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Sample records for account individual radiosensitivity

  1. Analysis of individual differences in radiosensitivity using genome editing.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, S; Royba, E; Akutsu, S N; Yanagihara, H; Ochiai, H; Kudo, Y; Tashiro, S; Miyamoto, T

    2016-06-01

    Current standards for radiological protection of the public have been uniformly established. However, individual differences in radiosensitivity are suggested to exist in human populations, which could be caused by nucleotide variants of DNA repair genes. In order to verify if such genetic variants are responsible for individual differences in radiosensitivity, they could be introduced into cultured human cells for evaluation. This strategy would make it possible to analyse the effect of candidate nucleotide variants on individual radiosensitivity, independent of the diverse genetic background. However, efficient gene targeting in cultured human cells is difficult due to the low frequency of homologous recombination (HR) repair. The development of artificial nucleases has enabled efficient HR-mediated genome editing to be performed in cultured human cells. A novel genome editing strategy, 'transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated two-step single base pair editing', has been developed, and this was used to introduce a nucleotide variant associated with a chromosomal instability syndrome bi-allelically into cultured human cells to demonstrate that it is the causative mutation. It is proposed that this editing technique will be useful to investigate individual radiosensitivity. PMID:27012844

  2. Individual Radiosensitivity Measured With Lymphocytes May Predict the Risk of Acute Reaction After Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Borgmann, Kerstin; Hoeller, Ulrike; Nowack, Sven; Bernhard, Michael; Roeper, Barbara; Brackrock, Sophie; Petersen, Cordula; Szymczak, Silke; Ziegler, Andreas; Feyer, Petra; Alberti, Winfried; Dikomey, Ekkehard

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We tested whether the chromosomal radiosensitivity of in vitro irradiated lymphocytes could be used to predict the risk of acute reactions after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Two prospective studies were performed: study A with 51 patients included different tumor sites and study B included 87 breast cancer patients. Acute reaction was assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group score. In both studies, patients were treated with curative radiotherapy, and the mean tumor dose applied was 55 Gy (40-65) {+-} boost with 11 Gy (6-31) in study A and 50.4 Gy {+-} boost with 10 Gy in study B. Individual radiosensitivity was determined with lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with X-ray doses of either 3 or 6 Gy and scoring the number of chromosomal deletions. Results: Acute reactions displayed a typical spectrum with 57% in study A and 53% in study B showing an acute reaction of Grade 2-3. Individual radiosensitivity in both studies was characterized by a substantial variation and the fraction of patients with Grade 2-3 reaction was found to increase with increasing individual radiosensitivity measured at 6 Gy (study A, p = 0.238; study B, p = 0.023). For study B, this fraction increased with breast volume, and the impact of individual radiosensitivity on acute reaction was especially pronounced (p = 0.00025) for lower breast volume. No such clear association with acute reaction was observed when individual radiosensitivity was assessed at 3 Gy. Conclusion: Individual radiosensitivity determined at 6 Gy seems to be a good predictor for risk of acute effects after curative radiotherapy.

  3. 25 CFR 115.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individual accounts. 115.101 Section 115.101 Indians... INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.101 Individual accounts. Except as otherwise provided in this part, adults shall have the right to withdraw funds from their accounts. Upon their application, or...

  4. 25 CFR 115.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Individual accounts. 115.101 Section 115.101 Indians... INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.101 Individual accounts. Except as otherwise provided in this part, adults shall have the right to withdraw funds from their accounts. Upon their application, or...

  5. Comparison of Individual Radiosensitivity to γ-Rays and Carbon Ions

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Normil, Marie Delna; Testard, Isabelle; Hempel, William M.; Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions are an up-and-coming ion species, currently being used in charged particle radiotherapy. As it is well established that there are considerable interindividual differences in radiosensitivity in the general population that can significantly influence clinical outcomes of radiotherapy, we evaluate the degree of these differences in the context of carbon ion therapy compared with conventional radiotherapy. In this study, we evaluate individual radiosensitivity following exposure to carbon-13 ions or γ-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals based on the frequency of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that was either misrepaired or left unrepaired to form chromosomal aberrations (CAs) (simply referred to here as DSBs for brevity). Levels of DSBs were estimated from the scoring of CAs visualized with telomere/centromere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TC-FISH). We examine radiosensitivity at the dose of 2 Gy, a routinely administered dose during fractionated radiotherapy, and we determined that a wide range of DSBs were induced by the given dose among healthy individuals, with highly radiosensitive individuals harboring more IR-induced breaks in the genome than radioresistant individuals following exposure to the same dose. Furthermore, we determined the relative effectiveness of carbon irradiation in comparison to γ-irradiation in the induction of DSBs at each studied dose (isodose effect), a quality we term “relative dose effect” (RDE). This ratio is advantageous, as it allows for simple comparison of dose–response curves. At 2 Gy, carbon irradiation was three times more effective in inducing DSBs compared with γ-irradiation (RDE of 3); these results were confirmed using a second cytogenetic technique, multicolor-FISH. We also analyze radiosensitivity at other doses (0.2–15 Gy), to represent hypo- and hyperfractionation doses and determined that RDE is dose dependent: high ratios at low

  6. 17 CFR 300.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Individual accounts. 300.101... A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of âseparateâ Customers of Sipc Members § 300.101 Individual accounts. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these...

  7. 17 CFR 300.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individual accounts. 300.101... A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of âseparateâ Customers of Sipc Members § 300.101 Individual accounts. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these...

  8. Pre-Class Planning for Individualized Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Dean; Brooke, Joyce Ann

    1974-01-01

    Pre-class planning of individualized accounting is involved with goals, objectives, and activities developed and selected by the teacher in providing compatibility between accounting content and teaching strategy. A systematic arrangement of activities should be developed so that students can understand and apply accounting principles at their own…

  9. Evidence for predictive validity of blood assays to evaluate individual radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Severin, Erhard . E-mail: severie@uni-muenster.de; Greve, Burkhard; Pascher, Elke; Wedemeyer, Niels; Hacker-Klom, Ursula; Silling, Gerda; Kienast, Joachim; Willich, Normann; Goehde, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: An escalation in standard irradiation dose ensuring improved local tumor control is estimated, but this strategy would require the exclusion of the most sensitive individuals from treatment. Therefore, fast and reliable assays for prediction of the individual radiosensitivity are urgently required. Methods and Materials: Seven parameters in lymphocytes of 40 patients with leukemia were analyzed before, during, and after total body irradiation (TBI) and in vitro X-ray irradiation. These were: cell proliferation, nuclear damage, activation of cytokines, and numbers of total leukocytes of CD34+ hematopoietic blood stem cells and of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Additionally, antioxidative capacity of blood plasma, uric acid, and hemoglobin levels were measured. Blood samples of 67 healthy donors were used as controls. Results: In vivo and in vitro irradiations showed comparable results. A dose-response relationship was found for most parameters. Three parameters were associated with severe acute oral mucositis (Grade 3 or 4 vs. Grade 0 to 2): leukocytes fewer than 6200/{mu}L after 4 Gy TBI, a rate of >19% lymphocytes with reduced DNA and protein content ('necroses') after 4 Gy in vitro irradiation, and a small antioxidative capacity in blood plasma (<0.68 mMol) after 8 Gy TBI. Conclusion: Three simple blood assays were associated with oral mucositis that are posed here hypothetically as an early symptom of enhanced radiosensitivity in leukemic patients: leukocyte count, damaged lymphocyte score, and the antioxidative capacity after exposure.

  10. Annotated Bibliography: Perspectives on Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Yang, Hannah; Anderson, Christian K.

    2009-01-01

    During their three-year research project, the authors found that most practitioners, researchers, and policymakers in the education field were not familiar with Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) or the existing research on IDAs. Therefore, in this paper the authors compiled a list of some of the references that they found useful and that they…

  11. Cost-Effectiveness in Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiner, Mark; Ng, Guat Tin; Sherraden, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Because resources are limited, the benefits and costs of social-work interventions--like all interventions--must be compared with the benefits and costs of alternatives. Evidence-based practice should ask, What works? How well does it work? And what does it cost? This article analyzes the provision of Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) with a…

  12. [Léon Bouchacourt (1865-1949): How an obstetrician pointed out individual radiosensitivity].

    PubMed

    Foray, N

    2015-12-01

    Léon Bouchacourt (1865-1949) was a misknown pioneer of radiology and radiotherapy from Lyon, France. While he was resident in obstetrics in Hôpitaux de Paris from 1892 to 1898, he met Charcot, the future polar explorer, and wrote the first thesis dissertation about X-rays. He invented a new radiology technique for cavitary organs such as vagina, rectum and mouth, the endodiascopy, which permitted him to perform the first pelvimetry and dental radiographies in France. While he undertook the first trials of contact-radiotherapy, he was confronted with radiation-induced reactions. In 1911, he wrote the first paper about individual radiosensitivity. During the First World War, he commanded one of the radiology vehicles, he met Irène Curie and developed his « radiological helmet », which will hold his name and became essential for interventional radiology. After the war, with Béclère and ten others, Léon Bouchacourt funded the French Radiology Society. He ended his career by thinking about public health and the different aspects of the duties of radiologists. PMID:26585802

  13. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Individual retirement accounts. 1.408-2 Section 1.408-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.408-2 Individual retirement accounts. (a) In general....

  14. [Blood DNA Radiosensitivity May Be Predictive Marker for Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in Glioma Tumorbearing Individuals].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S D; Korytova, L I; Yamshanov, V A; Zhabina, R M; Semenov, A L; Krasnikova, V G

    2015-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies were conducted to evaluate the association between the blood DNA radiosensitivity, assessed by determining the original S-index ex vivo, and the response of gliomas to irradiation in vivo. Possible modifications of the latter after administration of iron-containing water (ICW) in rats were also explored. The study was performed on the rats with subcutaneously implanted experimental glioma-35. The tumors were locally X-irradiated with a single 15 Gy dose as a radiation therapy (RT). ICW (60-63 mg · Fe 2+/l) was administered as a drinking water for 3 days before treatment. The animals underwent blood sampling for analysis of the DNA concentration and leukocyte count. The DNA index was estimated 24 h after RT. The S-index was evaluated within 4 h before RT. The mean initial S-index in the blood samples of glioma-bearing rats was 0.73 ± 0.05. Addition of ICW ex vivo resulted in a significantly increased S-index in a half of the samples. In general, the irradiated rats, which had been given pretreatment with ICW and demonstrated an ex vivo increase of the S-index to > 1.0, showed the most marked inhibition of tumor progression and the smallest tumor volume 25 days after irradiation. They also exhibited the lowest rate of growth and the longest survival. Determination of the biochemical S-index and evaluation of its changes ex vivo caused by ICW may be predictive of the response of experimental glioma to irradiation with radiomodification. The S-index may serve as a predictive indicator in clinic of the efficient evaluation of RT in patients with glioma. PMID:26863781

  15. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  16. Labour and Individual Learning Accounts: Let's Keep Talking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Alastair

    1996-01-01

    Reviews British political party proposals for individual learning accounts, designed to give adults purchasing power for further education and training. Raises concerns about effects on existing employee development programs and other potential problems. (SK)

  17. Latino Demographics, Democratic Individuality, and Educational Accountability: A Pragmatist's View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez Aleman, Ana M.

    2006-01-01

    In an era of heightened teacher and school accountability, what are the implications of standards-based reform for individual Latino children and their democratic self-realization? The educational demography of the fastest-growing and largest ethnic group in the United States suggests that the future of Latino self-realization is in jeopardy.…

  18. 78 FR 37598 - Missing Participants in Individual Account Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ..., and the contours of diligent search requirements. DATES: Comments must be received on or before August... search.'' What ``diligent search'' requirements should apply for individual account plans? Should PBGC offer diligent search services for a fee or post on its Web site the names of private sector...

  19. Does Individual Development Account Participation Help the Poor? A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Kristin V.; Thyer, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to review the current empirical research regarding the financial effects of participation in Individual Development Account (IDA) programs. Methods: Peer-reviewed outcome studies identified through electronic bibliographic databases and manual searches of article reference lists are reviewed. A total of 1…

  20. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Reauthorization: Accountability and Personal Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, H. Rutherford

    2005-01-01

    The reauthorized Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a school-reform law closely aligned with the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB); a civil rights law; and a "cousin" of the 1996 welfare reform law. By imposing new or strengthened accountability expectations on students with disabilities and their parents, the reauthorized IDEA…

  1. Welfare Recipiency and Savings Outcomes in Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, Min; Sherraden, Michael; Schreiner, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined how welfare recipiency is associated with savings outcomes in individual development accounts (IDAs), a structured savings program for low-income people. They investigated whether welfare recipients can save if they are provided with incentives. Data for this study ore from the American Dream Demonstration (ADD), the first…

  2. Accounting for individual differences in human associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Nicola C.

    2013-01-01

    Associative learning has provided fundamental insights to understanding psychopathology. However, psychopathology occurs along a continuum and as such, identification of disruptions in processes of associative learning associated with aspects of psychopathology illustrates a general flexibility in human associative learning. A handful of studies have looked specifically at individual differences in human associative learning, but while much work has concentrated on accounting for flexibility in learning caused by external factors, there has been limited work considering how to model the influence of dispositional factors. This review looks at the range of individual differences in human associative learning that have been explored and the attempts to account for, and model, this flexibility. To fully understand human associative learning, further research needs to attend to the causes of variation in human learning. PMID:24027551

  3. Individual Health Accounts: An Alternative Health Care Financing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stano, Miron

    1981-01-01

    After examining the major determinants of inefficiency in health care markets and several recent proposals to correct these problems, this paper introduces a market-oriented alternative which could be highly efficient while meeting all the established goals of a national health plan. To achieve these objectives, traditional forms of insurance would be replaced by a system with the following characteristics: (1) Instead of buying insurance, individuals and their employers would be required to contribute into individual health accounts from which each family would pay for medical care; (2) Once accumulations attain a designated level, any excess accumulations are distributed to the individual; and (3) A national health fund is established to support those without regular accumulations or those whose accounts have been depleted. This paper develops these principles to show how everyone would have access to care as well as the financial security normally associated with comprehensive insurance. But, by inducing many patients to behave as if they were paying for the full cost of care through reductions in potential earnings from their accounts, the paper explains how significant savings in total spending could also be achieved. PMID:10309471

  4. Object Individuation and Physical Reasoning in Infancy: An Integrative Account

    PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, Renée; Stavans, Maayan; Wu, Di; Gertner, Yael; Setoh, Peipei; Kittredge, Audrey K.; Bernard, Amélie

    2012-01-01

    Much of the research on object individuation in infancy has used a task in which two different objects emerge in alternation from behind a large screen, which is then removed to reveal either one or two objects. In their seminal work, Xu and Carey (1996) found that it is typically not until the end of the first year that infants detect a violation when a single object is revealed. Since then, a large number of investigations have modified the standard task in various ways and found that young infants succeed with some but not with other modifications, yielding a complex and unwieldy picture. In this article, we argue that this confusing picture can be better understood by bringing to bear insights from a related subfield of infancy research, physical reasoning. By considering how infants reason about object information within and across physical events, we can make sense of apparently inconsistent findings from different object-individuation tasks. In turn, object-individuation findings deepen our understanding of how physical reasoning develops in infancy. Integrating the insights from physical-reasoning and object-individuation investigations thus enriches both subfields and brings about a clearer account of how infants represent objects and events. PMID:23204946

  5. Comparison of the radiosensitivity of interleukin-2 production between species, between tissues, and between young and old individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, W.J.; Akagawa, T.; Anderson, D.G.; Makinodan, T.

    1985-04-01

    The radiosensitivity of interleukin-2 (IL-2) production was assessed of (a) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of young humans, dogs, and mice (C57BL/6); (b) PBMC and splenic cells of young mice; and (c) PBMC of young and old humans and the splenic cells of young and old mice. The results indicate that (a) large differences in radiosensitivity exist between the PBMC of humans, dogs, and mice (e.g., the radiation doses which resulted in 37% remaining IL-2 activity (D37) of human, dog, and mouse PBMC were 3771, greater than 10,000, and 1398 rads, respectively); (b) only a small difference exists between the PBMC and splenic cells of mice; and (c) no difference exists between the PBMC of young and old humans and between splenic cells of young and old mice. Topological abnormalities, as judged by scanning electron microscopic analysis, could not be detected in dog PBMC after their exposure to 1800 rads, but could be detected in mouse PBMC after their exposure to 400 rads.

  6. 45 CFR 263.20 - What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What definitions apply to Individual Development... Development Accounts? § 263.20 What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)? The following.... Individual Development Account (IDA) means an account established by, or for, an individual who is...

  7. 45 CFR 263.20 - What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What definitions apply to Individual Development... Development Accounts? § 263.20 What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)? The following.... Individual Development Account (IDA) means an account established by, or for, an individual who is...

  8. 45 CFR 263.20 - What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true What definitions apply to Individual Development... Development Accounts? § 263.20 What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)? The following.... Individual Development Account (IDA) means an account established by, or for, an individual who is...

  9. 45 CFR 263.20 - What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What definitions apply to Individual Development... Development Accounts? § 263.20 What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)? The following.... Individual Development Account (IDA) means an account established by, or for, an individual who is...

  10. 45 CFR 263.20 - What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true What definitions apply to Individual Development... Development Accounts? § 263.20 What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)? The following.... Individual Development Account (IDA) means an account established by, or for, an individual who is...

  11. The Impact of Individual Learning Accounts: A Study of the Early and Potential Impact of Individual Learning Accounts on Learning Providers and Learning. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Michael; Peters, Jane; Fletcher, Mick; Kirk, Gordon

    The impact of individual learning accounts (ILAs) on the success of learners in post-16 education sector in the United Kingdom was explored through an examination of available research on ILAs. The following were among the study's 12 messages for providers, the Department for Education and Skills, and the Individual Learning Account Centre: (1)…

  12. An Individual Educational Investment Account: A Swedish Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliasson, Gunnar

    1994-01-01

    For mature industrialized nations to meet the challenge of shifting to a high value added technology base, excellence in three areas is needed: (1) education, (2) labor market performance, and (3) social insurance. A Swedish proposal that would allow individuals to take responsibility for their own future is the individual educational investment…

  13. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... accepted auditing standards, and shall involve whatever tests of the fiduciary books and records of the... applicant may adopt an adequate continuous audit system in lieu of the periodic audits required by paragraph... auditing of accounts of the applicant with respect to the fund; the basis and method of valuing assets...

  14. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accepted auditing standards, and shall involve whatever tests of the fiduciary books and records of the... applicant may adopt an adequate continuous audit system in lieu of the periodic audits required by paragraph... auditing of accounts of the applicant with respect to the fund; the basis and method of valuing assets...

  15. Accounting for taste: individual differences in preference for harmony.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Stephen E; Griscom, William S

    2013-06-01

    Although empirical research on aesthetics has had some success in explaining the average preferences of groups of observers, relatively little is known about individual differences in preference, and especially about how such differences might covary across different domains. In this study, we identified a new factor underlying aesthetic response-preference for harmonious stimuli-and examined how it varies over four domains (color, shape, spatial location, and music) across individuals with different levels of training in art and music. We found that individual preferences for harmony are strongly correlated across all four dimensions tested and decrease consistently with training in the relevant aesthetic domains. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that cross-domain preference for harmony is well-represented as a single, unified factor, with effects separate from those of training and of common personality measures. PMID:23242798

  16. Individual Learning Accounts: A Strategy for Lifelong Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renkema, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Since the end of the previous century social partners in different branches of industry have laid down measures to stimulate individual learning and competence development of workers in collective labour agreements. Special attention is given to stimulating learning demand among traditional non-participants to lifelong learning, such as…

  17. Object Individuation and Physical Reasoning in Infancy: An Integrative Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baillargeon, Renee; Stavans, Maayan; Wu, Di; Gertner, Yael; Setoh, Peipei; Kittredge, Audrey K.; Bernard, Amelie

    2012-01-01

    Much of the research on object individuation in infancy has used a task in which two different objects emerge in alternation from behind a large screen, which is then removed to reveal either one or two objects. In their seminal work, Xu and Carey (1996) found that it is typically not until the end of the first year that infants detect a violation…

  18. Process and Protest: Accounting for Individual Protest Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schussman, Alan; Soule, Sarah Anne

    2005-01-01

    Using American Citizen Participation Survey data (Verba et al. 1995a), we perform logistic regression analyses to adjudicate between three core explanations for individual protest: biographical availability, political engagement and structural availability. We calculate estimated probabilities to weigh the relative effects of these factors on the…

  19. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No, however, individuals...

  20. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No, however, individuals...

  1. Asset Building in Rural Communities: The Experience of Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Curley, Jami; Charles, Pajarita

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the unique experiences of low-income rural participants in an asset building program--the Individual Development Account. Using data from the American Dream Demonstration, this study addresses three main questions: (1) What are the individual characteristics associated with saving outcomes among rural IDA participants? (2) What…

  2. Individual social security accounts: issues in assessing administrative feasibility and costs.

    PubMed

    Olsen, K A; Salisbury, D L

    1998-11-01

    Whether to add individual accounts (IAs) to the Social Security system is a highly political issue. But almost lost in the debate so far have been any practical considerations about how to administer such accounts. Any discussion of whether to create individual accounts must also address the basic but critical questions of how they would work: Who would run them? What would they cost? Logistically, are they even possible? This EBRI Issue Brief provides an overview of the most salient administrative issues facing the current Social Security reform debate--issues that challenge proponents to carefully think through how their proposals could be implemented so as to achieve their policy goals. The options and difficulties in administering IAs raise concerns that cut across ideology. The object of this report is neither to dissuade the advocates nor support the critics of individual accounts. Rather, it is to bring practical considerations to a political debate that has largely ignored the pragmatic challenges of whether IAs would be too complex for participants to understand or too difficult for record keepers to administer. The major findings in this analysis include: Adding individual accounts to Social Security could be the largest undertaking in the history of the U.S. financial market, and no system to date has the capacity to administer such a system. The number of workers currently covered by Social Security--the largest single entitlement program in the nation--is at least four times higher than the combined number of all tax-favored employment-based retirement accounts in the United States, which are administered by hundreds of entities. Direct comparisons between employment-based retirement savings plans and Social Security reform are tenuous at best. Social Security covers workers and businesses that are disproportionately excluded from employment-based plans. Because of these differences, a system of individual Social Security accounts would be more

  3. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No,...

  4. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No,...

  5. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No,...

  6. 75 FR 34626 - Rules and Regulations for Abandoned Individual Account Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 29 CFR Part 2578 Rules and Regulations for Abandoned Individual Account Plans CFR Correction In Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1927 to End, revised as...

  7. An Evaluation of the Individual Training Account/Eligible Training Provider Demonstration. Final Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Ronald; Martinez, Alexandria; Salzman, Jeffrey; Wagner, Robin

    In March 2000, thirteen grants were awarded as part of the Individual Training Account/Eligible Training Provider (ITA/ETP) Demonstration. In summer and fall of 2000, the grant recipients' activities were subjected to an interim evaluation. Site visits were made to each grantee to determine what ITA policies and practices were being formulated,…

  8. The Demand for Higher Education: A Static Structural Approach Accounting for Individual Heterogeneity and Nesting Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Darragh; O'Donoghue, Cathal

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we estimate a structural model of higher education participation and labour choices in a static setting that accounts for individual heterogeneity and possible nesting structures in the decision process. We assume that young people that complete upper secondary education are faced with three choices, go to higher education, not go to…

  9. 29 CFR 2578.1 - Termination of abandoned individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and phone number of the provider of the individual retirement plan (described in § 2550.404a-3(d)(1)(i... and, if different, the name, address and phone number of a contact person (or entity) for additional... termination administrator; (ii) The name of the plan; (iii) The account number or other...

  10. Identification of Sensorimotor Components Accounting for Individual Variability in Zahlen-Verbindungs-Test (ZVT) Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rammsayer, Thomas H.; Stahl, Jutta

    2007-01-01

    The Zahlen-Verbindungs-Test (ZVT) represents a highly feasible measure of information-processing speed that correlates quite highly with standard psychometric tests of intelligence. The present study was designed to identify specific stages of the sensorimotor processing system that may account for individual differences in overall variability of…

  11. Saving for Success: Financial Education and Savings Goal Achievement in Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstead, Mary L.; Mauldin, Teresa; Sabia, Joseph J.; Koonce, Joan; Palmer, Lance

    2011-01-01

    Using microdata from the American Dream Demonstration, the current study examines factors associated with savings and savings goal achievement (indicated by a matched withdrawal) among participants of individual development account (IDA) programs. Multinomial logit results show that hours of participation in financial education programs, higher…

  12. Effects of Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) on Household Wealth and Saving Taste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    This study examines effects of individual development accounts (IDAs) on household wealth of low-income participants. Methods: This study uses longitudinal survey data from the American Dream Demonstration (ADD) involving experimental design (treatment group = 537, control group = 566). Results: Results from quantile regression analysis indicate…

  13. Problems and the potential direction of reforms for the current individual medical savings accounts in the Chinese health care system.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangjin; Yang, Yang; Gong, Fuqing; Zhao, Mingjie

    2012-12-01

    Individual health savings accounts are an important part of the current basic medical insurance system for urban workers in China. Since 1998 when the system of personal medical insurance accounts was first implemented, there has been considerable controversy over its function and significance within different social communities. This paper analyzes the main problems in the practical implementation of individual medical insurance accounts and discusses the social and cultural foundations for the establishment of family health savings accounts from the perspective of Chinese Confucian familism. Accordingly, it addresses the direction of the reform and the development of the current system of individual health insurance accounts in China. PMID:23192456

  14. What is the role of individual accountability in patient safety? A multi-site ethnographic study.

    PubMed

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Parker, Michael; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2016-02-01

    An enduring debate concerns how responsibility for patient safety should be distributed between organisational systems and individual professionals. Though rule-based, calculus-like approaches intended to support a 'just culture' have become popular, they perpetuate an asocial and atomised account. In this article, we use insights from practice theory--which sees organisational phenomena as accomplished in everyday actions, with individual agency and structural conditions as a mutually constitutive, dynamic duality--along with contributions from the political science and ethics literature as a starting point for analysis. Presenting ethnographic data from five hospitals, three in one high-income country and two in low-income countries, we offer an empirically informed, normative rethinking of the role of personal accountability, identifying the collective nature of the healthcare enterprise and the extent to which patient safety depends on contributions from many hands. We show that moral responsibility for actions and behaviours is an irreducible element of professional practice, but that individuals are not somehow 'outside' and separate from 'systems': they create, modify and are subject to the social forces that are an inescapable feature of any organisational system; each element acts on the other. Our work illustrates starkly the structuring effects of the broader institutional and socioeconomic context on opportunities to 'be good'. These findings imply that one of the key responsibilities of organisations and wider institutions in relation to patient safety is the fostering of the conditions of moral community. PMID:26537016

  15. 19 CFR 201.29 - Commission disclosure of individual records, accounting of record disclosures, and requests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... disclosure required by 5 U.S.C. 552, the Privacy Act Officer shall keep an accurate accounting of: (1) The... individual requesting an accounting of disclosure of his or her records should make the request in writing to... and in the letter that it is a Privacy Act request for an accounting of disclosure of records....

  16. Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Newsletter of the Comprehensive Center-Region VI, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Controversy surrounding the accountability movement is related to how the movement began in response to dissatisfaction with public schools. Opponents see it as one-sided, somewhat mean-spirited, and a threat to the professional status of teachers. Supporters argue that all other spheres of the workplace have accountability systems and that the…

  17. Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This issue reviews publications that provide a starting point for principals looking for a way through the accountability maze. Each publication views accountability differently, but collectively these readings argue that even in an era of state-mandated assessment, principals can pursue proactive strategies that serve students' needs. James A.…

  18. Individualism, collectivism and ethnic identity: cultural assumptions in accounting for caregiving behaviour in Britain.

    PubMed

    Willis, Rosalind

    2012-09-01

    Britain is experiencing the ageing of a large number of minority ethnic groups for the first time in its history, due to the post-war migration of people from the Caribbean and the Indian subcontinent. Stereotypes about a high level of provision of informal caregiving among minority ethnic groups are common in Britain, as in the US, despite quantitative studies refuting this assumption. This paper reports on a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with older people from five different ethnic groups about their conceptualisation of their ethnic identity, and their attributions of motivations of caregiving within their own ethnic group and in other groups. It is argued that ethnic identity becomes salient after migration and becoming a part of an ethnic minority group in the new country. Therefore, White British people who have never migrated do not have a great sense of ethnic identity. Further, a strong sense of ethnic identity is linked with identifying with the collective rather than the individual, which explains why the White British participants gave an individualist account of their motivations for informal care, whereas the minority ethnic participants gave a collectivist account of their motivations of care. Crucially, members of all ethnic groups were providing or receiving informal care, so it was the attribution and not the behaviour which differed. PMID:22869345

  19. Recent developments in radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Linam, Justin; Yang, Li-Xi

    2015-05-01

    Radiation therapy is essential for local tumor control for many types of cancer histologies. Technological advancements in recent years have allowed for precise irradiation of target tissues while minimizing the dose to non-target tissues. To enhance radiation damage to cancer cells and further limit the radiation effects on normal tissue, researchers have explored compounds that specifically target cancer cells and make them more sensitive to ionizing radiation. Recent radiosensitization research has focused on promising compounds that alter hypoxia, inhibit topoisomerases, interfere with microtubules, and activate caspases, among other mechanisms. Many such compounds have shown impressive results in pre-clinical trials against a variety of cell types, but their safety, efficacy and practicability in clinical trials remains to be demonstrated. This review seeks to provide an overview of recent research in radiosensitization, detailing some of the more successful compounds, and illustrating avenues for future research. PMID:25964520

  20. 5 CFR 1655.9 - Effect of loans on individual account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... contributions and attributable earnings, pro rata from each TSP Fund in which the account is invested and pro... participant's account is invested. All pro rated amounts will be based on the balances in each TSP Fund...

  1. 5 CFR 1655.9 - Effect of loans on individual account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... contributions and attributable earnings, pro rata from each TSP Fund in which the account is invested and pro... participant's account is invested. All pro rated amounts will be based on the balances in each TSP Fund...

  2. Benzamide and nicotinamide radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.; Brown, J.M.; Grange, E.W.; Martinez, A.P.

    1993-06-01

    A method to destroy hypoxic tumor cells in a warmblooded animal is described, which method comprises: (a) administering to said warmblooded animal a compound of the formula: wherein X is O or S; Z is H, OR, SR or NHR in which R is H, hydrocarbyl (1-6C) including cyclic and unsaturated hydrocarbyl, optionally substituted with 1 or 2 substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, hydroxy, epoxy, alkoxy, alkylthio, amino including morpholino, acyloxy and acylamido and their thio analogs, alkylsulfonyl or alkylphosphonyl, carboxy or alkoxycarbonyl, or carbamyl or alkylcarbamyl, and in which R can optionally be interrupted by a single ether (-O-) linkage; or Z os O(CO)R, NH(CO)R, O(SO)R, or O(POR)R in which R is as above defined, in an amount effective to radiosensitize said hypoxic tumor cells, (b) followed by, after a time period to provide maximum radiosensitization, irradiating said tumor cells with a dose of radiation effective to destroy said cells.

  3. 78 FR 23827 - Designation of Eighteen Individuals Pursuant to the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... (individual) . 2. KUZNETSOV, Artem (a.k.a. KUZNETSOV, Artyom); DOB 28 Feb 1975; POB Baku, Azerbaijan.... UKHNALEVA, Svetlana V.); DOB 14 Mar 1973; POB Moscow, Russia (individual) . 16. VINOGRADOVA, Natalya V.;...

  4. Intrinsic Radiosensitivity and Cellular Characterization of 27 Canine Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Froning, Coral E.; Brents, Colleen A.; Rose, Barbara J.; Thamm, Douglas H.; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2016-01-01

    Canine cancer cell lines have progressively been developed, but are still underused resources for radiation biology research. Measurement of the cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity is important because understanding the difference may provide a framework for further elucidating profiles for prediction of radiation therapy response. Our studies have focused on characterizing diverse canine cancer cell lines in vitro and understanding parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity. First, intrinsic radiosensitivity of 27 canine cancer cell lines derived from ten tumor types was determined using a clonogenic assay. The 27 cell lines had varying radiosensitivities regardless tumor type (survival fraction at 2 Gy, SF2 = 0.19–0.93). In order to understand parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity, we evaluated the relationships of cellular radiosensitivity with basic cellular characteristics of the cell lines. There was no significant correlation of SF2 with S-phase fraction, doubling time, chromosome number, ploidy, or number of metacentric chromosomes, while there was a statistically significant correlation between SF2 and plating efficiency. Next, we selected the five most radiosensitive cell lines as the radiosensitive group and the five most radioresistant cell lines as the radioresistant group. Then, we evaluated known parameters for cell killing by ionizing radiation, including radiation-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and apoptosis, in the radiosensitive group as compared to the radioresistant group. High levels of residual γ-H2AX foci at the sites of DSBs were present in the four out of the five radiosensitive canine cancer cell lines. Our studies suggested that substantial differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity exist in canine cancer cell lines, and radiation-induced DSB repair was related to radiosensitivity, which is consistent with previous human studies. These data may assist further investigations

  5. Intrinsic Radiosensitivity and Cellular Characterization of 27 Canine Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Junko; Froning, Coral E; Brents, Colleen A; Rose, Barbara J; Thamm, Douglas H; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2016-01-01

    Canine cancer cell lines have progressively been developed, but are still underused resources for radiation biology research. Measurement of the cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity is important because understanding the difference may provide a framework for further elucidating profiles for prediction of radiation therapy response. Our studies have focused on characterizing diverse canine cancer cell lines in vitro and understanding parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity. First, intrinsic radiosensitivity of 27 canine cancer cell lines derived from ten tumor types was determined using a clonogenic assay. The 27 cell lines had varying radiosensitivities regardless tumor type (survival fraction at 2 Gy, SF2 = 0.19-0.93). In order to understand parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity, we evaluated the relationships of cellular radiosensitivity with basic cellular characteristics of the cell lines. There was no significant correlation of SF2 with S-phase fraction, doubling time, chromosome number, ploidy, or number of metacentric chromosomes, while there was a statistically significant correlation between SF2 and plating efficiency. Next, we selected the five most radiosensitive cell lines as the radiosensitive group and the five most radioresistant cell lines as the radioresistant group. Then, we evaluated known parameters for cell killing by ionizing radiation, including radiation-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and apoptosis, in the radiosensitive group as compared to the radioresistant group. High levels of residual γ-H2AX foci at the sites of DSBs were present in the four out of the five radiosensitive canine cancer cell lines. Our studies suggested that substantial differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity exist in canine cancer cell lines, and radiation-induced DSB repair was related to radiosensitivity, which is consistent with previous human studies. These data may assist further investigations

  6. 26 CFR 54.4974-1 - Excise tax on accumulations in individual retirement accounts or annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the account over the joint life and last survivor expectancy of himself and his wife. On January 1... the joint life and last survivor expectancy of H and his wife is 22.0 years (see Table II of § 1.72-9... dividing the balance in the account on the first day of each year by the joint life and last...

  7. 26 CFR 54.4974-1 - Excise tax on accumulations in individual retirement accounts or annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the account over the joint life and last survivor expectancy of himself and his wife. On January 1... the joint life and last survivor expectancy of H and his wife is 22.0 years (see Table II of § 1.72-9... dividing the balance in the account on the first day of each year by the joint life and last...

  8. 26 CFR 54.4974-1 - Excise tax on accumulations in individual retirement accounts or annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the account over the joint life and last survivor expectancy of himself and his wife. On January 1... the joint life and last survivor expectancy of H and his wife is 22.0 years (see Table II of § 1.72-9... dividing the balance in the account on the first day of each year by the joint life and last...

  9. 5 CFR 1655.9 - Effect of loans on individual account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... contributions and attributable earnings, pro rata from each TSP Fund in which the account is invested and pro rata from tax-deferred and tax-exempt balances. (c) Loan payments, including both principal...

  10. 5 CFR 1655.9 - Effect of loans on individual account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... contributions and attributable earnings, pro rata from each TSP Fund in which the account is invested and pro rata from tax-deferred and tax-exempt balances. (c) Loan payments, including both principal...

  11. On the Use of Factor-Analytic Multinomial Logit Item Response Models to Account for Individual Differences in Response Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Timothy R.; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    Multidimensional item response models are usually implemented to model the relationship between item responses and two or more traits of interest. We show how multidimensional multinomial logit item response models can also be used to account for individual differences in response style. This is done by specifying a factor-analytic model for…

  12. Long-Term Effects of Individual Development Accounts on Postsecondary Education: Follow-Up Evidence from a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Sherraden, Michael; Gale, William G.; Rohe, William M.; Schreiner, Mark; Key, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evidence from a randomized field experiment testing the impact of a 3-year matched savings program on educational outcomes 10 years after the start of the experiment. We examine the effect of an Individual Development Account (IDA) program on (1) educational enrollment, (2) degree completion, and (3) increased education level.…

  13. Accounting utility for determining individual usage of production level software systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    An accounting package was developed which determines the computer resources utilized by a user during the execution of a particular program and updates a file containing accumulated resource totals. The accounting package is divided into two separate programs. The first program determines the total amount of computer resources utilized by a user during the execution of a particular program. The second program uses these totals to update a file containing accumulated totals of computer resources utilized by a user for a particular program. This package is useful to those persons who have several other users continually accessing and running programs from their accounts. The package provides the ability to determine which users are accessing and running specified programs along with their total level of usage.

  14. Effects of low-level chronic irradiation on radiosensitivity of mammals: modeling and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O. A.; Yonezawa, M.

    Effects of low dose rate chronic irradiation on radiosensitivity of mammals mice are studied by experimental and modeling methods Own and reference experiments show that priming chronic low-level short-term and long-term exposures to radiation induce respectively elevated radiosensitivity and lowered radiosensitivity radioresistance in mice The manifestation of these radiosensitization and radioprotection effects are respectively increased and decreased mortality of preirradiated specimens after challenge acute irradiation in comparison with those for previously unexposed ones Taking into account that the reason of the animal death in the experiments was the hematopoietic syndrome the biophysical models of the critical body system hematopoiesis are used to simulate the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lines in mice exposed to challenge acute irradiation following the chronic one Juxtaposition of the modeling results obtained and the relevant experimental data shows that the radiosensitization effect of chronic low-level short-term less than 1 month preirradiation on mice is due to increased radiosensitivity of lymphopoietic granulocytopoietic and erythropoietic systems accompanied by increased or close to the normal level radiosensitivity of thrombocytopoietic system which are induced by the above-indicated exposure In turn the radioprotection effect of chronic low-level long-term more than 1 month preirradiation on mice is caused by decreased radiosensitivity radioresistance of the granulocytopoietic system which

  15. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  16. 29 CFR 2550.404a-3 - Safe harbor for distributions from terminated individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safe harbor for distributions from terminated individual... RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY § 2550.404a-3 Safe... a safe harbor under which a fiduciary (including a qualified termination administrator, within...

  17. Analyzing Repeated Measures Data on Individuals Nested within Groups: Accounting for Dynamic Group Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Daniel J.; Gottfredson, Nisha C.; Dean, Danielle; Zucker, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers commonly collect repeated measures on individuals nested within groups such as students within schools, patients within treatment groups, or siblings within families. Often, it is most appropriate to conceptualize such groups as dynamic entities, potentially undergoing stochastic structural and/or functional changes over time. For…

  18. A Cognitive Processing Account of Individual Differences in Novice Logo Programmers' Conceptualisation and Use of Recursion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Pamela

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated individual differences in the construction of mental models of recursion in LOGO programming. The learning process was investigated from the perspective of Norman's mental models theory and employed diSessa's ontology regarding distributed, functional, and surrogate mental models, and the Luria model of brain…

  19. 29 CFR 2550.404a-3 - Safe harbor for distributions from terminated individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... information is known at the time of the furnishing of this notice; (vi) The name, address and phone number of..., address, and telephone number of the plan administrator (or other fiduciary) from whom a participant or... beneficiary's last known address is located, or (C) An individual retirement plan (described in paragraph...

  20. 29 CFR 2550.404a-3 - Safe harbor for distributions from terminated individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information is known at the time of the furnishing of this notice; (vi) The name, address and phone number of..., address, and telephone number of the plan administrator (or other fiduciary) from whom a participant or... beneficiary's last known address is located, or (C) An individual retirement plan (described in paragraph...

  1. The Transformative Individual School Counseling Model: An Accountability Model for Urban School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eschenauer, Robert; Chen-Hayes, Stuart F.

    2005-01-01

    The realities and needs of urban students, families, and educators have outgrown traditional individual counseling models. The American School Counselor Association's National Model and National Standards and the Education Trust's Transforming School Counseling Initiative encourage professional school counselors to shift roles toward implementing…

  2. Phonology and Grammatical Morphology in Specific Language Impairment: Accounting for Individual Variation in English and Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortolini, Umberta; Leonard, Laurence B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether individual differences observed in the grammatical morphology of children with specific language impairment (SLI) could be traced to another source, such as the use of weak syllables. Results show that imitations in prosody may restrict the degree of grammatical morpheme use by children with SLI.…

  3. An Individual-Based Model of Zebrafish Population Dynamics Accounting for Energy Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudouin, Rémy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin; Augustine, Starrlight; Devillers, James; Brion, François; Péry, Alexandre R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model) was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model). Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level. PMID:25938409

  4. Radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Christopher C; Cowan, Morton J

    2010-02-01

    Inherited defects in components of the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair mechanism produce a T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) characterized by heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Patients with the radiosensitive form of SCID may also have increased short- and long-term sensitivity to the alkylator-based chemotherapy regimens that are traditionally used for conditioning before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Known causes of radiosensitive SCID include deficiencies of Artemis, DNA ligase IV, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, and Cernunnos-XLF, all of which have been treated with HCT. Because of these patients' sensitivity to certain forms of chemotherapy, the approach to donor selection and the type of conditioning regimen used for a patient with radiosensitive SCID requires careful consideration. Significantly more research needs to be done to determine the long-term outcomes of patients with radiosensitive SCID after HCT and to discover novel nontoxic approaches to HCT that might benefit those patients with intrinsic radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity as well as potentially all patients undergoing an HCT. PMID:20113890

  5. Emotional Stroop interference in trauma-exposed individuals: a contrast between two accounts.

    PubMed

    Caparos, Serge; Blanchette, Isabelle

    2014-08-01

    In the Emotional Stroop task, trauma-exposed victims are slowed when naming the colour print of trauma-related words, showing the presence of interference. This interference has been assumed to reflect emotional reactions triggered by experience-relevant emotional content which interfere with the task. However, it may equally reflect the activation of task-competing thoughts triggered by experience-relevant semantic content, thus resulting from cognitive- rather than emotion-driven processes. This study contrasted these possibilities by measuring the relationship between Emotional Stroop interference, on the one hand, and severity of sexual-abuse experience, subjective ratings of emotionality, and working-memory measures, on the other. Whereas there was no relationship between working-memory measures and interference, providing no support for the cognitive-based account, experience severity, emotionality ratings and abuse-related interference were all positively related, providing support for the emotion-based account. These findings support the idea that the Emotional Stroop task can be used as a diagnostic tool for emotion-filtering impairment. PMID:25058628

  6. Beyond price: individuals' accounts of deciding to pay for private healthcare treatment in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Delivering appropriate and affordable healthcare is a concern across the globe. As countries grapple with the issue of delivering healthcare with finite resources and populations continue to age, more health-related care services or treatments may become an optional 'extra' to be purchased privately. It is timely to consider how, and to what extent, the individual can act as both a 'patient' and a 'consumer'. In the UK the majority of healthcare treatments are free at the point of delivery. However, increasingly some healthcare treatments are being made available via the private healthcare market. Drawing from insights from healthcare policy and social sciences, this paper uses the exemplar of private dental implant treatment provision in the UK to examine what factors people considered when deciding whether or not to pay for a costly healthcare treatment for a non-fatal condition. Methods Qualitative interviews with people (n = 27) who considered paying for dental implants treatments in the UK. Data collection and analysis processes followed the principles of the constant comparative methods, and thematic analysis was facilitated through the use of NVivo qualitative data software. Results Decisions to pay for private healthcare treatments are not simply determined by price. Decisions are mediated by: the perceived 'status' of the healthcare treatment as either functional or aesthetic; how the individual determines and values their 'need' for the treatment; and, the impact the expenditure may have on themselves and others. Choosing a private healthcare provider is sometimes determined simply by personal rapport or extant clinical relationship, or based on the recommendation of others. Conclusions As private healthcare markets expand to provide more 'non-essential' services, patients need to develop new skills and to be supported in their new role as consumers. PMID:22397733

  7. The Search for New Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Carl M.; Kimler, Bruce F.; Cheng, C.C.; Abrahams, Iris L.; Podrebarac, Eugene G.; Wittek, Philip J.; Reddy, Eashwer K.

    1980-01-01

    A number of newly synthesized compounds whose chemical structure suggested possible or remotely possible ability to radiosensitize hypoxic mammalian cells were studied in an in-vitro system. Those compounds that were not excluded because of insolubility or extreme cytotoxicity were tested for radiosensitizing ability. The correlation between chemical structure and radiosensitizing ability will be used for the rational design of additional compounds with a high probability of being effective hypoxic cell radiosensitizers. It is hoped that this will contribute to attempts to improve the cure rate of patients with malignant tumors through the use of radiation therapy and hypoxic cell radiosensitizers. PMID:7401185

  8. Identifying individual changes in performance with composite quality indicators while accounting for regression to the mean.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Byron J; Dunton, Nancy

    2013-04-01

    Almost a decade ago Morton and Torgerson indicated that perceived medical benefits could be due to "regression to the mean." Despite this caution, the regression to the mean "effects on the identification of changes in institutional performance do not seem to have been considered previously in any depth" (Jones and Spiegelhalter). As a response, Jones and Spiegelhalter provide a methodology to adjust for regression to the mean when modeling recent changes in institutional performance for one-variable quality indicators. Therefore, in our view, Jones and Spiegelhalter provide a breakthrough methodology for performance measures. At the same time, in the interests of parsimony, it is useful to aggregate individual quality indicators into a composite score. Our question is, can we develop and demonstrate a methodology that extends the "regression to the mean" literature to allow for composite quality indicators? Using a latent variable modeling approach, we extend the methodology to the composite indicator case. We demonstrate the approach on 4 indicators collected by the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. A simulation study further demonstrates its "proof of concept." PMID:23035127

  9. Individual and developmental differences in semantic priming: empirical and computational support for a single-mechanism account of lexical processing.

    PubMed

    Plaut, D C; Booth, J R

    2000-10-01

    Existing accounts of single-word semantic priming phenomena incorporate multiple mechanisms, such as spreading activation, expectancy-based processes, and postlexical semantic matching. The authors provide empirical and computational support for a single-mechanism distributed network account. Previous studies have found greater semantic priming for low- than for high-frequency target words as well as inhibition following unrelated primes only at long stimulus-onset asynchronies (SOAs). A series of experiments examined the modulation of these effects by individual differences in age or perceptual ability. Third-grade, 6th-grade, and college students performed a lexical-decision task on high- and low-frequency target words preceded by related, unrelated, and nonword primes. Greater priming for low-frequency targets was exhibited only by participants with high perceptual ability. Moreover, unlike the college students, the children showed no inhibition even at the long SOA. The authors provide an account of these results in terms of the properties of distributed network models and support this account with an explicit computational simulation. PMID:11089407

  10. Individual account retirement plans: an analysis of the 2007 survey of consumer finances, with market adjustments to June 2009.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Craig

    2009-08-01

    LATEST SCF DATA: This Issue Brief assesses the current status of Americans' savings for retirement by examining the incidence of individual account plans among families, as well as the average amount of assets accumulated in these accounts. The 2007 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF), the Federal Reserve Board's triennial survey of wealth, is the basis for this study, as it is a leading source of data on Americans' wealth, provides detailed information on retirement plan incidence and account balances among families, and is the latest available. ACCOUNTING FOR THE ECONOMIC DOWNTURN: While 2007 SCF is the most comprehensive and current survey of Americans' finances, its timing was unfortunate due to the significant downturn in the economy in 2008 just after the survey was released. To account for that change, this analysis provides estimates of the changes in asset values from the end of 2007 to mid-June 2009 for individual account plan balances. The account balances of the defined contribution plans and IRAs are adjusted based on the asset allocation reported within the plans by using equity market returns and bond market returns from January 1, 2008, to June 19, 2009. MEDIAN ASSET LEVELS FOR DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLANS: Among all families with a defined contribution plan in 2007, the median (mid-point) plan balance was $31,800, up 16 percent from 2004. According to EBRI estimates, this dropped 16.4 percent (to $26,578) from year-end 2007 to mid-June 2009. Losses were higher for families with more than $100,000 a year in income (down 22 percent) or having a net worth in the top 10 percent (down 28 percent). MEDIAN ASSET LEVELS FOR IRA/KEOGH PLANS: Among all families with an IRA/Keogh plan, the median value of their plan was $34,000 in 2007, up 3 percent from 2004. EBRI estimates this median value dropped 15 percent (to $28,955) from year-end 2007 to mid-June 2009. LESS THAN HALF OF ALL FAMILIES HAVE A RETIREMENT PLAN THROUGH A CURRENT JOB: In 2007, 40.6 percent of

  11. Radiosensitive Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Christopher C.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Inherited defects in components of the non-homologous end joining DNA repair mechanism produce a T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) characterized by heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Patients with the radiosensitive form of SCID may also have increased short- and long-term sensitivity to the alkylator-based chemotherapy regimens traditionally utilized for conditioning prior to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Known etiologies of radiosensitive SCID include deficiencies of Artemis, DNA Ligase IV, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and Cernunnos-XLF, all of which have been treated with HCT. Because of their sensitivity to certain forms of chemotherapy, the approach to donor selection and type of conditioning regimen utilized for a radiosensitive SCID patient requires careful consideration. Significantly more research needs to be done in order to determine the long-term outcomes of radiosensitive SCID patients following HCT, as well as to discover novel non-toxic approaches to HCT that might benefit those with intrinsic radio- and chemo-sensitivity, as well as potentially all patients undergoing an HCT. PMID:20113890

  12. 25 CFR 115.411 - What if the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...'s supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? 115.411 Section 115.411... regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? If the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo...

  13. 25 CFR 115.411 - What if the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...'s supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? 115.411 Section 115.411... regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? If the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo...

  14. 25 CFR 115.411 - What if the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...'s supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? 115.411 Section 115.411... regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? If the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo...

  15. 25 CFR 115.411 - What if the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...'s supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? 115.411 Section 115.411... regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? If the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo...

  16. 25 CFR 115.411 - What if the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...'s supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? 115.411 Section 115.411... regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? If the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo...

  17. On differences in radiosensitivity estimation: TCP experiments versus survival curves. A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrev, Pavel; Stavreva, Nadejda; Ruggieri, Ruggero; Nahum, Alan

    2015-08-01

    We have compared two methods of estimating the cellular radiosensitivity of a heterogeneous tumour, namely, via cell-survival and via tumour control probability (TCP) pseudo-experiments. It is assumed that there exists intra-tumour variability in radiosensitivity and that the tumour consists predominantly of radiosensitive cells and a small number of radio-resistant cells. Using a multi-component, linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell kill, a pseudo-experimental cell-survival versus dose curve is derived. This curve is then fitted with a mono-component LQ model describing the response of a homogeneous cell population. For the assumed variation in radiosensitivity it is shown that the composite pseudo-experimental survival curve is well approximated by the survival curve of cells with uniform radiosensitivity. For the same initial cell radiosensitivity distribution several pseudo-experimental TCP curves are simulated corresponding to different fractionation regimes. The TCP model used accounts for clonogen proliferation during a fractionated treatment. The set of simulated TCP curves is then fitted with a mono-component TCP model. As in the cell survival experiment the fit with a mono-component model assuming uniform radiosensitivity is shown to be highly acceptable. However, the best-fit values of cellular radiosensitivity produced via the two methods are very different. The cell-survival pseudo-experiment yields a high radiosensitivity value, while the TCP pseudo-experiment shows that the dose-response is dominated by the most resistant sub-population in the tumour, even when this is just a small fraction of the total.

  18. Accountability the Individual Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vyrostek, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Rather than regard frequent and subjective testing as a negative, it should prove more beneficial for educators to offer students an opportunity to acquire life skills that will carry them through any test-taking situation. Offering students the skills necessary to succeed not only in the classroom but also through testing is where accountability…

  19. Educational Quality Is Measured by Individual Student Achievement Over Time. Mt. San Antonio College AB 1725 Model Accountability System Pilot Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    In December 1990, a project was begun at Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) in Walnut, California, to develop a model accountability system based on the belief that educational quality is measured by individual achievement over time. This proposal for the Accountability Model (AM) presents information on project methodology and organization in four…

  20. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  1. 20 CFR 903.4 - Procedures for access to records and accountings of disclosures from records, regarding individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to an accounting of a disclosure from such record made pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(c)(1), permit that... any such accounting and have a copy made of all or any portion thereof in a form comprehensible to the... section). (b) Requests. A request for access to records or accountings of disclosure from records,...

  2. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A; Welsh, Jessemae L; Sibenaller, Zita A; Allen, Bryan G; Wagner, Brett A; Kalen, Amanda L; Doskey, Claire M; Strother, Robert K; Button, Anna M; Mott, Sarah L; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C; Spitz, Douglas R; Buettner, Garry R; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-08-15

    The toxicity of pharmacologic ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Because pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate, they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacologic ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in nontumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacologic ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacologic ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  3. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A.; Welsh, Jessemae L.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Allen, Bryan G.; Wagner, Brett A.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Doskey, Claire M.; Strother, Robert K.; Button, Anna M.; Mott, Sarah L.; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Buettner, Garry R.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pharmacological ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Since pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in non-tumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacological ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacological ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  4. Evidence for variation in human radiosensitivity and its potential impact on radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Bouffler, S D

    2016-06-01

    Radiological protection standards generally assume that all members of the population are equally sensitive to the adverse health effects associated with radiation exposure, recognising the age- and sex-related differences in sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer. It has become very clear over recent years that genetic and lifestyle factors can play important roles in the susceptibility of individuals to a range of diseases; as such, the same may apply to radiation-associated diseases. Evidence is accumulating from studies at many levels of biological organisation - cells, experimental organisms, and humans - that a range of radiosensitivity exists between individuals in the population. Consideration of improvements in radiological protection practices to take account of such differences will require the availability of robust and accurate ways to assess the sensitivity of an individual or population subgroup. In addition, there will need to be careful consideration of the ethical aspects relating to use of individual sensitivity information. These ethical considerations are very likely to be exposure context dependent, and require careful risk-benefit balance consideration before practical application. PMID:26956676

  5. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  6. [Synthesis and radiosensitizing activity of benzimidazoles].

    PubMed

    Li, M J; Li, S Z; Zhuang, X L; Chen, A; Zhang, H Q; Pang, X C; Hu, B

    1992-01-01

    In search for effective radiosensitizer with low neurotoxicity, benzimidazole compounds were synthesized. Reaction of 2-nitrobenzimidazole with ethyl chloroformate yielded ethyl alpha-(2-nitrobenzimidazolyl-1)-formate(1) or ethyl alpha-(2-hydroxybenzimidazolyl-1)-formate(2), depending upon the solvents used. Reaction of 2-nitrobenzimidazole with 1,2-epoxy-3-chloropropane gave a cyclized compound which was confirmed to be benzimidazo(1,2b)-5'-chloromethyl-oxazolidine(3). In attempt to increase hydrophilicity, 1-substituted 2(3'-pyridyl)-5-nitrobenzimidazoles were prepared by reaction of 2-(3'-pyridyl)-5(6)-nitrobenzimidazole(4) with alkyl epoxides or ethyl chloroacetate. Some of the compounds synthesized were tested for radiosensitizing activity in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing mice. Preliminary results showed that some compounds have radiosensitizing activity. The radiosensitizing enhancement ratio (SER) of compounds 3, 5 and 6 were found to be 1.50, 1.52 and 1.65 respectively. PMID:1293936

  7. Radiosensitivity of different tissues from carrot root at different phases of growth in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Degani, N.; Pickholtz, D.

    1980-09-01

    The present work compares the effect of ..gamma..-radiation dose and time in culture on the growth of cambium and phloem carrot (Daucus carota) root explants. It was found that the phloem is more radiosensitive than the cambium and that both tissues were more radiosensitive when irradiated on excision at the G/sub 1/ phase rather than at the end of the lag phase on the ninth day of growth in culture when cells were predominantly at the G/sub 2/ phase. The nuclear volumes of cells from both tissues were similar but were larger at the end of the more radioresistant lag phase than those of the G/sub 1/ phase on excision. However, nuclear volume could not account for the differences in radiosensitivity between either the tissues or irradiation times in culture.

  8. Accountability for the Results of Educating Students with Disabilities: Assessment Conference Report on the New Assessment Provisions of the 1997 Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ysseldyke, James E.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Kozleski, Elizabeth; Reschly, Daniel

    Based on the findings of a 1998 conference on the new assessment and accountability requirements in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), this report discusses critical issues that surround the assessment provisions included in the 1997 IDEA amendments and contains recommendations related to state and district-wide assessments…

  9. Surviving, and Maybe Thriving, on Vouchers: A Guide for Organizations Making the Transition to Individual Training Accounts under the Workforce Investment Act. Working Ventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Sheila

    This booklet, which is intended for organizations making the transition to individual training accounts (ITAs) under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), explains how educational and training institutions can make vouchers work for them. After a brief overview of the WIA's main provisions regarding ITAs and the future of voucher programs, the…

  10. Clonal expansion accounts for an excess of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus colonising HIV-positive individuals in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olalekan, Adesola O; Schaumburg, Frieder; Nurjadi, Dennis; Dike, Adobi E; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Kolawole, Deboye O; Kun, Jürgen F; Zanger, Philipp

    2012-09-01

    Nasal colonisation with Staphylococcus aureus is a risk factor for invasive infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. This study aimed to characterise colonising S. aureus from regions with a high HIV prevalence. Single nasal swabs were taken from a total of 374 HIV-positive and 370 healthy individuals. Overall, 202 S. aureus carriers were detected. Compared with healthy individuals, HIV-positive subjects were more likely to be S. aureus nasal carriers (33% vs. 21%; P=0.0001). Isolates from HIV-positive individuals were more often resistant to meticillin (16% vs. 8%; P=0.13), chloramphenicol (47% vs. 16%; P<0.0001), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT) (90% vs. 55%; P<0.0001) and ciprofloxacin (18% vs. 0%; P<0.0001). Strains belonging to the spa clonal complexes 3772/ST25 and 064/ST8 were significantly more often isolated from HIV-positive individuals and exhibited greater resistance to ciprofloxacin, SXT and chloramphenicol (spa-CC 3772) or to meticillin (spa-CC 064), respectively. Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene content was high overall and was equally distributed between isolates from HIV-positive and healthy individuals (33% vs. 30%). Genotypic characteristics of colonising isolates were similar to those reported to cause invasive infection in Nigeria. The HIV pandemic contributes to the evolution of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus. Measures to contain antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in Nigeria must target risk groups such as HIV-positive individuals. PMID:22831840

  11. In Vitro-Pooled shRNA Screening to Identify Determinants of Radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ceroni, Alessandro; Higgins, Geoff S; Ebner, Daniel V

    2016-01-01

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-pooled screening is a valuable and cost-effective tool for assaying the contribution of individual genes to cell viability and proliferation on a genomic scale. Here we describe the key considerations for the design and execution of a pooled shRNA screen to identify determinants of radiosensitivity. PMID:27581288

  12. Association between cellular radiosensitivity and G1/G2 checkpoint proficiencies in human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hematulin, Arunee; Sagan, Daniel; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Seubwai, Wunchana; Wongkham, Sopit

    2014-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a destructive malignancy with a poor prognosis and lack of effective medical treatment. Radiotherapy is an alternative treatment for patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma. However, there are limited data on the radiation responsiveness of individual cholangiocarcinoma cells, which is a key factor that influences radiation treatment outcome. In this study, we found that cholangiocarcinoma cell lines differ remarkably in their radiosensitivity. The variation of radiosensitivity of cholangiocarcinoma cells correlates with their p53 status and existing G1 and/or G2 checkpoint defects. We also demonstrated the potential of checkpoint kinase Chk1/2 inhibition on the enhancement of the radiosensitivity of cholangiocarcinoma cells. Thus, this study provides useful information for predicting radiation response and provides evidence for the enchantment of radiotherapeutic efficiency by targeting checkpoint kinase Chk1/2 in some subpopulations of cholangiocarcinoma patients. PMID:24969815

  13. Innovations in Education for the Seventies: Selected Readings. Accountability, Behavioral Objectives, Differentiated Staffing, Education Vouchers, Individualized Instruction, Open Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Carlo, Julia E., Ed.; Madon, Constant A., Ed.

    A variety of innovations are being introduced in schools throughout the country for the purposes of improving instruction and enriching the learning experiences of students. This text covers six major innovations in education. They are: (1) accountability; (2) behavioral objectives; (3) differentiated staffing; (4) education vouchers; (5)…

  14. 29 CFR 2550.404a-5 - Fiduciary requirements for disclosure in participant-directed individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... each designated investment alternative which constitute plan assets within the meaning of 29 CFR 2510.3... of 60 days after such applicability date or 60 days after the effective date of 29 CFR 2550.408b-2(c... expenses can substantially reduce the growth of a participant's or beneficiary's retirement account...

  15. Education Alignment and Accountability in an Era of Convergence: Policy Insights from States with Individual Learning Plans and Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, L. Allen; Durham, Julie; Wills, Joan

    2011-01-01

    In response to the rising demand for market-responsive education reform across the U.S., since 1998 more than twenty states have created Individual Learning or Graduation Plan (ILP/IGP) state policies. Using extensive policy document analyses and stakeholder interview data from four early-adopting ILP/IGP states, the goal of this four-state case…

  16. Individual Accountability in Cooperative Learning Groups at the College Level: Differential Effects on High, Average, and Low Exam Performers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Robert L.; Carroll, Erin; Hautau, Briana

    2005-01-01

    Over a three-semester period in a large undergraduate human development course, students were assigned to 5-7 member groups to work together in preparing for an exam in one of the five content units in the course. Their exam performance was tracked over three units: a baseline unit in which students worked only individually, a unit in which they…

  17. On the radiosensitivity of man in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, R. D.; Durante, M.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Scampoli, P.; Jones, T. D.

    Astronauts' radiation exposure limits are based on experimental and epidemiological data obtained on Earth. It is assumed that radiation sensitivity remains the same in the extraterrestrial space. However, human radiosensitivity is dependent upon the response of the hematopoietic tissue to the radiation insult. It is well known that the immune system is affected by microgravity. We have developed a mathematical model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis which includes the effect of microgravity on bone marrow kinetics. It is assumed that cellular radiosensitivity is not modified by the space environment, but repopulation rates of stem and stromal cells are reduced as a function of time in weightlessness. A realistic model of the space radiation environment, including the HZE component, is used to simulate the radiation damage. A dedicated computer code was written and applied to solar particle events and to the mission to Mars. The results suggest that altered myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis in microgravity might increase human radiosensitivity in space.

  18. On the Path to Seeking Novel Radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, David; Ito, Emma; Liu Feifei

    2009-03-15

    Radiation therapy is a highly effective cancer treatment modality, and extensive investigations have been undertaken over the years to augment its efficacy in the clinic. This review summarizes the current understanding of the biologic bases underpinning many of the clinically used radiosensitizers. In addition, this review illustrates how the advent of innovative, high-throughput technologies with integration of different disciplines could be harnessed for an expeditious discovery process for novel radiosensitizers, providing an exciting future for such pursuits in radiation biology and oncology.

  19. Don’t stop thinking about tomorrow: Individual differences in future self-continuity account for saving

    PubMed Central

    Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Garton, M. Tess; Ballard, Kacey; Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R.; Knutson, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Some people find it more difficult to delay rewards than others. In three experiments, we tested a “future self-continuity” hypothesis that individual differences in the perception of one’s present self as continuous with a future self would be associated with measures of saving in the laboratory and everyday life. Higher future self-continuity (assessed by a novel index) predicted reduced discounting of future rewards in a laboratory task, more matches in adjectival descriptions of present and future selves, and greater lifetime accumulation of financial assets (even after controlling for age and education). In addition to demonstrating the reliability and validity of the future self-continuity index, these findings are consistent with the notion that increased future self-continuity might promote saving for the future. PMID:19774230

  20. A NEW METHDOLOGY FOR DETERMINING FISSILE MASS IN INDIVIDUAL ACCOUNTING ITEMS WITH THE USE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    KANE,W.R.; VANIER,P.E.; ZUHOSKI,P.B.; LEMLEY,J.R.

    2000-07-16

    In the safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation regimes measurements are required which give the quantity of fissile material in an accounting item, e.g., a standard container of plutonium or uranium oxide. Because of the complexity of modeling the absorption of gamma rays in high-Z materials, gamma-ray spectrometry is not customarily used for this purpose. Gamma-ray measurements can be used to determine the fissile mass when two conditions are met: (1) The material is in a standard container, and (2) The material is finely divided, or a solid item with a reproducible shape. The methodology consists of: (A) Measurement of the emitted gamma rays, and (B) Measurement of the transmission through the item of the high-energy gamma rays of Co-60 and Th-228. We have demonstrated that items containing nuclear materials possess a characteristic ''fingerprint'' of gamma rays which depends not only on the nuclear properties, but also on the mass, density, shape, etc.. The material's spectrum confirms its integrity, homogeneity, and volume as well. While there is attenuation of radiation from the interior, the residual radiation confirms the homogeneity of the material throughout the volume. Transmission measurements, where the attenuation depends almost entirely on Compton scattering, determine the material mass. With well-characterized standards, this methodology can provide an accurate measure of the contained fissile material.

  1. Individual Genetic Susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Hall

    2008-12-08

    Risk estimates derived from epidemiological studies of exposed populations, as well as the maximum permissible doses allowed for occupational exposure and exposure of the public to ionizing radiation are all based on the assumption that the human population is uniform in its radiosensitivity, except for a small number of individuals, such as ATM homozygotes who are easily identified by their clinical symptoms. The hypothesis upon which this proposal is based is that the human population is not homogeneous in radiosensitiviry, but that radiosensitive sub-groups exist which are not easy to identify. These individuals would suffer an increased incidence of detrimental radiation effects, and distort the shape of the dose response relationship. The radiosensitivity of these groups depend on the expression levels of specific proteins. The plan was to investigate the effect of 3 relatively rare, high penetrate genes available in mice, namely Atm, mRad9 & Brca1. The purpose of radiation protection is to prevent! deterministic effects of clinical significance and limit stochastic effects to acceptable levels. We plan, therefore to compare with wild type animals the radiosensitivity of mice heterozygous for each of the genes mentioned above, as well as double heterozygotes for pairs of genes, using two biological endpoints: a) Ocular cataracts as an important and relevant deterministic effect, and b) Oncogenic transformation in cultured embryo fibroblasts, as a surrogate for carcinogenesis, the most relevant stochastic effect.

  2. Azidothymidine Enhances Fluorodeoxyuridine-Mediated Radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-M.; Johnson, Monika; Smith, Brian J.; Dornfeld, Ken

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of DNA repair and altered thymidine analogues in altering the response to radiation during thymidine deprivation. Methods and Materials: Mismatch repair-deficient and -proficient cell lines HEC59 and HC-2.4 were treated with fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR), azidothymidine (AZT), and irradiation either alone or in combination, and outcomes of clonogenic survival and cell-cycle distributions were determined. Results: Survival outcomes for all treatments were similar for both cell lines, suggesting that hMSH2 does not significantly influence thymidine deprivation toxicity or radiosensitization. The chain-terminating thymidine analogue AZT increased the toxicity of FUdR and increased DNA fragmentation. The combination of FUdR and AZT afforded greater radiosensitization than either drug alone. Drug enhancement ratios, the degree of excess radiation-induced cell death in drug-treated cultures compared with radiation alone for HEC59, were 1.2, 1.4, and 1.8 for AZT, FUdR, and the combination, respectively. Enhancement ratios for HC-2.4 were 1.3, 1.5, and 1.8 for AZT, FUdR, and the combination, respectively. Conclusion: Azidothymidine, a chain-terminating thymidine analogue, can enhance the radiosensitizing affects of thymidine deprivation. Deoxyribonucleic acid strand breaks may play an important role in the mechanism of thymidine deprivation-induced radiosensitization.

  3. Radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloznelyte-Plesniene, Laima

    2003-12-01

    Around 12,000 deaths from glioblastoma occurs within the European Community annually. At present, the best available treatment for malignant brain tumors results in a median survival of patients of 15 months despite surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to review our results of radiosensitized treatment of malignant brain tumors.

  4. Comparative analysis of radiosensitizers for K-RAS mutant rectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, Laura B; Krebs, Angela M; Kim, Stephen Y; Hong, Theodore S; Haigis, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 40% of rectal cancers harbor activating K-RAS mutations, and these mutations are associated with poor clinical response to chemoradiotherapy. We aimed to identify small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) that synergize with ionizing radiation (IR) ("radiosensitizers") that could be incorporated into current treatment strategies for locally advanced rectal cancers (LARCs) expressing mutant K-RAS. We first optimized a high-throughput assay for measuring individual and combined effects of SMIs and IR that produces similar results to the gold standard colony formation assay. Using this screening platform and K-RAS mutant rectal cancer cell lines, we tested SMIs targeting diverse signaling pathways for radiosensitizing activity and then evaluated our top hits in follow-up experiments. The two most potent radiosensitizers were the Chk1/2 inhibitor AZD7762 and the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235. The chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which is used to treat LARC, synergized with AZD7762 and enhanced radiosensitization by AZD7762. This study is the first to compare different SMIs in combination with IR for the treatment of K-RAS mutant rectal cancer, and our findings suggest that Chk1/2 inhibitors should be evaluated in new clinical trials for LARC. PMID:24349411

  5. RRx-001, A novel dinitroazetidine radiosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Ning, Shoucheng; Peehl, Donna; Oronsky, Arnold; Cabrales, Pedro; Bednarski, Mark; Knox, Susan

    2016-06-01

    The 'holy grail' in radiation oncology is to improve the outcome of radiation therapy (RT) with a radiosensitizer-a systemic chemical/biochemical agent that additively or synergistically sensitizes tumor cells to radiation in the absence of significant toxicity. Similar to the oxygen effect, in which DNA bases modified by reactive oxygen species prevent repair of the cellular radiation damage, these compounds in general magnify free radical formation, leading to the permanent "fixation" of the resultant chemical change in the DNA structure. The purpose of this review is to present the origin story of the radiosensitizer, RRx-001, which emerged from the aerospace industry. The activity of RRx-001 as a chemosensitizer in multiple tumor types and disease states including malaria, hemorrhagic shock and sickle cell anemia, are the subject of future reviews. PMID:26841903

  6. Interfaces with Tunable Mechanical and Radiosensitizing Properties.

    PubMed

    Berg, Nora G; Pearce, Brady L; Snyder, Patrick J; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Nolan, Michael W; Adhikari, Prajesh; Khan, Saad A; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2016-08-31

    We report the fabrication of a composite containing nanostructured GaOOH and Matrigel with tunable radiosensitizing and stiffness properties. Composite characterization was done with microscopy and rheology. The utility of the interface was tested in vitro using fibroblasts. Cell viability and reactive oxygen species assays quantified the effects of radiation dosages and GaOOH concentrations. Fibroblasts' viability decreased with increasing concentration of GaOOH and composite stiffness. During ionizing radiation experiments the presence of the scintillating GaOOH triggered a different cellular response. Reactive oxygen species data demonstrated that one can reduce the amount of radiation needed to modulate the behavior of cells on interfaces with different stiffness containing a radiosensitizing material. PMID:26882455

  7. Daily rhythms of radiosensitivity of animals and several determining causes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druzhinin, Y. P.; Malyutina, T. S.; Seraya, V. M.; Rodina, G. P.; Vatsek, A.; Rakova, A.

    1974-01-01

    Daily rhythms of radiosensitivity in rats and mice were determined by survival rates after acute total radiation at the same dosage at different times of the day. Radiosensitivity differed in animals of different species and varieties. Inbred mice exhibited one or two increases in radiosensitivity during the dark, active period of the day. These effects were attributed to periodic changes in the state of stem hematopoietic cells.

  8. Irinotecan and radiosensitization in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Illum, Henrik

    2011-04-01

    Neoadjuvant radiation therapy with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is currently considered the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. Pathologically complete response is a desirable outcome and has been associated with increased disease-free survival. There is a need to improve on this approach given that only approximately 10% achieve a pathologically complete response. Irinotecan has an established role in the treatment of metastatic rectal cancer. Both in-vitro and in-vivo data have shown promising radiosensitization properties. This study provides an overview of the published clinical trials evaluating the role of irinotecan as a radiosensitizer in the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Although early-phase clinical trials initially showed promising results, this did not translate into improved outcome in a larger randomized phase II trial. Increased topoisomerase I expression has recently been identified as a possible predictive marker for improved response to irinotecan-based radiosensitization. This finding could help identify a subset of patients more likely to benefit from the addition of irinotecan in future trials. PMID:21160419

  9. TNFSF10/TRAIL regulates human T4 effector memory lymphocyte radiosensitivity and predicts radiation-induced acute and subacute dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Baijer, Jan; Déchamps, Nathalie; Perdry, Hervé; Morales, Pablo; Kerns, Sarah; Vasilescu, Alexandre; Baulande, Sylvain; Azria, David; Roméo, Paul Henri; Schmitz, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity of T4 effector-memory (T4EM) lymphocytes to radiation-induced apoptosis shows heritability compatible with a Mendelian mode of transmission. Using gene expression studies and flow cytometry, we show a higher TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL/TNFSF10) mRNA level and a higher level of membrane bound TRAIL (mTRAIL) on radiosensitive compared to radioresistant T4EM lymphocytes. Functionally, we show that mTRAIL mediates a pro-apoptotic autocrine signaling after irradiation of T4EM lymphocytes linking mTRAIL expression to T4EM radiosensitivity. Using single marker and multimarker Family-Based Association Testing, we identified 3 SNPs in the TRAIL gene that are significantly associated with T4EM lymphocytes radiosensitivity. Among these 3 SNPs, two are also associated with acute and subacute dermatitis after radiotherapy in breast cancer indicating that T4EM lymphocytes radiosensitivity may be used to predict response to radiotherapy. Altogether, these results show that mTRAIL level regulates the response of T4EM lymphocytes to ionizing radiation and suggest that TRAIL/TNFSF10 genetic variants hold promise as markers of individual radiosensitivity. PMID:26982083

  10. Molecularly targeted radiosensitization chances towards gene aberration-due organ confined/regionally advanced prostate cancer radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    ALBERTI, C.

    2015-01-01

    Considering that the prostate cancer radioresistance occurs in a significant percentage – as 20–40% of prostate cancer (PCa) patients undergone external beam radiation therapy developing, within ten years, recurrent and more aggressive tumor – the resort to customized radiosensitizer measures, focusly targeting PCa radioresistance-linked individual molecular aberrations, can increase the successful outcomes of PCa radiotherapy. PMID:26188759

  11. Association Between Genetic Polymorphisms in the XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, GSTM1, GSTT1, MSH2, MLH1, MSH3, and MGMT Genes and Radiosensitivity in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mangoni, Monica; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Carozzi, Francesca; Sani, Cristina; Biti, Giampaolo; Livi, Lorenzo; Barletta, Emanuela; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Clinical radiosensitivity varies considerably among patients, and radiation-induced side effects developing in normal tissue can be therapy limiting. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to correlate with hypersensitivity to radiotherapy. We conducted a prospective study of 87 female patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast surgery. We evaluated the association between acute skin reaction following radiotherapy and 11 genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes: XRCC1 (Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln), MSH2 (gIVS12-6T>C), MLH1 (Ile219Val), MSH3 (Ala1045Thr), MGMT (Leu84Phe), and in damage-detoxification GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes (allele deletion). Methods and Materials: Individual genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and single nucleotide primer extension for single nucleotide polymorphisms or by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for deletion polymorphisms. The development of severe acute skin reaction (moist desquamation or interruption of radiotherapy due to toxicity) associated with genetic polymorphisms was modeled using Cox proportional hazards, accounting for cumulative biologically effective radiation dose. Results: Radiosensitivity developed in eight patients and was increased in carriers of variants XRCC3-241Met allele (hazard ratio [HR] unquantifiably high), MSH2 gIVS12-6nt-C allele (HR = 53.36; 95% confidence intervals [95% CI], 3.56-798.98), and MSH3-1045Ala allele (HR unquantifiably high). Carriers of XRCC1-Arg194Trp variant allele in combination with XRCC1-Arg399Gln wild-type allele had a significant risk of radiosensitivity (HR = 38.26; 95% CI, 1.19-1232.52). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report to find an association between MSH2 and MSH3 genetic variants and the development of radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that mismatch repair mechanisms may be

  12. Accounting for Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Cooperative Accountability Project.

    This publication reports on two Regional Educational Accountability Conferences on Techniques sponsored by the Cooperative Accountability Project. Accountability is described as an "emotionally-charged issue" and an "operationally demanding concept." Overviewing accountability, major speakers emphasized that accountability is a means toward…

  13. Targeting Mcl-1 for Radiosensitization of Pancreatic Cancers12

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Dongping; Zhang, Qiang; Schreiber, Jason S.; Parsels, Leslie A.; Abulwerdi, Fardokht A.; Kausar, Tasneem; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Sun, Yi; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify targets whose inhibition may enhance the efficacy of chemoradiation in pancreatic cancer, we previously conducted an RNAi library screen of 8,800 genes. We identified Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1), an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, as a target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer cells to chemoradiation. In the present study we investigated Mcl-1 inhibition by either genetic or pharmacological approaches as a radiosensitizing strategy in pancreatic cancer cells. Mcl-1 depletion by siRNA produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells in association with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage, but only minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. We next tested the ability of the recently identified, selective, small molecule inhibitor of Mcl-1, UMI77, to radiosensitize in pancreatic cancer cells. UMI77 caused dissociation of Mcl-1 from the pro-apoptotic protein Bak and produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells, but minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Radiosensitization by UMI77 was associated with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Importantly, UMI77 did not radiosensitize normal small intestinal cells. In contrast, ABT-737, an established inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w, failed to radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells suggesting the unique importance of Mcl-1 relative to other Bcl-2 family members to radiation survival in pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these results validate Mcl-1 as a target for radiosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells and demonstrate the ability of small molecules which bind the canonical BH3 groove of Mcl-1, causing displacement of Mcl-1 from Bak, to selectively radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:25749177

  14. Chromosomal Radiosensitivity in Lymphocytes of Cervix Cancer Patients—Correlation with Side Effect after Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Lankoff, Anna; Lisowska, Halina; Banasik-Nowak, Anna; Arabski, Michał; Kedzierawski, Piotr; Florek, Agnieszka; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that cancer patients receiving similar radiotherapy treatments differ widely in normal tissue reactions ranging from undetectable to unacceptably severe levels. Therefore, an important goal of radiobiological research is to establish a test which would allow identifying individual radiosensitivity of patients prior to radiotherapy. The aim of the presented study is to assess the relationship between lymphocyte intrinsic radiosensitivity in vitro and early reaction of normal tissue in cervix cancer patients treated by radiotherapy. The following endpoints are analyzed in vitro: frequency of micronuclei, the kinetics of DNA repair and apoptosis. Acute normal tissue reaction to radiotherapy in the skin, bladder and rectum are scored according to the EORTC/RTOG scale. Our results show a wide inter-individual variability in chromosomal radiosensitivity in vitro. The majority of patients show a Grade 0, 1 or 2 reaction for all organs studied. No statistically significant correlation has been observed between the in vitro results in lymphocytes and the degree of early normal tissue and organ reaction.

  15. Dynamics of changes in physiological parameters of mice with different radiosensitivity after acute γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Alchinova, I B; Arkhipova, E N; Medvedeva, Yu S; Cherepov, A B; Karganov, M Yu

    2014-06-01

    We studied radiosensitivity of 101/Hf, C3H/Sn, and C57Bl mice exposed to sublethal doses of γ-radiation. C57Bl mice responded to radiation much later than 101/Hf and C3H/Sn mice, while their adaptability was high enough. 101/Hf and C3H/Sn mice developed acute radiation sickness in a similar way. However, C3H/Sn mice showed better physiological indicators after radiation crisis. There was no noticeable improvement after the development of radiation sickness in 101/Hf mice. To assess individual radiosensitivity, integrated approach should be applied using the data obtained by different methods on several physiological levels. PMID:24958371

  16. Factors Affecting the Radiosensitivity of Hexaploid Wheat to -Irradiation: Radiosensitivity of Hexaploid Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Gu, Jiayu; Zhao, Linshu; Guo, Huijun; Xie, Yongdun; Zhao, Shirong; Song, Xiyun; Han, Longzhi; Liu, Luxiang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the radiosensitivity of plants, an important factor in crop mutation breeding programs, requires a thorough investigation of the factors that contribute to this trait. In this study, we used the highly radiosensitive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) variety HY1 and J411, a γ-irradiation-insensitive control, which were screened from a natural population, to examine the factors affecting radiosensitivity, including free radical content and total antioxidant capacity, as well as the expression of TaKu70 and TaKu80 (DNA repair-related genes) as measured by real-time PCR. We also investigated the alternative splicing of this gene in the wild-type wheat ecotype by sequence analysis. Free radical contents and total antioxidant capacity significantly increased upon exposure of HY1 wheat to γ-irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, in J411, the free radical contents exhibited a similar trend, but the total antioxidant capacity exhibited a downward trend upon increasing γ-irradiation. Additionally, we detected dose-dependent increases in TaKu70 and TaKu80 expression levels in γ-irradiated HY1, while in J411, TaKu70 expression levels increased, followed by a decline. We also detected alternative splicing of TaKu70 mRNA, namely, intron retention, in HY1 but not in J411. Our findings indicate that γ-irradiation induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in hexaploid wheat, resulting in growth retardation of seedlings, and they suggest that TaKu70 may play a causal role in radiosensitivity in HY1. Further studies are required to exploit these factors to improve radiosensitivity in other wheat varieties. PMID:27551965

  17. Taxonomic and developmental aspects of radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1996-11-01

    Considerable information is available on the effects of radioactivity on adult and early life stages of organisms. The preponderance of data is on mortality after a single irradiation with relatively high doses. Unfortunately, because experiments were carried out under different conditions and for different time periods, the validity of comparing the results from different laxonomic groups is questionable. In general, the conclusions are that there is a relationship (1) between radioresistance to high doses of acute radiation and taxonomy of the organism, primitive forms being more radioresistant than complex vertebrates and (2) between radiosensitivity and developmental stage, early life stages being more sensitive than later stages. The first conclusion may be related to the capability of the organism to repopulate cells and to differentiate and redifferentiate them; the second to the rate of cellular division and to the degree of differentiation. In question, however, is the relevance of the responses from high levels of acute radiation to that of the responses to long-term exposure to low levels of radiation, which are ecologically of more interest. Data from studies of the effects of acute and chronic exposure on development of gametes and zygotes indicate that, for some fishes and invertebrates, responses at the cellular and molecular levels show effect levels comparable to those observed in some mammals. Acute doses between 0,05 and 0.5Cy and dose rates between 0.02 to 0.2mCy/h appear to define critical ranges in which detrimental effects on fertility are first observed in a variety of radiosensitive organisms. To better understand inherent radiosensitivity, we need more information on the ability of cells to repopulate and differentiate and to prevent or repair damage to biological critical molecules, such as DNA, because these factors may alter significantly organisms` responses to radiation.

  18. On the mechanism of salivary gland radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Antonius W.T. . E-mail: a.w.t.konings@med.rug.nl; Coppes, Rob P.; Vissink, Arjan

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To contribute to the understanding of the enigmatic radiosensitivity of the salivary glands by analysis of appropriate literature, especially with respect to mechanisms of action of early radiation damage, and to supply information on the possibilities of amelioration of radiation damage to the salivary glands after radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Selected published data on the mechanism of salivary gland radiosensitivity and radioprotection were studied and analyzed. Results: From a classical point of view, the salivary glands should not respond as rapidly to radiation as they appear to do. Next to the suggestion of massive apoptosis, the leakage of granules and subsequent lysis of acinar cells was suggested to be responsible for the acute radiation-induced function loss of the salivary glands. The main problem with these hypotheses is that recently performed assays show no cell loss during the first days after irradiation, while saliva flow is dramatically diminished. The water secretion is selectively hampered during the first days after single-dose irradiation. Literature is discussed that shows that the compromised cells suffer selective radiation damage to the plasma membrane, disturbing signal transduction primarily affecting watery secretion. Although the cellular composition of the submandibular gland and the parotid gland are different, the damage response is very alike. The acute radiation-induced function loss in both salivary glands can be ameliorated by prophylactic treatment with specific receptor agonists. Conclusions: The most probable mechanism of action, explaining the enigmatic high radiosensitivity for early effects, is selective radiation damage to the plasma membrane of the secretory cells, disturbing muscarinic receptor stimulated watery secretion. Later damage is mainly due to classical mitotic cell death of progenitor cells, leading to a hampered replacement capacity of the gland for secretory cells

  19. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder. Part 5: How Essential Are Gender-Specific Forensic Psychiatric Services?

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Tonia L; Crocker, Anne G; Seto, Michael C; Wilson, Catherine M; Charette, Yanick; Côté, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To state the sociodemographic characteristics, mental health histories, index offence characteristics, and criminal histories of male and female forensic psychiatric patients. Clinicians and researchers advocate that mental health and criminal justice organizations implement gender-specific services; however, few studies have sampled forensic patients to evaluate the extent to which men’s and women’s treatment and management needs are different. Method: Data were collected from Review Board files from May 2000 to April 2005 in the 3 largest Canadian provinces. Using official criminal records, participants were followed for 3 to 8 years, until December 2008. The final sample comprised 1800 individuals: 15.6% were women and 84.4% were men. Results: There were few demographic differences, but women had higher psychosocial functioning than men. Both men and women had extensive mental health histories; women were more likely diagnosed with mood disorders and PDs and men were more likely diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and SUDs. The nature of the index offence did not differ by gender, except women were more likely to have perpetrated murders and attempted murders. For offences against a person, women were more likely to offend against offspring and partners and less likely to offend against strangers, compared with men. Women had significantly less extensive criminal histories than men. Conclusions: Not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder–accused women have a distinct psychosocial, clinical, and criminological profile from their male counterparts, which may suggest gender-specific assessment, risk management, and treatment in forensic services could benefit patients. The findings are also consistent with traditional models (Risk-Need-Responsivity) and ultimately demonstrate the importance of individual assessment and client-centred services. PMID:25886689

  20. Investigating micronucleus assay applicability for prediction of normal tissue intrinsic radiosensitivity in gynecological cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Encheva, Elitsa; Deleva, Sofia; Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Hadjieva, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Background Pelvic organs morbidity after irradiation of cancer patients remains a major problem although new technologies have been developed and implemented. A relatively simple and suitable method for routine clinical practice is needed for preliminary assessment of normal tissue intrinsic radiosensitivity. The micronucleus test (MNT) determines the frequency of the radiation induced micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood lymphocytes, which could serve as an indicator of intrinsic cell radiosensitivity. Aim To investigate a possible use of the micronucleus test (MNT) for acute radiation morbidity prediction in gynecological cancer patients. Materials and methods Forty gynecological cancer patients received 50 Gy conventional external pelvic irradiation after radical surgery. A four-field “box” technique was applied with 2D planning. The control group included 10 healthy females. Acute normal tissue reactions were graded according to NCI CTCAE v.3.0. From all reaction scores, the highest score named “summarized clinical radiosensitivity” was selected for a statistical analysis. MNT was performed before and after in vitro irradiation with 1.5 Gy. The mean radiation induced frequency of micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells (MN/1000) and lymphocytes containing micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells (cells with MN/1000) were evaluated for both patients and controls. An arbitrary cut off value was created to pick up a radiosensitive individual: the mean value of spontaneous frequency of cells with MN/1000 ± 2SD, found in the control group. Results Both mean spontaneous frequency of cells with MN/1000 and MN/1000 were registered to be significantly higher in cancer patients compared to the control group (t = 2.46, p = 0.02 and t = 2.51, p = 0.02). No statistical difference was registered when comparing radiation induced MN frequencies between those groups. Eighty percent (32) of patients developed grade 2 summarized clinical radiosensitivity, with

  1. Gay-Straight Alliances Vary on Dimensions of Youth Socializing and Advocacy: Factors Accounting for Individual and Setting-Level Differences

    PubMed Central

    Poteat, V. Paul; Scheer, Jillian R.; Marx, Robert A.; Calzo, Jerel P.; Yoshikawa, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are school-based youth settings that could promote health. Yet, GSAs have been treated as homogenous without attention to variability in how they operate or to how youth are involved in different capacities. Using a systems perspective, we considered two primary dimensions along which GSAs function to promote health: providing socializing and advocacy opportunities. Among 448 students in 48 GSAs who attended six regional conferences in Massachusetts (59.8% LGBQ; 69.9% White; 70.1% cisgender female), we found substantial variation among GSAs and youth in levels of socializing and advocacy. GSAs were more distinct from one another on advocacy than socializing. Using multilevel modeling, we identified group and individual factors accounting for this variability. In the socializing model, youth and GSAs that did more socializing activities did more advocacy. In the advocacy model, youth who were more actively engaged in the GSA as well as GSAs whose youth collectively perceived greater school hostility and reported greater social justice efficacy did more advocacy. Findings suggest potential reasons why GSAs vary in how they function in ways ranging from internal provisions of support, to visibility raising, to collective social change. The findings are further relevant for settings supporting youth from other marginalized backgrounds and that include advocacy in their mission. PMID:25855133

  2. Radiosensitivity of Human Fibroblasts is Associated With Amino Acid Substitution Variants in Susceptible Genes And Correlates With The Number of Risk Alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbeih, Ghazi . E-mail: galsbeih@kfshrc.edu.sa; El-Sebaie, Medhat; Al-Harbi, Najla; Al-Buhairi, Muneera; Al-Hadyan, Khaled; Al-Rajhi, Nasser

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Genetic predictive markers of radiosensitivity are being sought for stratifying radiotherapy for cancer patients and risk assessment of radiation exposure. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes are associated with, and the number of risk alleles has incremental effect on, individual radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six amino acid substitution variants (ATM 1853 Asp/Asn G>A, p53 72 Arg/Pro G>C, p21 31 Ser/Arg C>A, XRCC1 399 Arg/Gln G>A, XRCC3 241 Thr/Met C>T, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu/Pro T>C) were genotyped by direct sequencing in 54 fibroblast strains of different radiosensitivity. Results: The clonogenic survival fraction at 2 Gy range was 0.15-0.50 (mean, 0.34, standard deviation, 0.08). The mean survival fraction at 2 Gy divided the cell strains into radiosensitive (26 cases) and normal (28 controls). A significant association was observed between the survival fraction at 2 Gy and ATM 1853 Asn, XRCC3 241 Met, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu alleles (p = 0.05, p = 0.02, and p = 0.02, respectively). The p53 72 Arg allele showed a borderline association (p = 0.07). The number of risk alleles increased with increasing radiosensitivity, and the group comparison showed a statistically significant difference between the radiosensitive and control groups (p {<=}0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes influence cellular radiation response and that the number of risk alleles has a combined effect on radiosensitivity. Individuals with multiple risk alleles could be more susceptible to radiation effects than those with fewer risk alleles. These results may have implications in predicting normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy and risk assessment of radiation exposure.

  3. Radiosensitization of mouse skin by oxygen and depletion of glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G.; Joiner, M.; Joiner, B.

    1995-09-30

    To determine the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and shape of the oxygen sensitization curve of mouse foot skin, the extent to which glutathione (GSH) depletion radiosensitized skin, and the dependence of such sensitization on the ambient oxygen tension. Carbogen caused the greatest radiosensitization of skin, with a reproducible enhancement of 2.2 relative to the anoxic response. The OER of 2.2 is lower than other reports for mouse skin. This may indicate that the extremes of oxygenation were not produced, although there was no direct evidence for this. Depletion of GSH caused minimal radiosensitization when skin was irradiated under anoxic or well-oxygenated conditions. Radiosensitization by GSH depletion was maximal at intermediate oxygen tensions of 10-21% O{sub 2} in the ambient gas. Increasing the extent of GSH depletion led to increasing radiosensitization, with sensitization enhancement ratios of 1.2 and 1.1, respectively, for extensive and intermediated levels of GSH depletion. In mice exposed to 100% O{sub 2}, a significant component of skin radiosensitivity was due to diffusion of oxygen directly through the skin. Pentobarbitone anesthesia radiosensitized skin in mice exposed to 100% O{sub 2} by a factor of 1.2, but did not further sensitize skin in mice exposed to carbogen. Glutathione levels and the local oxygen tension at the time of irradiation were important determinants of mouse foot skin radiosensitivity. The extent to which GSH levels altered the radiosensitivity of skin was critically dependent on the local oxygen tension. These results have significant implications for potential clinical applications of GSH depletion. 53 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Change in radiosensitivity of rats during hypokinetic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, I. P.

    1980-01-01

    The laws governing stress modification of radiation sickness in relation to hypokinetic stress were investigated. It was found that gamma irradiation (800 rad) of rats on the third day of exposure to hypokinesia increased the radiosensitivity of the animals which was determined by the survival rate and the dynamics of body weight and the weight of some internal organs. The same radiation dose was given on the 20th day of hypokinesia and on the third day of recovery from the 20 day hypokinesia decreased the radiosensitivity of rats. It is concluded that the variations in the radiosensitivity observed may be due to a stress effect of hypokinesia.

  5. Radiosensitivity of cultured insect cells: II. Diptera

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, T.M.

    1983-10-01

    The radiosensitivity of five dipteran cell lines representing three mosquito genera and one fruit fly genus were examined. These lines are: (1) ATC-10, Aedes aegypti; (2) RU-TAE-14, Toxorhynchites amboinensis; (3) RU-ASE-2A, Anopheles stephensi; (4) WR69-DM-1, Drosophila melanogaster; and (5) WR69-DM-2, Drosophila melanogaster. Population doubling times for these lines range from approximately 16 to 48 hr. Diploid chromosome numbers are six for the mosquito cells and eight for the fruit fly cells D/sub 0/ values are 5.1 and 6.5 Gy for the Drosophila cell lines and 3.6, 6.2, and 10.2 Gy for the mosquito cell lines. The results of this study demonstrate that dipteran insect cells are a few times more resistant to radiation than mammalian cells, but not nearly as radioresistant as lepidopteran cells.

  6. Ganetespib radiosensitization for liver cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Malek, Reem; Annadanam, Anvesh; Nugent, Katriana M.; Kato, Yoshinori; Wang, Hailun; Cades, Jessica A.; Taparra, Kekoa; Belcaid, Zineb; Ballew, Matthew; Manmiller, Sarah; Proia, David; Lim, Michael; Anders, Robert A.; Herman, Joseph M.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapies for liver cancer particularly those including radiation are still inadequate. Inhibiting the stress response machinery is an appealing anti-cancer and radiosensitizing therapeutic strategy. Heat-shock-protein-90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that is a prominent effector of the stress response machinery and is overexpressed in liver cancer cells. HSP90 client proteins include critical components of pathways implicated in liver cancer cell survival and radioresistance. The effects of a novel non-geldanamycin HSP90 inhibitor, ganetespib, combined with radiation were examined on 3 liver cancer cell lines, Hep3b, HepG2 and HUH7, using in vitro assays for clonogenic survival, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, γH2AX foci kinetics and client protein expression in pathways important for liver cancer survival and radioresistance. We then evaluated tumor growth delay and effects of the combined ganetespib-radiation treatment on tumor cell proliferation in a HepG2 hind-flank tumor graft model. Nanomolar levels of ganetespib alone exhibited liver cancer cell anti-cancer activity in vitro as shown by decreased clonogenic survival that was associated with increased apoptotic cell death, prominent G2-M arrest and marked changes in PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/MAPK client protein activity. Ganetespib caused a supra-additive radiosensitization in all liver cancer cell lines at low nanomolar doses with enhancement ratios between 1.33–1.78. These results were confirmed in vivo, where the ganetespib-radiation combination therapy produced supra-additive tumor growth delay compared with either therapy by itself in HepG2 tumor grafts. Our data suggest that combined ganetespib-radiation therapy exhibits promising activity against liver cancer cells, which should be investigated in clinical studies. PMID:26980196

  7. Radiosensitization of E. coli B/r by arylhydrazonopropanedinitriles.

    PubMed

    Crump, P W; Bisby, R H; Cundall, R B; Thomas, E W

    1989-04-01

    Several arylhydrazonopropanedinitriles and an arylhydrazonopropane-diethyl ester (derivatives of well-known uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation) have been studied with respect to their ability to radiosensitize E. coli B/r under oxic and hypoxic conditions. Of the compounds studied, 2-carboxyphenylhydrazono-propanedinitrile and 2-carboxyphenylhydrazonopropanediethylester were found to be the most efficient radiosensitizers under hypoxia, whilst the former compound was also found to provide radiosensitization under oxic conditions. Increased radiosensitization by 4-carboxyphenylhydrazonopropanedinitrile was observed on decreasing the pH of the irradiation incubation medium. The results are discussed with respect to the physicochemical properties of these compounds and their reactivity with thiols, for which data are presented. PMID:2564869

  8. Physical basis and biological mechanisms of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Karl T; McMahon, Stephen J; Currell, Fred J; Prise, Kevin M

    2012-08-21

    The unique properties of nanomaterials, in particular gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have applications for a wide range of biomedical applications. GNPs have been proposed as novel radiosensitizing agents due to their strong photoelectric absorption coefficient. Experimental evidence supporting the application of GNPs as radiosensitizing agents has been provided from extensive in vitro investigation and a relatively limited number of in vivo studies. Whilst these studies provide experimental evidence for the use of GNPs in combination with ionising radiation, there is an apparent disparity between the observed experimental findings and the level of radiosensitization predicted by mass energy absorption and GNP concentration. This review summarises experimental findings and attempts to highlight potential underlying biological mechanisms of response in GNP radiosensitization. PMID:22767423

  9. 20 CFR 416.546 - Payment into dedicated accounts of past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. 416.546 Section 416.546... past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. For purposes... amounts described in § 416.545(a) (1), (2), and (3). (a) For an eligible individual under age 18 who has...

  10. 20 CFR 416.546 - Payment into dedicated accounts of past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. 416.546 Section 416.546... past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. For purposes... amounts described in § 416.545(a) (1), (2), and (3). (a) For an eligible individual under age 18 who has...

  11. 20 CFR 416.546 - Payment into dedicated accounts of past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. 416.546 Section 416.546... past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. For purposes... amounts described in § 416.545(a) (1), (2), and (3). (a) For an eligible individual under age 18 who has...

  12. 20 CFR 416.546 - Payment into dedicated accounts of past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. 416.546 Section 416.546... past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. For purposes... amounts described in § 416.545(a) (1), (2), and (3). (a) For an eligible individual under age 18 who has...

  13. 20 CFR 416.546 - Payment into dedicated accounts of past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. 416.546 Section 416.546... past-due benefits for eligible individuals under age 18 who have a representative payee. For purposes... amounts described in § 416.545(a) (1), (2), and (3). (a) For an eligible individual under age 18 who has...

  14. Correlation between radiosensitivity, percentage hypoxic cells and pO2 measurements in one rodent and two human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C D; Chavaudra, N; Martin, L; Guichard, M

    1994-07-01

    Computerized pO2 histography has been used to measure the intratumor pO2 in patients for the past few years, and there is now evidence that these tumors contain hypoxic cells. One of the major questions that remains to be answered is the relevance of such data to radiosensitivity. The present study looks for a correlation between intratumor pO2, the percentage of hypoxic cells in the tumor and the radiosensitization induced by carbogen and/or the oxygen carrier, perflubron emulsion. Two human tumor xenografts (HRT18, Na11+) and one rodent tumor (EMT6) were used. The radiosensitivity (clonogenic assay) and the oxygen tension (computerized pO2 histography) were measured. All experiments were performed under similar conditions. Carbogen increased tumor radiosensitivity; sensitization was greatest when 4 ml/kg perflubron emulsion was used in conjunction with carbogen. The pO2 distribution was shifted to higher pO2 values in the tumors whatever the treatment; the shift was greater for perflubron emulsion plus carbogen. The low pO2 values (< 0.4 kPa) were lost for the HRT18 cells. A correlation (EMT6, HRT18) or a link (Na11+) between the radiosensitization and the oxygen tension measurements was found for values below 1.07 or 1.33 kPa. A trend between the percentage of hypoxic cells and pO2 measurements was found taking into account pO2 measurements comprised between 0.27 and 0.67 kPa. PMID:8016297

  15. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as radiosensitizers for radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2004-07-06

    The present invention covers radiosensitizers containing as an active ingredient halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the structure ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron--capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these radiosensitizers in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  16. Radiosensitivity of CD4 or CD8 positive human T-lymphocytes by an in vitro colony formation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, N.; Kusunoki, Y.; Akiyama, M. )

    1990-08-01

    The recent development of an in vitro lymphocyte colony assay makes it possible to examine variations in the radiosensitivity of humans using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) instead of the skin fibroblast assay. Our recent study showed that most of the colonies consisted of lymphocytes bearing CD4 or CD8 antigens. Since the fraction of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in PBL differs among individuals, we suspected that individual radiosensitivity might be biased by the different subset frequencies if the dose-survival curves of the CD4+ and CD8+ cells were different from each other. In the present study, CD4+ (helper/inducer T) and CD8+ (suppressor/cytotoxic T) lymphocytes were isolated from PBL and their dose-survival curves were determined. The results showed that the D10 (dose required to reduce the surviving fraction to 10%) was similar for these two types of cells (3.13 +/- 0.10 Gy (mean +/- SD) for CD4+, 3.34 +/- 0.50 Gy for CD8+ and 3.14 +/- 0.17 Gy for the unsorted cells), supporting the use of the whole PBL population for the screening of individuals with altered radiosensitivity.

  17. Dose-rate dependence of heat radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Gerner, E.W.; Oval, J.H.; Manning, M.R.; Sim, D.A.; Bowden, G.T.; Hevezi, J.M.

    1983-09-01

    The dose rate dependence of heat radiosensitization was studied using rat astrocytoma cells in culture and a cliniclly relevant protocol of heat dose and heat radiation sequence. Cells were treated with a minimally toxic heat dose of 43/sup 0/C for 30 minutes, after which they were irradiated with varying doses of radiation at dose rates ranging from 0.567 to 300 cGy/min. This heat dose substantially reduced the extrapolation number (n), but had little effect on D/sub 0/ of the radiation survival curve at dose rates of 50 cGy/min or greater. At dose rates less than 10 cGy/min, 43/sup 0/C for 30 min had little effect on n and only for the lowest dose rate studied (0.567 cGy/min) was there a significant reduction in D/sub 0/ (60%). The thermal enhancement ratio did not vary inversely with radiation dose rate over the dose rate range studied but, instead, was maximal at the two dose rate extremes (0.567 and 300 cGy/min). These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant heat dose enhances very low dose rate, as well as high dose rate, ionizing radiation, but suggest that little benefit is to be gained from using dose rates intermediate between conventional radiotherapeutic high dose rates or dose rates representative of interstitial implants.

  18. Lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles for radiosensitization of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Konstantin; Bekah, Devesh; Cooper, Daniel; Shastry, Sathvik; Hill, Colin; Bradforth, Stephen; Nadeau, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Dense inorganic nanoparticles have recently been identified as promising radiosensitizers. In addition to dose enhancement through increased attenuation of ionizing radiation relative to biological tissue, scintillating nanoparticles can transfer energy to coupled photosensitizers to amplify production of reactive oxygen species, as well as provide UVvisible emission for optical imaging. Lanthanum fluoride is a transparent material that is easily prepared as nanocrystals, and which can provide radioluminescence at a number of wavelengths through simple substitution of lanthanum ions with other luminescent lanthanides. We have prepared lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles doped with cerium, terbium, or both, that have good spectral overlap with chlorine6 or Rose Bengal photosensitizer molecules. We have also developed a strategy for stable conjugation of the photosensitizers to the nanoparticle surface, allowing for high energy transfer efficiencies on a per molecule basis. Additionally, we have succeeded in making our conjugates colloidally stable under physiological conditions. Here we present our latest results, using nanoparticles and nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates to demonstrate radiation dose enhancement in B16 melanoma cells. The effects of nanoparticle treatment prior to 250 kVp x-ray irradiation were investigated through clonogenic survival assays and cell cycle analysis. Using a custom apparatus, we have also observed scintillation of the nanoparticles and conjugates under the same conditions that the cell samples are irradiated.

  19. A comprehensive analysis of radiosensitization targets; functional inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 3B radiosensitizes by disrupting DNA damage regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Hiroaki; Sato, Akira; Kikuhara, Sota; Wang, Junhui; Hirai, Takahisa; Sasaki, Yuka; Murakami, Yasufumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive genome-wide screen of radiosensitization targets in HeLa cells was performed using a shRNA-library/functional cluster analysis and DNMT3B was identified as a candidate target. DNMT3B RNAi increased the sensitivity of HeLa, A549 and HCT116 cells to both γ-irradiation and carbon-ion beam irradiation. DNMT3B RNAi reduced the activation of DNA damage responses induced by γ-irradiation, including HP1β-, γH2AX- and Rad51-foci formation. DNMT3B RNAi impaired damage-dependent H2AX accumulation and showed a reduced level of γH2AX induction after γ-irradiation. DNMT3B interacted with HP1β in non-irradiated conditions, whereas irradiation abrogated the DNMT3B/HP1β complex but induced interaction between DNMT3B and H2AX. Consistent with radiosensitization, TP63, BAX, PUMA and NOXA expression was induced after γ-irradiation in DNMT3B knockdown cells. Together with the observation that H2AX overexpression canceled radiosensitization by DNMT3B RNAi, these results suggest that DNMT3B RNAi induced radiosensitization through impairment of damage-dependent HP1β foci formation and efficient γH2AX-induction mechanisms including H2AX accumulation. Enhanced radiosensitivity by DNMT3B RNAi was also observed in a tumor xenograft model. Taken together, the current study implies that comprehensive screening accompanied by a cluster analysis enabled the identification of radiosensitization targets. Downregulation of DNMT3B, one of the targets identified using this method, radiosensitizes cancer cells by disturbing multiple DNA damage responses. PMID:26667181

  20. A comprehensive analysis of radiosensitization targets; functional inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 3B radiosensitizes by disrupting DNA damage regulation.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Hiroaki; Sato, Akira; Kikuhara, Sota; Wang, Junhui; Hirai, Takahisa; Sasaki, Yuka; Murakami, Yasufumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive genome-wide screen of radiosensitization targets in HeLa cells was performed using a shRNA-library/functional cluster analysis and DNMT3B was identified as a candidate target. DNMT3B RNAi increased the sensitivity of HeLa, A549 and HCT116 cells to both γ-irradiation and carbon-ion beam irradiation. DNMT3B RNAi reduced the activation of DNA damage responses induced by γ-irradiation, including HP1β-, γH2AX- and Rad51-foci formation. DNMT3B RNAi impaired damage-dependent H2AX accumulation and showed a reduced level of γH2AX induction after γ-irradiation. DNMT3B interacted with HP1β in non-irradiated conditions, whereas irradiation abrogated the DNMT3B/HP1β complex but induced interaction between DNMT3B and H2AX. Consistent with radiosensitization, TP63, BAX, PUMA and NOXA expression was induced after γ-irradiation in DNMT3B knockdown cells. Together with the observation that H2AX overexpression canceled radiosensitization by DNMT3B RNAi, these results suggest that DNMT3B RNAi induced radiosensitization through impairment of damage-dependent HP1β foci formation and efficient γH2AX-induction mechanisms including H2AX accumulation. Enhanced radiosensitivity by DNMT3B RNAi was also observed in a tumor xenograft model. Taken together, the current study implies that comprehensive screening accompanied by a cluster analysis enabled the identification of radiosensitization targets. Downregulation of DNMT3B, one of the targets identified using this method, radiosensitizes cancer cells by disturbing multiple DNA damage responses. PMID:26667181

  1. Self-Instructional Materials for Topics in Elementary Accounting -- A Means to the Demonstration of Pay-Offs from Individualizing Time-To-Complete. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Frank A.

    The materials in this report provide a case study of the development and validation of self-instructional lessons on four topics customarily included in a first college accounting course. For each topic, performance objectives were embodied in four criterion tests. The author provides documents relating to departmental curriculum decisions and to…

  2. Radiosensitizing Properties of Bortezomib Depend on Therapeutic Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Labussiere, Marianne; Pinel, Sophie; Vandamme, Marc; Plenat, Francois; Chastagner, Pascal

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the bortezomib (BTZ) on malignant glioma radiosensitivity in two xenograft models. Methods and Materials: For TCG3 and U87 models, we evaluated the antitumor activity of BTZ, radiotherapy, and BTZ plus radiothearapy according to two therapeutic schedules: a 'nonfractionated' schedule corresponding to a single dose of treatment per week, and a 'fractionated' schedule corresponding to the same weekly dose divided into 5 fractions. Treatments influence on proliferation and apoptosis indexes, cell cycle distribution, and nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway were explored. Results: The radiosensitizing properties of BTZ observed with the nonfractionated schedule were lost with the fractionated schedule. Bortezomib-mediated radiosensitization was associated with an increased apoptosis response and major changes in cell proliferation, but the nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway was not involved. Most of the cellular effects induced by BTZ when tumors received a single irradiation were cancelled out if radiotherapy was fractionated. Conclusion: The influence of BTZ on glioma radiosensitivity seems to depend on the treatment fractionation schedule, emphasizing the need to clarify the mechanisms underlying BTZ's radiosensitizing effects before further clinical trials are initiated.

  3. Homologous recombination as a potential target for caffeine radiosensitization in mammalian cells: reduced caffeine radiosensitization in XRCC2 and XRCC3 mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asaad, N. A.; Zeng, Z. C.; Guan, J.; Thacker, J.; Iliakis, G.

    2000-01-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of caffeine has been associated with the disruption of multiple DNA damage-responsive cell cycle checkpoints, but several lines of evidence also implicate inhibition of DNA repair. The role of DNA repair inhibition in caffeine radiosensitization remains uncharacterized, and it is unknown which repair process, or lesion, is affected. We show that a radiosensitive cell line, mutant for the RAD51 homolog XRCC2 and defective in homologous recombination repair (HRR), displays significantly diminished caffeine radiosensitization that can be restored by expression of XRCC2. Despite the reduced radiosensitization, caffeine effectively abrogates checkpoints in S and G2 phases in XRCC2 mutant cells indicating that checkpoint abrogation is not sufficient for radiosensitization. Another radiosensitive line, mutant for XRCC3 and defective in HRR, similarly shows reduced caffeine radiosensitization. On the other hand, a radiosensitive mutant (irs-20) of DNA-PKcs with a defect in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is radiosensitized by caffeine to an extent comparable to wild-type cells. In addition, rejoining of radiation-induced DNA DSBs, that mainly reflects NHEJ, remains unaffected by caffeine in XRCC2 and XRCC3 mutants, or their wild-type counterparts. These observations suggest that caffeine targets steps in HRR but not in NHEJ and that abrogation of checkpoint response is not sufficient to explain radiosensitization. Indeed, immortalized fibroblasts from AT patients show caffeine radiosensitization despite the checkpoint defects associated with ATM mutation. We propose that caffeine radiosensitization is mediated by inhibition of stages in DNA DSB repair requiring HRR and that checkpoint disruption contributes by allowing these DSBs to transit into irreparable states. Thus, checkpoints may contribute to genomic stability by promoting error-free HRR.

  4. The Concept of Visual Acuity Ratio to the Maximum Level of Individual Visual Acuity—The Evaluation Method of Background Luminance and Visual Distance on Visibility Taking into Account of Individual Visual Acuity—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akizuki, Yuki; Inoue, Youko

    We use the maximum level of individual visual acuity (MVA) as an index for the individual visual ability. Also, we define the concept of the ratio of visual acuity under various environmental conditions for the MVA as Visual Acuity Ratio (VAR), in order to describe differences between individual visibilities. An experiment was carried out using various levels of background luminance and visual distance. The visual acuity of subjects in two age groups (Young and Aged) was measured by using Landolt’s eye chart (luminance contrast: 0.93). The Aged subjects’ vision was corrected by two kinds of spectacles: ones for myopia / presbyopia. Under conditions providing sufficient visual acuity, the subjects’ order of individual visual acuity was unchanged. Therefore, MVA can be used as an index for the visual ability of the individual. Regardless of corrected conditions, the individual visual acuity reaches the maximum level under 800cd/m2 and the corrected position. The results of the eyesight test can be used as a substitution for MVA. Visual acuity is changing under environmental conditions, and a degree of the changes varies with age, corrected conditions, and differences in visual acuity. Under the corrected position, the relationship between background luminance and VAR is constant regardless of age group, corrected conditions and differences of visual acuity. The relationship between visual distance and VAR differs by age and corrected conditions. However, in the neighborhood of the corrected position, the relationship between visual distance and VAR is constant regardless of differences between individual visibilities. The concept of VAR is applicable to past studies.

  5. Differences in DNA Repair Capacity, Cell Death and Transcriptional Response after Irradiation between a Radiosensitive and a Radioresistant Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Borràs-Fresneda, Mireia; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Rössler, Ute; Armengol, Gemma; Barrios, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy shows variability between patients, indicating inter-individual differences in radiosensitivity. Genetic variation probably contributes to these differences. The aim of the present study was to determine if two cell lines, one radiosensitive (RS) and another radioresistant (RR), showed differences in DNA repair capacity, cell viability, cell cycle progression and, in turn, if this response could be characterised by a differential gene expression profile at different post-irradiation times. After irradiation, the RS cell line showed a slower rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance, a higher frequency of incomplete chromosomal aberrations, a reduced cell viability and a longer disturbance of the cell cycle when compared to the RR cell line. Moreover, a greater and prolonged transcriptional response after irradiation was induced in the RS cell line. Functional analysis showed that 24 h after irradiation genes involved in "DNA damage response", "direct p53 effectors" and apoptosis were still differentially up-regulated in the RS cell line but not in the RR cell line. The two cell lines showed different response to IR and can be distinguished with cell-based assays and differential gene expression analysis. The results emphasise the importance to identify biomarkers of radiosensitivity for tailoring individualized radiotherapy protocols. PMID:27245205

  6. Differences in DNA Repair Capacity, Cell Death and Transcriptional Response after Irradiation between a Radiosensitive and a Radioresistant Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Borràs-Fresneda, Mireia; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Rössler, Ute; Armengol, Gemma; Barrios, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy shows variability between patients, indicating inter-individual differences in radiosensitivity. Genetic variation probably contributes to these differences. The aim of the present study was to determine if two cell lines, one radiosensitive (RS) and another radioresistant (RR), showed differences in DNA repair capacity, cell viability, cell cycle progression and, in turn, if this response could be characterised by a differential gene expression profile at different post-irradiation times. After irradiation, the RS cell line showed a slower rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance, a higher frequency of incomplete chromosomal aberrations, a reduced cell viability and a longer disturbance of the cell cycle when compared to the RR cell line. Moreover, a greater and prolonged transcriptional response after irradiation was induced in the RS cell line. Functional analysis showed that 24 h after irradiation genes involved in “DNA damage response”, “direct p53 effectors” and apoptosis were still differentially up-regulated in the RS cell line but not in the RR cell line. The two cell lines showed different response to IR and can be distinguished with cell-based assays and differential gene expression analysis. The results emphasise the importance to identify biomarkers of radiosensitivity for tailoring individualized radiotherapy protocols. PMID:27245205

  7. The temporal organization of processes of cell reproduction and its connection with rhythms of radiosensitivity of the body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druzhinin, Y. P.; Romanov, Y. A.; Vatsek, A.

    1974-01-01

    Radiosensitivity of individual phases of the mitotic cycle was studied in synchronous cell cultures and in several biological objects. It was found that radiosensitivity changed essentially according to phases of the mitotic cycle, depending on the kind of cells, evaluation criteria and the radiation dosage. Tests on partially synchronized HeLa cell populations, according to the criterion of survival, showed them most sensitive during mitosis, as well as in later G sub 1- or early DNA-synthesizing stages. With radiation in doses of 300 rad, the proportion of surviving cells showed a sensitivity directly before DNA synthesis of approximately 4 times higher than the later S-phase and during the major portion of G sub 1- and G sub 2-periods. Sensitivity of cells in mitosis was approximately 3 times higher than in late G sub 1- and early S-phases.

  8. Coculture with astrocytes reduces the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma stem-like cells and identifies additional targets for radiosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Barbara H; Wahba, Amy; Camphausen, Kevin; Tofilon, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Toward developing a model system for investigating the role of the microenvironment in the radioresistance of glioblastoma (GBM), human glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) were grown in coculture with human astrocytes. Using a trans-well assay, survival analyses showed that astrocytes significantly decreased the radiosensitivity of GSCs compared to standard culture conditions. In addition, when irradiated in coculture, the initial level of radiation-induced γH2AX foci in GSCs was reduced and foci dispersal was enhanced suggesting that the presence of astrocytes influenced the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. These data indicate that astrocytes can decrease the radiosensitivity of GSCs in vitro via a paracrine-based mechanism and further support a role for the microenvironment as a determinant of GBM radioresponse. Chemokine profiling of coculture media identified a number of bioactive molecules not present under standard culture conditions. The gene expression profiles of GSCs grown in coculture were significantly different as compared to GSCs grown alone. These analyses were consistent with an astrocyte-mediated modification in GSC phenotype and, moreover, suggested a number of potential targets for GSC radiosensitization that were unique to coculture conditions. Along these lines, STAT3 was activated in GSCs grown with astrocytes; the JAK/STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 enhanced the radiosensitivity of GSCs under coculture conditions and when grown as orthotopic xenografts. Further, this coculture system may also provide an approach for identifying additional targets for GBM radiosensitization. PMID:26518290

  9. Life Experiences of People Who Stutter, and the Perceived Impact of Stuttering on Quality of Life: Personal Accounts of South African Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klompas, Michelle; Ross, Eleanor

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the life experiences of a group of South African adults who stutter and the impact of stuttering on their quality of life. Participants were 16 adults with a mean age of 28.9 and ranging from 20 to 59 years. Methods involved individual interviews designed to explore the life domains of education; social…

  10. TGF{beta}1 polymorphisms and late clinical radiosensitivity in patients treated for gynecologic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyck, Kim de . E-mail: kim.deruyck@UGent.be; Van Eijkeren, Marc; Claes, Kathleen; Bacher, Klaus; Vral, Anne; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the association between six transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGF{beta}1) polymorphisms (-1.552delAGG, -800G>A, -509C>T, Leu10Pro, Arg25Pro, Thr263Ile) and the occurrence of late normal tissue reactions after gynecologic radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight women with cervical or endometrial cancer and 140 control individuals were included in the study. According to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAEv3.0) scale, 25 patients showed late adverse RT reactions (CTC2+), of whom 11 had severe complications (CTC3+). Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), single base extension and genotyping assays were performed to examine the polymorphic sites in TGF{beta}1. Results: Homozygous variant -1.552delAGG, -509TT, and 10Pro genotypes were associated with the risk of developing late severe RT reactions. Triple (variant) homozygous patients had a 3.6 times increased risk to develop severe RT reactions (p = 0.26). Neither the -800A allele, nor the 25Pro allele or the 263Ile allele were associated with clinical radiosensitivity. There was perfect linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the -1.552delAGG and the -509C>T polymorphisms, and tight LD between the -1.552/-509 and the Leu10Pro polymorphisms. Haplotype analysis revealed two major haplotypes but could not distinguish radiosensitive from nonradiosensitive patients. Conclusions: The present study shows that homozygous variant TGF{beta}1 -1.552delAGG, -509TT, and 10Pro genotypes may be associated with severe clinical radiosensitivity after gynecologic RT.

  11. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder in Canada. Part 1: Context and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Anne G; Nicholls, Tonia L; Seto, Michael C; Côté, Gilles; Charette, Yanick; Caulet, Malijai

    2015-01-01

    The National Trajectory Project examined longitudinal data from a large sample of people found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) to assess the presence of provincial differences in the application of the law, to examine the characteristics of people with serious mental illness who come into conflict with the law and receive this verdict, and to investigate the trajectories of NCRMD–accused people as they traverse the mental health and criminal justice systems. Our paper describes the rationale for the National Trajectory Project and the methods used to collect data in Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia, the 3 most populous provinces in Canada and the 3 provinces with the most people found NCRMD. PMID:25886685

  12. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy enhances radiosensitivity through natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chau-Hwa; Wang, Yu-Shan; Yang, Chieh-Han; Chi, Kwan-Hwa

    2010-02-01

    We investigated whether natural killer (NK) cells in the tumor microenvironment have a radiosensitization effect. The radiosensitization effect of combined CpG and Herceptin((R)) (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA) (CpG/Herceptin), given before or after radiation, was evaluated by using a murine colon cancer cell line overexpressing human HER2/neu, CT26HER2/neu. In vitro radiosensitization effects were investigated by coculture of CT26HER2/neu with splenocytes, CpG, and Herceptin before applying radiation. Tumor cells, cocultured with CpG-pretreated splenocytes and Herceptin, were more vulnerable to radiation damage. In BALB/c mice injected with CT26HER2/neu, CpG/Herceptin administered before radiotherapy was associated with a better retardation of tumor growth than when administered after radiotherapy. The radiosensitization effect was significantly abrogated by NK-cell depletion, indicating that NK cells play an essential role in it. Further, surviving mice treated with CpG or CpG/Herceptin and reverse transcriptase were resistant to renewed tumor challenge, suggesting the presence of an induced immune response to the tumor. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy with CpG/Herceptin may improve response to radiotherapy of HER2/neu-expressing tumors. PMID:20187795

  13. Histone Deacetylation Critically Determines T-cell Subset Radiosensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Jason L.; Sukhina, Alona S.; Seed, Thomas M.; Manley, Nancy R.; Sempowski, Gregory A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Smithey, Megan J.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes are sensitive to ionizing radiation and naïve lymphocytes are more radiosensitive than their memory counterparts. Less is known about radiosensitivity of memory cell subsets. We examined the radiosensitivity of naïve (TN), effector memory (TEM), and central memory (TCM) T cell subsets in C57BL/6 mice, and found TEM to be more resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis than either TN or TCM. Surprisingly, we found no correlation between the extent of radiation-induced apoptosis in T cell subsets and : (i) levels of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members; or (ii) the H2-AX content and maximal γH2-AX fold change. Rather, TEM cell survival correlated with higher levels of immediate γH2-AX marking, immediate break binding and genome-wide open chromatin structure. T cells were able to mark DNA damage seemingly instantly (30 s), even if kept on ice. Relaxing chromatin with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid following radiation or etoposide treatment, improved the survival of TCM and TN cells up to levels seen in the resistant TEM cells, but did not improve survival from caspase-mediated apoptosis. We conclude that an open genome-wide chromatin state is the key determinant of efficient immediate repair of DNA damage in T cells, explaining the observed T cell subset radiosensitivity differences. PMID:24990082

  14. Targeted radiosensitization of cells expressing truncated DNA polymerase {beta}.

    PubMed

    Neijenhuis, Sari; Verwijs-Janssen, Manon; van den Broek, Lenie J; Begg, Adrian C; Vens, Conchita

    2010-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is an effective anticancer treatment, although failures still occur. To improve radiotherapy, tumor-targeted strategies are needed to increase radiosensitivity of tumor cells, without influencing normal tissue radiosensitivity. Base excision repair (BER) and single-strand break repair (SSBR) contribute to the determination of sensitivity to IR. A crucial protein in BER/SSBR is DNA polymerase β (polβ). Aberrant polβ expression is commonly found in human tumors and leads to inhibition of BER. Here, we show that truncated polβ variant (polβ-Δ)-expressing cells depend on homologous recombination (HR) for survival after IR, indicating that a considerable fraction of polβ-Δ-induced lesions are subject to repair by HR. Increased sensitization was found not to result from involvement in DNA-dependent protein kinase-dependent nonhomologous end joining, the other major double-strand break repair pathway. Caffeine and the ATM inhibitor Ku55933 cause polβ-Δ-dependent radiosensitization. Consistent with the observed HR dependence and the known HR-modulating activity of ATM, polβ-Δ-expressing cells showed increased radiosensitization after BRCA2 knockdown that is absent under ATM-inhibited conditions. Our data suggest that treatment with HR modulators is a promising therapeutic strategy for exploiting defects in the BER/SSBR pathway in human tumors. PMID:20978197

  15. Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes of larynx cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowska, Halina; Lankoff, Anna; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Florek, Agnieszka; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Gozdz, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Andrzej . E-mail: awojcik@pu.kielce.pl

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The chromosomal radiosensitivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes of cancer patients was reported to be higher than that of healthy donors. This effect is especially prominent when aberrations induced in the G{sub 2} phase of the cell cycle are analyzed. The aim of our study was to investigate if the G{sub 2} aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of patients with larynx cancer are higher than in the case of control individuals. Also, we tested if the frequencies of G{sub 2} aberrations correlate with side effects of radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Peripheral blood of 38 patients was collected before the onset of radiotherapy, cultured for 72 h, and irradiated with 2 Gy after 67 h. Lymphocytes of 40 healthy donors were treated in the same way. Results: The spontaneous and radiation-induced aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of patients were on average higher than in those of healthy donors. No statistically significant correlation was observed between aberration frequencies in lymphocytes and the degree of both early and late normal tissue reactions. Conclusions: The chromosomal radiosensitivity of lymphocytes of patients with larynx cancer may be a marker of cancer predisposition; however, it does not appear to have a predictive value for the risk of developing side effects to radiotherapy.

  16. Radiosensitivity to high energy iron ions is influenced by heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Lieberman, H. B.; Ludwig, T.; Hall, E. J.

    2010-09-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1 GeV/ n56Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation.

  17. RADIOSENSITIVITY TO HIGH ENERGY IRON IONS IS INFLUENCED BY HETEROZYGOSITY for ATM, RAD9 and BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G; Smilenov, L B; Lieberman, H B; Ludwig, T; Hall, E J

    2010-09-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1GeV/n (56)Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy Iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation. PMID:24431481

  18. RADIOSENSITIVITY TO HIGH ENERGY IRON IONS IS INFLUENCED BY HETEROZYGOSITY for ATM, RAD9 and BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Lieberman, H. B.; Ludwig, T.; Hall, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1GeV/n 56Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy Iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation. PMID:24431481

  19. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder in Canada. Part 4: Criminal Recidivism

    PubMed Central

    Charette, Yanick; Crocker, Anne G; Seto, Michael C; Salem, Leila; Nicholls, Tonia L; Caulet, Malijai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine criminal recidivism rates of a large sample of people found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in Canada’s 3 most populous provinces, British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. Public concern about the dangerousness of people found NCRMD has been fed by media attention on high-profile cases. However, little research is available on the rate of reoffending among people found NCRMD across Canadian provinces. Method: Using data from the National Trajectory Project, this study examined 1800 men and women in British Columbia (n = 222), Ontario (n = 484), and Quebec (n = 1094) who were found NCRMD between May 2000 and April 2005 and followed until December 2008. Results: Recidivism was relatively low after 3 years (17%). There were interprovincial differences after controlling for number of prior criminal offences, diagnosis, seriousness of the index offence, and supervision by the review boards. British Columbia (10%) and Ontario (9%) were similar, whereas Quebec had almost twice the recidivism (22%). People who had committed severe violent index offences were less likely to reoffend than those who had committed less severe offences. People from the sample were less likely to reoffend when under the purview of review boards, across all 3 provinces. Conclusion: The results of this study, along with other research on processing differences, suggest systemic differences in the trajectories and outcomes of persons found NCRMD need to be better understood to guide national policies and practices. PMID:25886688

  20. WE-G-BRE-08: Radiosensitization by Olaparib Eluting Nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Tangutoori, S; Kumar, R; Sridhar, S; Korideck, H; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate brachytherapy often uses inert bio-absorbable spacers to achieve the desired geometric distribution of sources within the prostate. Transforming these spacers into implantable nanoplatforms for chemo-radiation therapy (INCeRT) provides a means of providing sustained in-situ release of radiosensitizers in the prostate to enhance the therapeutic ratio of the procedure. Olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, suppresses DNA repair processes present during low dose rate continuous irradiation. This work investigates the radiosensitizing/DNA damage repair inhibition by NanoOlaparib eluting nanospheres. Methods: Human cell line PC3 (from ATCC), was maintained in F12-k medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum. Clonogenic assay kit (from Fischer Scientific) was used to fix and stain the cells to determine the long term effects of irradiation. Nanoparticle size and zeta potential of nanospheres were determined using a Zeta particle size analyzer. The incorporation of Olaparib in nanospheres was evaluated by HPLC. Irradiation was performed in a small animal irradiator operating at 220 KeV.The long term effects of radio-sensitization with olaparib and nanoolaparib was determined using the clonogenic assay at 2 Gy and 4 Gy doses. The cells were allowed to grow for around 10 doubling cycles, The colonies were fixed and stained using clonogenic assay kit. The excess stain was washed off using DI water and the images were taken using a digital camera. Results: Radiosensitization studies were carried out in prostate cancer cell line, PC3 radiation at 0, 2 and 4Gy doses. Strongest dose response was observed with nanoolaparib treated cells compared to untreated cells. Conclusion: A two stage drug release of drug eluting nanospheres from a biodegradable spacer has been suggested for sustained in-situ release of Olaparib to suppress DNA repair processes during prostate brachytherapy. The Olaparib eluting nanospheres had the same in-vitro radiosensitizing effect as

  1. Disturbance of redox status enhances radiosensitivity of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chao; Wang, Zhen-hua; Liu, Xiong-xiong; Yang, Li-na; Wang, Yali; Liu, Yang; Mao, Ai-hong; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xin; Di, Cui-xia; Gan, Lu; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Aims: High constitutive expression of Nrf2 has been found in many types of cancers, and this high level of Nrf2 also favors resistance to drugs and radiation. Here we investigate how isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a natural antioxidant, inhibits the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant pathway and enhances the radiosensitivity of HepG2 cells and HepG2 xenografts. Results: Treatment of HepG2 cells with ISL for 6 h selectively enhanced transcription and expression of Keap1. Keap1 effectively induced ubiquitination and degradation of Nrf2, and inhibited translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. Consequently, expression of Nrf2 downstream genes was reduced, and the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant system was suppressed. Endogenous ROS was higher than before ISL treatment, causing redox imbalance and oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with ISL for 6 h followed by X-ray irradiation significantly increased γ-H2AX foci and cell apoptosis, and reduced clonogenic potential compared with cells irradiated with X-rays alone. In addition, HepG2 xenografts, ISL, and X-ray co-treatments induced greater apoptosis and tumor growth inhibition, when compared with X-ray treatments alone. Additionally, HepG2 xenografts, in which Nrf2 was expressed at very low levels due to ectopic expression of Keap1, showed that ISL-mediated radiosensitization was Keap1 dependent. Innovation and Conclusions: ISL inhibited the Nrf2-antioxidant pathway by increasing the levels of Keap1 and ultimately inducing oxidative stress via disturbance of the redox status. The antioxidant ISL possessed pro-oxidative properties, and enhanced the radiosensitivity of liver cancer cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, these results demonstrated the effectiveness of using ISL to decrease radioresistance, suggesting that ISL could be developed as an adjuvant radiosensitization drug. Disturbance of redox status could be a potential target for radiosensitization. PMID:26101703

  2. Heat inactivation of Ku autoantigen: possible role in hyperthermic radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Burgman, P; Ouyang, H; Peterson, S; Chen, D J; Li, G C

    1997-07-15

    Heat shock prior, during, or immediately after ionizing radiation synergistically increases cell killing, a phenomenon termed hyperthermic radiosensitization. Recently, we have shown a constitutive DNA-binding factor in rodent cells that is inactivated by heat shock to be identical to Ku autoantigen. Ku, consisting of an Mr 70,000 (Ku70) and an Mr 86,000 (Ku80) subunit, is a heterodimeric nuclear protein and is the DNA-binding regulatory component of the mammalian DNA-dependent protein kinase DNA-PK. Recent genetic and biochemical studies indicate the involvement of Ku and DNA-PK in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. On the basis of these findings, we propose that heat-induced loss of the DNA-binding activity of Ku may lead to hyperthermic radiosensitization. To test this hypothesis, we examined and compared the DNA-binding activity of Ku, the DNA-PK kinase activity, and hyperthermic radiosensitization in rodent cells immediately after heat shock and during post-heat shock recovery at 37 degrees C. Our results show that the heat-induced loss of Ku-DNA binding activity correlates well with an increased radiosensitivity of the heat-shocked cells, and furthermore, the loss of synergistic interaction between heat and radiation parallels the recovery of the DNA-binding activity of Ku. On the other hand, the heat-induced decrease of DNA-PK activity did not correlate with hyperthermic radiosensitization. Our data, for the first time, provide evidence for a role of Ku protein in modulating the cellular response to combined treatments of heat shock and ionizing radiation. PMID:9230187

  3. Radiosensitizing Effect of TRPV1 Channel Inhibitors in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Keisuke; Tanamachi, Keisuke; Nakanishi, Yuto; Ide, Shunta; Kojima, Shuji; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2016-07-01

    Radiosensitizers are used in cancer therapy to increase the γ-irradiation susceptibility of cancer cells, including radioresistant hypoxic cancer cells within solid tumors, so that radiotherapy can be applied at doses sufficiently low to minimize damage to adjacent normal tissues. Radiation-induced DNA damage is repaired by multiple repair systems, and therefore these systems are potential targets for radiosensitizers. We recently reported that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel is involved in early responses to DNA damage after γ-irradiation of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that TRPV1 channel inhibitors would have a radiosensitizing effect by blocking repair of radiation-induced cell damage. Here, we show that pretreatment of A549 cells with the TRPV1 channel inhibitors capsazepine, AMG9810, SB366791 and BCTC suppressed the γ-ray-induced activation of early DNA damage responses, i.e., activation of the protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and accumulation of p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1). Further, the decrease of survival fraction at one week after γ-irradiation (2.0 Gy) was enhanced by pretreatment of cells with these inhibitors. On the other hand, inhibitor pretreatment did not affect cell viability, the number of apoptotic or necrotic cells, or DNA synthesis at 24 h after irradiation. These results suggest that inhibition of DNA repair by TRPV1 channel inhibitors in irradiated A549 cells caused gradual loss of proliferative ability, rather than acute facilitation of apoptosis or necrosis. TRPV1 channel inhibitors could be novel candidates for radiosensitizers to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy, either alone or in combination with other types of radiosensitizers. PMID:27150432

  4. Radiosensitization of EMT6 cells by four platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Teicher, B A; Rockwell, S; Lee, J B

    1985-05-01

    The greatest research effort in producing radiation sensitizers has been directed toward organic compounds. However, platinum complexes also have radiosensitizing capabilities, perhaps because they bind to DNA. The compound described here are dichloro complexes of bivalent platinum with one or two potentially radiosensitizing ligands. The radiosensitization of oxygenated and hypoxic exponentially growing EMT6 cells in vitro was measured. The dose modifying factors obtained with 200 microM and 400 microM trans-bis(2-nitroimidazole)dichloroplatinum II (NIPt) in hypoxic cells were 1.5 and 2.1, respectively. For trans-bis(2-amino-5-nitrothiazole)dichloroplatinum II (Plant) under the same conditions, the dose modifying factor was 1.5 at 200 microM and 1.8 at 400 microM. Neither compound sensitized oxygenated cells when tested similar protocols. Unlike the trans complexes, (1,2-diamino-4-nitrobenzene)dichloroplatinum II (Plato) was cytotoxic toward the hypoxic cells in the absence of X rays. The time course of cytotoxicity for 100 microM Plato in exponentially growing cells showed rapid killing of hypoxic cells, and much less toxicity toward oxygenated cells. In radiosensitization studies, dose modifying factors of 1.6 and 2.0 were found with 200 microM and 400 microM Plato in hypoxic cells. The compound did not sensitize aerobic cells. The well-known platinum complex cis-dipyridinedichloroplatinum II (PyPt) represents a cis-platinum heterocyclic aromatic complex that does not have a nitro-functionality. The dose modifying factor obtained with 400 microM PyPt in hypoxic cells was 1.7. On a molar basis, the nitro-functional platinum complexes appear to be more effective as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers than the corresponding free ligands. PMID:4039304

  5. Investigation of Radiosensitivity Gene Signatures in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hall, John S.; Iype, Rohan; Senra, Joana; Taylor, Janet; Armenoult, Lucile; Oguejiofor, Kenneth; Li, Yaoyong; Stratford, Ian; Stern, Peter L.; O’Connor, Mark J.; Miller, Crispin J.; West, Catharine M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsic radiosensitivity is an important factor underlying radiotherapy response, but there is no method for its routine assessment in human tumours. Gene signatures are currently being derived and some were previously generated by expression profiling the NCI-60 cell line panel. It was hypothesised that focusing on more homogeneous tumour types would be a better approach. Two cell line cohorts were used derived from cervix [n = 16] and head and neck [n = 11] cancers. Radiosensitivity was measured as surviving fraction following irradiation with 2 Gy (SF2) by clonogenic assay. Differential gene expression between radiosensitive and radioresistant cell lines (SF2 median) was investigated using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0ST (cervix) or U133A Plus2 (head and neck) arrays. There were differences within cell line cohorts relating to tissue of origin reflected by expression of the stratified epithelial marker p63. Of 138 genes identified as being associated with SF2, only 2 (1.4%) were congruent between the cervix and head and neck carcinoma cell lines (MGST1 and TFPI), and these did not partition the published NCI-60 cell lines based on SF2. There was variable success in applying three published radiosensitivity signatures to our cohorts. One gene signature, originally trained on the NCI-60 cell lines, did partially separate sensitive and resistant cell lines in all three cell line datasets. The findings do not confirm our hypothesis but suggest that a common transcriptional signature can reflect the radiosensitivity of tumours of heterogeneous origins. PMID:24466029

  6. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder in Canada. Part 2: The People Behind the Label

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Anne G; Nicholls, Tonia L; Seto, Michael C; Charette, Yanick; Côté, Gilles; Caulet, Malijai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the psychosocio-criminological characteristics of not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD)–accused people and compare them across the 3 most populous provinces. In Canada, the number of people found NCRMD has risen during the past 20 years. The Criminal Code is federally legislated but provincially administered, and mental health services are provincially governed. Our study offers a rare opportunity to observe the characteristics and trajectories of NCRMD–accused people. Method: The National Trajectory Project examined 1800 men and women found NCRMD in British Columbia (n = 222), Quebec (n = 1094), and Ontario (n = 484) between May 2000 to April 2005, followed until December 2008. Results: The most common primary diagnosis was a psychotic spectrum disorder. One-third of NCRMD–accused people had a severe mental illness and a concomitant substance use disorder, with British Columbia having the highest rate of dually diagnosed NCRMD–accused people. Most accused people (72.4%) had at least 1 prior psychiatric hospitalization. Two-thirds of index NCRMD offences were against the person, with a wide range of severity. Family members, followed by professionals, such as police and mental health care workers, were the most frequent victims. Quebec had the highest proportion of people with a mood disorder and the lowest median offence severity. There were both interprovincial differences and similarities in the characteristics of NCRMD–accused people. Conclusions: Contrary to public perception, severe violent offenses such as murder, attempted murder or sexual offences represent a small proportion of all NCRMD verdict offences. The results reveal a heterogeneous population regarding mental health and criminological characteristics in need of hierarchically organized forensic mental health services and levels of security. NCRMD–accused people were well known to civil psychiatric services prior to being found NCRMD

  7. Rockets, radiosensitizers, and RRx-001: an origin story part I.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Ning, Shoucheng; Peehl, Donna; Oronsky, Arnold; Cabrales, Pedro; Bednarski, Mark; Knox, Susan

    2016-03-01

    From Adam and Eve, to Darwinism, origin stories attempt to fill in the blanks, connect the dots, and define the turning points that are fundamental to subsequent developments. The purpose of this review is to present the origin story of a one-of-a-kind anticancer agent, RRx-001, which emerged from the aerospace industry as a putative radiosensitizer; not since the dynamite-to-dilator transformation of nitroglycerin in 1878 or the post-World War II explosive-to-elixir conversion of hydralazine, an ingredient in rocket fuel, to an antihypertensive, an antidepressant and an antituberculant, has energetic chemistry been harnessed for therapeutic purposes. This is Part 1 of the radiosensitization story; Parts 2 and 3, which detail the crossover activity of RRx-001 as a chemosensitizer in multiple tumor types and disease states including malaria, hemorrhagic shock and sickle cell anemia, are the subject of future reviews. PMID:27115167

  8. [Cisplatin influence on: the radiosensitivity and recovery of yeast cells].

    PubMed

    Evstratova, E S; Petin, V G

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the simultaneous combined action of ionizing radiation and cisplatin on the radiosensitivity and liquid holding recovery (LHR) of diploid yeast cells was studied. It was shown that regardless of the cisplatin concentration (0; 0.002; 0.01; 0.02 g/ml) the radiosensitivity of cells was increased by 1.3 times. The ability of a cell to the LHR was progressively decreased with the increasing cisplatin concentration up to the complete inhibition. It was shown that the LHR of yeast cells after a combined action of ionizing radiation and chemical agents is mainly inhibited due to formation of a greater proportion of irreversible damage. The constant of recovery, characterizing the probability of recovery per a unit of time, was independent on cisplatine concentration. PMID:25486742

  9. [Cisplatin influence on: the radiosensitivity and recovery of yeast cells].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the simultaneous combined action of ionizing radiation and cisplatin on the radiosensitivity and liquid holding recovery (LHR) of diploid yeast cells was studied. It was shown that regardless of the cisplatin concentration (0; 0.002; 0.01; 0.02 g/ml) the radiosensitivity of cells was increased by 1.3 times. The ability of a cell to the LHR was progressively decreased with the increasing cisplatin concentration up to the complete inhibition. It was shown that the LHR of yeast cells after a combined action of ionizing radiation and chemical agents is mainly inhibited due to formation of a greater proportion of irreversible damage. The con- stant of recovery, characterizing the probability of recovery per a unit of time, was independent on cisplatine concentration. PMID:25508873

  10. Radiosensitization of EMT6 cells by four platinum complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Teicher, B.A.; Rockwell, S.; Lee, J.B.

    1985-05-01

    The compounds described here are dichloro complexes of bivalent platinum with one or two potentially radiosensitizing ligands. The radiosensitization of oxygenated and hypoxic exponentially growing EMT6 cells in vitro was measured. The dose modifying factors obtained with 200 ..mu..M and 400 ..mu..M trans-bis(2-nitroimidazole)dichloroplatinum II (NIPt) in hypoxic cells were 1.5 and 2.1, respectively. For trans-bis(2-amino-5-nitrothiazole)dichloroplatinum II (Plant) under the same conditions, the dose modifying factor was 1.5 at 200 ..mu..M and 1.8 at 400 ..mu..M. Neither compound sensitized oxygenated cells when tested similar protocols. Unlike the trans complexes (1,2-diamino-4-nitrobenzene)dichloroplatinum II (Plato) was cytotoxic toward the hypoxic cells in the absence of X rays. The time course of cytotoxicity for 100 ..mu..M Plato in exponentially growing cells showed rapid killing of hypoxic cells, and much less toxicity toward oxygenated cells. In radiosensitization studies, dose modifying factors of 1.6 and 2.0 were found with 200 ..mu..M and 400 ..mu..M Plato in hypoxic cells. The compound did not sensitize aerobic cells. The well-known platinum complex cis-dipyridinedichloroplatinum II (PyPt) represents a cis-platinum heterocyclic aromatic complex that does not have a nitro-functionality. The dose modifying factor obtained with 400 ..mu..M PyPt in hypoxic cells was 1.7. On a molar basis, the nitro-functional platinum complexes appear to be more effective as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers than the corresponding free ligands.

  11. Silibinin Preferentially Radiosensitizes Prostate Cancer by Inhibiting DNA Repair Signaling.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Rajamani, Paulraj; Deep, Gagan; Jain, Anil K; Agarwal, Rajesh; Singh, Rana P

    2015-12-01

    Radiotherapy, a frequent mode of cancer treatment, is often restricted by dose-related toxicity and development of therapeutic resistance. To develop a novel and selective radiosensitizer, we studied the radiosensitizing effects and associated mechanisms of silibinin in prostate cancer. The radiosensitizing effect of silibinin with ionizing radiation (IR) was assessed on radioresistant prostate cancer cell lines by clonogenic, cell cycle, cell death, and DNA repair assays. Tumor xenograft growth, immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of tumor tissues, and toxicity-related parameters were measured in vivo. Silibinin (25 μmol/L) enhanced IR (2.5-10 Gy)-caused inhibition (up to 96%, P < 0.001) of colony formation selectively in prostate cancer cells, and prolonged and enhanced IR-caused G2-M arrest, apoptosis, and ROS production. Mechanistically, silibinin inhibited IR-induced DNA repair (ATM and Chk1/2) and EGFR signaling and attenuated the levels of antiapoptotic proteins. Specifically, silibinin suppressed IR-induced nuclear translocation of EGFR and DNA-PK, an important mediator of DSB repair, leading to an increased number of γ-H2AX (ser139) foci suggesting lesser DNA repair. In vivo, silibinin strongly radiosensitized DU145 tumor xenograft inhibition (84%, P < 0.01) with higher apoptotic response (10-fold, P < 0.01) and reduced repair of DNA damage, and rescued the mice from IR-induced toxicity and hematopoietic injury. Overall, silibinin enhanced the radiotherapeutic response via suppressing IR-induced prosurvival signaling and DSB repair by inhibiting nuclear translocation of EGFR and DNA-PK. Because silibinin is already in phase II clinical trial for prostate cancer patients, the present finding has translational relevance for radioresistant prostate cancer. PMID:26516160

  12. Examination of Gossypol-Pluronic Micelles as Potential Radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Tomoda, Keishiro; Chiang, Carol; Kozak, Kevin R; Kwon, Glen S

    2015-11-01

    Chemoradiotherapy, the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy to treat cancer, has the potential to enhance local therapeutic effects and simultaneously treat systemic disease. However, chemoradiotherapy may also enhance normal tissue effects leading to both acute and late toxicities. Furthermore, subtherapeutic chemoradiotherapy may result in aggressive tumor repopulation. Tumor-specific radiosensitizing chemotherapy may yield a synergistic therapeutic effect and avoid augmentation of normal tissue toxicity. In this study, the radiosensitizing effects of gossypol were investigated. Also, Pluronics were studied for gossypol solubilization and co-radiosensitization effects. Gossypol inhibits Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, antiapoptotic proteins that are overexpressed in various cancer cells. Pluronic micelles (P85, F88, L35, and P123) effectively encapsulated gossypol, raising its water solubility by more than 1000-fold. Cytotoxic, anticlonogenic, and radiosensitizing effects were evaluated to characterize gossypol and Pluronic combinations. Gossypol and P85 had the strongest antiproliferative effect on A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells in a cell viability assay. The IC50 value was seven times lower than gossypol only treatment (330 ± 70 nM vs 2400 ± 400 nM, (mean ± SE)). Gossypol and P85 showed significant inhibition of clonogenic survival, approximately 30% inhibition, compared to treatment with gossypol alone. An experimental sequencing study demonstrated greater inhibition of clonogenic survival when drug treatment followed radiation compared to a sequence of drug treatment followed by radiation. These results suggest that Pluronic micelles readily solubilize gossypol and that the combination of gossypol and P85 may augment the therapeutic effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:26246329

  13. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  14. Radiosensitization effect of zidovudine on human malignant glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fuxiang; Liao Zhengkai; Dai Jing; Xiong Jie; Xie CongHua; Luo Zhiguo; Liu Shiquan; Zhou Yunfeng . E-mail: yfzhouwhu@163.com

    2007-03-09

    Telomeres are shortened with each cell division and play an important role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and function. Telomerase, responsible for telomere synthesis, is activated in 90% of human tumor cells but seldom in normal somatic cells. Zidovudine (AZT) is a reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In this study, we have investigated the effects of {gamma}-radiation in combination with AZT on telomerase activity (TA), telomere length, DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and the changes in radiosensitivity of human malignant glioma cell line U251. The results showed that the TA was suppressed by AZT but enhanced by irradiation, resulting in a deceleration of restored rate of shortened telomere, decreased repair rate of DNA strand breaks, and increased radiosensitivity of U251 cells. Our results suggested that telomerase activity and telomere length may serve as markers for estimating the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy and reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as AZT, may be used clinically as a new radiosensitizer in cancer radiotherapy.

  15. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W; Basse, Per H; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A; Greenberger, Joel S; Socinski, Mark A; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  16. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Oxygen-Dependent Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Lin, Qun; Yun, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Molecular oxygen has long been recognized as a powerful radiosensitizer that enhances the cell-killing efficiency of ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization by oxygen occurs at very low concentrations with the half-maximum radiosensitization at approximately 3 mmHg. However, robust hypoxia-induced signal transduction can be induced at <15 mmHg and can elicit a wide range of cellular responses that will affect therapy response as well as malignant progression. Great strides have been made, especially since the 1990s, toward identification and characterization of the oxygen-regulated molecular pathways that affect tumor response to ionizing radiation. In this review, we will discuss the current advances in our understanding of oxygen-dependent molecular modification and cellular signal transduction and their impact on tumor response to therapy. We will specifically address mechanistic distinctions between radiobiological hypoxia (0–3 mmHg) and pathological hypoxia (3–15 mmHg). We also propose a paradigm that hypoxia increases radioresistance by maintaining the cancer stem cell phenotype. PMID:25938770

  17. Dependence of Gold Nanoparticle Radiosensitization on Functionalizing Layer Thickness.

    PubMed

    Spaas, Cedric; Dok, Rüveyda; Deschaume, Olivier; De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Seo, Jin Won; Bartic, Carmen; Hoet, Peter; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Nuyts, Sandra; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with polyethylene glycol of different chain lengths are used to determine the influence of the capping layer thickness on the radiosensitizing effect of the particles. The size variations in organic coating, built up with polyethylene glycol polymers of molecular weight 1-20 kDa, allow an evaluation of the decrease in dose enhancement percentages caused by the gold nanoparticles at different radial distances from their surface. With localized eradication of malignant cells as a primary focus, radiosensitization is most effective after internalization in the nucleus. For this reason, we performed controlled radiation experiments, with doses up to 20 Gy and particle diameters in a range of 5-30 nm, and studied the relaxation pattern of supercoiled DNA. Subsequent gel electrophoresis of the suspensions was performed to evaluate the molecular damage and consecutively quantify the gold nanoparticle sensitization. In conclusion, on average up to 58.4% of the radiosensitizing efficiency was lost when the radial dimensions of the functionalizing layer were increased from 4.1 to 15.3 nm. These results serve as an experimental supplement for biophysical simulations and demonstrate the influence of an important parameter in the development of nanomaterials for targeted therapies in cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26950059

  18. Radiosensitization: enhancing the radiation inactivation of foodborne bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsa, J.; Lacroix, M.; Ouattara, B.; Chiasson, F.

    2004-09-01

    Irradiation of meat products to kill pathogens can be limited by radiation-induced detriment of sensory quality. Since such detriment is directly related to dose, one approach to reduce it is by devising means to lower the dose of radiation required for processing. Increasing the radiation sensitivity of the target microorganisms would lower the dose required for a given level of microbial kill. In this work, the radiation sensitivities of inoculated Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi in ground beef were examined under a variety of conditions. Results showed that specific manipulations of treatment conditions significantly increased the radiation sensitivity of the test organisms, ranging from a few percent to several-fold reduction in D10. In particular, radiation sensitization could be effected by certain additives, including carvacrol, thymol and trans-cinnamaldehyde, and also by certain compositions of modified atmosphere in the package headspace. A combination of additives and modified atmosphere effected a greater radiosensitization effect than could be achieved by either factor applied alone. Radiosensitization could be demonstrated with irradiation of either fresh or frozen ground meat. The radiosensitization phenomenon may be of practical utility in enhancing the technical effectiveness and feasibility of irradiation of a variety of meat and other food products.

  19. Is Radiosensitivity Associated to Different Types of Blood Groups? (A cytogenetic study)

    PubMed Central

    Elahimanesh, Farideh; Shabestani Monfared, Ali; Khosravifarsani, Meysam; Akhavan Niaki, Haleh; Abedian, Zeinab; Hajian-Tilaki, Karimollah; Borzouisileh, Sajad; Seyfizadeh, Nayer; Amiri, Mehrangiz

    2013-01-01

    Many biological factors affect radiosensitivity. In this study, radiosensitivity among the different blood groups was investigated. Peripheral blood sample of 95 healthy people were divided into two parts. One part was irradiated with 2 Gy Co-60 gamma rays and the second one was considered as control. Then all the samples were studied by cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN assay). Our study showed that the radiosensitivity index of A+ and O+ groups was significantly higher and lower than other blood groups, respectively. It seems that blood type can be used as a radiosensitivity index for determining the given dose to radiotherapy, although extensive studies are necessary. PMID:24551803

  20. Randomly Accountable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Thomas J.; Staiger, Douglas O.; Geppert, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    The accountability debate tends to devolve into a battle between the pro-testing and anti-testing crowds. When it comes to the design of a school accountability system, the devil is truly in the details. A well-designed accountability plan may go a long way toward giving school personnel the kinds of signals they need to improve performance.…

  1. School Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Williamson M., Ed.; Walberg, Herbert J., Ed.

    This book presents the perspectives of experts from the fields of history, economics, political science, and psychology on what is known about accountability, what still needs to be learned, what should be done right now, and what should be avoided in devising accountability systems. The common myths about accountability are dispelled and how it…

  2. Colorful Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, C. Shane

    2006-01-01

    As instructors of accounting, we should take an abstract topic (at least to most students) and connect it to content known by students to help increase the effectiveness of our instruction. In a recent semester, ordinary items such as colors, a basketball, and baseball were used to relate the subject of accounting. The accounting topics of account…

  3. Revamping High School Accounting Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Provides ideas for updating accounting courses: convert to semester length; focus on financial reporting/analysis, financial statements, the accounting cycle; turn textbook exercises into practice sets for the accounting cycle; teach about corporate accounting; and address individual line items on financial statements. (SK)

  4. Youth Individual Development Accounts: Retirement Planning Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shobe, Marcia A.; Sturm, Stephanie L.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in a privatized Social Security system and the lack of adequate retirement planning among many people in the United States, many households are often ill prepared for retirement. The outlook for low-income populations is even bleaker because they are often not privy to the same financial education and asset-building…

  5. Regional differences in radiosensitivity across the rat cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Bijl, Hendrik P. . E-mail: h.p.bijl@rt.azg.nl; Luijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To study regional differences in radiosensitivity within the rat cervical spinal cord. Methods and materials: Three types of inhomogeneous dose distributions were applied to compare the radiosensitivity of the lateral and central parts of the rat cervical spinal cord. The left lateral half of the spinal cord was irradiated with two grazing proton beams, each with a different penumbra (20-80% isodoses): lateral wide (penumbra = 1.1 mm) and lateral tight (penumbra = 0.8 mm). In the third experiment, the midline of the cord was irradiated with a narrow proton beam with a penumbra of 0.8 mm. The irradiated spinal cord length (CT-2) was 20 mm in all experiments. The animals were irradiated with variable single doses of unmodulated protons (150 MeV) with the shoot-through method, whereby the plateau of the depth-dose profile is used rather than the Bragg peak. The endpoint for estimating isoeffective dose (ED{sub 50}) values was paralysis of fore and/or hind limbs within 210 days after irradiation. Histology of the spinal cords was performed to assess the radiation-induced tissue damage. Results: High-precision proton irradiation of the lateral or the central part of the spinal cord resulted in a shift of dose-response curves to higher dose values compared with the homogeneously irradiated cervical cord to the same 20-mm length. The ED{sub 50} values were 28.9 Gy and 33.4 Gy for the lateral wide and lateral tight irradiations, respectively, and as high as 71.9 Gy for the central beam experiment, compared with 20.4 Gy for the homogeneously irradiated 20-mm length of cervical cord. Histologic analysis of the spinal cords showed that the paralysis was due to white matter necrosis. The radiosensitivity was inhomogeneously distributed across the spinal cord, with a much more radioresistant central white matter (ED{sub 50} = 71.9 Gy) compared with lateral white matter (ED{sub 50} values = 28.9 Gy and 33.4 Gy). The gray matter did not show any noticeable lesions, such

  6. Antisense inhibition of cyclin D1 expression is equivalent to flavopiridol for radiosensitization of zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Duffy, Kevin T.; Davidson, William R.; Kari, Gabor; Dicker, Adam P.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Wickstrom, Eric . E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Flavopiridol, a small molecule pan-cyclin inhibitor, has been shown to enhance Radiation response of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The clinical utility of flavopiridol, however, is limited by toxicity, previously attributed to pleiotropic inhibitory effects on several targets affecting multiple signal transduction pathways. Here we used zebrafish embryos to investigate radiosensitizing effects of flavopiridol in normal tissues. Methods and Materials: Zebrafish embryos at the 1- to 4-cell stage were treated with 500 nM flavopiridol or injected with 0.5 pmol antisense hydroxylprolyl-phosphono nucleic acid oligomers to reduce cyclin D1 expression, then subjected to ionizing radiation (IR) or no radiation. Results: Flavopiridol-treated embryos demonstrated a twofold increase in mortality after exposure to 40 Gy by 96 hpf and developed distinct radiation-induced defects in midline development (designated as the 'curly up' phenotype) at higher rates when compared with embryos receiving IR only. Cyclin D1-deficient embryos had virtually identical IR sensitivity profiles when compared with embryos treated with flavopiridol. This was particularly evident for the IR-induced curly up phenotype, which was greatly exacerbated by both flavopriridol and cyclin D1 downregulation. Conclusions: Treatment of zebrafish embryos with flavopiridol enhanced radiation sensitivity of zebrafish embryos to a degree that was very similar to that associated with downregulation of cyclin D1 expression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of cyclin D1 is sufficient to account for the radiosensitizing action of flavopiridol in the zebrafish embryo vertebrate model.

  7. Combined inhibition of Wee1 and PARP1/2 for radiosensitization in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karnak, David; Engelke, Carl G.; Parsels, Leslie A.; Kausar, Tasneem; Wei, Dongping; Robertson, Jordan R.; Marsh, Katherine B.; Davis, Mary A.; Zhao, Lili; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While the addition of radiation to chemotherapy improves survival in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, more effective therapies are urgently needed. Thus, we investigated the radiosensitizing efficacy of the novel drug combination of Wee1 and PARP1/2 [poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1/2] inhibitors (AZD1775 and olaparib, respectively) in pancreatic cancer. Experimental Design Radiosensitization of AsPC-1 or MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells was assessed by clonogenic survival and tumor growth assays. Mechanistically, the effects of AZD1775, olaparib, and radiation on cell cycle, DNA damage (γH2AX) and HRR (homologous recombination repair) were determined. Results Treatment of AsPC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 cells with either AZD1775 or olaparib caused modest radiosensitization while treatment with the combination significantly increased radiosensitization. Radiosensitization by the combination of AZD1775 and olaparib was associated with G2 checkpoint abrogation and persistent DNA damage. In addition, AZD1775 inhibited HRR activity and prevented radiation-induced Rad51 focus formation. Finally, in vivo, in MiaPaCa-2-derived xenografts, olaparib did not radiosensitize, while AZD1775 produced moderate, yet significant, radiosensitization (P<0.05). Importantly, the combination of AZD1775 and olaparib produced highly significant radiosensitization (P<0.0001) evidenced by a 13-day delay in tumor volume doubling (vs radiation alone) and complete eradication of 20% of tumors. Conclusions Taken together, these results demonstrate the efficacy of combined inhibition of Wee1 and PARP inhibitors for radiosensitizing pancreatic cancers and support the model that Wee1 inhibition sensitizes cells to PARP inhibitor-mediated radiosensitization through inhibition of HRR and abrogation of the G2 checkpoint, ultimately resulting in unrepaired, lethal DNA damage and radiosensitization. PMID:25117293

  8. Possible role of chromatin alteration in the radiosensitivity of ataxia-telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Hittelman, W N; Pandita, T K

    1994-12-01

    Cells derived from individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) are known to exhibit increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation and certain radiomimetic chemical agents. Here we summarize our findings regarding the role of chromosome damage and repair in this radiosensitivity. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from A-T homozygotes were characterized for initial chromosome (premature chromosome condensation) and DNA (neutral filter elution) damage and repair kinetics in cells from G1 and G2 cell cycle phases. Despite initial levels of DNA damage being similar to normal controls, A-T cells exhibited nearly a two-fold higher initial amount of chromosome damage. Different A-T cell lines exhibited differing chromosome repair capacities compared with control lymphoblastoid cell lines. These results suggest that A-T cells have an altered chromatin structure whereby DNA double-strand breaks are apparently more efficiently converted into chromosome breaks. Four A-T heterozygote cell lines were examined for chromosome damage and repair in the same fashion and all exhibited increased levels of chromosome damage, although the degree of sensitivity was more prominent in G2 phase cells (two-fold higher) than in G1 phase cells (1.5-fold higher than normal controls). These results suggest that A-T heterozygotes also exhibit an altered chromatin structure which impacts on chromosome damage expression. Of interest, A-T cells also exhibited increased chromosome stickiness after irradiation, and telomere regions appeared to be frequently involved. While the molecular basis for preferential telomere involvement is not understood, these results again suggest that structural alterations in the chromatin of A-T cells may play an important role in A-T radiosensitivity. PMID:7836837

  9. Synthesis and radiosensitization properties of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md.; Mohamed, Faizal; Heng, Cheong Kai; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohamad, Hur Munawar Kabir

    2014-09-03

    Cancer cells which are large in size are resistant towards radiation therapy due to the presence of large amount of anti-oxidative enzymes and hypoxic cancer cells. Thus radiosensitizer agents have been developed to enhance the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy by increasing the sensitivity of these cancer cells towards radiation. This study is conducted to investigate the radiosensitization properties of radiosensitizer complex containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate. Combination with sodium hyaluronate may decrease reactivity of hydrogen peroxide but maintain the oxygen concentration needed for radiosensitizing effect. HepG2 cancer cells are cultured as the mean of test subject. Cancer cell samples which are targeted and not targeted with these radiosensitizers are irradiated with 2Gy single fractionated dose. Results obtained shows that the cancer cells which are not targeted with radiosensitizers has a cell viability of 98.80±0.37% after a time interval of 48 hours and has even repopulated over 100% after a 72 hour time interval. This shows that the cancer cells are resistant towards radiation. However, when the cancer cells are targeted with radiosensitizers prior to irradiation, there is a reduction of cell viability by 25.50±10.81% and 10.30±5.10% at time intervals of 48 and 72 hours respectively. This indicates that through the use of these radiosensitizers, cancer cells are more sensitive towards radiation.

  10. Electrophilic 5-Substituted Uracils as Potential Radiosensitizers: A Density Functional Theory Study.

    PubMed

    Makurat, Samanta; Chomicz-Mańka, Lidia; Rak, Janusz

    2016-08-18

    Although 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (5BrdU) possesses significant radiosensitizing power in vitro, clinical studies do not confirm any advantages of radiotherapy employing 5BrdU. This situation calls for a continuous search for efficient radiosensitizers. Using the proposed mechanism of radiosensitization by 5BrdU, we propose a series of 5-substituted uracils, XYU, that should undergo efficient dissociative electron attachment. The DFT-calculated thermodynamic and kinetic data concerning the XYU degradations induced by electron addition suggests that some of the scrutinized derivatives have much better characteristics than 5BrdU itself. Synthesis of these promising candidates for radiosensitizers, followed by studies of their radiosensitizing properties in DNA context, and ultimately in cancer cells, are further steps to confirm their potential applicability in anticancer treatment. PMID:27156191

  11. Enhancement of photosensitization efficiency by various combinations with radiosensitization in an experimental Ehrlich ascites tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luksiene, Zivile; Kaspariunaite, G.; Aleknavicius, E.; Valuckas, Konstantinas P.

    1996-12-01

    According to our previous results porphyrin can interact not only with visible light but with ionizing radiation also. This phenomenon gives us new possibility to combine photosensitization with radiosensitization. Data obtained on BALB/c mice with 7-day Ehrlich ascites tumors pretreated with 30 mg/kg HP dimethylether (not toxic and not mutagenic concentration) and irradiated with 60Co source (2 Gy) and visible light source (5 J/cm2) showed remarkable inhibition of tumor growth. Two Gy alone inhibited Ehrlich ascites tumor growth by 17%, whereas combination of 30 mg/kg HPde and 2 Gy (radiosensitization) -- by 38%. Photosensitization (30 mg/kg HPde plus 5 J/cm2) showed 37% tumor growth inhibition. Combination of photosensitization with radiosensitization inhibited tumor growth by 87%. It is important to note, that sequence of treatments (radiosensitization - 1 h - photosensitization or photosensitization - 1 h - radiosensitization) had no influence on tumor growth inhibition.

  12. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for theranostic MRI-radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Lux, François; Sancey, Lucie; Bianchi, Andrea; Crémillieux, Yannick; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    A rapid development of gadolinium-based nanoparticles is observed due to their attractive properties as MRI-positive contrast agents. Indeed, they display high relaxivity, adapted biodistribution and passive uptake in the tumor thanks to enhanced permeability and retention effect. In addition to these imaging properties, it has been recently shown that they can act as effective radiosensitizers under different types of irradiation (radiotherapy, neutron therapy or hadron therapy). These new therapeutic modalities pave the way to therapy guided by imaging and to personalized medicine. PMID:25715316

  13. Neuropathy of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers: clinical and pathological description

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, T.H.; Nelson, J.S.; VonGerichten, D.

    1984-09-01

    The dose limiting toxicity of the nitroimidazole radiosensitizers is peripherial neuropathy. Improved pharmacology of newer drugs has eliminated the encephalopathy. Peripheral neuropathies are predominently mild to moderate paresthesias of both hands and feet. Subjective changes occur with or without minimal objective changes on neurologic exam. All of the neuropathies occurred within 30 days of the last drug dose and are of varible duration. Sural nerve biopsies from patients indicate progressive axonal degeneration affecting both large and small caliber myelinated fibers. Axonal damage appears to be more severe in the distal portion of the nerves. More data are needed for correlation of clinical and pathological changes.

  14. NLP-1: a DNA intercalating hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and cytotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Panicucci, R.; Heal, R.; Laderoute, K.; Cowan, D.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    The 2-nitroimidazole linked phenanthridine, NLP-1 (5-(3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl)-phenanthridinium bromide), was synthesized with the rationale of targeting the nitroimidazole to DNA via the phenanthridine ring. The drug is soluble in aqueous solution (greater than 25 mM) and stable at room temperature. It binds to DNA with a binding constant 1/30 that of ethidium bromide. At a concentration of 0.5 mM, NLP-1 is 8 times more toxic to hypoxic than aerobic cells at 37 degrees C. This concentration is 40 times less than the concentration of misonidazole, a non-intercalating 2-nitroimidazole, required for the same degree of hypoxic cell toxicity. The toxicity of NLP-1 is reduced at least 10-fold at 0 degrees C. Its ability to radiosensitize hypoxic cells is similar to misonidazole at 0 degrees C. Thus the putative targeting of the 2-nitroimidazole, NLP-1, to DNA, via its phenanthridine group, enhances its hypoxic toxicity, but not its radiosensitizing ability under the present test conditions. NLP-1 represents a lead compound for intercalating 2-nitroimidazoles with selective toxicity for hypoxic cells.

  15. Radiosensitivity of testicular cells in the prepubertal mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Vergouwen, R.P.F.A.; Roepers-Gajadien, H.L.; Rooij, D.G. de; Eerdenburg, F.J.C.M. van; Huiskamp, R.; Bas, R.J.; Jong, F.H. de; Davids, J.A.G.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of total-body X-irradiation on the prepubertal testis of the CBA/P mouse have been studied. At either day 14 or day 29 post partum male mice were exposed to single doses of X-rays ranging from 15-6.0 Gy. At 1 week after irradiation the repopulation index method was used to study the radiosensitivity of the spermatogonial stem cells. A D{sub 0} value of 1.8 Gy was determined for the stem cells at day 14 post partum as well as for the stem cells at day 29 post partum, indicating that the radiosensitivity of the spermatogonial stem cells in the prepubertal mouse testis is already comparable to that observed in the adult mouse. One, 2 or 3 weeks after irradiation total cell number per testis of Sertoli cells, Leydig cells, mesenchymal cells, macrophages, myoid cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, endothelium and perivascular cells were determined using the disector method. The Sertoli cells and interstitial cell types appeared to be relatively radioresistant during the prepubertal period. No significant changes in plasma testosterone levels were found, indicating that there is no Leydig cell dysfunction after exposure to doses up to 6 Gy during the prepubertal period. Taken together, the radioresponse of the prepubertal mouse testis is comparable to that of the adult mouse testis. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Advances in radiation biology: Radiosensitization in DNA and living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, S.; Sech, C. Le

    2009-06-01

    One fundamental goal of radiation biology is the evolution of concepts and methods for the elaboration of new approaches and protocols for the treatment of cancers. In this context, the use of fast ions as ionizing particles offers the advantage of optimizing cell killing inside the tumor whilst preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. One extremely promising strategy investigated recently is the addition of radiosensitizers in the targeted tissue. The optimization of radiotherapy with fast ions implies a multidisciplinary approach to ionizing radiation effects on complex living systems, ranging from studies on single molecules to investigations of entire organisms. In this article we review recent studies on ion induced damages in simple and complex biological systems, from DNA to living cells. The specific aspect of radiosensitization induced by metallic atoms is described. As a fundamental result, the addition of sensitizing compounds with ion irradiation may improve therapeutic index in cancer therapy. In conclusion, new perspectives are proposed based on the experience and contribution of different communities including Surface Sciences, to improve the development of radiation biology.

  17. 5-Fluorouracil modulation of radiosensitivity in cultured human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Smalley, S R; Kimler, B F; Evans, R G

    1991-02-01

    We evaluated conventional pulse exposure versus continuous exposure models of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) radiosensitization in HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) and DU-145 (human prostate cancer adenocarcinoma) cell lines. Cell survival following treatment with drug and/or radiation was determined by colony formation assays. Radiation was delivered either by itself, approximately midway through a 1-hr exposure to 5-FU (10 micrograms/ml), or at various times following initiation of exposure to 5-FU (0.5 microgram/ml) present throughout the entire period of incubation. Drug concentrations were selected to approximate those achieved in vivo in humans. HT-29 cells showed a plating efficiency of 87% and similar cytotoxicity (survival reduced to 0.57-0.71) for all 5-FU conditions. The Do's of the radiation survival curves were not different for 1 hr of 5-FU exposure versus radiation alone. However, continuous exposure conditions demonstrated statistically significantly different Do's from radiation alone and pulse 5-FU exposure. DU-145 cells displayed a plating efficiency of 17% and cytotoxicities of 0.10-0.91 for the 5-FU conditions. DU-145 cells showed different radiation 5-FU interactions: 5-FU produced statistically significant changes in Do well as the differences between cell lines insofar as their radiosensitization by 5-FU underscore the caution required in extrapolating these radiobiologic models to the clinical setting. PMID:1991680

  18. Radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo by 3-nitrotriazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Shibamoto, Y.; Sakano, K.; Kimura, R.; Nishidai, T.; Nishimoto, S.; Ono, K.; Kagiya, T.; Abe, M.

    1986-07-01

    A series of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole derivatives bearing various types of side chain (R) at the N1-position (AK-2000 series) were synthesized and their radiosensitizing effect and toxicity in vitro and in vivo were investigated, in comparison with those of Misonidazole (MISO), SR-2508, and RSU-1069. Of the fifteen 3-nitrotriazoles tested, all had sensitizing effects in vitro on hypoxic V79 cells. Also, all but one had definite effects on solid EMT6/KU and SCCVII tumors in vivo. For many of the triazole compounds, the degree of radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo appeared identical. However, they were generally less efficient, both in vitro and in vivo, than the corresponding 2-nitroimidazoles, whereas their aerobic cytotoxicity and toxicity to mice (LD50/7) were comparable to those of the 2-nitroimidazoles. Considering the sensitizing effect and toxicity, AK-2123 (R = CH/sub 2/CONHC/sub 2/H/sub 4/OCH/sub 3/) may be as useful as MISO, but none of the triazoles have been proved to be superior to SR-2508.

  19. The radiosensitivity index predicts for overall survival in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Fulp, William J.; Eschrich, Steven; Torres-Roca, Javier F.; Caudell, Jimmy J.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiosensitivity (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple cohorts and disease sites. We hypothesized RSI would identify glioblastoma patients who would respond to radiation and predict treatment outcomes. Clinical and array based gene expression (Affymetrix HT Human Genome U133 Array Plate Set) level 2 data was downloaded from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). A total of 270 patients were identified for the analysis: 214 who underwent radiotherapy and temozolomide and 56 who did not undergo radiotherapy. Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 9.1 months (range: 0.04–92.2 months). Patients who did not receive radiotherapy were more likely to be older (p < 0.001) and of poorer performance status (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, RSI is an independent predictor of OS (HR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.08–2.5; p = 0.02). Furthermore, on subset analysis, radiosensitive patients had significantly improved OS in the patients with high MGMT expression (unmethylated MGMT), 1 year OS 84.1% vs. 53.7% (p = 0.005). This observation held on MVA (HR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.19–3.31; p = 0.008), suggesting that RT has a larger therapeutic impact in these patients. In conclusion, RSI predicts for OS in glioblastoma. These data further confirm the value of RSI as a disease-site independent biomarker. PMID:26451615

  20. SU11657 Enhances Radiosensitivity of Human Meningioma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie Bois, Angelika Zabel-du; Ranai, Gholamreza; Trinh, Thuy; Unterberg, Andreas; Debus, Juergen; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Abdollahi, Amir; Huber, Peter E.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of the multireceptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor SU11657 (primarily vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor) in combination with irradiation in freshly isolated primary human meningioma cells. Methods and Materials: Tumor specimens were obtained from meningioma patients undergoing surgery at the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany. For the present study only cells up to passage 6 were used. Benign and atypical meningioma cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with SU11657 alone and in combination with 6-MV photons (0-10 Gy). Clonogenic survival and cell proliferation were determined alone and in coculture assays to determine direct and paracrine effects. Results: Radiation and SU11657 alone reduced cell proliferation in atypical and benign meningioma cells as well as in HUVEC in a dose-dependent manner. SU11657 alone also reduced clonogenic survival of benign and atypical meningioma cells. SU11657 increased radiosensitivity of human meningioma cells in clonogenic survival and cell number/proliferation assays. The anticlonogenic and antiproliferative effects alone and the radiosensitization effects of SU11657 were more pronounced in atypical meningioma cells compared with benign meningioma cells. Conclusion: Small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors like SU11657 are capable of amplifying the growth inhibitory effects of irradiation in meningioma cells. These data provide a rationale for further clinical evaluation of this combination concept, especially in atypical and malignant meningioma patients.

  1. Role of Natural Radiosensitizers and Cancer Cell Radioresistance: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Misbah; Qazi, Aamer; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Parveen, Gulshan; Waquar, Sulayman; Ashraf, Abdul Basit; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Cancer originates from genetic mutations accumulation. Cancer stem cells have been depicted as tumorigenic cells that can differentiate and self-renew. Cancer stem cells are thought to be resistant to conventional therapy like chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy damage carcinomic DNA cells. Because of the ability of cancer stem cells to self-renew and reproduce malignant tumors, they are the subject of intensive research. In this review, CSCs radioresistant mechanisms which include DNA damage response and natural radiosensitizers have been summed up. Reactive oxygen species play an important role in different physiological processes. ROS scavenging is responsible for regulation of reactive oxygen species generation. A researcher has proved that microRNAs regulate tumor radiation resistance. Ionizing radiation does not kill the cancer cells; rather, IR just slows down the signs and symptoms. Ionizing radiation damages DNA directly/indirectly. IR is given mostly in combination with other chemo/radiotherapies. We briefly described here the behavior of cancer stem cells and radioresistance therapies in cancer treatment. To overcome radioresistance in treatment of cancer, strategies like fractionation modification, treatment in combination, inflammation modification, and overcoming hypoxic tumor have been practiced. Natural radiosensitizers, for example, curcumin, genistein, and quercetin, are more beneficial than synthetic compounds. PMID:26998418

  2. Standardized Testing and School Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the use of standardized tests to hold schools accountable. The history of testing for accountability is reviewed, and it is shown that currently between-school differences account for less than 10% of the variance in student scores, in part because the progress of individuals is small compared to the spread of achievement…

  3. Mastering the Vocabulary of Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tischler, Helene

    Developed for use by students in an introductory accounting course, these learning modules deal with mastering the vocabulary of accounting. Focus of the modules is on vocabulary appearing in the first six chapters of the text, "Accounting Principles" by Niswonger and Fess. Covered in the individual modules are the following topics: discovering…

  4. MiR-593 mediates curcumin-induced radiosensitization of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells via MDR1

    PubMed Central

    FAN, HAONING; SHAO, MENG; HUANG, SHAOHUI; LIU, YING; LIU, JIE; WANG, ZHIYUAN; DIAO, JIANXIN; LIU, YUANLIANG; TONG, LI; FAN, QIN

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin (Cur) exhibits radiosensitization effects to a variety of malignant tumors. The present study investigates the radiosensitizing effect of Cur on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells and whether its mechanism is associated with microRNA-593 (miR-593) and multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1). A clonogenic assay was performed to measure the radiosensitizing effect. The expression of miR-593 and MDR1 was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) or western blot assay. A transplanted tumor model was established to identify the radiosensitizing effect in vivo. A luciferase-based reporter was constructed to evaluate the effect of direct binding of miR-593 to the putative target site on the 3′ UTR of MDR1. The clonogenic assay showed that Cur enhanced the radiosensitivity of cells. Cur (100 mg/kg) combined with 4 Gy irradiation inhibited the growth of a transplanted tumor model in vivo, resulting in the higher inhibition ratio compared with the radiotherapy-alone group. These results demonstrated that Cur had a radiosensitizing effect on NPC cells in vivo and in vitro; Cur-mediated upregulation of miR-593 resulted in reduced MDR1 expression, which may promote radiosensitivity of NPC cells. PMID:27313684

  5. Cyclopentenylcytosine does not enhance cisplatin-induced radiosensitization in human lung tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    RODERMOND, HANS M.; CATE, ROSEMARIE TEN; HAVEMAN, JAAP; VAN KUILENBURG, ANDRÉ; MEDEMA, JAN PAUL; VAN BREE, CHRIS; FRANKEN, NICOLAAS A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The search for agents that enhance the effect of ionizing radiation has been an object of study for decades. In this study, the sensitizing properties of cyclopentenylcytosine (CPEC) on radiation and cisplatin-induced radiosensitization in human squamous lung carcinoma cells were investigated. Human lung tumour SW-1573 cells (SWp, parental; SWg, gemcitabine-resistant) were incubated with CPEC and cisplatin and subsequently irradiated with different doses of γ-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined to measure the effectiveness of the treatments. CPEC (1 or 2 μM) treatment for 4 h decreased the plating efficiency to 75 and 50% in SWp and SWg cells, respectively. In the SWg cells, 0.1 and 1 μM CPEC for 4 h enhanced the cell killing effect of cisplatin. However, an increase was not noted in the SWp cells. Due to the moderate toxicity of 1 μM for 4 h, this CPEC dose was used in the radiosensitization experiments. However, CPEC neither radiosensitized the lung tumour cells nor enhanced the radiosensitizing effect of cisplatin. A 2-h incubation with 4 μM cisplatin also decreased the plating efficiency to 75–80% in the two cell lines. Using this cisplatin dose, radiosensitization was obtained in the two cell lines. Although cisplatin treatment clearly radiosensitized the lung tumour cells, CPEC treatment did not. Cisplatin-induced radiosensitization was also not enhanced by CPEC. PMID:22966339

  6. Isotype-Specific Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases: Identification of Optimal Targets for Radiosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; No, Mina; Kim, Jae Jin; Choi, Eun Jung; Cho, Bong Jun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Il Han; Kim, In Ah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors radiosensitize tumor cells. To elucidate mechanisms underlying radiosensitization by HDAC inhibition, understanding of differential contributions of HDAC isotypes is needed. The aim of this study was to investigate involvement of known HDAC isotypes in modulation of cellular radiosensitivity. Materials and Methods Because pharmacologic HDAC inhibitors lack isotype-specificity, RNA interference against 11 HDAC isotypes was used to inhibit HDAC in an isotype-specific manner. Radiation cell survival was evaluated using a clonogenic assay in SQ20B cells transfected with small interfering RNA specifically targeting HDAC isotypes. Immunocytochemistry was performed for detection of γH2AX foci. Protein expression was measured using Western blotting. Results Among 11 HDAC isotypes tested, specific inhibition of 7 isotypes (HDAC1, HDAC3, HDAC4, HDAC6, HDAC7, HDAC10, and HDAC11) enhanced radiation lethality in SQ20B cells. Radiosensitization by inhibition of these HDAC isotypes was accompanied by delay of DNA double strand break repair. Radiosensitivity of SQ20B cells was not altered by selective inhibition of the remaining four isotypes (HDAC2, HDAC5, HDAC8, and HDAC9). Inhibition of HDAC isotypes resulted in downregulation of various proteins involved in pro-survival and DNA damage repair pathways. Conclusion Isotype-specificity exists in HDAC inhibition-induced radiosensitization. Different HDAC isotypes are differentially involved in modulation of cellular radiosensitivity. PMID:26582395

  7. Accountability and Productivity: Some Longitudinal Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tausky, Curt; Chelte, Anthony F.

    1983-01-01

    Based on a nonobtrusive count of input, productivity in a metal-working shop is examined before implementing individual accountability, during intensified accountability, and after the accountability program was terminated. The data show quite clearly that when individual accountability was introduced, productivity rose steeply and then subsided…

  8. Differentiation and radiosensitivity of hemopoietic stem cells of mice during hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvets, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    The potential for differentiation and radiosensitivity of the stem hemopoietic cells (KOE) under conditions of initial and later hypokinesia is examined. It is established that in the initial period of hypokinesia (3 days) when a stress reaction prevails, changes occur in the erythroid differentiation and radiosensitivity of KOE. This effect is associated with redistribution of T-lymphocytes that increase in number in the bone marrow of mice during hypokinesia. At later periods of hypokinesia (30 days) when changes in the organism are related to hypokinesia proper, differentiation and radiosensitivity of KOE were normalized.

  9. Enhancement of radiosensitization by metal-based nanoparticles in cancer radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiang-Yu; Liu, Pei-Dang; Wu, Hao; Gu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy performs an important function in cancer treatment. However, resistance of tumor cells to radiation therapy still remains a serious concern, so the study of radiosensitizers has emerged as a persistent hotspot in radiation oncology. Along with the rapid advancement of nanotechnology in recent years, the potential value of nanoparticles as novel radiosensitizers has been discovered. This review summarizes the latest experimental findings both in vitro and in vivo and attempts to highlight the underlying mechanisms of response in nanoparticle radiosensitization. PMID:25009750

  10. Accountability Overboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chieppo, Charles D.; Gass, James T.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that special interest groups opposed to charter schools and high-stakes testing have hijacked Massachusetts's once-independent board of education and stand poised to water down the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) tests and the accountability system they support. President Barack Obama and Massachusetts…

  11. Accounting Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication identifies 20 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of accounting specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 20 units are as follows:…

  12. Dissociative electron attachment to the radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agent hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Huber, S E; Śmiałek, M A; Tanzer, K; Denifl, S

    2016-06-14

    Dissociative electron attachment to hydroxyurea was studied in the gas phase for electron energies ranging from zero to 9 eV in order to probe its radiosensitizing capabilities. The experiments were carried out using a hemispherical electron monochromator coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Diversified fragmentation of hydroxyurea was observed upon low energy electron attachment and here we highlight the major dissociation channels. Moreover, thermodynamic thresholds for various fragmentation reactions are reported to support the discussion of the experimental findings. The dominant dissociation channel, which was observed over a broad range of energies, is associated with formation of NCO(-), water, and the amidogen (NH2) radical. The second and third most dominant dissociation channels are associated with formation of NCNH(-) and NHCONH2 (-), respectively, which are both directly related to formation of the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Other ions observed with significant abundance in the mass spectra were NH2 (-)/O(-), OH(-), CN(-), HNOH(-), NCONH2 (-), and ONHCONH2 (-). PMID:27306009

  13. Dissociative electron attachment to the radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agent hydroxyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, S. E.; Śmiałek, M. A.; Tanzer, K.; Denifl, S.

    2016-06-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to hydroxyurea was studied in the gas phase for electron energies ranging from zero to 9 eV in order to probe its radiosensitizing capabilities. The experiments were carried out using a hemispherical electron monochromator coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Diversified fragmentation of hydroxyurea was observed upon low energy electron attachment and here we highlight the major dissociation channels. Moreover, thermodynamic thresholds for various fragmentation reactions are reported to support the discussion of the experimental findings. The dominant dissociation channel, which was observed over a broad range of energies, is associated with formation of NCO-, water, and the amidogen (NH2) radical. The second and third most dominant dissociation channels are associated with formation of NCNH- and NHCONH2-, respectively, which are both directly related to formation of the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Other ions observed with significant abundance in the mass spectra were NH2-/O-, OH-, CN-, HNOH-, NCONH2-, and ONHCONH2-.

  14. Radiosensitivity Parameters For Lethal Mutagenesis In Caenorhabditis Elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Wilson, J.W.; Katz, R.

    1994-01-01

    For the first time track structure theory has been applied to radiobiological effects in a living organism. Data for lethal mutagenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans, obtained after irradiation with nine different types of ions of atomic number 1-57 and gamma rays have yielded radiosensitivity parameters (E{sub 0}, sigma{sub 0}, Kappa, m = 68 Gy, 2.5 x 10(exp {minus}9) cm (exp 2), 750, 2) comparable with those found for the transformation of C3HT10 1/2 cells (180 Gy, 1.15 x 10(exp {minus}10) cm(exp 2), 750, 2) but remote from those (E{sub 0} and sigma{sub 0} = approx. 2 Gy, approx. 5 x 10(exp {minus}7) cm(exp 2)) for mammalian cell survival.

  15. Enhanced radiation therapy with multilayer microdisks containing radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peipei; Qiao, Yong; Xia, Junfei; Guan, Jingjiao; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2015-03-01

    A challenge of X-ray radiation therapy is that high dose X-rays at therapeutic conditions damage normal cells. This paper describes the use of gold nanoparticle-loaded multilayer microdisks to enhance X-ray radiation therapy, where each microdisk contains over 10(5) radiosensitizing nanoparticles. The microdisks are attached on cell membranes through electrostatic interaction. Upon X-ray irradiation, more photoelectrons and Auger electrons are generated in the vicinity of the nanoparticles, which cause water ionization and lead to the formation of free radicals that damage the DNA of adjacent cancer cells. By attaching a large amount of gold nanoparticles on cancer cells, the total X-ray dose required for DNA damage and cell killing can be reduced. Due to their controllable structure and composition, multilayer microdisks can be a viable choice for enhanced radiation therapy with nanoparticles. PMID:25679345

  16. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,…

  17. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Tretiakova, Maria; Zhang Zhongfa; Li Yan; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Gao Yuanhong; Mai Weiyuan; Furge, Kyle; Qian Chaonan; Amato, Robert; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10{sup -8} for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10{sup -4} for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  18. Validation of a Radiosensitivity Molecular Signature in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eschrich, Steven A.; Fulp, William J.; Pawitan, Yudi; Foekens, John A.; Smid, Marcel; Martens, John W. M.; Echevarria, Michelle; Kamath, Vidya; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Harris, Eleanor E.; Bergh, Jonas; Torres-Roca, Javier F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previously, we developed a radiosensitivity molecular signature (RSI) that was clinically-validated in three independent datasets (rectal, esophageal, head and neck) in 118 patients. Here, we test RSI in radiotherapy (RT) treated breast cancer patients. Experimental Design RSI was tested in two previously published breast cancer datasets. Patients were treated at the Karolinska University Hospital (n=159) and Erasmus Medical Center (n=344). RSI was applied as previously described. Results We tested RSI in RT-treated patients (Karolinska). Patients predicted to be radiosensitive (RS) had an improved 5 yr relapse-free survival when compared with radioresistant (RR) patients (95% vs. 75%, p=0.0212) but there was no difference between RS/RR patients treated without RT (71% vs. 77%, p=0.6744), consistent with RSI being RT-specific (interaction term RSIxRT, p=0.05). Similarly, in the Erasmus dataset RT-treated RS patients had an improved 5-year distant-metastasis-free survival over RR patients (77% vs. 64%, p=0.0409) but no difference was observed in patients treated without RT (RS vs. RR, 80% vs. 81%, p=0.9425). Multivariable analysis showed RSI is the strongest variable in RT-treated patients (Karolinska, HR=5.53, p=0.0987, Erasmus, HR=1.64, p=0.0758) and in backward selection (removal alpha of 0.10) RSI was the only variable remaining in the final model. Finally, RSI is an independent predictor of outcome in RT-treated ER+ patients (Erasmus, multivariable analysis, HR=2.64, p=0.0085). Conclusions RSI is validated in two independent breast cancer datasets totaling 503 patients. Including prior data, RSI is validated in five independent cohorts (621 patients) and represents, to our knowledge, the most extensively validated molecular signature in radiation oncology. PMID:22832933

  19. Expression of hPNAS-4 Radiosensitizes Lewis Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Hui; Yuan Zhu; Zhu Hong; Li Lei; Shi Huashan; Wang Zi; Fan Yu; Deng Qian; Zeng Jianshuang; He Yinbo; Xiao Jianghong; Li Zhiping

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to transfer the hPNAS-4 gene, a novel apoptosis-related human gene, into Lewis lung cancer (LL2) and observe its radiosensitive effect on radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The hPNAS-4 gene was transfected into LL2 cells, and its expression was detected via western blot. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the growth and apoptosis of cells treated with irradiation/PNAS-4 in vitro. The hPNAS-4 gene was transferred into LL2-bearing mice through tail vein injection of the liposome/gene complex. The tumor volumes were recorded after radiation therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect the tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vivo. Results: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue, and its overexpressions were confirmed via western blot analysis. Compared with the control, empty plasmid, hPNAS-4, radiation, and empty plasmid plus radiation groups, the hPNAS-4 plus radiation group more significantly inhibited growth and enhanced apoptosis of LL2 cells in vitro and in vivo (P<.05). Conclusions: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue and was expressed in both LL2 cell and tumor tissue. The hPNAS-4 gene therapy significantly enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis of LL2 tumor cells by radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it may be a potential radiosensitive treatment of radiation therapy for lung cancer.

  20. Rethinking evolutionary individuality

    PubMed Central

    Ereshefsky, Marc; Pedroso, Makmiller

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers whether multispecies biofilms are evolutionary individuals. Numerous multispecies biofilms have characteristics associated with individuality, such as internal integrity, division of labor, coordination among parts, and heritable adaptive traits. However, such multispecies biofilms often fail standard reproductive criteria for individuality: they lack reproductive bottlenecks, are comprised of multiple species, do not form unified reproductive lineages, and fail to have a significant division of reproductive labor among their parts. If such biofilms are good candidates for evolutionary individuals, then evolutionary individuality is achieved through other means than frequently cited reproductive processes. The case of multispecies biofilms suggests that standard reproductive requirements placed on individuality should be reconsidered. More generally, the case of multispecies biofilms indicates that accounts of individuality that focus on single-species eukaryotes are too restrictive and that a pluralistic and open-ended account of evolutionary individuality is needed. PMID:26039982

  1. Rethinking evolutionary individuality.

    PubMed

    Ereshefsky, Marc; Pedroso, Makmiller

    2015-08-18

    This paper considers whether multispecies biofilms are evolutionary individuals. Numerous multispecies biofilms have characteristics associated with individuality, such as internal integrity, division of labor, coordination among parts, and heritable adaptive traits. However, such multispecies biofilms often fail standard reproductive criteria for individuality: they lack reproductive bottlenecks, are comprised of multiple species, do not form unified reproductive lineages, and fail to have a significant division of reproductive labor among their parts. If such biofilms are good candidates for evolutionary individuals, then evolutionary individuality is achieved through other means than frequently cited reproductive processes. The case of multispecies biofilms suggests that standard reproductive requirements placed on individuality should be reconsidered. More generally, the case of multispecies biofilms indicates that accounts of individuality that focus on single-species eukaryotes are too restrictive and that a pluralistic and open-ended account of evolutionary individuality is needed. PMID:26039982

  2. Six Degrees of Separation: The Oxygen Effect in the Development of Radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Knox, Susan J; Scicinski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The popular theory six degrees of separation is used in this review as an analogy to relate all radiosensitization to oxygen. As the prime mover of all radiosensitizers, the pervasive influence of oxygen has consciously or unconsciously influenced the direction of research and development and provided the benchmark against which all other compounds and approaches are measured. It is the aim of this review to develop the six degrees of separation from oxygen analogy as a unifying framework for conceptually organizing the field and for giving context to its varied subspecializations and theories. Under such a framework, it would become possible for one area to consider questions and problems found in other areas of radiosensitization, using a common analogy, that would allow for further development and unification of this multifaceted discipline. In this review, approaches to the development of radiosensitizers and the current state of research in this field are discussed, including promising new agents in various stages of clinical development. PMID:21804913

  3. Suppression of autophagy augments the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition on human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Xiaopeng; Du, Jie; Hua, Song; Zhang, Haowen; Gu, Cheng; Wang, Jie; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jianfeng; Yu, Jiahua Liu, Fenju

    2015-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of the standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. To increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells is a feasible solution to improve the therapeutic effects. It has been suggested that inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) can radiosensitize glioma cells, probably via the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In this study, human malignant glioma cells, U251 and A172, were treated with an STAT3 inhibitor, WP1066, or a short hairpin RNA plasmid targeting STAT3 to suppress the activation of STAT3 signaling. The radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition were confirmed in glioma cells. Intriguingly, combination of ionizing radiation exposure and STAT3 inhibition triggered a pronounced increase of autophagy flux. To explore the role of autophagy, glioma cells were treated with 3-methyladenine or siRNA for autophagy-related gene 5, and it was demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy further strengthened the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition. Accordingly, more apoptotic cells were induced by the dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, our data revealed a protective role of autophagy in the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition, and inhibition of both autophagy and STAT3 might be a potential therapeutic strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells. - Highlights: • Inactivation of STAT3 signaling radiosensitizes malignant glioma cells. • STAT3 inhibition triggers a significant increase of autophagy flux induced by ionizing radiation in glioma cells. • Suppression of autophagy further strengthens the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition in glioma cells. • Dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 induce massive apoptotic cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  4. Is Nitric Oxide (NO) the Last Word in Radiosensitization? A Review

    PubMed Central

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Knox, Susan J; Scicinski, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    As a short-lived radical that diffuses across membranes, rather than interacting with membrane-bound receptors, nitric oxide (NO) represents a significant departure from synthetically derived radiosensitizers. An endogenous compound, NO may equal or surpass its molecular cousin, oxygen, as a hypoxic radiosensitizer, through pleiotropic phenotypic effects on tumor perfusion, cell signaling, mitochondrial respiration, the fixation of radiation-induced damage, and the radioprotection of normal tissue. However, unlike oxygen, in the context of radiosensitization, the clinical role and utility of NO are poorly understood, with often contradictory and controversial reported effects: whether NO functions as a radiosensitizer may ultimately be contextual to the tumor microenvironment. This may make NO manipulation an ideal candidate for a personalized radiosensitization approach tailored to specific patient and tumor types/microenvironmental characteristics. Effective delivery of NO both systemically and directly to the tumor may be critical to the success of this approach. Compounds that release NO or NO precursors have the potential to drive innovation and result in a new fertile branch of the radiosensitizer tree. PMID:22496921

  5. Re-evaluating gadolinium(III) texaphyrin as a radiosensitizing agent.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, E J; Mitchell, J B; Deen, D; Cardell, M; Rosenthal, D I; Brown, J M

    2000-01-01

    Gadolinium(III) texaphyrin (Gd-tex) was recently proposed as a radiosensitizing agent that combines preferential tumor uptake with detection of drug localization by magnetic resonance imaging (S. W. Young et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 93: 6610-6615, 1996). In view of the initial report on this compound, four radiobiology laboratories undertook independent efforts to further study radiosensitization by Gd-tex. In addition to repeating the previously reported studies on Gd-tex in HT-29 cells, we tested five other human tumor cell lines (U-87 MG, U251-NCI, SW480, A549, and MCF-7). These studies included a Gd-tex treatment period of 24 h before irradiation (as in the original publication), with concentrations of Gd-tex ranging from 20-500 microM. In neither the HT-29 cells nor any of the other five human cell lines did we see radiation sensitization by Gd-tex. Two cell lines (MCF-7 and U-87 MG) were further tested for radiosensitization by Gd-tex under hypoxic conditions. No radiosensitization was observed in either case. Finally, the radiation response of two tumor lines were assessed in vivo. Neither HT-29 xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice nor RIF-1 tumors growing in C3H mice demonstrated radiosensitization after Gd-tex treatment before single or fractionated doses of radiation. Our results raise questions about the efficacy of Gd-tex as a radiosensitizing agent. PMID:10646858

  6. Andrographolide radiosensitizes human ovarian cancer SKOV3 xenografts due to an enhanced apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Qiu, Xingsheng

    2015-11-01

    Andrographolide (AND), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to have radiosensitivity in several types of cancer. Whether AND can radiosensitize ovarian cancer remains unknown. The present study investigated the radiosensitizing effects of AND in human ovarian SKOV3 xenografts and examined the molecular mechanisms of AND-mediated radiosensitization. Nude mice bearing human ovarian SKOV3 were treated with AND to investigate the effects of drug administration on tumor growth, radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and autophagy. Subsequent Western blot analysis and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining (autophagy analysis) were used to determine the role of AND. Finally, the pathway of apoptosis was characterized by caspase-3 activity assay as well as TUNEL analysis. AND potently sensitized SKOV3 xenografts to radiation. Moreover, apoptosis and autophagy in radiation combined with drug-treated xenografts increased significantly compared with the simple drug or single radiation treatment. This result was associated with an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio and p-p53 expression after exposure to combination treatment. Meanwhile, the level of Beclin 1 and Atg5 and the conversion from LC3-I to LC3-II, three important proteins involved in autophagy, were increased. AND acts as a strong radiosensitizer in human ovarian SKOV3 xenografts in vivo by increasing the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio and promoting the activation of caspase-3, leading to enhanced apoptosis as well as autophagy. PMID:26014516

  7. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation of T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST and colony formation assay. No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  8. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation ot T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x-irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST (patients, D37 . 198 R; normals, D37 . 309 R, p . 0.057) and colony formation assay (patients, D37 . 53 R; normals, D37 . 109 R, p . 0.016). No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  9. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-09-17

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  10. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  11. Competency-Based Accounting Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, John E.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how the proposed model (an individualized competency based learning system) can be used effectively to produce a course in accounting principles which adapts to different entering competencies and to different rates and styles of learning. (TA)

  12. First-Person Accounts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gribs, H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Personal accounts describe the lives of 2 individuals with deaf-blindness, one an 87-year-old woman who was deaf from birth and became totally blind over a 50-year period and the other of a woman who became deaf-blind as a result of a fever at the age of 7. Managing activities of daily life and experiencing sensory hallucinations are among topics…

  13. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  14. Training within the Accounting Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Beth; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey received 509 responses from 2,000 randomly selected accounting employees about which training topics are receiving the most attention and who is receiving the training. Results prove that training has become an integral part of a certified public accountant's job; topics most often covered were tax related--individual and corporate income…

  15. Radiosensitization Effect of STI-571 on Pancreatic Cancer Cells In Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hye Won; Wen, Jing; Lim, Jong-Baeck; Bang, Seung Min; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To examine STI-571-induced radiosensitivity in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: Three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Bxpc-3, Capan-1, and MiaPaCa-2) exhibiting different expression levels of c-Kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRbeta) and showing different K-ras mutation types were used. For evaluation of the antitumor activity of STI-571 in combination with radiation, clonogenic survival assays, Western blot analysis, and the annexin V/propidium iodide assay with microscopic evaluation by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole were conducted. Results: Dramatic phosphorylated (p)-c-Kit and p-PDGFRbeta attenuation, a modest dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition, and significant radiosensitization were observed after STI-571 treatment in view of apoptosis, although the levels of growth inhibition and increased radiosensitization were different according to cell lines. The grades of radiosensitivity corresponded to the attenuation levels of p-c-Kit and p-PDGFRbeta by STI-571, particularly to those of p-c-Kit, and the radiosensitivity was partially affected by K-ras mutation in pancreatic cancer cells. Among downstream pathways associated with c-Kit or PDGFRbeta, p-PLCgamma was more closely related to radiosensitivity compared with p-Akt1 or p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1. Conclusion: STI-571 enhances radiation response in pancreatic cancer cells. This effect is affected by the attenuation levels of p-c-Kit or p-PDGFRbeta, and K-ras mutation status. Among them, p-c-Kit plays more important roles in the radiosensitivity in pancreatic cancer compared with p-PDGFRbeta or K-ras mutation status.

  16. DNA-PKcs-Dependent Modulation of Cellular Radiosensitivity by a Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kodym, Elisabeth; Kodym, Reinhard; Chen, Benjamin P.; Chen, David J.; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Choy, Hak; Saha, Debabrata

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 has been shown to increase radiosensitivity. Recently, the suppression of radiation-induced DNA-dependant protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity by the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib was reported. Given the importance of DNA-PK for repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end-joining and the clinical use of the substance, we investigated the relevance of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) for the modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. Methods and Materials: We used a syngeneic model of Chinese hamster ovarian cell lines: AA8, possessing a wild-type DNK-PKcs; V3, lacking a functional DNA-PKcs; and V3/WT11, V3 stably transfected with the DNA-PKcs. The cells were treated with celecoxib (50 {mu}M) for 24 h before irradiation. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined using the colony formation assay. Results: Treatment with celecoxib increased the cellular radiosensitivity in the DNA-PKcs-deficient cell line V3 with a dose-enhancement ratio of 1.3 for a surviving fraction of 0.5. In contrast, clonogenic survival was increased in DNA-PKcs wild-type-expressing AA8 cells and in V3 cells transfected with DNA-PKcs (V3/WT11). The decrease in radiosensitivity was comparable to the radiosensitization in V3 cells, with a dose-enhancement ratio of 0.76 (AA8) and 0.80 (V3/WT11) for a survival of 0.5. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a DNA-PKcs-dependent differential modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. These effects might be attributed to alterations in signaling cascades downstream of DNA-PK toward cell survival. These findings offer an explanation for the poor outcomes in some recently published clinical trials.

  17. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP reduces the radiosensitivity of cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.; Molteni, A.; Ts'ao, C.; Hinz, J. )

    1991-03-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dibutyryl cyclic AMP modifies the radiosensitivity of confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Three indices of BAEC function were monitored from 4-24 hrs after exposure to 1-10 Gy of {sup 60}Co gamma rays: the release of {sup 51}Cr from prelabeled cells, and release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and plasminogen activator (PLA) into the culture medium. There was a time- and radiation dose-dependent increase in {sup 51}Cr, LDH and PLA release from the BAEC, detectable within 12 hrs after 5 Gy or higher, and by 24 hrs after 1 Gy or higher. This increased release was accompanied by a radiation dose-dependent decrease in {sup 51}Cr and LDH, and an increase in PLA activity in the lysate of cells adherent to the monolayer at 24 hrs. The continuous presence of cAMP from 1 hr before to 24 hrs after irradiation reduced all of these radiation reactions, although mM concentrations of cAMP were required for significant sparing. The presence of cAMP from 1 hr before to 10 min after irradiation had no effect on BAEC sensitivity, whereas cAMP added 10 min after irradiation was fully as effective as continuously administered drug. Thus, cultured BAEC exhibit membrane dysfunction within 24 hrs after clinically relevant radiation doses, and this dysfunction is ameliorated by cAMP present after irradiation.

  18. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Jayant S.; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies. PMID:27121513

  19. Targeted Radiosensitization by the Chk1 Inhibitor SAR-020106

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; McLaughlin, Martin; Kyula, Joan N.; Neijenhuis, Sari; Khan, Aadil; Good, James; Zaidi, Shane; Powell, Ned G.; Meier, Pascal; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.; Verheij, Marcel; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To explore the activity of a potent Chk1 inhibitor (SAR-020106) in combination with radiation. Methods and Materials: Colony and mechanistic in vitro assays and a xenograft in vivo model. Results: SAR-020106 suppressed-radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and reduced clonogenic survival only in p53-deficient tumor cells. SAR-020106 promoted mitotic entry following irradiation in all cell lines, but p53-deficient cells were likely to undergo apoptosis or become aneuploid, while p53 wild-type cells underwent a postmitotic G{sub 1} arrest followed by subsequent normal cell cycle re-entry. Following combined treatment with SAR-020106 and radiation, homologous-recombination-mediated DNA damage repair was inhibited in all cell lines. A significant increase in the number of pan-γH2AX-staining apoptotic cells was observed only in p53-deficient cell lines. Efficacy was confirmed in vivo in a clinically relevant human head-and-neck cell carcinoma xenograft model. Conclusion: The Chk1 inhibitor SAR-020106 is a potent radiosensitizer in tumor cell lines defective in p53 signaling.

  20. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  1. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  2. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  3. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  4. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  5. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  6. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  7. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  8. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  9. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  10. Clofarabine Acts as Radiosensitizer In Vitro and In Vivo by Interfering With DNA Damage Response

    SciTech Connect

    Cariveau, Mickael J.; Stackhouse, Murray; Cui Xiaoli; Tiwari, Kamal; Waud, William; Secrist, John A.; Xu Bo

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Combination treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy has emerged as the dominant form of cancer adjuvant regimens in recent years. Clofarabine, a newly approved drug for pediatric leukemia, is a second-generation purine nucleoside analogue that can block DNA synthesis and inhibit DNA repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that clofarabine could work synergistically with radiotherapy to increase the tumor cell response. Methods and Materials: The effects of clofarabine on radiosensitivity have been established in several tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo using colony-forming assays and tumor xenografts. The effect of clofarabine on the DNA damage response was also studied in vitro by measuring {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. Results: Clonogenic survival was significantly reduced in irradiated cells treated with clofarabine, demonstrating the strong radiosensitizing effect of clofarabine. Furthermore, clofarabine displayed a radiosensitizing effect that was greater than gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil. We also found that low doses of clofarabine can prolong the presence of radiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX nuclear focus formation, and high doses of clofarabine can induce DNA double-strand breaks, suggesting that clofarabine can interfere with DNA damage response pathways. In addition, clofarabine-induced radiosensitization was also established in vivo using a colorectal cancer model, DLD-1, in athymic nude mice. When combined with fractionated radiotherapy, a moderate dose of clofarabine led to a significant increase in tumor growth inhibition. Conclusion: Clofarabine acts as a powerful radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo by interfering with the DNA damage response.

  11. 53BP1 foci as a marker of tumor cell radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Markova, E; Vasilyev, S; Belyaev, I

    2015-01-01

    Predicting tumor radiosensitivity has yet to be routinely integrated into radiotherapy. We analyzed the possibility to assess radiosensitivity of tumor cells based on endogenous and radiation-induced 53BP1 foci which are molecular markers of DNA double strand breaks (DSB). In eleven tumor cell lines of different origin, radiosensitivity was assessed by surviving cell fraction following irradiation with 2 Gy (SF2). 53BP1 foci were measured at 4 and 12 h post-irradiation by confocal laser microscopy and dedicated software. The correlation of 53BP1 foci and their post-irradiation kinetics with SF2 was assessed using Spearman rank test. The SF2 correlated with both excess of radiation-induced 53BP1 foci per cell at 4 h after irradiation and decay in number of 53BP1 foci from 4 to 12 h post-irradiation. The fraction of cells with multiple endogenous 53BP1 foci also correlated with SF2 of tumor cells. We conclude that the radiosensitivity of tumor cells can be predicted by kinetics of formation and decay of 53BP1 foci after irradiation. For the first time we report that the fraction of cells with multiple endogenous 53BP1 foci can be used as a marker of tumor cell radiosensitivity. PMID:26278144

  12. Radiosensitization by PARP inhibition to proton beam irradiation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Keiichiro; Nishio, Teiji; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2016-09-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 regulates DNA damage responses and promotes base excision repair. PARP inhibitors have been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation in various cancer cells and animal models. We have demonstrated that the PARP inhibitor (PARPi) AZD2281 is also an effective radiosensitizer for carbon-ion radiation; thus, we speculated that the PARPi could be applied to a wide therapeutic range of linear energy transfer (LET) radiation as a radiosensitizer. Institutes for biological experiments using proton beam are limited worldwide. This study was performed as a cooperative research at heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences. HIMAC can generate various ion beams; this enabled us to compare the radiosensitization effect of the PARPi on cells subjected to proton and carbon-ion beams from the same beam line. After physical optimization of proton beam irradiation, the radiosensitization effect of the PARPi was assessed in the human lung cancer cell line, A549, and the pancreatic cancer cell line, MIA PaCa-2. The effect of the PARPi, AZD2281, on radiosensitization to Bragg peak was more significant than that to entrance region. The PARPi increased the number of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and enhanced G2/M arrest after proton beam irradiation. This result supports our hypothesis that a PARPi could be applied to a wide therapeutic range of LET radiation by blocking the DNA repair response. PMID:27425251

  13. Base excision repair of both uracil and oxidatively damaged bases contribute to thymidine deprivation-induced radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Bryan G.; Johnson, Monika; Marsh, Anne E.; Dornfeld, Kenneth J. . E-mail: kenneth-dornfeld@uiowa.edu

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Increased cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation due to thymidine depletion is the basis of radiosensitization with fluoropyrimidine and methotrexate. The mechanism responsible for cytotoxicity has not been fully elucidated but appears to involve both the introduction of uracil into, and its removal from, DNA. The role of base excision repair of uracil and oxidatively damaged bases in creating the increased radiosensitization during thymidine depletion is examined. Methods and Materials: Isogenic strains of S. cerevisiae differing only at loci involved in DNA repair functions were exposed to aminopterin and sulfanilamide to induce thymidine deprivation. Cultures were irradiated and survival determined by clonogenic survival assay. Results: Strains lacking uracil base excision repair (BER) activities demonstrated less radiosensitization than the parental strain. Mutant strains continued to show partial radiosensitization with aminopterin treatment. Mutants deficient in BER of both uracil and oxidatively damaged bases did not demonstrate radiosensitization. A recombination deficient rad52 mutant strain was markedly sensitive to radiation; addition of aminopterin increased radiosensitivity only slightly. Radiosensitization observed in rad52 mutants was also abolished by deletion of the APN1, NTG1, and NTG2 genes. Conclusion: These data suggest radiosensitization during thymidine depletion is the result of BER activities directed at both uracil and oxidatively damaged bases.

  14. Radiosensitization of DNA in presence of Pt(II)-based compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A.; Ptasińska, Sylwia; Gow, Jason; Pieve, Chiara Da; Mason, Nigel J.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray irradiation of plasmid DNA in presence of platinum (II)-based compounds was carried out in order to assess the radiosensitization capabilities of these drugs. In present investigations pBR322 plasmid DNA was used to monitor the effectiveness of chosen compounds in inducing strand breaks. Samples were incubated in the presence of potential radiosensitisers: platinum (II) bromide and cis-diamminedibromoplatinum (II). The results were examined against a common cancer chemotherapy drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II). It was found that platinum (II) bromide can greatly increase the levels of single- and double-strand break formation observed in the irradiated samples with respect to the samples containing platinum as a radiosensitizer only, possessing very little chemotherapeutic activity. The suggested drugs exhibit much higher level of radiosensitivity than widely used cisplatin and thus may be good candidates for cancer treatment.

  15. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Debin; Jia, Hui; Qin, Mengmeng; Dai, Wenjie; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Dong, Guofu; Wang, Zuojun; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Feng, Fan

    2015-01-01

    MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR) on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy. PMID:26389880

  16. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Ma, Debin; Jia, Hui; Qin, Mengmeng; Dai, Wenjie; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Dong, Guofu; Wang, Zuojun; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Feng, Fan

    2015-01-01

    MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR) on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy. PMID:26389880

  17. Hypoxic radiosensitizers: prospects for effective compounds with fewer toxic side-effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, W. D.; Mroczkowski, Z.; Agrawal, K. C.

    1978-01-01

    Several radiosensitizing chemicals, including a family of simple nitroimidazoles, were examined in E. coli and compared with misonidazole for toxic side-effects on endpoints such as mutagenesis, cell killing and inhibition of the synthesis of the inducible enzyme beta-galactosidase. While all the compounds were similar to misonidazole or better in radiosensitization, marked differences in the various side effects were found. There results show that for E. coli it is possible to find compounds that sensitize as well as misonidazole but which have decreased mutagenicity and fewer other side-effects. Of the compounds examined, KA121 (2,5-dinitroimidazole) is the most promising for future study because it combines good radiosensitization with low mutagenicity and toxicity. PMID:98175

  18. Chitooligosaccharides promote radiosensitivity in colon cancer line SW480

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fu-Shi; Yang, Shi-Jie; Lin, Mou-Bin; Chen, Ying-Qun; Yang, Ping; Xu, Jin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-proliferation and radiosensitization effect of chitooligosaccharides (COS) on human colon cancer cell line SW480. METHODS: SW480 cells were treated with 0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 mg/mL of COS for 48 h. CCK-8 assay was employed to obtain the cell survival ratio of SW480 cells, and the anti-proliferation curve was observed with the inhibition ratio of COS on SW480 cells. The RAY + COS group was treated with 1.0 mg/mL of COS for 48 h, while both the RAY and RAY+COS groups were exposed to X-ray at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy, respectively. Clonogenic assay was used to analyze cell viability in the two groups at 10 d after treatment, and a cell survival curve was used to analyze the sensitization ratio of COS. The RAY group was exposed to X-ray at 6 Gy, while the RAY+COS group was treated with 1.0 mg/mL of COS for 48 h in advance and exposed to X-ray at 6 Gy. Flow cytometry was employed to detect cell cycle and apoptosis rate in the non-treatment group, as well as in the RAY and RAY + COS groups after 24 h of treatment. RESULTS: COS inhibited the proliferation of SW480 cells, and the inhibition rate positively correlated with the concentration of COS (P < 0.01). Cell viability decreased as radiation dose increased in the RAY and RAY+COS groups (P < 0.01). Cell viabilities in the RAY+COS group were lower than in the RAY group at all doses of X-ray exposure (P < 0.01), and the sensitization ratio of COS on SW480 cells was 1.39. Compared with the non-treatment group, there was a significant increase in apoptosis rate in both the RAY and RAY + COS groups; while the apoptosis rate in the RAY+COS group was significantly higher than in the RAY group (P < 0.01). In comparing these three groups, the percentage of G2/M phase in both the RAY and RAY + COS groups significantly increased, and the percentage of the S phase and G0/G1 phase was downregulated. Furthermore, the percentage in the G2/M phase was higher, and the percentage in the S phase and G0/G

  19. Nanoscale Dynamics of Radiosensitivity: Role of Low Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanche, Léon

    This chapter addresses the nanoscale dynamics involved in the sensitization of biological cells to ionizing radiation. More specifically, it describes the role of low energy electrons (LEE) in radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and chemotherapeutic agents, as well as potential applications to radiotherapy. The basic mechanisms of action of the LEE generated within nanoscopic volumes by ionizing radiation are described in solid water ice and various forms of DNA. These latter include the subunits (i.e., a base, a sugar or the phosphate group), short single strands (i.e., oligonucleotides) and plasmid and linear DNA. By comparing the results from experiments with the different forms of the DNA molecule and theory, it is possible to determine fundamental mechanisms that are involved in the dissociation of the subunits, base release and the production of single, double-strand breaks and cross-links. Below 15 eV, LEE localize on DNA subunits to form transient negative ions. Such states can damage DNA by dissociating into a stable anion and radical fragment(s), via dissociative electron attachment, or by decaying into dissociative electronically excited states. LEE can also transfer from one DNA subunit to another, particularly from a base to the phosphate group, where they can induce cleavage of the C-O bond (i.e., break a strand). DNA damage and the corresponding nanoscale dynamics are found to be modified in the presence of other cellular constituents. For example, condensing on DNA the most abundant cellular molecule, H2O, induces the formation of a new type of transient anion whose parent is a H2O-DNA complex.

  20. Intra-arterial bromodeoxyuridine radiosensitization of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hegarty, T.J.; Thornton, A.F.; Diaz, R.F.; Chandler, W.F.; Ensminger, W.D.; Junck, L.; Page, M.A.; Gebarski, S.S.; Hood, T.W.; Stetson, P.L. )

    1990-08-01

    In the 1950's it was first observed that mammalian cells exposed to the halogenated deoxyuridines were more sensitive to ultraviolet light and radiation than untreated cells. This prompted early clinical trials with bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) which showed mixed results. More recently, several Phase I studies, while establishing the feasibility of continuous intravenous (IV) infusion of BUdR, have reported significant dose limiting skin and bone marrow toxicities and have questioned the optimal method of BUdR delivery. To exploit the high mitotic activity of malignant gliomas relative to surrounding normal brain tissue, we have developed a permanently implantable infusion pump system for safe, continuous intraarterial (IA) internal carotid BUdR delivery. Since July 1985, 23 patients with malignant brain tumors (18 grade 4, 5 grade 3) have been treated in a Phase I clinical trial using IA BUdR (400-600 mg/m2/day X 8 1/2 weeks) and focal external beam radiotherapy (59.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/day in 6 1/2 weeks). Following initial biopsy/surgery the infusion pump system was implanted; BUdR infusion began 2 weeks prior to and continued throughout the 6 1/2 week course of radiotherapy. There have been no vascular complications. Side-effects in all patients have included varying degrees of anorexia, fatigue, ipsilateral forehead dermatitis, blepharitis, and conjunctivitis. Myelosuppression requiring dose reduction occurred in one patient. An overall Kaplan-Meier estimated median survival of 20 months has been achieved. As in larger controlled series, histologic grade and age are prognostically significant. We have shown in a Phase I study that IA BUdR radiosensitization is safe, tolerable, may lead to improved survival, and appears to be an efficacious primary treatment of malignant gliomas.

  1. Protein-directed modulation of high-LET hyperthermic radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.Y.

    1991-01-01

    A pair of Chinese Hamster Ovary cell lines, the wild-type CHO-SC1, and its temperature-sensitive mutant (CHO-tsH1) was used to examine the importance of protein synthesis in the development of thermotolerance. The classical biphasic thermotolerant survival response to hyperthermia was observed in the SC1 cells after continuous heating at 41.5C to 42.5C, while tsH1 showed no thermotolerance. In separate experiments, each cell line was triggered and challenged at 45C. The heat doses were separated with graded incubaton periods at 35C or 40C for thermotolerance development. SC1 cells expressed thermoresistance, with the synthesis of heat shock proteins, under both incubation conditions. tsH1 cells expressed thermotolerance similar to that seen in the SC1 cells when incubated at 35C, but the survival response with the non-permissive 40C incubation was much reduced in the absence of protein synthesis. The combined effects of heavy-ion radiation and hyperthermia were examined using the same cell system. A mild heat dose of 41.5C was used in conjunction with Neon particle radiation of various high LET values. The cell killing effects were highly dependent on the sequence of application of heat and Neon radiation. Heat applied immediately after Neon irradiation was more cytotoxic to SC1 cells than when heat was applied prior to the irradiation. The ability of cells to synthesize new proteins plays a key role in this sequence-dependent thermal radiosensitization. In the absence of protein synthesis in the tsH1 cells, the high-LET thermal enhancement for cell-killing was unchanged regardless of the sequence. In the presence of protein synthetic activity in the SC1 cells, the thermal enhancement of radiation-induced cell killing was LET-dependent.

  2. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of KrasG12D-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radio-sensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:23182391

  3. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  4. Radiosensitivity of testicular cells in the fetal mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Vergouwen, R.P.F.A.; Roepers-Gajadien, H.L.; Rooij, D.G. de; Huiskamp, R.; Bas, R.J.; Davids, J.A.G.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of prenatal X irradiation on postnatal development of the CBA/P mouse testis was studied. At days 14, 15 and 18 post coitus pregnant female mice were exposed to single doses of X rays ranging from 0.25-1.5 Gy. Higher doses resulted in extensive loss of fetal mice. In the male offspring, at days 3 and 31 post partum, the numbers of gonocytes, type A spermatogonia and Sertoli cells per testis were determined using the disector method. Furthermore, after irradiation at day 15 post coitus, the numbers of Leydig cells, mesenchymal cells, macrophages, myoid cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, endothelial cells and perivascular cells per testis were also determined at days 3 and 31 post partum. At day 3 post partum, the number of germ cells was decreased after irradiation at days 14 and 15 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.7 Gy was determined for the radiosensitivity of the gonocytes at day 14 post coitus. A D{sub o} value of 0.8 Gy was determined for the gonocytes at day 15 post coitus which, however, seems to be less accurate. No accurate D{sub o} value could be determined for the gonocytes at day 18 post coitus. At day 31 post partum, the repopulation of the seminiferous epithelium as well as testis weights and tubular diameters were more affected by irradiation with increasing age of the mice at the time of irradiation. The percentage of tubular cross sections showing spermatids decreased with increasing dose after irradiation at days 15 and 18 post coitus, but not after irradiation at day 14 post coitus. Furthermore, in tubular cross sections showing spermatids, exposure of testes to 1.25 and 1.5 Gy at day 18 post coitus resulted in significantly lower numbers of spermatids per cross section when compared to those testes exposed to the same doses at day 15 post coitus. 30 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Enhanced radiosensitization of p53 mutant cells by oleamide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Chung, Da Yeon; Lee, Su-Jae; Ja Jhon, Gil; Lee, Yun-Sil . E-mail: yslee@kcch.re.kr

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Effect of oleamide, an endogenous fatty-acid primary amide, on tumor cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) has never before been explored. Methods and Materials: NCI H460, human lung cancer cells, and human astrocytoma cell lines, U87 and U251, were used. The cytotoxicity of oleamide alone or in combination with IR was determined by clonogenic survival assay, and induction of apoptosis was estimated by FACS analysis. Protein expressions were confirmed by Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis of Bax by use of confocal microscopy was also performed. The combined effect of IR and oleamide to suppress tumor growth was studied by use of xenografts in the thighs of nude mice. Results: Oleamide in combination with IR had a synergistic effect that decreased clonogenic survival of lung-carcinoma cell lines and also sensitized xenografts in nude mice. Enhanced induction of apoptosis of the cells by the combined treatment was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which resulted in the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3 accompanied by cytochrome c release and Bid cleavage. The synergistic effects of the combined treatment were more enhanced in p53 mutant cells than in p53 wild-type cells. In p53 wild-type cells, both oleamide and radiation induced Bax translocation to mitochondria. On the other hand, in p53 mutant cells, radiation alone slightly induced Bax translocation to mitochondria, whereas oleamide induced a larger translocation. Conclusions: Oleamide may exhibit synergistic radiosensitization in p53 mutant cells through p53-independent Bax translocation to mitochondria.

  6. Microsatellite polymorphisms in DNA repair genes XRCC1, XRCC3 and XRCC5 in patients with gynecological tumors: association with late clinical radiosensitivity and cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    De Ruyck, K; Wilding, C S; Van Eijkeren, M; Morthier, R; Tawn, E J; Thierens, H

    2005-09-01

    This study investigates the association of microsatellite polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3 and XRCC5 with the development of late radiation-induced radiotherapy reactions and examines the correlation between these microsatellites and cancer incidence. Sixty-two women with cervical or endometrial cancer treated with radiotherapy were included in the study. According to the CTCAEv3.0 scale, 22 patients showed late adverse radiotherapy reactions (grade 2 or more). PCR on lymphocyte DNA followed by automated fragment analysis was performed to examine the number of tandem repeat units at each locus. No significant association was found between the repeat length at any of the microsatellites in XRCC1, XRCC3 or XRCC5 and the incidence of late radiotherapy complications. Since higher odds ratios (ORs) were found for the rare XRCC1 [AC]11 and [AC]21 repeats (OR = 2.65, P = 0.325 and OR = 8.67, P = 0.093, respectively), the possible involvement of these small and large repeats in clinical radiosensitivity cannot be completely ruled out. When specific numbers of repeats were examined, no significant correlation was found between the microsatellite repeat length in XRCC1 and XRCC5 and cancer incidence. A weak correlation between XRCC3 [AC]16 homozygotes and cancer incidence was found (OR = 2.56, P = 0.055). A large-scale multicenter study of cancer patients with a high number of radiosensitive individuals is needed to clarify the value of rare polymorphic microsatellite repeats in XRCC1 and XRCC3 as a biomarker of clinical radiosensitivity or increased cancer risk. PMID:16137195

  7. Tumor radiosensitization by monomethyl auristatin E: mechanism of action and targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Jessica L.; Jones, Karra A.; Hicks, Angel M.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Nguyen, Quyen T.; Sicklick, Jason K.; Lowy, Andrew M.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Advani, Sunil J.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic tumor resistance to radiotherapy limits the efficacy of ionizing radiation (IR). Sensitizing cancer cells specifically to IR would improve tumor control and decrease normal tissue toxicity. The development of tumor targeting technologies allows for developing potent radiosensitizing drugs. We hypothesized that the anti-tubulin agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), a component of a clinically approved antibody-directed conjugate, could function as a potent radiosensitizer and be selectively delivered to tumors using an activatable cell penetrating peptide targeting matrix metalloproteinases and RGD binding integrins (ACPP-cRGD-MMAE). We evaluated the ability of MMAE to radiosensitize both established cancer cells and a low passage cultured human pancreatic tumor cell line using clonogenic and DNA damage assays. MMAE sensitized colorectal and pancreatic cancer cells to IR in a schedule and dose dependent manner correlating with mitotic arrest. Radiosensitization was evidenced by decreased clonogenic survival and increased DNA double strand breaks in irradiated cells treated with MMAE. MMAE in combination with IR resulted in increased DNA damage signaling and activation of CHK1. To test a therapeutic strategy of MMAE and IR, PANC-1 or HCT-116 murine tumor xenografts were treated with non-targeted free MMAE or tumor targeted MMAE (ACPP-cRGD-MMAE). While free MMAE in combination with IR resulted in tumor growth delay, tumor targeted ACPP-cRGD-MMAE with IR produced a more robust and significantly prolonged tumor regression in xenograft models. Our studies identify MMAE as a potent radiosensitizer. Importantly, MMAE radiosensitization can be localized to tumors by targeted activatable cell penetrating peptides. PMID:25681274

  8. Dependence of 5-fluorouracil-mediated radiosensitization on DNA-directed effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, T.S.; Davis, M.A.; Maybaum, J. )

    1994-06-15

    Although 5-fluorouracil (FUra) has been demonstrated to be a radiation sensitizer both in the laboratory and the clinic, it is not known whether radiosensitization results primary from FUra's DNA or RNA-directed effects. The authors studied the radiosensitizing effects of FUra [+-] thymidine (dThd) on HT29 human colon cancer cells, which are relatively sensitive to the DNA-directed action of FUra, in comparison to SW620 and HuTu80 human colon cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to FUra's DNA-directed effects. They hypothesized that if FUra were acting chiefly through DNA dependent mechanisms, HT29 cells would (a) show greater radiosensitization than SW620 and HuTu80 cells under the same conditions of exposure; and (b) demonstrate selective reversal of radiation sensitivity (compared to cytotoxicity) in the presence of FUra + dThd, compared to FUra alone. They found that the enhancement ratio produced by a 24 h exposure to 10 [mu]M FUra was significantly greater in HT29 cells compared to SW620 and HuTu80 cells (enhancement ratios of 2.1 [+-] 0.1; 1.1 [+-] 0.1, and 1.3 [+-] 0.1, respectively). Furthermore, in HT29 cells, dThd blocked FUra-mediated radiosensitization to a greater extent than FUra-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, the hypotheses were confirmed. These findings support the concept that the manipulation of FUra's DNA-dependent actions, for example, through modulators of thymidylate synthase (TS) activity, may increase radiosensitization in clinical trials in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. However, since resistance to the DNA-directed effects of fluoropyrimidines can result from mechanisms unrelated to TS inhibition, additional strategies will be required to potentiate fluoropyrimidine-mediated radiosensitization. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Accounting Instruction in a Business Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polisky, Mildred K.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the individualized audiovisual approach to teaching beginning accounting at a Wisconsin technical college. Discusses how it began as a remedial lab, its theories of individualized instruction, how the pilot project worked, and why this method is used. (CT)

  10. Social Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornille, Thomas A.; Harrigan, John

    Relationships between individuals and society have often been presented from the perspective of the social institution. Social psychology has addressed the variables that affect the individual in relationships with larger groups. Social individualism is a conceptual framework that explores the relationship of the individual and society from the…

  11. The pharmacokinetics in mice and dogs of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.; Workman, P.; Owen, L.

    1982-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole (MISO) were examined. In dogs, 2 analogues showed comparable peak plasma concentrations with considerable shorter half-lives (t1/2) and reduced areas under curves (AUC). Benznidazole (R0 07-1051) had a much longer t1/2, a higher AUC, and somewhat higher peak concentrations. In mice tumor/plasma, brain/plasma, and tumor/brain ratios were generally similar to MISO, as was penetration of brain and peripheral nerve by benznidazole in dogs. Selection of lipophilic analogues with appropriate pharmacokinetic properties may facilitate accommodation of the potentially different requirements for improved radiosensitization or chemosensitization.

  12. Differential radiosensitivity in cultured B-16 melanoma cells following interrupted melanogenesis induced by glucosamine

    SciTech Connect

    Mileo, A.M.; Mattei, E.; Fanuele, M.; Delpino, A.; Ferrini, U. )

    1989-05-01

    The relationship between cell pigmentation and radiosensitivity was investigated in a cell model in which melanogenesis was suppressed by a glycosylation inhibitor. It was found that X-irradiation of melanotic B-16 melanoma cells and their amelanotic counterparts, obtained by glucosamine treatment, showed an inverse correlation between radiosensitivity and melanin contents. Since melanogenesis interruption by glucosamine does not affect the DNA repair capacity of nonpigmented cells, it is likely that intracellular melanins play a role in the relative resistance of pigmented cells to X-irradiation.

  13. Effect of anemia on tumor radiosensitivity under normo and hyperbaric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.; Smith, K.A.; Soranson, J.A.; Randhawa, V.S.; Stratford, M.R.; Denekamp, J.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of chronic anemia on tumor radiosensitivity in a murine tumor has been investigated. Anemia was induced by bilateral kidney irradiation given several months before tumor implantation. Anemic, anemic transfused, and normal non-anemic age-matched tumor bearing animals were irradiated with X rays (2 F/24 hr) either in air, air plus misonidazole, or under hyperbaric oxygen. The most resistant response was that of tumors grown in normal mice treated in air. Anemia produced an increase in radiosensitivity which was further enhanced by red blood cell replacement. The most sensitive overall response was seen in the anemic-transfused group treated with HBO.

  14. Predicting Radiosensitivity with Gamma-H2AX Foci Assay after Single High-Dose-Rate and Pulsed Dose-Rate Ionizing Irradiation.

    PubMed

    van Oorschot, Bregje; Hovingh, Suzanne; Dekker, Annelot; Stalpers, Lukas J; Franken, Nicolaas A P

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-H2AX foci detection is the standard method to quantify DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and repair. In this study, we investigated the induction and decay of γ-H2AX foci of different tumor cell lines and fibroblasts with known mutations in DNA damage repair genes, including ATM, LigIV, DNA-PKcs, Rad51 and Rad54. A radiation dose of 2.4 Gy was used for either an acute single high-dose-rate (sHDR) exposure or a pulsed dose-rate (pDR) exposure over 24 h. The number of γ-H2AX foci was determined at 30 min and 24 h after sHDR irradiation and directly after pDR irradiation. In a similar manner, γ-H2AX foci were also examined in lymphocytes of patients with differences in normal tissue toxicity after a total radiation dose of 1 Gy. In an initial count of the number of foci 30 min after sHDR irradiation, repair-proficient cell types could not be distinguished from repair-deficient cell types. However at 24 h postirradiation, while we observed a large decrease in foci numbers in NHEJ-proficient cells, the amount of γ-H2AX foci in cell types with mutated NHEJ repair remained at high levels. Except for IRS-1SF cells, HR-deficient cell types eventually did show a moderate decrease in foci number over time, albeit to a lesser extent than their corresponding parentals or repair-proficient control cells. In addition, analysis of γ-H2AX foci after sHDR exposure of patients with different sensitivity status clearly showed individual differences in radiation response. Radiosensitive patients could be distinguished from the more radioresistant patients with γ-H2AX foci decay ratios (initial number of foci divided by residual number of foci). Significantly higher decay ratios were observed in patients without toxicities, indicating more proficient repair compared to patients with radiation-induced side effects. After pDR irradiation, no consistent correlation could be found between foci number and radiosensitivity. In conclusion, γ-H2AX formation is a rapid and

  15. Radiosensitization of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by a SMAC-mimetic compound, SM-164, requires activation of caspases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; McEachern, Donna; Li, Wenyan; Davis, Mary A.; Li, Hua; Morgan, Meredith A.; Bai, Longchuan; Sebolt, Jonathan T.; Sun, Haiying; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the treatment of choice for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, radioresistance, which contributes to local recurrence, remains a significant therapeutic problem. In this study, we characterized SM-164, a small SMAC mimetic compound that promotes degradation of cIAP-1 (also known as BIRC2) and releases active caspases from XIAP inhibitory binding, as a radiosensitizing agent in HNSCC cells. We found that SM-164 at nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in some HNSCC cell lines in a manner dependent on intrinsic sensitivity to caspase activation and apoptosis induction. Blockage of caspase activation via siRNA knockdown or a pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk largely abrogated SM-164 radiosensitization. On the other hand, the resistant lines with a high level of BCL-2 that blocks caspase activation and apoptosis induction became sensitive to radiation upon BCL-2 knockdown. Mechanistic studies revealed that SM-164 radiosensitization in sensitive cells was associated with NFκB activation and TNFα secretion, followed by activation of caspases-8 and -9, leading to enhanced apoptosis. Finally, SM-164 also radiosensitized human tumor xenograft, while causing minimal toxicity. Thus, SM-164 is a potent radiosensitizer via a mechanism involving caspase activation and holds promise for future clinical development as a novel class of radiosensitizer for the treatment of a subset of head and neck cancer patients. PMID:21282353

  16. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  17. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of human immunodeficiency virus positive/negative cervical cancer patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    HERD, OLIVIA; FRANCIES, FLAVIA; KOTZEN, JEFFREY; SMITH, TRUDY; NXUMALO, ZWIDE; MULLER, XANTHENE; SLABBERT, JACOBUS; VRAL, ANNE; BAEYENS, ANS

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer amongst South African women and is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in this region. Several international studies on radiation-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes of cervical cancer patients have remained inconclusive. Despite the high incidence of cervical cancer in South Africa, and the extensive use of radiotherapy to treat it, the chromosomal radiosensitivity of South African cervical cancer patients has not been studied to date. Since a high number of these patients are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, the effect of HIV infection on chromosomal radiosensitivity was also investigated. Blood samples from 35 cervical cancer patients (20 HIV-negative and 15 HIV-positive) and 20 healthy controls were exposed to X-rays at doses of 6 MV of 2 and 4 Gy in vitro. Chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed using the micronucleus (MN) assay. MN scores were obtained using the Metafer 4 platform, an automated microscopic system. Three scoring methods of the MNScore module of Metafer were applied and compared. Cervical cancer patients had higher MN values than healthy controls, with HIV-positive patients having the highest MN values. Differences between groups were significant when using a scoring method that corrects for false positive and false negative MN. The present study suggested increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in HIV-positive South African cervical cancer patients. PMID:26549042

  18. Mitochondrial DNA and Functional Investigations into the Radiosensitivity of Four Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Steven B.; Maguire, David; Zhang, Mei; Tian, Yeping; Yang, Shanmin; Zhang, Amy; Casey-Sawicki, Katherine; Han, Deping; Ma, Jun; Yin, Liangjie; Guo, Yongson; Wang, Xiaohui; Chen, Chun; Litvinchuk, Alexandra; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Swarts, Steven; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; Zhang, Lurong; Okunieff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether genetic radiosensitivity-related changes in mtDNA/nDNA ratios are significant to mitochondrial function and if a material effect on mtDNA content and function exists. BALB/c (radiosensitive), C57BL/6 (radioresistant), and F1 hybrid mouse strains were exposed to total body irradiation. Hepatic genomic DNA was extracted, and mitochondria were isolated. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption, ROS, and calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling were measured. Radiation influenced strain-specific survival in vivo. F1 hybrid survival was influenced by maternal input. Changes in mitochondrial content corresponded to survival in vivo among the 4 strains. Calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling was strain dependent. Isolated mitochondria from BALB/c mice were significantly more sensitive to calcium overload than mitochondria from C57BL/6 mice. Maternal input partially influenced the recovery effect of radiation on calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling in F1 hybrids; the hybrid with a radiosensitive maternal lineage exhibited a lower rate of recovery. Hybrids had a survival rate that was biased toward maternal input. mtDNA content and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTP) measured in these strains before irradiation reflected a dominant input from the parent. After irradiation, the MPTP opened sooner in radiosensitive and hybrid strains, likely triggering intrinsic apoptotic pathways. These findings have important implications for translation into predictors of radiation sensitivity/resistance. PMID:24688546

  19. MicroRNA-218 Enhances the Radiosensitivity of Human Cervical Cancer via Promoting Radiation Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wang; Xiaoyun, Han; Haifeng, Qiu; Jing, Li; Weixu, Hu; Ruofan, Dong; Jinjin, Yu; Zongji, Shen

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported frequent loss of microRNA-218 (miR-218) in cervical cancer, which was associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. As microRNAs were found invovled in the regulation of radiosensitivity in various human cancers, we therefore aim to investigate the effects of miR-218 on radiosensitivity of cervical cancer in the present study. The clonogenic survival assay demonstrated that loss of miR-218 could predict radioresistance in the primary cervical cancer cells (R2=0.6516, P<0.001). In vitro, abundant miR-218 increased the radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells (P<0.001 for HeLa, P=0.009 for SiHa, P=0.016 for C33A and P=0.01 for CaSki). Upregulation of miR-218 significantly enhanced the radiation-induced apoptosis, which was further enhanced by the combination of miR-218 overexpression and radiation In xenograft growth assay, combination of miR-218 overexpression and radiation notably induced cellular apoptosis and suppressed tumor growth. In conclusion, we demonstrated that miR-218 resensitized cervical cancer cells to radiation via promoting cellular apoptosis. Moreover, we proved that miR-218 as a potent predictor of radiosensitivity in cervical cancer, especially for those patients with loss of miR-218. PMID:24843318

  20. In vitro 3-dimensional tumor model for radiosensitivity of HPV positive OSCC cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Rose, Barbara; Lee, C Soon; Hong, Angela M

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is increasing due to the rising prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) positive OSCC. HPV positive OSCC is associated with better outcomes than HPV negative OSCC. Our aim was to explore the possibility that this favorable prognosis is due to the enhanced radiosensitivity of HPV positive OSCC. HPV positive OSCC cell lines were generated from the primary OSCCs of 2 patients, and corresponding HPV positive cell lines generated from nodal metastases following xenografting in nude mice. Monolayer and 3 dimensional (3D) culture techniques were used to compare the radiosensitivity of HPV positive lines with that of 2 HPV negative OSCC lines. Clonogenic and protein assays were used to measure survival post radiation. Radiation induced cell cycle changes were studied using flow cytometry. In both monolayer and 3D culture, HPV positive cells exhibited a heterogeneous appearance whereas HPV negative cells tended to be homogeneous. After irradiation, HPV positive cells had a lower survival in clonogenic assays and lower total protein levels in 3D cultures than HPV negative cells. Irradiated HPV positive cells showed a high proportion of cells in G1/S phase, increased apoptosis, an increased proliferation rate, and an inability to form 3D tumor clumps. In conclusion, HPV positive OSCC cells are more radiosensitive than HPV negative OSCC cells in vitro, supporting a more radiosensitive nature of HPV positive OSCC. PMID:26046692

  1. Influence of some methodological factors on the radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Grinfeld, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The experiments reported here were undertaken to investigate the influence of some methodological factors on the radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote. The following factors were studied: (1) the use of natural or hormone-stimulated ovulation; (2) the procedure followed for fertilization:mating overnight, or only during a short period in the morning after all oocytes have been ovulated, in vitro fertilization; (3) the type of irradiation, i.e., in vivo or in vitro irradiation. The radiosensitivity of the zygotes was estimated under the different experimental conditions by measuring the ability of the irradiated embryos to cleave and to develop further to the blastocyst stage. Our results suggest that the protocols used for mating and fertilization probably have a greater influence on embryonic survival following irradiation than the use of gonadotropins to stimulate ovulation. The highest degree of synchrony in the development of the embryos is achieved by restricting mating to a short period or by using in vitro fertilization. The very low LD50s obtained under such synchronous conditions confirm the high radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote at the early pronuclear stage. Comparison between the effects of in vivo and in vitro irradiation does not indicate a greater radiosensitivity of the embryo irradiated in vitro in comparison to the embryo irradiated in vivo.

  2. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for potential application in radiosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayatullah, M.; Nurhasanah, I.; Budi, W. S.

    2016-03-01

    Radiosensitizer is a material that can increase the effects of radiation in radiotherapy application. Various materials with high effective atomic number have been developed as a radiosensitizer, such as metal, iron oxide and quantum dot. In this study, ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are included in iron oxide class were synthesized by precipitation method from the solution of zinc nitrate and ferrite nitrate and followed by calcination at 700° C for 3 hours. The XRD pattern shows that most of the observed peaks can be indexed to the cubic phase of ZnFe2O4 with a lattice parameter of 8.424 Å. SEM image reveals that nanoparticles are the sphere-like shape with size in the range 84-107 nm. The ability of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizer was examined by loading those nanoparticles into Escherichia coli cell culture which irradiated with photon energy of 6 MV at a dose of 2 Gy. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles showed ability to increase the absorbed dose by 0.5 to 1.0 cGy/g. In addition, the presence of 1 g/L ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in an increase radiation effect by 6.3% higher than if exposed to radiation only. These results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles can be used as the radiosensitizer for increasing radiation effect in radiotherapy.

  3. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F1-+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/Wv mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bgJ/bgJ. Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the back of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosensitive than those localized in the skin. D0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  4. Coupling of the radiosensitivity of melanocyte stem cells to their dormancy during the hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Makiko; Aoto, Takahiro; Mohri, Yasuaki; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Nishimura, Emi K

    2014-07-01

    Current studies have revealed that stem cells are more radiosensitive than mature cells. As somatic stem cells are mostly kept in a quiescent state, this conflicts with Bergonié and Tribondeau's law that actively mitotic cells are the most radiosensitive. In this study, we focused on hair graying to understand the stress-resistance of melanocyte stem cells (McSCs). We used Dct-H2B-GFP transgenic mice which enables the stable visualization of McSCs and an anti-Kit monoclonal antibody which selectively eradicates amplifying McSCs. The results demonstrate that quiescent McSCs are rather radiosensitive, but the coexistence of non-quiescent McSCs provides the stem cell pool with radioresistance. The irradiated quiescent McSCs prematurely differentiate in the niche upon their activation without sufficiently renewing themselves for cyclic hair pigmentation. These data indicate that tissue radiosensitivity is largely dependent on the state of somatic stem cells under their local microenvironment. PMID:24730534

  5. Differential Radiosensitizing Effect of Valproic Acid in Differentiation Versus Self-Renewal Promoting Culture Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Debeb, Bisrat G.; Xu Wei; Mok, Henry; Li Li; Robertson, Fredika; Ueno, Naoto T.; Reuben, Jim; Lucci, Anthony; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that valproic acid (VA) enhances the proliferation and self-renewal of normal hematopoietic stem cells and that breast cancer stem/progenitor cells can be resistant to radiation. From these data, we hypothesized that VA would fail to radiosensitize breast cancer stem/progenitor cells grown to three-dimensional (3D) mammospheres. Methods and Materials: We used the MCF7 breast cancer cell line grown under stem cell-promoting culture conditions (3D mammosphere) and standard nonstem cell monolayer culture conditions (two-dimensional) to examine the effect of pretreatment with VA on radiation sensitivity in clonogenic survival assays and on the expression of embryonic stem cell transcription factors. Results: 3D-cultured MCF-7 cells expressed higher levels of Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2. The 3D passage enriched self-renewal and increased radioresistance in the 3D mammosphere formation assays. VA radiosensitized adherent cells but radioprotected 3D cells in single-fraction clonogenic assays. Moreover, fractionated radiation sensitized VA-treated adherent MCF7 cells but did not have a significant effect on VA-treated single cells grown to mammospheres. Conclusion: We have concluded that VA might preferentially radiosensitize differentiated cells compared with those expressing stem cell surrogates and that stem cell-promoting culture is a useful tool for in vitro evaluation of novel cancer therapeutic agents and radiosensitizers.

  6. Radiosensitization by nicotinamide in tumors and normal tissues: the importance of tissue oxygenation status

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, M.R.; Hansen, P.V.; Overgaard, J.

    1989-05-01

    Nicotinamide induced radiosensitization of tumors has been suggested to be a consequence of a reduction in tumor hypoxia. We have investigated the possibility that nicotinamide may produce significant radiosensitization in a normal tissue in which the radiation response is also influenced by hypoxia. The normal tissue studied was testis and radiation damage was assessed by measuring survival of spermatogonial stem cells. The radiosensitizing action of nicotinamide in testis was compared to that observed in a C3H mammary carcinoma when assayed by both regrowth delay and local tumor control. Our results show that nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg; i.p.) enhanced radiation damage in both tissue types when the radiation was given up to at least 3 hr after drug injection. Enhancement ratios obtained when the drug and radiation were separated by a 1 hr time interval were between 1.1 to 1.2 for the testis and 1.0 to 1.5 for the tumor. The results suggest that nicotinamide will produce radiosensitization in testis, but the effect is small and less than that observed in tumors.

  7. Homozygous mutation of MTPAP causes cellular radiosensitivity and persistent DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Martin, N T; Nakamura, K; Paila, U; Woo, J; Brown, C; Wright, J A; Teraoka, S N; Haghayegh, S; McCurdy, D; Schneider, M; Hu, H; Quinlan, A R; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    2014-01-01

    The study of rare human syndromes characterized by radiosensitivity has been instrumental in identifying novel proteins and pathways involved in DNA damage responses to ionizing radiation. In the present study, a mutation in mitochondrial poly-A-polymerase (MTPAP), not previously recognized for its role in the DNA damage response, was identified by exome sequencing and subsequently associated with cellular radiosensitivity. Cell lines derived from two patients with the homozygous MTPAP missense mutation were radiosensitive, and this radiosensitivity could be abrogated by transfection of wild-type mtPAP cDNA into mtPAP-deficient cell lines. Further analysis of the cellular phenotype revealed delayed DNA repair, increased levels of DNA double-strand breaks, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased cell death after irradiation (IR). Pre-IR treatment of cells with the potent anti-oxidants, α-lipoic acid and n-acetylcysteine, was sufficient to abrogate the DNA repair and clonogenic survival defects. Our results firmly establish that mutation of the MTPAP gene results in a cellular phenotype of increased DNA damage, reduced repair kinetics, increased cell death by apoptosis, and reduced clonogenic survival after exposure to ionizing radiation, suggesting a pathogenesis that involves the disruption of ROS homeostasis. PMID:24651433

  8. Short Hairpin RNA Suppression of Thymidylate Synthase Produces DNA Mismatches and Results in Excellent Radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Sheryl A.; Cooper, Kristin S.; Mannava, Sudha; Nikiforov, Mikhail A.; Shewach, Donna S.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA)-mediated suppression of thymidylate synthase (TS) on cytotoxicity and radiosensitization and the mechanism by which these events occur. Methods and Materials: shRNA suppression of TS was compared with 5-fluoro-2 Prime -deoxyuridine (FdUrd) inactivation of TS with or without ionizing radiation in HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were measured by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle effects were measured by flow cytometry. The effects of FdUrd or shRNA suppression of TS on dNTP deoxynucleotide triphosphate imbalances and consequent nucleotide misincorporations into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and as pSP189 plasmid mutations, respectively. Results: TS shRNA produced profound ({>=}90%) and prolonged ({>=}8 days) suppression of TS in HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas FdUrd increased TS expression. TS shRNA also produced more specific and prolonged effects on dNTPs deoxynucleotide triphosphates compared with FdUrd. TS shRNA suppression allowed accumulation of cells in S-phase, although its effects were not as long-lasting as those of FdUrd. Both treatments resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1. TS shRNA alone was less cytotoxic than FdUrd but was equally effective as FdUrd in eliciting radiosensitization (radiation enhancement ratio: TS shRNA, 1.5-1.7; FdUrd, 1.4-1.6). TS shRNA and FdUrd produced a similar increase in the number and type of pSP189 mutations. Conclusions: TS shRNA produced less cytotoxicity than FdUrd but was equally effective at radiosensitizing tumor cells. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FdUrd on TS alone is sufficient to elicit radiosensitization with FdUrd, but it only partially explains FdUrd-mediated cytotoxicity and cell cycle inhibition. The increase in DNA mismatches after TS shRNA or FdUrd supports a causal and sufficient role for the depletion of dTTP thymidine triphosphate and consequent DNA

  9. Simultaneous Inhibition of EGFR and PI3K Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ping; Zhang Qing; Torossian, Artour; Li Zhaobin; Xu Wencai; Lu Bo; Fu Shen

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling transduction pathway are common in cancer. This pathway is imperative to the radiosensitivity of cancer cells. We aimed to investigate the radiosensitizing effects of the simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K in breast cancer cells. Methods and Materials: MCF-7 cell lines with low expression of EGFR and wild-type PTEN and MDA-MB-468 cell lines with high expression of EGFR and mutant PTEN were used. The radiosensitizing effects by the inhibition of EGFR with AG1478 and/or PI3K with Ly294002 were determined by colony formation assay, Western blot was used to investigate the effects on downstream signaling. Flow cytometry was used for apoptosis and cell cycle analysis. Mice-bearing xenografts of MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells were also used to observe the radiosensitizing effect. Results: Simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K greatly enhanced radiosensitizing effect in MDA-MB-468 in terms of apoptosis and mitotic death, either inhibition of EGFR or PI3K alone could enhance radiosensitivity with a dose-modifying factor (DMF{sub SF2}) of 1.311 and 1.437, radiosensitizing effect was further enhanced by simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K with a DMF{sub SF2} at 2.698. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that dual inhibition combined with irradiation significantly induced G0/G1 phase arrest in MDA-MB-468 cells. The expression of phosphor-Akt and phosphor-Erk1/2 (induced by irradiation and PI3K inhibitor) were fully attenuated by simultaneous treatment with both inhibitors in combination with irradiation. In addition, dual inhibition combined with irradiation induced dramatic tumor growth delay in MDA-MB-468 xenografts. Conclusions: Our study indicated that simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K could further sensitize the cancer cells to irradiation compared to the single inhibitor with irradiation in vitro and in vivo. The approach may have

  10. 5 CFR 1640.4 - Account transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Account transactions. 1640.4 Section 1640... STATEMENTS § 1640.4 Account transactions. (a) Where relevant, the following transactions will be reported in each individual account statement: (1) Contributions; (2) Withdrawals; (3) Forfeitures; (4)...

  11. 5 CFR 1640.4 - Account transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Account transactions. 1640.4 Section 1640... STATEMENTS § 1640.4 Account transactions. (a) Where relevant, the following transactions will be reported in each individual account statement: (1) Contributions; (2) Withdrawals; (3) Forfeitures; (4)...

  12. 32 CFR 701.111 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 701.111 Section 701.111... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.111 Disclosure accounting. Disclosure accounting allows the individual to determine what agencies or persons have been...

  13. 32 CFR 701.111 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 701.111 Section 701.111... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.111 Disclosure accounting. Disclosure accounting allows the individual to determine what agencies or persons have been...

  14. 32 CFR 701.111 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 701.111 Section 701.111... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.111 Disclosure accounting. Disclosure accounting allows the individual to determine what agencies or persons have been...

  15. 32 CFR 701.111 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 701.111 Section 701.111... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.111 Disclosure accounting. Disclosure accounting allows the individual to determine what agencies or persons have been...

  16. 32 CFR 701.111 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 701.111 Section 701.111... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.111 Disclosure accounting. Disclosure accounting allows the individual to determine what agencies or persons have been...

  17. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing gammaH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2mug/mL], Trinovin [10mug/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 mug/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10mug/mL) and Prostate Rx (6mug/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  18. DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase As Molecular Target for Radiosensitization of Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, M. Emmy M.; van der Ploeg, Ida; Koster, Jan; Bate-Eya, Laurel Tabe; Versteeg, Rogier; Caron, Huib N.; Molenaar, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells might resist therapy with ionizing radiation (IR) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of IR-induced double-strand breaks. One of the key players in NHEJ is DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK, i.e. DNA-PKcs, can be inhibited with the small-molecule inhibitor NU7026. In the current study, the in vitro potential of NU7026 to radiosensitize neuroblastoma cells was investigated. DNA-PKcs is encoded by the PRKDC (protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide) gene. We showed that PRKDC levels were enhanced in neuroblastoma patients and correlated with a more advanced tumor stage and poor prognosis, making DNA-PKcs an interesting target for radiosensitization of neuroblastoma tumors. Optimal dose finding for combination treatment with NU7026 and IR was performed using NGP cells. One hour pre-treatment with 10 μM NU7026 synergistically sensitized NGP cells to 0.63 Gy IR. Radiosensitizing effects of NU7026 increased in time, with maximum effects observed from 96 h after IR-exposure on. Combined treatment of NGP cells with 10 μM NU7026 and 0.63 Gy IR resulted in apoptosis, while no apoptotic response was observed for either of the therapies alone. Inhibition of IR-induced DNA-PK activation by NU7026 confirmed the capability of NGP cells to, at least partially, resist IR by NHEJ. NU7026 also synergistically radiosensitized other neuroblastoma cell lines, while no synergistic effect was observed for low DNA-PKcs-expressing non-cancerous fibroblasts. Results obtained for NU7026 were confirmed by PRKDC knockdown in NGP cells. Taken together, the current study shows that DNA-PKcs is a promising target for neuroblastoma radiosensitization. PMID:26716839

  19. DNMT (DNA methyltransferase) inhibitors radiosensitize human cancer cells by suppressing DNA repair activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histone modifications and DNA methylation are two major factors in epigenetic phenomenon. Unlike the histone deacetylase inhibitors, which are known to exert radiosensitizing effects, there have only been a few studies thus far concerning the role of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors as radiosensitizers. The principal objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of DNMT inhibitors on the radiosensitivity of human cancer cell lines, and to elucidate the mechanisms relevant to that process. Methods A549 (lung cancer) and U373MG (glioblastoma) cells were exposed to radiation with or without six DNMT inhibitors (5-azacytidine, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, zebularine, hydralazine, epigallocatechin gallate, and psammaplin A) for 18 hours prior to radiation, after which cell survival was evaluated via clonogenic assays. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed via flow cytometry. Expressions of DNMT1, 3A/3B, and cleaved caspase-3 were detected via Western blotting. Expression of γH2AX, a marker of radiation-induced DNA double-strand break, was examined by immunocytochemistry. Results Pretreatment with psammaplin A, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, and zebularine radiosensitized both A549 and U373MG cells. Pretreatment with psammaplin A increased the sub-G1 fraction of A549 cells, as compared to cells exposed to radiation alone. Prolongation of γH2AX expression was observed in the cells treated with DNMT inhibitors prior to radiation as compared with those treated by radiation alone. Conclusions Psammaplin A, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, and zebularine induce radiosensitivity in both A549 and U373MG cell lines, and suggest that this effect might be associated with the inhibition of DNA repair. PMID:22429326

  20. Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wenshu; Lee Yijang; Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of {gamma}-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

  1. Iodine-125-labeled cRGD-gold nanoparticles as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer and imaging agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ning; Dang, Yajie; Liang, Guangli; Liu, Guizhi

    2015-04-01

    Research interests on radiosensitive property of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are rapidly raised because of the extensively proved in vitro effectiveness and clinical necessity. However, the issue of targeted accumulation of GNPs in tumor tissues hindered the transference to in vivo applications. In this study, hybrid nano-sized cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated GNPs (cRGD-GNPs) integrated with radioactive iodine-125 was fabricated as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer. Therapeutic effects, including acute apoptosis (2 days post treatment) and long-term influence (up to 21 days), were investigated on NCI-H446 tumor-bearing mice via Tc-99 m-Annexin V SPECT and volume measurements, respectively. Apoptosis and volume loss were consistent in showing that tumor growth was effectively suppressed via the treatment of 125I-cRGD-GNP sensitized radiotherapy (RT), a more significantly radiosensitive effect than the treatment of non-targeted GNPs with RT, RT treatment alone, and no treatment. SPECT/CT images showed that the uptake of cRGD-GNPs by tumor tissues reached the peak target/non-target value of 4.76 at around 2 h post injection, and dynamic radioactivity monitoring showed that 125I-cRGD-GNPs maintained about 2.5% of injected dosage at 55 h post injection. For long-term influence, a significant radiosensitized RT-induced volume loss was observed. Hence, cyclic RGD conjugation makes the GNP-based radiosensitizer tumor targeting, offering a new modality for enhancing radiotherapeutic efficacy. Additionally, the introduction of I-125 serves as both a therapeutic factor and a radiotracer for in vivo tracking of GNPs.

  2. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Corde, Stéphanie; Yagi, Naoto; Abdul Aziz, Siti Aishah; Annabell, Nathan; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z) and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30–100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3.47. The dose enhancement factor obtained at other energy levels followed the same direction as the theoretical calculations based on the ratio of the mass energy absorption coefficients of gold and water. This experimental evidence shows that the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles varies with photon energy as predicted from theoretical calculations. However, prediction based on theoretical assumptions is sometimes difficult due to the complexity of biological systems, so further study at the cellular level is required to fully characterize the

  3. Celecoxib Enhances the Radiosensitizing Effect of 7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) in Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mee; Jeong, In-Hye; Pyo, Hongryull

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: 7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), a Chk1-specific inhibitor, showed promising in vitro and in vivo chemo- or radiosensitizing activity. However, there have been concerns about its limited therapeutic efficacy and risk of side effects. A method of enhancing the treatment efficacy of UCN-01 while not increasing its side effects on normal tissue may therefore be required to apply this drug in clinical settings. Celecoxib is a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-specific inhibitor that downregulates ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) protein, an upstream kinase of Chk1. In this study, we investigated whether the addition of celecoxib can potentiate the radiosensitizing effect of UCN-01. Methods and Materials: The cooperative radiosensitizing effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms of UCN-01 plus celecoxib were determined by clonogenic assay, tumor growth delay assay, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. Synergism of the three agents combined (UCN-01 plus celecoxib plus radiation) were evaluated using median drug effect analysis and drug-independent action model analysis. Results: The combination of UCN-01 and celecoxib could induce synergistic cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing effects in in vitro and in vivo systems. The combination of both drugs also cooperatively inhibited IR-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, and increased the G{sub 2} to mitotic transition. Conclusions: Combined treatment with UCN-01 and celecoxib can exert synergistically enhanced radiosensitizing effects via cooperative inhibition of the ionizing radiation-activated G{sub 2} checkpoint. We propose that this combination strategy may be useful in clinical applications of UCN-01 for radiotherapy of cancer patients.

  4. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Corde, Stéphanie; Yagi, Naoto; Abdul Aziz, Siti Aishah; Annabell, Nathan; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z) and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30-100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3.47. The dose enhancement factor obtained at other energy levels followed the same direction as the theoretical calculations based on the ratio of the mass energy absorption coefficients of gold and water. This experimental evidence shows that the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles varies with photon energy as predicted from theoretical calculations. However, prediction based on theoretical assumptions is sometimes difficult due to the complexity of biological systems, so further study at the cellular level is required to fully characterize the effects

  5. Simulation on the molecular radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles in cells irradiated by x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. Z.; Friedland, W.; Li, W. B.; Li, C. Y.; Oeh, U.; Qiu, R.; Li, J. L.; Hoeschen, C.

    2015-08-01

    Abundant studies have focused on the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the cellular environment with x-ray irradiation. To better understand the physical foundation and to initially study the molecular radiosensitization effect within the nucleus, a simple cell model with detailed DNA structure in the central nucleus was set up and complemented with different distributions of single and multiple GNPs in this work. With the biophysical Monte Carlo simulation code PARTRAC, the radiosensitization effects on both physical quantities and primary biological responses (DNA strand breaks) were simulated. The ratios of results under situations with GNPs compared to those without GNPs were defined as the enhancement factors (EFs). The simulation results show that the presence of GNP can cause a notable enhancement effect on the energy deposition within a few micrometers from the border of GNP. The greatest upshot appears around the border and is mostly dominated by Auger electrons. The enhancement effect on the DNA strand breakage becomes smaller because of the DNA distribution inside the nucleus, and the corresponding EFs are between 1 and 1.5. In the present simulation, multiple GNPs on the nucleus surface, the 60 kVp x-ray spectrum and the diameter of 100 nm are relatively more effective conditions for both physical and biological radiosensitization effects. These results preliminarily indicate that GNP can be a good radiosensitizer in x-ray radiotherapy. Nevertheless, further biological responses (repair process, cell survival, etc) need to be studied to give more accurate evaluation and practical proposal on GNP’s application in clinical treatment.

  6. Garcinol, a Histone Acetyltransferase Inhibitor, Radiosensitizes Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Non-Homologous End Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Torikai, Kohta; Nakano, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway used to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by ionizing radiation (IR), requires chromatin remodeling at DSB sites through the acetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs). However, the effect of compounds with HAT inhibitory activities on the DNA damage response (DDR), including the NHEJ and cell cycle checkpoint, as well as on the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated whether garcinol, a HAT inhibitor found in the rinds of Garcinia indica fruit (called mangosteens), has effects on DDR, and whether it can be used for radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: The following assays were used to examine the effect of garcinol on the inhibition of DSB repair, including the following: a conventional neutral comet assay; a cell-based assay recently developed by us, in which NHEJ repair of DSBs on chromosomal DNA was evaluated; the micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assay; and immunoblotting for autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We assessed the effect of garcinol on the cell cycle checkpoint after IR treatment by analyzing the phosphorylation levels of checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 and histone H3, and by cell cycle profile analysis using flow cytometry. The radiosensitizing effect of garcinol was assessed by a clonogenic survival assay, whereas its effects on apoptosis and senescence were examined by annexin V and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-Gal) staining, respectively. Results: We found that garcinol inhibits DSB repair, including NHEJ, without affecting cell cycle checkpoint. Garcinol radiosensitized A549 lung and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells with dose enhancement ratios (at 10% surviving fraction) of 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. Cellular senescence induced by IR was enhanced by garcinol. Conclusion: These results suggest that garcinol is a radiosensitizer that

  7. DNA polymerase activity in heat killing and hyperthermic radiosensitization of mammalian cells as observed after fractionated heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, J B; Burgman, P; Kampinga, H H; Konings, A W

    1986-03-01

    Possible relations between hyperthermic inactivation of alpha and beta DNA polymerase activity and hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization were investigated. Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) cells and HeLa S3 cells were treated with fractionated doses of hyperthermia. The heating schedules were chosen such that the initial heat treatment resulted in either thermotolerance or thermosensitization (step-down heating) for the second heat treatment. The results show that for DNA polymerase activity and heat radiosensitization (cell survival) no thermotolerance or thermosensitization is observed. Thus hyperthermic cell killing and DNA polymerase activity are not correlated. The correlation of hyperthermic radiosensitization and DNA polymerase activity was substantially less than observed in previous experiments with normotolerant and thermotolerant HeLa S3 cells. We conclude that alpha and beta DNA polymerase inactivation is not always the critical cellular process responsible for hyperthermic cell killing or hyperthermic radiosensitization. Other possible cellular systems that might determine these processes are discussed. PMID:3754338

  8. Individual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsini, Raymond

    1981-01-01

    Paper presented at the 66th Convention of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, October 20, 1980, Baltimore, Maryland, describes individual education based on the principles of Alfred Adler. Defines six advantages of individual education, emphasizing student responsibility, mutual respect, and allowing students to progress at…

  9. Radiosensitivity of CD45RO{sup +} memory and CD45RO{sup {minus}} naive T cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Uzawa, Akiko; Suzuki, Gen; Nakata, Yukiko; Akashi, Makoto; Ohyama, Harumi; Akanuma, Atsuo

    1994-01-01

    Radiosensitivities of various human T-cell subsets were investigated by a proliferation assay and by a single-cell gel electrophoresis assay. Each T-cell subset was purified using a cell sorter and was induced to proliferate by ionomycin and interleukin 2. Unsorted T cells showed biphasic dose-survival curves, indicating the heterogeneity of T cells in terms of radiosensitivity. Purified CD4{sup +} helper and CD8{sup +} killer T cells showed similar biphasic dose-survival curves. Hence both T-cell subsets were composed of cells of different radiosensitivity. The T-cell subsets belonging to different activation stages such as CD45RO{sup +} memory and CD45RO{sup {minus}} naive T cells had different dose-survival curves. The former was more radiosensitive than the latter. The high radiosensitivity of CD45RO{sup +} cells was also demonstrated by single-cell gel electrophoresis after irradiation. This is the first demonstration that a particular cell surface marker on T cells is correlated with greater radiosensitivity. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Health savings accounts and health reimbursement arrangements: assets, account balances, and rollovers, 2006-2011.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, Paul

    2012-01-01

    ASSET LEVELS GROWING: In 2011, there was $12.4 billion in health savings accounts (HSAs) and health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs), spread across 8.4 million accounts, according to data from the 2011 EBRI/MGA Consumer Engagement in Health Care Survey, sponsored by EBRI and Matthew Greenwald & Associates. This is up from 2006, when there were 1.3 million accounts with $873.4 million in assets, and 2010, when 5.4 million accounts held $7.3 billion in assets. AFTER LEVELING OFF, AVERAGE ACCOUNT BALANCES INCREASED: After average account balances leveled off in 2008 and 2009, and fell slightly in 2010, they increased in 2011. In 2006, account balances averaged $696. They increased to $1,320 in 2007, a 90 percent increase. Account balances averaged $1,356 in 2008 and $1,419 in 2009, 3 percent and 5 percent increases, respectively. In 2010, average account balances fell to $1,355, down 4.5 percent from the previous year. In 2011, average account balances increased to $1,470, a 9 percent increase from 2010. TOTAL AND AVERAGE ROLLOVERS INCREASE: After declining to $1,029 in 2010, average rollover amounts increased to $1,208 in 2011. Total assets being rolled over increased as well: $6.7 billion was rolled over in 2011, up from $3.7 billion in 2010. The percentage of individuals without a rollover remained at 13 percent in 2011. HEALTHY BEHAVIOR DOES NOT MEAN HIGHER ACCOUNT BALANCES AND HIGHER ROLLOVERS: Individuals who smoke have more money in their accounts than those who do not smoke. In contrast, obese individuals have less money in their account than the nonobese. There is very little difference in account balances by level of exercise. Very small differences were found in account balances and rollover amounts between individuals who used cost or quality information, compared with those who did not use such information. However, next to no relationship was found between either account balance or rollover amounts and various cost-conscious behaviors. When a difference

  11. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps.

  12. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps. PMID:27411781

  13. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps. PMID:27411781

  14. Rational design of cancer-targeted BSA protein nanoparticles as radiosensitizer to overcome cancer radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyu; Luo, Yi; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy displays curative potential for cervical cancer management, but radioresistance occurs during long-term therapy. To overcome this limitation, tumor-targeted nanotechnology has been proposed to enhance the radiosensitivity of solid tumors. Herein, we used biocompatible bovine serum albumin nanoparticles (BSANPs) as carriers of organic selenocompound (PSeD) with folate (FA) as the targeting ligand to fabricate a cancer-targeted nanosystem. The combination of PSeD and BSANPs endowed the nanosystem with higher light absorption and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation owing to their properties of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect, heavy metal effect, high refractive index and nanoparticulate interfacial effect. The combined treatment drastically increased the ROS overproduction, VEGF/VEGFR2 inactivation and inhibition of XRCC-1-mediated repair of DNA damage, thus triggering G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the utility of FA-BSANPs as a promising radiosensitizer to improve cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25314331

  15. Radiosensitivity of chromosomes in two successive mitotic cycles of human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Luchnik, N.V.; Poryadkova, N.A.

    1988-11-01

    A culture of human lymphocytes was irradiated with /gamma/-quanta in a dose of 0.5 Gy with different ratios of cells in first (M1) and second (M2) mitotic cycle and the frequency of aberrations induced at stage G2 was analyzed. With increase in interval of time between the start of culturing and irradiation, total yield of aberrations increased in a regular way. However, if the M1:M2 ratio is considered, then it turns out that in M2 chromosomes are /approximately/1.5 times more sensitive than in M1: within the limits of each cycle, radiosensitivity is constant and does not depend on its duration. It was established in accordance with data of other authors that 5-bromodeoxyuridine (5-BdU) increases radiosensitivity materially.

  16. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Maier, Patrick; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization. PMID:26784176

  17. Cellular and molecular mechanisms affecting tumour radiosensitivity : An in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Olive Mary

    The response of tumour cells in vitro to ionising radiation can, to a certain extent, predict the response of tumours to various radiotherapy treatment modalities. This thesis considers some of the factors known to be involved in the radiation response of human tumour cells in vitro. These parameters include radiation-induced cell-cycle perturbations, apoptosis and DNA damage repair. A panel of eight human tumour cell lines with markedly differing radiosensitivities were assessed in order to determine the key factors governing their radiation response. A wide range of doses spanning both the low dose region (0-2 Gy and 0-5 Gy) and the clinically relevant region (1-4 Gy) were used to determine whether differences in responses could distinguish cells which were radiosensitive or resistant. Ionising radiation produced a cell cycle delay in all cell lines in one or both of the cellular checkpoints. A Gl/S delay was detected in those cell lines that expressed wild-type p53, and the duration of this delay appeared to be directly related to the level of constitutive protein. p53 protein stabilisation was observed after 4 h, even at doses of 0-2 Gy, although a Gl/S delay was only detectable at higher doses. There was no direct relationship between p53 status and survival although wild-type p53 expression was more prevalent in the radiosensitive cell lines (3/4 sensitives are wild-type versus 2/4 resistants). A G2/M delay could only be detected at doses of > 1 Gy. This delay appeared to be dose independent in the resistant cell lines, suggesting a threshold dose of IGy, above which no further effect is observed. A radiation-induced reduction of cyclin B1 protein was observed in all cell lines implicating this protein in the induction of a G2/M delay. The duration of G2/M delay was significantly longer in the radiosensitive cell lines at 4 Gy (7-20 h versus 4-6 h at 4 Gy). The proportion of cells that exited the G2/M block and re-entered GO/G1 phase was also significantly

  18. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Patrick; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization. PMID:26784176

  19. Differential Radiosensitizing Potential of Temozolomide in MGMT Promoter Methylated Glioblastoma Multiforme Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nifterik, Krista A. van; Berg, Jaap van den; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lafleur, M. Vincent M.; Leenstra, Sieger; Slotman, Ben J.; Hulsebos, Theo J.M.; Sminia, Peter

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the radiosensitizing potential of temozolomide (TMZ) for human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines using single-dose and fractionated {gamma}-irradiation. Methods and Materials: Three genetically characterized human GBM cell lines (AMC-3046, VU-109, and VU-122) were exposed to various single (0-6 Gy) and daily fractionated doses (2 Gy per fraction) of {gamma}-irradiation. Repeated TMZ doses were given before and concurrent with irradiation treatment. Immediately plated clonogenic cell-survival curves were determined for both the single-dose and the fractionated irradiation experiments. To establish the net effect of clonogenic cell survival and cell proliferation, growth curves were determined, expressed as the number of surviving cells. Results: All three cell lines showed MGMT promoter methylation, lacked MGMT protein expression, and were sensitive to TMZ. The isotoxic TMZ concentrations used were in a clinically feasible range of 10 {mu}mol/L (AMC-3046), 3 {mu}mol/L (VU-109), and 2.5 {mu}mol/L (VU-122). Temozolomide was able to radiosensitize two cell lines (AMC 3046 and VU-122) using single-dose irradiation. A reduction in the number of surviving cells after treatment with the combination of TMZ and fractionated irradiation was seen in all three cell lines, but only AMC 3046 showed a radiosensitizing effect. Conclusions: This study on TMZ-sensitive GBM cell lines shows that TMZ can act as a radiosensitizer and is at least additive to {gamma}-irradiation. Enhancement of the radiation response by TMZ seems to be independent of the epigenetically silenced MGMT gen000.

  20. EGFRvIII does not affect radiosensitivity with or without gefitinib treatment in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Struve, Nina; Riedel, Matthias; Schulte, Alexander; Rieckmann, Thorsten; Grob, Tobias J.; Gal, Andreas; Rothkamm, Kai; Lamszus, Katrin; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Kriegs, Malte

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas (GBM) are often characterized by an elevated expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII). We used GBM cell lines with native EGFRvIII expression to determine whether this EGFR variant affects radiosensitivity with or without EGFR targeting. Methods Experiments were performed with GBM cell lines lacking (LN229, U87MG, U251, CAS-1) or endogenously expressing EGFRvIII (BS153, DKMG). The two latter cell lines were also used to establish sublines with a low (−) or a high proportion (+) of cells expressing EGFRvIII. EGFR signaling and the cell cycle were analyzed using Western blot and flow cytometry; cell survival was assessed by colony forming assay and double-strand break repair capacity by immunofluorescence. Results DKMG and BS153 parental cells with heterogeneous EGFRvIII expression were clearly more radiosensitive compared to other GBM cell lines without EGFRvIII expression. However, no significant difference was observed in cell proliferation, clonogenicity or radiosensitivity between the EGFRvIII− and + sublines derived from DKMG and BS153 parental cells. Expression of EGFRvIII was associated with decreased DSB repair capacity for BS153 but not for DKMG cells. The effects of EGFR targeting by gefitinib alone or in combination with irradiation were also found not to depend on EGFRvIII expression. Gefitinib was only observed to influence the proliferation of EGFRvIII− BS153 cells. Conclusion The data indicate that EGFRvIII does not alter radiosensitivity with or without anti-EGFR treatment. PMID:26418954

  1. HAP1 gene expression is associated with radiosensitivity in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Jun-ying; Yin, Li; Wu, Jian-zhong; Guo, Wen-jie; Wu, Jian-feng; Chen, Meng; Xia, You-you; Tang, Jin-hai; Ma, Yong-chao; He, Xia

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Overexpression of HAP1 gene promotes apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. • HAP1 reduces tumor volume in nude mice xenograft models after irradiation. • HAP1 increases radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells in vitro and vivo. - Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between huntingtin-associated protein1 (HAP1) gene and radiation therapy of breast cancer cells. Methods: HAP1 gene was transfected into breast cancer MCF-7 cells, which was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis (qRT-PCR) and Western blot in vitro. The changes of cell radiosensitivity were assessed by colony formation assay. Apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. The expressions of two radiation-induced genes were evaluated by Western blot. Tumor growth was investigated in nude mice xenograft models in vivo. Results: Our data showed that HAP1 gene expression was significantly increased in HAP1-transfected MCF-7 cells in comparison with the parental cells or negative control cells. The survival rate in MCF-7/HAP1 cells was significantly decreased after irradiation (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy), compared to cells in MCF-7 and MCF-7/Pb groups in vitro. HAP1 gene increased apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. Additionally, the tumor volume and weight in MCF-7/HAP1 + RT group were observably lower than in MCF-7/HAP1 group and MCF-7/Pb + RT group. Conclusion: The present study indicated that HAP1 gene expression was related to the radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells and may play an important role in the regulation of cellular radiosensitivity.

  2. Targeting radiosensitizers to DNA by attachment of an intercalating group: Nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, D.S.; Panicucci, R.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M. )

    1991-07-01

    The nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridine series of compounds (NLP-1, 2, and 3) were synthesized under the assumption that it should be possible to enhance the molar efficiency of 2-nitroimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and cytotoxins by targeting them to their likely site of action, DNA. The targeting group chosen was the phenanthridine moiety, the major component of the classical DNA intercalating compound, ethidium bromide. The sole difference between the compounds is the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the nitroimidazole to the phenanthridine. The phenanthridine group with a three-carbon side chain, P-1, was also synthesized to allow studies on the effect of the targeting group by itself. The ability of the compounds to bind to DNA is inversely proportional to their linker chain length with binding constant values ranging from approximately 1 {times} 10(5) mol-1 for NLP-2 to 6 {times} 10(5) mol-1 for NLP-3. The NLP compounds show selective toxicity to hypoxic cells at 37 degrees C at external drug concentrations 10-40 times lower than would be required for untargeted 2-nitroimidazoles such as misonidazole in vitro. Toxicity to both hypoxic and aerobic cells is dependent on the linker chain: the shorter the chain, the greater the toxicity. In addition, the NLP compounds radiosensitize hypoxic cells at external drug concentrations as low as 0.05 mM with almost the full oxygen effect being observed at a concentration of 0.5 mM. These concentrations are 10-100 times lower than would be required for similar radiosensitization using misonidazole. Radiosensitizing ability is independent of linker chain length. The present compounds represent prototypes for further studies of the efficacy and mechanism of action of 2-nitroimidazoles targeted to DNA by linkage to an intercalating group.

  3. Andrographolide radiosensitizes human esophageal cancer cell line ECA109 to radiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z-M; Kang, Y-H; Yang, X; Wang, J-F; Zhang, Q; Yang, B-X; Zhao, K-L; Xu, L-P; Yang, L-P; Ma, J-X; Huang, G-H; Cai, J; Sun, X-C

    2016-01-01

    To explore the radiosensitivity of andrographolide on esophageal cancer cell line ECA109. The inhibition effects of andrographolide were measured using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Clonogenic survival assay was used to evaluate the effects of andrographolide on the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer cells. Immunofluorescence was employed to examine Bax expression. The changes in cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assayed using flow cytometry. The expression of NF-κb/Cleaved-Caspase3/Bax/Bcl-2 was measured using Western blot analysis. DNA damage was detected via γ-H2AX foci counting. With a clear dose and time effects, andrographolide was found to inhibit the proliferation of esophageal cell line ECA109. The results of the clonogenic survival assay show that andrographolide could markedly enhance radiosensitivity (P < 0.05) with a sensitizing enhancement ratio of 1.28. Andrographolide caused a dose-dependent increase in Cleaved-Caspase3/Bax protein expression and a decrease in Bcl-2/NF-κb expression. Apoptosis in andrographolide-treated ECA-109 increased significantly compared with the apoptosis in the simple drug and radiation combined with drug groups (P < 0.001; P < 0.05). Moreover, compared with the independent radiation group, the andrographolide combined with radiation group increased the number of DNA double chain breaks. Andrographolide can increase the radiosensitivity of esophageal cell line ECA109. This result may be associated with the decrease in the NF-κb level and the induced apoptosis of esophageal cancer cells. PMID:25059546

  4. Cell-Specific Radiosensitization by Gold Nanoparticles at Megavoltage Radiation Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Suneil; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Muir, Mark F.; Dickson, Glenn R.; Prise, Kevin M.; Currell, Fred J.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hirst, David G.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to cause sensitization with kilovoltage (kV) radiation. Differences in the absorption coefficient between gold and soft tissue, as a function of photon energy, predict that maximum enhancement should occur in the kilovoltage (kV) range, with almost no enhancement at megavoltage (MV) energies. Recent studies have shown that GNPs are not biologically inert, causing oxidative stress and even cell death, suggesting a possible biological mechanism for sensitization. The purpose of this study was to assess GNP radiosensitization at clinically relevant MV X-ray energies. Methods and Materials: Cellular uptake, intracellular localization, and cytotoxicity of GNPs were assessed in normal L132, prostate cancer DU145, and breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Radiosensitization was measured by clonogenic survival at kV and MV photon energies and MV electron energies. Intracellular DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and DNA repair were determined and GNP chemosensitization was assessed using the radiomimetic agent bleomycin. Results: GNP uptake occurred in all cell lines and was greatest in MDA-MB-231 cells with nanoparticles accumulating in cytoplasmic lysosomes. In MDA-MB-231 cells, radiation sensitizer enhancement ratios (SERs) of 1.41, 1.29, and 1.16 were achieved using 160 kVp, 6 MV, and 15 MV X-ray energies, respectively. No significant effect was observed in L132 or DU145 cells at kV or MV energies (SER 0.97-1.08). GNP exposure did not increase radiation-induced DSB formation or inhibit DNA repair; however, GNP chemosensitization was observed in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with bleomycin (SER 1.38). Conclusions: We have demonstrated radiosensitization in MDA-MB-231 cells at MV X-ray energies. The sensitization was cell-specific with comparable effects at kV and MV energies, no increase in DSB formation, and GNP chemopotentiation with bleomycin, suggesting a possible biological mechanism of radiosensitization.

  5. Rosiglitazone enhances the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Shu-Jun; Hsaio, Ching-Hui; Tseng, Ho-Hsing; Su, Yu-Han; Shih, Wen-Ling; Lee, Jeng-Woei; Chuah, Jennifer Qiu-Yu

    2010-04-09

    Combined-modality treatment has improved the outcome in cases of various solid tumors, and radiosensitizers are used to enhance the radiotherapeutic efficiency. Rosiglitazone, a synthetic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {gamma} used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce tumor growth and metastasis in human cancer cells, and may have the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer in radiotherapy for human colorectal cancer cells. In this study, rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of p53-wild type HCT116 cells but not p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Interestingly, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiosensitivity in p53-mutant HT-29 cells but not HCT116 cells, and prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and enhanced radiation-induced cell growth inhibition in HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with rosiglitazone also suppressed radiation-induced H2AX phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and AKT activation for cell survival; on the contrary, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiation-induced caspase-8, -9, and -3 activation and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells. In addition, pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk, attenuated the levels of caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in radiation-exposed cancer cells in combination with rosiglitazone pretreatment. Our results provide proof for the first time that rosiglitazone suppresses radiation-induced survival signals and DNA damage response, and enhances the radiation-induced apoptosis signaling cascade. These findings can assist in the development of rosiglitazone as a novel radiosensitizer.

  6. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and γH2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  7. The toxic effects, GSH depletion and radiosensitivity by BSO on retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xianjin Yi; Li Ding; Yizun Jin; Chuo Ni; Wenji Wang )

    1994-05-15

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignant tumor in children. Previous investigations have reported that buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) can deplete intracellular glutathione (GSH) by specific inhibition and increase cellular radiosensitivity. The toxic effects, GSH depletion and radiosensitivity effects of BSO on retinoblastoma cells are reported in this paper. GSH content of retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, So-Rb50 and retinoblastoma xenograft is 2.7 [+-] 1.3 X 1.0[sup [minus]12] mmol/cell, 1.4 [+-] 0.2 X 1.0[sup [minus]12] mmol/cell, and 2.8 [+-] 1.2 [mu]mol/g, respectively. The ID[sub 50] of BSO on Y-79 and So-Rb50 in air for 3 h exposure is 2.5 mM and 0.2 mM, respectively. GSH depletion by 0.1 mM BSO for 24 h on Y-79 cells and 0.01 mM BSO for 24 h on So-Rb50 cells is 16.35%, and 4.7% of control. GSH depletion in tumor and other organ tissues in retinoblastoma-bearing nude mice after BSO administration is differential. GSH depletion after BSO exposure in Y-79 cells in vitro decreases the Do value of retinoblastoma cells. The SER of 0.01 mM and 0.05 mM BSO for 24 h under hypoxic conditions is 1.21 and 1.36, respectively. Based on these observations, the authors conclude that BSO toxicity on retinoblastoma cells depends on the characteristics of the cell line and that BSO can increase hypoxic retinoblastoma cells' radiosensitivity in vitro. Further study of BSO radiosensitization on retinoblastoma in vivo using nude mouse xenografts is needed. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Cytosine Deaminase/5-Fluorocytosine Exposure Induces Bystander and Radiosensitization Effects in Hypoxic Glioblastoma Cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jennifer K.; Hu, Lily J.; Wang Dongfang; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: dennisdeen@juno.com

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is limited by therapeutic ratio; therefore, successful therapy must be specifically cytotoxic to cancer cells. Hypoxic cells are ubiquitous in GBM, and resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and, thus, are logical targets for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) enzyme/prodrug treatment induced a bystander effect (BE) and/or radiosensitization in hypoxic GBM cells. Methods and Materials: We stably transfected cells with a gene construct consisting of the SV40 minimal promoter, nine copies of a hypoxia-responsive element, and the yeast CD gene. During hypoxia, a hypoxia-responsive element regulates expression of the CD gene and facilitates the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil, a highly toxic antimetabolite. We used colony-forming efficiency (CFE) and immunofluorescence assays to assess for BE in co-cultures of CD-expressing clone cells and parent, pNeo- or green fluorescent protein-stably transfected GBM cells. We also investigated the radiosensitivity of CD clone cells treated with 5-FC under hypoxic conditions, and we used flow cytometry to investigate treatment-induced cell cycle changes. Results: Both a large BE and radiosensitization occurred in GBM cells under hypoxic conditions. The magnitude of the BE depended on the number of transfected cells producing CD, the functionality of the CD, the administered concentration of 5-FC, and the sensitivity of cell type to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: Hypoxia-inducible CD/5-FC therapy in combination with radiation therapy shows both a pronounced BE and a radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic conditions.

  9. [Radioresistance parameters in head and neck cancers and methods to radiosensitize].

    PubMed

    Biau, J; Chautard, E; Miroir, J; Lapeyre, M

    2015-08-01

    Head and neck cancers have been widely studied concerning their sensitivity to radiation therapy. Several parameters affect tumour response to radiation therapy. Some parameters are linked to the tumour. Large or invasive tumours, localization, such as oral cavity or adenopathy, are factors of radioresistance. Others parameters are linked to the patients themselves. Tobacco intoxication during radiotherapy and a low hemoglobin level contribute to radioresistance. More recently, a positive human papilloma virus (HPV) status has been reported to positively affect radiosensitivity. Finally, other parameters are related to tumour biology. Hypoxia, intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumour cells, tumour differentiation and repopulation (provided by Ki-67 index or EGFR level) are components of radiosensitivity. Currently, concurrent chemoradiotherapy is one of the gold standard treatments to overcome clinical outcome of locally advanced head and neck cancer. This combination increases locoregional control and survival. Taxane-based induction chemotherapy can also be an alternative. Another validated approach is the association of radiotherapy with cetuximab (EGFR targeting) but only one randomized study has been published. Fractionation modifications, especially hyperfractionation, have given positive results on both tumour control and survival. Strategies targeting hypoxia improve locoregional control but have less clinical impact. PMID:26119219

  10. Radiosensitizing effect of zinc oxide and silica nanocomposites on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Generalov, Roman; Kuan, Woo Boon; Chen, Wei; Kristensen, Solveig; Juzenas, Petras

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticulates responsive to X-rays offer increased efficacy of radiation therapy. However, successful demonstrations of such nanoparticle use are limited so far due to lack of significant radiosensitizing effects or poor nanoparticle stability in a biological system. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is the most promising biocompatible material for medicinal applications. In this paper, we report preparation and characterization of scintillating ZnO/SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles. The ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles absorb ultraviolet (UV) radiation (below 360nm) and emit green fluorescence (400-750nm, maximum 550nm). Under X-ray irradiation (200kVp), the nanoparticles scintillate emitting luminescence in the region 350-700nm (maximum 420nm). The synthesized ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles are stable in a biologically relevant environment (water and cell growth medium). The potential of the ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles for radiosensitization is demonstrated in human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines (LNCaP and Du145). The nanoparticles enhance radiation-induced reduction in cell survival about 2-fold for LNCaP and 1.5-fold for Du145 cells. Radiosensitizing effect can be attributed to X-ray-induced radiocatalysis by the nanoparticles. PMID:25829130

  11. Radiosensitization of Human Colorectal Cancer Cells by MLN4924: An Inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wan, Juefeng; Zhu, Ji; Li, Guichao; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer and the combination of radiation with capecitabine has been shown to achieve only 15% to 25% of pathologic complete response. This study aimed to investigate the effect of MLN4924, a potent small molecule inhibitor of SKP1-Cullin-F-box proteins E3 ubiquitin ligases, as a novel radiosensitizing agent in colorectal cancer cells. Indeed, we found that MLN4924 effectively sensitized colorectal cancer cells to radiation with a sensitivity-enhancement ratio of 1.61 for HT-29 cells and 1.35 for HCT-116 cells. Mechanistically, MLN4924 significantly enhanced radiation-induced G2/M arrest, apoptosis, and DNA damage response through accumulation of p27. Knockdown of p27 via small interfering RNA partially inhibited MLN4924-induced radiosensitization, indicating a causal role played by p27. Our study suggested that MLN4924 could be further developed as a novel radiosensitizing agent against colorectal cancer. PMID:26082455

  12. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D/sub 0/ values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F/sub 1/+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/W/sup v/ mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bg/sup J//bg/sup J/, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the backs of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosenitive than those localized in the skin. D/sup 0/ value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  13. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine increase the radiosensitivity of human esophageal squamous cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan; Wang, Cong; Guan, Shanghui; Liu, Yuan; Han, Lihui; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase is a type of reverse transcriptase that is overexpressed in almost all human tumor cells, but not in normal tissues, which provides an opportunity for radiosensitization targeting telomerase. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine are reverse transcriptase inhibitors that have been applied in clinical practice for several years. We sought to explore the radiosensitization effect of these three drugs on human esophageal cancer cell lines. Eca109 and Eca9706 cells were treated with zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine for 48 h before irradiation was administered. Samples were collected 1 h after irradiation. Clonal efficiency assay was used to evaluate the effect of the combination of these drugs with radiation doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy. DNA damage was measured by comet assay. Telomerase activity (TA) and relative telomere length (TL) were detected and evaluated by real-time PCR. Apoptosis rates were assessed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that all the drugs tested sensitized the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines to radiation through an increase in radiation-induced DNA damage and cell apoptosis, deregulation of TA and decreasing the shortened TL caused by radiation. Each of the drugs investigated (zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine) could be used for sensitizing human esophageal cancer cell lines to radiation. Consequently, the present study supports the potential of these three drugs as therapeutic agents for the radiosensitization of esophageal squamous cell cancer. PMID:27220342

  14. Novel chemical enhancers of heat shock increase thermal radiosensitization through a mitotic catastrophe pathway.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Konjeti R; Sonar, Vijayakumar N; Muthusamy, Venkatraj; Sasi, Soumya; Laszlo, Andrei; Sawani, Jamil; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Bristow, Robert G; Borrelli, Michael J; Crooks, Peter A; Lepock, James R; Roti Roti, Joseph L; Freeman, Michael L

    2007-01-15

    Radiation therapy combined with adjuvant hyperthermia has the potential to provide outstanding local-regional control for refractory disease. However, achieving therapeutic thermal dose can be problematic. In the current investigation, we used a chemistry-driven approach with the goal of designing and synthesizing novel small molecules that could function as thermal radiosensitizers. (Z)-(+/-)-2-(1-Benzenesulfonylindol-3-ylmethylene)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octan-3-ol was identified as a compound that could lower the threshold for Hsf1 activation and thermal sensitivity. Enhanced thermal sensitivity was associated with significant thermal radiosensitization. We established the structural requirements for activity: the presence of an N-benzenesulfonylindole or N-benzylindole moiety linked at the indolic 3-position to a 2-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octan-3-ol) or 2-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octan-3-one) moiety. These small molecules functioned by exploiting the underlying biophysical events responsible for thermal sensitization. Thermal radiosensitization was characterized biochemically and found to include loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, followed by mitotic catastrophe. These studies identified a novel series of small molecules that represent a promising tool for the treatment of recurrent tumors by ionizing radiation. PMID:17234780

  15. Radiosensitizing effect of medroxyprogesterone acetate on endometrial cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.; Husslein, P.; Michalica, W.; Wagenbichler, P.

    1984-09-15

    From clinical experience it is known that medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) can increase the radiosensitivity of adenocarcinomas of the corpus uteri. This study investigates this phenomenon in vitro. Primary explants of highly differentiated adenocarcinomas were irradiated with or without pretreatment with MPA and compared with an untreated control group and to a group treated with MPA only. Cell culture itself was performed on an agarose medium in order to prevent overgrowth by fibroblasts. Untreated samples formed 43 +/- 5 clones, explants treated with MPA only produced 39 +/- 5 clones, a difference which was not statistically different; samples irradiated without pretreatment produced 16 +/- 8 and samples after combined treatment 9 +/- 3 clones (all values means +/- SD). This numeric reduction of cell growth through preirradiation treatment with MPA was statistically significant. The effect of MPA as a radiosensitizer may be due to its potential to prolong the radiosensitive G2 phase of the cell cycle. This effect of MPA may be useful also in other hormone-dependent tumors.

  16. Metabolic potentiation of the radiosensitization of hypoxic bacterial cells afforded by nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R F; Patel, K B

    1983-03-01

    Prolonged preirradiation incubation of nitroaromatic radiosensitizers with Escherichia coli cells has been found to increase the degree of radiosensitization of the cells in anoxia. Studies with E. coli strains which differ in their nitroreductase activity indicate that the increase in sensitization arises from the action of metabolites produced by the nitroreductase system of the cell. The metabolites alone appear to decrease the extrapolation number of irradiated hypoxic cells and when combined with the parent compound give a biphasic survival curve. The combination of misonidazole (1 mmole dm-3) and its metabolites (1 mmole dm-3) gave initial and final enhancement ratios of 2.4 and 1.4, respectively. The final enhancement ratio is that expected for 1 mmole dm-3 misonidazole alone, whereas the initial enhancement ratio indicates that the metabolites potentiate the action of misonidazole. The preirradiation incubation effect is removed by dithiothreitol at concentrations which do not affect the radiosensitization level of the nitroaromatic sensitizer. This result indicates that the active metabolite probably depletes a certain amount of the free-thiol compounds inside the cell which assist in the repair of radiation-induced damage. PMID:6344127

  17. STAT3 Serine 727 Phosphorylation: A Relevant Target to Radiosensitize Human Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ouédraogo, Zangbéwendé Guy; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Dedieu, Véronique; Biau, Julian; Khalil, Toufic; Raoelfils, Lala Ines; Granzotto, Adeline; Pereira, Bruno; Beaudoin, Claude; Guissou, Innocent Pierre; Berger, Marc; Morel, Laurent; Chautard, Emmanuel; Verrelle, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of glioma standard treatment. Glioblastomas (GBM), however, display an important radioresistance leading to tumor recurrence. To improve patient prognosis, there is a need to radiosensitize GBM cells and to circumvent the mechanisms of resistance caused by interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment. STAT3 has been identified as a therapeutic target in glioma because of its involvement in mechanisms sustaining tumor escape to both standard treatment and immune control. Here, we studied the role of STAT3 activation on tyrosine 705 (Y705) and serine 727 (S727) in glioma radioresistance. This study explored STAT3 phosphorylation on Y705 (pSTAT3-Y705) and S727 (pSTAT3-S727) in glioma cell lines and in clinical samples. Radiosensitizing effect of STAT3 activation down-modulation by Gö6976 was explored. In a panel of 15 human glioma cell lines, we found that the level of pSTAT3-S727 was correlated to intrinsic radioresistance. Moreover, treating GBM cells with Gö6976 resulted in a highly significant radiosensitization associated to a concomitant pSTAT3-S727 down-modulation only in GBM cell lines that exhibited no or weak pSTAT3-Y705. We report the constitutive activation of STAT3-S727 in all GBM clinical samples. Targeting pSTAT3-S727 mainly in pSTAT3-Y705-negative GBM could be a relevant approach to improve radiation therapy. PMID:25736961

  18. Lin28-let7 Modulates Radiosensitivity of Human Cancer Cells With Activation of K-Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jee-Sun.; Kim, Jae-Jin; Byun, Ju-Yeon; Kim, In-Ah

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of targeting Lin28-let7 microRNA regulatory network for overcoming the radioresistance of cancer cells having activated K-Ras signaling. Methods and Materials: A549 lung carcinoma cells and ASPC1 pancreatic cancer cells possessing K-RAS mutation were transfected with pre-let7a microRNA or Lin28 siRNA, respectively. Clonogenic assay, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western analysis were performed. The effects of Lin28 on SQ20B cells having wild-type K-RAS, and a normal fibroblast were also assessed. Results: The overexpression of let-7a decreased expression of K-Ras and radiosensitized A549 cells. Inhibition of Lin28, a repressor of let-7, attenuated K-Ras expression and radiosensitized A549 and ASPC1 cells. Neither SQ20B cells expressing wild-type K-RAS nor HDF, the normal human fibroblasts, were radiosensitized by this approach. Conclusions: The Lin28-let7 regulatory network may be a potentially useful therapeutic target for overcoming the radioresistance of human cancers having activated K-Ras signaling.

  19. Holding Accountability to Account. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Holding Accountability to Account: How Scholarship and Experience in Other Fields Inform Exploration of Performance Incentives in Education"--a paper presented at the National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference in February--Richard Rothstein, a research associate at the Economic Policy Institute, argues educational…

  20. Accountability, California Style: Counting or Accounting?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Michael; Higgins, Jennifer; Raczek, Anastasia

    2004-01-01

    Across the nation and at nearly all levels of our educational system, efforts to hold schools accountable for student learning dominate strategies for improving the quality of education. At both the national and state level, student testing stands at the center of educational accountability programs, such that schools are effectively held…

  1. International Accounting and the Accounting Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laribee, Stephen F.

    The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) has been instrumental in internationalizing the accounting curriculum by means of accreditation requirements and standards. Colleges and universities have met the AACSB requirements either by providing separate international accounting courses or by integrating international topics…

  2. Individualizing Medicare.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds. PMID:10915458

  3. A Harmonious Accounting Duo?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schapperle, Robert F.; Hardiman, Patrick F.

    1992-01-01

    Accountants have urged "harmonization" of standards between the Governmental Accounting Standards Board and the Financial Accounting Standards Board, recommending similar reporting of like transactions. However, varying display of similar accounting events does not necessarily indicate disharmony. The potential for problems because of differing…

  4. Seeking genetic signature of radiosensitivity - a novel method for data analysis in case of small sample sizes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of polymorphisms and/or genes responsible for an organism's radiosensitivity increases the knowledge about the cell cycle and the mechanism of the phenomena themselves, possibly providing the researchers with a better understanding of the process of carcinogenesis. Aim The aim of the study was to develop a data analysis strategy capable of discovering the genetic background of radiosensitivity in the case of small sample size studies. Results Among many indirect measures of radiosensitivity known, the level of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations was used in the study. Mathematical modelling allowed the transformation of the yield-time curve of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations into the exponential curve with limited number of parameters, while Gaussian mixture models applied to the distributions of these parameters provided the criteria for mouse strain classification. A detailed comparative analysis of genotypes between the obtained subpopulations of mice followed by functional validation provided a set of candidate polymorphisms that might be related to radiosensitivity. Among 1857 candidate relevant SNPs, that cluster in 28 genes, eight SNPs were detected nonsynonymous (nsSNP) on protein function. Two of them, rs48840878 (gene Msh3) and rs5144199 (gene Cc2d2a), were predicted as having increased probability of a deleterious effect. Additionally, rs48840878 is capable of disordering phosphorylation with 14 PKs. In silico analysis of candidate relevant SNP similarity score distribution among 60 CGD mouse strains allowed for the identification of SEA/GnJ and ZALENDE/EiJ mouse strains (95.26% and 86.53% genetic consistency respectively) as the most similar to radiosensitive subpopulation Conclusions A complete step-by-step strategy for seeking the genetic signature of radiosensitivity in the case of small sample size studies conducted on mouse models was proposed. It is shown that the strategy, which is a combination of

  5. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in paragraph (e) of this section, to the satisfaction of the Commissioner, that the manner in which... section may be a person other than a bank if the person demonstrates to the satisfaction of the... if the following requirements are satisfied: (1) The applicant is a credit union, industrial...

  6. Holding Individuals Accountable and Deterring Money Laundering Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Waters, Maxine [D-CA-43

    2013-10-23

    01/09/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in paragraph (e) of this section, to the satisfaction of the Commissioner, that the manner in which... section may be a person other than a bank if the person demonstrates to the satisfaction of the... to the satisfaction of the Commissioner that it is able to administer the trust in a manner that...

  8. Saving Performance in Individual Development Accounts: Does Marital Status Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Zhan, Min; Sherraden, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Research indicates that marriage has a large effect on reducing the risk of poverty and is associated with a higher probability of attaining affluence over the life course when compared with nonmarriage. Using data from the American Dream Demonstration (N = 2,364), this study compares savings performances of married and unmarried low-income…

  9. Changing Lives through Lifelong Learning Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    As conceived by the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL), Lifelong Learning Accounts (LiLAs[SM]) are employer-matched, portable individual accounts used to finance employee education and training. They provide employees with an affordable means of upgrading their skills and knowledge, while helping to meet the needs of employers and…

  10. Individualized Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    IntelliWeb and IntelliPrint, products from MicroMass Communications, utilize C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), a development and delivery expert systems tool developed at Johnson Space Center. IntelliWeb delivers personalized messages by dynamically creating single web pages or entire web sites based on information provided by each website visitor. IntelliPrint is a product designed to create tailored, individualized messages via printed media. The software uses proprietary technology to generate printed messages that are personally relevant and tailored to meet each individual's needs. Intelliprint is in use in many operations including Brystol-Myers Squibb's personalized newsletter, "Living at Your Best," geared to each recipient based on a health and lifestyle survey taken earlier; and SmithKline Beecham's "Nicorette Committed Quitters Program," in which customized motivational materials support participants in their attempt to quit smoking.

  11. Individual Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Andersen, Ture; Poulsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that hearing loss does not only lead to a reduction of hearing sensitivity. Large individual differences are typically observed among listeners with hearing impairment in a wide range of suprathreshold auditory measures. In many cases, audiometric thresholds cannot fully account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR), held in Nyborg, Denmark, in August 2015. The following collection of papers results from some of the work that was presented and discussed at the symposium. PMID:27566802

  12. NASA Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA is piloting fiscal year (FY) 1997 Accountability Reports, which streamline and upgrade reporting to Congress and the public. The document presents statements by the NASA administrator, and the Chief Financial Officer, followed by an overview of NASA's organizational structure and the planning and budgeting process. The performance of NASA in four strategic enterprises is reviewed: (1) Space Science, (2) Mission to Planet Earth, (3) Human Exploration and Development of Space, and (4) Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology. Those areas which support the strategic enterprises are also reviewed in a section called Crosscutting Processes. For each of the four enterprises, there is discussion about the long term goals, the short term objectives and the accomplishments during FY 1997. The Crosscutting Processes section reviews issues and accomplishments relating to human resources, procurement, information technology, physical resources, financial management, small and disadvantaged businesses, and policy and plans. Following the discussion about the individual areas is Management's Discussion and Analysis, about NASA's financial statements. This is followed by a report by an independent commercial auditor and the financial statements.

  13. Increased Chromosomal Radiosensitivity in Women Carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutations Assessed With the G2 Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ernestos, Beroukas; Nikolaos, Pandis; Koulis, Giannoukakos; Eleni, Rizou; Konstantinos, Beroukas; Alexandra, Giatromanolaki; Michael, Koukourakis

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Several in vitro studies suggest that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers present increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Different assays for the assessment of deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand break repair capacity have been used, but results are rather inconsistent. Given the concerns about the possible risks of breast screening with mammography in mutation carrier women and the potentially damaging effects of radiotherapy, the purpose of this study was to further investigate the radiosensitivity of this population. Methods and Materials: The G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay was used to assess chromosomal breaks in lymphocyte cultures after exposure to 1 Gy. A group of familiar breast cancer patients carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene (n = 15) and a group of healthy mutation carriers (n = 5) were investigated and compared with a reference group of healthy women carrying no mutation (n = 21). Results: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had a significantly higher number of mean chromatid breaks per cell (p = 0.006) and a higher maximum number of breaks (p = 0.0001) as compared with their matched controls. Both healthy carriers and carriers with a cancer history were more radiosensitive than controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.025, respectively). Age was not associated with increased radiosensitivity (p = 0.868). Conclusions: Our results indicate that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers show enhanced radiosensitivity, presumably because of the involvement of the BRCA genes in deoxyribonucleic acid repair and cell cycle control mechanisms.

  14. Down-regulation of GnT-V enhances nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell CNE-2 radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuo, Enqing; He, Jiao; Wei, Ting; Zhu, Weiliang; Meng, Hui; Li, Yan; Guo, Linlang; Zhang, Jian

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First investigated the role of GnT-V on the radiosensitivity of NPC cells in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanisms of the changing radiosensitivity were also investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study, more than one experiment methods were used to investigate a problem. -- Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of GnT-V on radiosensitivity in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) both in vitro and in vivo, and the possible mechanism. The GnT-V stably suppressed cell line CNE-2 GnT-V/2224 was constructed from CNE-2 by transfection. The radiosensitivity of the cells was studied by CCK-8 assay, flow-cytometry, caspases-3 activity analysis and tumor xenografts model. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Bcl-xl was analyzed with or without radiation. The results showed that down-regulation of GnT-V enhanced CNE-2 radiosensitivity. The underlying mechanisms may be link to the cell cycle G2-M arrest and the reduction of Bcl-2/Bax ratio. The results suggest that GnT-V may be a potential target for predicting NPC response to radiotherapy.

  15. Inhibition of PARP1-dependent end-joining contributes to Olaparib-mediated radiosensitization in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kötter, Annika; Cornils, Kerstin; Borgmann, Kerstin; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Mansour, Wael Y

    2014-12-01

    Poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase inhibitors (PARPi) are considered to be optimal tools for specifically enhancing radiosensitivity. This effect has been shown to be replication-dependent and more profound in HR-deficient tumors. Here, we present a new mode of PARPi-mediated radiosensitization which was observed in four out of six HR-proficient tumor cell lines (responders) investigated, but not in normal cells. This effect is replication-independent, as the radiosensitization remained unaffected following the inhibition of replication using aphidicolin. We showed that responders are radiosensitized by Olaparib because their DSB-repair is switched to PARP1-dependent end-joining (PARP1-EJ), as evident by (i) the significant increase in the number of residual γH2AX foci following irradiation with 3Gy and treatment with Olaparib, (ii) the enhanced enrichment of PARP1 at the chromatin after 3Gy and (iii) the inhibition of end-joining activity measured by a specific reporter substrate upon Olaparib treatment. This is the first study which directly demonstrates the switch to PARP1-EJ in tumor cells and its contribution to the response to Olaparib as a radiosensitizer, findings which could widen the scope of application of PARPi in tumor therapy. PMID:25028150

  16. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of DNA ligase 1 and non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility and radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tian, H; He, X; Yin, L; Guo, W J; Xia, Y Y; Jiang, Z X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in DNA ligase 1 (LIG1) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) susceptibility and radiosensitivity in a Chinese population. This was a case-control study that included 352 NSCLC patients and 448 healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was conducted to detect HaeIII polymorphisms in exon 6 of the LIG1 gene in this popula-tion. This information was used to observe the effects of radiation in pa-tients with different genotypes in order to determine the genotypes as-sociated with radiosensitivity. The CC genotype and C allele frequency were significantly higher in the NSCLC group than in the control group (P = 0.012 and P = 0.023, respectively). The relative risk of experienc-ing NSCLC was 2.55 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.98] for CC homozygous patients and 0.87 (95%CI, 0.46-1.88) for AA homozygous patients. Analysis of LIG1 genetic polymorphisms and radiosensitiv-ity of NSCLC patients showed that AA homozygous patients were sig-nificantly more radiosensitive than the control group (AA vs AC, P = 0.014; AA vs CC, P < 0.001; AC vs CC, P = 0.023). Therefore, the LIG1 CC genotype was associated with susceptibility to NSCLC, and the AA genotype demonstrated increased radiosensitivity compared to the AC and CC genotypes. PMID:26125914

  17. Radiosensitization by SAHA in Experimental Colorectal Carcinoma Models-In Vivo Effects and Relevance of Histone Acetylation Status

    SciTech Connect

    Folkvord, Sigurd; Ree, Anne Hansen; Furre, Torbjorn; Halvorsen, Thomas; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors are being evaluated as antitumor agents in ongoing clinical trials, and promising preclinical results, combined with favorable toxicity profiles, have rendered the drugs as interesting candidates for combination with other treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radiosensitizing properties of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and the possible requirement of histone hyperacetylation at radiation exposure. Methods and materials: Radiosensitization by SAHA was assessed in a colorectal carcinoma cell line and in two colorectal xenograft models by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Histone acetylation status at radiation exposure was evaluated by Western blot. Results: In vitro, radiosensitization was demonstrated when cells were preincubated with SAHA, and, in the xenografts, tumor growth was delayed when the mice were treated with fractionated radiation combined with daily SAHA injections compared with radiation alone. Surprisingly, the SAHA-dependent growth delay was still present when radiation was delivered at restored baseline acetylation levels compared with maximal histone hyperacetylation. Conclusion: SAHA was an effective radiosensitizer in experimental colorectal carcinoma models, suggesting that histone deacetylase inhibition might constitute a valuable supplement to current multimodal treatment strategies in rectal cancer. The presence of histone hyperacetylation at radiation was not required to obtain an increased radiation response, questioning the validity of using histone hyperacetylation as a molecular marker for radiosensitivity.

  18. Accountability: A Mosaic Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Teri

    1977-01-01

    The problems involved in definition, implementation and control of accountability processes are discussed. It is stated that "...emotional involvement in accountability is one of the most difficult aspects to deal with, the chief emotion being fear". (Author/RW)

  19. LMAL Accounting Office 1936

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Accounting Office: The Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory's accounting office, 1936, with photographs of the Wright brothers on the wall. Although the Lab was named after Samuel P. Langley, most of the NACA staff held the Wrights as their heroes.

  20. Managerial Accounting. Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plachta, Leonard E.

    This self-instructional study guide is part of the materials for a college-level programmed course in managerial accounting. The study guide is intended for use by students in conjuction with a separate textbook, Horngren's "Accounting for Management Control: An Introduction," and a workbook, Curry's "Student Guide to Accounting for Management…

  1. The Accounting Capstone Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrod, Henry; Norris, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Capstone courses in accounting programs bring students experiences integrating across the curriculum (University of Washington, 2005) and offer unique (Sanyal, 2003) and transformative experiences (Sill, Harward, & Cooper, 2009). Students take many accounting courses without preparing complete sets of financial statements. Accountants not only…

  2. Accounting & Computing Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avani, Nathan T.; And Others

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching a competency-based accounting and computing course that is designed to prepare students for employability in the following occupational areas: inventory control clerk, invoice clerk, payroll clerk, traffic clerk, general ledger bookkeeper, accounting clerk, account information clerk,…

  3. Intelligent Accountability in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Onora

    2013-01-01

    Systems of accountability are "second order" ways of using evidence of the standard to which "first order" tasks are carried out for a great variety of purposes. However, more accountability is not always better, and processes of holding to account can impose high costs without securing substantial benefits. At their worst,…

  4. Accounting Education in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Karen F.; Reed, Ronald O.; Greiman, Janel

    2011-01-01

    Almost on a daily basis new accounting rules and laws are put into use, creating information that must be known and learned by the accounting faculty and then introduced to and understood by the accounting student. Even with the 150 hours of education now required for CPA licensure, it is impossible to teach and learn all there is to learn. Over…

  5. Ethical accountability in the cyberspace

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, K.L.; Strohmaier, M.

    1994-12-31

    Conformance with ethical behavior consists of adherence to the standards of conduct for any given group. When standards are not formalized, there can exist ethical disparity from which many diverse problems can result. These problems are especially evident in the cyberspace. Within the cyberspace, the {open_quote}given group{close_quote} is culturally and ethnically diverse. As such, it $8 difficult to hold the individuals to a nonformalized set of standards. Several important issues need to be addressed in order to balance each individual`s dual needs for freedom of expression and protection in the cyberspace. These issues include development of formalized standards, a general protocol for cross- cultural interaction, and ethical accountability.

  6. What is accountability in health care?

    PubMed

    Emanuel, E J; Emanuel, L L

    1996-01-15

    Accountability has become a major issue in health care. Accountability entails the procedures and processes by which one party justifies and takes responsibility for its activities. The concept of accountability contains three essential components: 1) the loci of accountability--health care consists of at least 11 different parties that can be held accountable or hold others accountable; 2) the domains of accountability--in health care, parties can be held accountable for as many as six activities: professional competence, legal and ethical conduct, financial performance, adequacy of access, public health promotion, and community benefit; and 3) the procedures of accountability, including formal and informal procedures for evaluating compliance with domains and for disseminating the evaluation and responses by the accountable parties. Different models of accountability stress different domains, evaluative criteria, loci, and procedures. We characterize and compare three dominant models of accountability: 1) the professional model, in which the individual physician and patient participate in shared decision making and physicians are held accountable to professional colleagues and to patients; 2) the economic model, in which the market is brought to bear in health care and accountability is mediated through consumer choice of providers; and 3) the political model, in which physicians and patients interact as citizen-members within a community and in which physicians are accountable to a governing board elected from the members of the community, such as the board of a managed care plan. We argue that no single model of accountability is appropriate to health care. Instead, we advocate a stratified model of accountability in which the professional model guides the physician-patient relationship, the political model operates within managed care plans and other integrated health delivery networks, and the economic and political models operate in the relations between

  7. Radiosensitivity in HeLa cervical cancer cells overexpressing glutathione S-transferase π 1

    PubMed Central

    YANG, LIANG; LIU, REN; MA, HONG-BIN; YING, MING-ZHEN; WANG, YA-JIE

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the effect of overexpressed exogenous glutathione S-transferase π 1 (GSTP1) gene on the radiosensitivity of the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line and conduct a preliminarily investigation into the underlying mechanisms of the effect. The full-length sequence of human GSTP1 was obtained by performing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers based on the GenBank sequence of GSTP1. Subsequently, the gene was cloned into a recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid, and the resulting construct was confirmed by restriction analysis and DNA sequencing. A HeLa cell line that was stably expressing high levels of GSTP1 was obtained through stable transfection of the constructed plasmids using lipofectamine and screening for G418 resistance, as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR. Using the transfected HeLa cells, a colony formation assay was conducted to detect the influence of GSTP1 overexpression on the cell radiosensitivity. Furthermore, flow cytometry was used to investigate the effect of GSTP1 overexpression on cell cycle progression, with the protein expression levels of the cell cycle regulating factor cyclin B1 detected using western blot analysis. Colony formation and G2/M phase arrest in the GSTP1-expressing cells were significantly increased compared with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the expression of cyclin B1 was significantly reduced in the GSTP1-expressing cells. These results demonstrated that increased expression of GSTP1 inhibits radiosensitivity in HeLa cells. The mechanism underlying this effect may be associated with the ability of the GSTP1 protein to reduce cyclin B1 expression, resulting in significant G2/M phase arrest. PMID:26622693

  8. Comparison of the radiosensitivities of neurons and glial cells derived from the same rat brain

    PubMed Central

    KUDO, SHIGEHIRO; SUZUKI, YOSHIYUKI; NODA, SHIN-EI; MIZUI, TOSHIYUKI; SHIRAI, KATSUYUKI; OKAMOTO, MASAHIKO; KAMINUMA, TAKUYA; YOSHIDA, YUKARI; SHIRAO, TOMOAKI; NAKANO, TAKASHI

    2014-01-01

    Non-proliferating cells, such as mature neurons, are generally believed to be more resistant to X-rays than proliferating cells, such as glial and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, the late adverse effects of radiotherapy on the brain have been attributed to the radiation-induced damage of glial and vascular endothelial cells. However, little is known about the radiosensitivities of neurons and glial cells due to difficulties in culturing these cells, particularly neurons, independently. In the present study, primary dissociated neurons and glial cultures were prepared separately from the hippocampi and cerebrum, respectively, which had been obtained from the same fetal rat on embryonic day 18. X-irradiations of 50 Gy were performed on the cultured neurons and glial cells at 7 and 21 days in vitro (DIV). The cells were fixed at 24 h after irradiation. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling was then performed to measure the apoptotic indices (AIs). The AIs of non-irradiated and irradiated neurons at 7 DIV were 23.7±6.7 and 64.9±4.8%, and those at 21 DIV were 52.1±17.4 and 44.6±12.5%, respectively. The AIs of non-irradiated and irradiated glial cells at 7 DIV were 5.8±1.5 and 78.4±3.3% and those at 21 DIV were 9.6±2.6 and 86.3±4.9%, respectively. Glial cells and neurons were radiosensitive at 7 DIV. However, while glial cells were radiosensitive at 21 DIV, neurons were not. PMID:25120594

  9. Can Radiosensitivity Associated with Defects in DNA Repair be Overcome by Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidant Radioprotectors

    PubMed Central

    Greenberger, Joel S.; Berhane, Hebist; Shinde, Ashwin; Han Rhieu, Byung; Bernard, Mark; Wipf, Peter; Skoda, Erin M.; Epperly, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation oncologists have observed variation in normal tissue responses between patients in many instances with no apparent explanation. The association of clinical tissue radiosensitivity with specific genetic repair defects (Wegner’s syndrome, Ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom’s syndrome, and Fanconi anemia) has been well established, but there are unexplained differences between patients in the general population with respect to the intensity and rapidity of appearance of normal tissue toxicity including radiation dermatitis, oral cavity mucositis, esophagitis, as well as differences in response of normal tissues to standard analgesic or other palliative measures. Strategies for the use of clinical radioprotectors have included modalities designed to either prevent and/or palliate the consequences of radiosensitivity. Most prominently, modification of total dose, fraction size, or total time of treatment delivery has been necessary in many patients, but such modifications may reduce the likelihood of local control and/or radiocurability. As a model system in which to study potential radioprotection by mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant small molecules, we have studied cell lines and tissues from Fanconi anemia (Fancd2−/−) mice of two background strains (C57BL/6NHsd and FVB/N). Both were shown to be radiosensitive with respect to clonogenic survival curves of bone marrow stromal cells in culture and severity of oral cavity mucositis during single fraction or fractionated radiotherapy. Oral administration of the antioxidant GS-nitroxide, JP4-039, provided significant radioprotection, and also ameliorated distant bone marrow suppression (abscopal effect of irradiation) in Fancd2−/− mice. These data suggest that radiation protection by targeting the mitochondria may be of therapeutic benefit even in the setting of defects in the DNA repair process for irradiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. PMID:24596683

  10. Can Radiosensitivity Associated with Defects in DNA Repair be Overcome by Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidant Radioprotectors.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Joel S; Berhane, Hebist; Shinde, Ashwin; Rhieu, Byung Han; Bernard, Mark; Wipf, Peter; Skoda, Erin M; Epperly, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Radiation oncologists have observed variation in normal tissue responses between patients in many instances with no apparent explanation. The association of clinical tissue radiosensitivity with specific genetic repair defects (Wegner's syndrome, Ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom's syndrome, and Fanconi anemia) has been well established, but there are unexplained differences between patients in the general population with respect to the intensity and rapidity of appearance of normal tissue toxicity including radiation dermatitis, oral cavity mucositis, esophagitis, as well as differences in response of normal tissues to standard analgesic or other palliative measures. Strategies for the use of clinical radioprotectors have included modalities designed to either prevent and/or palliate the consequences of radiosensitivity. Most prominently, modification of total dose, fraction size, or total time of treatment delivery has been necessary in many patients, but such modifications may reduce the likelihood of local control and/or radiocurability. As a model system in which to study potential radioprotection by mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant small molecules, we have studied cell lines and tissues from Fanconi anemia (Fancd2(-/-)) mice of two background strains (C57BL/6NHsd and FVB/N). Both were shown to be radiosensitive with respect to clonogenic survival curves of bone marrow stromal cells in culture and severity of oral cavity mucositis during single fraction or fractionated radiotherapy. Oral administration of the antioxidant GS-nitroxide, JP4-039, provided significant radioprotection, and also ameliorated distant bone marrow suppression (abscopal effect of irradiation) in Fancd2 (-/-) mice. These data suggest that radiation protection by targeting the mitochondria may be of therapeutic benefit even in the setting of defects in the DNA repair process for irradiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. PMID:24596683

  11. Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Etsuko ); Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta )

    1994-06-15

    In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions [times] three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions [times] five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Partial knockdown of TRF2 increase radiosensitivity of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Orun, O; Tiber, P Mega; Serakinci, N

    2016-09-01

    Telomere repeat binding factor TRF2 is a member of shelterin complex with an important role in protecting and stabilizing chromosomal ends. In the present study, we investigated the effect of partial knockdown of TRF2 on radiosensitivity of telomerase immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-telo1), which have a higher radioresistance compared to non telomerized counterpart. Partial knockdown of the protein achieved 15-20% reduction in TRF2 protein levels. The study compared the effect of 2.5Gy radiation in two-four days after irradiation for hMSC-telo1 cells and the cells transfected with siTRF2 and null control vector. Radio-response of the cells were examined using senescence associated β-Gal assay (β-Gal), colony forming assay (CFU) and γ-H2AX phosphorylation. TRF2 deficiency substantially increased radiosensitivity of cells compared to controls in both proliferation and senescence assay (2.4 fold increase in β-Gal, 1.6 fold decrease in CFU). In addition, it increased the γ-H2AX foci as revealed by both immunfluorescence and Western blot analysis. Our data suggests that partial knockdown of TRF2 in hMSC-telo1 cells cause increased γ-H2AX foci which led to fail TRF2 to protect telomeres from radiation thus TRF2 deficiency led to a 1,5-2 fold increase in the radiosensitivity of hMSC-telo1 cells through telomere destabilization. PMID:26598048

  13. [Evodiamine enhances the radiosensitivity of esophageal squamous cell cancer Eca-109 cells].

    PubMed

    Feng, Hui; Guo, Baorui; Kong, Xiangmei; Wu, Biao

    2016-07-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of evodiamine on the radiosensitivity of esophageal squamous cell cancer Eca-109 cells. Methods Eca-109 cells were treated with various concentrations of evodiamine [(10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120) μg/mL], and then cell proliferation was examined by MTT assay. After the optimal evodiamine concentration was determined, the cells were divided into radiation group (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy X-ray radiation) and radiation combined with evodiamine group (80 μg/mL evodiamine and 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy X-ray radiation) .The radiosensitivity of Eca-109 cells was detected using colony formation assay. Flow cytometry was used to determine cell cycle of Eca-109 cells. The protein expressions of Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were examined by Western blotting. Results MTT assay showed that evodiamine decreased the proliferation of Eca-109 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition reached the maximal level at 80 μg/mL. Compared with radiotherapy alone, the combination of 80 μg/mL evodiamine and radiotherapy improved survival curve and decreased the values of D0 and Dq. Sensitizer enhancement ratio was 1.86±0.06. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that evodiamine suppressed radiotherapy-induced the G2/M arrest. Additionally, evodiamine treatment also significantly inhibited radiotherapy-induced increase in Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs and Rad51 expressions. Conclusion Evodiamine enhances radiosensitivity of Eca-109 cells during radiotherapy. The effect may be associated with the inhibition of G2/M arrest and the attenuation of Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs and Rad51 expressions. PMID:27363277

  14. Relationship between DNA double-strand break rejoining and cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation in human fibroblast strains with differing ATM/p53 status: Implications for evaluation of clinical radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Severin, Diane; Murray, David . E-mail: davem@cancerboard.ab.ca

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To better understand the impact of defects in the DNA damage-surveillance network on the various cell-based assays used for the prediction of patient radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We examined noncancerous human fibroblast strains from individuals with ataxia telangiectasia (ataxia telangiectasia mutated [ATM] deficient) or Li-Fraumeni syndrome (p53 deficient) using the neutral comet, H2AX phosphorylation, and clonogenic survival assays. Results: Using the comet assay, we found that, compared with normal fibroblasts, cells lacking either ATM or p53 function exhibited a reduced rate of double-strand break (DSB) rejoining early ({<=}4 h) after exposure to 8 Gy of {gamma}-radiation and also exhibited high levels of unrejoined DSBs later after irradiation. ATM-deficient and p53-deficient fibroblasts also exhibited abnormally increased levels of phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) at later intervals after irradiation. In the clonogenic assay, ATM-deficient cells exhibited marked radiosensitivity and p53-deficient cells had varying degrees of radioresistance compared with normal fibroblasts. Conclusion: Regardless of whether ataxia telangiectasia and Li-Fraumeni syndrome fibroblasts are DSB-repair deficient per se, it is apparent that p53 and ATM defects greatly influence the cellular phenotype as evidenced by the neutral comet and {gamma}-H2AX assays. Our data suggest that the {gamma}-H2AX levels observed at later intervals after irradiation may represent a reliable measure of the overall DSB rejoining capabilities of human fibroblasts. However, it appears that using this parameter as a predictor of radiosensitivity without knowledge of the cells' p53 status could lead to incorrect conclusions.

  15. Individualized Marriage and the Integration of Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Sean R.; Yodanis, Carrie

    2011-01-01

    In individualized marriages, spouses maintain independence in their relationship. In individualized marriages, do married couples manage their money in pooled accounts or do they keep separate accounts? We answer this question with the 2002 International Social Survey Programme (N = 18,587;31 country contexts) and examine how variation in the…

  16. Targeting BRG1 chromatin remodeler via its bromodomain for enhanced tumor cell radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Su-Jung; Lee, Seul-Ki; Na, Juri; Lee, Shin-Ai; Lee, Han-Sae; Park, Ji-Hye; Chung, June-Key; Youn, Hyewon; Kwon, Jongbum

    2015-02-01

    Radiotherapy treats cancer by inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in tumor cells using ionizing radiation. However, DNA repair in tumor cells often leads to radioresistance and unsuccessful outcome. Inhibition of DNA repair by targeting repair proteins can increase radiosensitivity of tumor cells. The BRG1 chromatin remodeling enzyme assists DSB repair by stimulating γ-H2AX formation and BRG1 binding to acetylated histones at DSBs via bromodomain (BRD) is critical for this activity. Here, we show that ectopic expression of BRG1-BRD inhibited γ-H2AX and DSB repair after irradiation and increased the radiosensitivity in various human cancer cells, including HT29 colon cancer. Dimerization of BRG1-BRD, increasing its chromatin binding affinity, aggravated the defects in γ-H2AX and DSB repair and further enhanced the radiosensitivity. While little affecting the upstream ATM activation, BRG1-BRD in irradiated HT29 cells inhibited the recruitment of 53BP1 to damaged chromatin, the downstream event of γ-H2AX, and compromised the G2-M checkpoint and increased apoptosis. Importantly, in a xenograft mouse model, BRG1-BRD increased the radiosensitivity of HT29 tumors, which was further enhanced by dimerization. These data suggest that BRG1-BRD radiosensitizes tumor cells by a dominant negative activity against BRG1, which disrupts γ-H2AX and its downstream 53BP1 pathways, leading to inefficient DNA repair, G2-M checkpoint defect, and increased apoptosis. This work therefore identifies BRG1-BRD as a novel tumor radiosensitizer and its action mechanism, providing the first example of chromatin remodeler as a target for improving cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25504753

  17. Replication-Dependent Radiosensitization of Human Glioma Cells by Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dungey, Fiona A.; Loeser, Dana A.; Chalmers, Anthony J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Current treatments for glioblastoma multiforme are inadequate and limited by the radiation sensitivity of normal brain. Because glioblastoma multiforme are rapidly proliferating tumors within nondividing normal tissue, the therapeutic ratio might be enhanced by combining radiotherapy with a replication-specific radiosensitizer. KU-0059436 (AZD2281) is a potent and nontoxic inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) undergoing a Phase II clinical trial as a single agent. Methods and Materials: Based on previous observations that the radiosensitizing effects of PARP inhibition are more pronounced in dividing cells, we investigated the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization of human glioma cells by KU-0059436, evaluating the replication dependence of this effect and its therapeutic potential. Results: KU-0059436 increased the radiosensitivity of four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, and U87-MG). Radiosensitization was enhanced in populations synchronized in S phase and abrogated by concomitant exposure to aphidicolin. Sensitization was further enhanced when the inhibitor was combined with a fractionated radiation schedule. KU-0059436 delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks and was associated with a replication-dependent increase in {gamma}H2AX and Rad51 foci. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that KU-0059436 increases radiosensitivity in a replication-dependent manner that is enhanced by fractionation. A mechanism is proposed whereby PARP inhibition increases the incidence of collapsed replication forks after ionizing radiation, generating persistent DNA double-strand breaks. These observations indicate that KU-0059436 is likely to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by radiotherapy in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. A Phase I clinical trial is in development.

  18. Enhancement of radiosensitivity by dual inhibition of the HER family with ZD1839 ('Iressa') and trastuzumab ('Herceptin')

    SciTech Connect

    Fukutome, Mika . E-mail: fukutome@rad.twmu.ac.jp; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Nasu, Sachiko; Seki, Kaori; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to examine the effects of dual inhibition of 2 members of the HER family, the epidermoid growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2/neu, by gefitinib (ZD1839) and trastuzumab on radiosensitivity; and (2) to explore the molecular mechanism of radiosensitization especially focusing on the survival signal transduction pathways by using A431 human vulvar squamous carcinoma cells expressing EGFR and HER2/neu. Methods and Materials: The effects of inhibitors on Radiation-induced activation of EGFR and/or HER2/neu, and the intracellular proteins that are involved in their downstream signaling, were quantified by the Western blot. Radiosensitizing effects by the blockage of EGFR and/or HER2/neu were determined by a clonogenic assay. Results: Radiation-induced activation of the EGFR and HER2/neu was inhibited with ZD1839 and/or trastuzumab. ZD1839 also inhibited Radiation-induced phosphorylation of HER2/neu. Radiation in combination with the HER family inhibitors inhibited the activation of Akt and MEK1/2, the downstream survival signaling of the HER family. ZD1839 enhanced radiosensitivity with a dose-modifying factor (DMF) (SF3) of 1.45 and trastuzumab did so with a DMF (SF3) of 1.11. Simultaneous blockade of EGFR and HER2/neu induced a synergistic radiosensitizing effect with a DMF (SF3) of 2.29. Conclusions: The present data suggest that a dual EGFR and HER2/neu targeting may have potential for radiosensitization in tumors in which both of these pathways are active.

  19. Selective radiosensitization of p53 mutant pancreatic cancer cells by combined inhibition of Chk1 and PARP1.

    PubMed

    Vance, Sean; Liu, Erqi; Zhao, Lili; Parsels, Joshua D; Parsels, Leslie A; Brown, Jeffery L; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S; Morgan, Meredith A

    2011-12-15

    We have recently shown that inhibition of HRR (homologous recombination repair) by Chk1 (checkpoint kinase 1) inhibition radiosensitizes pancreatic cancer cells and others have demonstrated that Chk1 inhibition selectively sensitizes p53 mutant tumor cells. Furthermore, PARP1 [poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1] inhibitors dramatically radiosensitize cells with DNA double strand break repair defects. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of HRR (mediated by Chk1 via AZD7762) and PARP1 [via olaparib (AZD2281)] would selectively sensitize p53 mutant pancreatic cancer cells to radiation. We also used 2 isogenic p53 cell models to assess the role of p53 status in cancer cells and intestinal epithelial cells to assess overall cancer specificity. DNA damage response and repair were assessed by flow cytometry, γH2AX, and an HRR reporter assay. We found that the combination of AZD7762 and olaparib produced significant radiosensitization in p53 mutant pancreatic cancer cells and in all of the isogenic cancer cell lines. The magnitude of radiosensitization by AZD7762 and olaparib was greater in p53 mutant cells compared with p53 wild type cells. Importantly, normal intestinal epithelial cells were not radiosensitized. The combination of AZD7762 and olaparib caused G 2 checkpoint abrogation, inhibition of HRR, and persistent DNA damage responses. These findings demonstrate that the combination of Chk1 and PARP1 inhibition selectively radiosensitizes p53 mutant pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, these studies suggest that inhibition of HRR by Chk1 inhibitors may be a useful strategy for selectively inducing a BRCA1/2 'deficient-like' phenotype in p53 mutant tumor cells, while sparing normal tissue. PMID:22134241

  20. Identification of Novel Radiosensitizers in a High-Throughput, Cell-Based Screen for DSB Repair Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Goglia, Alexander G.; Delsite, Robert; Luz, Antonio N.; Shahbazian, David; Salem, Ahmed F.; Sundaram, Ranjini K.; Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Hendrikx, Petrus J.; Wilshire, Jennifer A.; Jasin, Maria; Kluger, Harriet; Glickman, J. Fraser; Powell, Simon N.; Bindra, Ranjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer therapies involve a component of treatment which inflicts DNA damage in tumor cells, such as double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered the most serious threat to genomic integrity. Complex systems have evolved to repair these lesions, and successful DSB repair is essential for tumor cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) and other DNA damaging agents. As such, inhibition of DNA repair is a potentially efficacious strategy for chemo- and radio-sensitization. Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) represent the two major pathways by DSBs are repaired in mammalian cells. Here, we report the design and execution of a high-throughput, cell-based small molecule screen for novel DSB repair inhibitors. We miniaturized our recently developed dual NHEJ and HR reporter system into a 384-well plate-based format and interrogated a diverse library of 20,000 compounds for molecules which selectively modulate NHEJ and HR repair in tumor cells. We identified a collection of novel hits which potently inhibit DSB repair, and we have validated their functional activity in comprehensive panel of orthogonal secondary assays. A selection of these inhibitors were found to radiosensitize cancer cell lines in vitro, which suggests they may be useful as novel chemo- and radio-sensitizers. Surprisingly, we identified several FDA-approved drugs, including the calcium channel blocker, mibefradil dihydrochloride, which demonstrated activity as DSB repair inhibitors and radiosensitizers. These findings suggest the possibility for repurposing them as tumor cell radiosensitizers in the future. Accordingly, we recently initiated a Phase I clinical trial testing mibefradil as glioma radiosensitizer. PMID:25512618

  1. Combined effect of polymorphisms in Rad51 and Xrcc3 on breast cancer risk and chromosomal radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vral, A; Willems, P; Claes, K; Poppe, B; Perletti, Gianpaolo; Thierens, H

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity (CRS) has been proposed as a marker for low-penetrance gene mutations predisposing to breast cancer (BC). Since the double strand break (DSB) is the most detrimental form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, it is possible that mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in DSB repair affect breast cancer risk. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Rad51 and Xrcc3 (rs1801320, rs1801321, rs1799796, rs861539 and rs1799794) exhibited an association with breast cancer susceptibility in a Belgian population of BC patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition. We also ascertained whether a relationship exists between the occurrence of the variant alleles of these variations and in vitro CRS. Blood samples were obtained from BC patients and from the control population that included healthy female individuals. Variations in the 5' UTR of Rad51 and Xrcc3 were genotyped, and statistical analysis was performed. The results showed that low-penetrant variations in Rad51 and Xrcc3, two proteins belonging to the homologous recombination DSB repair pathway, may modify BC risk in patients already carrying a pathological mutation in the highly penetrant BC genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Combined risk genotype analysis revealed that Rad51 SNPs enhance BC risk in BRCA2 patients, whereas Xrcc3 SNPs significantly enhance BC risk in carriers of BRCA1 mutations and in patients with hereditary BC. When four putative risk genotypes of Rad51 and Xrcc3 were combined, positive significant odds ratios were obtained in the entire patient population and in patients with a hereditary history of disease. Although obtained from a limited number of patients, our data are supportive of a polygenic model whereby combinations of weak variations are responsible for an enhanced BC risk by acting jointly with high-penetrant mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. PMID:21725594

  2. Can Drugs Enhance Hypofractionated Radiotherapy? A Novel Method of Modeling Radiosensitization Using In Vitro Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Dicker, Adam P.; Lawrence, Yaacov Richard

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy (hRT) is being explored for a number of malignancies. The potential benefit of giving concurrent chemotherapy with hRT is not known. We sought to predict the effects of combined modality treatments by using mathematical models derived from laboratory data. Methods and Materials: Data from 26 published clonogenic survival assays for cancer cell lines with and without the use of radiosensitizing chemotherapy were collected. The first three data points of the RT arm of each assay were used to derive parameters for the linear quadratic (LQ) model, the multitarget (MT) model, and the generalized linear quadratic (gLQ) model. For each assay and model, the difference between the predicted and observed surviving fractions at the highest tested RT dose was calculated. The gLQ model was fitted to all the data from each RT cell survival assay, and the biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2s) of clinically relevant hRT regimens were calculated. The increase in cell kill conferred by the addition of chemotherapy was used to estimate the EQD2 of hRT along with a radiosensitizing agent. For comparison, this was repeated using conventionally fractionated RT regimens. Results: At a mean RT dose of 8.0 Gy, the average errors for the LQ, MT, and gLQ models were 1.63, 0.83, and 0.56 log units, respectively, favoring the gLQ model (p < 0.05). Radiosensitizing chemotherapy increased the EQD2 of hRT schedules by an average of 28% to 82%, depending on disease site. This increase was similar to the gains predicted for the addition of chemotherapy to conventionally fractionated RT. Conclusions: Based on published in vitro assays, the gLQ equation is superior to the LQ and MT models in predicting cell kill at high doses of RT. Modeling exercises demonstrate that significant increases in biologically equivalent dose may be achieved with the addition of radiosensitizing agents to hRT. Clinical study of this approach is warranted.

  3. Radiosensitization of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi in presence of active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, M.; Chiasson, F.; Borsa, J.; Ouattara, B.

    2004-09-01

    The radiosensitization of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi in ground beef was evaluated in the presence of 18 active compounds. Medium fat ground beef (23% fat) was inoculated with E. coli or S. typhi and each active compound was added separately at various concentrations. For E. coli, the most efficient compounds were trans-cinnamaldehyde, thymol and thyme. For S. typhi, the most efficient compounds was trans-cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol and thymol. The addition of tetrasodium pyrophosphate, carvacrol and ascorbic acid had no effect on the irradiation sensitivity of E. coli. For S. typhi, only ascorbic acid had no effect.

  4. In vivo study of breast carcinoma radiosensitization by targeting eIF4E

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hua; Li, Li-Wen; Shi, Mei; Wang, Jian-Hua; Xiao, Feng; Zhou, Bin; Diao, Li-Qiong; Long, Xiao-Li; Liu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Lin

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer eIF4E is associated with the formation and progression for breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pSecX-t4EBP1 can downregulated the expression of eIF4E in direct binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We transfected pSecX-t4EBP1 into a mouse xenograft model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can significantly inhibit tumor growth and enhance the radiosensitivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible mechanism is downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression. -- Abstract: Background: Eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E, an important regulator of translation, plays a crucial role in the malignant transformation, progression and radioresistance of many human solid tumors. The overexpression of this gene has been associated with tumor formation in a wide range of human malignancies, including breast cancer. In the present study, we attempted to explore the use of eIF4E as a therapeutic target to enhance radiosensitivity for breast carcinomas in a xenograft BALB/C mice model. Materials and methods: Ninety female BALB/C mice transfected with EMT-6 cells were randomly divided into six groups: control, irradiation (IR), pSecX-t4EBP1, pSecX-t4EBP1 + irradiation, pSecX and pSecX + irradiation. At the end of the experiments, all mice were sacrificed, the xenografts were harvested to measure the tumor volume and mass, and the tumor inhibition rates were calculated. Apoptosis was detected with a flow cytometric assay. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of HIF-1{alpha}. Results: The xenografts in pSecX-t4EBP1 mice showed a significantly delayed growth and smaller tumor volume, with a higher tumor inhibition rate compared with the control and pSecX groups. A similar result was obtained in the pSecX-t4EBP1 + IR group compared with IR alone and pSecX + irradiation. The expression of HIF-1{alpha} in the tumor cells was significantly decreased, while the apoptosis index was much higher. Conclusions: pSecX-t4EBP1 can

  5. Immunosuppression by hypoxic cell radiosensitizers: a phenomenon of potential clinical importance

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwell, S.; Kapp, D.S.

    1982-06-01

    The nitroimidazoles metronidazole, misonidazol, and desmethyl misonidazole are currently undergoing clinical trials as possible adjuncts to radiotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the effectiveness of these agents and also documenting the pharmacokinetics and toxicities of radiosensitizing doses of these drugs in man. A variety of toxic effects have been noted in man, including anorexia, nausea and vomiting, peripheral neuropathy, central nervous system symptoms, ototoxicity, allergy, and fear. Laboratory studies have also suggested that these agents have potential to be mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic. In the editorial presented, the author attempts to draw attention to an additional toxic effect of nitroimidazoles - the inhibition of cell-mediated immune responses. (JMT)

  6. [Optimization and Prognosis of Cell Radiosensitivity Enhancement in vitro and in vivo after Sequential Thermoradiactive Action].

    PubMed

    Belkina, S V; Petin, V G

    2016-01-01

    Previously developed mathematical model of simultaneous action of two inactivating agents has been adapted and tested to describe the results of sequential action. The possibility of applying the mathematical model to the interpretation and prognosis of the increase in radio-sensitivity of tumor cells as well as mammalian cells after sequential action of two high temperatures or hyperthermia and ionizing radiation is analyzed. The model predicts the value of the thermal enhancement ratio depending on the duration of thermal exposure, its greatest value, and the condition under which it is achieved. PMID:27534067

  7. The gangliosides as a possible molecular coupling factor between the proportion of radiosensitive cells in vitro and the metastatic potential in vivo within a human melanoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. P.; Buronfosse, A.; Portoukalian, J.; Fertil, B.

    1997-01-01

    With an experimental model of spontaneous lung metastases in immunosuppressed newborn rats, seven clones and variants with different metastatic potential and gangliosides expression were derived from a single parental human melanoma cell line M4Be. The cellular radiosensitivity of M4Be and its seven sublines was estimated using an in vitro colony assay. The total amount of gangliosides in M4Be and its seven sublines was determined by cell extraction and thin-layer chromatography, while the expression of GD3 gangliosides was estimated by flow cytometry with a monoclonal antibody. The radiation-cell survival curves of most clones and variants derived from M4Be showed a zero dose extrapolation clearly lower than 100%, suggesting that two populations of cells of very different radiosensitivity coexist within each of these clones and variants. Although the proportion of radiosensitive cells could be estimated from the shape of the survival curve, its radiosensitivity is too high to be properly evaluated by the colony assay. The eight survival curves differ essentially in the proportion of radiosensitive cells--which varied from 0% to 40% among M4Be and its seven sublines--whereas the cellular radiosensitivity of the radioresistant population was similar among them. The metastatic potential in vivo of M4Be and its seven sublines was not significantly related to the cellular radiosensitivity of their corresponding radioresistant population, but significantly increased with the fraction of radiosensitive cells. This relationship is valid only when the highly metastatic cells are cultured for no more than five passages in vitro as the fraction of radiosensitive cells is rapidly lost during subcultures. The relationship remains valid in vivo as metastatic melanoma-bearing newborn rats whole body irradiated with 20 cGy show no lung metastasis compared with controls. The radiosensitive cell fraction is inversely correlated with both the total ganglioside content (r = 0.84, P

  8. Investigation of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization mechanisms using a free radical scavenger and protons of different energies.

    PubMed

    Jeynes, J C G; Merchant, M J; Spindler, A; Wera, A-C; Kirkby, K J

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to x-ray radiation, particularly at kV energies where photoelectric interactions dominate and the high atomic number of gold makes a large difference to x-ray absorption. Protons have a high cross-section for gold at a large range of relevant clinical energies, and so potentially could be used with GNPs for increased therapeutic effect.Here, we investigate the contribution of secondary electron emission to cancer cell radiosensitization and investigate how this parameter is affected by proton energy and a free radical scavenger. We simulate the emission from a realistic cell phantom containing GNPs after traversal by protons and x-rays with different energies. We find that with a range of proton energies (1-250 MeV) there is a small increase in secondaries compared to a much larger increase with x-rays. Secondary electrons are known to produce toxic free radicals. Using a cancer cell line in vitro we find that a free radical scavenger has no protective effect on cells containing GNPs irradiated with 3 MeV protons, while it does protect against cells irradiated with x-rays. We conclude that GNP generated free radicals are a major cause of radiosensitization and that there is likely to be much less dose enhancement effect with clinical proton beams compared to x-rays. PMID:25296027

  9. Nebulized gadolinium-based nanoparticles: a theranostic approach for lung tumor imaging and radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Sandrine; Bianchi, Andrea; Henry, Maxime; Lux, François; Le Duc, Géraldine; Josserand, Véronique; Louis, Cédric; Perriat, Pascal; Crémillieux, Yannick; Tillement, Olivier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-14

    Lung cancer is the most common and most fatal cancer worldwide. Thus, improving early diagnosis and therapy is necessary. Previously, gadolinium-based ultra-small rigid platforms (USRPs) were developed to serve as multimodal imaging probes and as radiosensitizing agents. In addition, it was demonstrated that USRPs can be detected in the lungs using ultrashort echo-time magnetic resonance imaging (UTE-MRI) and fluorescence imaging after intrapulmonary administration in healthy animals. The goal of the present study is to evaluate their theranostic properties in mice with bioluminescent orthotopic lung cancer, after intrapulmonary nebulization or conventional intravenous administration. It is found that lung tumors can be detected non-invasively using fluorescence tomography or UTE-MRI after nebulization of USRPs, and this is confirmed by histological analysis of the lung sections. The deposition of USRPs around the tumor nodules is sufficient to generate a radiosensitizing effect when the mice are subjected to a single dose of 10 Gy conventional radiation one day after inhalation (mean survival time of 112 days versus 77 days for irradiated mice without USRPs treatment). No apparent systemic toxicity or induction of inflammation is observed. These results demonstrate the theranostic properties of USRPs for the multimodal detection of lung tumors and improved radiotherapy after nebulization. PMID:25201285

  10. On the Role of low-energy electrons in the radiosensitization of DNA by gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fangxing; Zheng, Yi; Cloutier, Pierre; He, Yunhui; Hunting, Darel; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Four different gold nanoparticle (GNP) preparations, including nude GNP and GNP coated either with thiolated undecane (S-C11H23), or with dithiolated diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (DTDTPA) or gadolinium (Gd) DTDTPA chelating agents were synthesized. The average diameters, for each type of nanoparticle are 5 nm, 10 and 13 nm, respectively. Dry films of plasmid DNA pGEM-3Zf(-), DNA with bound GNP and DNA with coated GNP were bombarded with 60 keV electrons. The yields of single and double strand breaks were measured as a function of exposure by electrophoresis. The binding of only one GNP without coating to DNA containing 3197 base pairs increases single and double strand breaks by a factor of 2.3 while for GNP coated with S-C11H23 this factor is reduced to 1.6. GNP coated with the DTDTPA and DTDTPA:Gd in same ratio with DNA, produce essentially no increment in damage. These results could be explained by the attenuation by the coatings of the intensity of low energy photoelectrons emitted from GNP. Thus, coatings of GNP may considerably attenuate short-range low energy electrons emitted from gold, leading to a considerable decrease of radiosensitization. According to our results, the highest radiosensitization should be obtained with GNP having the shortest possible ligand, directed to the DNA of cancer cells. PMID:22024607

  11. Optimization of a Novel Series of Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated Kinase Inhibitors as Potential Radiosensitizing Agents.

    PubMed

    Min, Jaeki; Guo, Kexiao; Suryadevara, Praveen K; Zhu, Fangyi; Holbrook, Gloria; Chen, Yizhe; Feau, Clementine; Young, Brandon M; Lemoff, Andrew; Connelly, Michele C; Kastan, Michael B; Guy, R Kiplin

    2016-01-28

    We previously reported a novel inhibitor of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, which is a target for novel radiosensitizing drugs. While our initial lead, compound 4, was relatively potent and nontoxic, it exhibited poor stability to oxidative metabolism and relatively poor selectivity against other kinases. The current study focused on balancing potency and selectivity with metabolic stability through structural modification to the metabolized site on the quinazoline core. We performed extensive structure-activity and structure-property relationship studies on this quinazoline ATM kinase inhibitor in order to identify structural variants with enhanced selectivity and metabolic stability. We show that, while the C-7-methoxy group is essential for potency, replacing the C-6-methoxy group considerably improves metabolic stability without affecting potency. Promising analogues 20, 27g, and 27n were selected based on in vitro pharmacology and evaluated in murine pharmacokinetic and tolerability studies. Compound 27g possessed significantly improve pharmacokinetics relative to that of 4. Compound 27g was also significantly more selective against other kinases than 4. Therefore, 27g is a good candidate for further development as a potential radiosensitizer. PMID:26632965

  12. Mitochondrial stress controls the radiosensitivity of the oxygen effect: Implications for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Richard B.; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2016-01-01

    It has been more than 60 years since the discovery of the oxygen effect that empirically demonstrates the direct association between cell radiosensitivity and oxygen tension, important parameters in radiotherapy. Yet the mechanisms underlying this principal tenet of radiobiology are poorly understood. Better understanding of the oxygen effect may explain difficulty in eliminating hypoxic tumor cells, a major cause of regrowth after therapy. Our analysis utilizes the Howard-Flanders and Alper formula, which describes the relationship of radiosensitivity with oxygen tension. Here, we assign and qualitatively assess the relative contributions of two important mechanisms. The first mechanism involves the emission of reactive oxygen species from the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which increases with oxygen tension. The second mechanism is related to an energy and repair deficit, which increases with hypoxia. Following a radiation exposure, the uncoupling of the oxidative phosphorylation system (proton leak) in mitochondria lowers the emission of reactive oxygen species which has implications for fractionated radiotherapy, particularly of hypoxic tumors. Our analysis shows that, in oxygenated tumor and normal cells, mitochondria, rather than the nucleus, are the primary loci of radiotherapy effects, especially for low linear energy transfer radiation. Therefore, the oxygen effect can be explained by radiation-induced effects in mitochondria that generate reactive oxygen species, which in turn indirectly target nuclear DNA. PMID:26894978

  13. Molecularly Targeted Agents as Radiosensitizers in Cancer Therapy—Focus on Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, Sara; Walker, Amanda J.; Gandhi, Nishant; Narang, Amol; Wild, Aaron T.; Hales, Russell K.; Herman, Joseph M.; Song, Danny Y.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2013-01-01

    As our understanding of the molecular pathways driving tumorigenesis improves and more druggable targets are identified, we have witnessed a concomitant increase in the development and production of novel molecularly targeted agents. Radiotherapy is commonly used in the treatment of various malignancies with a prominent role in the care of prostate cancer patients, and efforts to improve the therapeutic ratio of radiation by technologic and pharmacologic means have led to important advances in cancer care. One promising approach is to combine molecularly targeted systemic agents with radiotherapy to improve tumor response rates and likelihood of durable control. This review first explores the limitations of preclinical studies as well as barriers to successful implementation of clinical trials with radiosensitizers. Special considerations related to and recommendations for the design of preclinical studies and clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents combined with radiotherapy are provided. We then apply these concepts by reviewing a representative set of targeted therapies that show promise as radiosensitizers in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:23863691

  14. Slug inhibition increases radiosensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by upregulating PUMA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fangfang; Zhou, Lijie; Wei, Changbo; Zhao, Wei; Yu, Dongsheng

    2016-08-01

    As a new strategy, radio-gene therapy was widely used for the treatment of cancer patients in recent few years. Slug was involved in the radioresistance of various cancers and has been found to have an anti-apoptotic effect. This study aims to investigate whether the modulation of Slug expression by siRNA affects oral squamous cell carcinoma sensitivity to X-ray irradiation through upregulating PUMA. Two oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC3 and HSC6) were transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Slug and subjected to radiotherapy in vitro. After transfection with Slug siRNA, both HSC3 and HSC6 cells showed relatively lower expression of Slug and higher expression of PUMA. The Slug siRNA transfected cells showed decreased survival and proliferation rates, an increased apoptosis rate and enhanced radiosensitivity to X-ray irradiation. Our results revealed that Slug siRNA transfection in combination with radiation increased the expression of PUMA, which contributed to radiosensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Thus, controlling the expression of Slug might contribute to enhance sensitivity of HSC3 and HSC6 cells toward X-ray irradiation in vitro by upregulating PUMA. PMID:27277529

  15. Inhibition of HAS2 induction enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells via persistent DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yan Nan; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Chun-Ho; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •HAS2 may be a promising target for the radiosensitization of human cancer. •HAS2 is elevated (up to ∼10-fold) in irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cancer cells. •HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation. •HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptotic death. •Thus, the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. -- Abstract: Hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), a synthetic enzyme for hyaluronan, regulates various aspects of cancer progression, including migration, invasion and angiogenesis. However, the possible association of HAS2 with the response of cancer cells to anticancer radiotherapy, has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. Upon exposure to radiation, all of the tested human cancer cell lines exhibited marked (up to 10-fold) up-regulation of HAS2 within 24 h. Inhibition of HAS2 induction significantly reduced the survival of irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cells. Interestingly, HAS2 depletion rendered the cells to sustain irradiation-induced DNA damage, thereby leading to an increase of apoptotic death. These findings indicate that HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation via persistent DNA damage, further suggesting that the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. Thus, HAS2 could potentially be targeted for therapeutic interventions aimed at radiosensitizing cancer cells.

  16. Transcription Factor HBP1 Enhances Radiosensitivity by Inducing Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yicheng; Wang, Yueping; Yu, Yanlan; Xu, Liwei; Zhang, Youyun; Yu, Shicheng; Li, Gonghui; Zhang, Zhigeng

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for prostate cancer has been gradually carried out in recent years; however, acquired radioresistance often occurred in some patients after radiotherapy. HBP1 (HMG-box transcription factor 1) is a transcriptional inhibitor which could inhibit the expression of dozens of oncogenes. In our previous study, we showed that the expression level of HBP1 was closely related to prostate cancer metastasis and prognosis, but the relationship between HBP1 and radioresistance for prostate cancer is largely unknown. In this study, the clinical data of patients with prostate cancer was compared, and the positive correlation was revealed between prostate cancer brachytherapy efficacy and the expression level of HBP1 gene. Through research on prostate cancer cells in vitro, we found that HBP1 expression levels were negatively correlated with oncogene expression levels. Furthermore, HBP1 overexpression could sensitize prostate cancer cells to radiation and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. In addition, animal model was employed to analyze the relationship between HBP1 gene and prostate cancer radiosensitivity in vivo; the result showed that knockdown of HBP1 gene could decrease the sensitivity to radiation of xenograft. These studies identified a specific molecular mechanism underlying prostate cancer radiosensitivity, which suggested HBP1 as a novel target in prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26942107

  17. Cancer stem cells: The potential of carbon ion beam radiation and new radiosensitizers (Review).

    PubMed

    Baek, Sung-Jae; Ishii, Hideshi; Tamari, Keisuke; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Koseki, Jun; Fukusumi, Takahito; Hasegawa, Shinichiro; Ogawa, Hisataka; Hamabe, Atsushi; Miyo, Masaaki; Noguchi, Kozo; Seo, Yuji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of cells in cancer with stem-like properties such as cell proliferation, multiple differentiation and tumor initiation capacities. CSCs are therapy-resistant and cause cancer metastasis and recurrence. One key issue in cancer therapy is how to target and eliminate CSCs, in order to cure cancer completely without relapse and metastasis. To target CSCs, many cell surface markers, DNAs and microRNAs are considered as CSC markers. To date, the majority of the reported markers are not very specific to CSCs and are also present in non-CSCs. However, the combination of several markers is quite valuable for identifying and targeting CSCs, although more specific identification methods are needed. While CSCs are considered as critical therapeutic targets, useful treatment methods remain to be established. Epigenetic gene regulators, microRNAs, are associated with tumor initiation and progression. MicroRNAs have been recently considered as promising therapeutic targets, which can alter the therapeutic resistance of CSCs through epigenetic modification. Moreover, carbon ion beam radiotherapy is a promising treatment for CSCs. Evidence indicates that the carbon ion beam is more effective against CSCs than the conventional X-ray beam. Combination therapies of radiosensitizing microRNAs and carbon ion beam radiotherapy may be a promising cancer strategy. This review focuses on the identification and treatment resistance of CSCs and the potential of microRNAs as new radiosensitizers and carbon ion beam radiotherapy as a promising therapeutic strategy against CSCs. PMID:26330103

  18. Effect of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers on glutathione level and related enzyme activities in isolated rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, K.; Hattori, T.; Igarashi, T.; Ueno, K.; Satoh, T.; Kitagawa, H.; Hori, H.; Shibata, T.; Inayama, S.

    1985-08-19

    A comparative study of the effect of misonidazole and novel radiosensitizers on glutathione (GSH) levels and related enzyme activities in isolated rat hepatocytes was performed. Incubation of hepatocytes with 5 mM radiosensitizers led to a decrease in the intracellular GSH level. The most pronounced decrease in cellular GSH was evoked by 2,4-dinitromidazole-1-ethanol (DNIE); after incubation for only 15 min, GSH was hardly detected. DNIE-mediated GSH loss was dependent upon its concentration. DNIE reacted with GSH nonenzymatically as well as with diethylmaleate, while misonidazole and 1-methyl-2-methyl-sulfinyl-5-methoxycarbonylimidazole (KIH-3) did not. Addition of partially purified glutathione S-transferase (GST) did not enhance DNIE-mediated GSH loss in a cell-free system. DNIE inhibited glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), GST, and glutathione reductase (GSSG-R) activities in hepatocytes, while misonidazole and KIH-3 did not. GSH-Px activity assayed with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as substrate was the most inhibited. Inhibition of GSH-Px activity assayed with cumene hydroperoxide as substrate and GST was less than that of GSH-Px assayed with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as substrate. GSSG-R activity was decreased by DNIE, but not significantly. Incubation of purified GSH-Px with DNIE resulted in a little change in the activity when assayed with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as substrate. 26 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  19. MiR-124 Radiosensitizes Human Colorectal Cancer Cells by Targeting PRRX1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Gao, Fei; Lin, Xiaoshan; He, Lian; Li, Dan; Li, Zhijun; Ding, Yi; Chen, Longhua

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges in the treatment of colorectal cancer patients is that these tumors show resistance to radiation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in essential biological activities, including chemoresistance and radioresistance. Several research studies have indicated that miRNA played an important role in sensitizing cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). In this study, we found that miR-124 was significantly down-regulated both in CRC-derived cell lines and clinical CRC samples compared with adjacent non-tumor colorectal tissues, MiR-124 could sensitize human colorectal cancer cells to IR in vitro and in vivo. We identified PRRX1, a new EMT inducer and stemness regulator as a novel direct target of miR-124 by using target prediction algorithms and luciferase assay. PRRX1 knockdown could sensitize CRC cells to IR similar to the effects caused by miR-124. Overexpression of PRRX1 in stably overexpressed-miR-124 cell lines could rescue the effects of radiosensitivity enhancement brought by miR-124. Taking these observations into consideration, we illustrated that miR-124 could increase the radiosensitivity of CRC cells by blocking the expression of PRRX1, which indicated miR-124 could act as a great therapeutic target for CRC patients. PMID:24705396

  20. Radiosensitivity study and radiation effects on morphology characterization of grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Rosnani Abdul; Daud, Fauzi; Senafi, Sahidan; Awang, Mat Rasol; Mohamad, Azhar; Mutaat, Hassan Hamdani; Maskom, Mohd Meswan

    2014-09-01

    Radiosensitive dosage and morphology characterization of irradiated grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju by gamma rays was investigated due to effects of irradiation. In order to establish the effect, mycelium of P. sajor-caju was irradiated by gamma rays at dose 0.1 to 8.0 kGy with dose rate 0.227 Gy sec-1. The irradiation of mycelia was carried out at the radiation facility in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. The radiosensitivity study was performed by evaluating the percentage of survival irradiated mycelia. The lethal dose of the mycelium P. sajor-caju was determined at 4.0 kGy and LD50 to be equal at 2.2 kGy. The radiation effects on morphology were evaluated based on growth rate of irradiated mycelia, mycelia types, colonization period on substrate, morphology of fruit bodies and yields. The results shown growth rate of irradiated mycelium was slightly lower than the control and decreased as the dose increased. Irradiation was found can induced the primordia formation on PDA and the BE of irradiated seed is higher than to control. The irradiation is proven to be useful for generating new varieties of mushroom with commercial value to the industry.

  1. Investigation of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization mechanisms using a free radical scavenger and protons of different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeynes, J. C. G.; Merchant, M. J.; Spindler, A.; Wera, A.-C.; Kirkby, K. J.

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to x-ray radiation, particularly at kV energies where photoelectric interactions dominate and the high atomic number of gold makes a large difference to x-ray absorption. Protons have a high cross-section for gold at a large range of relevant clinical energies, and so potentially could be used with GNPs for increased therapeutic effect. Here, we investigate the contribution of secondary electron emission to cancer cell radiosensitization and investigate how this parameter is affected by proton energy and a free radical scavenger. We simulate the emission from a realistic cell phantom containing GNPs after traversal by protons and x-rays with different energies. We find that with a range of proton energies (1-250 MeV) there is a small increase in secondaries compared to a much larger increase with x-rays. Secondary electrons are known to produce toxic free radicals. Using a cancer cell line in vitro we find that a free radical scavenger has no protective effect on cells containing GNPs irradiated with 3 MeV protons, while it does protect against cells irradiated with x-rays. We conclude that GNP generated free radicals are a major cause of radiosensitization and that there is likely to be much less dose enhancement effect with clinical proton beams compared to x-rays.

  2. MG132 enhances the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Liu, Jing; Nie, Jihua; Sheng, Wenjiong; Cao, Han; Shen, Wenhao; Dong, Aijing; Zhou, Jundong; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment modality for lung cancer, however, radioresistance remains a fundamental barrier to attaining the maximal efficacy. Cancer cells take advantage of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) for increased proliferation and decreased apoptotic cell death. MG132 (carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal‑H), a specific and selective reversible inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, has shown anticancer effect in multiple types of cancers. Previously, we have reported that MG132 enhances the anti‑growth and anti-metastatic effects of irradiation in lung cancer cells. However, whether MG132 can enhance the radiosensitivity in lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. In this study, we found that MG132 increased apoptosis and dicentric chromosome ratio of A549 and H1299 cells treated by irradiation. Radiation-induced NF-κB expression and IκBα phosphorylation was attenuated in MG132 plus irradiation-treated cells. The in vivo model of H1299 xenografts of nude mice showed that the tumor size of MG132 plus irradiation treated xenografts was smaller than that of irradiation, MG132 or the control group. Moreover, MG132 plus irradiation group showed significant reduced Ki67 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MG132 enhances the radiosensitivity through multiple mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26238156

  3. Gold-loaded polymeric micelles for computed tomography-guided radiation therapy treatment and radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Al Zaki, Ajlan; Joh, Daniel; Cheng, Zhiliang; De Barros, André Luís Branco; Kao, Gary; Dorsey, Jay; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2014-01-28

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have generated interest as both imaging and therapeutic agents. AuNPs are attractive for imaging applications since they are nontoxic and provide nearly three times greater X-ray attenuation per unit weight than iodine. As therapeutic agents, AuNPs can sensitize tumor cells to ionizing radiation. To create a nanoplatform that could simultaneously exhibit long circulation times, achieve appreciable tumor accumulation, generate computed tomography (CT) image contrast, and serve as a radiosensitizer, gold-loaded polymeric micelles (GPMs) were prepared. Specifically, 1.9 nm AuNPs were encapsulated within the hydrophobic core of micelles formed with the amphiphilic diblock copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-capralactone). GPMs were produced with low polydispersity and mean hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 25 to 150 nm. Following intravenous injection, GPMs provided blood pool contrast for up to 24 h and improved the delineation of tumor margins via CT. Thus, GPM-enhanced CT imaging was used to guide radiation therapy delivered via a small animal radiation research platform. In combination with the radiosensitizing capabilities of gold, tumor-bearing mice exhibited a 1.7-fold improvement in the median survival time, compared with mice receiving radiation alone. It is envisioned that translation of these capabilities to human cancer patients could guide and enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy. PMID:24377302

  4. Radiosensitivity study and radiation effects on morphology characterization of grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Rosnani Abdul; Awang, Mat Rasol; Mohamad, Azhar; Mutaat, Hassan Hamdani; Maskom, Mohd Meswan; Daud, Fauzi; Senafi, Sahidan

    2014-09-03

    Radiosensitive dosage and morphology characterization of irradiated grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju by gamma rays was investigated due to effects of irradiation. In order to establish the effect, mycelium of P. sajor-caju was irradiated by gamma rays at dose 0.1 to 8.0 kGy with dose rate 0.227 Gy sec{sup −1}. The irradiation of mycelia was carried out at the radiation facility in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. The radiosensitivity study was performed by evaluating the percentage of survival irradiated mycelia. The lethal dose of the mycelium P. sajor-caju was determined at 4.0 kGy and LD{sub 50} to be equal at 2.2 kGy. The radiation effects on morphology were evaluated based on growth rate of irradiated mycelia, mycelia types, colonization period on substrate, morphology of fruit bodies and yields. The results shown growth rate of irradiated mycelium was slightly lower than the control and decreased as the dose increased. Irradiation was found can induced the primordia formation on PDA and the BE of irradiated seed is higher than to control. The irradiation is proven to be useful for generating new varieties of mushroom with commercial value to the industry.

  5. DNA damage response (DDR) pathway engagement in cisplatin radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sears, Catherine R; Cooney, Sean A; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc S; Turchi, John J

    2016-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are commonly treated with a platinum-based chemotherapy such as cisplatin (CDDP) in combination with ionizing radiation (IR). Although clinical trials have demonstrated that the combination of CDDP and IR appear to be synergistic in terms of therapeutic efficacy, the mechanism of synergism remains largely uncharacterized. We investigated the role of the DNA damage response (DDR) in CDDP radiosensitization using two NSCLC cell lines. Using clonogenic survival assays, we determined that the cooperative cytotoxicity of CDDP and IR treatment is sequence dependent, requiring administration of CDDP prior to IR (CDDP-IR). We identified and interrogated the unique time and agent-dependent activation of the DDR in NSCLC cells treated with cisplatin-IR combination therapy. Compared to treatment with CDDP or IR alone, CDDP-IR combination treatment led to persistence of γH2Ax foci, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), for up to 24h after treatment. Interestingly, pharmacologic inhibition of DDR sensor kinases revealed the persistence of γ-H2Ax foci in CDDP-IR treated cells is independent of kinase activation. Taken together, our data suggest that delayed repair of DSBs in NSCLC cells treated with CDDP-IR contributes to CDDP radiosensitization and that alterations of the DDR pathways by inhibition of specific DDR kinases can augment CDDP-IR cytotoxicity by a complementary mechanism. PMID:26991853

  6. Radiation-induced micronuclei in human fibroblasts in relation to clonogenic radiosensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, M. C.; Scott, D.; Orton, C. J.; Kiltie, A. E.; Davidson, S. E.; Hunter, R. D.; West, C. M.

    1998-01-01

    As part of our programme for developing predictive tests for normal tissue response to radiotherapy, we have investigated the efficacy of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) assay as a means of detecting interindividual differences in cellular radiosensitivity. A study was made of nine fibroblast strains established from vaginal biopsies of pretreatment cervical cancer patients and an ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cell strain. Cells were irradiated in plateau phase, replated and treated with cytochalasin B 24 h later. MN formation was examined 72 h after irradiation as the number of MN in 100 binucleate cells. The method yielded low spontaneous MN yields (<7 per 100 cells), and mean induced MN frequencies after 3.5 Gy varied between cell strains from 18 to 144 per 100 cells. However, in repeat experiments, considerable intrastrain variability was observed (CV = 32%), with up to twofold differences in MN yields, although this was less than interstrain variability (CV = 62%). An analysis was made of the relationship between MN results and previously obtained clonogenic survival data. There was a significant correlation between MN yields and clonogenic survival. However, when the A-T strain was excluded from the analysis, the correlation lost significance, mainly because of one slow-growing strain which was the most sensitive to cell killing but had almost the lowest MN frequency. With current methodology, the MN assay on human fibroblasts does not appear to have a role in predictive testing of normal tissue radiosensitivity. PMID:9862564

  7. Daily variation in radiosensitivity of circulating blood cells and bone marrow cell density in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    Mice on a 12/12 light/dark cycle were bled during a twenty-four hour period each week for eight weeks to establish daily values of circulating blood cells. No significant daily variation was found in total red blood cells, hematocrit, or percentage of reticulocytes. A significant (P < 0.001) daily variation was found in total white blood cells, with the minimum occurring at 8 PM and the maximum occurring during the daylight hours from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mice were then exposed to 0 R, 20 R, 50 R, or 100 R of x-radiation to determine what dose significantly reduces the total white cell count in circulating blood. It was found that 100 R significantly (P < .05) reduces the total white cell count over a four week period post-exposure. To determine if circulating blood cells and bone marrow cells show a diurnal radiosensitivity, mice were exposed to 100 R or 200 R of x-radiation at noon or midnight. Hematocrits, reticulocyte and white blood cell counts, daily white blood cell rhythm, and bone marrow cell density indicate that these mice were more radiosensitive at night.

  8. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. PMID:25770423

  9. Health savings accounts and health reimbursement arrangements: assets, account balances, and rollovers, 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, Paul

    2010-06-01

    ASSET LEVELS GROWING: In 2009, there was $7.1 billion in consumer-driven health plans (CDHPs), which include health savings accounts (or HSAs) and health reimbursement arrangements (or HRAs), spread across 5 million accounts. This is up from 2006, when there were 1.2 million accounts with $835.4 million in assets, and 2008, when 4.2 million accounts held $5.7 billion in assets. AVERAGE ACCOUNT BALANCE LEVELING OFF: Increases in average account balances appear to have leveled off. In 2006, account balances averaged $696. They increased to $1320 in 2007, a 90 percent increase. Account balances averaged $1356 in 2008 and $1419 in 2009, 3 percent and 5 percent increases, respectively. TYPICAL ENROLLEE: The typical CDHP enrollee was more likely than traditional plan enrollees to be young, unmarried, higher-income, educated, and exhibit healthy behavior. No differences were found between CDHPs enrollees and traditional plan enrollees with respect to gender, race, and presence of children. MORE ROLLOVERS: Overall, the number of people with a rollover, as well as the total level of assets being rolled over, have been increasing. The average rollover increased from $592 in 2006 to $1295 in 2009. DIFFERENCES IN ACCOUNT BALANCES: Men tend to have higher account balances than women, account balances increase with household income, education has a significant impact on account balances independent of income and other variables, and no statistically significant differences in account balances were found by smoking, obesity, or the presence of chronic health conditions. Individuals who developed a budget to manage their health care expenses had a higher account balance ($1726) than those who did not ($1428), but otherwise, no statistically significant differences in average account balances were found between individuals who exhibited various aspects of cost-conscious decision-making behaviors and those who did not. DIFFERENCES IN ROLLOVER AMOUNTS: Men rolled over more money than

  10. Computerizing the Accounting Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, John F.; England, Thomas G.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the use of computers in college accounting courses. Argues that the success of new efforts in using computers in teaching accounting is dependent upon increasing instructors' computer skills, and choosing appropriate hardware and software, including commercially available business software packages. (TW)

  11. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  12. The Choreography of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, P. Taylor

    2006-01-01

    The prevailing performance discourse in education claims school improvements can be achieved through transparent accountability procedures. The article identifies how teachers generate performances of their work in order to satisfy accountability demands. By identifying sources of teachers' knowledge that produce choreographed performances, I…

  13. Teaching Accounting with Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaoul, Jean

    This paper addresses the numerous ways that computers may be used to enhance the teaching of accounting and business topics. It focuses on the pedagogical use of spreadsheet software to improve the conceptual coverage of accounting principles and practice, increase student understanding by involvement in the solution process, and reduce the amount…

  14. Leadership for Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    2001-01-01

    This document explores issues of leadership for accountability and reviews five resources on the subject. These include: (1) "Accountability by Carrots and Sticks: Will Incentives and Sanctions Motivate Students, Teachers, and Administrators for Peak Performance?" (Larry Lashway); (2) "Organizing Schools for Teacher Learning" (Judith Warren…

  15. Accountability in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chippendale, P. R., Ed.; Wilkes, Paula V., Ed.

    This collection of papers delivered at a conference on accountability held at Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education in Australia examines the meaning of accountability in education for teachers, lecturers, government, parents, administrators, education authorities, and the society at large. In Part 1, W. G. Walker attempts to answer the…

  16. The Accountability Illusion: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  17. The Accountability Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glisson, Charles

    1975-01-01

    Author discusses accountability controversy concerning effectiveness of social services. Turem's mechanistic and Gruber's organic models of accountability are compared and an alternate open system model of organization is offered which combines positive aspects of Turem's and Gruber's models as well as adds other constructive elements to them. (SE)

  18. The Accountability Illusion: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  19. The Evolution of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, P. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Campus 2020: Thinking ahead is a policy in British Columbia (BC), Canada, that attempted to hold universities accountable to performance. Within, I demonstrate how this Canadian articulation of educational accountability intended to develop "governmentality constellations" to control the university and regulate its knowledge output. This research…

  20. The Accountability Illusion: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  1. Responsible and accountable.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, Philip

    2006-03-01

    Healthcare assistants are valuable members of the multi-disciplinary team, using many skills outlined in previous articles in this series. But anyone exceeding the limits of their skills can cause harm and may be called to account. This article explains how everyone is accountable. PMID:16538993

  2. The Accountability Illusion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  3. Accountability and primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  4. Accountability and Primary Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  5. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R S; Pal, Debojyoti; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K

    2016-09-01

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. PMID:27381867

  6. Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xiaonan; Yang Chunying; Liu Hai; Wang Qi; Wu Shixiu; Li Xia; Xie Tian; Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian; Xu Bo; Zheng, Shu

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

  7. Radiosensitization of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum using basil essential oil and ionizing radiation for food decontamination.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of basil oil, was determined for two pathogenic fungi of rice, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. The antifungal activity of the basil oil in combination with ionising radiation was then investigated to determine if basil oil caused radiosensit...

  8. Comment on 'Implications on clinical scenario of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization in regards to photon energy, nanoparticle size, concentration and location'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Prise, Kevin M.; Currell, Fred J.

    2012-01-01

    A recent paper by Lechtman et al (2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 4631-47) presented Monte Carlo modelling of gold nanoparticle dose modification. In it, they predict that the introduction of gold nanoparticles has the strongest effect with x-rays at kilovoltage energies, and that negligible increases in dose are expected at megavoltage energies. While these results are in agreement with others in the literature (including those produced by our group), the conclusion that '(gold nanoparticle) radiosensitization using a 6 MV photon source is not clinically feasible' appears to conflict with recently published experimental studies which have shown radiosensitization using 6 MV x-ray sources with relatively low gold concentrations. The increasing disparity between theoretical predictions of dose enhancement and experimental results in the field of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization suggests that, while the ability of gold nanoparticles to modify dose within a tumour volume is well understood, the resulting radiosensitization is not simply correlated with this measure. This highlights the need to validate theoretical predictions of this kind against experimental measurements, to ensure that the scenarios and values being modelled are meaningful within a therapeutic context.

  9. Comment on 'implications on clinical scenario of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization in regard to photon energy, nanoparticle size, concentration and location'.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Stephen J; Prise, Kevin M; Currell, Fred J

    2012-01-01

    A recent paper by Lechtman et al (2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 4631-47) presented Monte Carlo modelling of gold nanoparticle dose modification. In it, they predict that the introduction of gold nanoparticles has the strongest effect with x-rays at kilovoltage energies, and that negligible increases in dose are expected at megavoltage energies. While these results are in agreement with others in the literature (including those produced by our group), the conclusion that ‘(gold nanoparticle) radiosensitization using a 6 MV photon source is not clinically feasible’ appears to conflict with recently published experimental studies which have shown radiosensitization using 6 MV x-ray sources with relatively low gold concentrations. The increasing disparity between theoretical predictions of dose enhancement and experimental results in the field of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization suggests that, while the ability of gold nanoparticles to modify dose within a tumour volume is well understood, the resulting radiosensitization is not simply correlated with this measure. This highlights the need to validate theoretical predictions of this kind against experimental measurements, to ensure that the scenarios and values being modelled are meaningful within a therapeutic context. PMID:22156112

  10. Chemosensitization and radiosensitization of a lung cancer cell line A549 induced by a composite polymer micelle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Bi-Cheng; Li, Xiang-Long; Xu, Wen-Hong; Zhou, Juan; Shen, Li; Wei, Qi-Chun

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to Doxorubicin (DOX) remains a major obstacle to successful cancer treatment. The present study sought to overcome the MDR of lung cancer cells and achieve radiosensitization by developing a composite DOX-loaded micelle (M-DOX). M-DOX containing PEG-PCL/Pluronic P105 was prepared by the solvent evaporation method. Lung cancer cell line A549 was adopted in this study. In vitro cytotoxicity, cellular uptake behavior, subcellular distribution, and radiosensitivity were evaluated by the treatment with M-DOX, and free DOX was used as a control. A549 cells treated with M-DOX as opposed to free DOX showed greater cellular uptake as well as greater cytotoxicity. Furthermore, M-DOX reached the mitochondria and lysosome effectively after cellular uptake, and fluorescence used to track M-DOX was found to be surrounding the nucleus. Finally, colony-forming assays demonstrated that M-DOX treatment improved radiosensitization when compared to free DOX. Based on the increased cytotoxicity and radiosensitization, M-DOX could be considered as a promising drug delivery system to overcome MDR in lung cancer therapy. PMID:27585226

  11. MiR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme cells through targeting of ataxia–telangiectasia mutated

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Pin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei; Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Liemei; Qiu, Yongming; Mao, Qing

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is notoriously resistant to radiation, and consequently, new radiosensitizers are urgently needed. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous gene modulators with emerging roles in DNA repair. We found that overexpression of miR-26a can enhance radiosensitivity and reduce the DNA repair ability of U87 cells. However, knockdown miR-26a in U87 cells could act the converse manner. Mechanistically, this effect is mediated by direct targeting of miR-26a to the 3′UTR of ATM, which leads to reduced ATM levels and consequent inhibition of the homologous recombination repair pathway. These results suggest that miR-26a may act as a new radiosensitizer of GBM. - Highlights: ●miR-26a directly target ATM in GBM cells. ●miR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of GBM cells. ●miR-26a could reduce the DNA repair capacity of GBM cells.

  12. Downregulation of high mobility group box 1 modulates telomere homeostasis and increases the radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shaobo; Zhou, Fuxiang; Yang, Hui; Wei, Yuehua; Gong, Jun; Mei, Zijie; Wu, Lin; Yu, Haijun; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2015-03-01

    The functions of the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in tumor cells include replenishing telomeric DNA and maintaining cell immortality. There is a negative correlation between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Our aim was to elucidate the relationship among HMGB1, telomere homeostasis and radiosensitivity in MCF-7 cells. In this study, we established stably transfected control (MCF-7-NC) and HMGB1 knockdown (MCF-7-shHMGB1) cell lines. The expression of HMGB1 mRNA and the relative telomere length were examined by real-time PCR. Radiosensitivity was detected by clonogenic assay. The protein expressions were determined by western blot analysis. The telomerase activity was detected by PCR-ELISA. Proliferation ability was examined by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. DNA damage foci were detected by immunofluorescence. ShRNA-mediated downregulation of HMGB1 expression increased the radiosensitivity of MCF-7 cells, and reduced the accumulation of hTERT and cyclin D1. Moreover, knockdown of HMGB1 in MCF-7 cells inhibited telomerase activity and cell proliferation, while increasing the extent of apoptosis. Downregulation of HMGB1 modulated telomere homeostasis by changing the level of telomere-binding proteins, such as TPP1 (PTOP), TRF1 and TRF2. This downregulation also inhibited the ATM and ATR signaling pathways. The current data demonstrate that knockdown of HMGB1 breaks telomere homeostasis, enhances radiosensitivity, and suppresses the repair of DNA damage in human breast cancer cells. These results suggested that HMGB1 might be a potential radiotherapy target in human breast cancer. PMID:25501936

  13. Genome-wide siRNA Screen Identifies the Radiosensitizing Effect of Downregulation of MASTL and FOXM1 in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Remco; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Buijze, Marijke; van den Berg, Jaap; van der Meulen, Ida H; Hodzic, Jasmina; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Jiménez, Connie R; van Beusechem, Victor W; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and on top of that has a very poor prognosis, which is reflected by a 5-year survival rate of 5% to 15%. Radiotherapy is an integral part of most treatment regimens for this type of tumor, often combined with radiosensitizing cytotoxic drugs. In this study, we identified many genes that could potentially be exploited for targeted radiosensitization using a genome-wide siRNA screen in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. The screen identified 433 siRNAs that potentially sensitize lung cancer cells to radiation. Validation experiments showed that knockdown of expression of Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) or microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like (MASTL) indeed causes radiosensitization in a panel of NSCLC cells. Strikingly, this effect was not observed in primary human fibroblasts, suggesting that the observed radiosensitization is specific for cancer cells. Phosphoproteomics analyses with and without irradiation showed that a number of cell-cycle-related proteins were significantly less phosphorylated after MASTL knockdown in comparison to the control, while there were no changes in the levels of phosphorylation of DNA damage response proteins. Subsequent analyses showed that MASTL knockdown cells respond differently to radiation, with a significantly shortened G2-M phase arrest and defects in cytokinesis, which are followed by a cell-cycle arrest. In summary, we have identified many potential therapeutic targets that could be used for radiosensitization of NSCLC cells, with MASTL being a very promising and druggable target to combine with radiotherapy. PMID:25808837

  14. Bromodeoxyuridine-mediated radiosensitization in hum glioma: The effect of concentration, duration, and fluoropyrimidine modulation

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, P.W.; Lawrence, T.S.; Seabury, H.

    1994-10-15

    To define the relative influence of duration of exposure, concentration, and modulation by fluorodeoxyuridines (FdUrd) on the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdUrd) into DNA of human malignant glioma line (D-54) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies: an established human malignant glioma line (D-54)was exposed to a clinically achievable concentration of BrdUrd to model intravenous (1 {mu}M BrdUrd) and intraarterial (4 {mu}MBrdUrd) conditions. The influence of modulation was assessed using 1 nM FdUrd. Incorporation of BrdUrd, radiosensitization, and cytotoxicity were determined after 24, 72, and 120 h drug exposures. In Vivo studies: nude mice bearing D-54 xenografts were infused with BrdUrd at 100 mg/kg/day for 7 and 14 days or BrdUrd at 400 mg/kg/day for 5 days. The influence of modulation was assessed by combining 100 mg/kg/day of BrdUrd with 0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg/day FdUrd for 7 days. Incorporation of BrddUrd into the DNA of tumor, gut, and marrow were determined. In Vitro: thymidine replacement and radiosensitization were a function of concentration, and incorporation began to plateau after 2 to 3 population doublings. Modulation with 1 nM FdUrd significantly increased incorporation. Radiosensitization was a linear function of thymidine replacement under all conditions tested. In Vivo: infusion with 400 mg/kg/day for 5 days resulted in greater tumor incorporation (10.3 {plus_minus} 0.4% thymidine replaced) than treatment with 100 mg/kg/day for 14 days (6.0 {plus_minus} 0.6% of thymidine replaced) than treatment with 100 mg/kg/day for 14 days for 14 days (6.0 {plus_minus} 0.6% of thymidine replaced). Infusion of FdUrd with BrdUrd increased normal tissue incorporation of BrdUrd, but failed to increase BrdUrd incorporation in tumor cells. These results suggest that relatively short, high dose rate infusions may be preferable to long, low dose rate infusions. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Increased betulinic acid induced cytotoxicity and radiosensitivity in glioma cells under hypoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Betulinic acid (BA) is a novel antineoplastic agent under evaluation for tumor therapy. Because of the selective cytotoxic effects of BA in tumor cells (including gliomas), the combination of this agent with conservative therapies (such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy) may be useful. Previously, the combination of BA with irradiation under hypoxic conditions had never been studied. Methods In this study, the effects of 3 to 30 μM BA on cytotoxicity, migration, the protein expression of PARP, survivin and HIF-1α, as well as radiosensitivity under normoxic and hypoxic conditions were analyzed in the human malignant glioma cell lines U251MG and U343MG. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitivity were analyzed with clonogenic survival assays, migration was analyzed with Boyden chamber assays (or scratch assays) and protein expression was examined with Western blot analyses. Results Under normoxic conditions, a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 23 μM was observed in U251MG cells and 24 μM was observed in U343MG cells. Under hypoxic conditions, 10 μM or 15 μM of BA showed a significantly increased cytotoxicity in U251MG cells (p = 0.004 and p = 0.01, respectively) and U343MG cells (p < 0.05 and p = 0.01, respectively). The combination of BA with radiotherapy resulted in an additive effect in the U343MG cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Weak radiation enhancement was observed in U251MG cell line after treatment with BA under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, under hypoxic conditions, the incubation with BA resulted in increased radiation enhancement. The enhancement factor, at an irradiation dose of 15 Gy after treatment with 10 or 15 μM BA, was 2.20 (p = 0.02) and 4.50 (p = 0.03), respectively. Incubation with BA led to decreased cell migration, cleavage of PARP and decreased expression levels of survivin in both cell lines. Additionally, BA treatment resulted in a reduction of HIF-1α protein under hypoxic conditions. Conclusion Our

  16. Human Resource Accounting System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  17. 12 CFR 792.62 - Requests for accounting for disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requests for accounting for disclosures. 792.62... § 792.62 Requests for accounting for disclosures. At the time of the request for access or correction or at any other time, an individual may request an accounting of disclosures made of the...

  18. 5 CFR 2100.12 - Accounting of disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting of disclosure. 2100.12 Section... PROCEDURES § 2100.12 Accounting of disclosure. (a) The AFRH or agency will maintain a record of disclosures... made. (c) Except for the accounting of disclosure made to agencies, individuals, or entities in...

  19. Carrier account utilization at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, W. E.; Langmead, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The system in use at Goddard Space Flight Center for the utilization of the Common Use Service Carrier Account and the R&D Inventory Carrier Account technique for budgeting, accounting, financial control, and management reporting, both for the individual functional area and on a Center-wide basis, is documented.

  20. 31 CFR 208.11 - Accounts for disaster victims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and 31 CFR 210.5. For purposes of this section, “disaster victim” means an individual or entity... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accounts for disaster victims. 208.11... DISBURSEMENTS § 208.11 Accounts for disaster victims. Treasury may establish and administer accounts at...

  1. 49 CFR 10.23 - Accounting of disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accounting of disclosures. 10.23 Section 10.23... INDIVIDUALS Maintenance of Records § 10.23 Accounting of disclosures. Each operating administration, the... accurate accounting of: (1) The date, nature, and purpose of each disclosure of a record to any person...

  2. Employers' Perceptions of Online Accounting Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabatabaei, Manouchehr; Solomon, Alison; Strickland, Emily; Metrejean, Eddie

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this research is on perceptions of accounting employers of those individuals obtaining their accounting education online. An online survey of accounting professionals was conducted, and the findings suggest that a candidate with a traditional education is more suitable for employment than a candidate with an online education.…

  3. 47 CFR 32.2000 - Instructions for telecommunications plant accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... individual jobs and accounts charged, and the bases of the distribution. The amounts charged to each plant... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Instructions for telecommunications plant... Sheet Accounts § 32.2000 Instructions for telecommunications plant accounts. (a) Purpose...

  4. [Radiosensitivity and/or radioresistance of head and neck cancers: Biological angle].

    PubMed

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Rancoule, Chloé; Méry, Benoîte; Espenel, Sophie; Wozny, Anne-Sophie; Simonet, Stéphanie; Vallard, Alexis; Alphonse, Gersende; Ardail, Dominique; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a cornerstone of head and neck cancer management. Technological improvements in recent years in radiation therapy, with intensity-modulated techniques, reinforce even more its role. However, both local and locoregional relapses are still observed. Understanding biological mechanisms of treatment resistance is a topic of major interest. From the cancer cell itself, its ability to repair and proliferate, its microenvironment and oxygenation conditions, migratory and invasive capacity, to biological parameters related to the patient, there are many mechanisms involving radiosensitivity and/or radioresistance of head and neck cancer. The present study explores the main biological mechanisms involved in radiation resistance of head and neck cancer, and describes promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:26702507

  5. HDAC inhibition radiosensitizes human normal tissue cells and reduces DNA Double-Strand Break repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Purrucker, Jan C; Fricke, Andreas; Ong, Mei Fang; Rübe, Christian; Rübe, Claudia E; Mahlknecht, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are gaining increasing attention in the treatment of cancer, particularly in view of their therapeutic effectiveness and assumed mild toxicity profile. While numerous studies have investigated the role of HDACi in tumor cells, little is known about their effects on normal tissue cells. We studied the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), MS275, sodium-butyrate and valproic acid in healthy human fibroblasts and found HDACi-treatment to go along with increased radiosensitivity and reduced DSB repair capacity. In view of the potential genotoxic effects of HDACi-treatment, particularly when being administered long-term for chronic disease or when given to children, to women of childbearing age or their partners or in combination with radiotherapy, an extensive education of patients and prescribing physicians as well as a stringent definition of clinical indications is urgently required. PMID:19956891

  6. Baicalein Inhibits MCF-7 Cell Proliferation In Vitro, Induces Radiosensitivity, and Inhibits Hypoxia Inducible Factor.

    PubMed

    Gade, Shruti; Gandhi, Nitin Motilal

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is a key transcription factor responsible for imparting adaptability to the cancer cells growing in tumors. HIF induces the modulation of glucose metabolism, angiogenesis, and prosurvival signaling. Therefore, HIF is one of the attractive targets to treat solid tumors. Results presented in this study indicate that Baicalein (BA) inhibits HIF stabilization and also reduces its transcription activity in MCF-7 cells in vitro. Furthermore, BA was found to have antiproliferative ability as determined by the MTT assay and clonogenic survival. BA also induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells at the concentration of 50 µM. We also report the radiosensitization of MCF-7 cells when they are treated with BA, resulting in higher γ-radiation-induced DNA damage. BA is extensively used in Chinese medicine and is known to be nontoxic at pharmacological doses. Our studies indicate that BA is one of the attractive natural compounds suitable for further evaluation as an adjuvant therapy. PMID:26756423

  7. Computed tomography imaging-guided radiotherapy by targeting upconversion nanocubes with significant imaging and radiosensitization enhancements

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Huaiyong; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Ren, Qingguo; Bu, Wenbo; Ge, Weiqiang; Xiao, Qingfeng; Zhang, Shengjian; Wei, Chenyang; Qu, Haiyun; Wang, Zheng; Hua, Yanqing; Zhou, Liangping; Peng, Weijun; Zhao, Kuaile; Shi, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    The clinical potentials of radiotherapy could not be achieved completely because of the inaccurate positioning and inherent radioresistance of tumours. In this study, a novel active-targeting upconversion theranostic agent (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-labelled BaYbF5: 2% Er3+ nanocube) was developed for the first time to address these clinical demands. Heavy metal-based nanocubes (~10 nm) are potential theranostic agents with bifunctional features: computed tomography (CT) contrast agents for targeted tumour imaging and irradiation dose enhancers in tumours during radiotherapy. Remarkably, they showed low toxicity and excellent performance in active-targeting CT imaging and CT imaging-guided radiosensitizing therapy, which could greatly concentrate and enlarge the irradiation dose deposition in tumours to enhance therapeutic efficacy and minimize the damage to surrounding tissues. PMID:23624542

  8. [The chromosomal radiosensitivity of children whose parents were exposed to antitumor radiochemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vorobtsova, I E; Vorob'eva, M V

    1992-12-01

    The effect of gamma radiation was studied on routine stained chromosomes from lymphocytes of children born to Hodgkin's disease patients after cancer therapy (CP) in comparison to children from healthy parents (HP). Irradiation (0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 1.50 Gy) of the whole blood was performed in culture medium. Metaphases were obtained from 52-h cultures. Chromosomal aberrations were used as an endpoint. Aberrations of both chromosomal and chromatid types were scored in 150-200 metaphases for estimation of spontaneous level of cytogenetic injuries and in 100 metaphases of induced one. It is found that chromosomes of CP children are more radiosensitive than chromosomes of HP ones, the spontaneous frequency of chromosome aberrations being equal in both groups. PMID:1292705

  9. Contribution of hydroxyl radical to radiosensitization: a study of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Skov, K.A.

    1984-09-01

    Using the radioprotector dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO, as a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals, the proportions of DNA damage caused by OH were determined in mammalian cells irradiated in hypoxia with or without the radiosensitizers misonidazole and TAN or in air. Yields of both single-strand breaks (SSB) and base/sugar damage (MLS for Micrococcus luteus sensitive sites) were measured for each situation. Most of the damage enhanced by the sensitizers was found to be OH dependent, for both MLS and SSB classes of damage. The sensitizer enhancement ratios in the presence of scavenger and the degree of protection afforded by the scavenger determined for total (MSL + SSB) damage agree well with those derived from corresponding survival experiments.

  10. Cell killing, radiosensitization and cell cycle redistribution induced by chronic hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Spiro, I.J.; Rice, G.C.; Durand, R.E.; Stickler, R.; Ling, C.C.

    1984-08-01

    Some of the biological changes associated with extreme hypoxia at 37/sup 0/C (less than 10 ppM pO/sub 2/) were examined in Chinese hamster V79 cells. Specifically, extreme hypoxia caused an initial decrease in plating efficiency to 55% in 4 hr after the onset of hypoxia. Beyond this time, the decline in plating efficiency was more gradual reaching 35% of control at 20 hr. Flow microfluorimetry (FMF) studies, in which cells are sorted on the basis of DNA content and then assayed for viability, demonstrated that mid S phase cells were most sensitive to chronic hypoxia. Hypoxia also caused alterations in the cell cycle distribution of initially asynchronous cells, as determined by dual parameter FMF measurements of both cellular DNA content and incorporated BudR. Lastly, cells stored in chronic hypoxia displayed an enhanced radiosensitivity when compared to acutely hypoxic cells.

  11. Eighth annual Juan del Regato lecture. Chemical modifiers of radiosensitivity--theory and reality: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.F.

    1985-04-01

    In this review the poor clinical gains from hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and misonidazole (MISO) are discussed critically. The biggest factor reducing clinical gains is almost certainly reoxygenation. Other possible reasons include vasoconstrictive self-limitation of HBO and neurotoxicity of MISO, so that the radiosensitization of any hypoxic cells in human tumors was not adequate. Nevertheless, there have been some positive clinical results, so that hypoxic cells can sometimes be a problem in some tumors, especially those of the head and neck, even after multiple fraction radiotherapy. While hypoxic cell radioresistance is obviously only one form of radioresistance it is a large factor of resistance when hypoxic cells are present. Current developments are briefly reviewed: the new clinical sensitizers Ro-03-8799 and SR-2508 which should be 3 to 10 times more efficient than MISO if viable hypoxic cells are present; and methods of measuring which human tumors might have significant numbers of hypoxic viable cells. 77 references.

  12. Gold nanoparticles functionalization notably decreases radiosensitization through hydroxyl radical production under ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Manon; Brun, Emilie; Sicard-Roselli, Cécile

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the influence of gold nanoparticles (GNP) coating on hydroxyl radical (HO) production under ionizing radiation. Though radiosensitizing mechanisms are still unknown, radical oxygen species are likely to be involved, especially HO. We synthesized six different types of GNP, choosing relevant ligands such as polyethylene glycol or human serum albumin. A great attention was paid to characterize these GNP in terms of size, charge and number of atoms in the coating. Our results show that functionalization dramatically decreases HO production, which is correlated to reduced plasmidic DNA damages. These findings are of high importance as GNP translation from fundamental research to applied medicine requires their functionalization to increase blood circulation time and specific cancerous cells addressing. We suggest that to keep GNP efficient for radiotherapy, a wispy coating is required. PMID:25454667

  13. A fast kinetics study of the modes of action of some different radiosensitizers in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Michael, B. D.; Harrop, H. A.; Maughan, R. L.; Patel, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    Using a fast mixing a irradiation technique, the gas explosion method, with Serratia marcescents, the decay of oxygen-dependent damage is found to consist of a fast and a slow stage, each of which is associated with a sub-component of this damage. In the present work, the interactions of these components with radiosensitizers are examined. At low concentrations O2, TAN (a nitroxyl) and misonidazole all preferentially sensitize the slow-stage damage. At higher concentrations, O2 and TAN sensitize the fast-stage damage by a fixation reaction that competes with its repair; in contrast, misonidazole appears mainly to operate by reaction with an earlier, ever shorter form of oxygen-dependent damage. PMID:354678

  14. Radiosensitization in head and neck cancer: do we have an alternative to platins? Role of taxanes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bindhu; Vishwanath, Lokesh; Venugopal, Bindu K

    2014-03-01

    In the past few decades, concurrent chemoradiation has conclusively been established as the standard of care in resectable, locally advanced head and neck cancer. Platins until now have been the established radiosensitizer in all concurrent settings, including postoperative high-risk scenarios. However, retrospective and evolving data suggest that they have their limitations in terms of compatibility, toxicity, and intrinsic resistance. There is therefore the need to explore the scope of other agents that may address these issues through a different mode of action, a better toxicity profile, or preferably a combination of both. In recent years, taxanes have emerged as an effective chemotherapeutic agent for head and neck cancer for recurrent or metastatic disease and chemoinduction for downstaging before definitive treatment. In this article, the authors review the potential of taxanes as an alternative to platins in the concurrent setting. PMID:24388535

  15. Accounting for the environment.

    PubMed

    Lutz, E; Munasinghe, M

    1991-03-01

    Environmental awareness in the 1980s has led to efforts to improve the current UN System of National Accounts (SNA) for better measurement of the value of environmental resources when estimating income. National governments, the UN, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank are interested in solving this issue. The World Bank relies heavily on national aggregates in income accounts compiled by means of the SNA that was published in 1968 and stressed gross domestic product (GDP). GDP measures mainly market activity, but it takes does not consider the consumption of natural capital, and indirectly inhibits sustained development. The deficiencies of the current method of accounting are inconsistent treatment of manmade and natural capital, the omission of natural resources and their depletion from balance sheets, and pollution cleanup costs from national income. In the calculation of GDP pollution is overlooked, and beneficial environmental inputs are valued at zero. The calculation of environmentally adjusted net domestic product (EDP) and environmentally adjusted net income (ENI) would lower income and growth rate, as the World Resources Institute found with respect to Indonesia for 1971-84. When depreciation for oil, timber, and top soil was included the net domestic product (NDP) was only 4% compared with a 7.1% GDP. The World Bank has advocated environmental accounting since 1983 in SNA revisions. The 1989 revised Blue Book of the SNA takes environment concerns into account. Relevant research is under way in Mexico and Papua New Guinea using the UN Statistical Office framework as a system for environmentally adjusted economic accounts that computes EDP and ENI and integrates environmental data with national accounts while preserving SNA concepts. PMID:12285741

  16. Targeted radiosensitization of ETS fusion-positive prostate cancer through PARP1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Han, Sumin; Brenner, J Chad; Sabolch, Aaron; Jackson, Will; Speers, Corey; Wilder-Romans, Kari; Knudsen, Karen E; Lawrence, Theodore S; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Feng, Felix Y

    2013-10-01

    ETS gene fusions, which result in overexpression of an ETS transcription factor, are considered driving mutations in approximately half of all prostate cancers. Dysregulation of ETS transcription factors is also known to exist in Ewing's sarcoma, breast cancer, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We previously discovered that ERG, the predominant ETS family member in prostate cancer, interacts with the DNA damage response protein poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) in human prostate cancer specimens. Therefore, we hypothesized that the ERG-PARP1 interaction may confer radiation resistance by increasing DNA repair efficiency and that this radio-resistance could be reversed through PARP1 inhibition. Using lentiviral approaches, we established isogenic models of ERG overexpression in PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. In both cell lines, ERG overexpression increased clonogenic survival following radiation by 1.25 (±0.07) fold (mean ± SEM) and also resulted in increased PARP1 activity. PARP1 inhibition with olaparib preferentially radiosensitized ERG-positive cells by a factor of 1.52 (±0.03) relative to ERG-negative cells (P < .05). Neutral and alkaline COMET assays and immunofluorescence microscopy assessing γ-H2AX foci showed increased short- and long-term efficiencies of DNA repair, respectively, following radiation that was preferentially reversed by PARP1 inhibition. These findings were verified in an in vivo xenograft model. Our findings demonstrate that ERG overexpression confers radiation resistance through increased efficiency of DNA repair following radiation that can be reversed through inhibition of PARP1. These results motivate the use of PARP1 inhibitors as radiosensitizers in patients with localized ETS fusion-positive cancers. PMID:24204199

  17. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  18. Mutations in Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit C Increase Radiosensitivity and Bystander Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongning; Hei, Tom K.

    Although radiation-induced bystander effect is well studied in the past decade, the precise mech-anisms are still unclear. It is likely that a combination of pathways involving both primary and secondary signaling processes is involved in producing a bystander effect. There is recent evidence that mitochondria play a critical role in bystander responses. Recently studies found that a mutation in succinate dehydrogenese subunit C (SDHC), an integral membrane protein in complex II of the electron transport chain, resulted in increased superoxide, oxidative stress, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and genomic instability, indicating that SDHC play a critical role in maintaining mitochondrial function. In the present study, using Chinese hamster fibroblasts (B1 cells) and the mutants (B9 cells) containing a single base substitution that produced a premature stop codon resulting in a 33-amino acid COOH-terminal truncation of the SDHC protein, we found that B9 cells had an increase in intracellular superoxide content, nitric oxide species, and mitochondrial membrane potential when compared with wild type cells. After irradiated with a grade of doses of gamma rays, B9 cells show an increased radiosensitivity, especially at high doses. The HPRT- mutant yield after gamma-ray irradiation in B9 cells was significantly higher than that of B1 cells. A single, 3Gy dose of gamma-rays increased the background mutant level by more than 4 fold. In contrast, the mutant induction was less than 2 fold in B1 cells. In addition, B9 cells produced a higher bystander mutagenesis after alpha particle irradiation than the B1 cells. Furthermore, pretreated with carboxy-2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO), a nitric oxide scavenger, significantly decreased the bystander effect. Our findings demonstrate that a mutation in SDHC increases radiosensitivity in both directly irradiated cells and in neighboring bystander cells, and mito-chondrial function play an essential role in

  19. Cytosolic phospholipaseA2 inhibition with PLA-695 radiosensitizes tumors in lung cancer animal models.

    PubMed

    Thotala, Dinesh; Craft, Jeffrey M; Ferraro, Daniel J; Kotipatruni, Rama P; Bhave, Sandeep R; Jaboin, Jerry J; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the rest of the world. The advent of molecularly directed therapies holds promise for improvement in therapeutic efficacy. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is associated with tumor progression and radioresistance in mouse tumor models. Utilizing the cPLA2 specific inhibitor PLA-695, we determined if cPLA2 inhibition radiosensitizes non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and tumors. Treatment with PLA-695 attenuated radiation induced increases of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt in endothelial cells. NSCLC cells (LLC and A549) co-cultured with endothelial cells (bEND3 and HUVEC) and pre-treated with PLA-695 showed radiosensitization. PLA-695 in combination with irradiation (IR) significantly reduced migration and proliferation in endothelial cells (HUVEC & bEND3) and induced cell death and attenuated invasion by tumor cells (LLC &A549). In a heterotopic tumor model, the combination of PLA-695 and radiation delayed growth in both LLC and A549 tumors. LLC and A549 tumors treated with a combination of PLA-695 and radiation displayed reduced tumor vasculature. In a dorsal skin fold model of LLC tumors, inhibition of cPLA2 in combination with radiation led to enhanced destruction of tumor blood vessels. The anti-angiogenic effects of PLA-695 and its enhancement of the efficacy of radiotherapy in mouse models of NSCLC suggest that clinical trials for its capacity to improve radiotherapy outcomes are warranted. PMID:23894523

  20. Cytosolic PhospholipaseA2 Inhibition with PLA-695 Radiosensitizes Tumors in Lung Cancer Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Daniel J.; Kotipatruni, Rama P.; Bhave, Sandeep R.; Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the rest of the world. The advent of molecularly directed therapies holds promise for improvement in therapeutic efficacy. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is associated with tumor progression and radioresistance in mouse tumor models. Utilizing the cPLA2 specific inhibitor PLA-695, we determined if cPLA2 inhibition radiosensitizes non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and tumors. Treatment with PLA-695 attenuated radiation induced increases of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt in endothelial cells. NSCLC cells (LLC and A549) co-cultured with endothelial cells (bEND3 and HUVEC) and pre-treated with PLA-695 showed radiosensitization. PLA-695 in combination with irradiation (IR) significantly reduced migration and proliferation in endothelial cells (HUVEC & bEND3) and induced cell death and attenuated invasion by tumor cells (LLC &A549). In a heterotopic tumor model, the combination of PLA-695 and radiation delayed growth in both LLC and A549 tumors. LLC and A549 tumors treated with a combination of PLA-695 and radiation displayed reduced tumor vasculature. In a dorsal skin fold model of LLC tumors, inhibition of cPLA2 in combination with radiation led to enhanced destruction of tumor blood vessels. The anti-angiogenic effects of PLA-695 and its enhancement of the efficacy of radiotherapy in mouse models of NSCLC suggest that clinical trials for its capacity to improve radiotherapy outcomes are warranted. PMID:23894523

  1. Radiosensitization of Human Leukemic HL-60 Cells by ATR Kinase Inhibitor (VE-821): Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Šalovská, Barbora; Fabrik, Ivo; Ďurišová, Kamila; Link, Marek; Vávrová, Jiřina; Řezáčová, Martina; Tichý, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapy are frequently used in oncology. DNA damage response (DDR)—triggered by radiation-induced double strand breaks—is orchestrated mainly by three Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs): Ataxia teleangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ATM and Rad3-related kinase (ATR). Their activation promotes cell-cycle arrest and facilitates DNA damage repair, resulting in radioresistance. Recently developed specific ATR inhibitor, VE-821 (3-amino-6-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-N-phenylpyrazine-2-carboxamide), has been reported to have a significant radio- and chemo-sensitizing effect delimited to cancer cells (largely p53-deficient) without affecting normal cells. In this study, we employed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to describe the mechanism of the radiosensitizing effect of VE-821 in human promyelocytic leukemic cells HL-60 (p53-negative). Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC)-prefractionation with TiO2-enrichment and nano-liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed 9834 phosphorylation sites. Proteins with differentially up-/down-regulated phosphorylation were mostly localized in the nucleus and were involved in cellular processes such as DDR, all phases of the cell cycle, and cell division. Moreover, sequence motif analysis revealed significant changes in the activities of kinases involved in these processes. Taken together, our data indicates that ATR kinase has multiple roles in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle and that its inhibitor VE-821 is a potent radiosensitizing agent for p53-negative HL-60 cells. PMID:25003641

  2. Bacterial radiosensitization by using radiation processing in combination with essential oil: Mechanism of action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Monique; Caillet, Stéphane; Shareck, Francois

    2009-07-01

    Spice extracts under the form of essential oils were tested for their efficiency to increase the relative radiosensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157H7 in culture media. The two pathogens were treated by gamma-irradiation alone or in combination with oregano essential oil to evaluate their mechanism of action. The membrane murein composition, and the intracellular and extracellular concentration of ATP was determined. The bacterial strains were treated with two irradiation doses: 1.2 kGy to induce cell damage and 3.5 kGy to cause cell death for L. monocytogenes. A dose of 0.4 kGy to induce cell damages, 1.1 kGy to obtain viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state and 1.3 kGy to obtain a lethal dose was also applied on E. coli O157H7. Oregano essential oil was used at 0.020% and 0.025% (w/v), which is the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for L. monocytogenes. For E. coli O157H7, a concentration of 0.006% and 0.025% (w/v) which is the minimum inhibitory concentration was applied. The use of essential oils in combination with irradiation has permitted an increase of the bacterial radiosensitization by more than 3.1 times. All treatments had also a significant effect ( p⩽0.05) on the murein composition, although some muropeptides did not seem to be affected by the treatment. Each treatment influenced differently the relative percentage and number of muropeptides. There was a significant ( p⩽0.05) correlation between the reduction of intracellular ATP and increase in extracellular ATP following treatment of the cells with oregano oil. The reduction of intracellular ATP was even more important when essential oil was combined with irradiation, but irradiation of L. monocytogenes alone induced a significant decrease ( p⩽0.05) of the internal ATP without affecting the external ATP.

  3. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi; Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer; Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  4. The Myb-p300-CREB axis modulates intestine homeostasis, radiosensitivity and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sampurno, S; Bijenhof, A; Cheasley, D; Xu, H; Robine, S; Hilton, D; Alexander, W S; Pereira, L; Mantamadiotis, T; Malaterre, J; Ramsay, R G

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium is constantly renewing, depending upon the intestinal stem cells (ISC) regulated by a spectrum of transcription factors (TFs), including Myb. We noted previously in mice with a p300 mutation (plt6) within the Myb-interaction-domain phenocopied Myb hypomorphic mutant mice with regard to thrombopoiesis, and here, changes in GI homeostasis. p300 is a transcriptional coactivator for many TFs, most prominently cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and also Myb. Studies have highlighted the importance of CREB in proliferation and radiosensitivity, but not in the GI. This prompted us to directly investigate the p300–Myb–CREB axis in the GI. Here, the role of CREB has been defined by generating GI-specific inducible creb knockout (KO) mice. KO mice show efficient and specific deletion of CREB, with no evident compensation by CREM and ATF1. Despite complete KO, only modest effects on proliferation, radiosensitivity and differentiation in the GI under homeostatic or stress conditions were evident, even though CREB target gene pcna (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) was downregulated. creb and p300 mutant lines show increased goblet cells, whereas a reduction in enteroendocrine cells was apparent only in the p300 line, further resembling the Myb hypomorphs. When propagated in vitro, crebKO ISC were defective in organoid formation, suggesting that the GI stroma compensates for CREB loss in vivo, unlike in MybKO studies. Thus, it appears that p300 regulates GI differentiation primarily through Myb, rather than CREB. Finally, active pCREB is elevated in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells and adenomas, and is required for the expression of drug transporter, MRP2, associated with resistance to Oxaliplatin as well as several chromatin cohesion protein that are relevant to CRC therapy. These data raise the prospect that CREB may have a role in GI malignancy as it does in other cancer types, but unlike Myb, is not critical for GI

  5. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in predicting the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaolei; Tong, Yuanhe; Xiao, Youping; Liao, Jiang; Chen, Yunbing; Wang, Min

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the application value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in predicting cervical cancer radiosensitivity. Twenty-five patients who were newly diagnosed as cervical cancer and accepted simple radiotherapy were included in this study. Before external irradiation, 20 GY and at the end of irradiation, routine 1.5 T MRI and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scanning were carried. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of primary tumor was measured. Its correlation with tumor regression rate was analyzed. ADC values of before irradiation, 20 GY and at the end of irradiation was (0.93 ± 0.14) × 10-3 mm2/s, (1.25 ± 0.17) × 10-3 mm2/s and (1.55 ± 0.13) × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. There were statistical significant differences (P< 0.01). D-value of ADC values between before and 20 GY external irradiation was (0.33 ± 0.16) mm2/s. The tumor volume before and at the end of external irradiation were (37.48 ± 26.83) cm3 and (4.41 ± 3.72) cm3 respectively, with tumor regression rate of before and after external irradiation of (0.86 ± 0.11). ADC values of before irradiation, 20 GY and at the end of irradiation did not correlate with tumor regression rate. D-value of ADC values between before and 20 GY external irradiation positively correlated with tumor regression rate (r = 0.423, P = 0.035). ADC value of cervical cancer increased after radiotherapy and early changes of ADC value was positively correlated with tumor regression rate, thus, ADC value could be used as a potential prediction factor for cervical cancer radiosensitivity. PMID:26550334

  6. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Should Be Combined With a Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Martin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tumor hypoxia on the expected level of cell killing by regimens of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and to determine the extent to which the negative effect of hypoxia could be prevented using a clinically available hypoxic cell radiosensitizer. Results and Discussion: We have calculated the expected level of tumor cell killing from regimens of SABR, both with and without the assumption that 20% of the tumor cells are hypoxic, using the standard linear quadratic model and the universal survival curve modification. We compare the results obtained with our own clinical data for lung tumors of different sizes and with published data from other studies. We also have calculated the expected effect on cell survival of adding the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Modeling tumor cell killing with any of the currently used regimens of SABR produces results that are inconsistent with the majority of clinical findings if tumor hypoxia is not considered. However, with the assumption of tumor hypoxia, the expected level of cell killing is consistent with clinical data. For only some of the smallest tumors are the clinical data consistent with no tumor hypoxia, but there could be other reasons for the sensitivity of these tumors. The addition of etanidazole at clinically achievable tumor concentrations produces a large increase in the expected level of tumor cell killing from the large radiation doses used in SABR. Conclusions: The presence of tumor hypoxia is a major negative factor in limiting the curability of tumors by SABR at radiation doses that are tolerable to surrounding normal tissues. However, this negative effect of hypoxia could be overcome by the addition of clinically tolerable doses of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer etanidazole.

  7. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meidanchi, Alireza; Akhavan, Omid; Khoei, Samideh; Shokri, Ali A; Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khansari, Nakisa

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ~1 min for 2 mg mL(-1) of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (~1T). The ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of (60)Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL(-1), in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in ~53% inactivation of the cells (~17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy. PMID:25492003

  8. Inhibition of PARP-1 by olaparib (AZD2281) increases the radiosensitivity of a lung tumor xenograft.

    PubMed

    Senra, Joana M; Telfer, Brian A; Cherry, Kim E; McCrudden, Cian M; Hirst, David G; O'Connor, Mark J; Wedge, Stephen R; Stratford, Ian J

    2011-10-01

    PARP-1 is a critical enzyme in the repair of DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of PARP-1 increases the effectiveness of radiation in killing tumor cells. However, although the mechanism(s) are well understood for these radiosensitizing effects in vitro, the underlying mechanism(s) in vivo are less clear. Nicotinamide, a drug structurally related to the first generation PARP-1 inhibitor, 3-aminobenzamide, reduces tumor hypoxia by preventing transient cessations in tumor blood flow, thus improving tumor oxygenation and sensitivity to radiotherapy. Here, we investigate whether olaparib, a potent PARP-1 inhibitor, enhances radiotherapy, not only by inhibiting DNA repair but also by changing tumor vascular hemodynamics in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). In irradiated Calu-6 and A549 cells, olaparib enhanced the cytotoxic effects of radiation (sensitizer enhancement ratio at 10% survival = 1.5 and 1.3) and DNA double-strand breaks persisted for at least 24 hours after treatment. Combination treatment of Calu-6 xenografts with olaparib and fractionated radiotherapy caused significant tumor regression (P = 0.007) relative to radiotherapy alone. To determine whether this radiosensitization was solely due to effects on DNA repair, we used a dorsal window chamber model to establish the drug/radiation effects on vessel dynamics. Olaparib alone, when given as single or multiple daily doses, or in combination with fractionated radiotherapy, increased the perfusion of tumor blood vessels. Furthermore, an ex vivo assay in phenylephrine preconstricted arteries confirmed olaparib to have higher vasodilatory properties than nicotinamide. This study suggests that olaparib warrants consideration for further development in combination with radiotherapy in clinical oncology settings such as NSCLC. PMID:21825006

  9. Radiosensitization by 6-aminonicotinamide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Varshney, R; Dwarakanath, Bs; Jain, V

    2005-05-01

    The aim was to exploit simultaneous inhibition of glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways of energy production for radiosensitization using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN) in transformed mammalian cells. Two human tumour cell lines (cerebral glioma, BMG-1 and squamous carcinoma cells 4197) were investigated. 2-DG and/or 6-AN added at the time of irradiation were present for 4 h after radiation. Radiation-induced cell death (macrocolony assay), cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation), cell cycle delay (bromodeoxyuridne (BrdU) pulse chase), apoptosis (externalization of phosphotidylserine (PS) by annexin V), chromatin-bound proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cellular glutathione (GSH) levels were investigated as parameters of radiation response. The presence of 2-DG (5 mM) during and for 4 h after irradiation increased the radiation-induced micronuclei formation and cell death, and caused a time-dependent decrease in GSH levels in BMG-1 cells while no significant effects could be observed in 4197 cells. 6-AN (5 microM) enhanced the radiosensitivity of both cell lines and reduced the GSH content by nearly 50% in gamma-irradiated 4197 cells. Combining 2-DG and 6-AN caused a profound decrease in the GSH content and enhanced the radiation damage in both the cell lines by increasing mitotic and apoptotic cell death. Further, the combination (2-DG + 6-AN) enhanced the radiation-induced G2 block, besides arresting cells in S phase and inhibited the recruitment of PCNA. The combination of 2-DG and 6-AN enhances radiation damage by modifying damage response pathways and has the potential for improving radiotherapy of cancer. PMID:16076755

  10. Radiosensitization of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein E6*I

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ervinna; Delic, Naomi C.; Hong, Angela; Zhang Mei; Rose, Barbara R.; Lyons, J. Guy

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) whose disease is associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have a significantly better outcome than those with HPV-negative disease, but the reasons for the better outcome are not known. We postulated that they might relate to an ability of HPV proteins to confer a better response to radiotherapy, a commonly used treatment for OSCC. Methods and Materials: We stably expressed the specific splicing-derived isoforms, E6*I and E6*II, or the entire E6 open reading frame (E6total), which gives rise to both full length and E6*I isoforms, in OSCC cell lines. Radiation resistance was measured in clonogenicity assays, p53 activity was measured using transfected reporter genes, and flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis. Results: E6*I and E6total sensitized the OSCC cells to irradiation, E6*I giving the greatest degree of radiosensitization (approximately eightfold lower surviving cell fraction at 10 Gy), whereas E6*II had no effect. In contrast to radiosensitivity, E6*I was a weaker inhibitor than E6total of tumor suppressor p53 transactivator activity in the same cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that irradiated E6*I expressing cells had a much higher G2M:G1 ratio than control cells, indicating that, after G2, cells were diverted from the cell cycle to programmed cell death. Conclusion: This study supports a role for E6*I in the enhanced responsiveness of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas to p53-independent radiation-induced death.

  11. Thinking about Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Accountability is a key component of healthcare reforms, in Canada and internationally, but there is increasing recognition that one size does not fit all. A more nuanced understanding begins with clarifying what is meant by accountability, including specifying for what, by whom, to whom and how. These papers arise from a Partnership for Health System Improvement (PHSI), funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), on approaches to accountability that examined accountability across multiple healthcare subsectors in Ontario. The partnership features collaboration among an interdisciplinary team, working with senior policy makers, to clarify what is known about best practices to achieve accountability under various circumstances. This paper presents our conceptual framework. It examines potential approaches (policy instruments) and postulates that their outcomes may vary by subsector depending upon (a) the policy goals being pursued, (b) governance/ownership structures and relationships and (c) the types of goods and services being delivered, and their production characteristics (e.g., contestability, measurability and complexity). PMID:25305385

  12. Isoalantolactone Enhances the Radiosensitivity of UMSCC-10A Cells via Specific Inhibition of Erk1/2 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiehua; Wang, Hongyan; Li, Lihua; Liu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background Although radiotherapy is one of the mainstream approaches for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), this cancer is always associated with resistance to radiation. In this study, the mechanism of action of isoalantolactone as well as its radiosensitizing effect was investigated in UMSCC-10A cells. Methods The radiosensitization of UMSCC-10A cells treated with isoalantolactone was analyzed by colony formation assay. The radiosensitization effects of isoalantolactone on cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis regulation were examined by BrdU incorporation assay, DNA content assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Western blotting was performed to determine the effects of isoalantolactone combined with radiation on the protein expression of Mek, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk1/2) as well as phosphorylated Mek and Erk1/2. Erk1/2 knockdown by siRNA was used to confirm that isoalantolactone specifically inhibited the activation of Erk1/2 signaling pathway in UMSCC-10A cells. Results Isoalantolactone enhanced the radiosensitivity of UMSCC-10A cells; the sensitivity enhanced ratios (SERs) were 1.44 and 1.63, respectively, for 2.5 and 5 μM. Moreover, isoalantolactone enhanced radiation-induced cell proliferation and apoptosis and cell cycle arrested at G2/M phase. Furthermore, no marked changes were observed in the expression of total Erk1/2 and Mek protein after radiation treatment. However, isoalantolactone was significantly reduced radiation-induced the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, whereas it altered the phosphorylation of Mek to a lesser extent. In addition, the radiosensitivity of UMSCC-10A cells with Erk1/2 knockdown was increased. Isoalantolactone cannot further prevent the proliferation of UMSCC-10A cells with Erk1/2 knockdown which other mechanism regulated cell proliferation. Conclusion Our results suggested that isoalantolactone enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis, cell cycle arrested and reduced the cell

  13. Knocking Down Nucleolin Expression Enhances the Radiosensitivity of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by Influencing DNA-PKcs Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-Yu; Lu, Shan; Xu, Xiang-Ying; Hu, Song-Liu; Li, Bin; Qi, Rui-Xue; Chen, Lin; Chang, Joe Y

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolin (C23) is an important anti-apoptotic protein that is ubiquitously expressed in exponentially growing eukaryotic cells. In order to understand the impact of C23 in radiation therapy, we attempted to investigate the relationship of C23 expression with the radiosensitivity of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We investigated the role of C23 in activating the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA- PKcs), which is a critical protein for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair. As a result, we found that the expression of C23 was negatively correlated with the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cell lines. In vitro clonogenic survival assays revealed that C23 knockdown increased the radiosensitivity of a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line, potentially through the promotion of radiation-induced apoptosis and adjusting the cell cycle to a more radiosensitive stage. Immunofluorescence data revealed an increasing quantity of γ-H2AX foci and decreasing radiation-induced DNA damage repair following knockdown of C23. To further clarify the mechanism of C23 in DNA DSBs repair, we detected the expression of DNA-PKcs and C23 proteins in NSCLC cell lines. C23 might participate in DNA DSBs repair for the reason that the expression of DNA-PKcs decreased at 30, 60, 120 and 360 minutes after irradiation in C23 knockdown cells. Especially, the activity of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation sites at the S2056 and T2609 was significantly suppressed. Therefore we concluded that C23 knockdown can inhibit DNA-PKcs phosphorylation activity at the S2056 and T2609 sites, thus reducing the radiation damage repair and increasing the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells. Taken together, the inhibition of C23 expression was shown to increase the radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells, as implied by the relevance to the notably decreased DNA-PKcs phosphorylation activity at the S2056 and T2609 clusters. Further research on targeted C23 treatment may promote effectiveness of radiotherapy

  14. The radiosensitizing effect of immunoadjuvant OM-174 requires cooperation between immune and tumor cells through interferon-gamma and inducible nitric oxide synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Ridder, Mark de . E-mail: Mark.De.Ridder@vub.ac.be; Verovski, Valeri N.; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Berge, Dirk L. van den; Monsaert, Christinne; Law, Kalun; Storme, Guy A.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To explore whether antitumor immunoadjuvant OM-174 can stimulate immune cells to produce interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and thereby radiosensitize tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Splenocytes from BALB/c mice were stimulated by OM-174 at plasma-achievable concentrations (0.03-3 {mu}g/mL), and afterward analyzed for the expression and secretion of IFN-{gamma} by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Stimulated splenocytes were used as a source of IFN-{gamma} to radiosensitize hypoxic EMT-6 tumor cells through the cytokine-inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Results: OM-174 activated the production of IFN-{gamma} at high levels that reached 70 ng/mL in normoxia (21% oxygen) and 27 ng/mL in tumor-relevant hypoxia (1% oxygen). This caused up to 2.1-fold radiosensitization of EMT-6 tumor cells, which was associated with the iNOS-mediated production of the radiosensitizing molecule nitric oxide, as confirmed by accumulation of its oxidative metabolite nitrite, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Both iNOS activation and radiosensitization were counteracted by neutralizing antibodies against IFN-{gamma}. The same mechanism of radiosensitization through the IFN-{gamma} secretion pathway was identified for IL-12 + IL-18, which are known to mediate IFN-{gamma} responses. Hypoxia displayed a dual effect on the immune-tumor cell interaction, by downregulating the expression of the IFN-{gamma} gene while upregulating iNOS at transcriptional level. Conclusion: Immunoadjuvant OM-174 is an efficient radiosensitizer of tumor cells through activation of the IFN-{gamma} secretion pathway in immune cells. This finding indicates a rationale for combining immunostimulatory and radiosensitizing strategies and extends the potential therapeutic applications of OM-174.

  15. Radiosensitization of TPGS-emulsified docetaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles in CNE-1 and A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Yuan, Yin; Chu, Min; Zhao, Shuang; Song, Qingle; Mu, Xiaoqian; Xu, Shuangbing; Zhang, Zhiping; Yang, Kunyu

    2016-03-01

    Docetaxel is among the most effective radiosensitizers. It is widely used as radiosensitizer in many tumors, including head and neck carcinoma. Nevertheless, poor solubility and severe hypersensitivity limit its clinical use and its therapeutic effect remains to be improved. In this study, docetaxel-loaded polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation method to be new radiosensitizer with lower side effects and higher efficacy. The physiochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles were studied. Two human tumor cell lines which are resistant to radiotherapy were used in this research. We have compared the radioenhancement efficacy of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles with docetaxel in A549 and CNE-1 cells. Compared with docetaxel, radiosensitization of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles was improved significantly (sensitization enhancement ratio in A549 increased 1.24-fold to 1.68-fold when the radiation was applied 2 h after the drug, p < 0.01, sensitization enhancement ratio in CNE-1 increased 1.32-fold to 1.61-fold, p < 0.05). We explored the mechanisms for the radiosensitization efficiency and the difference between docetaxel and docetaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The improved radiosensitization efficacy was associated with enhanced G2/M arrest, promoted apoptosis and the role of D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate which will enhance the cell uptake and inhibit the multiple drug resistance. Moreover, the radiosensitization efficacy of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles was more prominent than docetaxel. In conclusion, tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-emulsified docetaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were more efficacious and fewer adverse effects were observed than with the commercial docetaxel formulation. Thus, PLGA nanoparticles hold promise as a radiosensitizing agent. PMID:26608458

  16. 17 CFR 17.01 - Identification of special accounts, volume threshold accounts, and omnibus accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accounts, volume threshold accounts, and omnibus accounts. 17.01 Section 17.01 Commodity and Securities..., CLEARING MEMBERS, AND FOREIGN BROKERS § 17.01 Identification of special accounts, volume threshold accounts... in § 17.02(b). (b) Identification of volume threshold accounts. Each clearing member shall...

  17. Differences in heat-induced cell killing as determined in three mammalian cell lines do not correspond with the extent of heat radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Kampinga, H H; Jorritsma, J B; Burgman, P; Konings, A W

    1986-10-01

    Three different cell lines, Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells, HeLa S3 cells and LM mouse fibroblasts, were used to investigate whether or not the extent of heat killing (44 degrees C) and heat radio-sensitization (44 degrees C before 0-6 Gy X-irradiation) are related. Although HeLa cells were the most heat-resistant cell line and showed the least heat radiosensitization, we found that the most heat-sensitive EAT cells (D0, EAT = 8.0 min; D0, LM = 10.0 min; D0, HeLa = 12.5 min) showed less radiosensitization than the more heat-resistant LM fibroblasts (TERHeLa less than TEREAT less than TERLM). Therefore, it is concluded that the routes leading to heat-induced cell death are not identical to those determining heat radiosensitization. Furthermore the inactivation of DNA polymerase alpha and beta activities by heat seemed not to correlate with heat survival alone but showed a positive relationship to heat radiosensitization. The possibility of these enzymes being a determinant in heat radiosensitization is discussed. PMID:3489689

  18. Identification of vitamin B1 metabolism as a tumor-specific radiosensitizing pathway using a high-throughput colony formation screen

    PubMed Central

    Buffa, Francesca M.; Yu, Sheng; Ebner, Daniel V.; Howarth, Alison; Folkes, Lisa K.; Budwal, Balam; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Durrant, Lisa; Muschel, Ruth J.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Higgins, Geoff S.

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation is the gold standard assay for determining reproductive cell death after radiation treatment, since effects on proliferation often do not reflect survival. We have developed a high-throughput radiosensitivity screening method based on clonogenicity and screened a siRNA library against kinases. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK1), a key component of Vitamin B1/thiamine metabolism, was identified as a target for radiosensitization. TPK1 knockdown caused significant radiosensitization in cancer but not normal tissue cell lines. Other means of blocking this pathway, knockdown of thiamine transporter-1 (THTR1) or treatment with the thiamine analogue pyrithiamine hydrobromide (PyrH) caused significant tumor specific radiosensitization. There was persistent DNA damage in cells irradiated after TPK1 and THTR1 knockdown or PyrH treatment. Thus this screen allowed the identification of thiamine metabolism as a novel radiosensitization target that affects DNA repair. Short-term modulation of thiamine metabolism could be a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor specific radiosensitization. PMID:25788274

  19. Peer Assessment Accounting for Student Agreement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neus, Jordan L.

    2011-01-01

    Peer assessment has been gaining significant ground as a means of fostering an environment of accountability and responsibility for group projects in higher education. A popular peer assessment method assigns individual grades via a linear relationship to peer assessment scores. Using this method, a group member who receives his or her group's…

  20. Holding Students Accountable in Team Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an efficient peer evaluation process that can be implemented at the middle and high school levels, and that holds students accountable for their individual contributions in a team-based project. Teachers faced with this challenge will welcome the web-based peer-evaluation interface that was capable of soliciting student…