Science.gov

Sample records for accorded high priority

  1. Priority classification of patients according to a modified 'Norwegian model'.

    PubMed

    van Assendelft, A H

    1996-01-01

    A priority classification was evaluated according to a modified 'Norwegian model.' Many diseases do not belong to any specific priority category based only on the diagnosis. The classification also depends on the condition's type, site, and phase as well as the patient's age and overall condition. Savings cannot be achieved by the model used because 89% of the patients belonged to the priority categories I-III, the care of which can be classified as necessary. PMID:8707510

  2. High priority tank sampling and analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.M.

    1998-03-05

    In July 1993, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) transmitted Recommendation 93-5 (Conway 1993) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). Recommendation 93-5 noted that there was insufficient tank waste technical information and the pace to obtain it was too slow to ensure that Hanford Site wastes could be safely stored, that associated operations could be conducted safely, and that future disposal data requirements could be met. In May 1996, the DOE issued Revision 1 of the Recommendation 93-5 Implementation Plan (DOE-RL 1996). The Implementation Plan revision presented a modified approach to achieve the original plan`s objectives. The approach concentrated on actions necessary to ensure that wastes can be safely stored, that operations can be safely conducted, and that timely characterization information for the tank waste Disposal Program could be obtained. The Implementation Plan proposed 28 High Priority tanks, which, if sampled and analyzed, were expected to provide information to answer questions regarding safety and disposal issues. The High Priority tank list was originally developed in Section 9.0 of the Tank Waste Characterization Basis (Brown et al. 1995) by integrating the needs of the various safety and disposal programs. The High Priority tank list represents a set of tanks that were expected to provide the highest information return for characterization resources expended. The High Priority tanks were selected for near-term core sampling and were not expected to be the only tanks that would provide meaningful information. Sampling and analysis of non-High Priority tanks also could be used to provide scientific and technical data to confirm assumptions, calibrate models, and measure safety related phenomenological characteristics of the waste. When the sampling and analysis results of the High Priority and other tanks were reviewed, it was expected that a series of questions should be answered allowing key decisions to be made. The first

  3. Defining conservation priorities for freshwater fishes according to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strecker, Angela; Olden, Julian D.; Whittier, Joanna B.; Paukert, Craig P.

    2011-01-01

    To date, the predominant use of systematic conservation planning has been to evaluate and conserve areas of high terrestrial biodiversity. Although studies in freshwater ecosystems have received recent attention, research has rarely considered the potential trade-offs between protecting different dimensions of biodiversity and the ecological processes that maintain diversity. We provide the first systematic prioritization for freshwaters (focusing on the highly threatened and globally distinct fish fauna of the Lower Colorado River Basin, USA) simultaneously considering scenarios of: taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity; contemporary threats to biodiversity (including interactions with nonnative species); and future climate change and human population growth. There was 75% congruence between areas of highest conservation priority for different aspects of biodiversity, suggesting that conservation efforts can concurrently achieve strong complementarity among all types of diversity. However, sizable fractions of the landscape were incongruent across conservation priorities for different diversity scenarios, underscoring the importance of considering multiple dimensions of biodiversity and highlighting catchments that contribute disproportionately to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity in the region. Regions of projected human population growth were not concordant with conservation priorities; however, higher human population abundance will likely have indirect effects on native biodiversity by increasing demand for water. This will come in direct conflict with projected reductions in precipitation and warmer temperatures, which have substantial overlap with regions of high contemporary diversity. Native and endemic fishes in arid ecosystems are critically endangered by both current and future threats, but our results highlight the use of systematic conservation planning for the optimal allocation of limited resources that incorporates

  4. Defining conservation priorities for freshwater fishes according to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strecker, A.L.; Olden, J.D.; Whittier, Joanna B.; Paukert, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    To date, the predominant use of systematic conservation planning has been to evaluate and conserve areas of high terrestrial biodiversity. Although studies in freshwater ecosystems have received recent attention, research has rarely considered the potential tradeoffs between protecting different dimensions of biodiversity and the ecological processes that maintain diversity. We provide the first systematic prioritization for freshwaters (focusing on the highly threatened and globally distinct fish fauna of the Lower Colorado River Basin, USA) simultaneously considering scenarios of: taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity;contemporary threats to biodiversity (including interactions with nonnative species);and future climate change and human population growth. There was 75% congruence between areas of highest conservation priority for different aspects of biodiversity, suggesting that conservation efforts can concurrently achieve strong complementarity among all types of diversity. However, sizable fractions of the landscape were incongruent across conservation priorities for different diversity scenarios, underscoring the importance of considering multiple dimensions of biodiversity and highlighting catchments that contribute disproportionately to taxonomic, functional, and phylogenetic diversity in the region. Regions of projected human population growth were not concordant with conservation priorities;however, higher human population abundance will likely have indirect effects on native biodiversity by increasing demand for water. This will come in direct conflict with projected reductions in precipitation and warmer temperatures, which have substantial overlap with regions of high contemporary diversity. Native and endemic fishes in arid ecosystems are critically endangered by both current and future threats, but our results highlight the use of systematic conservation planning for the optimal allocation of limited resources that incorporates multiple

  5. Computing Network Bill Viewed as High Priority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, David

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the High Performance Computing Act of 1991 which would provide federal funding for the establishment of a National Research and Education network. The rationale for the proposed legislation is discussed. (CW)

  6. Iron Phosphate Glasses for Vitrifying DOE High Priority Nuclear Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.W.; Day, D.E.

    2004-03-29

    Iron phosphate glasses have been studied as an alternative glass for vitrifying Department of Energy (DOE) high priority wastes. The high priority wastes were the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and the High Level Waste (HLW) with high chrome content stored at Hanford, WA, and the Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. These wastes were recommended by Tanks Focus Area since they were expected to require special attention when vitrified in borosilicate glasses. All three of these wastes have been successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses at waste loadings ranging from a low of 32 wt% for the high sulfate LAW to 40 wt% for the SBW to a high of 75 wt% for the high chrome HLW. In addition to these desirable high waste loadings, the iron phosphate glasses were easily melted, typically between 950 and 1200 C, in less than 4 hours in commercial refractory oxide containers. It is noteworthy that the chemical durability of both glassy and deliberately crystallized iron phosphate wasteforms not only met, but significantly exceeded, all current DOE chemical durability requirements as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and Vapor Hydration Test (VHT). The high waste loading, low melting temperature, rapid furnace throughput (short melting time) and their outstanding chemical durability could significantly accelerate the clean up effort and reduce the time and cost of vitrifying these high priority wastes.

  7. 78 FR 75571 - Independent Assessment of the Process for the Review of Device Submissions; High Priority...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is presenting Booz Allen Hamilton's high priority... Hamilton. Findings on high-priority recommendations (i.e., those likely to have a significant impact...

  8. Case studies of six high priority DOD installations

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This is a supplement to the report entitled Environmental Cleanup: Too Many High Priority Sites Impede DOD`s Program. It provides six installation case studies addressing issues including the status of the restoration program, the cost of cleanup to date and projected costs, the cleanup options considered, the option selected, expected completion, and the applicable cleanup standards. The case studies also provide installation specific information on reasons installation was listed on the NPL, the regulatory process, cooperation between the installation and the regulatory agencies, staffing at the installations and the regulatory agencies, and the process for funding the cleanup.

  9. An Active Queue Management for QoS Guarantee of the High Priority Service Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Jong; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Hwa-Suk; Cho, Kee Seong; Choi, Seong Gon

    In this paper, we propose the active queue management mechanism (Active-WRED) for guaranteeing the quality of the high priority service class (VoIP or IPTV) in the multi-class traffic service environment. In the congestion situation, this mechanism increases the drop probability of the low priority traffic and reduces the drop probability of the high priority traffic; therefore it can guarantee the quality of the high priority service class from the poor quality by the packet loss.

  10. Astrometry and Photometry of Faint, High Priority Solar System Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Robert S.; Larsen, Jeffrey A.; Scotti, James V.; Bressi, Terrence H.; Maleszewski, Chester K.

    2014-02-01

    We propose to use MOSAIC 1.1 on the Mayall 4-meter telescope to improve knowledge of the orbits and magnitudes of high priority classes of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and other small solar system bodies that cannot be reached with our Spacewatch telescopes. Many asteroids and comets are being lost owing to insufficient followup astrometry, but only the most important ones can continue to be observed with the limited resources available. Objects flagged as high scientific priority and urgently in need of further observations include freshly discovered virtual impactors (VIs) and NEOs discovered by the soon-to-be reactivated WISE spacecraft. It is better to follow objects longer during their discovery apparitions than to search tens of degrees of arc for them when they return years later, hence our need to reach fainter magnitudes. Other targets for recovery include future targets of radar, NEOs previously detected by WISE with orbits or albedos suggesting potential for cometary activity, potential destinations for spacecraft, and returning NEOs with hard-won albedos and diameters previously determined by WISE in need of astrometry.

  11. High Priority of Nanocrystalline Diamond as a Biosensing Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianfen; Kurihara, Shinichiro; Hasegawa, Masataka; Rahim Ruslinda, A.; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    Here we report the performance of surface functionalized diamond surfaces as biosensing platform for human immunodeficiency virus trans-activator of transcription (HIV-Tat) peptide detection. Comparative investigations were conducted on nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) and polycrystalline diamond (PCD) films. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed the morphology differences between NCD and PCD films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data showed that functional components and corresponding coverages, demonstrating denser carboxyl acid groups and fluorinated groups on NCD than that PCD films after UV/ozone and fluorine plasma treatment respectively. Contact angle results showed the differences in surface wettability and free energy between functionalized NCD and PCD biosensors. Fluorescence observations confirmed that higher biosensing performance can be obtained on NCD biosensors with high sensitivity selectivity, and stability. The NCD films with denser surface coverages of functionalizations made NCD films much more priority as an effective biosensing candidate than PCD films.

  12. Sampling and Sensing Systems for High Priority Analytes

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C.Jeffrey; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Sellinger, Alan

    1999-04-01

    This reports summarizes the results from a Laboratory Directed Research and Development effort to develop selective coastings for detecting high priority analytes (HPAs), such as chemical warfare (CW) agents and their precursors, in the presence of common interferents. Accomplishments during this project included synthesis and testing of new derivatized sol-gel coatings for surface acoustic wave sensors (SAWs). Surfactant modified and fluoroalcohol derivatized sol-gel oxides were coated onto SAW devices and tested with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Theses modified sol-gel coatings improved SAW sensitivity to DMMP by over three orders of magnitude when compared to standard polymeric oatings such as polyisobutylene and by over two orders of magnitude compared with polymers tailor made for enhanced sensitivity to phosphonates. SAW sensors coated with these materials exhibit highly sensitive reversible behavior at elevated temperatures (>90 degree C), possibly leading to low detection levels for semivolatile analytes while remaining insensitive to volatile organic interferants. Additionally, we have investigated the use of reactive polymers for detection of volatile and reactive CW agent precursors (Chemical Weapons Convention Schedule 3 Agents) such as phosphouous oxychloride (POCl(3)). The results obtained in this study find that sensitive and selective responses can be obtained for Schedule 3 agents using commercially available polymers and chemical guidelines from solution phase chemistry.

  13. Astrometry and Photometry of Faint, High Priority Solar System Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Robert S.; Larsen, Jeff; Scotti, Jim; Bressi, Terry; Spahr, Tim; Maleszewski, Chet

    2014-08-01

    We request MOSAIC 1.1 on the Mayall 4-meter telescope to improve knowledge of the orbits and magnitudes of high priority classes of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) and other small solar system bodies that cannot be reached with our Spacewatch telescopes. Targets include freshly discovered virtual impactors (VIs), other close approachers, and NEOs discovered by the NEOWISE spacecraft. It is better to follow objects longer during their discovery apparitions than to search tens of degrees of arc for them when they return years later, hence the need to reach fainter magnitudes on short notice. About half of our targets are therefore unknown at the time of this proposal. Other targets for recovery include future targets of radar, NEOs previously detected by WISE with orbits or albedos suggesting potential for cometary activity, potential destinations for spacecraft, and returning NEOs with hard-won albedos and diameters determined by WISE that need astrometry. Our past use of the Mayall telescope has been determined by Co-Investigator Tim Spahr of the Minor Planet Center to provide ``dramatic improvement'' to orbits.

  14. [An analysis of financial flows from the Brazilian Ministry of Health for research and development in 2003-2005 according to the National Agenda for Health Research Priorities].

    PubMed

    Silva, Rondineli Mendes da; Caetano, Rosangela

    2011-04-01

    This study mapped the application of financing in research and development in health (R&D/H) by the Brazilian Ministry of Health in 2003-2005, according to the National Agenda for Health Research Priorities, created in 2004. The analysis was based on data from a study aimed primarily at measuring these investment flows during the same period. The calculations included only direct financing with actual outlays in research, including payroll expenditures. The studies were categorized according to the 24 sub-agendas of the national priority agenda by two independent researchers, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Research and development expenditures in health totaled 409.7 million reais, concentrated mainly in the following sub-agendas: transmissible diseases, the health industry complex, clinical research, pharmaceutical care, and non-communicable diseases (79% of the total). All 24 sub-agendas received some financing during the period. The study established a baseline for subsequent evaluations of this financing instrument's inductive capacity and the relationship between R&D/H investments and the population's health needs. PMID:21603752

  15. DRD4 long allele carriers show heightened attention to high-priority items relative to low-priority items.

    PubMed

    Gorlick, Marissa A; Worthy, Darrell A; Knopik, Valerie S; McGeary, John E; Beevers, Christopher G; Maddox, W Todd

    2015-03-01

    Humans with seven or more repeats in exon III of the DRD4 gene (long DRD4 carriers) sometimes demonstrate impaired attention, as seen in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and at other times demonstrate heightened attention, as seen in addictive behavior. Although the clinical effects of DRD4 are the focus of much work, this gene may not necessarily serve as a "risk" gene for attentional deficits, but as a plasticity gene where attention is heightened for priority items in the environment and impaired for minor items. Here we examine the role of DRD4 in two tasks that benefit from selective attention to high-priority information. We examine a category learning task where performance is supported by focusing on features and updating verbal rules. Here, selective attention to the most salient features is associated with good performance. In addition, we examine the Operation Span (OSPAN) task, a working memory capacity task that relies on selective attention to update and maintain items in memory while also performing a secondary task. Long DRD4 carriers show superior performance relative to short DRD4 homozygotes (six or less tandem repeats) in both the category learning and OSPAN tasks. These results suggest that DRD4 may serve as a "plasticity" gene where individuals with the long allele show heightened selective attention to high-priority items in the environment, which can be beneficial in the appropriate context. PMID:25244120

  16. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C - IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix A Appendix A to Subpart C Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION...—IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix Score 10 5 3 1 0 Accident and fatality rate for...

  17. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C - IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix A Appendix A to Subpart C Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION...—IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix Score 10 5 3 1 0 Accident and fatality rate for...

  18. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C - IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix A Appendix A to Subpart C Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION...—IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix Score 10 5 3 1 0 Accident and fatality rate for...

  19. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C - IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix A Appendix A to Subpart C Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION...—IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix Score 10 5 3 1 0 Accident and fatality rate for...

  20. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C - IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false IRR High Priority Project Scoring Matrix A Appendix A to Subpart C Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Funding Pt. 170, Subpt. C, App. A Appendix A to Subpart C—IRR High Priority Project Scoring...

  1. Fluvial processes in Ma'adim Vallis and the potential of Gusev crater as a high priority site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, Nathalie; Landheim, Ragnild; Greeley, Ronald; Farmer, Jack

    1994-01-01

    According to exobiology site selection criteria for Mars, the search for potential extinct/extant water dependent life should focus on sites were water flowed and ponded. The Ma'adim Vallis/Gusev crater system is of high priority for exobiology research, because it appears to have involved long term flooding, different periods and rates of sedimentation, and probable episodic ponding. The topics covered include the following: evidence of nonuniform fluvial processes and early overflooding of the plateau and ponding.

  2. Setting Educational Priorities: High Achievers Speak Out. White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickeson, Robert C.

    Noting that high achieving Indiana high school students can provide important insights into the educational system in the state, this study examined the opinions of recipients of Ameritchieve recognition, National Merit finalists, African-American students who were National Achievement finalists, and national Hispanic Scholar finalists, all from…

  3. Space Weather Impacts on Spacecraft Operations: Identifying and Establishing High-Priority Operational Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G.; Reid, S.; Tranquille, C.; Evans, H.

    2013-12-01

    Space Weather is a multi-disciplinary and cross-domain system defined as, 'The physical and phenomenological state of natural space environments. The associated discipline aims, through observation, monitoring, analysis and modelling, at understanding and predicting the state of the Sun, the interplanetary and planetary environments, and the solar and non-solar driven perturbations that affect them, and also at forecasting and nowcasting the potential impacts on biological and technological systems'. National and Agency-level efforts to provide services addressing the myriad problems, such as ESA's SSA programme are therefore typically complex and ambitious undertakings to introduce a comprehensive suite of services aimed at a large number and broad range of end users. We focus on some of the particular threats and risks that Space Weather events pose to the Spacecraft Operations community, and the resulting implications in terms of User Requirements. We describe some of the highest-priority service elements identified as being needed by the Operations community, and outline some service components that are presently available, or under development. The particular threats and risks often vary according to orbit, so the particular User Needs for Operators at LEO, MEO and GEO are elaborated. The inter-relationship between these needed service elements and existing service components within the broader Space Weather domain is explored. Some high-priority service elements and potential correlation with Space Weather drivers include: solar array degradation and energetic proton storms; single event upsets at GEO and solar proton events and galactic cosmic rays; surface charging and deep dielectric charging at MEO and radiation belt dynamics; SEUs at LEO and the South Atlantic Anomaly and its variability. We examine the current capability to provide operational services addressing such threats and identify some advances that the Operations community can expect to benefit

  4. Risk-based inspection priorities for PWR high-pressure injection system components

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, T.V.; Simonen, F.A.; Phan, H.K. )

    1993-01-01

    Under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a risk-based method that can be used to establish in-service inspection priorities for nuclear power plant components. The overall goal of this effort was to develop technical bases for improvements of inspection plans and to provide recommendations for revisions of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Sec. XI. The developed method used results of probabilistic risk assessment in combination with the failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) technique to establish in-service inspection priorities for systems and components. The Surry nuclear power station, unit 1 (Surry-1) was selected for study. Inspection priorities for several pressure boundary systems at Surry-1 were determined in the early phase of the project. To complete the study, the remaining safety systems, plus balance of plant, have been analyzed; one of these is the high-pressure injection (HPI) system. This paper presents the results of inspection priorities for the HPI system.

  5. 49 CFR 350.329 - How may a State or local agency qualify for High Priority or Border Activity Funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How may a State or local agency qualify for High Priority or Border Activity Funds? 350.329 Section 350.329 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... How may a State or local agency qualify for High Priority or Border Activity Funds? (a) States...

  6. 49 CFR 350.329 - How may a State or local agency qualify for High Priority or Border Activity Funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How may a State or local agency qualify for High Priority or Border Activity Funds? 350.329 Section 350.329 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... How may a State or local agency qualify for High Priority or Border Activity Funds? (a) States...

  7. Priority interventions to improve the management of chronic non-cancer pain in primary care: a participatory research of the ACCORD program

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, Lyne; Choinière, Manon; Martin, Elisabeth; Lévesque, Lise; Hudon, Eveline; Bélanger, Danielle; Perreault, Sylvie; Lacasse, Anaïs; Laliberté, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is evidence that the management of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) in primary care is far from being optimal. A 1-day workshop was held to explore the perceptions of key actors regarding the challenges and priority interventions to improve CNCP management in primary care. Methods Using the Chronic Care Model as a conceptual framework, physicians (n=6), pharmacists (n=6), nurses (n=6), physiotherapists (n=6), psychologists (n=6), pain specialists (n=6), patients (n=3), family members (n=3), decision makers and managers (n=4), and pain researchers (n=7) took part in seven focus groups and five nominal groups. Results Challenges identified in focus group discussions were related to five dimensions: knowledge gap, “work in silos”, lack of awareness that CNCP represents an important clinical problem, difficulties in access to health professionals and services, and patient empowerment needs. Based on the nominal group discussions, the following priority interventions were identified: interdisciplinary continuing education, interdisciplinary treatment approach, regional expert leadership, creation and definition of care paths, and patient education programs. Conclusion Barriers to optimal management of CNCP in primary care are numerous. Improving its management cannot be envisioned without considering multifaceted interventions targeting several dimensions of the Chronic Care Model and focusing on both clinicians and patients. PMID:25995648

  8. High Priority Future Research Needs for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kamal; Moorthy, Denish; Chan, Jeffrey A.; Concannon, Thomas W.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Chung, Mei; Balk, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify and prioritize future research needs (FRN) topics for diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Twenty-one panel members represented six stake-holder categories: patients and the public, providers; purchasers of health care, payers, policymakers, and principal investigators. Building on a recently completed comparative effectiveness review, stakeholders nominated and discussed potential FRN topics. Stakeholders then nominated their top priority FRN topics based on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Effective Health Care Program Selection Criteria. From these nominations, the highest priority FRN topics were determined and were elaborated upon to include possible study designs to address the topics. Results: Thirty-seven topics were discussed and prioritized. The nine highest priority FRN topics included: cost-effectiveness of management strategies, defining age- and sex-specific criteria for OSA, evaluating routine preoperative screening for OSA, evaluating involvement of a sleep medicine specialist in diagnosis of OSA, evaluating clinical prediction rules, assessing the effect of treating sleep disordered breathing and long-term clinical outcomes, comparing treatments for patients who do not tolerate positive airway pressure, evaluating strategies to improve treatment compliance, and evaluating the association between sleep apnea severity and long-term clinical outcomes. Conclusions: While there are numerous specific research questions with low or insufficient strength of evidence for OSA management, OSA patients, their healthcare providers, and society at large would benefit from refocusing research efforts into the prioritized research questions and away from simple comparisons of short-term outcomes between specific interventions. Citation: Patel K; Moorthy D; Chan JA; Concannon TW. High priority future research needs for obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. J Clin Sleep Med 2013

  9. Priority arbitration mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Garmire, Derrick L.; Herring, Jay R.; Stunkel, Craig B.

    2007-03-06

    A method is provided for selecting a data source for transmission on one of several logical (virtual) lanes embodied in a single physical connection. Lanes are assigned to either a high priority class or to a low priority class. One of six conditions is employed to determine when re-arbitration of lane priorities is desired. When this occurs a next source for transmission is selected based on a the specification of the maximum number of high priority packets that can be sent after a lower priority transmission has been interrupted. Alternatively, a next source for transmission is selected based on a the specification of the maximum number of high priority packets that can be sent while a lower priority packet is waiting. If initialized correctly, the arbiter keeps all of the packets of a high priority packet contiguous, while allowing lower priority packets to be interrupted by the higher priority packets, but not to the point of starvation of the lower priority packets.

  10. High School Students' Metaphors towards "Climate" Concept According to Gender Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coskun, Mucahit

    2010-01-01

    This research was carried out to determine the metaphors of high school students towards "climate" concept according to gender variable. A total of 108 students in two high schools in Karabuk City participated in the research in 2009-2010 academic years. The data of the research were gathered from the students' completing the expressions: "climate…

  11. Screening of high phytotoxicity priority pollutants and their ecological risk assessment in China's surface waters.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenguang; Wang, Weili; Zhou, Junli; Yi, Xianliang; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Xiaonan; Liu, Zhengtao

    2015-06-01

    The protection of aquatic plants has received less attention in ecological risk assessment of pollutants compared with animals. Some pollutants like herbicide, however, are more toxic to aquatic plants than to animals. Aquatic toxicity data of 126 priority pollutants were screened and analyzed in this study. Through data analysis, five priority pollutants namely 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA), 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) were identified to have high phytotoxicity effect. The most sensitive aquatic plants to these five pollutants are all alage, including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Gymnodinium breve. The water quality criteria concentration of the five pollutants were derived by the species sensitivity distribution method. The acute criteria concentration for the five pollutants were derived to be 1474, 2180, 54.41, 98.52 and 520.4 μg L(-1), and the chronic criteria concentration for them were 147.4, 218.0, 5.441, 9.852 and 52.04 μg L(-1), respectively. For China's freshwater bodies, the results of ecological risk assessment based on the derived criteria showed that, for the selected pollutants except DBP, there were basically no significant risk in most of the studied water bodies. DBP showed apparent ecological risks in all of the studied water bodies, particularly in the middle Yellow River, the Xuanwu Lake, the Yuehu Lake, etc. Field monitoring data of the Liao River and the Taihu Lake showed that DBP had moderate risks in some of the sampling sites of both the watersheds, while BBP posed moderate risks only on a few sites of the Liao River. PMID:25655815

  12. High-Throughput Screening of a Diversity Collection Using Biodefense Category A and B Priority Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, Esther W.; Clinkenbeard, Patricia A.; Duncan-Decocq, Rebecca A.; Perteet, Rachel F.; Hill, Kimberly D.; Bourne, Philip C.; Valderas, Michelle W.; Bourne, Christina R.; Clarkson, Nicole L.; Clinkenbeard, Kenneth D.; Barrow, William W.

    2013-01-01

    One of the objectives of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Biodefense Program is to identify or develop broad-spectrum antimicrobials for use against bioterrorism pathogens and emerging infectious agents. As a part of that program, our institution has screened the 10 000-compound MyriaScreen Diversity Collection of high-purity druglike compounds against three NIAID category A and one category B priority pathogens in an effort to identify potential compound classes for further drug development. The effective use of a Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute–based high-throughput screening (HTS) 96-well–based format allowed for the identification of 49 compounds that had in vitro activity against all four pathogens with minimum inhibitory concentration values of ≤16 μg/mL. Adaptation of the HTS process was necessary to conduct the work in higher-level containment, in this case, biosafety level 3. Examination of chemical scaffolds shared by some of the 49 compounds and assessment of available chemical databases indicates that several may represent broad-spectrum antimicrobials whose activity is based on novel mechanisms of action. PMID:22653912

  13. Camera Trapping: A Contemporary Approach to Monitoring Invasive Rodents in High Conservation Priority Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Rendall, Anthony R.; Sutherland, Duncan R.; Cooke, Raylene; White, John

    2014-01-01

    Invasive rodent species have established on 80% of the world's islands causing significant damage to island environments. Insular ecosystems support proportionally more biodiversity than comparative mainland areas, highlighting them as critical for global biodiversity conservation. Few techniques currently exist to adequately detect, with high confidence, species that are trap-adverse such as the black rat, Rattus rattus, in high conservation priority areas where multiple non-target species persist. This study investigates the effectiveness of camera trapping for monitoring invasive rodents in high conservation areas, and the influence of habitat features and density of colonial-nesting seabirds on rodent relative activity levels to provide insights into their potential impacts. A total of 276 camera sites were established and left in situ for 8 days. Identified species were recorded in discrete 15 min intervals, referred to as ‘events’. In total, 19 804 events were recorded. From these, 31 species were identified comprising 25 native species and six introduced. Two introduced rodent species were detected: the black rat (90% of sites), and house mouse Mus musculus (56% of sites). Rodent activity of both black rats and house mice were positively associated with the structural density of habitats. Density of seabird burrows was not strongly associated with relative activity levels of rodents, yet rodents were still present in these areas. Camera trapping enabled a large number of rodents to be detected with confidence in site-specific absences and high resolution to quantify relative activity levels. This method enables detection of multiple species simultaneously with low impact (for both target and non-target individuals); an ideal strategy for monitoring trap-adverse invasive rodents in high conservation areas. PMID:24599307

  14. Imaging exoplanets with the WFIRST Coronagraph: A background check of high priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangwei; Turnbull, Margaret C.; Gallagher, John S.; Kotulla, Ralf C.; Merrelli, Aronne; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Hu, Renyu

    2016-01-01

    The WFIRST coronagraph is envisioned to achieve a limiting contrast for exoplanet detection of 10e-9. This revolutionary mission will enable the direct detection of known and newly discovered exoplanets amongst the nearest stars, from super-Earths to giants. However, at this contrast the coronagraph will essentially see a Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) in every image. For targets near the Galactic Plane on the sky, distant stars with varying levels of extinction and reddening will dominate the background. Away from the plane, we then expect extragalactic sources to dominate. What impact will these background sources have on the WFIRST exoplanet imaging program? How can we efficiently distinguish background sources from exoplanet targets in a single image? To have a comprehensive understanding of the distribution of background sources across the sky, we have used the HUDF to model extragalactic faint sources, and "Trilegal" simulations to model galactic background sources. Through some preliminary color and point source analysis, we offer a statistical estimation of expected background contamination and the probability of false positive background sources. In this poster we show plots relating number of extragalactic sources versus magnitude in HUDF and "Trilegal" simulation. We present a table of high priority WFIRST exoplanet imaging targets, with an assessment of the "background threat" due to background stars, galaxies, and binary companions.

  15. Balancing forest-regeneration probabilities and maintenance costs in dry grasslands of high conservation priority

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolliger, Janine; Edwards, Thomas C., Jr.; Eggenberg, Stefan; Ismail, Sascha; Seidl, Irmi; Kienast, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Abandonment of agricultural land has resulted in forest regeneration in species-rich dry grasslands across European mountain regions and threatens conservation efforts in this vegetation type. To support national conservation strategies, we used a site-selection algorithm (MARXAN) to find optimum sets of floristic regions (reporting units) that contain grasslands of high conservation priority. We sought optimum sets that would accommodate 136 important dry-grassland species and that would minimize forest regeneration and costs of management needed to forestall predicted forest regeneration. We did not consider other conservation elements of dry grasslands, such as animal species richness, cultural heritage, and changes due to climate change. Optimal sets that included 95–100% of the dry grassland species encompassed an average of 56–59 floristic regions (standard deviation, SD 5). This is about 15% of approximately 400 floristic regions that contain dry-grassland sites and translates to 4800–5300 ha of dry grassland out of a total of approximately 23,000 ha for the entire study area. Projected costs to manage the grasslands in these optimum sets ranged from CHF (Swiss francs) 5.2 to 6.0 million/year. This is only 15–20% of the current total estimated cost of approximately CHF30–45 million/year required if all dry grasslands were to be protected. The grasslands of the optimal sets may be viewed as core sites in a national conservation strategy.

  16. Recommendations for high-priority research on cancer-related fatigue in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Barsevick, Andrea M; Irwin, Michael R; Hinds, Pamela; Miller, Andrew; Berger, Ann; Jacobsen, Paul; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Reeve, Bryce B; Mustian, Karen; O'Mara, Ann; Lai, Jin-Shei; Fisch, Michael; Cella, David

    2013-10-01

    Over the past decades, some scientific progress has been made in understanding and treating cancer-related fatigue (CRF). However, three major problems have limited further progress: lack of agreement about measurement, inadequate understanding of the underlying biology, and problems in the conduct of clinical trials for CRF. This commentary reports the recommendations of a National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Planning Meeting and an ongoing National Cancer Institute working group to address these problems so that high-priority research and clinical trials can be conducted to advance the science of CRF and its treatment. Recommendations to address measurement issues included revising the current case definition to reflect more rigorous criteria, adopting the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System fatigue scales as standard measures of CRF, and linking legacy measures to the scales. With regard to the biology of CRF, the group identified the need for longitudinal research to examine biobehavioral mechanisms underlying CRF and testing mechanistic hypotheses within the context of intervention research. To address clinical trial issues, recommendations included using only placebo-controlled trial designs. setting eligibility to minimize sample heterogeneity or enable subgroup analysis, establishing a CRF severity threshold for participation in clinical trials, conducting dissemination trials of efficacious interventions (such as exercise), and combining nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions to exploit the potential synergy between these approaches. Accomplishing these goals has the potential to advance the science of CRF and improve the clinical management of this troubling symptom. PMID:24047960

  17. High-Rank Stakeholders' Perspectives on High-Stakes University Entrance Examinations Reform: Priorities and Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiany, Gholam Reza; Shayestefar, Parvaneh; Samar, Reza Ghafar; Akbari, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    A steady stream of studies on high-stakes tests such as University Entrance Examinations (UEEs) suggests that high-stakes tests reforms serve as the leverage for promoting quality of learning, standards of teaching, and credible forms of accountability. However, such remediation is often not as effective as hoped and success is not necessarily…

  18. Priority in Process Algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleaveland, Rance; Luettgen, Gerald; Natarajan, V.

    1999-01-01

    This paper surveys the semantic ramifications of extending traditional process algebras with notions of priority that allow for some transitions to be given precedence over others. These enriched formalisms allow one to model system features such as interrupts, prioritized choice, or real-time behavior. Approaches to priority in process algebras can be classified according to whether the induced notion of preemption on transitions is global or local and whether priorities are static or dynamic. Early work in the area concentrated on global pre-emption and static priorities and led to formalisms for modeling interrupts and aspects of real-time, such as maximal progress, in centralized computing environments. More recent research has investigated localized notions of pre-emption in which the distribution of systems is taken into account, as well as dynamic priority approaches, i.e., those where priority values may change as systems evolve. The latter allows one to model behavioral phenomena such as scheduling algorithms and also enables the efficient encoding of real-time semantics. Technically, this paper studies the different models of priorities by presenting extensions of Milner's Calculus of Communicating Systems (CCS) with static and dynamic priority as well as with notions of global and local pre- emption. In each case the operational semantics of CCS is modified appropriately, behavioral theories based on strong and weak bisimulation are given, and related approaches for different process-algebraic settings are discussed.

  19. Disseminating evidence-based treatments for PTSD in organizational settings: A high priority focus area.

    PubMed

    Ruzek, Josef I; Rosen, Raymond C

    2009-11-01

    Dissemination of evidence-based treatments for PTSD has become an important focus of activity in the aftermath of recent terrorist attacks (e.g., London underground and U.S. 9/11 attacks), natural disasters (e.g., Indian Ocean tsunami and Hurricane Katrina), and wars (e.g., in Iraq and Afghanistan). This has become a high priority need for all mental health training and service delivery organizations. Researchers and educators have begun to examine clinician and client perceptions and preferences regarding PTSD treatment processes, and health care systems are organizing more comprehensive efforts at training and system change. As this evolution of services moves forward, effective dissemination should be a major focus of health policy research for the next decade or more. This review critically evaluates the PTSD-related research and emerging theory related to four major sets of variables that affect dissemination: (1) Practitioner factors, (2) Training methods, (3) The practice innovation(s) being disseminated; and (4) Organization or system factors. We evaluate findings from recent studies in light of emerging models of dissemination, and in the final section of the paper, we consider five broad topics with particular implications for dissemination of PTSD-specific treatments. They are: (1) The content of dissemination (i.e., which treatment protocols or intervention methods should be prioritized); (2) Strict adherence versus flexibility in the use of treatment manuals and the role of fidelity assessment; (3) The need for collaboration with user audiences; (4) The potential role of web-based technologies in increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of dissemination; and (5) Development of dissemination infrastructures within organizations. PMID:19632668

  20. Current Human Exposures Under Control at High-Priority Cleanup Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the numbers of National Priority List (NPL) Indicator Baseline (Superfund) sites and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Cleanup Baseline sites from 2000 to 2007 for which government officials have determined that 1) humans are not e...

  1. Migration of Contaminated Ground Water Under Control at High-Priority Cleanup Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the percentage of National Priority List (NPL) or Superfund Indicator Baseline sites and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Cleanup Baseline sites from 2000 to 2007 where government officials have determined that contaminated ground water is...

  2. Meteorological predictions for Mars 2020 Exploration Rover high-priority landing sites throug MRAMS Mesoscale Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-García, Jorge; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) is used to predict meteorological conditions that are likely to be encountered by the Mars 2020 Exploration Rover at several proposed landing sites during entry, descent, and landing (EDL). The meteorology during the EDL window at most of the sites is dynamic. The intense heating of the lower atmosphere drives intense thermals and mesoscale thermal circulations. Moderate mean winds, wind shear, turbulence, and vertical air currents associated with convection are present and potentially hazardous to EDL [1]. Nine areas with specific high-priority landing ellipses of the 2020 Rover, are investigated: NE Syrtis, Nili Fossae, Nili Fossae Carbonates, Jezero Crater Delta, Holden Crater, McLaughlin Crater, Southwest Melas Basin, Mawrth Vallis and East Margaritifer Chloride. MRAMS was applied to the landing site regions using nested grids with a spacing of 330 meters on the innermost grid that is centered over each landing site. MRAMS is ideally suited for this investigation; the model is explicitly designed to simulate Mars' atmospheric thermal circulations at the mesoscale and smaller with realistic, high-resolution surface properties [2, 3]. Horizontal wind speeds, both vertical profiles and vertical cross-sections wind speeds, are studied. For some landing sites simulations, two example configurations -including and not including Hellas basin in the mother domain- were generated, in order to study how the basin affects the innermost grids circulations. Afternoon circulations at all sites pose some risk entry, descent, and landing. Most of the atmospheric hazards are not evident in current observational data and general circulation model simulations and can only be ascertained through mesoscale modeling of the region. Decide where to go first and then design a system that can tolerate the environment would greatly minimize risk. References: [1] Rafkin, S. C. R., and T. I. Michaels (2003), J. Geophys. Res., 108(E12

  3. Offset time decision (OTD) algorithm for guaranteeing the requested QoS of high priority traffic in OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Won-Ho; Cha, Yun-Ho; Roh, Sun-Sik; Kim, Young-Chon

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, we propose the Offset Time Decision (OTD) algorithm for supporting the QoS in optical networks based on Optical Burst Switching (OBS), which is the new switching paradigm, and evaluate the performance of the OTD algorithm. The proposed algorithm can decide a reasonable offset time to guarantee the Burst Loss Rate (BLR) of high priority traffic by considering traffic load of network and the number of wavelengths. In order to design this effective OTD algorithm, firstly we illustrate the new burst loss formula, which includes the effect of offset time of high priority class. As the decision of offset time corresponding to the requested BLR, however, should use the reversed formula of new one, we are not able to use it without any changes. Thus, we define the Heuristic Loss Formula (HLF) that is based on the new burst loss formula and the proportional equation considering its characteristics. Finally we show the OTD algorithm to decide the reasonable offset time by using HLF. The simulation result shows that the requested BLR of high priority traffic is guaranteed under various traffic load.

  4. Assigning Priorities for Fixed Priority Preemption Threshold Scheduling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Preemption threshold scheduling (PTS) enhances real-time schedulability by controlling preemptiveness of tasks. This benefit of PTS highly depends on a proper algorithm that assigns each task feasible scheduling attributes, which are priority and preemption threshold. Due to the existence of an efficient optimal preemption threshold assignment algorithm that works with fully assigned priority orderings, we need an optimal priority assignment algorithm for PTS. This paper analyzes the inefficiency or nonoptimality of the previously proposed optimal priority assignment algorithms for PTS. We develop theorems for exhaustively but safely pruning infeasible priority orderings while assigning priorities to tasks for PTS. Based on the developed theorems, we correct the previously proposed optimal priority assignment algorithm for PTS. We also propose a performance improved optimal priority assignment algorithm for PTS proving its optimality. The empirical evaluation results clearly show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26688828

  5. Setting high-impact clinical research priorities for the Society for Vascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kraiss, Larry W; Conte, Michael S; Geary, Randolph L; Kibbe, Melina; Ozaki, C Keith

    2013-02-01

    With the overall goal of enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of vascular care, the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) recently completed a process by which it identified its top clinical research priorities to address critical gaps in knowledge guiding practitioners in prevention and treatment of vascular disease. After a survey of the SVS membership, a panel of SVS committee members and opinion leaders considered 53 distinct research questions through a structured process that resulted in identification of nine clinical issues that were felt to merit immediate attention by vascular investigators and external funding agencies. These are, in order of priority: (1) define optimal management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis, (2) compare the effectiveness of medical vs invasive treatment (open or endovascular) of vasculogenic claudication, (3) compare effectiveness of open vs endovascular infrainguinal revascularization as initial treatment of critical limb ischemia, (4) develop and compare the effectiveness of clinical strategies to reduce cardiovascular and other perioperative complications (eg, wound) after vascular intervention, (5) compare the effectiveness of strategies to enhance arteriovenous fistula maturation and durability, (6) develop best practices for management of chronic venous ulcer, (7) define optimal adjunctive medical therapy to enhance the success of lower extremity revascularization, (8) identify and evaluate medical therapy to prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm growth, and (9) evaluate ultrasound vs computed tomographic angiography surveillance after endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:23337859

  6. High altitude atmospheric discharges according to the runaway air breakdown mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Symbalisty, E.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Yukhimuk, V.; Taranenko, Y.

    1997-04-01

    High altitude optical transients - red sprites, blue jets, and elves - are modeled in the context of the relativistic electron runaway air breakdown mechanism. These emissions are usually associated with large mesoscale convective systems (hereafter MCS). In thunderstorms cloud electrification proceeds over a time scale long enough to permit the conducting atmosphere above the cloud to polarize and short out the thunderstorm electric field. When a lightning strike rapidly neutralizes a cloud charge layer runaway driving fields can develop in the stratosphere and mesosphere. According to present simulations of the full runaway process the variety of observed optical emissions are due to the nature of the normal lightning event in the MCS that kick starts the runaway avalanche. In this paper the authors describe some details of the model, present the results of the evolution of the primary electron population, and summarize the initial conditions necessary for different types of discharges. Two companion papers present (a) the predicted optical, gamma ray, and radio emissions caused by these electrical discharges, and (b) the time evolution of the secondary electron population and its implications in terms of observables.

  7. Criteria for assessing high-priority drug-drug interactions for clinical decision support in electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High override rates for drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts in electronic health records (EHRs) result in the potentially dangerous consequence of providers ignoring clinically significant alerts. Lack of uniformity of criteria for determining the severity or validity of these interactions often results in discrepancies in how these are evaluated. The purpose of this study was to identify a set of criteria for assessing DDIs that should be used for the generation of clinical decision support (CDS) alerts in EHRs. Methods We conducted a 20-year systematic literature review of MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify characteristics of high-priority DDIs. These criteria were validated by an expert panel consisting of medication knowledge base vendors, EHR vendors, in-house knowledge base developers from academic medical centers, and both federal and private agencies involved in the regulation of medication use. Results Forty-four articles met the inclusion criteria for assessing characteristics of high-priority DDIs. The panel considered five criteria to be most important when assessing an interaction- Severity, Probability, Clinical Implications of the interaction, Patient characteristics, and the Evidence supporting the interaction. In addition, the panel identified barriers and considerations for being able to utilize these criteria in medication knowledge bases used by EHRs. Conclusions A multi-dimensional approach is needed to understanding the importance of an interaction for inclusion in medication knowledge bases for the purpose of CDS alerting. The criteria identified in this study can serve as a first step towards a uniform approach in assessing which interactions are critical and warrant interruption of a provider’s workflow. PMID:23763856

  8. Analysis of road pricing, metering and the priority treatment of high occupancy vehicles using system dynamics. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, W.

    1992-01-01

    Transportation Systems Management (TSM) employs various techniques such as road pricing, metering and the priority treatment of high occupancy vehicles (HOVs) in an effort to make more efficient use of existing transportation facilities. Efficiency is improved in terms of moving more people through the facility while simultaneously reducing the number of vehicles using the facility. This report uses a hypothetical toll facility and examines four computer modeling approaches to determine which of the approaches are valid in terms of predicting the behavior of trip makers seeking to use the facility in response to various combinations of TSM techniques. Once an approach has been determined to be valid, seven different combination of TSM techniques, or strategies, are compared to a base strategy to determine what strategy or strategies are most affective in achieving the goals of TSM.

  9. Sex Education in Connecticut High Schools: Teachers' Reports of Content and Importance Ratings According to the SIECUS Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obloj, Wallace; Lynn, Donna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Connecticut teachers' reports of the sex education content taught to high school students as well as teachers' reports of the degree of importance for Connecticut high school students to understand according to the SIECUS Guidelines. The data revealed that participants (N=125) reported teaching 72% of the…

  10. Gigacycle Fatigue Properties of High-Strength Steels According to Inclusion and ODA Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Y.; Hirukawa, H.; Kimura, T.; Hayaishi, M.

    2007-08-01

    Gigacycle fatigue tests were conducted for several versions of JIS-SCM440 low-alloy and JIS-SUJ2 bearing steels using 20-kHz ultrasonic fatigue testing to elucidate the relationship of the inclusion size and type to fish-eye fracture properties. The total number of tested specimens was over 200. Most of the specimens revealed Al2O3 or (Cr, Fe)3C inclusion-originating types of fish-eye fractures, while TiN inclusions and the matrix also caused fish-eye fractures in some specimens. Based on these fatigue test results, 109-cycle fatigue limits were estimated according to inclusion size by resorting the obtained data points according to their inclusion sizes at the fish-eye fracture origin. The estimated fatigue limits revealed saturation when the inclusion sizes were smaller than 15 μm, while those fatigue limits depended on the inclusion sizes to the -1/6th power in the case of inclusions above 15 μm in size. The saturation of the 109-cycle fatigue limits was considered to be caused by the effects of the optically dark areas (ODAs). Moreover, the fatigue limits also depended on inclusion type. In comparing the Al2O3 and (Cr, Fe)3C inclusions, the key features causing the difference in the fatigue limits were likely to be bonding between the inclusion and the matrix, i.e., the (Cr, Fe)3C inclusions were tightly bonded to the matrix, unlike the Al2O3 inclusions, although both inclusions were of the hard type.

  11. Aging Education for High School Students: Effectiveness According to the Mode of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalor, Janice Marie

    This paper discusses a study undertaken to analyze pre-and posttest scores of junior high and high school students involved in an aging education unit. Objectives were to determine whether a unit on aging helped students relate to aging as part of the life cycle and to assess the success of different modes of instruction (i.e. independent study,…

  12. Investigation of High School Students' Reading Compherension Levels According to Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceran, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the level of reading comprehension of high school students in their fields of study and learning strategies to explain the relationship between the level of reading comprehension. This working group is composed of 11th grade high school students. In this study, relational model was used. In the study…

  13. The High School Economics Text: An Examination of Priorities and Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radner, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes high school economics textbooks through an examination of the questions that textbooks traditionally address about economic production: What, how much, and how will something be produced, and who gets the product? Considers teachers' relationships to economic textbooks and courses. Concludes that textbooks should be more relevant to…

  14. High-Priority Professional Development Needs Identified by ASCA Presidents/Presidents-Elect (1986-87).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comas, Robert E.; And Others

    The 1986-1987 American School Counselor Association (ASCA) Research Committee identified as one of six goals the identification of two topics of high professional development need for school counselors and distribution of bibliographic information on these two topics. To achieve this goal, ASCA presidents and presidents-elect (N=31) completed…

  15. High-priority drug–drug interactions for use in electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Amrita A; Bell, Douglas; Yoshida, Eileen; Doole, John; Czochanski, Melissa; Middleton, Blackford; Bates, David W

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop a set of high-severity, clinically significant drug–drug interactions (DDIs) for use in electronic health records (EHRs). Methods A panel of experts was convened with the goal of identifying critical DDIs that should be used for generating medication-related decision support alerts in all EHRs. Panelists included medication knowledge base vendors, EHR vendors, in-house knowledge base developers from academic medical centers, and both federal and private agencies involved in the regulation of medication use. Candidate DDIs were assessed by the panel based on the consequence of the interaction, severity levels assigned to them across various medication knowledge bases, availability of therapeutic alternatives, monitoring/management options, predisposing factors, and the probability of the interaction based on the strength of evidence available in the literature. Results Of 31 DDIs considered to be high risk, the panel approved a final list of 15 interactions. Panelists agreed that this list represented drugs that are contraindicated for concurrent use, though it does not necessarily represent a complete list of all such interacting drug pairs. For other drug interactions, severity may depend on additional factors, such as patient conditions or timing of co-administration. Discussion The panel provided recommendations on the creation, maintenance, and implementation of a central repository of high severity interactions. Conclusions A set of highly clinically significant drug-drug interactions was identified, for which warnings should be generated in all EHRs. The panel highlighted the complexity of issues surrounding development and implementation of such a list. PMID:22539083

  16. Applicability of the CompMech trout model to hydropower impact assessment. A case study of high-priority environmental issues at Pacific Gas and Electric: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Railsback, S.F.; Yeoman, E.H.

    1994-07-01

    The primary purpose of the CompMech trout program is the improved assessment of instream flow needs, but its applicability to assessment of other important aquatic environmental issues was examined using Pacific Gas and Electric`s hydroelectric system as a case study. High-priority aquatic issues for PG&E hydrogen were identified by examining the characteristics of the hydro projects and trends in environmental regulation of hydro. The CompMech trout program is expected to develop improved assessment methods for a number of high-priority issues, although CompMech models would require adaptation to address some issues.

  17. Requirements of High-Quality Kindergarten Programs According to Jordanian Parents: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Taleb, Tagreed Fathi

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore what Jordanian parents of children attending "traditional" kindergartens recognize as high-quality education programs. The sample consisted of 509 families ("N"?=?509) of kindergarten-age children. Data were collected using a three-part questionnaire: curriculum domains, teacher…

  18. Roadmap for the international collaborative epidemiologic monitoring of safety and effectiveness of new high priority vaccines.

    PubMed

    Izurieta, Hector S; Zuber, Patrick; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Chen, Robert T; Sankohg, Osman; Laserson, Kayla F; Sturkenboom, Miriam; Loucq, Christian; Weibel, Daniel; Dodd, Caitlin; Black, Steve

    2013-08-01

    With the advent of new vaccines targeted to highly endemic diseases in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) and with the expansion of vaccine manufacturing globally, there is an urgent need to establish an infrastructure to evaluate the benefit-risk profiles of vaccines in LMIC. Fortunately the usual decade(s)-long time gap between introduction of new vaccines in high and low income countries is being significantly reduced or eliminated due to initiatives such as the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations (GAVI) and the Decade of Vaccines for the implementation of the Global Vaccine Action Plan. While hoping for more rapid disease control, this time shift may potentially add risk, unless appropriate capacity for reliable and timely evaluation of vaccine benefit-risk profiles in some LMIC's are developed with external assistance from regional or global level. An ideal vaccine safety and effectiveness monitoring system should be flexible and sustainable, able to quickly detect possible vaccine-associated events, distinguish them from programmatic errors, reliably and quickly evaluate the suspected event and its association with vaccination and, if associated, determine the benefit-risk of vaccines to inform appropriate action. Based upon the demonstrated feasibility of active surveillance in LMIC as shown by the Burkina Faso assessment of meningococcal A conjugate vaccine or that of rotavirus vaccine in Mexico and Brazil, and upon the proof of concept international GBS study, we suggest a sustainable, flexible, affordable and timely international collaborative vaccine safety monitoring approach for vaccines being newly introduced. While this paper discusses only the vaccine component, the same system could also be eventually used for monitoring drug effectiveness (including the use of substandard drugs) and drug safety. PMID:23707171

  19. Challenges in Mentoring Software Development Projects in the High School: Analysis According to Shulman's Teacher Knowledge Base Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meerbaum-Salant, Orni; Hazzan, Orit

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on challenges in mentoring software development projects in the high school and analyzes difficulties encountered by Computer Science teachers in the mentoring process according to Shulman's Teacher Knowledge Base Model. The main difficulties that emerged from the data analysis belong to the following knowledge sources of…

  20. Priorities for Federal Education Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murnane, Richard J.

    The paper suggests priorities for the federal government's elementary and secondary education data collection efforts. Sections on outputs, inputs, and private schools describe what data is needed, what is already available, and what is recommended for data collection. Recommendations include a high priority for federal funding for the National…

  1. High priority needs for range-wide monitoring of North American landbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunn, E.H.; Altman, B.L.; Bart, J.; Beardmore, C.J.; Berlanga, H.; Blancher, P.J.; Butcher, G.S.; Demarest, D.W.; Dettmers, R.; Hunter, W.C.; Iñigo-Elias, E.E.; Panjabi, A.O.; Pashley, D.N.; Ralph, C.J.; Rich, T.D.; Rosenberg, K.V.; Rustay, C.M.; Ruth, J.M.; Will, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    This document is an extension of work done for the Partners in Flight North American Landbird Conservation Plan (Rich et al. 2004). The Continental Plan reviewed conservation status of the 448 native landbird species that regularly breed in the United States and Canada. Two groups of species were identified as having high conservation importance: the PIF Watch List, made up of species for which there is conservation concern, and Stewardship Spices that are particularly characteristic of regional avifaunas. In addition, continental scale monitoring needs were identified for all species. Here we extend the monitoring needs aspect of the Plan, providing additional detail and suggesting the best means of filling the gaps in broad-scale, long-term trend monitoring. This analysis and report was compiled by the Partners in Flight (PIF) Science Committee as a contribution to current work by the North American Bird Conservation Initiative to assess the status of bird population monitoring in North America and to make recommendations for improvements.

  2. Forecasting High-Priority Infectious Disease Surveillance Regions: A Socioeconomic Model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Emily H.; Scales, David A.; Brewer, Timothy F.; Madoff, Lawrence C.; Pollack, Marjorie P.; Hoen, Anne G.; Choden, Tenzin; Brownstein, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Few researchers have assessed the relationships between socioeconomic inequality and infectious disease outbreaks at the population level globally. We use a socioeconomic model to forecast national annual rates of infectious disease outbreaks. Methods. We constructed a multivariate mixed-effects Poisson model of the number of times a given country was the origin of an outbreak in a given year. The dataset included 389 outbreaks of international concern reported in the World Health Organization's Disease Outbreak News from 1996 to 2008. The initial full model included 9 socioeconomic variables related to education, poverty, population health, urbanization, health infrastructure, gender equality, communication, transportation, and democracy, and 1 composite index. Population, latitude, and elevation were included as potential confounders. The initial model was pared down to a final model by a backwards elimination procedure. The dependent and independent variables were lagged by 2 years to allow for forecasting future rates. Results. Among the socioeconomic variables tested, the final model included child measles immunization rate and telephone line density. The Democratic Republic of Congo, China, and Brazil were predicted to be at the highest risk for outbreaks in 2010, and Colombia and Indonesia were predicted to have the highest percentage of increase in their risk compared to their average over 1996–2008. Conclusions. Understanding socioeconomic factors could help improve the understanding of outbreak risk. The inclusion of the measles immunization variable suggests that there is a fundamental basis in ensuring adequate public health capacity. Increased vigilance and expanding public health capacity should be prioritized in the projected high-risk regions. PMID:23118271

  3. Stellar evolution at high mass with semiconvective mixing according to the Ledoux criterion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of semiconvective mixing are investigated in evolutionary sequences of models for stars of 10, 15, and 30 solar masses with four different initial chemical compositions. The models are constructed using the Ledoux criterion for both the definition of convective instability and the state of convective neutrality assumed to be attained in regions with a gradient of mean molecular weight. It is shown that semiconvection is nonexistent at 10 solar masses, of minor importance at 15 solar masses, but covers most of the intermediate zone at 30 solar masses, developing into full convection if the initial hydrogen and metals abundances are high. The effects of low initial hydrogen and metals abundances are examined, and the critical importance is demonstrated of the depths of the semiconvective zone and the outer convective envelope in promoting a blue loop and determining the maximum effective temperature on the loop. The extent of the thermally stable stages of the blue-loop phase is determined.

  4. Your Health Priorities Tool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Explore Your Treatment Options: Your Health Priorities Tool Home Why Explore Your Options Start the Conversation ... Home > Your Health Priorities Tool Your Health Priorities Tool If you don’t share details about your ...

  5. Report on Tribal Priority Allocations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    As part of Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) funding, Tribal Priority Allocations (TPA) are the principal source of funds for tribal governments and agency offices at the reservation level. According to their unique needs and circumstances, tribes may prioritize funding among eight general categories: government, human services, education, public…

  6. Micronutrient bioavailability research priorities.

    PubMed

    Casgrain, Amélie; Collings, Rachel; Harvey, Linda J; Boza, Julio J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2010-05-01

    A micronutrient bioavailability workshop, which involved international experts and members of the scientific community and the food industry, with interactive breakout sessions based on synectics principles, was organized by the International Life Sciences Institute Europe Addition of Nutrients to Food Task Force and the European Commission Network of Excellence European Micronutrient Recommendations Aligned. After presentations by experts, a series of "challenge statements" was discussed. The aim was to address topical issues, in particular those that linked bioavailability with the derivation of micronutrient requirements and dietary recommendations, to identify gaps in knowledge and to consider research priorities. Several generic research priorities were identified, including improving the quality of dietary surveys/food composition tables, the need for more metabolic studies that use stable isotopes and high-quality longer-term interventions, and the development of multifactorial mathematical models. Among the common recurrent factors identified as important were polymorphisms/genotype, consideration of the whole diet, chemical form of the micronutrient, and the determination of physiologic requirements. The involvement of all participants in the structured discussions ensured a broad overview of current knowledge, state-of-the-art research, and consideration of priorities for future research. PMID:20200267

  7. Priorities for Venus Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Beauchamp, P. M.; Chin, G.; Crisp, D.; Grimm, R. E.; Herrick, R. R.; Johnston, S.; Limaye, S. S.; Smrekar, S. E.; Ocampo, A.; Thompson, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Venus remains one of the most enigmatic bodies in our Solar System. Important questions remain regarding the origin and evolution of the atmosphere, the history of the surface and interior, and how the surface and atmosphere interact. In a broader context, understanding Venus has implications for understanding the evolution of terrestrial planets in our Solar System as well as for interpreting the growing set of observations of extra-solar planets. The Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG), established in 2005, is chartered by NASA's Planetary Science Division and reports its findings to the NASA Advisory Council. Open to all interested scientists, VEXAG regularly evaluates Venus exploration goals, scientific objectives, investigations and critical measurement requirements, including especially recommendations in the NRC Decadal Survey and the Solar System Exploration Strategic Roadmap. At the last general meeting in November 2012, VEXAG resolved to update the scientific priorities and strategies for Venus exploration. To achieve this goal, three major tasks were defined for 2013, (1) update the document prioritizing Goals, Objectives and Investigations for Venus Exploration, (2) develop a Roadmap for Venus exploration that is consistent with VEXAG priorities as well as Planetary Decadal Survey priorities, and (3) develop a white paper on technologies for Venus missions. Proposed versions of all three documents were presented at the VEXAG general meeting in November 2013. Here, we present the findings and final versions of all three documents for community comment and feedback. A follow-on Workshop on Venus Exploration Targets is also being planned for the early summer of 2014. The workshop will provide a forum for the Venus science community to discuss approaches for addressing high priority investigations. Participants will be encouraged to present their ideas for specific targets on Venus (interior, surface and atmosphere) as well as to present specific data

  8. Characterisation of honeys according to their content of phenolic compounds using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sergiel, Iwona; Pohl, Pawel; Biesaga, Magdalena

    2014-02-15

    A simple, fast and specific high performance liquid chromatography separation with an electro-spray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry detection in a negative single reaction ion monitoring scan mode was developed and used for the characterization of Polish honeys according to the content of phenolic acids, including caffeic, chlorogenic, p-coumaric, ferulic, homogentisic, p-hydroxybenzoic and vanillic acids, and flavonoids, i.e., apigenin, genistein, hesperetin, kaempferol, luteolin, rhamnetin, rutin, tricetin and quercetin. Target compounds were isolated and pre-concentrated from the honey matrix by means of the solid phase extraction using Strata X (500mg) cartridges. Analysed honeys did not contain tricetin and genistein. Hesperetin was determined for the first time in heather and linden honeys while rutin in rape honey. PMID:24128495

  9. Priorities for global felid conservation.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Amy J; Hinks, Amy E; Macdonald, Ewan A; Burnham, Dawn; Macdonald, David W

    2015-06-01

    Conservation resources are limited, necessitating prioritization of species and locations for action. Most prioritization approaches are based solely on biologically relevant characteristics of taxa or areas and ignore geopolitical realities. Doing so risks a poor return on conservation investment due to nonbiological factors, such as economic or political instability. We considered felids, a taxon which attracts intense conservation attention, to demonstrate a new approach that incorporates both intrinsic species traits and geopolitical characteristics of countries. We developed conservation priority scores for wild felids based on their International Union for Conservation of Nature status, body mass, habitat, range within protected area, evolutionary distinctiveness, and conservation umbrella potential. We used published data on governance, economics and welfare, human population pressures, and conservation policy to assign conservation-likelihood scores to 142 felid-hosting countries. We identified 71 countries as high priorities (above median) for felid conservation. These countries collectively encompassed all 36 felid species and supported an average of 96% of each species' range. Of these countries, 60.6% had below-average conservation-likelihood scores, which indicated these countries are relatively risky conservation investments. Governance was the most common factor limiting conservation likelihood. It was the major contributor to below-median likelihood scores for 62.5% of the 32 felid species occurring in lower-likelihood countries. Governance was followed by economics for which scores were below median for 25% of these species. An average of 58% of species' ranges occurred in 43 higher-priority lower-likelihood countries. Human population pressure was second to governance as a limiting factor when accounting for percentage of species' ranges in each country. As conservation likelihood decreases, it will be increasingly important to identify relevant

  10. 7 CFR 1410.8 - Conservation priority areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conservation priority areas. 1410.8 Section 1410.8... OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS CONSERVATION RESERVE PROGRAM § 1410.8 Conservation priority areas. (a) CCC may designate National conservation priority areas according to...

  11. Suicidal-related behaviors and quality of life according to gender in adolescent Mexican high school students.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Rasmussen, Carlos; Martín, Alfredo Hidalgo-San

    2015-11-01

    The study of pre-suicidal behaviors is important not only because of their association with suicide but also because of their impact on quality of life (QOL). Given the scarcity of information regarding this relationship in adolescence, the objective of this study was to analyze the association between suicidal-related behavior and QOL according to gender in adolescent Mexican high school students. This cross-sectional study was conducted with participants between 14 and 18 years of age. A translated version of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey and the Spanish version of the Youth Quality of Life Research - Instrument version were used. Non-parametric tests were applied. Informed consent was obtained from parents and students, and ethical committee approval was sought. The developmental-transactional model of suicidal behavior in adolescents by Bridge et al. was used. Separate analyses were conducted for males and females to show the suicidal-related behaviors associated with QOL. The behavior of having felt sad or hopeless generally presented the greatest effect sizes. The regression models showed that some suicidal-related behaviors increase the probability of a lower QOL even after adjusting for covariates. PMID:26602721

  12. Sustained high incidence of injuries from burns in a densely populated urban slum in Kenya: An emerging public health priority

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua M.; Nyachieo, Dhillon O.; Benzekri, Noelle A.; Cosmas, Leonard; Ondari, Daniel; Yekta, Shahla; Montgomery, Joel M.; Williamson, John M.; Breiman, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ninety-five percent of burn deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); however, longitudinal household-level studies have not been done in urban slum settings, where overcrowding and unsafe cook stoves may increase likelihood of injury. Methods Using a prospective, population-based disease surveillance system in the urban slum of Kibera in Kenya, we examined the incidence of household-level burns of all severities from 2006–2011. Results Of approximately 28,500 enrolled individuals (6000 households), we identified 3072 burns. The overall incidence was 27.9/1000 person-years-of-observation. Children <5 years old sustained burns at 3.8-fold greater rate compared to ( p < 0.001) those ≥5 years old. Females ≥5 years old sustained burns at a rate that was 1.35-fold ( p < 0.001) greater than males within the same age distribution. Hospitalizations were uncommon (0.65% of all burns). Conclusions The incidence of burns, 10-fold greater than in most published reports from Africa and Asia, suggests that such injuries may contribute more significantly than previously thought to morbidity in LMICs, and may be increased by urbanization. As migration from rural areas into urban slums rapidly increases in many African countries, characterizing and addressing the rising burden of burns is likely to become a public health priority. PMID:24461306

  13. Priorities for Endometriosis Research

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Peter A. W.; D’Hooghe, Thomas M.; Fazleabas, Asgerally; Gargett, Caroline E.; Giudice, Linda C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Rombauts, Luk; Salamonsen, Lois A.; Zondervan, Krina T.

    2009-01-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disorder where endometrial tissue forms lesions outside the uterus. Endometriosis affects an estimated 10% of women in the reproductive-age group, rising to 30% to 50% in patients with infertility and/or pain, with significant impact on their physical, mental, and social well-being. There is no known cure, and most current medical treatments are not suitable long term due to their side-effect profiles. Endometriosis has an estimated annual cost in the United States of $18.8 to $22 billion (2002 figures). Although endometriosis was first described more than 100 years ago, current knowledge of its pathogenesis, spontaneous evolution, and the pathophysiology of the related infertility and pelvic pain, remain unclear. A consensus workshop was convened following the 10th World Congress on Endometriosis to establish recommendations for priorities in endometriosis research. One major issue identified as impacting on the capacity to undertake endometriosis research is the need for multidisciplinary expertise. A total of 25 recommendations for research have been developed, grouped under 5 subheadings: (1) diagnosis, (2) classification and prognosis, (3) treatment and outcome, (4) epidemiology, and (5) pathophysiology. Endometriosis research is underfunded relative to other diseases with high health care burdens. This may be due to the practical difficulties of developing competitive research proposals on a complex and poorly understood disease, which affects only women. By producing this consensus international research priorities statement it is the hope of the workshop participants that researchers will be encouraged to develop new interdisciplinary research proposals that will attract increased funding support for work on endometriosis. PMID:19196878

  14. A primer on potential impacts, management priorities, and future directions for Elodea spp. in high latitude systems: learning from the Alaskan experience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, Michael P.; Sethi, Suresh A; Larsen, Sabrina J; Rich, Cecil F

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species introductions in Arctic and Subarctic ecosystems are growing as climate change manifests and human activity increases in high latitudes. The aquatic plants of the genus Elodea are potential invaders to Arctic and Subarctic ecosystems circumpolar and at least one species is already established in Alaska, USA. To illustrate the problems of preventing, eradicating, containing, and mitigating aquatic, invasive plants in Arctic and Subarctic ecosystems, we review the invasion dynamics of Elodea and provide recommendations for research and management efforts in Alaska. Foremost, we conclude the remoteness of Arctic and Subarctic systems such as Alaska is no longer a protective attribute against invasions, as transportation pathways now reach throughout these regions. Rather, high costs of operating in remote Arctic and Subarctic systems hinders detection of infestations and limits eradication or mitigation, emphasizing management priorities of prevention and containment of aquatic plant invaders in Alaska and other Arctic and Subarctic systems.

  15. The Big Rocks: Priority Management for Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Kim

    2008-01-01

    How can a dedicated principal work really, really hard but fail to get significant gains in student achievement? The answer is obvious: by spending too much time on the wrong things and not enough on the right things. The principal's number-one priority is zeroing in on the highest-priority activities for bringing all students to high levels of…

  16. Highly sensitive determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in surface water by GC coupled to high-resolution MS according to the EU Water Directive 2008/105/EC.

    PubMed

    Barco-Bonilla, Nieves; Plaza-Bolaños, Patricia; Tarifa, Noelia Ma Valera; Romero-González, Roberto; Vidal, José Luis Martínez; Frenich, Antonia Garrido

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), has received increased interest because of their toxicity and ubiquity. According to European Union Directive 2008/105/EC, the development of highly sensitive and selective methods capable of determining PBDEs at low concentration levels (<0.5 ng/L) is necessary. In this work, an SPE method was developed for the analysis of the six PBDEs (BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-153, BDE-154) specified by the aforementioned directive in surface waters. The analyses were performed by GC coupled to magnetic sector high-resolution MS. The conditions were also optimized to detect the target compounds in water samples at concentrations below the environmental quality standards established by European legislation. The validated method provided adequate linearity (determination coefficient, R(2) ≥ 0.9960), recovery (101-120%, except for BDE-47 at 5 ng/L, 127%), and precision values (RSD < 20%) at two fortification levels (0.2 and 5 ng/L). The method showed LODs and LOQs ranging from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.05 to 0.1 ng/L, respectively. The method was applied in surface water samples, allowing the determination of these compounds at the limits established by current legislation. PMID:24302622

  17. Different Citrus rootstocks present high dissimilarities in their antioxidant activity and vitamins content according to the ripening stage.

    PubMed

    Cardeñosa, Vanessa; Barros, Lillian; Barreira, João C M; Arenas, Francisco; Moreno-Rojas, José M; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2015-02-01

    "Lane Late" sweet orange grafted on six different citrus rootstocks and grown in the Guadalquivir valley (Seville, Spain) were picked at different ripening stages in two consecutive seasons to characterize their antioxidant activity (free radicals scavenging activity, reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition) and quantify their main antioxidant compounds (vitamin E and vitamin C). Linear discriminant analysis and 2-way ANOVA were applied to compare the effects induced by citrus rootstock and ripening stage. The results showed that differences in antioxidant activity and related compounds are mainly dependent on the citrus rootstock, despite ripening stage had also some particular effects. Changes observed in 2012 showed less marked differences among the citrus rootstock. Nevertheless, Cleopatra rootstock showed the highest antioxidant activity in both years, indicating that an increase in its cultivation might be a good solution to sweet orange farmers. Concerning the ripening stage, samples collected in January presented higher vitamin contents, while those collected in April showed higher antioxidant activity. This result allows deciding the harvesting period according to the desired effect. PMID:25462974

  18. 7 CFR 1777.13 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ineligible will be advised of their appeal rights in accordance with 7 CFR part 11. (b) State Office review... not available and advised of their appeal rights as set forth in 7 CFR part 11. (c) National Office... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project priority. 1777.13 Section 1777.13...

  19. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shortage. Grants made in accordance with § 1778.11(b) of this part to assist an established water system remedy an acute shortage of quality water or correct a significant decline in the quantity or quality of... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph...

  20. 7 CFR 1777.13 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... advised of their appeal rights in accordance with 7 CFR part 11. (b) State Office review. All applications... are not available and advised of their appeal rights as set forth in 7 CFR part 11. (c) National... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Project priority. 1777.13 Section 1777.13...

  1. 7 CFR 1777.13 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ineligible will be advised of their appeal rights in accordance with 7 CFR part 11. (b) State Office review... not available and advised of their appeal rights as set forth in 7 CFR part 11. (c) National Office... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Project priority. 1777.13 Section 1777.13...

  2. 7 CFR 1777.13 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ineligible will be advised of their appeal rights in accordance with 7 CFR part 11. (b) State Office review... not available and advised of their appeal rights as set forth in 7 CFR part 11. (c) National Office... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project priority. 1777.13 Section 1777.13...

  3. The Priority and Challenge of High-Power Performance of Low-Platinum Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Kongkanand, Anusorn; Mathias, Mark F

    2016-04-01

    Substantial progress has been made in reducing proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathode platinum loadings from 0.4-0.8 mgPt/cm(2) to about 0.1 mgPt/cm(2). However, at this level of cathode Pt loading, large performance loss is observed at high-current density (>1 A/cm(2)), preventing a reduction in the overall stack cost. This next developmental step is being limited by the presence of a resistance term exhibited at these lower Pt loadings and apparently due to a phenomenon at or near the catalyst surface. This issue can be addressed through the design of catalysts with high and stable Pt dispersion as well as through development and implementation of ionomers designed to interact with Pt in a way that does not constrain oxygen reduction reaction rates. Extrapolating from progress made in past decades, we are optimistic that the concerted efforts of materials and electrode designers can resolve this issue, thus enabling a large step toward fuel cell vehicles that are affordable for the mass market. PMID:26961326

  4. New Prompt Fission γ-ray Data in Response to the OECD/NEA High Priority Request

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, S.; Billnert, R.; Belgya, T.; Borcea, R.; Bryś, T.; Geerts, W.; Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Kish, Z.; Martinez Perez, T.; Oberstedt, A.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Vidali, M.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we report about new prompt fission γ-ray measurements, which we have performed with highly efficient γ-ray detectors based on lanthanide-halide crystals, aiming at very fast timing in conjunction with a good energy resolution. About four decades after the experiments were performed, whose results are still used for current evaluations, we present new spectral prompt fission γ-ray data from the reactions 252Cf(SF) and 235U(nth, f). Based on our new findings we recommend to replace the current ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation for 252Cf(SF) and 235U(nth,f) as well as to perform new measurements for 238U(n, f) and 241Pu(n, f).

  5. Solid waste treatment as a high-priority and low-cost alternative for greenhouse gas mitigation.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, O; Avnimelech, Y; Shechter, M

    2001-05-01

    The increased concern about environmental problems caused by inadequate waste management, as well as the concern about global warming, promotes actions toward a sustainable management of the organic fraction of the waste. Landfills, the most common means to dispose of municipal solid waste (MSW), lead to the conversion of the organic waste to biogas, containing about 50% methane, a very active greenhouse gas (GHG). One unit of methane has a global warming potential of 21 computed for a 100-year horizon or 56 computed for 20 years. The waste sector in Israel contributes 13% of total greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions for a time horizon of 100 years (for a time horizon of 20 years, the waste sector contribution equals to more than 25% of total GHG emissions). The ultimate goal is to minimize the amount of methane (CH4) by converting it to CO2. This can be achieved by physicochemical means (e.g., landfill gas flare, incineration) or by biological processes (e.g., composting, anaerobic digestion). Since the waste in Israel has a high organic material content, it was found that the most cost-effective means to treat the degradable organic components is by aerobic composting (investment of less than US$ 10 to reduce emission of one ton CO2 equivalent per year). Another benefit of this technology is the ability to implement it within a short period. The suggested approach, which should be implemented especially in developing countries, could reduce a significant amount of GHG at relatively low cost and short time. The development of a national policy for proper waste treatment can be a significant means to abate GHG emissions in the short term, enabling a gain in time to develop other means for the long run. In addition, the use of CO2 quotas will credit the waste sector and will promote profitable proper waste management. PMID:11334157

  6. 46 CFR 340.8 - Priorities for materials and production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administrator, in accordance with the Defense Priorities and Allocation System (15 CFR part 330 et seq. (49 FR... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Priorities for materials and production. 340.8 Section... production. (a) Vessel operators, port authorities and container and chassis suppliers may request...

  7. High performance in healthcare priority setting and resource allocation: A literature- and case study-based framework in the Canadian context.

    PubMed

    Smith, Neale; Mitton, Craig; Hall, William; Bryan, Stirling; Donaldson, Cam; Peacock, Stuart; Gibson, Jennifer L; Urquhart, Bonnie

    2016-08-01

    Priority setting and resource allocation, or PSRA, are key functions of executive teams in healthcare organizations. Yet decision-makers often base their choices on historical patterns of resource distribution or political pressures. Our aim was to provide leaders with guidance on how to improve PSRA practice, by creating organizational contexts which enable high performance. We carried out in-depth case studies of six Canadian healthcare organizations to obtain from healthcare leaders their understanding of the concept of high performance in PSRA and the factors which contribute to its achievement. Individual and group interviews were carried out (n = 62) with senior managers, middle managers and Board members. Site observations and document review were used to assist researchers in interpreting the interview data. Qualitative data were analyzed iteratively with the literature on empirical examples of PSRA practice, in order to develop a framework of high performance in PSRA. The framework consists of four domains - structures, processes, attitudes and behaviours, and outcomes - within which are 19 specific elements. The emergent themes derive from case studies in different kinds of health organizations (urban/rural, small/large) across Canada. The elements can serve as a checklist for 'high performance' in PSRA. This framework provides a means by which decision-makers in healthcare might assess their practice and identify key areas for improvement. The findings are likely generalizable, certainly within Canada but also across countries. This work constitutes, to our knowledge, the first attempt to present a full package of elements comprising high performance in health care PSRA. PMID:27367899

  8. Ethical priority setting for universal health coverage: challenges in deciding upon fair distribution of health services.

    PubMed

    Norheim, Ole F

    2016-01-01

    Priority setting is inevitable on the path towards universal health coverage. All countries experience a gap between their population's health needs and what is economically feasible for governments to provide. Can priority setting ever be fair and ethically acceptable? Fairness requires that unmet health needs be addressed, but in a fair order. Three criteria for priority setting are widely accepted among ethicists: cost-effectiveness, priority to the worse-off, and financial risk protection. Thus, a fair health system will expand coverage for cost-effective services and give extra priority to those benefiting the worse-off, whilst at the same time providing high financial risk protection. It is considered unacceptable to treat people differently according to their gender, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, social status, or place of residence. Inequalities in health outcomes associated with such personal characteristics are therefore unfair and should be minimized. This commentary also discusses a third group of contested criteria, including rare diseases, small health benefits, age, and personal responsibility for health, subsequently rejecting them. In conclusion, countries need to agree on criteria and establish transparent and fair priority setting processes. PMID:27170046

  9. Priority Planetary Science Missions Identified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. National Research Council's (NRC) planetary science decadal survey report, released on 7 March, lays out a grand vision for priority planetary science missions for 2013-2022 within a tightly constrained fiscal environment. The cost-conscious report, issued by NRC's Committee on the Planetary Science Decadal Survey, identifies high-priority flagship missions, recommends a number of potential midsized missions, and indicates support for some smaller missions. The report states that the highest-priority flagship mission for the decade is the Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C)—the first of three components of a NASA/European Space Agency Mars sample return campaign—provided that the mission scope can be reduced so that MAX-C costs no more than $2.5 billion. The currently estimated mission cost of $3.5 billion “would take up a disproportionate near-term share of the overall budget for NASA's Planetary Science Division,” the report notes.

  10. Inclusion Practice Priorities Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montie, Jo; And Others

    This instrument was developed to assist individuals or teams to review best practice indicators regarding the development of inclusive school communities and to establish priority targets for improvement. The instrument covers three areas: (1) school community issues, (2) team issues, and (3) classroom issues. For each area, there is a review…

  11. Rural Development: Research Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Larry R., Ed.

    Directed at the problem of providing equitable long term rural development, this collection of papers deals with the criteria on which research and educational priorities should be based, given the vast problems and limited resources in the U.S. today. There are 11 papers in this collection: "National Outlook and Perspective" (a plea for…

  12. Millennial Perspectives and Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therrell, James A.; Dunneback, Staci K.

    2015-01-01

    Through prioritizing student voice, this study investigated the perspectives of millennial students in relation to their preferences and priorities for how they desired to experience teaching and learning. While not experts, our assumption was that undergraduate students, because of their relatively long experience as students, would be closely in…

  13. Sifting Academic Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickeson, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    Cost control in higher education is hampered by the failure of governing boards to focus on the value and quality of academic programs, and barriers to board priority-setting are significant. However, boards must understand the need for reform, identify responsible administrative leadership, reaffirm institutional mission, define what constitutes…

  14. Priorities of Test Publishers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoepfner, Ralph; Doherty, William J.

    1973-01-01

    The profiles of seven major publishers of elementary-level tests were prepared from systematic ratings of the qualities of their tests. Meaningful rating differences among the publishers' priorities were found and three types of publishers could be identified and described. (Authors)

  15. Global conservation priorities for marine turtles.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bryan P; DiMatteo, Andrew D; Bolten, Alan B; Chaloupka, Milani Y; Hutchinson, Brian J; Abreu-Grobois, F Alberto; Mortimer, Jeanne A; Seminoff, Jeffrey A; Amorocho, Diego; Bjorndal, Karen A; Bourjea, Jérôme; Bowen, Brian W; Briseño Dueñas, Raquel; Casale, Paolo; Choudhury, B C; Costa, Alice; Dutton, Peter H; Fallabrino, Alejandro; Finkbeiner, Elena M; Girard, Alexandre; Girondot, Marc; Hamann, Mark; Hurley, Brendan J; López-Mendilaharsu, Milagros; Marcovaldi, Maria Angela; Musick, John A; Nel, Ronel; Pilcher, Nicolas J; Troëng, Sebastian; Witherington, Blair; Mast, Roderic B

    2011-01-01

    Where conservation resources are limited and conservation targets are diverse, robust yet flexible priority-setting frameworks are vital. Priority-setting is especially important for geographically widespread species with distinct populations subject to multiple threats that operate on different spatial and temporal scales. Marine turtles are widely distributed and exhibit intra-specific variations in population sizes and trends, as well as reproduction and morphology. However, current global extinction risk assessment frameworks do not assess conservation status of spatially and biologically distinct marine turtle Regional Management Units (RMUs), and thus do not capture variations in population trends, impacts of threats, or necessary conservation actions across individual populations. To address this issue, we developed a new assessment framework that allowed us to evaluate, compare and organize marine turtle RMUs according to status and threats criteria. Because conservation priorities can vary widely (i.e. from avoiding imminent extinction to maintaining long-term monitoring efforts) we developed a "conservation priorities portfolio" system using categories of paired risk and threats scores for all RMUs (n = 58). We performed these assessments and rankings globally, by species, by ocean basin, and by recognized geopolitical bodies to identify patterns in risk, threats, and data gaps at different scales. This process resulted in characterization of risk and threats to all marine turtle RMUs, including identification of the world's 11 most endangered marine turtle RMUs based on highest risk and threats scores. This system also highlighted important gaps in available information that is crucial for accurate conservation assessments. Overall, this priority-setting framework can provide guidance for research and conservation priorities at multiple relevant scales, and should serve as a model for conservation status assessments and priority-setting for

  16. Global Conservation Priorities for Marine Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bryan P.; DiMatteo, Andrew D.; Bolten, Alan B.; Chaloupka, Milani Y.; Hutchinson, Brian J.; Abreu-Grobois, F. Alberto; Mortimer, Jeanne A.; Seminoff, Jeffrey A.; Amorocho, Diego; Bjorndal, Karen A.; Bourjea, Jérôme; Bowen, Brian W.; Briseño Dueñas, Raquel; Casale, Paolo; Choudhury, B. C.; Costa, Alice; Dutton, Peter H.; Fallabrino, Alejandro; Finkbeiner, Elena M.; Girard, Alexandre; Girondot, Marc; Hamann, Mark; Hurley, Brendan J.; López-Mendilaharsu, Milagros; Marcovaldi, Maria Angela; Musick, John A.; Nel, Ronel; Pilcher, Nicolas J.; Troëng, Sebastian; Witherington, Blair; Mast, Roderic B.

    2011-01-01

    Where conservation resources are limited and conservation targets are diverse, robust yet flexible priority-setting frameworks are vital. Priority-setting is especially important for geographically widespread species with distinct populations subject to multiple threats that operate on different spatial and temporal scales. Marine turtles are widely distributed and exhibit intra-specific variations in population sizes and trends, as well as reproduction and morphology. However, current global extinction risk assessment frameworks do not assess conservation status of spatially and biologically distinct marine turtle Regional Management Units (RMUs), and thus do not capture variations in population trends, impacts of threats, or necessary conservation actions across individual populations. To address this issue, we developed a new assessment framework that allowed us to evaluate, compare and organize marine turtle RMUs according to status and threats criteria. Because conservation priorities can vary widely (i.e. from avoiding imminent extinction to maintaining long-term monitoring efforts) we developed a “conservation priorities portfolio” system using categories of paired risk and threats scores for all RMUs (n = 58). We performed these assessments and rankings globally, by species, by ocean basin, and by recognized geopolitical bodies to identify patterns in risk, threats, and data gaps at different scales. This process resulted in characterization of risk and threats to all marine turtle RMUs, including identification of the world's 11 most endangered marine turtle RMUs based on highest risk and threats scores. This system also highlighted important gaps in available information that is crucial for accurate conservation assessments. Overall, this priority-setting framework can provide guidance for research and conservation priorities at multiple relevant scales, and should serve as a model for conservation status assessments and priority-setting for

  17. Priority management system

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, W.A.

    1990-12-18

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This plant recovers Uranium-235 and rare gases from spent nuclear fuel. Improved fuel processing and waste management methods are also developed at this site. Facilities at ICPP include spent fuel storage and reprocessing areas, a waste solidification facility and related waste storage bins, remote analytical laboratories, and a coal-fired steam generation plant. Maintaining and modernizing a plant of this complexity presents difficult, but not unique problems in scheduling and resource management. WINCO accomplishes the many tasks inherent in any maintenance and construction program by using a Priority Management System. This system allows WINCO to provide integrated and systematic review of all aspects of design and construction, thus meeting customer requirements. This paper provides an overview of the priority setting process and necessary actions to fully implement the system.

  18. Differential Benefit of Statin in Secondary Prevention of Acute Myocardial Infarction according to the Level of Triglyceride and High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Cheol Hwan; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Wan; Kim, Jong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The differential benefit of statin according to the state of dyslipidemia has been sparsely investigated. We sought to address the efficacy of statin in secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) according to the level of triglyceride and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) on admission. Subjects and Methods Acute MI patients (24653) were enrolled and the total patients were divided according to level of triglyceride and HDL-C on admission: group A (HDL-C≥40 mg/dL and triglyceride<150 mg/dL; n=11819), group B (HDL-C≥40 mg/dL and triglyceride≥150 mg/dL; n=3329), group C (HDL-C<40 mg/dL and triglyceride<150 mg/dL; n=6062), and group D (HDL-C<40 mg/dL & triglyceride≥150 mg/dL; n=3443). We evaluated the differential efficacy of statin according to the presence or absence of component of dyslipidemia. The primary end points were major adverse cardiac events (MACE) for 2 years. Results Statin therapy significantly reduced the risk of MACE in group A (hazard ratio=0.676; 95% confidence interval: 0.582-0.785; p<0.001). However, the efficacy of statin was not prominent in groups B, C, or D. In a propensity-matched population, the result was similar. In particular, the benefit of statin in group A was different compared with group D (interaction p=0.042) Conclusion The benefit of statin in patients with MI was different according to the presence or absence of dyslipidemia. In particular, because of the insufficient benefit of statin in patients with MI and dyslipidemia, a different lipid-lowering strategy is necessary in these patients. PMID:27275169

  19. How to Establish Instructional Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railsback, C. E.

    Establishing instructional priorities in public schools is a worthwhile and important process. Because time and money are insufficient to increase staffing in schools, setting priorities is a necessary component of successful managing. Steps to be taken in setting instructional priorities are as follows: (1) Adopt a statement of mission describing…

  20. 40 CFR 35.1620-5 - State work programs and lake priority lists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State work programs and lake priority... Publicly Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1620-5 State work programs and lake priority lists. (a)(1) A State... lakes according to trophic condition (§ 35.1630) and to set priorities for implementing clean...

  1. 15 CFR 700.11 - Priority ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities § 700.11 Priority ratings. (a) Levels...

  2. Deontics = Betterness + Priority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Benthem, Johan; Grossi, Davide; Liu, Fenrong

    This paper looks at deontic logic as resulting from both a betterness ordering on states (i.e., a 'deontic preference') and a priority ordering on properties (i.e., a 'law' explicitly representing a standard of behavior). The correspondence between these two orderings offers a rich perspective from which to look at deontic scenarios and puzzles, and in particular at contrary-to-duties. The framework naturally lends itself to describing dynamics involving both orderings, thereby providing a new analysis of norm change as 'betterness change'.

  3. EVALUATION OF GLASS IONOMER SEALANTS PLACED ACCORDING TO THE ART APPROACH IN A COMMUNITY WITH HIGH CARIES EXPERIENCE: 1-YEAR FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Ana Luiza Falavinha; Zanella, Nildiceli Leite Melo; Bresciani, Eduardo; Barata, Terezinha de Jesus Esteves; da Silva, Salete Moura Bonifácio; Machado, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; Navarro, Maria Fidela de Lima

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the retention rates and effect on occlusal caries incidence of two glass ionomers used as sealants, placed according to the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach, in a high caries-risk community. A total of 150 newly erupted first molars of 42 schoolchildren, between 6-8 years of age were selected. The teeth were divided into two groups: experimental and control groups. In the experimental group, 76 teeth were sealed using Vidrion R-SS White (conventional GIC) and in the control group, 74 teeth were sealed using ChemFlex–Dentsply (high-viscosity conventional GIC). The sealants were applied by one operator following the "press finger technique", described in the ART-WHO manual. Two calibrated independent examiners carried out the evaluation according to the ART criteria. The intra and inter-examiner agreements were 0.84 and 0.81, respectively. Data were submitted to Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests (p<0.05). At the 1-year follow-up, 136 (90.7%) sealants were evaluated. In the control group: 28 (41.8%) of the sealants were partially or completely retained, 38 (56.7%) completely lost, and 1 (1.5%) was replaced by another treatment. In the experimental group, 30 (43.5%) of the sealants were partially or completely retained, 38 (55.1%) were clinically scored as complete loss and 1 (1.4%) were replaced by another treatment. Seven sealants in both groups were not evaluated. Secondary caries was not observed in both groups. There was no statistically significant difference between the retention (p=0.49) and effect on caries incidence rates for both groups (p=0.84). The clinical performance of the glass ionomer sealants of both groups was considered satisfactory with a high success rate (98.5%). Although the sealants placed according to the ART approach showed retention rates lower than 50% after 1 year in newly erupted first molars, this approach seems to be appropriate for communities with high caries experience. PMID

  4. 7 CFR 1465.4 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... identify national priorities to achieve the conservation objectives of AMA. (b) National priorities will be... priorities in conjunction with State and local priorities to prioritize and select AMA applications...

  5. Overuse and Underuse of Antiosteoporotic Treatments According to Highly Influential Osteoporosis Guidelines: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Sanfélix-Gimeno, Gabriel; Hurtado, Isabel; Sanfélix-Genovés, José; Baixauli-Pérez, Cristóbal; Rodríguez-Bernal, Clara L.; Peiró, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate prescribing of antiosteoporotic medications has been observed; however, the joint study of both overuse and underuse has barely been attempted. Spain, with its high utilization rates, constitutes a good example to assess differences in over and under use according to diverse highly-influential osteoporosis guidelines (HIOG) worldwide. We used data of a population-based cross-sectional study including 824 post-menopausal women ≥50 years old living in the city of Valencia, Spain and aimed to estimate the percentage of women eligible for treatment, and the proportion of overuse and underuse of antiosteoporotic treatment according to HIOG. The prevalence of antiosteoporotic treatment in postmenopausal women ≥ 50 in Valencia was 20.9% (95%CI:17.6–24.4). The type of antiosteoporotic drugs prescribed varied greatly depending on the medical specialty responsible of the initial prescription. When applying the HIOG, the percentage of women 50 and over who should be treated varied from less than 9% to over 44%. In real terms, from the approximately eight million women of 50 years old and over in Spain, the number eligible for treatment would range from 0.7 to 3.8 million, depending on the guideline used. A huge proportion of inappropriate treatments was found when applying these guidelines to the Spanish population, combining a high overuse (42–78% depending on the guideline used) and underuse (7–41%). In conclusion, we found that the pharmacological management of osteoporosis in women of 50 and over in this population combines an important overuse and, to a lesser extent, underuse, although the level of inappropriateness varied strikingly depending on the CPG used. It seems urgent to reduce treatment overuse without neglecting underuse, as is urgent an attempt to reach wider agreement worldwide regarding osteoporosis management, in order to facilitate appropriate treatment and development of policies to reduce effectively treatment inappropriateness

  6. Priority Queues for Computer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is embodied in new priority queue data structures for event list management of computer simulations, and includes a new priority queue data structure and an improved event horizon applied to priority queue data structures. ne new priority queue data structure is a Qheap and is made out of linked lists for robust, fast, reliable, and stable event list management and uses a temporary unsorted list to store all items until one of the items is needed. Then the list is sorted, next, the highest priority item is removed, and then the rest of the list is inserted in the Qheap. Also, an event horizon is applied to binary tree and splay tree priority queue data structures to form the improved event horizon for event management.

  7. Social Priorities as Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubert, E.

    2015-12-01

    Decision makers' responses to local risks and expected changes to a community from circumstances like natural hazards, human developments, and demographic changes can greatly affect social and environmental outcomes in a community. Translating physical data based in disciplines like engineering and geosciences into positive outcomes for communities can be challenging and often results in conflict that appears to pit "science" against "the public." Scientists can be reluctant to offer recommendations for action based on their work, often (and often correctly) noting that their role is not to make value judgments for a community - particularly for a community that is not their own. Conversely, decision makers can be frustrated by the lack of guidance they receive to help translate data into effective and acceptable action. The solution posed by this submission, given the goal of co-production of knowledge by scientists and decision makers to foster better community outcomes, is to involve the community directly by integrating social scientific methods that address decision making and community engagement to the scientist-decision maker interaction. Specifically, the missing dataset in many scientist-decision maker interactions is the nature of community priorities. Using scientifically valid methods to rigorously collect and characterize community priorities to help recommend tradeoffs between different outcomes indicated by the work of physical and natural scientists can bridge the gap between science and action by involving the community in the process. This submission presents early work on US preferences for different types of social and environmental outcomes designed to integrate directly with engineering and physical science frameworks like Life Cycle Assessment and Environmental Impact Statements. Cardinal preference data are based on surveys of US adults using tools like the Analytical Hierarchy Process, budget allocation, and ranking.

  8. Priority nutrition messages.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    The Philippine Food and Nutrition Program deliver priority short, simple, clear, and action filled nutrition messages in different languages and dialects to different audiences. Its 1st priority task is to promote breast feeding. It informs mothers that breast milk is the most nutritious food for infants and that it protects them from infectious diseases. The program also encourages breast feeding as long as possible. If mothers cannot breast feed, they should talk to an infant nutrition expert to help them choose the best formula and learn about proper preparation. A 4-6 month infant needs to begin eating small amounts of semisolid nutritious foods. Moreover these foods must include body building foods, such as meat and eggs, and energy providing foods, such as corn and rice. Mothers must 1st attend to food needs of infants and preschoolers since they are more likely to suffer malnutrition than older children and adults. This is especially important when they suffer from an infection. Specifically, the very young need a variety of foods each day including the vitamin and mineral rich vegetables and fruits. In fact, families should grow their own fruits and vegetables to ensure an adequate supply. Hands must be cleaned with soap and water after defecation and before preparing foods. Mothers should add fats and oils when preparing foods because they provide concentrated energy, fatty acids, and fat soluble vitamins. Pregnant mothers must consume increased amounts of fish, beans, and other body building foods as well as regulating foods (vegetables and fruits). Mothers must also space births. They should weigh children each month to monitor nutritional levels. Moreover they must pay attention to signs indicating inadequate and insufficient food intake e.g., underweight and night blindness. PMID:12284666

  9. School Discipline Inequities Become a Federal Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Federal officials are getting the word out that addressing racial disparities in school discipline is a high priority, and they plan to use "disparate-impact analysis" in enforcing school discipline cases--a legal course of action that some civil rights lawyers contend was neglected under the administration of President George W. Bush. In…

  10. Rethinking funding priorities in mental health research.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Betts, Virginia Trotter; Greenman, Lisa; Essock, Susan M; Escobar, Javier I; Barch, Deanna; Hogan, Michael F; Areán, Patricia A; Druss, Benjamin G; DiClemente, Ralph J; McGlashan, Thomas H; Jeste, Dilip V; Proctor, Enola K; Ruiz, Pedro; Rush, A John; Canino, Glorisa J; Bell, Carl C; Henry, Renata; Iversen, Portia

    2016-06-01

    Mental health research funding priorities in high-income countries must balance longer-term investment in identifying neurobiological mechanisms of disease with shorter-term funding of novel prevention and treatment strategies to alleviate the current burden of mental illness. Prioritising one area of science over others risks reduced returns on the entire scientific portfolio. PMID:27251688

  11. Priorities Statements of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    In response to recommendations in the Illinois Board of Higher Education's Priorities, Quality, and Productivity report of November 1994, the 52 community colleges in the state prepared priority statements detailing specific college objectives for the current fiscal year (FY). This report provides the second update of the colleges' statements,…

  12. Dreissenid mussel research priorities workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sytsma, Mark; Phillips, Stephen; Counihan, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    On November 4-5, 2015, a Dreissenid Mussel Research Priorities Workshop funded by the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative occurred at Portland State University. The purpose of the workshop was to update research priorities in the 2010 Quagga-Zebra Mussel Action Plan in light of the westward expansion of mussels in the United States and Canada.

  13. Microextraction of priority pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Leepipatriboon, S.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the priority pollutants, e.g., aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and halogenated alkanes and alkenes have been studied by a microextraction technique. The compounds studied were benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene for aromatic hydrocarbons; chlorobenzene, m-dichlorobenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, and o-dichlorobenzene for halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons; and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, choloroform, ethylene chloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, methylene chloride, bromodichloromethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, trichloroethylene and bromoform for halogenated alkanes and alkenes. The organic solvent-to-water sample ratios of study were 1:9, 5:5 and 8:2, respectively. Solvent extractability effect of carbon disulfide, methylene chloride and hexane or iso-octane and the effect of salts, e.g., saturated sodium chloride solution, saturated sodium sulfate solution, 2.00 g of sodium chloride and 2.00 g of sodium sulfate on the percent recovery were investigated in this study. This technique is based on the extraction into an organic solvent phase followed by the measurement of the peak area by a flame ionization detector. Gas chromatography and the internal standard technique were used throughout the stud. The gas chromatographic conditions for each system of study were reported. The standard deviation of this study ranged from 1-16%. The distribution constant, K{sub D}, and the results of percent recovery for each compound are discussed.

  14. Conservation priorities of Iberoamerican pig breeds and their ancestors based on microsatellite information.

    PubMed

    Cortés, O; Martinez, A M; Cañon, J; Sevane, N; Gama, L T; Ginja, C; Landi, V; Zaragoza, P; Carolino, N; Vicente, A; Sponenberg, P; Delgado, J V

    2016-07-01

    Criollo pig breeds are descendants from pigs brought to the American continent starting with Columbus second trip in 1493. Pigs currently play a key role in social economy and community cultural identity in Latin America. The aim of this study was to establish conservation priorities among a comprehensive group of Criollo pig breeds based on a set of 24 microsatellite markers and using different criteria. Spain and Portugal pig breeds, wild boar populations of different European geographic origins and commercial pig breeds were included in the analysis as potential genetic influences in the development of Criollo pig breeds. Different methods, differing in the weight given to within- and between-breed genetic variability, were used in order to estimate the contribution of each breed to global genetic diversity. As expected, the partial contribution to total heterozygosity gave high priority to Criollo pig breeds, whereas Weitzman procedures prioritized Iberian Peninsula breeds. With the combined within- and between-breed approaches, different conservation priorities were achieved. The Core Set methodologies highly prioritized Criollo pig breeds (Cr. Boliviano, Cr. Pacifico, Cr. Cubano and Cr. Guadalupe). However, weighing the between- and within-breed components with FST and 1-FST, respectively, resulted in higher contributions of Iberian breeds. In spite of the different conservation priorities according to the methodology used, other factors in addition to genetic information also need to be considered in conservation programmes, such as the economic, cultural or historical value of the breeds involved. PMID:27025169

  15. Discrepancies among Teachers' Priorities for and Knowledge of Freshwater Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Meyer, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    Teachers were asked to examine a list of water topics, assign a level of priority for their students to know about each topic, then report on their own knowledge level and the amount of teaching they do on the topics. Indicates that topics such as basic water properties and wetlands that had high priorities among teachers were not accompanied by…

  16. High modal number and triple trisomies are highly correlated favorable factors in childhood B-cell precursor high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the NOPHO ALL 1992/2000 protocols.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, Kajsa; Forestier, Erik; Andersen, Mette K; Autio, Kirsi; Barbany, Gisela; Borgström, Georg; Cavelier, Lucia; Golovleva, Irina; Heim, Sverre; Heinonen, Kristiina; Hovland, Randi; Johannsson, Johann H; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nordgren, Ann; Palmqvist, Lars; Johansson, Bertil

    2013-09-01

    Between 1992 and 2008, 713 high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemias in children aged 1-15 years were diagnosed and treated according to the Nordic Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology acute lymphoblastic leukemia 1992/2000 protocols. Twenty (2.8%) harbored t(1;19), t(9;22), der(11q23), or t(12;21). The median age of patients with "classic" high hyperdiploidy was lower than that of patients with translocation-positive high hyperdiploidy (P<0.001). Cases with triple trisomies (+4, +10, +17), comprising 50%, had higher modal numbers than the triple trisomy-negative cases (P<0.0001). The probabilities of event-free survival and overall survival were lower for those with white blood cell counts ≥ 50 × 10(9)/L (P=0.017/P=0.009), ≥ 5% bone marrow blasts at day 29 (P=0.001/0.002), and for high-risk patients (P<0.001/P=0.003), whereas event-free, but not overall, survival, was higher for cases with gains of chromosomes 4 (P<0.0001), 6 (P<0.003), 17 (P=0.010), 18 (P=0.049), and 22 (P=0.040), triple trisomies (P=0.002), and modal numbers >53/55 (P=0.020/0.024). In multivariate analyses, modal number and triple trisomies were significantly associated with superior event-free survival in separate analyses with age and white blood cell counts. When including both modal numbers and triple trisomies, only low white blood cell counts were significantly associated with superior event-free survival (P=0.009). We conclude that high modal chromosome numbers and triple trisomies are highly correlated prognostic factors and that these two parameters identify the same subgroup of patients characterized by a particularly favorable outcome. PMID:23645689

  17. High modal number and triple trisomies are highly correlated favorable factors in childhood B-cell precursor high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the NOPHO ALL 1992/2000 protocols

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Kajsa; Forestier, Erik; Andersen, Mette K.; Autio, Kirsi; Barbany, Gisela; Borgström, Georg; Cavelier, Lucia; Golovleva, Irina; Heim, Sverre; Heinonen, Kristiina; Hovland, Randi; Johannsson, Johann H.; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nordgren, Ann; Palmqvist, Lars; Johansson, Bertil

    2013-01-01

    Between 1992 and 2008, 713 high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemias in children aged 1–15 years were diagnosed and treated according to the Nordic Society for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology acute lymphoblastic leukemia 1992/2000 protocols. Twenty (2.8%) harbored t(1;19), t(9;22), der(11q23), or t(12;21). The median age of patients with “classic” high hyperdiploidy was lower than that of patients with translocation-positive high hyperdiploidy (P<0.001). Cases with triple trisomies (+4, +10, +17), comprising 50%, had higher modal numbers than the triple trisomy-negative cases (P<0.0001). The probabilities of event-free survival and overall survival were lower for those with white blood cell counts ≥50×109/L (P=0.017/P=0.009), ≥5% bone marrow blasts at day 29 (P=0.001/0.002), and for high-risk patients (P<0.001/P=0.003), whereas event-free, but not overall, survival, was higher for cases with gains of chromosomes 4 (P<0.0001), 6 (P<0.003), 17 (P=0.010), 18 (P=0.049), and 22 (P=0.040), triple trisomies (P=0.002), and modal numbers >53/55 (P=0.020/0.024). In multivariate analyses, modal number and triple trisomies were significantly associated with superior event-free survival in separate analyses with age and white blood cell counts. When including both modal numbers and triple trisomies, only low white blood cell counts were significantly associated with superior event-free survival (P=0.009). We conclude that high modal chromosome numbers and triple trisomies are highly correlated prognostic factors and that these two parameters identify the same subgroup of patients characterized by a particularly favorable outcome. PMID:23645689

  18. Global Priorities for Marine Biodiversity Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Selig, Elizabeth R.; Turner, Will R.; Troëng, Sebastian; Wallace, Bryan P.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Kaschner, Kristin; Lascelles, Ben G.; Carpenter, Kent E.; Mittermeier, Russell A.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, many marine populations have experienced major declines in abundance, but we still know little about where management interventions may help protect the highest levels of marine biodiversity. We used modeled spatial distribution data for nearly 12,500 species to quantify global patterns of species richness and two measures of endemism. By combining these data with spatial information on cumulative human impacts, we identified priority areas where marine biodiversity is most and least impacted by human activities, both within Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) and Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ). Our analyses highlighted places that are both accepted priorities for marine conservation like the Coral Triangle, as well as less well-known locations in the southwest Indian Ocean, western Pacific Ocean, Arctic and Antarctic Oceans, and within semi-enclosed seas like the Mediterranean and Baltic Seas. Within highly impacted priority areas, climate and fishing were the biggest stressors. Although new priorities may arise as we continue to improve marine species range datasets, results from this work are an essential first step in guiding limited resources to regions where investment could best sustain marine biodiversity. PMID:24416151

  19. Phylogenetically-Informed Priorities for Amphibian Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Nick J. B.; Redding, David W.; Meredith, Helen M.; Safi, Kamran

    2012-01-01

    The amphibian decline and extinction crisis demands urgent action to prevent further large numbers of species extinctions. Lists of priority species for conservation, based on a combination of species’ threat status and unique contribution to phylogenetic diversity, are one tool for the direction and catalyzation of conservation action. We describe the construction of a near-complete species-level phylogeny of 5713 amphibian species, which we use to create a list of evolutionarily distinct and globally endangered species (EDGE list) for the entire class Amphibia. We present sensitivity analyses to test the robustness of our priority list to uncertainty in species’ phylogenetic position and threat status. We find that both sources of uncertainty have only minor impacts on our ‘top 100‘ list of priority species, indicating the robustness of the approach. By contrast, our analyses suggest that a large number of Data Deficient species are likely to be high priorities for conservation action from the perspective of their contribution to the evolutionary history. PMID:22952807

  20. Flow injection combined with ICP-MS for accurate high throughput analysis of elemental impurities in pharmaceutical products according to USP <232>/<233>.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Lisa; Zipfel, Barbara; Koellensperger, Gunda; Kovac, Jessica; Bilz, Susanne; Kunkel, Andrea; Venzago, Cornel; Hann, Stephan

    2014-07-01

    New guidelines of the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), European Pharmacopeia (EP) and international organization (ICH, International Conference on Harmonization) regulating elemental impurity limits in pharmaceuticals seal the end of unspecific analysis of metal(oid)s as outlined in USP <231> and EP 2.4.8. Chapter USP <232> and EP 5.20 as well as drafts from ICH Q3D specify both daily doses and concentration limits of metallic impurities in pharmaceutical final products and in active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) and excipients. In chapters USP <233> and EP 2.4.20 method implementation, validation and quality control during the analytical process are described. By contrast with the--by now--applied methods, substance specific quantitative analysis features new basic requirements, further, significantly lower detection limits ask for the necessity of a general changeover of the methodology toward sensitive multi element analysis by ICP-AES and ICP-MS, respectively. A novel methodological approach based on flow injection analysis and ICP-SFMS/ICP-QMS for the quick and accurate analysis of Cd, Pb, As, Hg, Ir, Os, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru, Cr, Mo, Ni, V, Cu, Mn, Fe and Zn in drug products by prior dilution, dissolution or microwave assisted closed vessel digestion according to the regulations is presented. In comparison to the acquisition of continuous signals, this method is advantageous with respect to the unprecedented high sample throughput due to a total analysis time of approximately 30s and the low sample consumption of below 50 μL, while meeting the strict USP demands on detection/quantification limits, precision and accuracy. PMID:24667566

  1. A priority agenda for energy-related indoor environmental quality research

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Brager, G.; Brook, M.; Burge, H.; Cole, J.; Cummings, J.; Levin, H.; Loftness, V.; Logee, T.; Mendell, M.J.; Persily, A.; Taylor, S.; Zhang, J.

    2002-05-01

    A multidisciplinary team of IEQ and energy researchers is working together to define a program of priority energy-related IEQ research. This paper describes the methods employed, ten high priority broad research and development (R&D) goals, and 34 high priority R&D project areas linked to these goals.

  2. Congestion pricing by priority auction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guanxiang; He, Jianhua; Ma, Yajie; Cheng, Wenqing; Yang, Zongkai

    2005-02-01

    This paper analyzes a communication network facing users with a continuous distribution of delay cost per unit time. Priority queueing is often used as a way to provide differential services for users with different delay sensitivities. Delay is a key dimension of network service quality, so priority is a valuable resource which is limited and should to be optimally allocated. We investigate the allocation of priority in queues via a simple bidding mechanism. In our mechanism, arriving users can decide not to enter the network at all or submit an announced delay sensitive value. User entering the network obtains priority over all users who make lower bids, and is charged by a payment function which is designed following an exclusion compensation principle. The payment function is proved to be incentive compatible, so the equilibrium bidding behavior leads to the implementation of "cμ-rule". Social warfare or revenue maximizing by appropriately setting the reserve payment is also analyzed.

  3. Use of observed wild bird activity on poultry farms and a literature review to target species as high priority for avian influenza testing in 2 regions of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Theresa E.; Ribble, Carl; Stephen, Craig; Kelton, David; Toews, Lorraine; Osterhold, Jason; Wheeler, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    The risk of avian influenza outbreaks in poultry is partially dependent on the probability of contact between domestic poultry and wild birds shedding avian influenza (AI) virus. The major objective of this study was to document wild bird activity on poultry farms to determine which wild bird species should be targeted for AI surveillance in Canada. We collected data in 2 major poultry producing regions of Canada, southwestern Ontario and the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, on the relative abundance of various wild bird species found on poultry farms and on how these species utilized habitat around poultry farms. We reviewed the published literature to determine what was known about AI pathobiology in the species we observed. From these results we created a list of 10 wild bird species that are a priority for further study. These species are the European starling, barn swallow, rock dove, American crow, northwestern crow, American robin, dark-eyed junco, song sparrow, horned lark, and common grackle. Abundance of these and other species varied between provinces and seasons. PMID:22851777

  4. Norwegian Priority Setting in Practice – an Analysis of Waiting Time Patterns Across Medical Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    Gangstøe, Jurgita Januleviciute; Heggestad, Torhild; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different strategies for addressing the challenge of prioritizing elective patients efficiently and fairly have been introduced in Norway. In the time period studied, there were three possible outcomes for elective patients that had been through the process of priority setting: (i) high priority with assigned individual maximum waiting time; (ii) low priority without a maximum waiting time; and (iii) refusal (not in need for specialized services). We study variation in priority status and waiting time of the first two groups across different medical disciplines. Methods: Data was extracted from the Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) and contains information on elective referrals to 41 hospitals in the Western Norway Regional Health Authority in 2010. The hospital practice across different specialties was measured by patient priority status and waiting times. The distributions of assigned maximum waiting times and the actual ones were analyzed using standard Kernel density estimation. The perspective of the planning process was studied by measuring the time interval between the actual start of healthcare and the maximum waiting time. Results: Considerable variation was found across medical specialties concerning proportion of priority patients and their maximum waiting times. The degree of differentiation in terms of maximum waiting times also varied by medical discipline. We found that the actual waiting time was very close to the assigned maximum waiting time. Furthermore, there was no clear correspondence between the actual waiting time for patients and their priority status. Conclusion: Variations across medical disciplines are often interpreted as differences in clinical judgment and capacity. Alternatively they primarily reflect differences in patient characteristics, patient case-mix, as well as capacity. One hypothesis for further research is that the introduction of maximum waiting times may have contributed to push the actual waiting time towards

  5. Global health prioritiespriorities of the wealthy?

    PubMed Central

    Ollila, Eeva

    2005-01-01

    Health has gained importance on the global agenda. It has become recognized in forums where it was once not addressed. In this article three issues are considered: global health policy actors, global health priorities and the means of addressing the identified health priorities. I argue that the arenas for global health policy-making have shifted from the public spheres towards arenas that include the transnational for-profit sector. Global health policy has become increasingly fragmented and verticalized. Infectious diseases have gained ground as global health priorities, while non-communicable diseases and the broader issues of health systems development have been neglected. Approaches to tackling the health problems are increasingly influenced by trade and industrial interests with the emphasis on technological solutions. PMID:15847685

  6. SUSY Les Houches Accord 2

    SciTech Connect

    Allanach, B.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Bernhardt, M.; Boudjema, F.; Choudhury, D.; Desch, K.; Ellwanger, U.; Gambino, P.; Godbole, R.; Goto, T.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Monash U. /Annecy, LAPTH /Bonn U. /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Orsay, LPT /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /KEK, Tsukuba /Barcelona U.

    2007-11-08

    The Supersymmetry Les Houches Accord (SLHA) [1] provides a universal set of conventions for conveying spectral and decay information for supersymmetry analysis problems in high energy physics. Here, we propose extensions of the conventions of the first SLHA to include various generalizations: the minimal supersymmetric standard model with violation of CP, R-parity, and flavor, as well as the simplest next-to-minimal model.

  7. SUSY Les Houches Accord 2

    SciTech Connect

    Allanach, B.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Bernhardt, M.; Boudjema, F.; Choudhury, D.; Desch, K.; Ellwanger, U.; Gambino, P.; Godbole, R.; Goto, T.; Guasch, J.; Guchait, M.; Hahn, T.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hugonie, C.; Hurth, T.; Kraml, S.; Kreiss, S.; Lykken, J.; Moortgat, F.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Monash U. /Annecy, LAPTH /Bonn U. /Harish-Chandra Res. Inst. /Orsay, LPT /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /KEK, Tsukuba /Barcelona U. /Tata Inst. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Montpellier U. /CERN /SLAC /Edinburgh U. /Fermilab /Zurich, ETH /Southampton U.

    2007-11-08

    The Supersymmetry Les Houches Accord (SLHA) provides a universal set of conventions for conveying spectral and decay information for supersymmetry analysis problems in high energy physics. Here, we propose extensions of the conventions of the first SLHA to include various generalizations: the minimal supersymmetric standard model with violation of CP, R-parity, and flavor, as well as the simplest next-to-minimal model.

  8. Setting priorities for safeguards upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Patenaude, C.J.; Sicherman, A.

    1987-07-10

    This paper describes an analytic approach and a computer program for setting priorities among safeguards upgrades. The approach provides safeguards decision makers with a systematic method for allocating their limited upgrade resources. The priorities are set based on the upgrades cost and their contribution to safeguards effectiveness. Safeguards effectiveness is measured by the probability of defeat for a spectrum of potential insider and outsider adversaries. The computer program, MI$ER, can be used alone or as a companion to ET and SAVI, programs designed to evaluate safeguards effectiveness against insider and outsider threats, respectively. Setting the priority requires judgments about the relative importance (threat likelihoods and consequences) of insider and outsider threats. Although these judgments are inherently subjective, MI$ER can analyze the sensitivity of the upgrade priorities to these weights and determine whether or not they are critical to the priority ranking. MI$ER produces tabular and graphical results for comparing benefits and identifying the most cost-effective upgrades for a given expenditure. This framework provides decision makers with an explicit and consistent analysis to support their upgrades decisions and to allocate the safeguards resources in a cost-effective manner.

  9. Setting priorities for safeguards upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.; Patenaude, C.J.; Sicherman, A.

    1987-07-01

    This paper describes an analytic approach and a computer program for setting priorities among safeguards upgrades. The approach provides safeguards decision makers with a systematic method for allocating their limited upgrade resources. The priorities are set based on the upgrades cost and their contribution to safeguards effectiveness. Safeguards effectiveness is measured by the probability of defeat for a spectrum of potential insider and outsider adversaries. The computer program, MI$ER, can be used alone or as a companion to ET and SAVI, programs designed to evaluate safeguards effectiveness against insider and outsider threats, respectively. Setting the priority required judgments about the relative importance (threat likelihoods and consequences) of insider and outsider threats. Although these judgments are inherently subjective, MI$ER can analyze the sensitivity of the upgrade priorities to these weights and determine whether or not they are critical to the priority ranking. MI$ER produces tabular and graphical results for comparing benefits and identifying the most cost-effective upgrades for a given expenditure. This framework provides decision makers with an explicit and consistent analysis to support their upgrades decisions and to allocate the safeguards resources in a cost-effective manner.

  10. Research priorities in medical education: A national study

    PubMed Central

    Tootoonchi, Mina; Yamani, Nikoo; Changiz, Tahereh; Yousefy, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One preliminary step to strengthen medical education research would be determining the research priorities. The aim of this study was to determine the research priorities of medical education in Iran in 2007-2008. METHODS: This descriptive study was carried out in two phases. Phase one was performed in 3 stages and used Delphi technique among academic staffs of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The three stages included a brainstorming workshop for 140 faculty members and educational experts resulting in a list of research priorities, then, in the second and third stages 99 and 76 questionnaires were distributed among faculty members. In the second phase, the final questionnaires were mailed to educational research center managers of universities type I, II and III, and were distributed among 311 academic members and educational experts to rate the items on a numerical scale ranging from 1 to 10. RESULTS: The most important research priorities included faculty members’ development methods, faculty members’ motives, satisfaction and welfare, criteria and procedures of faculty members’ promotion, teaching methods and learning techniques, job descriptions and professional skills of graduates, quality management in education, second language, clinical education, science production in medicine, faculty evaluation and information technology. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows the medial education research priorities in national level and in different types of medical universities in Iran. It is recommended that faculty members and research administrators consider the needs and requirements of education and plan the researches in education according to these priorities. PMID:23248661

  11. Priorities in Urban Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, James A.

    The disparities in urban/nonurban education can be changed through community participation and a redistribution of educational revenues. The high positive correlation of race and economic class to school achievement is the most pressing concern of education today. Public pressure is necessary to resist the tendency toward bureaucratic isolation of…

  12. Evolving Perspectives on Monopolization and Priority Effects.

    PubMed

    De Meester, Luc; Vanoverbeke, Joost; Kilsdonk, Laurens J; Urban, Mark C

    2016-02-01

    Biologists are often confronted with high levels of unexplained variation when studying the processes that determine genetic and species diversity. Here, we argue that eco-evolutionary interactions might often play an important role during colonization and have longstanding effects on populations and communities. Adaptation following colonization can produce a strong positive feedback loop that promotes priority effects and context-dependent trajectories of population or species assembly. We establish how monopolization, and more generally evolution-mediated priority effects, influence ecological patterns at multiple scales of space, time, and biological organization. We then highlight the underappreciated implications for our understanding of population and landscape genetics, adaptive evolution, community diversity, biogeography, and conservation biology. We indicate multiple future directions for research, including extending theory beyond competition. PMID:26778169

  13. International survey of nursing home research priorities.

    PubMed

    Morley, John E; Caplan, Gideon; Cesari, Matteo; Dong, Birong; Flaherty, Joseph H; Grossberg, George T; Holmerova, Iva; Katz, Paul R; Koopmans, Raymond; Little, Milta O; Martin, Finbarr; Orrell, Martin; Ouslander, Joseph; Rantz, Marilyn; Resnick, Barbara; Rolland, Yves; Tolson, Debbie; Woo, Jean; Vellas, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    This article reports the findings of a policy survey designed to establish research priorities to inform future research strategy and advance nursing home practice. The survey was administered in 2 rounds during 2013, and involved a combination of open questions and ranking exercises to move toward consensus on the research priorities. A key finding was the prioritization of research to underpin the care of people with cognitive impairment/dementia and of the management of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia within the nursing home. Other important areas were end-of-life care, nutrition, polypharmacy, and developing new approaches to putting evidence-based practices into routine practice in nursing homes. It explores possible innovative educational approaches, reasons why best practices are difficult to implement, and challenges faced in developing high-quality nursing home research. PMID:24703926

  14. Accounting and Financial Planning--Top Priorities for School Business Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Donald L.

    Success for the business administrator depends largely on ability to identify priorities and to direct time, energy, and know-how accordingly. This study attempted to find out the priorities of the tasks of accounting and financial planning for school business administrators and the precise nature of the school business administrator's…

  15. Priorities Statements of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    Each year since 1994, the 52 community colleges in Illinois prepare priority statements detailing specific college objectives for the current fiscal year (FY). This report provides the third update of the colleges' statements, covering FY 1998. Brief statements, from one to four pages, are provided for the following colleges: Belleville Area…

  16. National Institutional Priorities Report, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This document reports on a study that gathered information about how colleges and universities view their effectiveness in meeting the expectations of their students. By quantifying the importance that faculty, staff, and administrators place on student expectations, the institution is able to pinpoint its strengths and to assign priorities for…

  17. Setting Priorities for NIOSH Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Richard E.

    1975-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is attempting to develop total programs of occupational safety and health protection. It has established research criteria and a priority system for evaluating the order of investigating suspect substances or agents based upon the expected gain of the health benefit. (Author/MW)

  18. Systemwide Communications Plan and Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Ann

    The Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges has repeatedly identified the strengthening of communications as a key component to developing the California Community Colleges (CCC) as a system. The genesis of communications planning, activities and priorities took place in 1989 with the Burson-Marsteller Communications Action Plan,…

  19. National Priorities for Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruff, Richard D.; And Others

    National priorities exist that can be served through federal legislation for the funding of vocational education. Four alternatives that are examples of national needs that vocational education would appear to have a potential to address are (1) training and retraining of workers in national critical skill shortage occupations, (2) training and…

  20. National Priorities List book set

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The report provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) sites. The set of documents compiles State-Specific site summary fact sheets on each site being cleaned up under the Superfund program. The individual state sites are available as PB91-921207, and PB91-921209 thru PB91-921258.

  1. National Institutional Priorities Report, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This report describes the seventh annual National Institutional Priorities Study conducted to determine the perceptions of faculty, administration, and staff regarding areas of highest importance and areas of greatest and least agreement on meeting student expectations. Also identified were the greatest performance gaps between levels of…

  2. National Institutional Priorities Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This report describes the sixth annual National Institutional Priorities Study conducted to determine the perceptions of faculty, administration, and staff regarding areas of highest important and areas of greatest and least agreement on meeting student expectations. Also identified were the greatest performance gaps between levels of importance…

  3. Enrollees Choose Priorities for Medicare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danis, Marion; Biddle, Andrea K.; Goold, Susan Dorr

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility and results of ascertaining Medicare enrollees' priorities for insured medical benefits. Design and Methods: Structured group exercises were conducted with Medicare enrollees from clinical and community settings in central North Carolina. By participating in a decision exercise,…

  4. Science Indicators and Science Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Harvey

    1982-01-01

    Discusses science/society interface and difficulties involved in developing realistic science indicators. Topics include: intrinsic vs. extrinsic indicators; four problems society faces as a result of technological activities (toxic chemicals, radioactive wastes, auto safety, cancer); research and development (R&D) priorities; international…

  5. Clinical Experiences of Incidental Prostate Cancer after Transurethral Resection of Prostate (TURP) According to Initial Treatment: A Study of a Korean High Volume Center

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Chung, Doo Yong; Lee, Kwang-suk; Kim, In Kyong; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Chung, Byung Ha; Hong, Sung Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose These are the clinical experiences of Korean incidental prostate cancer patients detected by transurethral resection of the prostate according to initial treatment: active surveillance (AS), radical prostatectomy (RP) and hormone therapy (HT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 156 incidental prostate cancer patients between 2001 and 2012. The clinicopathologic outcomes were reviewed and follow-up results were obtained. Results Among 156 patients, 97 (62.2%) had T1a and 59 (37.8%) had T1b. Forty-six (29.5%) received AS, 67 (42.9%) underwent RP, 34 (21.8%) received HT, 4 (2.6%) received radiotherapy, and 5 (3.2%) chose watchful waiting. Of 46 patients on AS, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression occurred in 12 (26.1%) patients. Among them, 3 patients refused treatment despite PSA progression. Five patients, who underwent RP as an intervention, all had organ-confined Gleason score ≤6 disease. In 67 patients who underwent RP, 50 (74.6%) patients had insignificant prostate cancer and 8 (11.9%) patients showed unfavorable features. During follow-up, biochemical recurrence occurred in 2 patients. Among 34 patients who received HT, 3 (8.8%) patients had PSA progression. Among 156 patients, 6 patients died due to other causes during follow-up. There were no patients who died due to prostate cancer. Conclusion The clinical outcomes of incidental prostate cancer were satisfactory regardless of the initial treatment. However, according to recent researches and guidelines, immediate definite therapy should be avoided without a careful assessment. We also believe that improved clinical staging is needed for these patients. PMID:24339290

  6. Reexamining competitive priorities: Empirical study in service sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Fazli; Mohammad, Jihad

    2015-02-01

    The general objective of this study is to validate the multi-level concept of competitive priorities using reflective-formative model at a higher order for service industries. An empirical study of 228 firms from 9 different service industries is conducted to answer the objective of this study. Partial least square analysis with SmartPLS 2.0 was used to perform the analysis. Finding revealed six priorities: cost, flexibility, delivery, quality talent management, quality tangibility, and innovativeness. It emerges that quality are expanded into two types; one is related to managing talent for process improvement and the second one is the physical appearance and tangibility of the service quality. This study has confirmed competitive priorities as formative second-order hierarchical latent construct by using rigorous empirical evidence. Implications, limitation and suggestion for future research are accordingly discussed in this paper.

  7. Adult immunization priorities in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S

    1996-01-01

    Pneumonia and influenza (P&I) are the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Despite universal coverage under Medicare, one-half to three-quarters of elderly adults fail to get vaccinated against P&I disease. Hepatitis B vaccine is also widely underutilized by adults. Although more than 100 times as many adults as children die from vaccine-preventable disease, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) currently allocates the vast majority of federal immunization funds to childhood programs. Top CDC officials say this is in accordance with the will of the Congress and the President. However, analysis of legislative documents shows that there is no legal bar or restriction to the use of federal funds to support adult immunization. CDC has the authority to use federal immunization funds to enhance adult immunization services, but the agency has yet to make adult immunization a priority. A commentary follows. PMID:8632737

  8. Photovoltaic-cell-research priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, J.G.; Hien, L.K.; Silberglitt, R.

    1983-09-30

    The current state of research and development on photovoltaic materials and advanced concepts are reviewed, and priority research activities for improved photovoltaic cells in the major individual research areas (i.e., silicon, III-V materials, II-VI materials) are identified. Also noted is the importance of reserving a small but finite portion of photovoltaic research funding for out-of-the-mainstream research. The major features of a research management philosophy aimed at attracting the best available scientific resources and research capabilities to photovoltaic research and development are outlined. The priority research activities in the principal areas of photovoltaic research are then summarized and compared, and the overall conclusions of the assessment are presented. (LEW)

  9. Physics Teachers' Behavioral, Control and Normative Beliefs about Teaching Physics According to the National High School Physics Curriculum in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapucu, Serkan; Yildirim, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    In Turkey, a new Turkish High School Physics Curriculum (THSPC) was put into practice, starting initially with the Grade 9 in the 2008-2009 education-year. When compared with the previous ones, this curriculum emphasized the importance of students' active involvement in learning, use of real-life contexts and development of new skills. Even…

  10. Teaching High School Physical Education According to National Standards: The 6 Verbs of Success--Demonstrate, Understand, Participate, Achieve, Exhibit and Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bert, Greg

    2010-01-01

    The six national content standards from NASPE define what a student should know and be able to do as a result of a high quality physical education program. The "NASPE SIX" serve as a North Star to guide teachers as they prepare and implement programs. Simply stated, the NASPE Standards for Physical Education are all about six simple verbs: (1)…

  11. National Priorities List sites: Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  12. National Priorities List sites: Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  13. National Priorities List sites: Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  14. National Priorities List sites: Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  15. National Priorities List sites: Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  16. National Priorities List sites: Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  17. National Priorities List sites: Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  18. National Priorities List sites: Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  19. National Priorities List sites: Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  20. National Priorities List sites: Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  1. National Priorities List sites: Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  2. National Priorities List sites: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  3. National Priorities List sites: Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  4. National Priorities List sites: Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  5. National Priorities List sites: Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  6. National Priorities List sites: Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  7. National Priorities List sites: Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  8. National Priorities List sites: Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  9. National Priorities List sites: Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  10. National Priorities List sites: Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  11. National Priorities List sites: Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  12. National Priorities List sites: Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  13. National Priorities List sites: Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  14. National Priorities List sites: Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  15. National Priorities List sites: Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  16. National Priorities List sites: Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  17. National Priorities List sites: Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  18. National Priorities List sites: California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  19. National Priorities List sites: Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  20. National Priorities List sites: Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  1. National Priorities List sites: Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  2. National Priorities List sites: Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  3. National Priorities List sites: Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  4. National Priorities List sites: Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  5. National Priorities List sites: Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  6. National Priorities List sites: Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  7. National Priorities List sites: Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  8. National Priorities List sites: Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  9. Priorities in pediatric epilepsy research

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Christine B.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Vickrey, Barbara G.; Dlugos, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The Priorities in Pediatric Epilepsy Research workshop was held in the spirit of patient-centered and patient-driven mandates for developing best practices in care, particularly for epilepsy beginning under age 3 years. The workshop brought together parents, representatives of voluntary advocacy organizations, physicians, allied health professionals, researchers, and administrators to identify priority areas for pediatric epilepsy care and research including implementation and testing of interventions designed to improve care processes and outcomes. Priorities highlighted were 1) patient outcomes, especially seizure control but also behavioral, academic, and social functioning; 2) early and accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment; 3) role and involvement of parents (communication and shared decision-making); and 4) integration of school and community organizations with epilepsy care delivery. Key factors influencing pediatric epilepsy care included the child's impairments and seizure presentation, parents, providers, the health care system, and community systems. Care was represented as a sequential process from initial onset of seizures to referral for comprehensive evaluation when needed. We considered an alternative model in which comprehensive care would be utilized from onset, proactively, rather than reactively after pharmacoresistance became obvious. Barriers, including limited levels of evidence about many aspects of diagnosis and management, access to care—particularly epilepsy specialty and behavioral health care—and implementation, were identified. Progress hinges on coordinated research efforts that systematically address gaps in knowledge and overcoming barriers to access and implementation. The stakes are considerable, and the potential benefits for reduced burden of refractory epilepsy and lifelong disabilities may be enormous. PMID:23966254

  10. Research Priorities in Spasmodic Dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.; Adler, Charles H.; Berke, Gerald S.; Bielamowicz, Steven A.; Blitzer, Andrew; Bressman, Susan B.; Hallett, Mark; Jinnah, H. A.; Juergens, Uwe; Martin, Sandra B.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Sapienza, Christine; Singleton, Andrew; Tanner, Caroline M.; Woodson, Gayle E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify research priorities for increasing understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and improved treatment of spasmodic dysphonia. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING A multidisciplinary working group was formed including both scientists and clinicians from multiple disciplines, otolaryngology, neurology, speech pathology, genetics and neuroscience, to review currently available information on spasmodic dysphonia and to identify research priorities. RESULTS Operational definitions for spasmodic dysphonia at different levels of certainty were recommended for diagnosis and recommendations made for a multi-center multidisciplinary validation study. CONCLUSIONS The highest priority is to characterize the disorder and identify risk factors that may contribute to its onset. Future research should compare and contrast spasmodic dysphonia with other forms of focal dystonia. Development of animal models is recommended to explore hypotheses related to pathogenesis. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of SD should provide the basis for developing new treatment options and exploratory clinical trials. SIGNIFICANCE This document should foster future research to improve the care of patients with this chronic debilitating voice and speech disorder by otolaryngology, neurology, and speech pathology. PMID:18922334

  11. Priority Pollutants: I. A Perspective View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Larry H.; Telliard, William A.

    1979-01-01

    This article relates the historical origins of the EPA's Priority Pollutants list and the development of the Priority Pollutant Protocol. Then, it summarizes the status of the current analytical procedures in their present and still-developing forms. (BB)

  12. High Density of Aligned Nanowire Treated with Polydopamine for Efficient Gene Silencing by siRNA According to Cell Membrane Perturbation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Baiju G; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ueda, Motoki; Yu, Hsiao-Hua; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-27

    High aspect ratio nanomaterials, such as vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) substrates, are three-dimensional topological features for cell manipulations. A high density of SiNWs significantly affects not only cell adhesion and proliferation but also the delivery of biomolecules to cells. Here, we used polydopamine (PD) that simply formed a thin coating on various material surfaces by the action of dopamine as a bioinspired approach. The PD coating not only enhanced cell adhesion, spreading, and growth but also anchored more siRNA by adsorption and provided more surface concentration for substrate-mediated delivery. By comparing plain and SiNW surfaces with the same amount of loaded siRNA, we quantitatively found that PD coating efficiently anchored siRNA on the surface, which knocked down the expression of a specific gene by RNA interference. It was also found that the interaction of SiNWs with the cell membrane perturbed the lateral diffusion of lipids in the membrane by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The perturbation was considered to induce the effective delivery of siRNA into cells and allow the cells to carry out their biological functions. These results suggest promising applications of PD-coated, high-density SiNWs as simple, fast, and versatile platforms for transmembrane delivery of biomolecules. PMID:27420034

  13. Effects of solar proton events in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region according to the data of meteo radar wind measurements at high and middle latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, A. N.; Makarov, N. A.; Merzlyakov, E. G.

    2016-03-01

    Data from meteo radar measurements of the wind in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region at high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere (Molodezhnaya station, 68° S, 45° E) and at middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (Obninsk station, 55° N, 37° E) during solar proton events that took place in 1989, 1991, 2000, 2005, and 2012 are analyzed in the paper. In 1989 and 1991, we succeeded in observing the response to solar proton evens at both stations simultaneously. The results show that solar proton events lead to a change in the wind regime of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. At high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, significant changes are observed in the values of the velocities of the meridional and zonal components of the prevailing wind. In the case of powerful solar proton events, the amplitude of the semidiurnal tide grows in the vicinity of the proton flux maximum. The response to these events depends on the season. The reaction of the prevailing wind at middle latitudes shows the same features as the reaction of the wind at high latitudes. However no unambiguous response of the tide amplitude is observed. In the summer season, even powerful events (for example, in July 2000) cause no changes in the wind regime parameters in the midlatitude region of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere.

  14. [Features of food priorities in urban population of Kazakhstan in regard of consumption of foods with high glycemic index and significant content of fat].

    PubMed

    Akhmetova, S V; Terekhin, S P

    2015-01-01

    The diseases, associated with metabolism disorders, are now considered as the most common in the world, their prevalence has reached epidemic indicator values in both developed and developing countries. One of the most important methods of treatment and correction of dyslipidemic disorders and disorders of carbohydrate metabolism is the changing of eating behavior, including the literacy of consumers when choosing foods. The most significant indicators of the value of products for patients with metabolic disorders are the glycemic index and fat content. The frequency of consumption of foods with high glycemic index and significant content of fat in urban population of Kazakhstan has been investigated. A random, stratified by sex and age sampling from the number of residents (n=8219) of large cities of Kazakhstan at the age of 18-73 years has been covered. The study was performed using a specially designed questionnaire, including detailed questions on assessment of eating behavior, eating habits and diet. It has been revealed that foods with a high glycemic index and significant fat content are the predominant in frequency of consumption by the urban population of Kazakhstan. About 90% of the citizens consumed bread and bakery products daily or several times a week. Pies, cakes and cookies are consumed daily or several times per week by 35% of the surveyed, pasta products--57%, cereals--68% of the urban population. Average daily diet of fruit and vegetable set of urban residents of Kazakhstan represented 80% of the potatoes, carrots and beets. Tea and coffee admission is traditionally combined with the intake of sugar and sweets. More than 70% of surveyed population consume butter daily or several times a week. The excessive intake of foods with a large amount of fat and high glycemic index against the background of the deficiency of complete protein remains an urgent problem for several years. The obtained results dictate the need of development and implementation

  15. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. Results The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94–106% in atomic absorption and 97–103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6–5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9–6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference

  16. Signs of interaction of the NGC 1275 nucleus with the high-velocity system according to 0.7 sec seeing observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudinov, V. N.; Tsvetkova, V. S.; Novikov, S. B.; Pronik, I. I.

    1990-01-01

    The nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275 was observed in the B system on 1 December 1989 with seeing 0, 7 seconds using the Zeiss-1000 telescope on Mount Majdanak in Central Asia. Special methods of processing reveal low-contrast details. The nucleus and circumnucleus are stretched in NW-SE direction. There are two narrow filaments near the nucleus in position angles roughly 340 degrees and 320 degrees. The first is directed near the radio jet of the nucleus, the second has broken details curved to the NW or toward the high-velocity system of NGC 1275.

  17. 40 CFR 60.16 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Priority list. 60.16 Section 60.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.16 Priority list. Prioritized Major Source Categories Priority Number 1...

  18. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  19. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  20. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  1. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  2. 7 CFR 632.12 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding priorities. 632.12 Section 632.12 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Qualifications § 632.12 Funding priorities. (a) All eligible applications within a State are to be assigned a funding priority and...

  3. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project priority. 1778.7 Section 1778.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph (d... to determine the proposed project's priority for available funds. (b) State Office review....

  4. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Project priority. 1778.7 Section 1778.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph (d... to determine the proposed project's priority for available funds. (b) State Office review....

  5. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Project priority. 1778.7 Section 1778.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph (d... to determine the proposed project's priority for available funds. (b) State Office review....

  6. 7 CFR 1778.7 - Project priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project priority. 1778.7 Section 1778.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.7 Project priority. Paragraph (d... to determine the proposed project's priority for available funds. (b) State Office review....

  7. 40 CFR 60.16 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Priority list. 60.16 Section 60.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.16 Priority list. Prioritized Major Source Categories Priority Number 1...

  8. 40 CFR 60.16 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Priority list. 60.16 Section 60.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.16 Priority list. Prioritized Major Source Categories Priority Number 1...

  9. Overcoming barriers to priority setting using interdisciplinary methods.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Stuart; Mitton, Craig; Bate, Angela; McCoy, Bonnie; Donaldson, Cam

    2009-10-01

    Ten years ago, Holm's highly influential paper "Goodbye to the simple solutions: the second phase of priority setting" was published [Holm S. Goodbye to the simple solutions: the second phase of priority setting in health care. British Medical Journal 1998;317:1000-7]. Whilst attending the 2nd International Conference on Priorities in Health Care in London, Holm argued that the search for a rational set of decision-making rules was no longer adequate. Instead, the priority setting process itself was now thought to be more complex. Ten years later, the Conference returns to the UK for the first time, and it is timely to describe some new tools intended to assist both researchers and decision-makers seeking to develop both rational and fair and legitimate priority setting processes. In this paper we argue that to do so, researchers and decision-makers need to adopt an interdisciplinary and collaborative approach to priority setting. We focus on program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) and bring together three hitherto separate interdisciplinary strands of the PBMA literature. Our aim is to assist researchers and decision-makers seeking to effectively develop and implement PBMA in practice. Specifically, we focus on the use of multi-criteria decision analysis, participatory action research, and accountability for reasonableness, drawn from the disciplines of decision analysis, sociology, and ethics respectively. PMID:19346024

  10. Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training Range–South (UTTR–S)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

    2012-04-01

    the graben in areas with temperatures as high as 140 C (284 F). In conclusion, all of the field data collected during 2011 and documented in the Appendices of this report indicate that there is reasonable potential for a viable geothermal resource along faults that bound the Wendover graben. Prospects for a system capable of binary electrical generation are especially good, and the possibility of a flash steam system is also within reason. The next steps should focus on securing the necessary funding for detailed geophysical surveys and for drilling a set of temperature gradient wells to further evaluate the resource, and to focus deep exploration efforts in the most promising areas.

  11. Metabolic profiling of plant extracts using direct-injection electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allows for high-throughput phenotypic characterization according to genetic and environmental effects.

    PubMed

    García-Flores, Martín; Juárez-Colunga, Sheila; García-Casarrubias, Adrián; Trachsel, Samuel; Winkler, Robert; Tiessen, Axel

    2015-01-28

    In comparison to the exponential increase of genotyping methods, phenotyping strategies are lagging behind in agricultural sciences. Genetic improvement depends upon the abundance of quantitative phenotypic data and the statistical partitioning of variance into environmental, genetic, and random effects. A metabolic phenotyping strategy was adapted to increase sample throughput while saving reagents, reducing cost, and simplifying data analysis. The chemical profiles of stem extracts from maize plants grown under low nitrogen (LN) or control trial (CT) were analyzed using optimized protocols for direct-injection electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DIESI-MS). Specific ions significantly decreased or increased because of environmental (LN versus CT) or genotypic effects. Biochemical profiling with DIESI-MS had a superior cost-benefit compared to other standard analytical technologies (e.g., ultraviolet, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection) routinely used for plant breeding. The method can be successfully applied in maize, strawberry, coffee, and other crop species. PMID:25588121

  12. Milk yield and estrous behavior during eight consecutive estruses in Holstein cows fed standardized or high energy diets and grouped according to live weight changes in early lactation.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, C; Barbu, H; Sørensen, M T; Sehested, J; Callesen, H; Vestergaard, M

    2016-04-01

    Cows managed for extended lactation go through several estruses before rebreeding. The aims of this study were (1) to quantify the effect of the first 8 estruses after calving on milk yield, milking frequency, and estrous behavioral activity, and (2) to determine the effects of early lactation live weight gain (LWG) as an indication of energy balance on milk yield, plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentration, estrous behavioral activity, interval from calving to first estrus, between-estrus intervals, and pregnancy risk. Milk yield, live weight, and estrous behavioral activity were measured daily in 62 Holstein cows, 17 primiparous and 45 multiparous, managed for an 18-mo calving interval. Blood plasma obtained at wk 3, 5, 12, and 24 after calving was analyzed for IGF-1. Estrus was detected by use of milk progesterone profiles combined with visual observations (i.e., mounting behavior and other). The cows were divided into 2 groups: the cows having a negative LWG in each of the first 5wk postpartum and the cows having a positive LWG in at least 1 of the first 5wk after calving. The results indicate a similar decrease of 0.56kg of milk per day of estrus during each of the 8 consecutive estruses. The activity level was 17±1 movements per hour higher during the 8 estruses compared with the basic activity level. More cows expressed mounting behavior at estrus 8 than at estrus 2 (63.3 and 45.9%, respectively). The negative LWG cows had lower IGF-1 and higher milk production than the positive LWG cows. Both LWG groups had similar interval from calving to first estrus, on average 55 d. To conclude, the decrease in milk yield during estrus is marginal and similar in consecutive estruses. Moreover, estrous behavior is more highly expressed in the later estruses compared with the earlier estruses. Reproductive parameters (frequency of mounting, pregnancy risk, interval to first estrus, and between-estrus intervals) were not influenced by the live weight change

  13. Agricultural aviation user requirement priorities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, R. L.; Meeland, T.; Peterson, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    The results are given of a research project pertaining to the development of agricultural aviation user requirement priorities. The raw data utilized in the project was obtained from the National Agricultural Aviation Association. A specially configured poll, developed by the Actuarial Research Corporation was used to solicit responses from NAAA members and others. The primary product of the poll is the specification of seriousness as determined by the respondents for some selected agricultural aviation problem areas identified and defined during the course of an intensive analysis by the Actuarial Research Corporation.

  14. Analysis of conservation priorities of Iberoamerican cattle based on autosomal microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Determining the value of livestock breeds is essential to define conservation priorities, manage genetic diversity and allocate funds. Within- and between-breed genetic diversity need to be assessed to preserve the highest intra-specific variability. Information on genetic diversity and risk status is still lacking for many Creole cattle breeds from the Americas, despite their distinct evolutionary trajectories and adaptation to extreme environmental conditions. Methods A comprehensive genetic analysis of 67 Iberoamerican cattle breeds was carried out with 19 FAO-recommended microsatellites to assess conservation priorities. Contributions to global diversity were investigated using alternative methods, with different weights given to the within- and between-breed components of genetic diversity. Information on Iberoamerican plus 15 worldwide cattle breeds was used to investigate the contribution of geographical breed groups to global genetic diversity. Results Overall, Creole cattle breeds showed a high level of genetic diversity with the highest level found in breeds admixed with zebu cattle, which were clearly differentiated from all other breeds. Within-breed kinships revealed seven highly inbred Creole breeds for which measures are needed to avoid further genetic erosion. However, if contribution to heterozygosity was the only criterion considered, some of these breeds had the lowest priority for conservation decisions. The Weitzman approach prioritized highly differentiated breeds, such as Guabalá, Romosinuano, Cr. Patagonico, Siboney and Caracú, while kinship-based methods prioritized mainly zebu-related breeds. With the combined approaches, breed ranking depended on the weights given to the within- and between-breed components of diversity. Overall, the Creole groups of breeds were generally assigned a higher priority for conservation than the European groups of breeds. Conclusions Conservation priorities differed significantly according to the

  15. High Priority: Teachers' Opportunities to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Although most teachers are finished with their formal education, their desire to learn has not been extinguished. As important as initial teacher and administrator preparation are, the ability of a school leadership team to maximize the potential of each staff member is perhaps even more important to helping each student realize his or her…

  16. Priority Questions and Horizon Scanning for Conservation: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kark, Salit; Sutherland, William J.; Shanas, Uri; Klass, Keren; Achisar, Hila; Dayan, Tamar; Gavrieli, Yael; Justo-Hanani, Ronit; Mandelik, Yael; Orion, Nir; Pargament, David; Portman, Michelle; Reisman-Berman, Orna; Safriel, Uriel N.; Schaffer, Gad; Steiner, Noa; Tauber, Israel; Levin, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Several projects aimed at identifying priority issues for conservation with high relevance to policy have recently been completed in several countries. Two major types of projects have been undertaken, aimed at identifying (i) policy-relevant questions most imperative to conservation and (ii) horizon scanning topics, defined as emerging issues that are expected to have substantial implications for biodiversity conservation and policy in the future. Here, we provide the first overview of the outcomes of biodiversity and conservation-oriented projects recently completed around the world using this framework. We also include the results of the first questions and horizon scanning project completed for a Mediterranean country. Overall, the outcomes of the different projects undertaken (at the global scale, in the UK, US, Canada, Switzerland and in Israel) were strongly correlated in terms of the proportion of questions and/or horizon scanning topics selected when comparing different topic areas. However, some major differences were found across regions. There was large variation among regions in the percentage of proactive (i.e. action and response oriented) versus descriptive (non-response oriented) priority questions and in the emphasis given to socio-political issues. Substantial differences were also found when comparing outcomes of priority questions versus horizon scanning projects undertaken for the same region. For example, issues related to climate change, human demography and marine ecosystems received higher priority as horizon scanning topics, while ecosystem services were more emphasized as current priority questions. We suggest that future initiatives aimed at identifying priority conservation questions and horizon scanning topics should allow simultaneous identification of both current and future priority issues, as presented here for the first time. We propose that further emphasis on social-political issues should be explicitly integrated into future

  17. Priority Questions and Horizon Scanning for Conservation: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kark, Salit; Sutherland, William J; Shanas, Uri; Klass, Keren; Achisar, Hila; Dayan, Tamar; Gavrieli, Yael; Justo-Hanani, Ronit; Mandelik, Yael; Orion, Nir; Pargament, David; Portman, Michelle; Reisman-Berman, Orna; Safriel, Uriel N; Schaffer, Gad; Steiner, Noa; Tauber, Israel; Levin, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Several projects aimed at identifying priority issues for conservation with high relevance to policy have recently been completed in several countries. Two major types of projects have been undertaken, aimed at identifying (i) policy-relevant questions most imperative to conservation and (ii) horizon scanning topics, defined as emerging issues that are expected to have substantial implications for biodiversity conservation and policy in the future. Here, we provide the first overview of the outcomes of biodiversity and conservation-oriented projects recently completed around the world using this framework. We also include the results of the first questions and horizon scanning project completed for a Mediterranean country. Overall, the outcomes of the different projects undertaken (at the global scale, in the UK, US, Canada, Switzerland and in Israel) were strongly correlated in terms of the proportion of questions and/or horizon scanning topics selected when comparing different topic areas. However, some major differences were found across regions. There was large variation among regions in the percentage of proactive (i.e. action and response oriented) versus descriptive (non-response oriented) priority questions and in the emphasis given to socio-political issues. Substantial differences were also found when comparing outcomes of priority questions versus horizon scanning projects undertaken for the same region. For example, issues related to climate change, human demography and marine ecosystems received higher priority as horizon scanning topics, while ecosystem services were more emphasized as current priority questions. We suggest that future initiatives aimed at identifying priority conservation questions and horizon scanning topics should allow simultaneous identification of both current and future priority issues, as presented here for the first time. We propose that further emphasis on social-political issues should be explicitly integrated into future

  18. Simultaneous update of priority structures

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, J.; Browne, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    To avoid centralized bottlenecks, data structures for multiple computer systems must be simultaneously updatable and yet must have some coherent and consistent state. This can be achieved through judicious partitioning of system data structures and control of access to them in such a manner that (1) either different processes operate upon disjoint segments of a given structure; or (2) processes operate upon the same datum object, in a controlled manner. Partitioning of data structures can be by structure or content. It can also occur at multiple times. In this paper we demonstrate content partitioning of a k-ary tree data structure at runtime, to realize a simultaneously updatable priority queue. The tree algorithms are then generalized to banyan data structures and shown to possess attractive properties of simultaneous update and throughput.

  19. Priorities for tuberculosis research: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rylance, Jamie; Pai, Madhukar; Lienhardt, Christian; Garner, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary Reliable and relevant research can help to improve tuberculosis control worldwide. In recent years, various organisations have assessed research needs and proposed priorities for tuberculosis. We summarise existing priority statements and assess the rigour of the methods used to generate them. We found 33 documents that specifically outline priorities in tuberculosis research. The top priority areas were drug development (28 articles), diagnosis and diagnostic tests (27), epidemiology (20), health services research (16), basic research (13), and vaccine development and use (13). The most focused questions were on the treatment and prevention of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in people co-infected with HIV. Methods used to identify these priorities were varied. Improvements can be made to ensure the process is more rigorous and transparent, and to use existing research or systematic reviews more often. WHO, Stop TB Partnership, and other organisations could adopt an incremental process of priority development, building on the existing knowledge base. PMID:21050822

  20. Life Priorities in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Between Ages of 45 to 65.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hasan Huseyin; Ahmadov, Asif; Cebeci, Suleyman; Binar, Murat; Karahatay, Serdar

    2016-06-01

    Diseases in head and neck cancer patients and applied therapies according to former affect life quality to a higher extent. In this paper, life priorities in 49 patients with head and neck cancer who referred to Gulhane Military Medical Academy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and the relationship between these priorities and sociodemographic properties have been studied. Following life priorities have been observed more important for the patients: to communicate with people in social places, to eat without any help by themselves, external appearance, taste and odor sense, continuing sexual life. Other priorities have been observed less important for the patients: attending social activities like cinema and theater, swimming pool and sea sports, money required for check-ups, necessities like time. Besides, these necessities do not show dissimilarities to any significant extent according to sociodemographic properties of the patients. PMID:27244211

  1. Communicable Diseases Prioritized According to Their Public Health Relevance, Sweden, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Viktor; Tegnell, Anders; Wallensten, Anders

    2015-01-01

    To establish strategic priorities for the Public Health Agency of Sweden we prioritized pathogens according to their public health relevance in Sweden in order to guide resource allocation. We then compared the outcome to ongoing surveillance. We used a modified prioritization method developed at the Robert Koch Institute in Germany. In a Delphi process experts scored pathogens according to ten variables. We ranked the pathogens according to the total score and divided them into four priority groups. We then compared the priority groups to self-reported time spent on surveillance by epidemiologists and ongoing programmes for surveillance through mandatory and/or voluntary notifications and for surveillance of typing results. 106 pathogens were scored. The result of the prioritization process was similar to the outcome of the prioritization in Germany. Common pathogens such as calicivirus and Influenza virus as well as blood-borne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B and C virus, gastro-intestinal infections such as Campylobacter and Salmonella and vector-borne pathogens such as Borrelia were all in the highest priority group. 63% of time spent by epidemiologists on surveillance was spent on pathogens in the highest priority group and all pathogens in the highest priority group, except for Borrelia and varicella-zoster virus, were under surveillance through notifications. Ten pathogens in the highest priority group (Borrelia, calicivirus, Campylobacter, Echinococcus multilocularis, hepatitis C virus, HIV, respiratory syncytial virus, SARS- and MERS coronavirus, tick-borne encephalitis virus and varicella-zoster virus) did not have any surveillance of typing results. We will evaluate the possibilities of surveillance for the pathogens in the highest priority group where we currently do not have any ongoing surveillance and evaluate the need of surveillance for the pathogens from the low priority group where there is ongoing surveillance in

  2. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program § 3431.14 Priority. Pursuant to NVMSA, the Secretary will...

  3. Perioperative leadership: managing change with insights, priorities, and tools.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David L

    2014-07-01

    The personal leadership of the perioperative director is a critical factor in the success of any change management initiative. This article presents an approach to perioperative nursing leadership that addresses obstacles that prevent surgical departments from achieving high performance in clinical and financial outcomes. This leadership approach consists of specific insights, priorities, and tools: key insights include self-understanding of personal barriers to leadership and accuracy at understanding economic and strategic considerations related to the OR environment; key priorities include creating a customer-centered organization, focusing on process improvement, and concentrating on culture change; and key tools include using techniques (e.g., direct engagement, collaborative leadership) to align surgical organizations with leadership priorities and mitigate specific perioperative management risks. Included in this article is a leadership development plan for perioperative directors. PMID:24973182

  4. Syncrude`s fire hazard index priorities risks

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, B.

    1997-05-01

    To quantify fire hazard risks within large production facilities and help establish priorities for additional fire controls, Syncrude Canada Ltd. created a fire hazard index, to identify high-priority risks. The fire hazard index scoring system assigns a number score to each facility or work area. The numerical score represents the composite fire risk associated with the area of concern. The resulting scores are used as a comparative tool to determine which fire risks receive top priority for additional controls and fire inspections/surveys. Unlike other fire hazard indices, the Syncrude index can be used for all facilities regardless of whether they handle flammable material. As a result, the potential fire hazard associated with vehicles, shops, offices, computer rooms, and mechanical equipment can be assessed. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Energy-related indoor environmental quality research: A priority agenda

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Brager, G.; Burge, H.; Cummings, J.; Levin, H.; Loftness, V.; Mendell, M.J.; Persily, A.; Taylor, S.; Zhang, J.S.

    2002-08-01

    A multidisciplinary team of IEQ and energy researchers has defined a program of priority energy-related IEQ research. This paper describes the methods employed to develop the agenda, and 35 high priority research and development (R&D) project areas related to four broad goals: (1) identifying IEQ problems and opportunities; (2) developing and evaluating energy-efficient technologies for improving IEQ; (3) developing and evaluating energy-efficient practices for improving IEQ; and (4) encouraging or assisting the implementation of technologies or practices for improving IEQ. The identified R&D priorities reflect a strong need to benchmark IEQ conditions in small commercial buildings, schools, and residences. The R&D priorities also reflect the need to better understand how people are affected by IEQ conditions and by the related building characteristics and operation and maintenance practices. The associated research findings will provide a clearer definition of acceptable IEQ that is required to guide the development of technologies, practices, standards, and guidelines. Quantifying the effects of building characteristics and practices on IEQ conditions, in order to provide the basis for development of energy efficient and effective IEQ control measures, was also considered a priority. The development or advancement in a broad range of IEQ tools, technologies, and practices are also a major component of the priority research agenda. Consistent with the focus on ''energy-related'' research priorities, building ventilation and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and processes are very prominent in the agenda. Research related to moisture and microbiological problems, particularly within hot and humid climates, is also prominent within the agenda. The agenda tends to emphasize research on residences, small commercial buildings, and schools because these types of buildings have been underrepresented in prior research. Most of the research areas

  6. Incentives a Priority for New Secretary of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan says he is eager to use a proposed $15 billion federal incentive-grant fund in part to reward states, districts, and even nonprofit organizations that have set high standards for the students they serve. Duncan's comments came in an interview in which he named as priorities reauthorization of the federal No…

  7. Setting priorities: is there a role for citizens' juries?

    PubMed

    Lenaghan, J; New, B; Mitchell, E

    1996-06-22

    Citizens' juries are an attempt to meaningfully involve members of the public in decisions which affect them in their own communities. The Institute for Public Policy Research and Cambridge and Huntingdon Health Authority have recently piloted the first jury in the United Kingdom. Sixteen jurors sat for four days, hearing evidence from a number of expert witnesses. The jurors were asked to consider how priorities for health care should be set, according to what criteria, and to what extent the public should be involved in this process. This pilot was also an attempt to assess the process itself, and our initial evaluation indicates that, given enough time and information, the public is willing and able to contribute to the debate about priority setting in health care. PMID:8664672

  8. Research on the Priority of China's Internet Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuqing, Chen; Xiaoyue, Ding; Liping, Yu

    According to the development indexes of China's netizens and sites number, this paper simulates the life cycle of Chinese Internet development adopting the Logistic growth curve, and verifies the development priority of netizens and Internet sites in Chinese Internet development process. The result shows that the starting point of Chinese website growth period lags behind the starting point of Chinese netizen growth period, the starting point of Chinese website mature period is ahead of the starting point of Chinese netizen mature period, which presents a typical latemature and premature senility curve, and the average lagging time is two years. The result also indicates that the Chinese Internet development is of abundant breadth and insufficient depth, China should improve the priority of domestic website development, promote site construction, and encourage the Internet websites and netizens to develop with benign circulation.

  9. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  10. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  11. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  12. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  13. 40 CFR 35.2015 - State priority system and project priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... project. (d) Public participation. (1) In addition to any requirements in 40 CFR part 25, the State shall... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State priority system and project... State priority system and project priority list. (a) General. The Regional Administrator will...

  14. Learning Spaces as a Strategic Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Gene; Erwin, Tom; Barnes, Briony

    2009-01-01

    In April 2007 Butler Community College made learning spaces one of its five strategic priorities. The college had just completed a major renovation of the work spaces for the IT division and had started a project to build a student union and create informal learning spaces at the Andover campus. With learning spaces becoming a strategic priority,…

  15. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  16. 7 CFR 1466.4 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National priorities. 1466.4 Section 1466.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY INCENTIVES PROGRAM General Provisions § 1466.4 National priorities....

  17. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... earlier the application was received, the higher the priority given). Note to paragraph (a)(1): The... subpriorities. ER26JN01.000 (2) Priority group 2. An application not meeting the criteria of paragraph (a)(1) of this section but meeting the criteria of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section. Projects within...

  18. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  19. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  20. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  1. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  2. 10 CFR 580.03 - Curtailment priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) CURTAILMENT PRIORITIES FOR ESSENTIAL AGRICULTURAL USES § 580.03 Curtailment priorities. (a) Notwithstanding any provision of law other than section 401(b) of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, or any other rule, regulation, or order...

  3. Research Priorities in Networking and Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    A workshop focused on major research issues in networking and communications. This report defines the context for research priorities and initiatives and deals with issues in networking and communications. Fifteen major research priorities and four research specific initiatives were identified by participants as areas that should be pursued over…

  4. Reframing Recreation as a Public Policy Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Issues pertaining to children often struggle to become public policy priorities. A clear demonstration of this phenomenon is the degree to which children are supported in the federal budget in comparison to other priorities. If issues pertaining to children struggle for the policy spotlight, subissues pertaining to them face an even greater…

  5. 7 CFR 1775.11 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Priority. 1775.11 Section 1775.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS Grant Application Processing § 1775.11 Priority. The application and supporting information will be used...

  6. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  7. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  8. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  9. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of §...

  10. Strategic Issues: Priorities for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alamo Community Coll. District, San Antonio, TX.

    Strategic priorities for the Alamo Community College District (ACCD) are identified based on conclusions drawn by the ACCD Community Advisory Council from studies of: (1) Bexar County population characteristics and trends; (2) community economic and social priorities; (3) college enrollment potential; (4) needs and characteristics of the ACCD's…

  11. Quality of Educational Life, Priorities for Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO.

    This report discusses how life on campus has been affected by changes in society and changes in the university's role. These changes have placed new demands upon the higher education system. But dynamics within the system have grown inflexible and dehumanizing as a result of system priorities. These priorities set in motion dynamics that compel…

  12. The 50 Constellation Priority Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S.; Joosten, K.; Eppler, D.; Gruener, J.; Mendell, W.; French, R.; Plescia, J.; Spudis, P.; Wargo, M.; Robinson, M.; Lucey, P.

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation program (CxP) has developed a list of 50 sites of interest on the Moon which will be targeted by the LRO narrow angle camera. The list has also been provided to the M team to supplement their targeting list. This list does not represent a "site selection" process; rather the goal was to find "representative" sites and terrains to understand the range of possible surface conditions for human lunar exploration to aid engineering design and operational planning. The list compilers leveraged heavily on past site selection work (e.g. Geoscience and a Lunar Base Workshop - 1988, Site Selection Strategy for a Lunar Outpost - 1990, Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) - 2005). Considerations included scientific, resource utilization, and operational merits, and a desire to span lunar terrain types. The targets have been organized into two "tiers" of 25 sites each to provide a relative priority ranking in the event of mutual interference. A LEAG SAT (special action team) was established to validate and recommend modifications to the list. This SAT was chaired by Dr. Paul Lucey. They provided their final results to CxP in May. Dr. Wendell Mendell will organize an on-going analysis of the data as they come down to ensure data quality and determine if and when a site has sufficient data to be retired from the list. The list was compiled using the best available data, however, it is understood that with the flood of new lunar data, minor modifications or adjustments may be required.

  13. Proximal Priority Laser Therapy: PPLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshiro, Toshio

    2004-09-01

    The author has, in the past, classified treatment methods for pain geometrically as point, line, two-dimensional, three-dimensional treatment and has used these over the years. However as a practitioner of western medicine, the author originally treated pain only directed at the painful site, and encountered cases where local treatment did not suffice. The author proved with SPECT and the Rand Phantom that treating the neck which is the midpoint of the brain, the center of the nervous system and the heart, the center of circulation, increased cerebral blood flow and also that laser emitted to neck will reach the spinal chord no matter from where on the neck the laser is emitted. From such research and 25 years of clinical experience, the author has created an anatomy based, systemic treatment method called the Proximal Priority Laser Therapy (PPLT) where not only the cerebral cortex, spinal chord and peripheral nerves are treated but also the tracts of blood vessels and lymph ducts are treated as well. Treatment method and cases are presented herein.

  14. Priority Setting for Improvement of Cervical Cancer Prevention in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Azam; Ghiasvand, Reza; Hadji, Maryam; Nahvijou, Azin; Mousavi, Azam-Sadat; Pakgohar, Minoo; Khodakarami, Nahid; Abedini, Mehrandokht; Amouzegar Hashemi, Farnaz; Rahnamaye Farzami, Marjan; Shahsiah, Reza; Sajedinejhad, Sima; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Nadali, Fatemeh; Rashidian, Arash; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Mogensen, Ole; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. Organized cervical screening and vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) have been successful interventions for prevention of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Because of cultural and religious considerations, ICC has low incidence in Iran and many other Muslim countries. There is no organized cervical screening in these countries. Therefore, ICC is usually diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis in these countries. We performed a priority setting exercise and suggested priorities for prevention of ICC in this setting. Methods: We invited experts and researchers to a workshop and asked them to list important suggestions for ICC prevention in Iran. After merging similar items and removing the duplicates, we asked the experts to rank the list of suggested items. We used a strategy grid and Go-zone analysis to determine final list of priorities for ICC prevention in Iran. Results: From 26 final items suggested as priorities for prevention of ICC, the most important priorities were developing national guidelines for cervical screening and quality control protocol for patient follow-up and management of precancerous lesions. In addition, we emphasized considering insurance coverage for cervical screening, public awareness, and research priorities, and establishment of a cervical screening registry. Conclusion: A comprehensive approach and implementation of organized cervical screening program is necessary for prevention of ICC in Iran and other low incidence Muslim countries. Because of high cost for vaccination and low incidence of cervical cancer, we do not recommend HPV vaccination for the time being in Iran. PMID:27239863

  15. First results from the Permafrost Research Priorities initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantuit, Hugues; Michel, Allard; Mauro, Guglielmin; Margareta, Johansson; Gleb, Kraev; Michael, Krautblatter; Gerhard, Krinner; Schuur Edward, A., G.; Ylva, Sjöberg; Jenny, Baeseman; Karina, Schollän

    2015-04-01

    At present, no consensus document ("white paper" or "strategy") exists at the international level to identify forward-looking priorities in permafrost research. CliC has partnered with the International Permafrost Association (IPA) to seize the opportunity offered by the upcoming International Conference on Arctic Research Planning III (ICARP III) and the SCAR Horizon Scan to frame a consultative process that will result in the formulation of such permafrost priorities. Provisionally entitled "Permafrost Research Priorities: A Roadmap for the Future", it will focus on all permafrost regions, from the Arctic to the Antarctic and mountain permafrost around the globe in order to accurately represent the level of overlap in scientific challenges in all three domains. The product stemming from the effort will consist of a high level, but short publication (ca. 2-3 pages) in a high-profile journal listing and putting into context permafrost research priorities. The document aims to become the benchmark against which permafrost research should be gauged starting in 2015. Here we present the first results stemming from this effort and outline avenues for answering the research questions outlined in the effort.

  16. Active-solar-energy-system materials research priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, S.A.; Hien, L.K.; Silberglitt, R.

    1983-01-01

    THis report describes and prioritizes materials research alternatives to improve active solar heating and cooling system cost-effectiveness. Materials research areas analyzed are (polymer) glazings, heat mirrors, (selective) absorber surfaces, absorber adhesives, absorber substrates, fluids, thermal storage materials, and desiccants. Three classes of solar collectors are considered in the cost-effectiveness analysis: medium-temperature flat-plate collectors (operating temperature, 70/sup 0/C); high-temperature flat-plate collectors (operating temperature, 70 to 120/sup 0/C); and evacuated tubes (operating temperature 70 to 230/sup 0/C). We found the highest priority for medium-temperature flat-plate collectors to be research on polymeric materials to improve performance and durability characteristics. For the high-temperature, flat-plate collectors and evacuated tubes, heat mirror and selective absorber research is the highest priority. Research on storage materials, fluids, and desiccants is of relatively low priority for improving cost-effectiveness in all cases. The highest priority materials research areas identified include: optical properties and degradation of transparent conducting oxide heat mirrors and thickness insensitive selective paints; uv and thermal stabilization of polymeric glazing materials; and systems analysis of integrated polymeric collectors.

  17. Priorities for CMV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Krause, Philip R; Bialek, Stephanie R; Boppana, Suresh B; Griffiths, Paul D; Laughlin, Catherine A; Ljungman, Per; Mocarski, Edward S; Pass, Robert F; Read, Jennifer S; Schleiss, Mark R; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2013-12-17

    A multidisciplinary meeting addressed priorities related to development of vaccines against cytomegalovirus (CMV), the cause of congenital CMV (cCMV) disease and of serious disease in the immunocompromised. Participants discussed optimal uses of a CMV vaccine, aspects of clinical study design, and the value of additional research. A universal childhood CMV vaccine could potentially rapidly reduce cCMV disease, as infected children are sources of viral transmission to seronegative and seropositive mothers. A vaccine administered to adolescents or adult women could also reduce cCMV disease by making them immune prior to pregnancy. Clinical trials of CMV vaccines in women should evaluate protection against cCMV infection, an essential precursor of cCMV disease, which is a more practical and acceptable endpoint for assessing vaccine effects on maternal-fetal transmission. Clinical trials of vaccines to evaluate prevention of CMV disease in stem cell transplant recipients could use CMV viremia at a level triggering pre-emptive antiviral therapy as an endpoint, because widespread use of pre-emptive and prophylactic antivirals has rendered CMV-induced disease too rare to be a practical endpoint for clinical trials. In solid organ transplant patients, CMV-associated disease is sufficiently common for use as a primary endpoint. Additional research to advance CMV vaccine development should include identifying factors that predict fetal loss due to CMV, determining age-specific incidence and transmission rates, defining the mechanism and relative contributions of maternal reactivation and re-infection to cCMV disease, developing assays that can distinguish between reactivation and re-infection in seropositive vaccinees, further defining predictors of sequelae from cCMV infection, and identifying clinically relevant immune response parameters to CMV (including developing validated assays that could assess CMV antibody avidity) that could lead to the establishment of immune

  18. Active debris removal of multiple priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Vitali; Lüpken, A.; Flegel, S.; Gelhaus, J.; Möckel, M.; Kebschull, C.; Wiedemann, C.; Vörsmann, P.

    2013-05-01

    Today's space debris environment shows major concentrations of objects within distinct orbital regions for nearly all size regimes. The most critical region is found at orbital altitudes near 800 km with high declinations. Within this region many satellites are operated in so called sun-synchronous orbits (SSO). Among those, there are Earth observation, communication and weather satellites. Due to the orbital geometry in SSO, head-on encounters with relative velocities of about 15 km/s are most probable and would thus result in highly energetic collisions, which are often referred to as catastrophic collisions, leading to the complete fragmentation of the participating objects. So called feedback collisions can then be triggered by the newly generated fragments, thus leading to a further population increase in the affected orbital region. This effect is known as the Kessler syndrome.Current studies show that catastrophic collisions are not a major problem today, but will become the main process for debris generation within the SSO region in the near future, even without any further launches. In order to avoid this effect, objects with a major impact on collisional cascading have to be actively removed from the critical region after their end of life. Not having the capability to perform an end-of-life maneuver in order to transfer to a graveyard orbit or to de-orbit, many satellites and rocket bodies would have to be de-orbited within a dedicated mission. In such a mission, a service satellite would perform a de-orbit maneuver, after having docked to a specific target.In this paper, chemical and electric propulsion systems were analysed with the main focus on removing multiple targets within one single mission. The targets were chosen from a previously defined priority list in order to enhance the mission efficiency. Total mission time, ΔV and system mass were identified as key parameters to allow for an evaluation of the different concepts. It was shown that it

  19. Attentional Priority Determines Working Memory Precision

    PubMed Central

    Klyszejko, Zuzanna; Rahmati, Masih; Curtis, Clayton E

    2014-01-01

    Visual working memory is a system used to hold information actively in mind for a limited time. The number of items and the precision with which we can store information has limits that define its capacity. How much control do we have over the precision with which we store information when faced with these severe capacity limitations? Here, we tested the hypothesis that rank-ordered attentional priority determines the precision of multiple working memory representations. We conducted two psychophysical experiments that manipulated the priority of multiple items in a two-alternative forced choice task (2AFC) with distance discrimination. In Experiment 1, we varied the probabilities with which memorized items were likely to be tested. To generalize the effects of priority beyond simple cueing, in Experiment 2, we manipulated priority by varying monetary incentives contingent upon successful memory for items tested. Moreover, we illustrate our hypothesis using a simple model that distributed attentional resources across items with rank-ordered priorities. Indeed, we found evidence in both experiments that priority affects the precision of working memory in a monotonic fashion. Our results demonstrate that representations of priority may provide a mechanism by which resources can be allocated to increase the precision with which we encode and briefly store information. PMID:25240420

  20. Priorities for toxic wastewater management in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, A.

    1996-12-31

    This study assesses the number of industries in Pakistan, the total discharge of wastewater, the biological oxygen demand (BOD) load, and the toxicity of the wastewater. The industrial sector is a major contributor to water pollution, with high levels of BOD, heavy metals, and toxic compounds. Only 30 industries have installed water pollution control equipment, and most are working at a very low operational level. Priority industrial sectors for pollution control are medium- to large-scale textile industries and small-scale tanneries and electroplating industries. Each day the textile industries discharge about 85,000 m{sup 3} of wastewater with a high BOD, while the electroplating industries discharge about 23,000 m{sup 3} of highly toxic and hazardous wastewater. Various in-plant modifications can reduce wastewater discharges. Economic incentives, like tax rebates, subsidies, and soft loans, could be an option for motivating medium- to large-scale industries to control water pollution. Central treatment plants may be constructed for treating wastewater generated by small-scale industries. The estimated costs for the treatment of textile and electroplating wastewater are given. The legislative structure in Pakistan is insufficient for control of industrial pollution; not only do existing laws need revision, but more laws and regulations are needed to improve the state of affairs, and enforcement agencies need to be strengthened. 15 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  1. New priorities and developments at NAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradie, J. L.; Botha, A. H.; Celliers, P. J.; Cronje, P. M.; Delsink, J. L. G.; de Villiers, J. G.; du Plessis, H.; du Toit, J. S.; Fourie, D. T.; Hogan, M. E.; Jungwirth, H. N.; Kohler, I. H.; Müller, A.; Rohwer, P. F.; Smit, H. A.; Theron, P. J.; van Niekerk, M. J.

    2001-12-01

    The facilities at the National Accelerator Center (NAC) are utilized for proton and neutron therapy, the production of radioisotopes and for nuclear physics experiments. This implies an operating schedule with nine energy changes per week. Mainly due to this the reliability of beam delivery deteriorated to such an extent that we recently had to revert to a beam schedule with only four energy changes per week. This necessitated redefinition of the priorities for our proton therapy program. The request for higher proton beam currents at 66 MeV, for radioisotope production, stimulated the design of dedicated flat-top systems for both the light-ion injector cyclotron (SPC1) and the separated-sector cyclotron (SSC). We also investigated the feasibility of accelerating high-intensity proton beams (500 μA) in the SSC by using the high-intensity space-charge mode developed at PSI. The design of a vertical beamline and modifications to the existing beam transport system for the new high-intensity target station are in progress. Further developments include an additional septum magnet for the SSC extraction system and a new Local Area Network computer-control system for the RF systems. The progress with these projects will be presented and the status of the facilities discussed.

  2. A new proposal for priority setting in Norway: Open and fair.

    PubMed

    Ottersen, Trygve; Førde, Reidun; Kakad, Meetali; Kjellevold, Alice; Melberg, Hans Olav; Moen, Atle; Ringard, Ånen; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2016-03-01

    Health systems worldwide struggle to meet increasing demands for health care, and Norway is no exception. This paper discusses the new, comprehensive framework for priority setting recently laid out by the third Norwegian Committee on Priority Setting in the Health Sector. The framework posits that priority setting should pursue the goal of "the greatest number of healthy life years for all, fairly distributed" and centres on three criteria: 1) The health-benefit criterion: The priority of an intervention increases with the expected health benefit (and other relevant welfare benefits) from the intervention; 2) The resource criterion: The priority of an intervention increases, the less resources it requires; and 3) The health-loss criterion: The priority of an intervention increases with the expected lifetime health loss of the beneficiary in the absence of such an intervention. Cost-effectiveness plays a central role in this framework, but only alongside the health-loss criterion which incorporates a special concern for the worse off and promotes fairness. In line with this, cost-effectiveness thresholds are differentiated according to health loss. Concrete implementation tools and open processes with user participation complement the three criteria. Informed by the proposal, the Ministry of Health and Care Services is preparing a report to the Parliament, with the aim of reaching political consensus on a new priority-setting framework for Norway. PMID:26851991

  3. Assessment of cold-climate environmental research priorities

    SciTech Connect

    States, J.B.

    1983-04-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has consistently recognized that cold regions pose unique environmental problems. This report sets forth the conceptual framework and research plans for several high priority research areas. It provides the fundamental basis for implementation of the EPA Cold-Climate Environmental Research Program. This three- to five-year program encompasses both short- and long-term research of high relevance to the EPA and to the cold regions that it serves.

  4. Collaborating on global priorities: science education for everyone—any time and everywhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Building on the key ideas from Dana Zeidler's paper I expand the conversation from the standpoint that the challenges facing humanity and the capacity of Earth to support life suggest that changes in human lifestyles are a priority. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to educate all humans about some of the science-related grand challenges, such as global warming and wellness. The key is to enact programs that have relevance to all citizens, irrespective of: age, location, language proficiency, economic resources, religion, gender, sexual preference, and level of prior education. Since significant changes are needed in human lifestyles the current emphasis on preK-12 science education needs to be expanded to cover all humans and the places in which education occurs should be everywhere. I explore the use of a multilogical framework to conceptualize science and thereby transform science education in ways that better relate to priorities of wellness and harmony in the ecosystems that sustain life on Earth. I illustrate the potential of multilogicality in a context of complementary medicine, using three frameworks: Jin Shin Jyutsu, an ancient system of medicine; a diet to reduce inflammation; and iridology. Use of a multilogical framework to conceptualize science provides opportunities for science education to focus on education for literate citizenry (birth-death) and responsible action, connect to the massive challenges of the present, and select content that has high relevance to sustainability, wellness, and well-being at local, national, and global levels.

  5. Cairo conference affirms CEDPA priorities.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) that was held in Cairo during September adopted a 20-year Programme of Action endorsing the empowerment of women as the foundation of sustainable development. 178 countries and more than a 1000 nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), including the Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA), from 100 countries attended the conference and the parallel NGO forum. The final document sets out specific steps for achievement of universal access to a full range of voluntary, quality family planning and reproductive health services for women and men; provision of services for the special needs of adolescents; closure of the gender gap in education; and empowerment of women via education, health care, and economic options. The CEDPA network of alumnae from 30 countries had worked over the 3 years prior to the conference for the inclusion of women's priorities in policies and to achieve consensus among the government and NGO caucuses. 14 alumnae, including Peggy Curlin (CEDPA President and US delegate), were appointed to their countries' delegations and directly influenced the Programme of Action. The NGO Forum provided a place to exchange experiences and expertise; CEDPA mounted an exhibit, "Empowering Women." The network's theme was "Access, Choice, and Participation." With support from the United Nations Population Fund, CEDPA developed a manual, "After Cairo: A Handbook on Advocacy for Women Leaders," which has been distributed at training sessions and workshops and was translated into French (with support from the US Agency for International Development in Mali) for distribution at the Dakar conference in November in preparation for the World Conference on Women. CEDPA and The Global Committee for Cairo honored the secretary-general of the conference, Dr. Nafis Sadik, for her leadership of the ICPD and UNFPA, and Aziza Hussein, co-chair of the NGO steering committee, at a luncheon; Dr. Sadik

  6. Midwestern Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    The Midwestern Greenhouse Gas Reduction Acccord, or Midwestern Greenhouse gas Accord (MGA), is a regional agreement by governors of the states in the US Midwest and one Canadian province to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to combat climate change. Signatories to the accord include the US states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Kansas, Ohio and South Dakota, and the Canadian Province of Manitoba. The accord, signed on November 15, 2007, established the Midwestern Greenhouse Gas Reduction Program, which aims to: establish greenhouse gas reduction targets and timeframes consistent with MGA member states' targets; develop a market-based and multi-sector cap-and-trade mechanism to help achieve those reduction targets; establish a system to enable tracking, management, and crediting for entities that reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and develop and implement additional steps as needed to achieve the reduction targets, such as a low-carbon fuel standards and regional incentives and funding mechanisms. The GHG registry will be managed by the Climate Registry, which manages the registry for other US state schemes. One of the first actions was to convene an Energy Security under Climate Stewardship Platform to guide future development of the Midwest's energy economy.

  7. Basic research needs and priorities in solar energy. Volume II. Technology crosscuts for DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, J S; Roessner, D eds.

    1980-01-01

    Priorities for basic research important to the future developments of solar energy are idenified, described, and recommended. SERI surveyed more than 120 leading scientists who were engaged in or knowledgeable of solar-related research. The result is an amalgam of national scientific opinion representing the views of key researchers in relevant disciplines and of SERI staff members. The scientific disciplines included in the report are: chemistry, biology, materials sciences, engineering and mathematics, and the social and behavioral sciences. Each discipline is subdivided into two to five topical areas-and, within each topical area, research needs are described and ranked according to the priorities suggested in the survey. Three categories of priority were established: crucial, important, and needed. A narrative accompanying the description of research needs in each topical area discusses the importance of research in the area for solar energy development and presents the bases for the priority rankings recommended.

  8. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... that replaces an existing facility; (B) Nursing home renovation (e.g., patient privacy) and...) All other projects (e.g., nurse call systems, patient lifts). (ii) Priority group 1—subpriority 2....

  9. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that replaces an existing facility; (B) Nursing home renovation (e.g., patient privacy) and...) All other projects (e.g., nurse call systems, patient lifts). (ii) Priority group 1—subpriority 2....

  10. SARASOTA BAY PRIORITY COMMITTEE MEETING 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is a summary of the 2002 Priority Committee meeting with corresponding attachments. The meeting covered the Director's Report and the EPA Biennial Review. Topics discussed included public involvement and education, proposed technical projects, sea grass reporting, p...

  11. PRIORITY POLLUTANT REMOVAL FROM MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the removal of selected priority pollutants from acid mine drainage was conducted at EPA's Crown, West Virginia, site. The pollutants studied were the volatiles benzene, chloroform, methylene chloride, tetrachloroethene, toluene, trans-dichloroethene; the semivolatiles...

  12. 77 FR 65912 - Priority Mail Contract

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ...The Commission is noticing a recent Postal Service filing concerning an amendment to Priority Mail Contract 19. This notice informs the public of the filing, invites public comment, and takes other administrative...

  13. BIODEGRADABILITY STUDIES WITH ORGANIC PRIORITY POLLUTANT COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ninty-six organic priority pollutants (from EPA Effluent Guidelines Consent Decree) were studied to determine the extent and rate of microbial degradation and the acclimation periods needed for substrate biooxidation. The pollutants have been classified into groups with character...

  14. High Discrepancy in Abdominal Obesity Prevalence According to Different Waist Circumference Cut-Offs and Measurement Methods in Children: Need for Age-Risk-Weighted Standardized Cut-Offs?

    PubMed Central

    Prodam, Flavia; Fuiano, Nicola; Diddi, Giuliana; Petri, Antonella; Bellone, Simonetta; Bona, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Background Waist circumference (WC) is a good proxy measure of central adiposity. Due to the multiplicity of existing WC cut-offs and different measurement methods, the decision to use one rather than another WC chart may lead to different prevalence estimates of abdominal obesity in the same population. Aim of our study was to assess how much the prevalence of abdominal obesity varies in Italian schoolchildren using the different available WC cut-offs. Methods We measured WC at just above the uppermost lateral border of the right ilium in 1062 Italian schoolchildren aged 7–14 years, 499 living in Northern Italy and 563 in Southern Italy. Abdominal obesity was defined as WC ≥90th percentile for gender and age according to nine WC charts. Results We found an extremely high variability in the prevalence of abdominal obesity detected in our study-populations according to the different WC charts, ranging in the overall group from 9.1% to 61.4%. In Northern Italy children it varied from 2.4% to 35.7%, and in Southern ones from 15.1% to 84.2%. Conclusions On the basis of the chosen WC cut-offs the prevalence of abdominal obesity varies widely, because percentile-charts are strongly influenced by the population status in a particular moment. A further rate of variability may lay on the site of WC measurement and on the statistical method used to calculate WC cut-offs. Risk-weighted WC cut-offs measured in a standardized anatomic site and calculated by the appropriate method are needed to simply identify by WC measurement those children at high risk of cardio-metabolic complications to whom specific and prompt health interventions should be addressed. PMID:26745148

  15. Maternal and perinatal health research priorities beyond 2015: an international survey and prioritization exercise

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality has declined by nearly half since 1990, but over a quarter million women still die every year of causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Maternal-health related targets are falling short of the 2015 Millennium Development Goals and a post-2015 Development Agenda is emerging. In connection with this, setting global research priorities for the next decade is now required. Methods We adapted the methods of the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHNRI) to identify and set global research priorities for maternal and perinatal health for the period 2015 to 2025. Priority research questions were received from various international stakeholders constituting a large reference group, and consolidated into a final list of research questions by a technical working group. Questions on this list were then scored by the reference working group according to five independent and equally weighted criteria. Normalized research priority scores (NRPS) were calculated, and research priority questions were ranked accordingly. Results A list of 190 priority research questions for improving maternal and perinatal health was scored by 140 stakeholders. Most priority research questions (89%) were concerned with the evaluation of implementation and delivery of existing interventions, with research subthemes frequently concerned with training and/or awareness interventions (11%), and access to interventions and/or services (14%). Twenty-one questions (11%) involved the discovery of new interventions or technologies. Conclusions Key research priorities in maternal and perinatal health were identified. The resulting ranked list of research questions provides a valuable resource for health research investors, researchers and other stakeholders. We are hopeful that this exercise will inform the post-2015 Development Agenda and assist donors, research-policy decision makers and researchers to invest in research that will ultimately make the most

  16. Political strategies in difficult times - The "backstage" experience of Swedish politicians on formal priority setting in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Garpenby, Peter; Nedlund, Ann-Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    This paper contributes to the knowledge on the governing of healthcare in a democratic context in times of austerity. Resource allocation in healthcare is a highly political issue but the political nature of healthcare is not always made clear and the role of politicians is often obscure. The absence of politicians in rationing/disinvestment arrangements is usually explained with blame-shifting arguments; they prefer to delegate "the burden of responsibility" to administrative agencies or professionals. Drawing on a case where Swedish regional politicians involved themselves in setting priorities at a more detailed level than previously, the findings suggest that the subject of "blame avoidance" is more complicated than usually assumed. A qualitative case study was designed, involving semi-structured interviews with 14 regionally elected politicians in one Swedish health authority, conducted in June 2011. The interviews were analysed through a thematic analysis in accordance with the "framework approach" by Ritchie and Lewis. Findings show that an overarching strategy among the politicians was to appear united and to suppress conflict, which served to underpin the vital strategy of bringing the medical profession into the process. A key finding is the importance that politicians, when appearing "backstage", attach to the prevention of blame from the medical profession. This case illustrates that one has to take into account that priority settings requires various types of skills and knowledges - not only technical but also political and social. Another important lesson points toward the need to broaden the political leadership repertoire, as leadership in the case of priority setting is not about politicians being all in or all out. The results suggest that in a priority-setting process it is of importance to have politics on-board at an early stage to secure loyalty to the process, although not necessarily being involved in all details. PMID:27404909

  17. Competing priorities in treatment decision-making: a US national survey of individuals with depression and clinicians who treat depression

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Paul J; Forcino, Rachel C; Mishra, Manish; Blitzer, Rachel; Elwyn, Glyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify information priorities for consumers and clinicians making depression treatment decisions and assess shared decision-making (SDM) in routine depression care. Design 20 questions related to common features of depression treatments were provided. Participants were initially asked to select which features were important, and in a second stage they were asked to rank their top 5 ‘important features’ in order of importance. Clinicians were asked to provide rankings according to both consumer and clinician perspectives. Consumers completed CollaboRATE, a measure of SDM. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified consumer characteristics associated with CollaboRATE scores. Setting Online cross-sectional surveys fielded in September to December 2014. Participants We administered surveys to convenience samples of US adults with depression and clinicians who treat depression. Consumer sampling was targeted to reflect age, gender and educational attainment of adults with depression in the USA. Primary outcome measures Information priority rankings; CollaboRATE, a 3-item consumer-reported measure of SDM. Results 972 consumers and 244 clinicians completed the surveys. The highest ranked question for both consumers and clinicians was ‘Will the treatment work?’ Clinicians were aware of consumers’ priorities, yet did not always prioritise that information themselves, particularly insurance coverage and cost of treatment. Only 18% of consumers reported high levels of SDM. Working with a psychiatrist (OR 1.87; 95% CI 1.07 to 3.26) and female gender (OR 2.04; 95% CI 1.25 to 3.34) were associated with top CollaboRATE scores. Conclusions While clinicians know what information is important to consumers making depression treatment decisions, they do not always address these concerns. This mismatch, coupled with low SDM, adversely affects the quality of depression care. Development of a decision support intervention based on our findings can improve

  18. 15 CFR 700.20 - Use of priority ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities for Energy Programs § 700.20 Use...

  19. Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In healthcare today, decisions are made in the face of serious resource constraints. Healthcare managers are struggling to provide high quality care, manage resources effectively, and meet changing patient needs. Healthcare managers who are constantly making difficult resource decisions desire a way to improve their priority setting processes. Despite the wealth of existing priority setting literature (for example, program budgeting and marginal analysis, accountability for reasonableness, the 'describe-evaluate-improve' strategy) there are still no tools to evaluate how healthcare resources are prioritised. This paper describes the development and piloting of a process to evaluate priority setting in health institutions. The evaluation process was designed to examine the procedural and substantive dimensions of priority setting using a multi-methods approach, including a staff survey, decision-maker interviews, and document analysis. Methods The evaluation process was piloted in a mid-size community hospital in Ontario, Canada while its leaders worked through their annual budgeting process. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data. Results The evaluation process was both applicable to the context and it captured the budgeting process. In general, the pilot test provided support for our evaluation process and our definition of success, (i.e., our conceptual framework). Conclusions The purpose of the evaluation process is to provide a simple, practical way for an organization to better understand what it means to achieve success in its priority setting activities and identify areas for improvement. In order for the process to be used by healthcare managers today, modification and contextualization of the process are anticipated. As the evaluation process is applied in more health care organizations or applied repeatedly in an organization, it may become more streamlined. PMID:20482843

  20. Give first priority to publicity and education.

    PubMed

    1991-12-01

    Commentary is provided on the implementation of China's Three Priorities in strengthening family planning (FP) for population control. The Three Priorities issued by the Party Central Committee of China and the State Council refers to the emphasis on 1) "publicity and education rather than economic disincentives," 2) contraception rather than induced abortion," and 3) "day to day management work rather than irregular campaigns." The expectations are that leaders at all levels should be active, steadfast, patient, and down to earth. Improvements in management lead to more constant, scientific, and systematic FP. Family planning should be voluntary. The achievement is not just population control but better relations with the Party and cadres, which leads to social stability and unity. The directives have been well thought out and are to be resolutely carried out. It was stressed in April 1991 by the General-Secretary and the Premier that coercion would not be tolerated in FP work. The confidence of the masses must be relied upon. The success of FP is guaranteed with the practice of these directives. Constancy of education and publicity is the key work. There should be a strong population awareness and the awareness of available resources/capita, and also an understanding and firm command of the principles and methods of better implementation. FP has an effect both on the fundamental interests of the country and immediate personal interests. The task is expected to be difficult because traditional ideas are still strong. The country is just at the beginning stages of socialism. A social security system is not a reality and farmer's educational attainment is not high. Productivity in the rural areas is underdeveloped. There is a contradiction between childbearing intentions of some farmers and the government requirements of FP. In order for the people to understand government FP policy, painstaking and meticulous education must be carried out to explain why FP is

  1. Final Priority--Training of Interpreters for Individuals Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind Program. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2016-07-25

    Rehabilitative Services announces a final priority under the Training of Interpreters for Individuals Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year 2016 and later years. We take this action to provide training and technical assistance to better prepare novice interpreters to become highly qualified nationally certified sign language interpreters. PMID:27459750

  2. Final Priority--Training of Interpreters for Individuals Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind Program. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2016-08-12

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a final priority under the Training of Interpreters for Individuals Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind Program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year 2016 and later years. We take this action to provide training and technical assistance to better prepare novice interpreters to become highly qualified, nationally certified sign language interpreters. PMID:27529904

  3. Community-based decision making and priority setting using the R software: the community priority index.

    PubMed

    Salihu, Hamisu M; Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A; Paothong, Arnut; Wang, Wei; King, Lindsey M

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines how to compute community priority indices in the context of multicriteria decision making in community settings. A simple R function was developed and validated with community needs assessment data. Particularly, the first part of this paper briefly overviews the existing methods for priority setting and reviews the utility of a multicriteria decision-making approach for community-based prioritization. The second part illustrates how community priority indices can be calculated using the freely available R program to handle community data by showing the computational and mathematical steps of CPI (Community Priority Index) with bootstrapped 95% confidence intervals. PMID:25815045

  4. Global conservation priorities for crop wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Álvarez, Nora P; Khoury, Colin K; Achicanoy, Harold A; Bernau, Vivian; Dempewolf, Hannes; Eastwood, Ruth J; Guarino, Luigi; Harker, Ruth H; Jarvis, Andy; Maxted, Nigel; Müller, Jonas V; Ramirez-Villegas, Julian; Sosa, Chrystian C; Struik, Paul C; Vincent, Holly; Toll, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The wild relatives of domesticated crops possess genetic diversity useful for developing more productive, nutritious and resilient crop varieties. However, their conservation status and availability for utilization are a concern, and have not been quantified globally. Here, we model the global distribution of 1,076 taxa related to 81 crops, using occurrence information collected from biodiversity, herbarium and gene bank databases. We compare the potential geographic and ecological diversity encompassed in these distributions with that currently accessible in gene banks, as a means to estimate the comprehensiveness of the conservation of genetic diversity. Our results indicate that the diversity of crop wild relatives is poorly represented in gene banks. For 313 (29.1% of total) taxa associated with 63 crops, no germplasm accessions exist, and a further 257 (23.9%) are represented by fewer than ten accessions. Over 70% of taxa are identified as high priority for further collecting in order to improve their representation in gene banks, and over 95% are insufficiently represented in regard to the full range of geographic and ecological variation in their native distributions. The most critical collecting gaps occur in the Mediterranean and the Near East, western and southern Europe, Southeast and East Asia, and South America. We conclude that a systematic effort is needed to improve the conservation and availability of crop wild relatives for use in plant breeding. PMID:27249561

  5. Differential Clinical Implications of High-Degree Atrioventricular Block Complicating ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction according to the Location of Infarction in the Era of Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The clinical implication of high-degree (second- and third-degree) atrioventricular block (HAVB) complicating ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is ripe for investigation in this era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We sought to address the incidence, predictors and prognosis of HAVB according to the location of infarct in STEMI patients treated with primary PCI. Subjects and Methods A total of 16536 STEMI patients (anterior infarction: n=9354, inferior infarction: n=7692) treated with primary PCI were enrolled from a multicenter registry. We compared in-hospital mortality between patients with HAVB and those without HAVB with anterior or inferior infarction, separately. Multivariate analyses were performed to unearth predictors of HAVB and to identify whether HAVB is independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Results STEMI patients with HAVB showed higher in-hospital mortality than those without HAVB in both anterior (hazard ratio [HR]=9.821, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.946-19.503, p<0.001) and inferior infarction (HR=2.819, 95% CI: 2.076-3.827, p<0.001). In multivariate analyses, HAVB was associated with increased in-hospital mortality in anterior myocardial infarction (HR=19.264, 95% CI: 5.804-63.936, p<0.001). However, HAVB in inferior infarction was not an independent predictor of increased in-hospital mortality (HR=1.014, 95% CI: 0.547-1.985, p=0.901). Conclusion In this era of primary PCI, the prognostic impact of HAVB is different according to the location of infarction. Because of recent improvements in reperfusion strategy, the negative prognostic impact of HAVB in inferior STEMI is no longer prominent. PMID:27275168

  6. Recommended Priorities for NASA's Gamma Ray Astronomy Program 1999-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carol, Ladd

    1999-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Astronomy Program Working Group (GRAPWG) recommends priorities for the NASA Gamma-Ray Astronomy Program. The highest priority science topic is nuclear astrophysics and sites of gamma ray line emission. Other high priority topics are gamma ray bursts, hard x-ray emission from accreting black holes and neutron stars, the Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT), the High-resolution Spectroscopic Imager (HSI), and the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST). The recommendations include special consideration for technology development, TeV astronomy, the ultra-long duration balloon (ULDB) program, the International Space Station, optical telescope support, and data analysis and theory.

  7. Reading in High School. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The workers of the 21st Century will be expected to do more reading and writing than has been done in the past. In order to be successful, one author, Langer, stated that students need to possess "high literacy." According to the literature, it is evident when reading is truly a priority and supported by all stakeholders because there are high…

  8. Applicants' Self-Reported Priorities in Selecting a Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Macklin, E. A.; Goldsmith, J.; Weinstein, Debra F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency recruitment is a high-stakes activity for all participants, yet there is limited information about how applicants choose among programs. Objective This study evaluated the importance applicants place on various residency program attributes; whether applicant priorities vary by sex, race/ethnicity, or specialty choice; and whether the importance of these factors changes over time. Methods Highly ranked applicants to residency programs at 2 academic medical centers were surveyed annually from 2004 to 2012 regarding the importance of 26 characteristics in selecting a program. Mean ratings of importance for each factor were analyzed to assess priority for the overall applicant group, and whether priorities differed for subgroups (by sex, race/ethnicity, and specialty). Results Of 9669 applicants surveyed, 6285 (65%) responded. The 5 factors with highest rating of importance (overall and across all subgroups) were the program's ability to prepare residents for future training or position, resident esprit de corps, faculty availability and involvement in teaching, depth and breadth of faculty, and variety of patients and clinical resources. Small but significant differences in the ratings of some factors by sex and/or specialty group were identified. Institution-level characteristics, such as call rooms, salary, and benefits, were relatively unimportant. Applicant priorities were stable over the 9-year study period. Conclusions Highly ranked applicants to competitive residency programs value educational aspects of the program most highly, along with resident morale. Top factors were consistent across subgroups and over the 9 years of the study. These findings have implications for resident recruitment strategies. PMID:26217417

  9. Contemporary Priorities for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisen, H.; Sherwood, B.

    2012-06-01

    Human/robotic exploration implemented by an SMD/HEOMD/OCT partnership should refocus mission objectives beyond either refining prior measurements, or fixating on a singular sample return Pathway. The opportunity cost of default is too high.

  10. 40 CFR 47.125 - Eligible and priority projects and activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... foster international cooperation in addressing environmental issues and problems involving the United... environmental pollution problems; (3) Projects to understand and assess a specific environmental issue or a... environmental issue which, in the judgment of EPA, is of a high priority....

  11. 40 CFR 47.125 - Eligible and priority projects and activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... foster international cooperation in addressing environmental issues and problems involving the United... environmental pollution problems; (3) Projects to understand and assess a specific environmental issue or a... environmental issue which, in the judgment of EPA, is of a high priority....

  12. Top 40 Priorities for Science to Inform US Conservation and Management Policy

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a list of America's "Top 40" high-priority questions that, if answered, would help inform some of the most important current and future decisions about resource management in the United States

  13. 20 CFR 1010.310 - How will priority of service be applied?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for qualified job training programs must implement processes in accordance with § 1010.300 to identify... of their eligibility for priority of service. Since qualified job training programs may offer various... provided to covered persons by the qualified job training program. (b) Three categories of qualified...

  14. 20 CFR 1010.310 - How will priority of service be applied?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for qualified job training programs must implement processes in accordance with § 1010.300 to identify... of their eligibility for priority of service. Since qualified job training programs may offer various... provided to covered persons by the qualified job training program. (b) Three categories of qualified...

  15. 20 CFR 1010.310 - How will priority of service be applied?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for qualified job training programs must implement processes in accordance with § 1010.300 to identify... of their eligibility for priority of service. Since qualified job training programs may offer various... provided to covered persons by the qualified job training program. (b) Three categories of qualified...

  16. Can Michigan Meet the NCLB Challenge? Interpreting the 2004 Priority Schools List. Policy Report Number 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimann, Christopher B.; Lee, Kwanghyun

    2004-01-01

    The Michigan Department of Education (MDE) recently released its second annual list of schools that have not met their Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) goals. Targets for AYP are established by the state in accordance with the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001. The list, also known as the priority schools list, identifies 896 schools…

  17. Collaborating on Global Priorities: Science Education for Everyone--Any Time and Everywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Building on the key ideas from Dana Zeidler's paper I expand the conversation from the standpoint that the challenges facing humanity and the capacity of Earth to support life suggest that changes in human lifestyles are a priority. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to educate all humans about some of the science-related grand challenges, such…

  18. 75 FR 5877 - Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP): Amendment Removing Priority Given to Women, Infants...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... (48 FR 29114, June 24, 1983), the donation of foods in such programs is included in the scope of... Priority Given to Women, Infants, and Children Before the Elderly in Program Participation AGENCY: Food and... before the elderly in program participation, in accordance with the amendment made by the...

  19. Multiresidue determination of fluoroquinolones in poultry muscle and kidney according to the regulation 2002/657/EC. A systematic comparison of two different approaches: Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry or tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Diego G; Santos, Flavio A; da Silva, Júlio César C; Augusti, Rodinei; Faria, Adriana F

    2015-01-30

    This work involved the optimization and validation of two methods according to the Commission Decision 2002/657/EC directives for determining fluoroquinolones residues in samples of poultry muscle and kidney: ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, marbofloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, oxolinic acid, pipemidic acid and sarafloxacin. The extraction procedure was based on a QuEChERS approach, whose optimization employed a Box-Behnken 3(3) factorial design. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method (LC-MS/MS) was developed for determining the twelve analytes using the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Accuracy, evaluated by recovery studies, varied from 88.8 to 112.2% for the selected levels with RSD values lower than 12.3%. The second validated method employed high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) performed in the single ion monitoring mode (SIM), determining nine among twelve analytes. The validation parameters were evaluated as satisfactory, with recoveries from 82.5 to 114.4% and RSD lower than 8.7%. Decision limits and detection capabilities for both methods were reported. The two methods were statistically compared using the Student's t test, at 95% confidence level, resulting in no significant difference. PMID:25577647

  20. 10 CFR 217.41 - Requests for priority rating authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requests for priority rating authority. 217.41 Section 217.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Special Priorities Assistance § 217.41 Requests for priority rating authority. (a) If a rated order is likely to be...

  1. 10 CFR 217.41 - Requests for priority rating authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requests for priority rating authority. 217.41 Section 217.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Special Priorities Assistance § 217.41 Requests for priority rating authority. (a) If a rated order is likely to be...

  2. 10 CFR 217.41 - Requests for priority rating authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requests for priority rating authority. 217.41 Section 217.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ENERGY PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Special Priorities Assistance § 217.41 Requests for priority rating authority. (a) If a rated order is likely to be...

  3. 49 CFR 33.41 - Requests for priority rating authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requests for priority rating authority. 33.41 Section 33.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATION SYSTEM Special Priorities Assistance § 33.41 Requests for priority rating authority. (a) If a rated order is likely to be delayed because...

  4. Direct analysis of organic priority pollutants by IMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giam, C. S.; Reed, G. E.; Holliday, T. L.; Chang, L.; Rhodes, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    Many routine methods for monitoring of trace amounts of atmospheric organic pollutants consist of several steps. Typical steps are: (1) collection of the air sample; (2) trapping of organics from the sample; (3) extraction of the trapped organics; and (4) identification of the organics in the extract by GC (gas chromatography), HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography), or MS (Mass Spectrometry). These methods are often cumbersome and time consuming. A simple and fast method for monitoring atmospheric organics using an IMS (Ion Mobility Spectrometer) is proposed. This method has a short sampling time and does not require extraction of the organics since the sample is placed directly in the IMS. The purpose of this study was to determine the responses in the IMS to organic 'priority pollutants'. Priority pollutants including representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalates, phenols, chlorinated pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) were analyzed in both the positive and negative detection mode at ambient atmospheric pressure. Detection mode and amount detected are presented.

  5. Priority of discovery in the life sciences.

    PubMed

    Vale, Ronald D; Hyman, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    The job of a scientist is to make a discovery and then communicate this new knowledge to others. For a scientist to be successful, he or she needs to be able to claim credit or priority for discoveries throughout their career. However, despite being fundamental to the reward system of science, the principles for establishing the "priority of discovery" are rarely discussed. Here we break down priority into two steps: disclosure, in which the discovery is released to the world-wide community; and validation, in which other scientists assess the accuracy, quality and importance of the work. Currently, in biology, disclosure and an initial validation are combined in a journal publication. Here, we discuss the advantages of separating these steps into disclosure via a preprint, and validation via a combination of peer review at a journal and additional evaluation by the wider scientific community. PMID:27310529

  6. Setting mental health priorities: problems and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Callahan, D

    1994-01-01

    A recent project at the Hastings Center examined the question of priority setting in the provision of mental health services. A central issue was whether those services should be prioritized independently of other health services. The answer to that question was no: they should have full parity. Even so, priority setting can be a complex venture. At the heart of any such effort will be the relationship between empirical evidence on treatment outcomes and efficacy and the political and ethical interests that legitimately bear on interpreting and using that evidence. An argument is made that a priority should be given those whose suffering and inability to function in ordinary life is most pronounced, even if the available treatment for them is comparatively less efficacious than for other conditions. PMID:7935242

  7. Priority of discovery in the life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Ronald D; Hyman, Anthony A

    2016-01-01

    The job of a scientist is to make a discovery and then communicate this new knowledge to others. For a scientist to be successful, he or she needs to be able to claim credit or priority for discoveries throughout their career. However, despite being fundamental to the reward system of science, the principles for establishing the "priority of discovery" are rarely discussed. Here we break down priority into two steps: disclosure, in which the discovery is released to the world-wide community; and validation, in which other scientists assess the accuracy, quality and importance of the work. Currently, in biology, disclosure and an initial validation are combined in a journal publication. Here, we discuss the advantages of separating these steps into disclosure via a preprint, and validation via a combination of peer review at a journal and additional evaluation by the wider scientific community. PMID:27310529

  8. Reframing recreation as a public policy priority.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Recreation has the potential to be an important public policy priority; however, it must be reframed to address critical policy priorities. Few policymakers understand the value and benefits of recreation, requiring practitioners and advocates to closely connect recreation to issues of concern to policymakers. A significant policy opportunity to expand recreational opportunities for children and youth lies in the area of education, including the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. By educating policymakers on the myriad outcomes that can result from quality recreational experiences, including the ways in which recreation can support the education of children and youth, solid,incremental progress can be made in positioning recreation as a public policy priority. PMID:21786415

  9. Priority regions for research on dryland cereals and legumes

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Glenn; Barona, Elizabeth; Biradar, Chandrashekhar; Guevara, Edward; Dixon, John; Beebe, Steve; Castano, Silvia Elena; Alabi, Tunrayo; Gumma, Murali Krishna; Sivasankar, Shoba; Rivera, Ovidio; Espinosa, Herlin; Cardona, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Dryland cereals and legumes  are important crops in farming systems across the world.  Yet they are frequently neglected among the priorities for international agricultural research and development, often due to lack of information on their magnitude and extent. Given what we know about the global distribution of dryland cereals and legumes, what regions should be high priority for research and development to improve livelihoods and food security? This research evaluated the geographic dimensions of these crops and the farming systems where they are found worldwide. The study employed geographic information science and data to assess the key farming systems and regions for these crops. Dryland cereal and legume crops should be given high priority in 18 farming systems worldwide, where their cultivated area comprises more than 160 million ha. These regions include the dryer areas of South Asia, West and East Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, Central America and other parts of Asia. These regions are prone to drought and heat stress, have limiting soil constraints, make up half of the global population and account for 60 percent of the global poor and malnourished. The dryland cereal and legume crops and farming systems merit more research and development attention to improve productivity and address development problems. This project developed an open access dataset and information resource that provides the basis for future analysis of the geographic dimensions of dryland cereals and legumes. PMID:27303632

  10. Priority regions for research on dryland cereals and legumes.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Glenn; Barona, Elizabeth; Biradar, Chandrashekhar; Guevara, Edward; Dixon, John; Beebe, Steve; Castano, Silvia Elena; Alabi, Tunrayo; Gumma, Murali Krishna; Sivasankar, Shoba; Rivera, Ovidio; Espinosa, Herlin; Cardona, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Dryland cereals and legumes  are important crops in farming systems across the world.  Yet they are frequently neglected among the priorities for international agricultural research and development, often due to lack of information on their magnitude and extent. Given what we know about the global distribution of dryland cereals and legumes, what regions should be high priority for research and development to improve livelihoods and food security? This research evaluated the geographic dimensions of these crops and the farming systems where they are found worldwide. The study employed geographic information science and data to assess the key farming systems and regions for these crops. Dryland cereal and legume crops should be given high priority in 18 farming systems worldwide, where their cultivated area comprises more than 160 million ha. These regions include the dryer areas of South Asia, West and East Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, Central America and other parts of Asia. These regions are prone to drought and heat stress, have limiting soil constraints, make up half of the global population and account for 60 percent of the global poor and malnourished. The dryland cereal and legume crops and farming systems merit more research and development attention to improve productivity and address development problems. This project developed an open access dataset and information resource that provides the basis for future analysis of the geographic dimensions of dryland cereals and legumes. PMID:27303632

  11. Identifying environmental health priorities in underserved populations: a study of rural versus urban communities

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, M.C.; Evans, M.B.; Kent, S.T.; Johnson, E.; Threadgill, S.L.; Tyson, S.; Becker, S.M.; Gohlke, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Understanding and effectively addressing persistent health disparities in minority communities requires a clear picture of members’ concerns and priorities. This study was intended to engage residents in urban and rural communities in order to identify environmental health priorities. Specific emphasis was placed on how the communities defined the term environment, their perceptions of environmental exposures as affecting their health, specific priorities in their communities, and differences in urban versus rural populations. Study design A community-engaged approach was used to develop and implement focus groups and compare environmental health priorities in urban versus rural communities. Methods A total of eight focus groups were conducted: four in rural and four in urban communities. Topics included defining the term environment, how the environment may affect health, and environmental priorities within their communities, using both open discussion and a predefined list. Data were analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively to identify patterns and trends. Results There were important areas of overlap in priorities between urban and rural communities; both emphasized the importance of the social environment and shared a concern over air pollution from industrial sources. In contrast, for urban focus groups, abandoned houses and their social and physical sequelae were a high priority while concerns about adequate sewer and water services and road maintenance were high priorities in rural communities. Conclusions This study was able to identify environmental health priorities in urban versus rural minority communities. In contrast to some previous risk perception research, the results of this study suggest prioritization of tangible, known risks in everyday life instead of rare, disaster-related events, even in communities that have recently experienced devastating damage from tornadoes. The findings can help inform future efforts to study

  12. Priorities for treatment research from different professional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, William E; Wald, Arnold; Norton, Nancy J

    2004-01-01

    The consensus conference "Advancing the Treatment of Fecal and Urinary Incontinence Through Research" had as one of its goals the development of a comprehensive list of research priorities. Experts from all disciplines that treat incontinence-gastroenterology, pediatric gastroenterology, urology, urogynecology, colorectal surgery, geriatrics, neurology, nursing, and psychology-and patient advocates were asked to identify their highest priorities for treatment-related research. Meeting participants were shown the aggregated list and invited to propose additional priorities. Treatments for fecal incontinence (biofeedback, sphincteroplasty, antidiarrheal and laxative medications, and sacral nerve stimulation) require validation by randomized, controlled trials. For urinary incontinence, the greatest need is to compare pharmacological, behavioral, and surgical treatments. Trials assessing combined treatments (e.g., biofeedback plus surgery vs. surgery alone or biofeedback alone) are also needed. New drugs are needed that target anal canal resting pressure in fecal incontinence and hypersensitivity to distention in urge urinary incontinence. It may be possible to substantially reduce the incidence of incontinence through modification of obstetric practices (e.g., avoiding episiotomies or offering elective cesarean delivery to high-risk patients), providing pelvic floor exercises before childbirth, and educating patients to avoid straining during defecation. For the elderly, practical behavioral and pharmacological treatments are needed that can postpone or avoid institutionalization. Social science research may identify ways to counteract the social stigma of fecal incontinence and assist physicians in providing patients with more comprehensive and understandable information on the risks associated with different treatment options. PMID:14978659

  13. [Health personnel research: analysis of priorities and political orientations].

    PubMed

    Stulhman, L; Codina, F

    1985-01-01

    The authors endeavor to determine the right priorities for research on health personnel in the framework of the policies on science and technology of the countries in the Region. Although it is difficult to work out a common systematic approach for the analysis, definition and location of the infinity of variables that make up a health system, it is clear that the Region's ever evolving manpower situation has three effects that are ineluctably bound up with the socioeconomic development of the society served: the planning, education and training, and utilization of those resources. The article considers the lack of definite policies on just these three key elements in the development of health personnel and services in relation to both the supply of and demand for them. The authors point out that a genuine solution to the problems requires imperatively the satisfaction of the great need for high priority to serious and thorough research on the health care system, on mutual responsiveness between care services and training systems, and the economic, political and social aspects of the health field itself. The paper also considers the policy guidelines required by the research priorities, and identifies possible activities in the short and middle run for carrying forward programs and projects of social research in those subjects. PMID:3996280

  14. Mapping of Networks to Detect Priority Zoonoses in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Erin M; El Azhari, Mohammad; Maswdeh, Nezar; Kornblet, Sarah; Standley, Claire J; Katz, Rebecca L; Ablan, Ibrahim; Fischer, Julie E

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of emerging disease events is a priority focus area for cooperative bioengagement programs. Communication and coordination among national disease surveillance and response networks are essential for timely detection and control of a public health event. Although systematic information sharing between the human and animal health sectors can help stakeholders detect and respond to zoonotic diseases rapidly, resource constraints, and other barriers often prevent efficient cross-sector reporting. The purpose of this research project was to map the laboratory and surveillance networks currently in place for detecting and reporting priority zoonotic diseases in Jordan in order to identify the nodes of communication, coordination, and decision-making where health and veterinary sectors intersect, and to identify priorities and gaps that limit information sharing for action. We selected three zoonotic diseases as case studies: highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, rabies, and brucellosis. Through meetings with government agencies and health officials, and desk research, we mapped each system from the index case through response - including both surveillance and laboratory networks, highlighting both areas of strength and those that would benefit from capacity-building resources. Our major findings indicate informal communication exists across sectors; in the event of emergence of one of the priority zoonoses studied, there is effective coordination across the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Agriculture. However, routine formal coordination is lacking. Overall, there is a strong desire and commitment for multi-sectoral coordination in detection and response to zoonoses across public health and veterinary sectors. Our analysis indicates that the networks developed in response to HPAI can and should be leveraged to develop a comprehensive laboratory and surveillance One Health network. PMID:26528460

  15. Mapping of Networks to Detect Priority Zoonoses in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, Erin M.; El Azhari, Mohammad; Maswdeh, Nezar; Kornblet, Sarah; Standley, Claire J.; Katz, Rebecca L.; Ablan, Ibrahim; Fischer, Julie E.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of emerging disease events is a priority focus area for cooperative bioengagement programs. Communication and coordination among national disease surveillance and response networks are essential for timely detection and control of a public health event. Although systematic information sharing between the human and animal health sectors can help stakeholders detect and respond to zoonotic diseases rapidly, resource constraints, and other barriers often prevent efficient cross-sector reporting. The purpose of this research project was to map the laboratory and surveillance networks currently in place for detecting and reporting priority zoonotic diseases in Jordan in order to identify the nodes of communication, coordination, and decision-making where health and veterinary sectors intersect, and to identify priorities and gaps that limit information sharing for action. We selected three zoonotic diseases as case studies: highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, rabies, and brucellosis. Through meetings with government agencies and health officials, and desk research, we mapped each system from the index case through response – including both surveillance and laboratory networks, highlighting both areas of strength and those that would benefit from capacity-building resources. Our major findings indicate informal communication exists across sectors; in the event of emergence of one of the priority zoonoses studied, there is effective coordination across the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Agriculture. However, routine formal coordination is lacking. Overall, there is a strong desire and commitment for multi-sectoral coordination in detection and response to zoonoses across public health and veterinary sectors. Our analysis indicates that the networks developed in response to HPAI can and should be leveraged to develop a comprehensive laboratory and surveillance One Health network. PMID:26528460

  16. 78 FR 29785 - Priority Mail Pricing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION Priority Mail Pricing AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is....452 percent. Id. at 5. The Postal Service indicates that after the price change, the unused...

  17. 7 CFR 4279.155 - Loan priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Loan priorities. 4279.155 Section 4279.155 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Business and Industry...

  18. 7 CFR 4279.155 - Loan priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Loan priorities. 4279.155 Section 4279.155 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Business and Industry...

  19. 7 CFR 4279.155 - Loan priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Loan priorities. 4279.155 Section 4279.155 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Business and Industry...

  20. Pres. Clinton's Education Priorities: Early 1993 Indications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    Educators anticipate bold new education reform initiatives from President Bill Clinton and his Education Secretary, Richard Riley. A priority project is college tuition loans, repayable through voluntary public service jobs. The President also supports increased funding for the Head Start Program and money for a national apprenticeship program for…

  1. U.S. Foreign Policy Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pell, Claiborne

    1983-01-01

    The three highest priorities for American foreign policy are avoiding nuclear war by working with the Soviet leadership to alter our present collision course, demonstrating our commitment to human rights throughout the world, and ensuring American economic prosperity by strengthening exports and ensuring the stability of the international monetary…

  2. Remembering What's Important: Priorities of School Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnici, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    In "Remembering What's Important: Priorities of School Leadership," Charles A. Bonnici addresses several issues facing school leaders through strategies supported by real-life examples and anecdotes. The issues addressed include questions such as: (1) What is the most urgent issue faced by a new school leader?; (2) How can this leader address the…

  3. The Top Training Priorities for 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Brandon

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 222 training professionals identified current training priorities: soft skills training; technical training; enhancing the quality of training; business skills; business alignment, business impact, and return on investment; online learning; sales training; safety and compliance training; performance management; and human…

  4. 47 CFR 211.5 - Priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Priorities. 211.5 Section 211.5 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EMERGENCY RESTORATION... intelligence; (4) Distribute essential food and other supplies critical to health; (5) Provide for...

  5. 47 CFR 211.5 - Priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Priorities. 211.5 Section 211.5 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EMERGENCY RESTORATION... intelligence; (4) Distribute essential food and other supplies critical to health; (5) Provide for...

  6. Gore's Controversial Priorities for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Ben

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates presidential candidate Al Gore's priorities for higher education, noting criticism by some educators of his emphasis on benefits for the middle class and the large number of specific proposals he has offered, including the College Opportunity Tax Cut, 21st Century Teachers' Corps, 401(j) Educational Savings Accounts, the National Tuition…

  7. National Adult Student Priorities Report, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents the results of the fourth annual National Adult Student Priorities Study (ASPS) conducted to determine the areas of highest importance to students 25 years and older, the areas of greatest and least satisfaction to these college students, and the greatest performance gaps between levels of importance and levels of…

  8. National Adult Student Priorities Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This report describes the third annual National Adult Student Priorities Study (ASPS), an attempt to determine the areas of highest importance to students aged 25 and older. The 2002 ASPS represents data from 78 colleges and universities representing four-year public, four-year private, and two-year community, junior, and technical institutions.…

  9. Priority Queuing On A Parallel Data Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Queuing strategy for communications along shared data bus minimizes number of data lines while always assuring user of highest priority given access to bus. New system handles up to 32 user demands on 17 data lines that previously serviced only 17 demands.

  10. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Priority. 3431.14 Section 3431.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program §...

  11. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Priority. 3431.14 Section 3431.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program §...

  12. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Priority. 3431.14 Section 3431.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program §...

  13. 7 CFR 3431.14 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Priority. 3431.14 Section 3431.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program §...

  14. 42 CFR 57.1506 - Priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Priority. 57.1506 Section 57.1506 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS GRANTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Loan Guarantees and Interest Subsidies to Assist in Construction of...

  15. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  16. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  17. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  18. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  19. 45 CFR 2531.20 - Funding priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Funding priorities. 2531.20 Section 2531.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PURPOSES AND AVAILABILITY OF GRANTS FOR INVESTMENT FOR QUALITY AND INNOVATION ACTIVITIES § 2531.20...

  20. 48 CFR 8.603 - Purchase priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase priorities. 8.603 Section 8.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition From Federal Prison Industries, Inc. 8.603...

  1. 48 CFR 808.603 - Purchase priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase priorities. 808.603 Section 808.603 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition From Federal...

  2. 48 CFR 8.704 - Purchase priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase priorities. 8.704 Section 8.704 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING... Prison Industries, Inc., ordering offices shall purchase supplies and services in the...

  3. Institutional Priority for Diversity at Christian Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes-Collins, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This evaluative study explored the relationship between institutional priority for diversity and minority enrollment at four schools within the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, a consortium of Christian institutions. This institutional evaluation utilized public resources in order to gather descriptive data on minority enrollment…

  4. Education and Work: A NIE Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieder, Corinne H.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a rationale and objectives for NIE's education and work priority area, to discuss the status of current R&D activities within this area, and to describe possible future efforts that are now under discussion. (Author)

  5. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; building construction; egress; building compartmentalization (e.g., smoke barrier, fire walls); fire alarm... acquisition of a nursing home or domiciliary from a State that has a great need for the beds that the State... of establishing priorities under this section: (1) A State has a great need for nursing home...

  6. 38 CFR 59.50 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... construction; egress; building compartmentalization (e.g., smoke barrier, fire walls); fire alarm/detection... acquisition of a nursing home or domiciliary from a State that has a great need for the beds that the State... of establishing priorities under this section: (1) A State has a great need for nursing home...

  7. 7 CFR 636.5 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.5 National priorities. (a) The... or important native fish and wildlife habitats; (2) Protect, restore, develop, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat to benefit at-risk species; (3) Reduce the impacts of invasive species on fish...

  8. 7 CFR 636.5 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVES PROGRAM § 636.5 National priorities. (a) The... or important native fish and wildlife habitats; (2) Protect, restore, develop, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat to benefit at-risk species; (3) Reduce the impacts of invasive species on fish...

  9. 42 CFR 51.24 - Program priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program priorities. 51.24 Section 51.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Program Administration...

  10. 42 CFR 51.24 - Program priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program priorities. 51.24 Section 51.24 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Program Administration...

  11. Protecting Our Priorities: 2010 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    What does "protecting our priorities" mean in an era when economic realities require that institutions of higher education trim their budgets while also providing critical education and training to more and more students--those "human resources" whose skills will be the key to any economic turnaround? This is a question WICHE addresses every day.…

  12. National priorities list sites: Connecticut, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  13. National priorities list sites: Colorado, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  14. National priorities list sites: Kentucky, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  15. National priorities list sites: West Virginia, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  16. National priorities list sites: Tennessee, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  17. National priorities list sites: Wyoming, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  18. National priorities list sites: Louisiana, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  19. National priorities list sites: North Carolina, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  20. National priorities list sites: Maine, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  1. National priorities list sites: Florida, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  2. National priorities list sites: Minnesota, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  3. National priorities list sites: New Mexico, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  4. National priorities list sites: Arkansas, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  5. National priorities list sites: Washington, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  6. National priorities list sites: New Jersey, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  7. National priorities list sites: Vermont, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  8. National priorities list sites: Oregon, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  9. National priorities list sites: Alaska, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  10. National priorities list sites: Michigan, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  11. National priorities list sites: Mississippi, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  12. National priorities list sites: Alabama, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  13. National priorities list sites: South Carolina, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  14. National priorities list sites: Georgia, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  15. National priorities list sites: Rhode Island, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  16. National priorities list sites: Iowa, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  17. National priorities list sites: Massachusetts, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  18. National priorities list sites: Montana, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  19. National priorities list sites: Delaware, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  20. National priorities list sites: Missouri, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  1. National priorities list sites: Wisconsin, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  2. National priorities list sites: Ohio, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  3. National priorities list sites: New Hampshire, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  4. National priorities list sites: Maryland, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  5. National priorities list sites: Indiana, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  6. National priorities list sites: New York, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  7. National priorities list sites: Utah, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  8. National priorities list sites: Pennsylvania, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  9. National priorities list sites: Nebraska, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  10. National priorities list sites: Idaho, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  11. National priorities list sites: Virginia, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  12. National priorities list sites: Kansas, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  13. National priorities list sites: Texas, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  14. National priorities list sites: Oklahoma, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  15. National priorities list sites: Illinois, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  16. 7 CFR 636.5 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.5 National priorities. (a) The... or important native fish and wildlife habitats; (2) Protect, restore, develop, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat to benefit at-risk species; (3) Reduce the impacts of invasive species on fish...

  17. 7 CFR 636.5 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.5 National priorities. (a) The... or important native fish and wildlife habitats; (2) Protect, restore, develop, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat to benefit at-risk species; (3) Reduce the impacts of invasive species on fish...

  18. 7 CFR 636.5 - National priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WILDLIFE HABITAT INCENTIVE PROGRAM § 636.5 National priorities. (a) The... or important native fish and wildlife habitats; (2) Protect, restore, develop, or enhance fish and wildlife habitat to benefit at-risk species; (3) Reduce the impacts of invasive species on fish...

  19. Current Priorities of Soviet School Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soviet Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Six articles discuss top priorities of Soviet education policy. Topics discussed include labor training, revision of the curriculum for the 10-year general education program, quantitative v qualitative demands on the educational system, and extended-day programs for the children of working mothers. (DB)

  20. Mitigation assessment results and priorities in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zongxin; Wei Zhihong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper energy related CO2 emission projections of China by 2030 are given. CO2 mitigation potential and technology options in main fields of energy conservation and energy substitution are analyzed. CO2 reduction costs of main mitigation technologies are estimated and the AHP approach is used for helping assessment of priority technologies.

  1. 7 CFR 4279.255 - Loan priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Loan priorities. 4279.255 Section 4279.255 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Biorefinery Assistance...

  2. 7 CFR 4279.255 - Loan priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Loan priorities. 4279.255 Section 4279.255 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Biorefinery Assistance...

  3. 7 CFR 4279.255 - Loan priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Loan priorities. 4279.255 Section 4279.255 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED LOANMAKING Biorefinery Assistance...

  4. 76 FR 54244 - Telecommunications Service Priority System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... published this information collection request (ICR) in the Federal Register, 76 FR 2011-13953 (June 7, 2011... SECURITY Telecommunications Service Priority System AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate... Directorate (NPPD), Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C), National Communications System...

  5. Leadership Education Priorities for a Democratic Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenlink, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the priorities for leadership education in a democratic society is a complex, challenging responsibility, not a task to be taken lightly. It is complex on one level in that to be a leader in schools "today is to understand a profoundly human as well as a professional responsibility." It is challenging on another level in that preparing…

  6. 38 CFR 39.3 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES... date of the preapplication. Such projects would include expansion projects as well as improvement... cemeteries. (3) Priority Group 3—Expansion projects at existing veterans cemeteries when a disruption...

  7. 38 CFR 39.7 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT OF VETERANS' CEMETERIES (Eff. until 7-16-10) Grant... years of the date of the preapplication. Such projects would include expansion projects as well as... veterans' cemeteries. (3) Priority Group 3—Expansion projects at existing veterans' cemeteries when...

  8. 38 CFR 39.3 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES... date of the preapplication. Such projects would include expansion projects as well as improvement... cemeteries. (3) Priority Group 3—Expansion projects at existing veterans cemeteries when a disruption...

  9. 38 CFR 39.3 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES... date of the preapplication. Such projects would include expansion projects as well as improvement... cemeteries. (3) Priority Group 3—Expansion projects at existing veterans cemeteries when a disruption...

  10. 38 CFR 39.3 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS... years of the date of the preapplication. Such projects would include expansion projects as well as... veterans cemeteries. (3) Priority Group 3—Expansion projects at existing veterans cemeteries when...

  11. Organic crop production's top research priority: Pestiphytology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pestiphytology is the study of pest plants, commonly referred to as weeds. In a recent national survey, weed research was designated as the top research priority by organic producers. Manual weed control is a costly practice that can quickly decrease return on investment, while the absence of weed...

  12. Marine Science Affairs--Selecting Priority Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Marine Resources and Engineering Development, Washington, DC.

    This report summarizes accomplishments in 1969, describing Federal programs and policies, and new programs implemented to meet those policies. The report describes the priorities that have been selected in the Federal Marine Science program during 1969. The first chapter reviews the steps taken by the Federal Government during 1969 to advance and…

  13. Public Opinion Poll on Community Priorities: Sacramento

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra Health Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to measure public perceptions, opinions and priorities as they pertain to youth issues in Sacramento for the purposes of further developing public and private youth programming and public policy in the Sacramento region. By presenting a "statistically reliable" profile of public opinion on youth issues, the…

  14. 47 CFR 211.5 - Priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Priorities. 211.5 Section 211.5 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL EMERGENCY RESTORATION... intelligence; (4) Distribute essential food and other supplies critical to health; (5) Provide for...

  15. 2008 Public Sector Cucumber Research Priority Survey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In December 2008, a national wide survey was conducted to identify priorities for cucumber research in the public sector. The questions in the survey were in four categories: diseases, insects, abiotic stresses and other issues. The survey was sent to cucumber-related researchers in the public insti...

  16. 48 CFR 8.704 - Purchase priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purchase priorities. 8.704 Section 8.704 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition From Nonprofit Agencies Employing People Who...

  17. Annual Report on LSCA Priorities. FY 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Center for Libraries and Education Improvement.

    This collection of six reports was compiled by the State and Public Library Services Branch of the United States Department of Education to disseminate pertinent information submitted by the State Library Administrative Agencies on the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) priority areas. Based on data from the fiscal year 1982 LSCA Annual…

  18. 7 CFR 623.9 - Easement priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Easement priority. 623.9 Section 623.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... selection will consider the following: (a) Protection and enhancement of habitat for migratory birds...

  19. 7 CFR 623.9 - Easement priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Easement priority. 623.9 Section 623.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... selection will consider the following: (a) Protection and enhancement of habitat for migratory birds...

  20. 7 CFR 623.9 - Easement priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Easement priority. 623.9 Section 623.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... selection will consider the following: (a) Protection and enhancement of habitat for migratory birds...

  1. 7 CFR 623.9 - Easement priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Easement priority. 623.9 Section 623.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... selection will consider the following: (a) Protection and enhancement of habitat for migratory birds...

  2. Incorporating national priorities into the curriculum.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Deborah Y

    2012-01-01

    There are many aspects of care that need an overhaul to function safely, efficiently, and effectively. There needs to be a new culture in health care that focuses on safety and quality, and it will take many shareholders working together to make this possible. The National Priorities Partnership is a group of 28 national organizations from across the health care spectrum collaborating to change the health care delivery system. The Partners acknowledged four challenges individuals face in the current U.S. system: harm, disparity, disease burden, and waste. To meet these challenges and improve performance, the Partners identified six priorities: patient and family engagement, population health, safety, care coordination, palliative and end-of-life care, and overuse (National Priorities Partnership). It is hopeful that when put into practice, these essentials will have a significant impact on improving health care. It comes down to creating a culture of safety and quality. This culture should start during entry-level education for health care providers, such as nursing schools. The priorities and goals provide a framework that can be incorporated into the curriculum so future nurses are aware of the issues and challenges in health care today. Each challenge needs evidence-based strategies for achieving the desired results. It is time to create a culture of safety and quality in health care. PMID:22459140

  3. Research priorities for advanced fibrous composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, K. J.; Swedlow, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Priorities for research in advanced laminated fibrous composite materials are presented. Supporting evidence is presented in two bodies, including a general literature survey and a survey of aerospace composite hardware and service experience. Both surveys were undertaken during 1977-1979. Specific results and conclusions indicate that a significant portion of contemporary published research diverges from recommended priorites.

  4. 40 CFR 60.16 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Categories Priority Number 1 Source Category 1. Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) and... Coating: Automobiles 28. Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances 29. Crude Oil and Natural Gas... production 21. Vegetable Oil 22. Industrial Surface Coating: Metal Coil 23. Petroleum Transportation...

  5. 40 CFR 60.16 - Priority list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Categories Priority Number 1 Source Category 1. Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) and... Coating: Automobiles 28. Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances 29. Crude Oil and Natural Gas... production 21. Vegetable Oil 22. Industrial Surface Coating: Metal Coil 23. Petroleum Transportation...

  6. UNICEF's Priorities for Children, 2002-2005.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This document provides an overview of UNICEF's medium-term strategic plan for the period 2002-2005. Five priorities are detailed to which UNICEF has committed resources: (1) girls' education, completion of a quality primary school education for every girl and boy; (2) early intervention, promotion of integrated early childhood development to…

  7. Driving Forces and Priorities in the Hungarian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Takats, F.; Ormai, P.

    2002-02-26

    Hungary, being a candidate state to the European Union, pays particular attention to the measures that are typically considered as good practice within the EU when developing and implementing its national program for the safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste. The Public Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (PURAM) has been designated to carry out the multilevel tasks in the field of radioactive waste management. In accordance with changes in infrastructure, Hungary is about to make significant strategic and technical decisions. There are several technical priorities for the coming years, such as improving the existing L/ILW repository, construction of a new repository for L/ILW, extension of the interim storage facility for spent fuel and setting up a revised back-end policy. Preparations for decommissioning of the nuclear facilities have to be developed as well. The paper outlines the main problem areas as well as the approach to managing radioactive wastes. It will be concluded that priorities can be set, but key dates and deadlines will always contain an element of uncertainty due to public and political acceptance problems.

  8. Are survival processing memory advantages based on ancestral priorities?

    PubMed

    Soderstrom, Nicholas C; McCabe, David P

    2011-06-01

    Recent research has suggested that our memory systems are especially tuned to process information according to its survival relevance, and that inducing problems of "ancestral priorities" faced by our ancestors should lead to optimal recall performance (Nairne & Pandeirada, Cognitive Psychology, 2010). The present study investigated the specificity of this idea by comparing an ancestor-consistent scenario and a modern survival scenario that involved threats that were encountered by human ancestors (e.g., predators) or threats from fictitious creatures (i.e., zombies). Participants read one of four survival scenarios in which the environment and the explicit threat were either consistent or inconsistent with ancestrally based problems (i.e., grasslands-predators, grasslands-zombies, city-attackers, city-zombies), or they rated words for pleasantness. After rating words based on their survival relevance (or pleasantness), the participants performed a free recall task. All survival scenarios led to better recall than did pleasantness ratings, but recall was greater when zombies were the threat, as compared to predators or attackers. Recall did not differ for the modern (i.e., city) and ancestral (i.e., grasslands) scenarios. These recall differences persisted when valence and arousal ratings for the scenarios were statistically controlled as well. These data challenge the specificity of ancestral priorities in survival-processing advantages in memory. PMID:21327372

  9. Identifying spatial priorities for protecting ecosystem services

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Gary W

    2012-01-01

    Priorities for protecting ecosystem services must be identified to ensure future human well-being. Approaches to broad-scale spatial prioritization of ecosystem services are becoming increasingly popular and are a vital precursor to identifying locations where further detailed analyses of the management of ecosystem services is required (e.g., examining trade-offs among management actions). Prioritization approaches often examine the spatial congruence between priorities for protecting ecosystem services and priorities for protecting biodiversity; therefore, the spatial prioritization method used is crucial because it will influence the alignment of service protection and conservation goals. While spatial prioritization of ecosystem services and prioritization for conservation share similarities, such as the need to document threats and costs, the former differs substantially from the latter owing to the requirement to measure the following components: supply of services; availability of human-derived alternatives to service provision; capacity to meet beneficiary demand; and site dependency in and scale of service delivery. We review studies that identify broad-scale spatial priorities for managing ecosystem services and demonstrate that researchers have used different approaches and included various measures for identifying priorities, and most studies do not consider all of the components listed above. We describe a conceptual framework for integrating each of these components into spatial prioritization of ecosystem services and illustrate our approach using a worked example for water provision. A fuller characterization of the biophysical and social context for ecosystem services that we call for should improve future prioritization and the identification of locations where ecosystem-service management is especially important or cost effective. PMID:24555017

  10. Middle Urals` pollution prevention priorities assessment project

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.; Ott, R.L.; Chukanov, V.

    1995-09-13

    The Middle Urals is an important Russian industrial region. The key industries are also the most environmentally damaging: mining, metallurgical and chemical industries. There are some 600 large-sized and medium-sized enterprises located within the Middle Urals` region. Their annual solid and gaseous chemical releases have led to exceeding some maximum permissible contaminant concentrations by factors of tens and hundreds. The environmental problems of the Middle Urals are of such magnitude, seriousness, and urgency that the limited available resources can be applied only to the problems of the highest priority in the most cost-effective way. By the combined efforts of scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Institute of Industrial Ecology (Ekaterinburg, Russia) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Snezhinsk, Russia) the project on Environmental Priorities Assessment was initiated in 1993. Because the project will cut across a spectrum of Russian environmental, social, and political issues, it has been established as a genuine Russian effort led by Russian principals. Russian participants are the prime movers and decision-makers, and LLNL participants are advisors. A preliminary project has been completed to gather relevant environmental data and to develop a formal proposal for the full priorities assessment project for submittal to the International Science and Technology Center. The proposed priorities assessment methodology will be described in this paper. The specific objectives of this project are to develop and to implement a methodology to establish Russian priorities for future pollution prevention efforts in a limited geographic region of the Middle Urals (a part of Chelyabinsk and Sverdlovsk Oblasts). This methodology will be developed on two geographic levels: local (town scale) and regional (region scale). Detailed environmental analysis will be performed on a local scale and extrapolated to the regional scale.

  11. [Problems and priorities in child survival].

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, J L

    1988-01-01

    This work synthesizes the conclusions and recommendations of the 1985 International Workshop on Child Survival held in Teotihuacan, Mexico. Data are presented which document the extent of the problem of child survival in Latin America and the deficiencies of available data. Malnutrition, diseases preventable through vaccination, diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory infections, perinatal disorders, and shortcomings in quality of care are separately discussed following an assessment of their socioeconomic and cultural determining factors. Recent advances in the preventive component of primary health care programs are discussed. In Latin America, 900 of each 1000 live born babies survive to the 5th year of life compared to 980 in developed countries. Although the mortality rate of children under 5 in Latin America declined from 128 in 1950-55 to 63 in 1980-85, there are wide disparities between countries. Most countries of Latin America were classified as having high or very high infant and child mortality. There are serious differences in child survival between geographic regions and social groups of each country. The mortality decline in Costa Rica, Cuba, and Chile demonstrates that other countries could avoid a large proportion of deaths by ensuring that benefits of current programs have broader coverage. The severe economic crisis in Mexico and other countries threatens the progress already achieved in child survival. The recommendations of the conference are based on the premise that recent efforts to improve survival have been insufficient and a more rational use of the available resources and knowledge is required. In the area of health policy, priority should continue to be given to providing care for mothers and small children. Investments should be reoriented toward extending coverage of primary health care. The proportion of mothers attended during delivery by trained paramedical personnel or physicians should be increased, and family planning programs in

  12. Active Debris Removal of Multiple Priority Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Vitali; Flegel, Sven Kevin; Vörsmann, Peter; Wiedemann, Carsten; Gelhaus, Johannes; Moeckel, Marek; Kebschull, Christopher

    2012-07-01

    Today's space debris environment shows major concentrations of objects within distinct orbital regions for nearly all size regimes. The most critical region is found at orbital altitudes near 800 kilometers with high declinations. Within this region many satellites are operated in so called sun-synchronous orbits (SSO). Among those, there are Earth observation, communication and weather satellites. Due to the orbital geometry, head-on encounters with relative velocities of about 15 km/s are most probable and would thus result in highly energetic collisions, which are often referred to as catastrophic collisions, leading to the complete fragmentation of the participating objects. So called feedback collisions can then be triggered by the newly generated fragments, thus leading to a further population increase in the affected orbital region. This effect is known as the Kessler syndrome. Current studies show that catastrophic collisions are not a major problem today, but will become the main process for debris generation within the SSO region in the near future, even without any future launches. In order to avoid this effect, objects with a major impact on collisional cascading have to be actively removed from the critical region after their end of life. Not having the capability to perform an end-of-life maneuver in order to transfer to a graveyard orbit or to de-orbit, many satellites and rocket bodies would have to be de-orbited within a dedicated mission. In such a mission, a service satellite would perform a de-orbit maneuver, after having docked to a specific target. In this paper several systems, e.g. chemical and electrical engines are analysed with the main focus on removing multiple targets within one single mission. The service satellite has to undock from the previously de-orbited target in order to start the rendezvous and docking phase for a subsequent target. The targets are chosen from a previously defined priority list in order to enhance the mission

  13. Parental Perception of the Importance of Friendship and Other Outcome Priorities in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrina, Neysa; Carter, Mark; Stephenson, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Parental perceptions of the importance of friendship development in comparison to other outcome priorities are examined in this research. Parents of children with high functioning autism between the age of 5-10?years (N?=?74) were asked to rate and rank the importance of the following six outcome priorities: friendship, social skills, physical and…

  14. Differentiating innovation priorities among stakeholder in hospital care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Decisions to adopt a particular innovation may vary between stakeholders because individual stakeholders may disagree on the costs and benefits involved. This may translate to disagreement between stakeholders on priorities in the implementation process, possibly explaining the slow diffusion of innovations in health care. In this study, we explore the differences in stakeholder preferences for innovations, and quantify the difference in stakeholder priorities regarding costs and benefits. Methods The decision support technique called the analytic hierarchy process was used to quantify the preferences of stakeholders for nine information technology (IT) innovations in hospital care. The selection of the innovations was based on a literature review and expert judgments. Decision criteria related to the costs and benefits of the innovations were defined. These criteria were improvement in efficiency, health gains, satisfaction with care process, and investments required. Stakeholders judged the importance of the decision criteria and subsequently prioritized the selected IT innovations according to their expectations of how well the innovations would perform for these decision criteria. Results The stakeholder groups (patients, nurses, physicians, managers, health care insurers, and policy makers) had different preference structures for the innovations selected. For instance, self-tests were one of the innovations most preferred by health care insurers and managers, owing to their expected positive impacts on efficiency and health gains. However, physicians, nurses and patients strongly doubted the health gains of self-tests, and accordingly ranked self-tests as the least-preferred innovation. Conclusions The various stakeholder groups had different expectations of the value of the nine IT innovations. The differences are likely due to perceived stakeholder benefits of each innovation, and less to the costs to individual stakeholder groups. This study

  15. Risk ranking priority of carcinogenic and/or genotoxic environmental contaminants in food in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vromman, V; Maghuin-Rogister, G; Vleminckx, C; Saegerman, C; Pussemier, L; Huyghebaert, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the risks of environmental carcinogenic and/or genotoxic contaminants in food. It describes, for each contaminant studied, the carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, the toxicological reference values, the exposure and the risk characterisation. The compounds studied were classified into 3 categories based on a risk assessment. Effects others than carcinogenicity and/or genotoxicity (e.g. endocrine disruption activity) were also taken into account for the classification. Given the low margin of exposure values for arsenic and lead, these two compounds are classified as priority 1 (high concern) for food safety and as a first priority to take actions to reduce exposure. Cadmium, methylmercury, dioxins and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), non-dioxin-like PCB and toxaphene are classified as priority 2 (medium concern). Polybrominated biphenyls, chlordane, heptachlor, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and metabolites, hexachlorobenzene, hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane included), polychlorophenols and their salts are classified as priority 3 (low concern). PMID:24471940

  16. In Brief: Commission for Environmental Cooperation priorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-11-01

    Members of the Joint Public Advisory Committee of the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) will host a 1 December live Webcast discussion on environmental priorities the commission should consider during the next 5 years. The priorities will relate to “healthy communities and ecosystems,” “climate change-low-carbon economy,” and “greening the economy in North America.” CEC is an international organization created by Canada, Mexico, and the United States under the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation. The meeting, in Los Cabos, Baja California Sur, Mexico, will include a virtual forum to allow online participation. More information will be available soon at http://www.cec.org.

  17. US protected lands mismatch biodiversity priorities.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Clinton N; Van Houtan, Kyle S; Pimm, Stuart L; Sexton, Joseph O

    2015-04-21

    Because habitat loss is the main cause of extinction, where and how much society chooses to protect is vital for saving species. The United States is well positioned economically and politically to pursue habitat conservation should it be a societal goal. We assessed the US protected area portfolio with respect to biodiversity in the country. New synthesis maps for terrestrial vertebrates, freshwater fish, and trees permit comparison with protected areas to identify priorities for future conservation investment. Although the total area protected is substantial, its geographic configuration is nearly the opposite of patterns of endemism within the country. Most protected lands are in the West, whereas the vulnerable species are largely in the Southeast. Private land protections are significant, but they are not concentrated where the priorities are. To adequately protect the nation's unique biodiversity, we recommend specific areas deserving additional protection, some of them including public lands, but many others requiring private investment. PMID:25847995

  18. Publishing priorities of biomedical research funders

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To understand the publishing priorities, especially in relation to open access, of 10 UK biomedical research funders. Design Semistructured interviews. Setting 10 UK biomedical research funders. Participants 12 employees with responsibility for research management at 10 UK biomedical research funders; a purposive sample to represent a range of backgrounds and organisation types. Conclusions Publicly funded and large biomedical research funders are committed to open access publishing and are pleased with recent developments which have stimulated growth in this area. Smaller charitable funders are supportive of the aims of open access, but are concerned about the practical implications for their budgets and their funded researchers. Across the board, biomedical research funders are turning their attention to other priorities for sharing research outputs, including data, protocols and negative results. Further work is required to understand how smaller funders, including charitable funders, can support open access. PMID:24154520

  19. US protected lands mismatch biodiversity priorities

    PubMed Central

    Pimm, Stuart L.; Sexton, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    Because habitat loss is the main cause of extinction, where and how much society chooses to protect is vital for saving species. The United States is well positioned economically and politically to pursue habitat conservation should it be a societal goal. We assessed the US protected area portfolio with respect to biodiversity in the country. New synthesis maps for terrestrial vertebrates, freshwater fish, and trees permit comparison with protected areas to identify priorities for future conservation investment. Although the total area protected is substantial, its geographic configuration is nearly the opposite of patterns of endemism within the country. Most protected lands are in the West, whereas the vulnerable species are largely in the Southeast. Private land protections are significant, but they are not concentrated where the priorities are. To adequately protect the nation’s unique biodiversity, we recommend specific areas deserving additional protection, some of them including public lands, but many others requiring private investment. PMID:25847995

  20. Web server for priority ordered multimedia services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet; Godavari, Rakesh K.; Vetnes, Vermund

    2001-10-01

    In this work, our aim is to provide finer priority levels in the design of a general-purpose Web multimedia server with provisions of the CM services. The type of services provided include reading/writing a web page, downloading/uploading an audio/video stream, navigating the Web through browsing, and interactive video teleconferencing. The selected priority encoding levels for such operations follow the order of admin read/write, hot page CM and Web multicasting, CM read, Web read, CM write and Web write. Hot pages are the most requested CM streams (e.g., the newest movies, video clips, and HDTV channels) and Web pages (e.g., portal pages of the commercial Internet search engines). Maintaining a list of these hot Web pages and CM streams in a content addressable buffer enables a server to multicast hot streams with lower latency and higher system throughput. Cold Web pages and CM streams are treated as regular Web and CM requests. Interactive CM operations such as pause (P), resume (R), fast-forward (FF), and rewind (RW) have to be executed without allocation of extra resources. The proposed multimedia server model is a part of the distributed network with load balancing schedulers. The SM is connected to an integrated disk scheduler (IDS), which supervises an allocated disk manager. The IDS follows the same priority handling as the SM, and implements a SCAN disk-scheduling method for an improved disk access and a higher throughput. Different disks are used for the Web and CM services in order to meet the QoS requirements of CM services. The IDS ouput is forwarded to an Integrated Transmission Scheduler (ITS). The ITS creates a priority ordered buffering of the retrieved Web pages and CM data streams that are fed into an auto regressive moving average (ARMA) based traffic shaping circuitry before being transmitted through the network.

  1. Priority-setting in Finnish healthcare.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, P; Häkkinen, U

    1999-12-01

    The characteristics which affect priority setting in the Finnish healthcare system include strong municipal (local) administration, no clear separation between producers and purchasers, a duality in funding, and the potential for physicians in public hospitals to practice in the private sector. This system has its strengths, such as the possibility to effectively co-ordinate social and healthcare services, and a strong incentive to take care of local needs, because of municipal responsibility to finance these services largely through local taxes. However, the municipalities are typically too small to take advantage of these potentials, their knowledge is scarce especially of secondary care and their negotiating power with respect to hospitals is low. Local politicians also have a dual role: they represent the needs of the local population but simultaneously they are decision-makers in hospitals. Full-time physicians are allowed to act in a dual role as well; they can run a private practice, which is paid for on a fee-for-service basis, while the hospital pays (mostly) a fixed monthly salary. The share of financing which flows from the National Sickness Insurance system to healthcare users may have adverse effects on the local use of resources. The broad national consensus statement on patient-level priorities did not reach any general rules on priorities. Strong support was given to citizens' equal right to access all healthcare services. In healthcare practice, this general rule has some exemptions. First, the reimbursement schemes for prescribed drugs vary depending on the severity and chronic nature of the disease. Secondly, the tax-financed dental services for the young are clearly prioritised over those of older citizens. In the consensus statement, emphasis was put on improving the efficiency of producing health services in order to avoid having to impose patient-level priorities. PMID:10827305

  2. National Priorities List sites: New Hampshire

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  3. National Priorities List sites: New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  4. National Priorities List sites: Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  5. National Priorities List sites: West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  6. National Priorities List sites: New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  7. National Priorities List sites: North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  8. National Priorities List sites: New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  9. National Priorities List sites: South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  10. National Priorities List sites set (1991)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The publications provide general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The report clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in Site Cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. (The overview document, Superfund: Focusing on the Nation at Large (1991), available separately order as PB92-953252).

  11. National Priorities List sites: Arizona and Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  12. Priority setting for health in emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Amanda; Giedion, Ursula; McQueston, Kate

    2013-05-01

    The use of health technology assessment research in emerging economies is becoming an increasingly important tool to determine the uses of health spending. As low- and middle-income countries' gross domestic product grows, the funding available for health has increased in tandem. There is growing evidence that comparative effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness can be used to improve health outcomes within a predefined financial space. The use of these evaluation tools, combined with a systematized process of priority setting, can help inform national and global health payers. This review of country institutions for health technology assessment illustrates two points: the efforts underway to use research to inform priorities are widespread and not confined to wealthier countries; and many countries' efforts to create evidence-based policy are incomplete and more country-specific research will be needed. Further evidence shows that there is scope to reduce these gaps and opportunity to support better incorporation of data through better-defined priority-setting processes. PMID:24236627

  13. The emergence of global disease control priorities.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Jeremy; Beer, Tanya; Wu, Yonghong

    2002-09-01

    How do global disease control priorities emerge? This paper examines the post-World War II histories of efforts to control three diseases--polio, malaria and tuberculosis--to investigate this issue. The paper draws from the policy studies literature to evaluate three models of the priority generation process. A rational model suggests logical selection based on global burden and the availability of cost-effective interventions. An incremental model suggests a drawn out process in which health priorities emerge gradually and interventions reach affected populations through slow diffusion. A punctuated equilibrium model suggests a more complex pattern: long periods of stability during which interventions are available only to select populations, punctuated by bursts of attention as these interventions spread across the globe in concentrated periods of time. The paper finds that the punctuated equilibrium model corresponds most closely to efforts to control these three diseases. Bursts are associated with the convergence of three conditions: the widespread acceptance of the disease as a threat; a perception that human interventions can control disease transmission; and the formation of a transnational coalition of health actors concerned with fighting the disease. The generation of each condition requires considerable groundwork, the reason for long periods of stability. Initiatives take off rapidly when the conditions couple, the reason for bursts. The paper aims to spark additional research on the subject of global disease control agenda setting, a neglected issue in the health policy literature. PMID:12135988

  14. 7 CFR 1.77 - Assignment of priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Television Films § 1.77 Assignment of priorities. (a) Authority. (1) The Director of Information or his designee will make assignment of priorities for the U.S. Department of Agriculture for a television...

  15. 7 CFR 1.77 - Assignment of priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Television Films § 1.77 Assignment of priorities. (a) Authority. (1) The Director of Information or his designee will make assignment of priorities for the U.S. Department of Agriculture for a television...

  16. 7 CFR 1.77 - Assignment of priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Television Films § 1.77 Assignment of priorities. (a) Authority. (1) The Director of Information or his designee will make assignment of priorities for the U.S. Department of Agriculture for a television...

  17. 7 CFR 1.77 - Assignment of priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Television Films § 1.77 Assignment of priorities. (a) Authority. (1) The Director of Information or his designee will make assignment of priorities for the U.S. Department of Agriculture for a television...

  18. 7 CFR 1.77 - Assignment of priorities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Television Films § 1.77 Assignment of priorities. (a) Authority. (1) The Director of Information or his designee will make assignment of priorities for the U.S. Department of Agriculture for a television...

  19. ANALYSIS OF PRIORITY POLLUTANTS AT A PRIMARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project investigated the source of priority pollutants, assessment of the wastewater treatment plant, and priority pollutant removal efficiency for a single Soderberg-type primary aluminum plant. Forty-eight hour composite samples were collected from the following streams: (...

  20. Characteristics of Randomized Trials Published in Latin America and the Caribbean According to Funding Source

    PubMed Central

    Reveiz, Ludovic; Sangalang, Stephanie; Glujovsky, Demian; Pinzon, Carlos E.; Asenjo Lobos, Claudia; Cortes, Marcela; Cañón, Martin; Bardach, Ariel; Bonfill, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Few studies have assessed the nature and quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Methods and Findings The aims of this systematic review are to evaluate the characteristics (including the risk of bias assessment) of RCT conducted in LAC according to funding source. A review of RCTs published in 2010 in which the author's affiliation was from LAC was performed in PubMed and LILACS. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The primary outcomes were risk of bias assessment and funding source. A total of 1,695 references were found in PubMed and LILACS databases, of which 526 were RCTs (N = 73.513 participants). English was the dominant publication language (93%) and most of the RCTs were published in non-LAC journals (84.2%). Only five of the 19 identified countries accounted for nearly 95% of all RCTs conducted in the region (Brazil 70.9%, Mexico 10.1%, Argentina 5.9%, Colombia 3.8%, and Chile 3.4%). Few RCTs covered priority areas related with Millennium Development Goals like maternal health (6.7%) or high priority infectious diseases (3.8%). Regarding children, 3.6% and 0.4% RCT evaluated nutrition and diarrhea interventions respectively but none pneumonia. As a comparison, aesthetic and sport related interventions account for 4.6% of all trials. A random sample of RCTs (n = 358) was assessed for funding source: exclusively public (33.8%); private (e.g. pharmaceutical company) (15.3%); other (e.g. mixed, NGO) (15.1%); no funding (35.8%). Overall assessments for risk of bias showed no statistically significant differences between RCTs and type of funding source. Statistically significant differences favoring private and others type of funding was found when assessing trial registration and conflict of interest reporting. Conclusion Findings of this study could be used to provide more direction for future research to facilitate innovation, improve health outcomes

  1. International initiative to engage Iraq's science and technology community : report on the priorities of the Iraqi science and technology community.

    SciTech Connect

    Littlefield, Adriane C.; Munir, Ammar M.; Alnajjar, Abdalla Abdelaziz; Pregenzer, Arian Leigh

    2004-05-01

    This report describes the findings of the effort initiated by the Arab Science and Technology Foundation and the Cooperative Monitoring Center at Sandia National Laboratories to identify, contact, and engage members of the Iraqi science and technology (S&T) community. The initiative is divided into three phases. The first phase, the survey of the Iraqi scientific community, shed light on the most significant current needs in the fields of science and technology in Iraq. Findings from the first phase will lay the groundwork for the second phase that includes the organization of a workshop to bring international support for the initiative, and simultaneously decides on an implementation mechanism. Phase three involves the execution of outcomes of the report as established in the workshop. During Phase 1 the survey team conducted a series of trips to Iraq during which they had contact with nearly 200 scientists from all sections of the country, representing all major Iraqi S&T specialties. As a result of these contacts, the survey team obtained over 450 project ideas from Iraqi researchers. These projects were revised and analyzed to identify priorities and crucial needs. After refinement, the result is approximately 170 project ideas that have been categorized according to their suitability for (1) developing joint research projects with international partners, (2) engaging Iraqi scientists in solving local problems, and (3) developing new business opportunities. They have also been ranked as to high, medium, or low priority.

  2. 12 CFR 627.2745 - Priority of claims-associations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Priority of claims-associations. 627.2745..., RECEIVERS, AND VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATIONS Receivers and Receiverships § 627.2745 Priority of claims—associations. The following priority of claims shall apply to the distribution of the assets of an association...

  3. 76 FR 9381 - Change in Contractual Priority Mail Postal Prices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Change in Contractual Priority Mail Postal Prices AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice... contractual Priority Mail prices. This document provides public notice of the changes and addresses related... of a change in prices pursuant to an amendment to Priority Mail Contract 7.\\1\\ The Notice...

  4. 37 CFR 1.452 - Restoration of right of priority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... filing date which is later than the expiration of the priority period as defined by PCT Rule 2.4 but... the priority period and must include: (1) A notice under PCT Rule 26bis.1(a) adding the priority claim... request for early publication under PCT Article 21(2)(b), any requirement under paragraph (b) of...

  5. 45 CFR 400.314 - Priority in provision of services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Targeted Assistance Funding and Service Priorities § 400.314 Priority in provision of services. A State must plan its targeted assistance program and allocate its targeted assistance funds in such a manner that services are provided to refugees in the following order of priority, except in certain...

  6. 45 CFR 400.314 - Priority in provision of services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Targeted Assistance Funding and Service Priorities § 400.314 Priority in provision of services. A State must plan its targeted assistance program and allocate its targeted assistance funds in such a manner that services are provided to refugees in the following order of priority, except in certain...

  7. 45 CFR 400.314 - Priority in provision of services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Targeted Assistance Funding and Service Priorities § 400.314 Priority in provision of services. A State must plan its targeted assistance program and allocate its targeted assistance funds in such a manner that services are provided to refugees in the following order of priority, except in certain...

  8. 45 CFR 400.314 - Priority in provision of services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Targeted Assistance Funding and Service Priorities § 400.314 Priority in provision of services. A State must plan its targeted assistance program and allocate its targeted assistance funds in such a manner that services are provided to refugees in the following order of priority, except in certain...

  9. 45 CFR 400.314 - Priority in provision of services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Targeted Assistance Funding and Service Priorities § 400.314 Priority in provision of services. A State must plan its targeted assistance program and allocate its targeted assistance funds in such a manner that services are provided to refugees in the following order of priority, except in certain...

  10. Setting Priorities: Personal Values, Organizational Results. Ideas into Action Guidebooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Talula

    2007-01-01

    Successful leaders get results. To get results, you need to set priorities. This book can help you do a better job of setting priorities, recognizing the personal values that motivate your decision making, the probable trade-offs and consequences of your decisions, and the importance of aligning your priorities with your organization's…

  11. 10 CFR 216.7 - Conflict in priority orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conflict in priority orders. 216.7 Section 216.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MATERIALS ALLOCATION AND PRIORITY PERFORMANCE UNDER CONTRACTS OR ORDERS TO MAXIMIZE DOMESTIC ENERGY SUPPLIES § 216.7 Conflict in priority orders. If it appears that the use of assistance pursuant to DPA section 101(c)...

  12. 10 CFR 216.7 - Conflict in priority orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Conflict in priority orders. 216.7 Section 216.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MATERIALS ALLOCATION AND PRIORITY PERFORMANCE UNDER CONTRACTS OR ORDERS TO MAXIMIZE DOMESTIC ENERGY SUPPLIES § 216.7 Conflict in priority orders. If it appears that the use of assistance pursuant to DPA section 101(c)...

  13. 10 CFR 216.7 - Conflict in priority orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conflict in priority orders. 216.7 Section 216.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MATERIALS ALLOCATION AND PRIORITY PERFORMANCE UNDER CONTRACTS OR ORDERS TO MAXIMIZE DOMESTIC ENERGY SUPPLIES § 216.7 Conflict in priority orders. If it appears that the use of assistance pursuant to DPA section 101(c)...

  14. 10 CFR 216.7 - Conflict in priority orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conflict in priority orders. 216.7 Section 216.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MATERIALS ALLOCATION AND PRIORITY PERFORMANCE UNDER CONTRACTS OR ORDERS TO MAXIMIZE DOMESTIC ENERGY SUPPLIES § 216.7 Conflict in priority orders. If it appears that the use of assistance pursuant to DPA section 101(c)...

  15. 10 CFR 216.7 - Conflict in priority orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conflict in priority orders. 216.7 Section 216.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MATERIALS ALLOCATION AND PRIORITY PERFORMANCE UNDER CONTRACTS OR ORDERS TO MAXIMIZE DOMESTIC ENERGY SUPPLIES § 216.7 Conflict in priority orders. If it appears that the use of assistance pursuant to DPA section 101(c)...

  16. 29 CFR 4044.13 - Priority category 3 benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., in a plan with a termination date of September 1, 2012, the benefits in priority category 3 are those... throughout the 5-year period from September 2, 2007, to September 1, 2012, is included in priority category 3... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Priority category 3 benefits. 4044.13 Section 4044.13...

  17. Research priorities and history of advanced composite compression testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    Priorities for standard compression testing research in advanced laminated fibrous composite materials are presented along with a state of the art survey (completed in 1979) including history and commentary on industrial test methods. Historically apparent research priorities and consequent (lack of) progress are supporting evidence for newly derived priorities.

  18. 47 CFR 80.312 - Priority of distress transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Priority of distress transmissions. 80.312..., Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.312 Priority of distress transmissions. The distress call has absolute priority over all other transmissions. All stations which hear it must immediately cease any...

  19. 47 CFR 80.312 - Priority of distress transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Priority of distress transmissions. 80.312..., Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.312 Priority of distress transmissions. The distress call has absolute priority over all other transmissions. All stations which hear it must immediately cease any...

  20. 47 CFR 80.312 - Priority of distress transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Priority of distress transmissions. 80.312..., Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.312 Priority of distress transmissions. The distress call has absolute priority over all other transmissions. All stations which hear it must immediately cease any...

  1. 47 CFR 80.312 - Priority of distress transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Priority of distress transmissions. 80.312..., Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.312 Priority of distress transmissions. The distress call has absolute priority over all other transmissions. All stations which hear it must immediately cease any...

  2. 47 CFR 80.312 - Priority of distress transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Priority of distress transmissions. 80.312..., Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.312 Priority of distress transmissions. The distress call has absolute priority over all other transmissions. All stations which hear it must immediately cease any...

  3. 78 FR 12368 - Priority Mail Contract; Negotiated Service Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Priority Mail Contract; Negotiated Service Agreement AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice... Priority Mail Contract 47 Negotiated Service Agreement. This notice informs the public of the filing... Service filed notice that it has agreed to an amendment to existing Priority Mail Contract 47, which...

  4. Health Canada's use of priority review status for drugs for unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Nigel S B

    2015-10-01

    The processes for granting priority review status to new drug submissions in Canada and the United States are not exactly the same, but reasonable concordance should be expected since the selection criteria are similar in the two countries. This study compared new therapeutic drugs approved by both Health Canada and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) between 2000 and 2014 to evaluate concordance on priority review status. New therapeutic drugs approved in both countries totalled 301; 86 (28.6%) and 136 (45.2%) were given priority review status in Canada and the United States, respectively, with 73 (24.3%) in both. Sensitivity and specificity were 53.7% and 92.1%. Overall concordance on review type was 74.8%. κ was 0.47 indicating moderate agreement. Agreement on review type was >70% for all drugs, except oncology therapies. Broad agreement exists between Health Canada and the FDA on drugs that should not have priority review status. Concordance on drugs that should have this status was generally satisfactory and, for critical drugs, was high. Agreement would improve if more oncology drugs received priority review status in Canada. Despite a higher number of drugs receiving priority review status in the United States, there is reasonable concordance between the two countries. PMID:26260656

  5. Towards deep inclusion for equity-oriented health research priority-setting: A working model.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Merritt, Maria; Hyder, Adnan A

    2016-02-01

    Growing consensus that health research funders should align their investments with national research priorities presupposes that such national priorities exist and are just. Arguably, justice requires national health research priority-setting to promote health equity. Such a position is consistent with recommendations made by the World Health Organization and at global ministerial summits that health research should serve to reduce health inequalities between and within countries. Thus far, no specific requirements for equity-oriented research priority-setting have been described to guide policymakers. As a step towards the explication and defence of such requirements, we propose that deep inclusion is a key procedural component of equity-oriented research priority-setting. We offer a model of deep inclusion that was developed by applying concepts from work on deliberative democracy and development ethics. This model consists of three dimensions--breadth, qualitative equality, and high-quality non-elite participation. Deep inclusion is captured not only by who is invited to join a decision-making process but also by how they are involved and by when non-elite stakeholders are involved. To clarify and illustrate the proposed dimensions, we use the sustained example of health systems research. We conclude by reviewing practical challenges to achieving deep inclusion. Despite the existence of barriers to implementation, our model can help policymakers and other stakeholders design more inclusive national health research priority-setting processes and assess these processes' depth of inclusion. PMID:26812416

  6. An integrative review: instructional strategies to improve nurses' retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation priorities.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing and responding to a cardiac arrest in the hospital setting is a high stress, high anxiety event for all healthcare providers. It requires the performance of several basic, but extremely important cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills and response priorities. If not executed correctly and in a timely manner, a bad outcome may result. Poor retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills and priorities is well documented in the literature. An integrative review of the evidence was conducted to answer the question, "Is there a more effective training method to improve nurses' retention of CPR priorities during an in hospital cardiac arrest as compared to traditional American Heart Association training? "This review evaluated high fidelity and low fidelity simulation training, online or computer-based training and video instruction as potential teaching strategies focusing on CPR priorities. The role of deliberate practice is discussed. The strongest evidence suggests that a teaching plan employing brief, frequent, repetitive or deliberate practice used in collaboration with low fidelity or high fidelity simulation may be a potential strategy to improve nurses' retention of CPR priorities over time. PMID:25830906

  7. The Instrumental Music Program Unit in the South-West Queensland Priority Country Area. Priority Country Area Program Evaluation Series: Report No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briody, P.

    The Instrumental Music Program Unit in the South-West Priority Country Area (a vast, generally arid hot region some 800 km by 450 km) is a unique, dynamic, and successful program, enjoying an extremely high degree of enthusiastic support from all involved--administrators, instructors, students, schools, and communities. Begun in 1977, there are…

  8. Research priorities in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences:categories and subcategories in the Iranian context

    PubMed Central

    NABEIEI, PARISA; AMINI, MITRA; GHANAVATI, SHIRIN; MARHAMATI, SAADAT

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Research in education is a globally significant issue without a long history. Due to the importance of the issue in Health System Development programs, this study intended to determine research priorities in medical education, considering their details and functions. By determining barriers existing in research in education progress, it is tried to make research priorities more functional by recommending acceptable strategies. Methods This is a qualitative-descriptive study in two descriptive phases. The goal of these phases was to determine research priorities subcategories in medical education by Nominal Group Technique (NGT) and two rounds of Delphi method. Through the first phase, subcategories of research priorities were determined, using Nominal Group Technique under medical education experts’ supervision. Through two rounds of Delphi, a questionnaire was constructed based on the subcategories. Eventually, research priorities were determined based on their highest score (scores more than 7 out of 10). Results In the first phase (NGT), 35 priorities in 5 major fields of medical education were presented. In the second phase, priorities were scored, using Delphi method. Medical Ethics and professionalism gained the highest scores (7.63±1.26) and educational evaluation the lowest (7.28±1.52). In this stage, 7 items were omitted but 2 of them were added again after experts’ revision in the third round of Delphi. Conclusion According to the results of the present study and based on previous studies, it really seems that the fields of “Learning and Teaching Approaches” and “Medical Ethics and Professionalism” were more important. Because of financial and resource limitations in our country and the importance of research priorities, it is recommended to frequently study “research priorities determination program” at universities. PMID:26793723

  9. Forecaster priorities for improving probabilistic flood forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterhall, Fredrik; Pappenberger, Florian; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Cloke, Hannah; Thielen, Jutta

    2014-05-01

    Hydrological ensemble prediction systems (HEPS) have in recent years been increasingly used for the operational forecasting of floods by European hydrometeorological agencies. The most obvious advantage of HEPS is that more of the uncertainty in the modelling system can be assessed. In addition, ensemble prediction systems generally have better skill than deterministic systems both in the terms of the mean forecast performance and the potential forecasting of extreme events. Research efforts have so far mostly been devoted to the improvement of the physical and technical aspects of the model systems, such as increased resolution in time and space and better description of physical processes. Developments like these are certainly needed; however, in this paper we argue that there are other areas of HEPS that need urgent attention. This was also the result from a group exercise and a survey conducted to operational forecasters within the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS) to identify the top priorities of improvement regarding their own system. They turned out to span a range of areas, the most popular being to include verification of an assessment of past forecast performance, a multi-model approach for hydrological modelling, to increase the forecast skill on the medium range (>3 days) and more focus on education and training on the interpretation of forecasts. In light of limited resources, we suggest a simple model to classify the identified priorities in terms of their cost and complexity to decide in which order to tackle them. This model is then used to create an action plan of short-, medium- and long-term research priorities with the ultimate goal of an optimal improvement of EFAS in particular and to spur the development of operational HEPS in general.

  10. [Environment and health: priorities for preventive medicine].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Yu A; Mikhaylova, R I

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary environmental factors influencing the formation of the environment and public health have been analyzed The increasing chemical pollution of the environment (air water, soil, living environment), and the intensification of the impact of physical factors in the first place, "electromagnetic smog" associated with the widespread use of appliances and computer equipment, cellular threaten public health have been shown. In this connection, there were determined priorities and main directions of research in the platform "Preventive Environment", approved by Ministry of Health of Russia, which is based on the concept of the factor prevention of noninfectious diseases. PMID:25831920

  11. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  12. Final Priority. Rehabilitation Training: Vocational Rehabilitation Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2015-08-13

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Rehabilitation Training program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year 2015 and later years. We take this action to provide training and technical assistance to State vocational rehabilitation agencies to improve services under the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services program and State Supported Employment Services program for individuals with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities, and to implement changes to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), signed into law on July 22, 2014. PMID:26292366

  13. Priority setting for new technologies in medicine: A transdisciplinary study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Jennifer L; Martin, Douglas K; Singer, Peter A

    2002-01-01

    Background Decision makers in health care organizations struggle with how to set priorities for new technologies in medicine. Traditional approaches to priority setting for new technologies in medicine are insufficient and there is no widely accepted model that can guide decision makers. Discussion Daniels and Sabin have developed an ethically based account about how priority setting decisions should be made. We have developed an empirically based account of how priority setting decisions are made. In this paper, we integrate these two accounts into a transdisciplinary model of priority setting for new technologies in medicine that is both ethically and empirically based. Summary We have developed a transdisciplinary model of priority setting that provides guidance to decision makers that they can operationalize to help address priority setting problems in their institution. PMID:12126482

  14. Conservative parallel simulation of priority class queueing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A conservative synchronization protocol is described for the parallel simulation of queueing networks having C job priority classes, where a job's class is fixed. This problem has long vexed designers of conservative synchronization protocols because of its seemingly poor ability to compute lookahead: the time of the next departure. For, a job in service having low priority can be preempted at any time by an arrival having higher priority and an arbitrarily small service time. The solution is to skew the event generation activity so that the events for higher priority jobs are generated farther ahead in simulated time than lower priority jobs. Thus, when a lower priority job enters service for the first time, all the higher priority jobs that may preempt it are already known and the job's departure time can be exactly predicted. Finally, the protocol was analyzed and it was demonstrated that good performance can be expected on the simulation of large queueing networks.

  15. Conservative parallel simulation of priority class queueing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David

    1992-01-01

    A conservative synchronization protocol is described for the parallel simulation of queueing networks having C job priority classes, where a job's class is fixed. This problem has long vexed designers of conservative synchronization protocols because of its seemingly poor ability to compute lookahead: the time of the next departure. For, a job in service having low priority can be preempted at any time by an arrival having higher priority and an arbitrarily small service time. The solution is to skew the event generation activity so that the events for higher priority jobs are generated farther ahead in simulated time than lower priority jobs. Thus, when a lower priority job enters service for the first time, all the higher priority jobs that may preempt it are already known and the job's departure time can be exactly predicted. Finally, the protocol was analyzed and it was demonstrated that good performance can be expected on the simulation of large queueing networks.

  16. Mapping of Florida's Coastal and Marine Resources: Setting Priorities Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Lisa; Wolfe, Steven; Raabe, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    of data for mapping; * seek innovative solutions to the primary obstacles identified; * identify the steps needed to move mapping of Florida's oceans and coasts forward, in preparation for a better coordinated, more cost-effective mapping program to allow State and Federal agencies to make better decisions on coastal-resource issues. Over 90 invited participants representing more than 30 State and Federal agencies, universities, NGOs, and private industries played a large role in the success of this two-day workshop. State of Florida agency participants created a ranked priority order for mapping 13 different regions around Florida. The data needed for each of the 13 priority regions were outlined. A matrix considering State and Federal priorities was created, utilizing input from all agencies. The matrix showed overlapping interests of the entities and will allow for partnering and leveraging of resources. The five most basic mapping needs were determined to be bathymetry, high-vertical resolution coastline for sea-level rise scenarios, shoreline change, subsurface geology, and benthic habitats at sufficient scale. There was a clear convergence on the need to coordinate mapping activities around the state. Suggestions for coordination included: * creating a glossary of terms: a standard for specifying agency data-mapping needs; * creating a geographic information officer (GIO) position or permanent organizing group to maintain communications established at this workshop and to maintain progress on the issues identified during the workshop. The person or group could develop a website, maintain a project-status matrix, develop a list of contacts, create links to legislative updates and links to funding sources; * developing a web portal and one-stop/clearinghouse of data. There was general consensus on the need to adopt a single habitat classification system and a strategy to accommodate existing systems smoothly. Unresolve

  17. A confirmatory method for the simultaneous extraction, separation, identification and quantification of Tetracycline, Sulphonamide, Trimethoprim and Dapsone residues in muscle by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Mark; Mannion, Celine; Rafter, Paul

    2009-11-13

    A rapid confirmatory multi-residue method for the analysis of tetracyclines, sulphonamides, trimethoprim and dapsone by UPLC-MS/MS is described. The method is able to quantify and confirm the following 19 compounds, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, sulfadiazine, sulfathiazole, sulfapyridine, trimethoprim, sulfamerazine, sulfamethizole, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfamonomethoxine, sulfachlorpyridazine, dapsone, sulfamethoxazole, sulfisoxazole, sulfaquinoxaline and sulfadimethoxine. Samples are extracted with 0.1M EDTA and acetonitrile, which is then evaporated under a stream of nitrogen and reconstituted in water. Following centrifugation and filtering, an aliquot is analysed by UPLC-MS/MS using positive electrospray ionisation and multiple reaction monitoring. The method is deemed rapid as all analytes are extracted by a single extraction technique, with no solid-phase extraction clean up required. Validation is according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and was carried out for bovine, porcine, ovine and poultry species. Specificity, recovery, repeatability, reproducibility, CCalpha and CCbeta data is presented. PMID:19586630

  18. Future priorities for a successful dental school.

    PubMed

    Ranney, R R

    1999-01-01

    Priorities for success for a dental school of the future are considered. University relations, demographic changes, digital information technology and functional genetic technology are emphasised as important environmental pressures that will influence the priorities. The goal advocated for university relations is creating a culture in which the dental school is viewed as integral and necessary to the University's mission. Financial stability, quality research and scholarship and provision of health care for employees may be important ingredients. Keeping an eye on demographic changes and taking the school's business where the customers are is another key to success in the future. Ethnic diversity, changing approaches with changing disease patterns, flexibility in schedule and collaborations in areas of need are strategies to be considered. The emerging field of functional genetics typifies a new biology with which currency will be needed in a health-sciences field. Necessity for faculty development, adoption of molecular diagnostic technologies, emphasis on risk assessment and preventive counselling, and a shift to a wellness model are likely consequences. Digital information technology will result in increased distance-learning opportunity. Dental schools will also need to make accommodating changes in curriculum structure available. Conversion to electronic imaging and totally electronic patient records are likely to become standard. PMID:10865371

  19. The Commercial Market For Priority Review Vouchers.

    PubMed

    Ridley, David B; Régnier, Stephane A

    2016-05-01

    In 2007 the US Congress created the priority review voucher program to encourage the development of drugs for neglected diseases. Under the program, the developer of a drug that treats a neglected disease receives both a faster review of the drug by the Food and Drug Administration and a voucher for a faster review of a different drug. The developer can sell the voucher. We estimated the commercial value of the voucher using US sales of new treatments approved in the period 2007-09. A third of the commercial value of a voucher comes from capturing market share from competitors, nearly half from the value of earlier sales because of the expedited review, and less than a quarter from lengthening the time between approval and the launch of a generic competitor. We estimate that if only one priority review voucher is available in a year, it will be worth more than $200 million, but if four vouchers are available, the value could fall below $100 million. Congress should be cautious about expanding the voucher program, because increasing the number of vouchers sharply decreases the expected price. Lower voucher prices could undermine the incentive to develop new medicines for neglected diseases. PMID:27140982

  20. Priority-Based Job Scheduling in Distributed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Sunita; Hota, Chittaranjan

    Global computing systems like SETI@home tie together the unused CPU cycles, buffer space and secondary storage resources over the Internet for solving large scale computing problems like weather forecasting, and image processing that require high volume of computing power. In this paper we address issues that are critical to distributed scheduling environments such as job priorities, length of jobs, and resource heterogeneity. However, researchers have used metrics like resource availability at the new location, and response time of jobs in deciding upon the job transfer. Our load sharing algorithms use dynamic sender initiated approach to transfer a job. We implemented distributed algorithms using a centralized approach that improves average response time of jobs while considering their priorities. The job arrival process and the CPU service times are modeled using M/M/1 queuing model. We compared the performance of our algorithms with similar algorithms in the literature. We evaluated our algorithms using simulation and presented the results that show the effectiveness of our approach.