L.; Bell, Nicole S.; Hollander, Ilyssa E.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare civilian and Army alcohol-related hospitalization trends and to plot temporal changes in rates relative to alcohol-related legislation and social policies. Method We compared population-based civilian and Army annual hospitalization rates for overall alcohol-related diagnoses and for alcohol-related diagnostic subgroups (1980–1995) and plotted them against civilian and military substance abuse regulations. Civilian data were adjusted to Army age, gender, and race. Results Although overall civilian and Army alcohol hospitalization rates were similar, alcohol subgroup rates varied. Simultaneous drug and alcohol abuse (polyabuse) rates were higher among civilians (16.6 per 10,000) than Army soldiers (5.1 per 10,000). Army rates for dependent alcohol-related disorders were higher and increased. Army nondependent alcohol disorders tracked with alcohol-related regulations as rates fell 69% between 1985 and 1995. Conclusion Army and civilian alcohol abuse trends vary by abuse type. Without longitudinal, diagnosis-specific subgroup analyses, these trends would not have emerged. Army policies and screening may explain divergent nondependent alcohol abuse and lower polyabuse rates. PMID:17937358

  14. A historical look at alcohol abuse trends in army and civilian populations, 1980-1995.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Katy L; Bell, Nicole S; Hollander, Ilyssa E

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare civilian and Army alcohol-related hospitalization trends and to plot temporal changes in rates relative to alcohol-related legislation and social policies. We compared population-based civilian and Army annual hospitalization rates for overall alcohol-related diagnoses and for alcohol-related diagnostic subgroups (1980-1995) and plotted them against civilian and military substance abuse regulations. Civilian data were adjusted to Army age, gender, and race. Although overall civilian and Army alcohol hospitalization rates were similar, alcohol subgroup rates varied. Simultaneous drug and alcohol abuse (polyabuse) rates were higher among civilians (16.6 per 10,000) than Army soldiers (5.1 per 10,000). Army rates for dependent alcohol-related disorders were higher and increased. Army nondependent alcohol disorders tracked with alcohol-related regulations as rates fell 69% between 1985 and 1995. Army and civilian alcohol abuse trends vary by abuse type. Without longitudinal, diagnosis-specific subgroup analyses, these trends would not have emerged. Army policies and screening may explain divergent nondependent alcohol abuse and lower polyabuse rates.

  15. 2017 ISCB Accomplishment by a Senior Scientist Award: Pavel Pevzner.

    PubMed

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E; Berger, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology ( ISCB) recognizes an established scientist each year with the Accomplishment by a Senior Scientist Award for significant contributions he or she has made to the field. This award honors scientists who have contributed to the advancement of computational biology and bioinformatics through their research, service, and education work. Pavel Pevzner, PhD, Ronald R. Taylor Professor of Computer Science and Director of the NIH Center for Computational Mass Spectrometry at University of California, San Diego, has been selected as the winner of the 2017 Accomplishment by a Senior Scientist Award. The ISCB awards committee, chaired by Dr. Bonnie Berger of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, selected Pevzner as the 2017 winner. Pevzner will receive his award and deliver a keynote address at the 2017 Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology-European Conference on Computational Biology joint meeting ( ISMB/ECCB 2017) held in Prague, Czech Republic from July 21-July 25, 2017. ISMB/ECCB is a biennial joint meeting that brings together leading scientists in computational biology and bioinformatics from around the globe.

  16. 2017 ISCB Accomplishment by a Senior Scientist Award: Pavel Pevzner

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Christiana N.; Kovats, Diane E.; Berger, Bonnie

    2017-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology ( ISCB) recognizes an established scientist each year with the Accomplishment by a Senior Scientist Award for significant contributions he or she has made to the field. This award honors scientists who have contributed to the advancement of computational biology and bioinformatics through their research, service, and education work. Pavel Pevzner, PhD, Ronald R. Taylor Professor of Computer Science and Director of the NIH Center for Computational Mass Spectrometry at University of California, San Diego, has been selected as the winner of the 2017 Accomplishment by a Senior Scientist Award. The ISCB awards committee, chaired by Dr. Bonnie Berger of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, selected Pevzner as the 2017 winner. Pevzner will receive his award and deliver a keynote address at the 2017 Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology-European Conference on Computational Biology joint meeting ( ISMB/ECCB 2017) held in Prague, Czech Republic from July 21-July 25, 2017. ISMB/ECCB is a biennial joint meeting that brings together leading scientists in computational biology and bioinformatics from around the globe. PMID:28713548

  17. Material Recovery and Waste Form Development FY 2015 Accomplishments Report

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Terry Allen; Braase, Lori Ann

    2015-11-01

    The Material Recovery and Waste Form Development (MRWFD) Campaign under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is responsible for developing advanced separation and waste form technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The FY 2015 Accomplishments Report provides a highlight of the results of the research and development (R&D) efforts performed within the MRWFD Campaign in FY-14. Each section contains a high-level overview of the activities, results, technical point of contact, applicable references, and documents produced during the fiscal year. This report briefly outlines campaign management and integration activities, but primarily focuses on the many technical accomplishments made during FY-15. The campaign continued to utilize an engineering driven-science-based approach to maintain relevance and focus. There was increased emphasis on development of technologies that support near-term applications that are relevant to the current once-through fuel cycle.

  18. Civilian stressors associated with alcohol use disorders in the National Guard.

    PubMed

    Cerdá, Magdalena; Richards, Catherine; Cohen, Greg H; Calabrese, Joseph R; Liberzon, Israel; Tamburrino, Marijo; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C

    2014-10-01

    Alcohol use disorders are a serious public health concern among soldiers. Although deployment-related exposures have been linked with alcohol use disorders in soldiers, less is understood about the link between modifiable, civilian stressors and post-deployment alcohol use disorders. To (1) compare the influence of civilian stressors and deployment-related traumatic events and stressors on post-deployment alcohol use disorders among Army National Guardsmen primarily deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq; and (2) evaluate whether civilian stressors influence a different set of alcohol use disorder phenotypes than deployment-related traumatic events and stressors. A cohort of Ohio National Guard soldiers was recruited in 2008-2009 and interviewed three times over 3 years. The analytic sample included Ohio National Guard soldiers who had been deployed by 2008-2009, had participated in at least one follow-up wave, had reported consuming at least one alcoholic drink in their lifetime, and had non-missing data on alcohol use disorders (n=1,095). Analyses were conducted in 2013. In a model including measures of civilian stressors and deployment-related traumatic events, only civilian stressors (OR=2.07, 95% CI=1.46, 2.94) were associated with subsequent alcohol use disorder. The effects of civilian stressors were only present among people with no history of alcohol use disorder. Independent of deployment-related exposures, post-deployment civilian stressors are associated with the onset of alcohol use disorder among reserve-component soldiers. Concerted investment to address daily civilian difficulties associated with reintegration into civilian life may be needed to prevent new cases of alcohol use disorders among returning military personnel. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental Assessment, Joint and Interim Civilian Use of Hangars 1027 and 1050

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    AD-A281 183 * f 𔃾 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT, JOINT AND INTERIM CIVILIAN USE OF HANGARS 1027 AND 1050 t ofJanuary 1992 ’IHH DTIC i •ELECTE * JUL 0 8...Avail a:;d ’ or Dist Special *A-i JOINT AND INTERIM CIVILIAN USE OF HANGARS 1027 AND 1050 , CARSWELL AFB, TEXAS FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT JOINT AND...INTERIM CIVILIAN USE OF HANGARS 1027 AND 1050 , CARSWELL AIR FORCE BASE, TEXAS DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES The interim use of

  20. The law's interface with expanding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    The role of the law in technology assessment is described in generalized terms of a legal system as it confronts expanding technology. The functions of a technology assessment are considered to be twofold; provide for legislative action designed to channel technological advance along lines which are regarded as optimal from the standpoint of society's interests; and encourage and promote legislative action which will deal decisively with the potential disruptions and injuries caused by technology at a much earlier stage of the growth of the technology than is feasible under the present legal system. It is concluded that since new law always has a disruptive effect on expectations and commitments arrived at under old law, it is generally desirable that new legislation should make the least possible change in the law consistant with accomplishing the desired objective.

  1. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, A

    2008-01-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe. PMID:21611002

  2. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, Harold B [Evans, GA; Imrich, Kenneth J [Grovetown, GA

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  3. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, R.F.

    1983-07-19

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces is described. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluid tight barrier. A counter rotation removes the barrier. 6 figs.

  4. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Richard F.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluidtight barrier. A counterrotation removes the barrier.

  5. CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND RELEVANCE TO THE DOE COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H.; Langton, C.; Flach, G.; Kosson, D.

    2010-11-15

    The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was initiated to reduce risk and uncertainties in the performance assessments that directly impact U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup and closure programs. The CBP is supported by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) and has been specifically addressing the following critical EM program needs: (i) the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities and (ii) increased understanding of contaminant transport behavior within cementitious barrier systems to support the development and deployment of adequate closure technologies. To accomplish this, the CBP has two initiatives: (1) an experimental initiative to increase understanding of changes in cementitious materials over long times (> 1000 years) over changing conditions and (2) a modeling initiative to enhance and integrate a set of computational tools validated by laboratory and field experimental data to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term performance of cementitious barriers and waste forms used in nuclear applications. In FY10, the CBP developed the initial phase of an integrated modeling tool that would serve as a screening tool which could help in making decisions concerning disposal and tank closure. The CBP experimental programs are underway to validate this tool and provide increased understanding of how CM changes over time and under changing conditions. These initial CBP products that will eventually be enhanced are anticipated to reduce the uncertainties of current methodologies for assessing cementitious barrier performance and increase the consistency and transparency of the DOE assessment process. These tools have application to low activity waste forms, high level waste tank closure, D&D and entombment of major nuclear facilities, landfill waste acceptance criteria, and in-situ grouting and immobilization of vadose zone contamination. This paper summarizes

  6. International Research Results and Accomplishments From the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruttley, Tara M.; Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy; Perkins, Nekisha; Cohen, Luchino; Marcil, Isabelle; Heppener, Marc; Hatton, Jason; Tasaki, Kazuyuki; Umemura, Sayaka; hide

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, the International Space Station (ISS) partnership published the first-ever compilation of international ISS research publications resulting from research performed on the ISS through 2011. The International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results From 2000-2011 is a collection of summaries of over 1,200 journal publications that describe ISS research in the areas of biology and biotechnology; Earth and space science; educational activities and outreach; human research; physical sciences; technology development and demonstration; and, results from ISS operations. This paper will summarize the ISS results publications obtained through 2011 on behalf of the ISS Program Science Forum that is made up of senior science representatives across the international partnership. NASA's ISS Program Science office maintains an online experiment database (www.nasa.gov/issscience) that tracks and communicates ISS research activities across the entire ISS partnership, and it is continuously updated. It captures ISS experiment summaries and results and includes citations to the journals, conference proceedings, and patents as they become available. The International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results From 2000-2011 is a testament to the research that was underway even as the ISS laboratory was being built. It reflects the scientific knowledge gained from ISS research, and how it impact the fields of science in both space and traditional science disciplines on Earth. Now, during a time when utilization is at its busiest, and with extension of the ISS through at least 2024, the ISS partners work together to track the accomplishments and the new knowledge gained in a way that will impact humanity like no laboratory on Earth. The ISS Program Science Forum will continue to capture and report on these results in the form of journal publications, conference proceedings, and patents. We anticipate that successful ISS research will

  7. Prediction of jet mean flow structure in support of HSCT noise suppression concepts. [High Speed Civilian Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, N.; Dash, S. M.; York, B. J.; Lee, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the application of techniques based on computational fluid dynamics to the simulation of jet flowfields. A solution code for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is supplemented by conventional two-equation turbulence models based on the Boussinesq approximation. The axisymmetric SCIPVIS code is enhanced with the PARCH and CRAFT codes to examine plug-jet flowfields and imperfectly expanded axisymmetric free round jets. The sensitivity of shock/boundary layer interactions is observed in simulations of the plug case, and the adaptive gridding in the disk region and turbulence levels generated at the triple point are identified as areas in the Mach case that require improvement. Jet-wave structure in the region beyond the first several shock cells can be predicted, and turbulence modeling can be undertaken with respect to improving compressibility, length scale, vorticity, and energy budget. The mean flow structure of imperfectly expanded jets can be studied to develop related noise suppression concepts for the High-Speed Civilian Transport (HSCT).

  8. OTEC mooring system development: recent accomplishments. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.M.; Wood, W.A.

    1981-10-01

    The mooring system for a floating OTEC platform consists of a seafloor foundation, a platform foundation, and a connecting line. This paper introduces the OTEC mooring system with a brief historical overview, reviews developmental work accomplished during the past year, and then presents a new look at life cycle costs for an example mooring system. Since June 1980, a significant effort within the OTEC Program has been directed toward the further development of mooring systems. The effort has included work leading to a better understanding of anchoring capabilities and problems, refinement of an existing mooring analytical model, a review of OTEC past mooring designs, and the production of a mooring system technology development plan. A major finding of the past year was a new upward estimate of mooring system lifetime costs as a result of downward-revised estimates of wire rope service life.

  9. Geothermal materials development: FY 1990 accomplishments and current activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in the development of hydrothermally stable materials, the commercial availabilities of which are considered essential for the attainment of the Geothermal Division's (GD) Hydrothermal Category Objectives, continue to be made. Fiscal year 1990 R D was focused on reducing well drilling and completion costs, energy conversion costs, and on mitigating corrosion in well casing. Activities on lost circulation control materials, CO{sub 2}-resistant lightweight cements and thermally conductive corrosion and scale-resistant linear systems have reached the final development stages. In addition, field tests to determine the feasibility for the use of polymer cement liners to mitigate HCl-induced corrosion at the Geysers were performed. Technology transfer efforts on high temperature elastomers for use in drilling tools such as drillpipe protectors and rotating head seals were continued under Geothermal Drilling Organization sponsorship. Recent accomplishments and ongoing work on each of these activities are described in the paper. 8 refs.

  10. Accomplishments at NASA Langley Research Center in rotorcraft aerodynamics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the development of aerodynamic technology for rotorcraft has continued successfully at NASA LaRC. Though the NASA Langley Research Center is not the lead NASA center in this area, the activity was continued due to facilities and individual capabilities which are recognized as contributing to helicopter research needs of industry and government. Noteworthy accomplishments which contribute to advancing the state of rotorcraft technology in the areas of rotor design, airfoil research, rotor aerodynamics, and rotor/fuselage interaction aerodynamics are described. Rotor designs were defined for current helicopters and evaluated in wind tunnel testing. These designs have incorporated advanced airfoils defined analytically and also proven in wind tunnel tests. A laser velocimetry system has become a productive tool for experimental definition of rotor inflow/wake and is providing data for rotorcraft aerodynamic code validation.

  11. Fort Collins Science Center - Fiscal Year 2008 Science Accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2009-01-01

    Public land and natural resource managers in the United States are confronted with increasingly complex decisions that have important ramifications for both ecological and human systems. The scientists and technical professionals at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) contribute a unique blend of ecological, socioeconomic, and technological expertise to investigating complicated ecological problems that address critical management questions. In Fiscal Year 2008 (FY08), FORT's scientific and technical professionals continued research vital to the science and management needs of U.S. Department of the Interior agencies and other entities. This annual report describes select FY08 accomplishments in research and technical assistance involving biological information management and delivery; aquatic, riparian, and managed-river ecosystems; invasive species; status and trends of biological resources (including human dimensions and social science); terrestrial ecosystems; and fish and wildlife resources.

  12. Recent Accomplishments in Laser-Photovoltaic Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John C.; Henley, Mark W.; Mankins, John C.; Howell, Joe T.; Fork, Richard L.; Cole, Spencer T.; Skinner, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Wireless power transmission can be accomplished over long distances using laser power sources and photovoltaic receivers. Recent research at AMOS has improved our understanding of the use of this technology for practical applications. Research by NASA, Boeing, the University of Alabama-Huntsville, the University of Colorado, Harvey Mudd College, and the Naval Postgraduate School has tested various commercial lasers and photovoltaic receiver configurations. Lasers used in testing have included gaseous argon and krypton, solid-state diodes, and fiber optic sources, at wavelengths ranging from the visible to the near infra-red. A variety of Silicon and Gallium Arsenide photovoltaic have been tested with these sources. Safe operating procedures have been established, and initial tests have been conducted in the open air at AMOS facilities. This research is progressing toward longer distance ground demonstrations of the technology and practical near-term space demonstrations.

  13. Fiscal Year 2005 Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Gotseff, P.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Anderberg, M.; Kay, B.; Bowen, A.

    2005-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiometry and Metrology task provides traceable optical radiometric calibrations and measurements to photovoltaic (PV) researchers and the PV industry. Traceability of NREL solar radiometer calibrations to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) was accomplished during Pyrheliometer Comparison at NREL in October 2004. Ten spectral and more than 200 broadband radiometers for solar measurements were calibrated this year. We measured detailed spectral distributions of the NREL and PV industry Pulsed Solar Simulators and are analyzing the influence of environmental variables on radiometer uncertainty. New systems for indoor and outdoor solar radiometer calibrations and ultraviolet (UV) spectral measurements and UV radiometer calibrations were purchased and tested. Optical metrology functions support the NREL Measurement and Characterization Task effort for ISO 17025 accreditation of NREL Solar Reference Cell Calibrations and have been integrated into the NREL quality system and audited for ISO17025 compliance.

  14. Viewpoint: a comparison of cause-of-injury coding in U.S. military and civilian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, P J; Bell, N S; Smith, G S; Senier, L; Pickett, D

    2000-04-01

    Complete and accurate coding of injury causes is essential to the understanding of injury etiology and to the development and evaluation of injury-prevention strategies. While civilian hospitals use ICD-9-CM external cause-of-injury codes, military hospitals use codes derived from the NATO Standardization Agreement (STANAG) 2050. The STANAG uses two separate variables to code injury cause. The Trauma code uses a single digit with 10 possible values to identify the general class of injury as battle injury, intentionally inflicted nonbattle injury, or unintentional injury. The Injury code is used to identify cause or activity at the time of the injury. For a subset of the Injury codes, the last digit is modified to indicate place of occurrence. This simple system contains fewer than 300 basic codes, including many that are specific to battle- and sports-related injuries not coded well by either the ICD-9-CM or the draft ICD-10-CM. However, while falls, poisonings, and injuries due to machinery and tools are common causes of injury hospitalizations in the military, few STANAG codes correspond to these events. Intentional injuries in general and sexual assaults in particular are also not well represented in the STANAG. Because the STANAG does not map directly to the ICD-9-CM system, quantitative comparisons between military and civilian data are difficult. The ICD-10-CM, which will be implemented in the United States sometime after 2001, expands considerably on its predecessor, ICD-9-CM, and provides more specificity and detail than the STANAG. With slight modification, it might become a suitable replacement for the STANAG.

  15. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S.

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  16. Exploring the planets with spacecraft - Accomplishments to date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of knowledge gained about Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Mercury via spacecraft. Mariner and Venera probes returned data on Venus' size, atmospheric structure and composition, temperature profiles, and magnetic field. Knowledge of the clouds is still primitive. Mars and Mariner probes (especially Mariner 9) expanded knowledge of the Martian surface, atmospheric structure and dynamics, and magnetic field. Mars is now viewed as a very active planet, with the possibility of life not immediately ruled out. Pioneer 10 returned data on Jovian temperature profiles and magnetic field, Galilean satellite masses, and Io's atmosphere. Mariner 10 added to knowledge of Mercury's surface, magnetic field, atmosphere, and activity.

  17. Exploring the planets with spacecraft - Accomplishments to date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of knowledge gained about Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Mercury via spacecraft. Mariner and Venera probes returned data on Venus' size, atmospheric structure and composition, temperature profiles, and magnetic field. Knowledge of the clouds is still primitive. Mars and Mariner probes (especially Mariner 9) expanded knowledge of the Martian surface, atmospheric structure and dynamics, and magnetic field. Mars is now viewed as a very active planet, with the possibility of life not immediately ruled out. Pioneer 10 returned data on Jovian temperature profiles and magnetic field, Galilean satellite masses, and Io's atmosphere. Mariner 10 added to knowledge of Mercury's surface, magnetic field, atmosphere, and activity.

  18. Evaluating the Special Needs of the Military for Radiation Biodosimetry for Tactical Warfare against Deployed Troops: Comparing Military to Civilian Needs for Biodosimetry Methods

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Ann Barry; Ali, Arif N.; Boyle, Holly K.; Du, Gaixin; Satinsky, Victoria A.; Swarts, Steven G.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Demidenko, Eugene; Schreiber, Wilson; Swartz, Harold M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper is to delineate characteristics of biodosimetry most suitable for assessing individuals who have potentially been exposed to significant radiation from a nuclear device explosion, when the primary population targeted by the explosion and needing rapid assessment for triage is civilians vs. deployed military personnel. Methods We first carry out a systematic analysis of the requirements for biodosimetry to meet the military's needs to assess deployed troops in a warfare situation, which include accomplishing the military mission. We then systematically compare and contrast the military's special capabilities to respond and carry out biodosimetry for deployed troops in warfare, in contrast to those available to respond and conduct biodosimetry for civilians who have been targeted, e.g., by terrorists. We then compare the effectiveness of different biodosimetry methods to address military vs. civilian needs and capabilities in these scenarios and, using five representative types of biodosimetry with sufficient published data to be useful for the simulations, we estimate the number of individuals who could be assessed by military vs. civilian responders within the timeframe needed for triage decisions. Conclusions Analyses based on these scenarios indicate that, in comparison to responses for a civilian population, a wartime military response for deployed troops has both more complex requirements for and greater capabilities to utilize different types of biodosimetry to evaluate radiation exposure in a very short timeframe after the exposure occurs. Greater complexity for the deployed military is based on factors such as a greater likelihood of partial or whole body exposure, conditions that include exposure to neutrons, and a greater likelihood of combined injury. Our simulations showed, for both the military and civilian response, that a very fast rate of initiating the processing (24,000 per day) is needed to have at least some

  19. Civilian Power from Space in the Early 21st Century

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Ishikawa, M; Wood, L

    2003-06-01

    If power beamed from space is to be become widely used on Earth in the first half of the 21St century, several thus-far-persistent impediments must be obviated, including threshold effects and problematic aspects of cost, availability, reliability, hazards and environmental impacts. We sketch a generally-applicable route to doing so, noting key enabling technologies and practical features. Likely-essential features of any successful strategy include vigorous, systematic leveraging of all intrinsic features of space-derived power, e.g., addressing marginal, high-value-added markets for electric power in space- and time-agile manners to conveniently provide power-upon-demand, and incrementally ''wedging'' into ever-larger markets with ever more cost-efficient generations and scales of technology. We suggest that no prudent strategic plan will rely upon large-scale, long-term public subsidies--fiscal, regulatory, etc.--with their attendant ''sovereign risks'' and interminable delays, and that plan-essential governmental support likely will be limited to early feasibility demonstrations, provision of threshold technologies and a rational, competition-neutral licensing environment. If salient realities are uniformly respected and accessible technologies are intelligently leveraged, electricity derived from space-sourced power-beams may come into significant civilian use during the latter part of the first quarter of this century, and may become widely used by the half-century point.

  20. Military and Civilian Burn Injuries During Armed Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.S.; Gunn, S.W.A.; Hayek, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment, and war burns have been described for more than 5,000 years of written history. Fire was probably utilized as a weapon long before that. With the ever-increasing destructive power and efficiency of modern weapons, casualties, both fatal and non-fatal, are reaching new highs, particularly among civilians who are becoming the major wartime targets in recent wars, accounting for most of the killed and wounded. Even though medical personnel usually believe that a knowledge of weaponry has little relevance to their ability to effectively treat injuries and that it may in some way be in conflict with their status, accorded under the Geneva and Hague treaties, it is imperative that they know how weapons are used and understand their effects on the human body. The present review explores various categories of weapons of modern warfare that are unfamiliar to most medical and paramedical personnel responsible for burn treatment. The mechanisms and patterns of injury produced by each class of weapons are examined so that a better understanding of burn management in a warfare situation may be achieved. PMID:21991098

  1. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    This seventh Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) describes activities and expenditures of the Office during fiscal years (FY) 1989 and 1990. In November 1989, OCRWM is responsible for disposing of the Nation`s spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and the quality of the environment. To direct the implementation of its mission, OCRWM has established the following objectives: (1) Safe and timely disposal: to establish as soon as practicable the ability to dispose of radioactive waste in a geologic repository licensed by the NRC. (2) Timely and adequate waste acceptance: to begin the operation of the waste management system as soon as practicable in order to obtain the system development and operational benefits that have been identified for the MRS facility. (3) Schedule confidence: to establish confidence in the schedule for waste acceptance and disposal such that the management of radioactive waste is not an obstacle to the nuclear energy option. (4) System flexibility: to ensure that the program has the flexibility necessary for adapting to future circumstances while fulfilling established commitments. To achieve these objectives, OCRWM is developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository for permanent disposed deep beneath the surface of the earth, a facility for MRS, and a system for transporting the waste.

  2. Military and civilian burn injuries during armed conflicts.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B S; Gunn, S W A; Hayek, S N

    2007-12-31

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment, and war burns have been described for more than 5,000 years of written history. Fire was probably utilized as a weapon long before that. With the ever-increasing destructive power and efficiency of modern weapons, casualties, both fatal and non-fatal, are reaching new highs, particularly among civilians who are becoming the major wartime targets in recent wars, accounting for most of the killed and wounded. Even though medical personnel usually believe that a knowledge of weaponry has little relevance to their ability to effectively treat injuries and that it may in some way be in conflict with their status, accorded under the Geneva and Hague treaties, it is imperative that they know how weapons are used and understand their effects on the human body. The present review explores various categories of weapons of modern warfare that are unfamiliar to most medical and paramedical personnel responsible for burn treatment. The mechanisms and patterns of injury produced by each class of weapons are examined so that a better understanding of burn management in a warfare situation may be achieved.

  3. Heavy vehicle automation: transitioning from civilian to military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misener, James A.; Shladover, Steven E.; Empey, Dan; Tan, Han-Shue

    2001-09-01

    We describe potential military robotics applications for the heavy vehicle automation and driver assistance research that has been conducted on at the California Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways (PATH). Specifically, we summarize the state of vehicle automation research at PATH by beginning with a short description of automated platoon operations with eight light duty passenger vehicles. Then we focus on automation of a Class 8 Freightliner Model FLD 125 tractor with 45-ft trailer, and lateral driver assist installed in a 10-wheel International snowplow. We also discuss full automation plans for a Kodiak 4000-ton/hour rotary snowblower, two 40-ft New Flyer buses, one 60-ft New Flyer articulated bus, and three Freightliner Century tractor-trailer combinations. We discuss benefits for civilian applications - congestion relief, driver safety, and fuel economy/emissions reductions. We then follow with a discussion of the benefits from potential military spin-ons which include, as dual-use applications, driver safety and fuel economy/emissions. We end by discussing the additional military benefit in the conduct of tactical resupply operations, where vehicles of similar weight class and performance as those experimented by PATH can be used in automated convoys with savings in manpower and survivability in addition to improved mission operations.

  4. US Civilian Smallpox Preparedness and Response Program, 2003.

    PubMed

    Strikas, Raymond A; Neff, Linda J; Rotz, Lisa; Cono, Joanne; Knutson, Donna; Henderson, Joseph; Orenstein, Walter A

    2008-03-15

    Variola virus, the cause of smallpox disease, has been deemed a possible bioterrorism agent. Since November 2001, federal, state, and local public health partners implemented activities to prepare for a possible smallpox outbreak. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) produced and delivered training and educational materials for smallpox preparedness in many formats, developed detailed smallpox vaccine information statements about vaccine contraindications and vaccination site care, and established mechanisms to monitor and respond to adverse events after smallpox vaccination. The last included enhancements to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, a pregnancy registry for inadvertently vaccinated pregnant women, and a Clinician Telephone Information Line to collect reports about adverse events. The civilian responder vaccination program was conducted with rigorous safety procedures, and few historically recognized adverse events were observed. However, myocarditis and/or pericarditis was newly recognized as an adverse event caused by the New York City Board of Health vaccinia vaccine strain. This smallpox preparedness program put into place a number of measures to advance the United States' readiness for a smallpox outbreak that have assisted in preparedness for other threats.

  5. A series of civilian fatalities during the war in Syria.

    PubMed

    Çelikel, Adnan; Karaarslan, Bekir; Demirkıran, Dua Sümeyra; Zeren, Cem; Arslan, Muhammet Mustafa

    2014-09-01

    A considerable number of deaths due to firearm injuries have occurred during wars all over the world. In this study, it is aimed to evaluate demographic characteristics and injury properties of cases died during civil war in Syria. The postmortem examination and autopsy reports of 321 forensic deaths occurred between January and December 2012 were analyzed, retrospectively. Of the 321 forensic deaths,186 cases were injured and died in the civil war in Syria and, therefore, included in the scope of the study. Four cases died by natural causes or traffic accidents were excluded. Cases were most commonly (n=73, 39.2%) aged between 21 and 30 years, and 21.5% (n=40) of cases aged under 20 years. Of females, 68.8% (n=11) were children and young adults under 20 years of age. An overwhelming majority of deaths (n=125, 67.2%) were caused by explosive and shrapnel injuries, followed by (n=49, 26.3%) gunshot injuries related deaths. This study indicated that a significant proportion of those who died after being injured in the Syrian war were children, women and elderly people. The nature and localization of the observed injuries indicated open attacks by military forces regardless of targets being civilians and human rights violations.

  6. Safety profile of amateur kickboxing among military and civilian competitors.

    PubMed

    Buse, George J; Wood, Robert M

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify match-ending injuries in amateur kickboxing (KB) among military and civilian competitors. A total of 148 competitors, of whom 5 were on active duty in the U.S. Air Force or Marine Corps, participated in amateur KB matches (N = 74) from 1999 to 2001. Match-ending injuries were observed and managed from ringside by one author (G.J.B.). Of all matches, 23 (31.1%) were stopped because of injury. Of the 23 matches, 15 (65.2%) ended because of traumatic brain injury, 4 (17.4%) because of orthopedic trauma, 3 (13.0%) because of thoracoabdominal trauma, and 1 (4.4%) because of ocular trauma. The incidence of traumatic brain injury was greater than that of all other match-ending injuries combined (p < 0.01). Because of the incidence and potentially serious sequelae of injuries associated with competitive KB, military commanders should exercise operational risk management in an attempt to safeguard personnel from unnecessary hazard.

  7. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury.

  8. Study of aerospace technology utilization in the civilian biomedical field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The treatment of patients with acute pulmonary or cardiovascular diseases is used to demonstrate the benefits to be derived from a more extensive application of NASA technology in public health care. Significant and rather universal problems faced by the medical profession and supporting services are identified. The required technology and specifications for its development and evaluation are delineated. Institutional relationships and collaboration needed to accomplish technology transfer are developed.

  9. Once a Veteran. The Transition to Civilian LIfe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    annual leave accrua! for all of their years in ieht’. as a veteran . enlistee. rejectee, reservist or National uniform if they pay a percentage of the...are proud and grateful for all you have accomplished. Your contributions have only just begun. Thank you, and all the best. Contents Veterans Benefits...6 Social Security Survivor Benefits ................. l....b......1 Veterans E-ducational Assistance Program .....-........6 VA Dependency

  10. A guide to treating military personnel in a civilian mental health facility.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Gwen A

    2014-11-01

    As the number of troops returning home from the Middle East continues to rise, so does the need for psychiatric treatment. More and more often, civilian mental health facilities will be faced with treating active duty service members. Because the patients are active duty status, civilian providers need to become familiar with the unique intricacies and challenges of interacting with military command and mental health clinics. Concepts such as confidentiality and consent have a slightly different meaning in the military that affects care in the civilian realm. Diagnoses, medication choices, and treatment planning can also have an impact on a service member's career in the military that civilian providers may not recognize. This guide serves as a "beginner's" manual for working with active duty service members.

  11. 45 CFR 506.1 - “Civilian American citizen” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TITLE I OF THE WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPENSATION Civilian... who, being then a citizen of the United States, was captured in Southeast Asia during the...

  12. Security Clearances: Agencies Need Clearly Defined Policy for Determining Civilian Position Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    branch has established policies and procedures for agencies to use when (1) first determining if federal civilian positions require a security...has established (1) policies and procedures for agencies to use when first determining whether federal civilian positions require a security...support for several nonservice DOD agencies and activities. For our first objective, to examine the extent to which the executive branch has established

  13. Health and health behavior differences: U.S. Military, veteran, and civilian men.

    PubMed

    Hoerster, Katherine D; Lehavot, Keren; Simpson, Tracy; McFall, Miles; Reiber, Gayle; Nelson, Karin M

    2012-11-01

    Little is known about health and health behavior differences among military service veterans, active duty service members, National Guard/Reserve members, and civilians. Several important differences were identified among U.S. women from these subpopulations; to identify areas for targeted intervention, studies comparing men from these subpopulations are needed. To compare veteran, military, and civilian men on leading U.S. health indicators. Data were from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, a U.S. population-based study. In 2011, self-reported health outcomes were compared using multivariable logistic regression across male veterans (n=53,406); active duty service members (n=2144); National Guard/Reserve service members (n=3724); and civilians (n=110,116). Multivariate logistic regression results are presented. Despite better healthcare access, veterans had poorer health and functioning than civilians and National Guard/Reserve members on several indicators. Veterans also were more likely than those on active duty to report diabetes. Veterans were more likely to report current smoking and heavy alcohol consumption than National Guard/Reserve members and civilian men, and lack of exercise compared to active duty men and National Guard/Reserve members. National Guard/Reserve men had higher levels of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (versus active duty and veterans, active duty, and civilians, respectively). Active duty men were more likely to report current smoking and heavy alcohol consumption than civilians and National Guard/Reserve members, and reported more smokeless tobacco use than civilians. Veterans have poorer health and health behaviors; increased prevention efforts are needed from veteran-serving organizations. Despite good health, active duty men reported unhealthy lifestyles, indicating an important area for prevention efforts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Improving Interagency Integration at the Operational Level: CORDS - A Model for the Advanced Civilian Team

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-25

    transition from military to civilian control as rapidly as possible. When conditions for handover to civilian control are met, the ACT headquarters is...very fuzzy , and that was one of the basic problems in the field. You are on to what I regard as an extremely important problem area. The “other...for example) and vertical construction (such as buildings), and Department of Defense (DOD)-allocated funds.101 Much of DOD’s monetary contribution

  15. Command and Control of Civilian Contract Manned Navy Fleet Support and Military Sealift Command Ships.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    members. J B. NMEBA POSrIIN On 25 April 1983, the president of the NAM, Mr. Jesse M. Calhoon , testified before the House Armed Services Cammittee’s...Maritime Administration 25 Ii In his testiny, Mr. Calhoon argued that civilian contract operation of Navy and MSC fleet support ships was in the...the number of merchant seamen who are trained and ready to serve with the Navy. C. CIVILIAN CCNTRACT MANNING PRCOPSAL In his testimony, Mr. Calhoon

  16. Aviation Epidemiology Data Register: Coronary Angiography Outcomes of Civilian Aviators Flying U.S. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    All Army aviators participate in a cardiovascular disease screening program. Five percent of Army aviators are civilian. The U.S. Army Aviation...Center requested a review of cardiovascular disease screening outcomes among this subgroup of aviators. The AEDR was queried to determine the coronary...angiography outcomes of civilian aviators who failed levels 1 and 2 of cardiovascular disease screening program during the period 1988 to 1992. Among 847

  17. Comparison of Civilian and Military Overhead Spending: Three Case Studies. Revision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-17

    aDesignations used by the Defense Housing Management Systems Office. TABLE 4 CIVILIAN HOUSING MAINTENANCE SPENDING VS. AGEa (Single unit, owner occupied...I-t9 ONCOMlPARISON OF CIVILIRN iND MILITARY OVERHEAD SPENDING : ,l THREE CASE STUDIES.. (U) CENTER FOR NAVAL ANALYSES RLEXADRIA YR NAVAL PLRNNING RND...ftFL RESEARCH MEMORANDUM 0 COMPARISON OF CIVILIAN AND MILITARY OVERHEAD SPENDING : I THREE CASE STUDIES Daniel B. Levine Colin P. Hammon DTIC ELECTE K

  18. Assessment of the DoD Laboratory Civilian Science and Engineering Workforce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    does not lead quickly to a broadly accepted conclusion. Ref-1 References 1. Asch , B. J. May 2003. The defense civilian workforce: Insights from...2002_rpt_st_community_crisis.pdf 4 Asch , B. J. The Defense Civilian Workforce: Insights From Research. RAND Report CT-208 (Santa Monica, CA: RAND, May...2003). Available at http://www.rand.org/pubs/testimonies/2005/CT208.pdf 5 Asch , B. J., S. Haider, and J. Zissimopoulous. The Effects of Workforce

  19. Immunity to Diphtheria and Tetanus in Army Personnel and Adult Civilians in Mashhad, Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Shokouh, Seyyed Javad; Mohammadi, Babak; Rajabi, Jalil; Mohammadian Roshan, Ghasem

    2017-03-24

    This study aimed to investigate serologic immunity to diphtheria and tetanus in army personnel and a sample population of adult civilians in Mashhad, Iran. Army personnel (n = 180) and civilians (n = 83) who presented at Mashhad army hospital participated in this study. Diphtheria and tetanus antitoxin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Approximately 77% and 94% of army personnel aged 18-34 years had at least basic protection against diphtheria (antitoxin level ≥0.1 IU/mL) and tetanus (antitoxin level >0.1 IU/mL), respectively. For civilians in this age group, the proportions were 76% for both diseases. Antitoxin levels waned with age. Thus, participants older than 50 years had lower immunity; this decrease in immunity was more pronounced for tetanus than for diphtheria in both army personnel and civilians. For both diseases, geometric mean antitoxin titers and the proportion of participants with at least basic protection were higher in subjects with a history of vaccination in the last 10 years (P < 0.001), higher in men than women, and in army personnel than civilians in each age group. Young army personnel and civilians (18-34 years old) had adequate immunity to diphtheria and tetanus. However, the large number of susceptible older adults (>50 years old) calls for improved booster vaccination protocols.

  20. Operation Protective Edge - A Unique Challenge for a Civilian EMS Agency.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Eli; Strugo, Refael; Wacht, Oren

    2015-10-01

    During July through August 2014, Operation Protective Edge, a military conflict between Israel and the Hamas regime in Gaza, dramatically affected both populations. Magen David Adom (MDA), the Israeli national Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and a member of the Red Cross, faced a unique challenge during the conflict: to continue providing crucial service to the entire civilian population of Israel, which was under constant missile threat. This challenge included not only providing immediate care for routine EMS calls under missile threat, but also preparing and delivering immediate care to civilians injured in attacks on major cities, as well as small communities, in Israel. This task is a challenge for a civilian EMS agency that normally operates in a non-military environment, yet, in an instant, must enhance its capability to respond to a considerable threat to its population. During Operation Protective Edge, MDA provided care for 842 wounded civilians and utilized a significant amount of its resources. Providing EMS services for a civilian population in a mixed civilian/military scenario is a challenging task on a national level for an EMS system, especially when the threat lasts for weeks. This report describes MDA's preparedness and operations during Operation Protective Edge, and the unique EMS challenges and dilemmas the agency faced.

  1. Who kills whom? The micro-dynamics of civilian targeting in civil war.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Madhav; Quinn, Jason Michael

    2017-03-01

    Prior research on civilian targeting in civil war has focused on characteristics of either the government or rebel group that make them more or less likely to target civilians. However, no government or rebel group targets a population, but rather individuals within it. To date, no study has explored the issue of why particular civilians would be chosen by one actor versus the other. This study examines the divergent civilian-targeting strategies of governments and rebel groups. We argue that unique identification problems facing each political actor in civil war leads the parties to resort to social stereotypes based on data derived from known enemy subjects killed in combat. We specify and then test a model that accounts for time and space and the demographic characteristics of each victim utilizing a new dataset on the personal, political, and demographic characteristics of individual civilians targeted by the state and rebels in the civil war in Nepal (1996-2006). The findings demonstrate for the first time that governments (and rebels) tend to kill the same types of individuals in non-combat settings as they kill in combat exchanges, and the civilians targeted by each actor differ significantly in the extent that they share certain social traits.

  2. Soviet gas processing expands

    SciTech Connect

    Sagers, M.J.

    1987-09-01

    The Soviet gas processing industry expanded with the recent completion of two new gas processing plants, the Krasnoleninskiy and Noyabr'sk plants, both located in West Siberia. Both process associated gas from nearby oil fields to remove valuable liquid hydrocarbons before putting the dry gas into pipelines; previously the gas was flared or vented. These plants represent part of a major program, ongoing since the 1970s, to increase the level of utilization of the tremendous amount of valuable associated gas now being produced in West Siberia. Another major effort to develop gas processing is under way in western Kazakhstan at the Tengiz and Zhanazhol' fields. At Zhanazhol', a small gas recovery plant went into operation in late 1984 in conjunction with a separation plant with a processing capacity of 1 million tons of oil per year. A much larger enterprise to refine oil and process associated gas is under construction at the Tengiz field. This enterprise is different from the major petrochemical operation planned to use feedstocks from Tengiz; the petrochemical operation will be constructed at Kulsary, 120 kilometers from Tengiz, and produce polyethylene, polypropylene, and other plastics.

  3. EarthScope Education and Outreach: Accomplishments and Emerging Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, S.; Ellins, K. K.; Semken, S. C.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2014-12-01

    EarthScope's Education and Outreach (E&O) program aims to increase public awareness of Earth science and enhance geoscience education at the K-12 and college level. The program is distinctive among major geoscience programs in two ways. First, planning for education and public engagement occurred in tandem with planning for the science mission. Second, the NSF EarthScope program includes funding support for education and outreach. In this presentation, we highlight key examples of the program's accomplishments and identify emerging E&O opportunities. E&O efforts have been collaboratively led by the EarthScope National Office (ESNO), IRIS, UNAVCO, the EarthScope Education and Outreach Subcommittee (EEOSC) and PI-driven EarthScope projects. Efforts by the EEOSC, guided by an EarthScope Education and Outreach Implementation Plan that is periodically updated, focus EarthScope E&O. EarthScope demonstrated early success in engaging undergraduate students (and teachers) in its mission through their involvement in siting USArray across the contiguous U.S. Funded E&O programs such as TOTLE, Illinois EarthScope, CEETEP (for K-12), InTeGrate and GETSI (for undergraduates) foster use of freely available EarthScope data and research findings. The Next Generation Science Standards, which stress science and engineering practices, offer an opportunity for alignment with existing EarthScope K-12 educational resources, and the EEOSC recommends focusing efforts on this task. The EEOSC recognizes the rapidly growing use of mobile smart devices by the public and in formal classrooms, which bring new opportunities to connect with the public and students. This will capitalize on EarthScope's already prominent social media presence, an effort that developed to accomplish one of the primary goals of the EarthScope E&O Implementation Plan to "Create a high-profile public identity for EarthScope" and to "Promote science literacy and understanding of EarthScope among all audiences through

  4. Technical Report of Accomplishments of the Weatherization Leveraging Partnership Project

    SciTech Connect

    Economic Opportunity Studies

    2007-09-30

    The Weatherization Leveraging Partnership Project was established to provide three types of technical assistance support to W.A.P. network organizations seeking to achieve the Weatherization Plus goal of expanding their non-federal resources. It provided: (1) Analysis that profiled W.A.P.-eligible household energy characteristics and finances for all in determining efficiency investment targets and goals; (2) Detailed information on leveraged partnerships linked from many sources and created a website with finding aids to meet the needs the network identified. There are five major market segments with related, but different, technical assistance needs; (3) Direct, sustained assistance in preparing strategies, analyses, and communications for a limited set of local network initiatives that were in early stages of initiating or changing their resource expansion strategies. The Project identified trends in the challenges that weatherizers initiatives encountered; it designed materials and tools, including the dynamic www.weatherizationplus.org website, to meet the continuing and the emerging needs.

  5. New ways of understanding and accomplishing leadership in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Souba, Wiley W

    2004-04-01

    Understanding leadership as being about a person in charge is not wrong, but it is no longer adequate. The challenges and problems confronting medicine today are so complex and unpredictable that it is practically impossible for one person to accomplish the work of leadership alone. More leadership requires more shared work, but as hospitals and medical centers begin to break down departmental barriers, people have to learn to work with individuals and groups who may have different work ethics, dissimilar styles of solving problems, or even contrasting values. Successful academic medical centers will make use of a broader repertoire of leadership strategies--besides developing leaders, they will develop leadership as a property of the system, as an organizational capacity. While leader development involves enhancing human (individual) capital, the emphasis in leadership development is on social capital and building more productive relationships that enhance networking, collaboration, and resource exchange. Leadership is created in and emerges from the relational space that connects people--accordingly, leadership development involves building high-quality connections between people. To make leadership happen more effectively, academic medical centers will have to identify and study the ingredients that catalyze and enhance human connectivity, augment social capital and activate leadership. Leadership is a uniquely human activity--studying it and how it works is core to the learning organization.

  6. The Vasimr Engine: Project Status and Recent Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ChangDiaz, Franklin R.; Squire, Jared P.; Bering, Edgar A., III; Baitty, F. Wally; Goulding, Richard H.; Bengtson, Roger D.

    2004-01-01

    The development of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) was initiated in the late 1970s to address a critical requirement for fast, high-power interplanetary space transportation. While not being a fusion rocket, it nevertheless borrows heavily from that technology and takes advantage of the natural topology of open-ended magnetic systems. In addition to its high power density and high exhaust velocity, VASIMR is capable of "constant power throttling" a feature, which allows in-flight mission-optimization of thrust and specific impulse to enhance performance and reduce trip time. A NASA-led, research team, involving industry, academia and government facilities is pursuing the development of this concept in the United States. The technology can be validated, in the near term, in venues such as the International Space Station, where it can also serve as both a drag compensation device and a plasma contactor for the orbital facility. Other near-Earth applications in the commercial and scientific satellite sectors are also envisioned. This presentation covers the evolution of the VASIMR concept to its present status, as well as recent accomplishments in our understanding of the physics. Approaches and collaborative programs addressing the major technical challenges will also be presented.

  7. Fort Collins Science Center: Fiscal Year 2007 Accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 2007 (FY07), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) continued research vital to U.S. Department of the Interior science and management needs and associated USGS programmatic goals. FORT work also supported the science needs of other government agencies as well as private cooperators. Specifically, FORT scientific research and technical assistance focused on client and partner needs and goals in the areas of biological information management, fisheries and aquatic systems, invasive species, status and trends of biological resources, terrestrial ecosystems, and wildlife resources. In addition, FORT's 5-year strategic plan was refined to incorporate focus areas identified in the USGS strategic science plan, including ecosystem-landscape analysis, global climate change, and energy and mineral resource development. As a consequence, several science projects initiated in FY07 were either entirely new research dor amplifications of existing work. Highlights of FORT project accomplishments are described below under the USGS science program with which each task is most closely associated. The work of FORT's 6 branches (Aquatic Systems and Technology Applications, Ecosystem Dynamics, Information Science, Invasive Species Science, Policy Analysis and Science Assistance, and Species and Habitats of Federal Interest) often involves major partnerships with other agencies or cooperation with other USGS disciplines (Geology, Geography, Water Resources) and the Geospatial Information Office.

  8. National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center project accomplishments: highlights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holl, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) has invested more than $20M since 2008 to put cutting-edge climate science research in the hands of resource managers across the Nation. With NCCWSC support, more than 25 cooperative research initiatives led by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researchers and technical staff are advancing our understanding of habitats and species to provide guidance to managers in the face of a changing climate. Projects focus on quantifying and predicting interactions between climate, habitats, species, and other natural resources such as water. Spatial scales of the projects range from the continent of North America, to a regional scale such as the Pacific Northwest United States, to a landscape scale such as the Florida Everglades. Time scales range from the outset of the 20th century to the end of the 21st century. Projects often lead to workshops, presentations, publications and the creation of new websites, computer models, and data visualization tools. Partnership-building is also a key focus of the NCCWSC-supported projects. New and on-going cooperative partnerships have been forged and strengthened with resource managers and scientists at Federal, tribal, state, local, academic, and non-governmental organizations. USGS scientists work closely with resource managers to produce timely and relevant results that can assist managers and policy makers in current resource management decisions. This fact sheet highlights accomplishments of five NCCWSC projects.

  9. Bengt Liliequist: life and accomplishments of a true renaissance man.

    PubMed

    Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2017-02-01

    In the 1970s, the membrane of Liliequist became the accepted name for a small band of arachnoid membrane separating the interpeduncular and chiasmatic cisterns, making it one of the most recent of the universally accepted medical eponyms. The story of its discovery, however, cannot be told without a thorough understanding of the man responsible and his contribution to the growth of a specialty. Bengt Liliequist lived during what many would consider the Golden Age of neuroradiology. With his colleagues at the Serafimer Hospital in Stockholm, he helped set the standard for appropriate imaging of the CNS and contributed to more accurate localization of intracerebral as well as spinal lesions. The pneumoencephalographic discovery of the membrane that was to bear his name serves merely as a starting point for a career that spanned five decades and included the defense of two separate doctoral theses, the last of which occurred after his 80th birthday. Although the recognition of neuroradiology as a subspecialty did not occur in his home country of Sweden until after his retirement, and technological progress saw the obsolescence of the procedure that he had mastered, Dr. Liliequist's accomplishments and his contributions to the current understanding of neuroanatomy merit our continued praise.

  10. Expanding contraceptive options.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The goals of Family Health International (FHI) have been to introduce a variety of birth control options to people in developing countries, and to provide information to the user on the advantages and disadvantages of each method. FHI has worked with many developing countries in clinical trials of established as well as new contraceptive methods. These trials played an important part in making 2 sterilization procedures, laparoscopy and minilaparotomy popular for women. Further research improved the methods and have made them the most popular in the world, chosen by 130 million users. FHI is doing clinical trials on a new IUD, that is a copper bearing T-shaped device called the TCu380A. they have collected data on over 10,000 women using IUD's and early analysis indicates TCu380A is more effective than others. FHI is also evaluating devices such as Norplant that will prevent pregnancy up to 5 years by implanting the capsules in the arm. More than 8,000 women are being tested to determine the acceptability of implants in different geographical locations. Other research groups are doing work in 10 additional countries: Bangladesh will expand its program to 24,000 women and Nepal to 8,000 women. Trials are also being conducted on progestogen pills, since they do not lesson the volume of milk in breast feeding. FHI has also worked to introduce creative community-based distribution channels. In one case, specially trained health workers delivered contraceptives door-to-door in over 150,000 households. They found that 2 of 3 women accepted the pills and in a follow up survey 90% were still using them. FHI is now focusing on ways to improve moving new contraceptives from clinical testing on everyday use. They will coordinate training programs, educational material, media campaigns, and efforts with other international organizations, government agencies, and family planning groups.

  11. The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  12. Civilian exposure to toxic agents: emergency medical response.

    PubMed

    Baker, David

    2004-01-01

    Civilian populations are at risk from exposure to toxic materials as a result of accidental or deliberate exposure. In addition to industrial hazards, toxic agents designed for use in warfare now are a potential hazard in everyday life through terrorist action. Civil emergency medical responders should be able to adapt their plans for dealing with casualties from hazardous materials (HazMat) to deal with the new threat. Chemical and biological warfare (CBW) and HazMat agents can be viewed as a continuous spectrum. Each of these hazards is characterized by qualities of toxicity, latency of action, persistency, and transmissibility. The incident and medical responses to release of any agent is determined by these characteristics. Chemical and biological wardare agents usually are classified as weapons of mass destruction, but strictly, they are agents of mass injury. The relationship between mass injury and major loss of life depends very much on the protection, organization, and emergency care provided. Detection of a civil toxic agent release where signs and symptoms in casualties may be the first indicator of exposure is different from the military situation where intelligence information and tuned detection systems generally will be available. It is important that emergency medical care should be given in the context of a specific action plan. Within an organized and protected perimeter, triage and decontamination (if the agent is persistent) can proceed while emergency medical care is provided at the same time. The provision of advanced life support (TOXALS) in this zone by protected and trained medical responders now is technically feasible using specially designed ventilation equipment. Leaving life support until after decontamination may have fatal consequences. Casualties from terrorist attacks also may suffer physical as well as toxic trauma and the medical response also should be capable of dealing with mixed injuries.

  13. Civilian cerebral gunshot wounds: a South African experience.

    PubMed

    Kong, Victor; Odendaal, Jocinta; Sartorius, Benn; Clarke, Damian; Brysiewicz, Petra; Jerome, Ellen; Bruce, John; Laing, Grant

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral gunshot wounds represent one of the most lethal forms of traumatic brain injury, but there is a paucity of literature on the topic, especially from the developing world. We reviewed our experience and describe the spectrum and outcome of civilian cerebral gunshot wounds in a major metropolitan trauma centre in South Africa. This was a retrospective study of all patients with isolated cerebral gunshot wounds managed by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service over a 5-year period from 2010 to 2014. One hundred and two patients were included, 92% (94/102) were male and the mean age was 29 years. Fifty-four per cent (55/102) of all patients were from urban areas. The mean time from injury to arrival was 6 h (standard deviation: 5) for urban patients and 15 h (standard deviation: 5.2) for rural patients (P < 0.001). Ninety-four per cent (94/102) of all injuries were related to interpersonal violence and involved low velocity firearms. Twenty per cent of all patients (20/102) had a Glasgow Coma Scale 3-8, 20% (20/102) 9-12 and 61% (61/102) 12-15. All 102 patients underwent computed tomography scans. Thirty per cent (31/102) required neurosurgical interventions. The overall mortality rate was 22% (22/102). There was a significant difference in mortality between urban and rural patients (9% versus 36%, P < 0.001). Cerebral gunshot wounds are associated with significant mortality and protracted delay to definitive care is common in our setting. Those who survive the delayed transfer to definitive care generally do well and have reasonably good clinical outcomes. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  14. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine technology component technology for the next space engine. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced missions focused components and new health monitoring techniques. The split-expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  15. Advanced expander test bed engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high pressure expander cycle concept, study system interactions, and conduct studies of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  16. Astrobiology at Arizona State University: An Overview of Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack

    2005-01-01

    During our five years as an NAI charter member, Arizona State University sponsored a broadly-based program of research and training in Astrobiology to address the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Solar System. With such a large, diverse and active team, it is not possible in a reasonable space, to cover all details of progress made over the entire five years. The following paragraphs provide an overview update of the specific research areas pursued by the Arizona State University (ASU) Astrobiology team at the end of Year 5 and at the end of the 4 month and subsequent no cost month extensions. for a more detailed review, the reader is referred to the individual annual reports (and Executive Summaries) submitted to the NAI at the end of each of our five years of membership. Appended in electronic form is our complete publication record for all five years, plus a tabulation of undergraduates, graduate students and post-docs supported by our program during this time. The overarching theme of ASU s Astrobiology program was "Exploring the Living Universe: Studies of the Origin, Evolution and Distribution of Life in the Solar System". The NAi-funded research effort was organized under three basic sub- themes: 1. Origins of the Basic Building Blocks of Life. 2. Early Biosphere Evolution. and 3. Exploring for Life in the Solar System. These sub-theme areas were in turn, subdivided into Co-lead research modules. In the paragraphs that follow, accomplishments for individual research modules are briefly outlined, and the key participants presented in tabular form. As noted, publications for each module are appended in hard copy and digital formats, under the name(s) of lead co-Is.

  17. Research in child and adolescent psychopharmacology: recent accomplishments and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Benedetto

    2007-03-01

    Research in pediatric psychopharmacology has expanded considerably in the last 10 years. Still, controversy remains about the effectiveness and safety of commonly used psychotropics and their role in child treatment, thus pointing to the need for more in-depth and targeted investigations. To review recent accomplishments and current limitations of pediatric psychopharmacology, and discuss approaches to further research. Selective review of the relevant literature and research in progress. Controlled clinical trials have been conducted in many common psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents, thus providing a basis on which evidence-based treatment guidelines can be constructed. Little innovation has, however, occurred in treatment development and testing. Safety concerns are prominent and have a major influence on clinical practice and drug utilization. While a research infrastructure has been successfully built for conducting pediatric clinical trials, important aspects such as long-term treatment effects, optimal sequencing and individualization of interventions, and integration of neuroscience findings into innovative, theory-driven treatment development remain to be addressed.

  18. Research progress and accomplishments on International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Roe, Lesa B; Uri, John J

    2003-01-01

    The first research payloads reached the International Space Station (ISS) more than two years ago, with research operating continuously since March 2001. Seven research racks are currently on-orbit, with three more arriving soon to expand science capabilities. Through the first five expeditions, 60 unique NASA-managed investigations from 11 nations have been supported, many continuing into later missions. More than 90,000 experiment hours have been completed, and more than 1,000 hours of crew time have been dedicated to research, numbers that grow daily. The multidisciplinary program includes research in life sciences, physical sciences, biotechnology, Earth sciences, technology demonstrations as well as commercial endeavors and educational activities. The Payload Operations and Integration Center monitors the onboard activities around the clock, working with numerous Principal Investigators and Payload Developers at their remote sites. Future years will see expansion of the station with research modules provided by the European Space Agency and Japan, which will be outfitted with additional research racks. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Research progress and accomplishments on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Lesa B.; Uri, John J.

    2003-01-01

    The first research payloads reached the International Space Station (ISS) more than two years ago, with research operating continuously since March 2001. Seven research racks are currently on-orbit, with three more arriving soon to expand science capabilities. Through the first five expeditions, 60 unique NASA-managed investigations from 11 nations have been supported, many continuing into later missions. More than 90,000 experiment hours have been completed, and more than 1,000 hours of crew time have been dedicated to research, numbers that grow daily. The multidisciplinary program includes research in life sciences, physical sciences, biotechnology, Earth sciences, technology demonstrations as well as commercial endeavors and educational activities. The Payload Operations and Integration Center monitors the onboard activities around the clock, working with numerous Principal Investigators and Payload Developers at their remote sites. Future years will see expansion of the station with research modules provided by the European Space Agency and Japan, which will be outfitted with additional research racks. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Research progress and accomplishments on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Lesa B.; Uri, John J.

    2003-01-01

    The first research payloads reached the International Space Station (ISS) more than two years ago, with research operating continuously since March 2001. Seven research racks are currently on-orbit, with three more arriving soon to expand science capabilities. Through the first five expeditions, 60 unique NASA-managed investigations from 11 nations have been supported, many continuing into later missions. More than 90,000 experiment hours have been completed, and more than 1,000 hours of crew time have been dedicated to research, numbers that grow daily. The multidisciplinary program includes research in life sciences, physical sciences, biotechnology, Earth sciences, technology demonstrations as well as commercial endeavors and educational activities. The Payload Operations and Integration Center monitors the onboard activities around the clock, working with numerous Principal Investigators and Payload Developers at their remote sites. Future years will see expansion of the station with research modules provided by the European Space Agency and Japan, which will be outfitted with additional research racks. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Civilian firearm injury and death in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Davies, M J; Wells, C; Squires, P A; Hodgetts, T J; Lecky, F E

    2012-01-01

    There is currently concern in the UK that injuries and deaths caused by firearms are increasing. This is supported by small local studies but not by wider research to inform targeted prevention programmes. A retrospective analysis was performed of firearm injuries from the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) database (1998-2007), the largest national registry of serious injuries. Data were analysed to determine temporal trends in the prevalence of firearm injuries and demographic characteristics of firearm victims. The UK Office of National Statistics provided data on all deaths by firearms as TARN does not record prehospital deaths. Of 91 232 cases in the TARN database, 487 (0.53%) were due to firearm injury. There were 435 men and 52 women of median age 30 years. The median New Injury Severity Score in men was 18 with a mortality of 7.4%, compared with 15.5 and 3.8% for women. The highest rate of firearm injuries as a proportion of all injuries was submitted from London (1.4%), with the South East (0.23%) submitting the lowest rate. 90.5% resided in urban areas, 78% presented outside 'normal' hours and 90% were alleged assaults. As a proportion of all injuries submitted, a small upward trend in the prevalence of deaths due to firearms was demonstrated over the study period. An increase in homicides since 2000 was also noted with an increasingly younger population being involved. In contrast, data from the Office of National Statistics showed that the greatest number of deaths were self-inflicted rather than homicides (984 vs 527), with Wales having the highest number of such deaths and predominantly involving older men. Deaths and serious injuries caused by firearms remain rare in the civilian population of England and Wales, although an upward trend can be described. Victims of assault and homicide are predominantly young men living in urban areas and the population involved is getting younger. However, of all deaths, self-inflicted wounds are nearly

  2. An Evaluation of State Energy Program Accomplishments: 2002 Program Year

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.

    2005-07-13

    SEP activities performed by the states during the 2002 program year, based on primary data provided by the states themselves. This is the second systematic evaluation of SEP accomplishments performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE. A report documenting the findings of the first study was published in January 2003 (Schweitzer et.al., 2003).

  3. Non-medical aspects of civilian-military collaboration in management of major incidents.

    PubMed

    Khorram-Manesh, A; Lönroth, H; Rotter, P; Wilhelmsson, M; Aremyr, J; Berner, A; Andersson, A Nero; Carlström, E

    2017-03-02

    Disasters and major incidents demand a multidisciplinary management. Recent experiences from terrorist attacks worldwide have resulted in a search for better assessment of the needs, resources, and knowledge in the medical and non-medical management of these incidents and also actualized the need for collaboration between civilian and military healthcare. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the civilian-military collaboration in a Swedish context with the main focus on its non-medical management. An exercise, simulating a foreign military attack centrally on Swedish soil, was designed, initiated, and conducted by a team consisting of civilian and military staff. Data were collected prospectively and evaluated by an expert team. Specific practical and technical issues were presented in collaboration between civilian and military staffs. In addition, shortcomings in decision-making, follow-up, communication, and collaboration due to prominent lack of training and exercising the tasks and positions in all managerial levels of the hospital were identified. Current social and political unrests and terror attacks worldwide necessitate civilian-military collaboration. Such collaboration, however, needs to be synchronized and adjusted to avoid preventable medical and non-medical consequences. Simulation exercises might be one important source to improve such collaboration.

  4. Trends and outcomes of endovascular therapy in the management of civilian vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Branco, Bernardino C; DuBose, Joseph J; Zhan, Luke X; Hughes, John D; Goshima, Kay R; Rhee, Peter; Mills, Joseph L

    2014-11-01

    The rapid evolution of endovascular surgery has greatly expanded management options for a wide variety of vascular diseases. Endovascular therapy provides a less invasive alternative to open surgery for critically ill patients who have sustained arterial injuries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate recent trends in the management of arterial injuries in the United States with specific reference to the use of endovascular strategies and to examine the outcomes of endovascular vs open therapy for the treatment of civilian arterial traumatic injuries. A 9-year analysis of the National Trauma Data Bank was performed to identify all patients who sustained arterial injuries. Demographics, clinical data, interventions, and outcomes were extracted. Propensity scores were used to match endovascular patients to those undergoing open operation. Patient outcomes were compared according to treatment approach. A total of 23,105 patients were available for analysis. Overall, there was a significant increase in the use of endovascular procedures during 9 years (from 0.3% in 2002 to 9.0% in 2010; P < .001), particularly among blunt trauma patients (from 0.4% in 2002 to 13.2% in 2010; P < .001). This increase was noteworthy and dramatic for injuries of the internal iliac artery (from 8.0% in 2002 to 40.3% in 2010; P < .001), thoracic aorta (from 0.5% in 2002 to 21.9% in 2010; P < .001), and common/external iliac arteries (from 0.4% in 2002 to 20.4% in 2010; P < .001). A significant decrease was noted for open procedures (49.1% in 2002 to 45.6%; P < .001), especially for blunt trauma (42.9% in 2002 to 35.8% in 2010; P < .001). There was a stepwise increase in the proportion of patients managed by endovascular therapy as the Injury Severity Score increased (highest in the spectrum Injury Severity Score 31-50). When outcomes were compared between matched patients who underwent endovascular and open procedures, patients who underwent endovascular procedures had

  5. Monolithical aspherical beam expanding systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, U.; Matthias, Sabrina

    2014-10-01

    Beam expanding is a common task, where Galileo telescopes are preferred. However researches and customers have found limitations when using these systems. A new monolithical solution which is based on the usage of only one aspherical component will be presented. It will be shown how to combine up to five monolithical beam expanding systems and to keep the beam quality at diffraction limitation. Insights will be given how aspherical beam expanding systems will help using larger incoming beams and reducing the overall length of such a system. Additionally an add-on element for divergence and wavelength adaption will be presented.

  6. Fort Collins Science Center-Fiscal year 2009 science accomplishments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Juliette T.

    2010-01-01

    .S. Geological Survey Science Strategy (http://www.usgs.gov/science_strategy), including understanding and predicting change in ecosystems, climate variability and change, energy development and land management, the role of the environment and wildlife in human health, freshwater ecosystems, data integration, and evolving technologies. Several science projects were expanded in Fiscal Year 2009 to meet these evolving needs.

  7. The International Space Station (ISS) Education Accomplishments and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alleyne, Camille W.; Blue, Regina; Mayo, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has the unique ability to capture the imaginations of both students and teachers worldwide and thus stands as an invaluable learning platform for the advancement of proficiency in research and development and education. The presence of humans on board ISS for the past ten years has provided a foundation for numerous educational activities aimed at capturing that interest and motivating study in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines which will lead to an increase in quality of teachers, advancements in research and development, an increase in the global reputation for intellectual achievement, and an expanded ability to pursue unchartered avenues towards a brighter future. Over 41 million students around the world have participated in ISS-related activities since the year 2000. Projects such as the Amateur Radio on International Space Station (ARISS) and Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students (EarthKAM), among others, have allowed for global student, teacher, and public access to space through radio contacts with crewmembers and student image acquisition respectively. . With planned ISS operations at least until 2020, projects like the aforementioned and their accompanying educational materials will be available to enable increased STEM literacy around the world. Since the launch of the first ISS element, a wide range of student experiments and educational activities have been performed by each of the international partner agencies: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Canadian Space Agency (CSA), European Space Agency (ESA), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos). Additionally, a number of non-participating countries, some under commercial agreements, have also participated in Station-related activities. Many of these programs still continue while others are being developed and added to the station crewmembers tasks

  8. Cognitive Training Can Reduce Civilian Casualties in a Simulated Shooting Environment.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Adam T; Cain, Matthew S; Mitroff, Stephen R

    2015-08-01

    Shooting a firearm involves a complex series of cognitive abilities. For example, locating an item or a person of interest requires visual search, and firing the weapon (or withholding a trigger squeeze) involves response execution (or inhibition). The present study used a simulated shooting environment to establish a relationship between a particular cognitive ability and a critical shooting error-response inhibition and firing on civilians, respectively. Individual-difference measures demonstrated, perhaps counterintuitively, that simulated civilian casualties were not related to motor impulsivity (i.e., an itchy trigger finger) but rather to an individual's cognitive ability to withhold an already initiated response (i.e., an itchy brain). Furthermore, active-response-inhibition training reduced simulated civilian casualties, which revealed a causal relationship. This study therefore illustrates the potential of using cognitive training to possibly improve shooting performance, which might ultimately provide insight for military and law-enforcement personnel.

  9. The Character Strengths of Special Forces Personnel: Insights for Civilian Health Care Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Gayton, Scott D; Kehoe, E James

    2016-09-01

    Civilian employees, contractors, and private community clinicians are increasingly providing health treatment to currently serving and former military personnel. This study addresses recent calls for evidence-based information to assist civilian practitioners in understanding the perspectives of their military clients. To this end, the self-reported character strengths of military personnel were elicited as an operationalized expression of their underlying personal values that shape their perspectives and conduct as soldiers. Specifically, Australian Army Special Forces operators and support personnel (N = 337) were asked to rank themselves on 24 character strengths. The three character strengths of integrity, teamworker, and good judgment were ranked significantly above random assignment. Nearly all the respondents (84%) gave a top rank to at least one of these character strengths. Differences between the operators and support personnel were modest. Results are discussed with respect to establishing an effective relationship between military clients and civilian health care practitioners.

  10. The association between unemployment status and physical health among veterans and civilians in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh V; Canfield, Julie; Chan, Keith

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzed data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to examine the association between unemployment status and physical health among a sample of 170,924 civilians and 12,129 veterans (aged 18-50 years). Multivariate regression analysis was used to test the interaction effect between employment status and veteran/civilian status on physical health. Veterans who were unemployed long term (longer than 27 weeks) reported a significantly greater number of days with poor physical health than civilians who experienced long-term unemployment. Timely prevention and intervention efforts to integrate veterans into the workforce could lead to substantially improved physical health outcomes. Public health policies and programs that are funded to assist veterans in securing and maintaining gainful employment can have lasting implications for their overall improved health and physical well-being.

  11. Comparison of occupational hearing losses among military engineers and their civilian counterparts

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.L.; Chandler, D.W.

    1983-10-01

    A previous study examined group hearing loss of 209 U.S.Army engineers by comparing current with reference audiograms. The sample was categorized by military occupation specialty, age, and time on job. The present study reports comparable data for 187 civilian engineers on the same Army post exposed to essentially the same noise. These had less hearing loss than their military counterparts. Some reasons are suggested, such as attrition of the civilian workforce because of hearing problems, and a likely greater exposure of the military engineers to noises not job-related. Age was less important than time on the job. Both groups, however, exhibited significantly lower hearing levels than the industrial population of Glorig et al at the 1954 Wisconsin State Fair, possibly because both military and civilian personnel at this Army post had been for some years in an aggressive hearing conservation program.

  12. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors.

  13. Update: Temporary Total Depletion of U.S. Licensed Yellow Fever Vaccine for Civilian Travelers Addressed by Investigational New Drug Use of Imported Stamaril Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Gershman, Mark D; Sotir, Mark J

    2017-07-28

    Sanofi Pasteur, the manufacturer of the only yellow fever vaccine (YF-VAX) licensed in the United States, has announced that their stock of YF-VAX is totally depleted as of July 24, 2017. YF-VAX for civilian use will be unavailable for ordering from Sanofi Pasteur until mid-2018, when their new manufacturing facility is expected to be completed. However, YF-VAX might be available at some clinics for several months, until remaining supplies at those sites are exhausted. In anticipation of this temporary total depletion, in 2016, Sanofi Pasteur submitted an expanded access investigational new drug application to the Food and Drug Administration to allow for importation and use of Stamaril. The Food and Drug Administration accepted Sanofi Pasteur's application in October 2016.

  14. Educating nurses to care for military veterans in civilian hospitals: An integrated literature review.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Linda; Andrew, Sharon; Fossey, Matt

    2016-12-01

    In the UK, military veterans will receive care by civilian nurses in civilian hospitals. We propose that the nurses providing this care require an understanding of the unique experiences and specific health needs of veterans to deliver evidence-based care. To conduct an integrative review of published literature to explore how nursing programmes prepare nurses to care for the military veteran population in civilian hospitals. A systematic search was undertaken of a range of electronic databases, Google Scholar and hand searching of Military and Veteran health journals. Papers that focused on education of civilian nurses about veteran health and included primary research or description of practice-based innovations were included in the review. The search generated sixteen papers that were focused on nurse education in higher education institutions. Several papers focused on simulation as a teaching method for veteran-specific health issues or curriculum developments with educational innovations such as online courses. Six papers focusing in continuing professional education of nurses in the clinical setting were included as supplementary information. All papers reviewed were US focused and dated between January 2011 and September 2015. Our search concluded that there is a gap in knowledge in this subject area within a UK context, therefore our review includes UK background information to support the US findings. Civilian nurses need educational preparation to understand the specific needs of veterans. Educational institutions in the US have responded to nationwide initiatives to undertake that preparation. More empirical studies need to be undertaken to develop, test and evaluate educational innovations for preparing students and nurses delivering care to military veteran in civilian healthcare settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Military-to-civilian translation of battlefield innovations in operative trauma care.

    PubMed

    Haider, Adil H; Piper, Lydia C; Zogg, Cheryl K; Schneider, Eric B; Orman, Jean A; Butler, Frank K; Gerhardt, Robert T; Haut, Elliott R; Mather, Jacques P; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Schwartz, Diane A; Geyer, David W; DuBose, Joseph J; Rasmussen, Todd E; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2015-12-01

    Historic improvements in operative trauma care have been driven by war. It is unknown whether recent battlefield innovations stemming from conflicts in Iraq/Afghanistan will follow a similar trend. The objective of this study was to survey trauma medical directors (TMDs) at level 1-3 trauma centers across the United States and gauge the extent to which battlefield innovations have shaped civilian practice in 4 key domains of trauma care. Domains were determined by the use of a modified Delphi method based on multiple consultations with an expert physician/surgeon panel: (1) damage control resuscitation (DCR), (2) tourniquet use, (3) use of hemostatic agents, and (4) prehospital interventions, including intraosseous catheter access and needle thoracostomy. A corresponding 47-item electronic anonymous survey was developed/pilot tested before dissemination to all identifiable TMD at level 1-3 trauma centers across the US. A total of 245 TMDs, representing nearly 40% of trauma centers in the United States, completed and returned the survey. More than half (n = 127; 51.8%) were verified by the American College of Surgeons. TMDs reported high civilian use of DCR: 95.1% of trauma centers had implemented massive transfusion protocols and the majority (67.7%) tended toward 1:1:1 packed red blood cell/fresh-frozen plasma/platelets ratios. For the other 3, mixed adoption corresponded to expressed concerns regarding the extent of concomitant civilian research to support military research and experience. In centers in which policies reflecting battlefield innovations were in use, previous military experience frequently was acknowledged. This national survey of TMDs suggests that military data supporting DCR has altered civilian practice. Perceived relevance in other domains was less clear. Civilian academic efforts are needed to further research and enhance understandings that foster improved trauma surgeon awareness of military-to-civilian translation. Copyright © 2015

  16. Compliance with traffic laws by traffic police officers, non-traffic police officers, and civilian drivers.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Tova; Pereg, Avihu; Perlman, Amotz

    2014-01-01

    The policy of a public organization, such as police, may shape the norms and the behavior of the citizens. In line with this, police officers are expected by the public to comply with traffic laws and serve as an example for the citizenry. This study used on-site observations of civilian and police driver, comparing police officers' compliance with traffic laws to that of civilians. We compared driver compliance with traffic laws for drivers in 3 groups of vehicles: traffic police cars, non-traffic police cars, and civilian cars. Four hundred sixty-six vehicles were observed and compared by vehicle type and whether a uniform was worn by the driver. We observed safety belt usage, signaling before turning, cellular phone usage, and giving way to traffic (measured by merging time). We found evidence that generally drivers in police cars use seat belts while driving more that drivers in civilian cars do. In particular, more traffic police car drivers used seat belts than non-traffic police car drivers do. In addition, drivers in civilian cars and non-traffic police cars waited longer periods of time before merging right into traffic compared to traffic police car drivers. Our findings supported the notion that on-duty police officers, and traffic police officers in particular, adhere more closely to traffic laws compared to civilian drivers. As the general public compliance with traffic laws is affected by the police perceived legitimacy, the publication of these results can both boost public cooperation with the police and encourage police officers to continue providing positive role models to the public.

  17. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccardi, D. P.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust. Contract work began 27 Apr. 1990. During 1992, a major milestone was achieved with the review of the final design of the oxidizer turbopump in Sep. 1992.

  18. Joint civilian/national guard mass casualty exercise provides model for preparedness training.

    PubMed

    Grant, William D; Secreti, LaLainia

    2007-08-01

    After-action reports on the 2005 hurricane relief efforts pointed to the need for effective and efficient civilian/military operational cooperation. Cited for particular attention was the interface with National Guard units. This article describes an exercise conducted with National Guard units and members of the Central New York Medical Reserve Corps to educate all participants in effective interaction during disaster responses. Using a unique health care facility located at the New York State Fairgrounds, this 2-day operation demonstrated that jointly trained civilian and military units become well prepared for the conduct of joint relief and rescue operations.

  19. Comparison Between Civilian Burns and Combat Burns From Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Steven E.; Kauvar, David S.; Wade, Charles E.; Cancio, Leopoldo C.; Renz, Evan P.; Horvath, Edward E.; White, Christopher E.; Park, Myung S.; Wanek, Sandra; Albrecht, Michael A.; Blackbourne, Lorne H.; Barillo, David J.; Holcomb, John B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess outcome differences between locally burned civilians and military personnel burned in a distant combat zone treated in the same facility. Summary Background Data: The United States Army Institute of Surgical Research (USAISR) Burn Center serves as a referral center for civilians and is the sole center for significant burns in military personnel. We made the hypothesis that outcomes for military personnel burned in the current conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan would be poorer because of delays to definitive treatment, other associated injury, and distance of evacuation. Methods: We reviewed the civilian and military records of patients treated at the USAISR from the outset of hostilities in Iraq in April 2003 to May 2005. Demographics, injury data, mortality, and clinical outcomes were compared. Results: We cared for 751 patients during this time period, 273 of whom were military (36%). Military injuries occurred in a younger population (41 ± 19 vs. 26 ± 7 years for civilian and military respectively, P < 0.0001) with a longer time from injury to burn center arrival (1 ± 5 days vs. 6 ± 5, P < 0.0001), a higher Injury Severity Score (ISS 5 ± 8 vs. 9 ± 11, P < 0.0001), and a higher incidence of inhalation injury (8% vs. 13%, P = 0.024). Total burn size did not differ. Mortality was 7.1% in the civilian and 3.8% in the military group (P = 0.076). When civilians outside the age range of the military cohort were excluded, civilian mortality was 5.0%, which did not differ from the military group (P = 0.57). Total body surface area (TBSA) burned, age ≥40 years, presence of inhalation injury, and ventilator days were found to be important predictors of mortality by stepwise regression, and were used in a final predictive model with the area under receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.97 for both populations considered together. No significant effect of either group was identified during development. Conclusions: Mortality does not differ

  20. Preparing the Defense Intelligence Community’s Civilian Intelligence Workforce for the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Intelligence Service would help achieve this end. FIGURE 1 DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY CIVILIAN WORKFORCE D I A N I M A N R O N S A J I C S S E R V I C...Combatant Commands require mid or senior level training, except for DISES (Defense Intelligence Senior Executive Service). With the exception of DISES ...uncommon to find GG-15s and DISES who have held senior rank for one or more decades. This suggests that stagnation among the Defense civilian

  1. Intensive care of severely wounded military and civilian casualties in Zadar, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Mlinarić, J; Nincević, N; Peranić, H; Kostov, D; Gnjatović, D; Dominis, M; Tolić, I; Mitrović, N; Serić, J

    1994-06-01

    From August 1, 1991, to May 30, 1992, 148 severely wounded military and civilian casualties with the injury severity score of 3 to 5 were treated in the intensive care unit of the Zadar General Hospital. There were 138 male and 10 female patients; their mean age was 32 years. There were 64 wounded civilians and 84 wounded soldiers. The average evacuation time was 3 hours. Twelve (8%) severely wounded persons died. The cause of death was craniocerebral injury in 7 patients (58%) and hemorrhage in 4 patients (33%). Complications following shock-like acute renal failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, coagulopathy, and hepathopathy developed in 18 wounded persons (12%).

  2. Peacekeeping/Stabilization and Conflict Transitions: Background and Congressional Action on the Civilian Response/Reserve Corps and Other Civilian Stabilization and Reconstruction Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-18

    and conducting post-conflict operations, as is fielding the appropriate civilian personnel. In his January 23, 2007, State of the Union address ...Background President Bush’s pledge, articulated in his February 2, 2005, State of the Union address , “to build and preserve a community of free and independent...January 18, 2006. Available at [http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2006/59306.htm]. This theme was reiterated by Stephen Krasner , director of Policy

  3. "On Course" for Supporting Expanded Participation and Improving Scientific Reasoning in Undergraduate Thesis Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Jason E.; Roy, Christopher P.; Thompson, Robert J., Jr.; Reynolds, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Chemistry at Duke University has endeavored to expand participation in undergraduate honors thesis research while maintaining the quality of the learning experience. Accomplishing this goal has been constrained by limited departmental resources (including faculty time) and increased diversity in students' preparation to engage in…

  4. "On Course" for Supporting Expanded Participation and Improving Scientific Reasoning in Undergraduate Thesis Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Jason E.; Roy, Christopher P.; Thompson, Robert J., Jr.; Reynolds, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Chemistry at Duke University has endeavored to expand participation in undergraduate honors thesis research while maintaining the quality of the learning experience. Accomplishing this goal has been constrained by limited departmental resources (including faculty time) and increased diversity in students' preparation to engage in…

  5. Civil-Military Relations in Post-Conflict Sri Lanka: Successful Civilian Consolidation in the Face of Political Competition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    case study because in recent history, no civilian government has concluded terrorism through military means. A combination of Huntington’s...questions were examined as a comparative single case study because in recent history, no civilian government has concluded terrorism through military...COLLABORATION: EXECUTIVE COMMAND 2005-2009 AND END OF TERRORISM .................................................................70 F. REINFORCING

  6. A Cost Benefit Analysis of the Naval Postgraduate School’s Financial Management Program Versus Civilian Institutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    8217 undergraduate academic profiles. 20 TABLE 3-1 CURRENT FINANCIAL MANAGIENT STUDENTS DIRECT ACCEPTANCE CATEGORY UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOLS ATTENDED 4 -- Virginia...civilian faculty fringe benefit costs of 21.6%. The fringe benefit percentages represent the cost of the non-salary compensation received by civilian

  7. Child Care: Availability for Civilian Dependents at Selected DOD Installations. Report to the Honorable Vic Fazio, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) reviewed the need for child care facilities for civilian employees at seven Department of Defense installations. The GAO was charged with: (1) determining the current availability of work-site child care services for civilian employees at the installations; and (2) surveying employees at McClellan Air Force Base…

  8. 32 CFR 884.18 - Civilian authority's acknowledgment of transfer of custody and agreement to notify member's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.18 Civilian authority's acknowledgment of transfer of... member at (location) to me for trial upon the above charge, pursuant to the authority vested in me as... military upon completion of the trial, if acquitted; or upon satisfying the sentence imposed, if convicted...

  9. 32 CFR 884.18 - Civilian authority's acknowledgment of transfer of custody and agreement to notify member's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.18 Civilian authority's acknowledgment of transfer of... member at (location) to me for trial upon the above charge, pursuant to the authority vested in me as... military upon completion of the trial, if acquitted; or upon satisfying the sentence imposed, if convicted...

  10. 32 CFR 884.18 - Civilian authority's acknowledgment of transfer of custody and agreement to notify member's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.18 Civilian authority's acknowledgment of transfer of... member at (location) to me for trial upon the above charge, pursuant to the authority vested in me as... military upon completion of the trial, if acquitted; or upon satisfying the sentence imposed, if convicted...

  11. 20 CFR 404.1018a - Work by civilians for the United States Government or its instrumentalities-remuneration paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Work by civilians for the United States... by civilians for the United States Government or its instrumentalities—remuneration paid prior to... States Government or an instrumentality of the United States, your work was excluded from employment if...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1018a - Work by civilians for the United States Government or its instrumentalities-remuneration paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Work by civilians for the United States... by civilians for the United States Government or its instrumentalities—remuneration paid prior to... States Government or an instrumentality of the United States, your work was excluded from employment if...

  13. 77 FR 21618 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Civilian Response Corps Database In-Processing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Civilian Response Corps Database In-Processing Electronic Form... of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Civilian Response Corps Database In-Processing...

  14. NASA's In-Situ Resource Utilization Project: Current Accomplishments and Exciting Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Sanders, Gerald B.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of Space resources has been identified in publications for over 40 years for its potential as a "game changing" technology for the human exploration of Space. It is called "game changing" because of the mass leverage possible when local resources at the exploration destination arc used to reduce or even eliminate resources that are brought from the Earth. NASA, under the Exploration Technology Development Program has made significant investments in the development of Space resource utilization technologies as a part of the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project. Over the last four years, the ISRU project has taken what was essentially an academic topic with lots of experimentation but little engineering and produced near-full-scale systems that have been demonstrated. In 2008 & again in early 2010, systems that could produce oxygen from lunar soils (or their terrestrial analogs) were tested at a lunar analog site on a volcano in Hawaii. These demonstrations included collaborations with International Partners that made significant contributions to the tests. The proposed federal budget for Fiscal Year 2011 encourages the continued development and demonstration of ISRU. However it goes beyond what the project is currently doing and directs that the scope of the project be expanded to cover destinations throughout the inner solar system with the potential for night demonstrations. This paper will briefly cover the past accomplishments of the ISRU project then move to a di scussion of the plans for the project's future as NASA moves to explore a new paradigm for Space Exploration that includes orbital fuel depots and even refueling on other planetary bodies in the solar system.

  15. ROS homeostasis as a prerequisite for the accomplishment of plant cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Livanos, Pantelis; Galatis, Basil; Quader, Hartmut; Apostolakos, Panagiotis

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are emerging players in several biological processes. The present work investigates their potential involvement in plant cytokinesis by the application of reagents disturbing ROS homeostasis in root-tip cells of Triticum turgidum. In particular, the NADPH-oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium, the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine, and menadione that leads to ROS overproduction were used. The effects on cytokinetic cells were examined using light, fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. ROS imbalance had a great impact on the cytokinetic process including the following: (a) formation of atypical "phragmoplasts" incapable of guiding vesicles to the equatorial plane, (b) inhibition of the dictyosomal and/or endosomal vesicle production that provides the developing cell plates with membranous and matrix polysaccharidic material, (c) disturbance of the fusion processes between vesicles arriving on the cell plate plane, (d) disruption of endocytic vesicle production that mediates the removal of the excess membrane material from the developing cell plate, and (e) the persistence of large callose depositions in treated cell plates. Consequently, either elevated or low ROS levels in cytokinetic root-tip cells resulted in a total inhibition of cell plate assembly or the formation of aberrant cell plates, depending on the stage of the affected cytokinetic cells. The latter failed to expand towards cell cortex and hence to give rise to complete daughter cell wall. These data revealed for the first time the necessity of ROS homeostasis for accomplishment of plant cytokinesis, since it seems to be a prerequisite for almost every aspect of this process.

  16. Occurrence of hearing loss in a cohort of civilians employed at a US Navy industrial facility. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Helmkamp, J.C.; Bone, C.M.; Blood, C.G.; Kelley, J.B.; Seidman, J.H.

    1986-12-18

    Although hearing loss has been the focus of national surveys in the civilian population, these surveys typically do not include occupational exposure information. Furthermore, very few studies have addressed this problem in the military, particularly in industrial settings. Audiometric data, including hearing loss information, recorded and stored in the prototype application of the Navy's Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS) has not been systematically evaluated to identify military and civilian populations that are at high risk for hearing loss. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in a cohort of Navy civilian workers employed at an industrialized facility. It is both appropriate and timely to look at hearing loss among civilian workers, as well as among the military, especially in relation to the recent Presidential initiative that established a government-wide five year goal of reducing civilian workplace injury/illness 3% per year.

  17. Survey of Retired Military Pharmacist's Transition to a Civilian Pharmacy Career Path.

    PubMed

    Bennett, David; Wellman, Greg; Mahmood, Maysaa; Freye, Ryan; Remund, Daniel; Samples, Phil L

    2015-12-01

    To explore variables relevant to transition to civilian pharmacy career path for retiring military pharmacists. A cross-sectional survey was designed to collect information from retired military pharmacists including demographics, military service information, postretirement employment and perceptions of transition, satisfaction, level of responsibility, work environment, rewards (level of financial compensation, opportunities for professional development and career advancement, health benefits), and level of supervisory support. The questionnaire also included additional items asking about their perception of their military experience, transition to civilian work and the impact the military career had on their personal and family life. Respondents included 140 retired pharmacists from the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, or Coast Guard. Factors found to be significant predictors of transition to civilian career included: bureaucracy in current job, time elapsed since retirement, extent to which an individual misses military structure and chain of command, access to military facilities and Veterans Administration benefits, and reporting little or no stress in committed long-term personal relationship while in the military. Findings suggest that the majority of retired military pharmacists perceived the transition to civilian professional sector was about what they expected or easier than expected. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  18. 32 CFR 720.23 - Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in civilian courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NAVY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL; SERVICE OF PROCESS AND SUBPOENAS; PRODUCTION OF OFFICIAL RECORDS Service of Process and Subpoenas Upon Personnel § 720.23 Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in... source: (2) That the civilian authority will provide adequate security arrangements for the prisoner and...

  19. Human Capital: DOD Should Fully Develop Its Civilian Strategic Workforce Plan to Aid Decision Makers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    funding needed to implement strategies for developing, training , deploying, compensating, and motivating the civilian employee workforce of the...developing, training , deploying, compensating, motivating, and designing career paths and career opportunities. Specifically, DOD’s plan identified the...July 2014. Additionally, the plan partially addresses the requirement to include specific strategies for developing, training , deploying, compensating

  20. 32 CFR 720.21 - Members or civilian employees subpoenaed as witnesses in State courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL; SERVICE OF PROCESS AND SUBPOENAS; PRODUCTION OF OFFICIAL RECORDS Service of Process and Subpoenas Upon Personnel § 720.21 Members or civilian employees... should immediately contact the Judge Advocate General, or the Associate General Counsel (Litigation), as...

  1. 32 CFR 720.23 - Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in civilian courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NAVY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL; SERVICE OF PROCESS AND SUBPOENAS; PRODUCTION OF OFFICIAL RECORDS Service of Process and Subpoenas Upon Personnel § 720.23 Naval prisoners as witnesses or parties in... to the Judge Advocate General. The civilian authority should include the following averments in its...

  2. Oil production and problems in Nigeria's Niger Delta: Military and civilian regimes' responses (1979--2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okereke, Ifeoma Christie

    This study examines the environmental and social problems caused by oil production in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. It also determines how the military and civilian regimes respond to the problems. It critically discusses the environmental and social consequences of oil production in the region. The subjects include three military and two civilian regimes that ruled between 1979 and 2001. The study analyzes the overall nature and characteristics of the regimes along with their general roles in the governance of oil in Nigeria, the significance of oil to the country's political economy, and the issues of oil revenue allocation in the country. After analyzing how each regime responds to the problems in the Niger Delta region, it compares and contrasts the responses. Differences and similarities characterize the responses of the military and civilian regimes to the environmental and social problems in the Niger Delta region. However, the civilian regimes are slightly more sensitive than the military regimes to the problems in the region. While the similarities in response are attributable to the socioeconomic and political background and problems of Nigeria, the differences are linked to the basic differences in their political mandates and orientation. The issues and implications arising from the findings are critically analyzed leading to the exploration of the role of democracy in the developing countries. The study recommends political, socioeconomic, and environmental improvements of Nigeria generally as well as the Niger Delta region in particular. It also suggests areas of further studies.

  3. Army Civilian Leadership Development: Self-Efficacy, Choice, and Learning Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godinez, Eileen; Leslie, Barry B.

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the Army Management Staff College (AMSC) is to provide leader development educational experiences for Army civilians. To develop as leaders, students must recognize they have a choice to take action that influences their work environment. The authors suggest the learning environment at AMSC is intentionally designed to be…

  4. 10 CFR 217.52 - Controlling the general distribution of a material in the civilian market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Controlling the general distribution of a material in the civilian market. 217.52 Section 217.52 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS... a written finding that: (1) Such material is a scarce and critical material essential to the...

  5. Mental Health Symptoms among Student Service Members/Veterans and Civilian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Sandi D.; Branscum, Adam J.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate if and to what extent student service members/veterans differ from civilian college students in the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of poor mental health. Participants: The Fall 2011 implementation of the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment included 27,774…

  6. Enlisted Service Members' Transition into the Civilian World of Work: A Cognitive Information Processing Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Milsom, Amy S.

    2008-01-01

    For many enlisted service members in transition, securing new jobs or careers is among their top priorities (B. Litz & S. M. Orsillo, 2004; U.S. Army Garrison Vicenza, n.d.). The complexity of enlisted soldiers' transitions combined with the significant number of 1st-term enlisted soldiers returning to civilian life calls for career counselors to…

  7. Using Civilian Supply Chain Management Best Practices to Improve Army Supply Chain Management Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-09

    per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...different practices used by civilian corporations that have been tested and proven to achieve enhanced capabilities and improve supply chain procedures... corporations , the Center for Army Lessons Learned, and Combat Training Centers can vastly improve Army logistics. The overall reason of this study is

  8. Opportunities for policy historians: The evolution of the US civilian space program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, J.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of U.S. civilian space policy and the institutional framework through which that policy was implemented are discussed. Space policy principles the governed decision making between 1957 and 1962 are identified. The government/industry relations regarding space related research and development are discussed.

  9. 5 CFR 875.201 - Am I eligible as a Federal civilian or Postal employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Am I eligible as a Federal civilian or Postal employee? 875.201 Section 875.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  10. 5 CFR 875.201 - Am I eligible as a Federal civilian or Postal employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Am I eligible as a Federal civilian or Postal employee? 875.201 Section 875.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  11. 5 CFR 875.201 - Am I eligible as a Federal civilian or Postal employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Am I eligible as a Federal civilian or Postal employee? 875.201 Section 875.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  12. 5 CFR 875.201 - Am I eligible as a Federal civilian or Postal employee?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Am I eligible as a Federal civilian or Postal employee? 875.201 Section 875.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  13. Civilian Unemployment and Mental Health: The Moderating Impact of Alcohol Misuse in Returning National Guard.

    PubMed

    Kintzle, Sara; Oh, Hyunsung; Wilcox, Sherrie; Hassan, Anthony; Ell, Kathy; Castro, Carl

    2015-09-01

    Postdeployment civilian unemployment has become a common problem and source of additional stress for National Guard (NG) personnel. This study evaluated 126 California NG members, exploring the relationship between immediate postdeployment employment status and self-reported mental health symptoms, including evidence of alcohol misuse. Participants were recruited from a NG unit within the first 3 months after returning home in August 2011. Over one-third of participants reported being unemployed beyond the part-time NG commitment. Mental health symptoms were greater in those participants without civilian employment. Additionally, those participants with comorbid alcohol misuse with either depression or post-traumatic stress disorder were significantly more likely to lack civilian employment. Interaction testing revealed a significant interaction between employment status and alcohol misuse for both depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Alcohol use was concluded to moderate the relationship between civilian unemployment and mental health symptoms. Results suggest that the part-time employment provided through NG service may serve as a protective factor in the development of negative psychological outcomes, except for cases where alcohol misuse is present. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Department of Defense Financial Management Regulation. Volume 8. Civilian Pay Policy and Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    sea. The NOL is 4 information and the DD/EITf muting number. served on thle civilian payroll office responsible for payments to the employee. The NOL...Johnston Atoll 67 Nevada NV 32 Midway Islands 71 New Hampshire NII 33 Puerto Rico 72 New Jersey NJ 34 Ryuku Islands, S,’uthern 73 New Mexico NM 35 Swan

  15. Factors of Non-Persistence in Civilian Helicopter Flight Training: A Narrative Inquiry of Pilot Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Previous literature on retention of student helicopter pilots shows a gap in research of civilian schools and qualitative studies. To address this gap in the literature and to help helicopter flight schools better understand the incidents of attrition from flight training, this qualitative study investigated student and school-based factors…

  16. Civilian Personnel Administration in the Army: Deciding the Future of the Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-28

    Civilian Training, clearinghouse Education, and Development System (ACTEDS) -- Long-term training -- Personnel Proponent System -- Outplacement of...nonpersonal adverse actions such as RIF, outplacement ) -- Analysis of applicant qualifications -- Applicant assistance -- Delegation of direct hire...practice of hiring, promoting, and outplacing employees (Ulrich 1987, 174). Common staffing functions are listed in Table 2-2 below. Table 2-2. Staffing

  17. Implications of Posttraumatic Stress among Military-Affiliated and Civilian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Adam E.; Whiteman, Shawn D.; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms are associated with problem drinking and alcohol-related consequences, as well as academic correlates among military-affiliated and civilian students. Participants: The final sample (n = 248) included 78 combat-exposed student service members/veterans, 53 non-combat-exposed…

  18. The Evaluation of Three U.S. Air Force Instructional Systems Within Civilian Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straubel, James H.

    This research was designed to study the effectiveness of transferring vocational-technical military training into the civilian education system. The military training, which was tested in six Utah schools ranging from high school to 4-year college, included electronics principles (90 hours), aircraft pneudraulics (60 hours), and nurse's aide (20…

  19. Applying Computerized Text Measurement Strategies from Project Essay Grade (PEG) to Military and Civilian Organizational Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Jack H.

    Project Essay Grade (PEG), developed by E. Page (1968) uses computerized methodology to grade student writing. PEG can also be used to assess the quality of civilian and military writing products, such as regulations or instructional texts. Application of PEG offers the potential for enhancing government efforts to monitor writing quality and…

  20. DOD Civilian and Contractor Workforces: Additional Cost Savings Data and Efficiencies Plan are Needed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    challenges likely to continue, DOD must operate strategically and efficiently, to include cost-effective management of its human capital . Section...accurately reflect the number of contractors providing services to DOD. See GAO, Human Capital : Additional Steps Needed to Help Determine the Right Size...17 GAO, Human Capital : DOD Should Fully Develop Its Civilian Strategic

  1. Alaska Native Participation in the Civilian Conservation Corps. Alaska Historical Commission Studies in History No. 206.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Connor; And Others

    The report is a finding aid to the sources which document the 1937 federal policy decision mandating that 50% of the enrollees in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in Alaska must be Alaska Natives and provides a list of the Native CCC projects in Alaska. The finding aid section is organized according to the location of the collections and…

  2. Army Civilian Leadership Development: Self-Efficacy, Choice, and Learning Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godinez, Eileen; Leslie, Barry B.

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the Army Management Staff College (AMSC) is to provide leader development educational experiences for Army civilians. To develop as leaders, students must recognize they have a choice to take action that influences their work environment. The authors suggest the learning environment at AMSC is intentionally designed to be…

  3. 49 CFR 33.52 - Controlling the general distribution of a material in the civilian market.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controlling the general distribution of a material... TRANSPORTATION PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATION SYSTEM Allocation Actions § 33.52 Controlling the general distribution... used to control the general distribution of a material in the civilian market, unless the Secretary...

  4. Art Therapy Services to Support Veterans' Transition to Civilian Life: The Studio and the Gallery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLucia, Jennifer Marie

    2016-01-01

    Beyond having knowledge of the treatment of combat-related trauma, art therapists need to understand veterans' experiences of transition from military to civilian life in order to offer effective interventions. This article reviews the literature on veteran transition and the challenges common to transition difficulty and describes two major…

  5. Information Technology Management: Defense Civilian Personnel Data System Functionality and User Satisfaction (D-2003-110)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-27

    Information Technology Management Department of Defense Office of the Inspector General June 27, 2003 AccountabilityIntegrityQuality Defense...SUBTITLE Information Technology Management : Defense Civilian Personnel Data System Functionality and User Satisfaction (D-2003-110) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  6. Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Civilian Aviation Alternative Support Study: Report of Findings and Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-30

    with Navy aviation civilian contractors and US Coast Guard helicopter personnel indicates that significantly fewer active duty personnel might be...required to operate and support embarked aircraft within the LCS aviation operations & maintenance profiles using NAVAIR’s preliminary assumptions and "Sea Base" concept as delineated in the LCS concept of operations.

  7. Appraisal and Merit Pay Systems for Air Force Civilian General Managers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    Civilian Personnel (AF/ MPK ) under RPR 76-40 to develop a merit pay and performance appraisal system for GMs. This research program was started in March 1979...Crava, 3.1. & Mecesmk. 9J. Jog nitoy vijbmahom T&A and cak _- . PRL-TR-67-15. AD- 681 509. Lackland AFB, TX: Personnel Research Laboratory, Aerospace

  8. Suicidal or Self-Harming Ideation in Military Personnel Transitioning to Civilian Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Alyssa J.; Bender, Randall H.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Larson, Gerald E.

    2011-01-01

    Suicides have markedly increased among military personnel in recent years. We used path analysis to examine factors associated with suicidal/self-harming ideation among male Navy and Marine Corps personnel transitioning to civilian life. Roughly 7% of men (Sailors = 5.3%, Marines = 9.0%) reported ideation during the previous 30 days. Results…

  9. Factors of Non-Persistence in Civilian Helicopter Flight Training: A Narrative Inquiry of Pilot Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Previous literature on retention of student helicopter pilots shows a gap in research of civilian schools and qualitative studies. To address this gap in the literature and to help helicopter flight schools better understand the incidents of attrition from flight training, this qualitative study investigated student and school-based factors…

  10. 32 CFR 705.36 - Government transportation of civilians for public affairs purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....36 Government transportation of civilians for public affairs purposes. (a) General policy. (1... authority in this regard. (3) The following policy has been established by DOD for providing all types of... authorized (under Defense Department policy) to approve local travel for public affairs purposes within the...

  11. Protecting into Emotion: Therapeutic Enactments with Military Veterans Transitioning Back into Civilian Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfoura, Michael; Westwood, Marvin; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2014-01-01

    Over 18.5% of military personnel returning from war zones to civilian life suffer mental health issues, which can lead to family breakdown, homelessness and other problems. Almost 4000 Australian soldiers have returned home from active service in the last decade suffering from combat stress and mental health conditions. A 2009 Australian…

  12. Mental Health Symptoms among Student Service Members/Veterans and Civilian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Sandi D.; Branscum, Adam J.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate if and to what extent student service members/veterans differ from civilian college students in the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of poor mental health. Participants: The Fall 2011 implementation of the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment included 27,774…

  13. 32 CFR 728.45 - Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... military services) and their dependents. 728.45 Section 728.45 National Defense Department of Defense... DEPARTMENT FACILITIES Members of Foreign Military Services and Their Dependents § 728.45 Civilian components (employees of foreign military services) and their dependents. (a) Care authorized. Beneficiaries covered...

  14. The Civilian Conservation Corps and the National Park Service, 1933-1942: An Administrative History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paige, John C.

    The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) has been credited as one of Franklin D. Roosevelt's most successful efforts to conserve both the natural and human resources of the nation. This publication provides a review of the program and its impact on resource conservation, environmental management, and education. Chapters give accounts of: (1) the…

  15. Protecting into Emotion: Therapeutic Enactments with Military Veterans Transitioning Back into Civilian Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfoura, Michael; Westwood, Marvin; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2014-01-01

    Over 18.5% of military personnel returning from war zones to civilian life suffer mental health issues, which can lead to family breakdown, homelessness and other problems. Almost 4000 Australian soldiers have returned home from active service in the last decade suffering from combat stress and mental health conditions. A 2009 Australian…

  16. Process of Converting Military Training Materials to Competency-Based Modules for Civilian Use. A Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organization and Human Resources Development Associates, Inc., Austin, TX.

    This document outlines the steps in the process of converting military training materials in physician and dental assistant education to competency-based learning modules for use in the civilian sector. Subsections discuss the activity and any problems or issues involved for 14 steps. The 14 steps are as follow: establish liaison to obtain…

  17. 75 FR 49913 - Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Department of the Air Force Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups SUMMARY: On July 30, 2010, the Secretary of the Air Force, acting as Executive Agent of the Secretary of Defense...'' for purposes of all laws administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). FOR...

  18. THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS AND AMERICAN EDUCATION--THREAT TO LOCAL CONTROL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOWER, CALVIN W.

    THE HISTORY OF THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS (CCC) AND ITS CONTROVERSIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IS REVIEWED. CREATED IN MARCH, 1933, THE CCC PROVIDED WORK FOR UNEMPLOYED YOUTH (18-25). THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR RECRUITED THEM, THE DEPARTMENT OF WAR RAN THE CAMPS, AND THE DEPARTMENTS OF INTERIOR AND AGRICULTURE DIRECTED THE CONSERVATION WORK. IN JULY…

  19. Enlisted Service Members' Transition into the Civilian World of Work: A Cognitive Information Processing Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Milsom, Amy S.

    2008-01-01

    For many enlisted service members in transition, securing new jobs or careers is among their top priorities (B. Litz & S. M. Orsillo, 2004; U.S. Army Garrison Vicenza, n.d.). The complexity of enlisted soldiers' transitions combined with the significant number of 1st-term enlisted soldiers returning to civilian life calls for career counselors to…

  20. Suicidal or Self-Harming Ideation in Military Personnel Transitioning to Civilian Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Alyssa J.; Bender, Randall H.; Hourani, Laurel L.; Larson, Gerald E.

    2011-01-01

    Suicides have markedly increased among military personnel in recent years. We used path analysis to examine factors associated with suicidal/self-harming ideation among male Navy and Marine Corps personnel transitioning to civilian life. Roughly 7% of men (Sailors = 5.3%, Marines = 9.0%) reported ideation during the previous 30 days. Results…