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Sample records for account individual radiosensitivity

  1. A Monte Carlo-based model of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization accounting for increased radiobiological effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Lechtman, E; Mashouf, S; Chattopadhyay, N; Keller, B M; Lai, P; Cai, Z; Reilly, R M; Pignol, J-P

    2013-05-21

    Radiosensitization using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been shown to vary widely with cell line, irradiation energy, AuNP size, concentration and intracellular localization. We developed a Monte Carlo-based AuNP radiosensitization predictive model (ARP), which takes into account the detailed energy deposition at the nano-scale. This model was compared to experimental cell survival and macroscopic dose enhancement predictions. PC-3 prostate cancer cell survival was characterized after irradiation using a 300 kVp photon source with and without AuNPs present in the cell culture media. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations were conducted, producing individual tracks of photoelectric products escaping AuNPs and energy deposition was scored in nano-scale voxels in a model cell nucleus. Cell survival in our predictive model was calculated by integrating the radiation induced lethal event density over the nucleus volume. Experimental AuNP radiosensitization was observed with a sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) of 1.21 ± 0.13. SERs estimated using the ARP model and the macroscopic enhancement model were 1.20 ± 0.12 and 1.07 ± 0.10 respectively. In the hypothetical case of AuNPs localized within the nucleus, the ARP model predicted a SER of 1.29 ± 0.13, demonstrating the influence of AuNP intracellular localization on radiosensitization.

  2. Rh factor is associated with individual radiosensitivity: A cytogenetic study

    PubMed Central

    Khosravifarsani, Meysam; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Borzoueisileh, Sajad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Radiosensitivity is an inherent trait, associated with a raised reaction to ionizing radiation on the human body. In radiotherapy and radiation protection fields, individualization of the patient’s treatment is one of the main topics. With the goal of determining biomarkers capable of anticipating normal tissue side reactions, we studied the association between the Rh factor and radiosensitivity. Methods This experimental study was carried out from January to June 2014 among 50 normal responders with A blood group (25Rh+ and 25Rh−) between the ages of 22 and 23 in Babol, Iran. Human peripheral blood samples were taken from subjects and, using CBMN assay, the biological effects of gamma irradiation, including the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and nuclear division index (NDI), were measured. A data analysis was performed using SPSS version 18 to determine the independent and paired samples t-tests. Results A significant increment occurred in the frequency of MN in group Rh+ (196 ± 18.23) compared with Rh- (169 ± 17.11) following irradiation (p<0.001). Conclusions The Rh factor might be a predicting marker in an individual’s radiosensitivity to ionizing radiations. However, we believe that additional investigations are needed to prove this hypothesis. PMID:27757196

  3. Individual radiosensitivity in a breast cancer collective is changed with the patients’ age

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Judith; Keller, Ulrike; Schmidt, Manfred; Ott, Oliver; Fietkau, Rainer; Distel, Luitpold V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individual radiosensitivity has a crucial impact on radiotherapy related side effects. Our aim was to study a breast cancer collective for its variation of individual radiosensitivity depending on the patients’ age. Materials and methods Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 129 individuals. Individual radiosensitivity in 67 breast cancer patients and 62 healthy individuals was estimated by 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results Breast cancer patients were distinctly more radiosensitive compared to healthy controls. A subgroup of 9 rather radiosensitive and 9 rather radio-resistant patients was identified. A subgroup of patients aged between 40 and 50 was distinctly more radiosensitive than younger or older patients. Conclusions In the breast cancer collective a distinct resistant and sensitive subgroup is identified, which could be subject for treatment adjustment. Preliminary results indicate that especially in the range of age 40 to 50 patients with an increased radiosensitivity are more frequent and may have an increased risk to suffer from therapy related side effects. PMID:24587784

  4. Individual radiosensitivity and its daily variations. [leukocyte reaction to epinephrine load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druzhinin, Y. N.; Grigoryev, Y. G.; Podluzhnaya, G. N.; Pospishil, M.

    1974-01-01

    The effectiveness of determining individual radiosensitivity of rats by total gas exchange measurements, studies of Na/K content in urine, and the reaction of leukocytes to intra-abdominal administration of epinephrine, was studied. The most indicative results of predicting individual reaction to radiation were obtained by the leukocyte reaction to epinephrine load; however, changes in the leukocyte content of peripheral blood after epinephrine administration depended on the initial level during the day.

  5. Comparison of Individual Radiosensitivity to γ-Rays and Carbon Ions.

    PubMed

    Shim, Grace; Normil, Marie Delna; Testard, Isabelle; Hempel, William M; Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions are an up-and-coming ion species, currently being used in charged particle radiotherapy. As it is well established that there are considerable interindividual differences in radiosensitivity in the general population that can significantly influence clinical outcomes of radiotherapy, we evaluate the degree of these differences in the context of carbon ion therapy compared with conventional radiotherapy. In this study, we evaluate individual radiosensitivity following exposure to carbon-13 ions or γ-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals based on the frequency of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that was either misrepaired or left unrepaired to form chromosomal aberrations (CAs) (simply referred to here as DSBs for brevity). Levels of DSBs were estimated from the scoring of CAs visualized with telomere/centromere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TC-FISH). We examine radiosensitivity at the dose of 2 Gy, a routinely administered dose during fractionated radiotherapy, and we determined that a wide range of DSBs were induced by the given dose among healthy individuals, with highly radiosensitive individuals harboring more IR-induced breaks in the genome than radioresistant individuals following exposure to the same dose. Furthermore, we determined the relative effectiveness of carbon irradiation in comparison to γ-irradiation in the induction of DSBs at each studied dose (isodose effect), a quality we term "relative dose effect" (RDE). This ratio is advantageous, as it allows for simple comparison of dose-response curves. At 2 Gy, carbon irradiation was three times more effective in inducing DSBs compared with γ-irradiation (RDE of 3); these results were confirmed using a second cytogenetic technique, multicolor-FISH. We also analyze radiosensitivity at other doses (0.2-15 Gy), to represent hypo- and hyperfractionation doses and determined that RDE is dose dependent: high ratios at low doses

  6. Comparison of Individual Radiosensitivity to γ-Rays and Carbon Ions.

    PubMed

    Shim, Grace; Normil, Marie Delna; Testard, Isabelle; Hempel, William M; Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions are an up-and-coming ion species, currently being used in charged particle radiotherapy. As it is well established that there are considerable interindividual differences in radiosensitivity in the general population that can significantly influence clinical outcomes of radiotherapy, we evaluate the degree of these differences in the context of carbon ion therapy compared with conventional radiotherapy. In this study, we evaluate individual radiosensitivity following exposure to carbon-13 ions or γ-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals based on the frequency of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that was either misrepaired or left unrepaired to form chromosomal aberrations (CAs) (simply referred to here as DSBs for brevity). Levels of DSBs were estimated from the scoring of CAs visualized with telomere/centromere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TC-FISH). We examine radiosensitivity at the dose of 2 Gy, a routinely administered dose during fractionated radiotherapy, and we determined that a wide range of DSBs were induced by the given dose among healthy individuals, with highly radiosensitive individuals harboring more IR-induced breaks in the genome than radioresistant individuals following exposure to the same dose. Furthermore, we determined the relative effectiveness of carbon irradiation in comparison to γ-irradiation in the induction of DSBs at each studied dose (isodose effect), a quality we term "relative dose effect" (RDE). This ratio is advantageous, as it allows for simple comparison of dose-response curves. At 2 Gy, carbon irradiation was three times more effective in inducing DSBs compared with γ-irradiation (RDE of 3); these results were confirmed using a second cytogenetic technique, multicolor-FISH. We also analyze radiosensitivity at other doses (0.2-15 Gy), to represent hypo- and hyperfractionation doses and determined that RDE is dose dependent: high ratios at low doses

  7. Comparison of Individual Radiosensitivity to γ-Rays and Carbon Ions

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Normil, Marie Delna; Testard, Isabelle; Hempel, William M.; Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions are an up-and-coming ion species, currently being used in charged particle radiotherapy. As it is well established that there are considerable interindividual differences in radiosensitivity in the general population that can significantly influence clinical outcomes of radiotherapy, we evaluate the degree of these differences in the context of carbon ion therapy compared with conventional radiotherapy. In this study, we evaluate individual radiosensitivity following exposure to carbon-13 ions or γ-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals based on the frequency of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that was either misrepaired or left unrepaired to form chromosomal aberrations (CAs) (simply referred to here as DSBs for brevity). Levels of DSBs were estimated from the scoring of CAs visualized with telomere/centromere-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TC-FISH). We examine radiosensitivity at the dose of 2 Gy, a routinely administered dose during fractionated radiotherapy, and we determined that a wide range of DSBs were induced by the given dose among healthy individuals, with highly radiosensitive individuals harboring more IR-induced breaks in the genome than radioresistant individuals following exposure to the same dose. Furthermore, we determined the relative effectiveness of carbon irradiation in comparison to γ-irradiation in the induction of DSBs at each studied dose (isodose effect), a quality we term “relative dose effect” (RDE). This ratio is advantageous, as it allows for simple comparison of dose–response curves. At 2 Gy, carbon irradiation was three times more effective in inducing DSBs compared with γ-irradiation (RDE of 3); these results were confirmed using a second cytogenetic technique, multicolor-FISH. We also analyze radiosensitivity at other doses (0.2–15 Gy), to represent hypo- and hyperfractionation doses and determined that RDE is dose dependent: high ratios at low

  8. 17 CFR 300.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individual accounts. 300.101... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.101 Individual accounts. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these rules... deemed his individual accounts, shall be combined so as to constitute a single account of a...

  9. 25 CFR 115.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Individual accounts. 115.101 Section 115.101 Indians... INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.101 Individual accounts. Except as otherwise provided in this part, adults shall have the right to withdraw funds from their accounts. Upon their application, or...

  10. 25 CFR 115.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Individual accounts. 115.101 Section 115.101 Indians... INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.101 Individual accounts. Except as otherwise provided in this part, adults shall have the right to withdraw funds from their accounts. Upon their application, or...

  11. 25 CFR 115.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Individual accounts. 115.101 Section 115.101 Indians... INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.101 Individual accounts. Except as otherwise provided in this part, adults shall have the right to withdraw funds from their accounts. Upon their application, or...

  12. 25 CFR 115.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Individual accounts. 115.101 Section 115.101 Indians... INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.101 Individual accounts. Except as otherwise provided in this part, adults shall have the right to withdraw funds from their accounts. Upon their application, or...

  13. Evidence for predictive validity of blood assays to evaluate individual radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Severin, Erhard . E-mail: severie@uni-muenster.de; Greve, Burkhard; Pascher, Elke; Wedemeyer, Niels; Hacker-Klom, Ursula; Silling, Gerda; Kienast, Joachim; Willich, Normann; Goehde, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: An escalation in standard irradiation dose ensuring improved local tumor control is estimated, but this strategy would require the exclusion of the most sensitive individuals from treatment. Therefore, fast and reliable assays for prediction of the individual radiosensitivity are urgently required. Methods and Materials: Seven parameters in lymphocytes of 40 patients with leukemia were analyzed before, during, and after total body irradiation (TBI) and in vitro X-ray irradiation. These were: cell proliferation, nuclear damage, activation of cytokines, and numbers of total leukocytes of CD34+ hematopoietic blood stem cells and of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Additionally, antioxidative capacity of blood plasma, uric acid, and hemoglobin levels were measured. Blood samples of 67 healthy donors were used as controls. Results: In vivo and in vitro irradiations showed comparable results. A dose-response relationship was found for most parameters. Three parameters were associated with severe acute oral mucositis (Grade 3 or 4 vs. Grade 0 to 2): leukocytes fewer than 6200/{mu}L after 4 Gy TBI, a rate of >19% lymphocytes with reduced DNA and protein content ('necroses') after 4 Gy in vitro irradiation, and a small antioxidative capacity in blood plasma (<0.68 mMol) after 8 Gy TBI. Conclusion: Three simple blood assays were associated with oral mucositis that are posed here hypothetically as an early symptom of enhanced radiosensitivity in leukemic patients: leukocyte count, damaged lymphocyte score, and the antioxidative capacity after exposure.

  14. 25 CFR 115.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individual accounts. 115.101 Section 115.101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS IIM Accounts § 115.101 Individual accounts. Except as otherwise provided in this...

  15. Chromosomal radiosensitivity during the G2 cell-cycle period of skin fibroblasts from individuals with familial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parshad, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    The authors reported previously that human cells after neoplastic transformation in culture had acquired an increased susceptibility to chromatid damage induced by x-irradiation during the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Evidence suggested that this results from deficient DNA repair during G2 phase. Cells derived from human tumors also showed enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. Furthermore, skin fibroblasts from individuals with genetic diseases predisposing to a high risk of cancer, including ataxia-telangiectasia, Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, and xeroderma pigmentosum exhibited enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. The present study shows that apparently normal skin fibroblasts from individuals with familial cancer--i.e., from families with a history of neoplastic disease--also exhibit enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. This radiosensitivity appears, therefore, to be associated with both a genetic predisposition to cancer and a malignant neoplastic state. Furthermore, enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity may provide the basis for an assay to detect genetic susceptibility to cancer.

  16. 17 CFR 300.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Individual accounts. 300.101... A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of âseparateâ Customers of Sipc Members § 300.101 Individual accounts. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these...

  17. 17 CFR 300.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Individual accounts. 300.101... A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of âseparateâ Customers of Sipc Members § 300.101 Individual accounts. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these...

  18. 17 CFR 300.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Individual accounts. 300.101... A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of âseparateâ Customers of Sipc Members § 300.101 Individual accounts. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these...

  19. 17 CFR 300.101 - Individual accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Individual accounts. 300.101... A to Part 285 RULES OF THE SECURITIES INVESTOR PROTECTION CORPORATION Accounts of âseparateâ Customers of Sipc Members § 300.101 Individual accounts. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these...

  20. [Léon Bouchacourt (1865-1949): How an obstetrician pointed out individual radiosensitivity].

    PubMed

    Foray, N

    2015-12-01

    Léon Bouchacourt (1865-1949) was a misknown pioneer of radiology and radiotherapy from Lyon, France. While he was resident in obstetrics in Hôpitaux de Paris from 1892 to 1898, he met Charcot, the future polar explorer, and wrote the first thesis dissertation about X-rays. He invented a new radiology technique for cavitary organs such as vagina, rectum and mouth, the endodiascopy, which permitted him to perform the first pelvimetry and dental radiographies in France. While he undertook the first trials of contact-radiotherapy, he was confronted with radiation-induced reactions. In 1911, he wrote the first paper about individual radiosensitivity. During the First World War, he commanded one of the radiology vehicles, he met Irène Curie and developed his « radiological helmet », which will hold his name and became essential for interventional radiology. After the war, with Béclère and ten others, Léon Bouchacourt funded the French Radiology Society. He ended his career by thinking about public health and the different aspects of the duties of radiologists.

  1. Individual Learning Accounts: Honourable Intentions, Ignoble Utility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thursfield, Denise; Smith, Vikki; Holden, Rick; Hamblett, John

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of the implementation of Individual Learning Accounts in Britain revealed five themes that may explain the program's lack of success: individualistic approach to adult education, conflict of individualism with partnership, ineffective targeting of low-skilled populations, lack of linkage with a lifelong commitment to learning, and…

  2. Annotated Bibliography: Perspectives on Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Yang, Hannah; Anderson, Christian K.

    2009-01-01

    During their three-year research project, the authors found that most practitioners, researchers, and policymakers in the education field were not familiar with Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) or the existing research on IDAs. Therefore, in this paper the authors compiled a list of some of the references that they found useful and that they…

  3. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  4. Next generation of individual account pension reforms in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Kritzer, Barbara E; Kay, Stephen J; Sinha, Tapen

    2011-01-01

    Latin America led the world in introducing individual retirement accounts intended to complement or replace defined benefit state-sponsored, pay-as-you-go systems. After Chile implemented the first system in 1981, a number of other Latin American countries incorporated privately managed individual accounts as part of their retirement income systems beginning in the 1990s. This article examines the subsequent "reform of the reform" of these pension systems, with a focus on the recent overhaul of the Chilean system and major reforms in Mexico, Peru, and Colombia. The authors analyze key elements of pension reform in the region relating to individual accounts: system coverage, fees, competition, investment, the impact of gender on benefits, financial education, voluntary savings, and payouts. PMID:21466033

  5. Next generation of individual account pension reforms in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Kritzer, Barbara E; Kay, Stephen J; Sinha, Tapen

    2011-01-01

    Latin America led the world in introducing individual retirement accounts intended to complement or replace defined benefit state-sponsored, pay-as-you-go systems. After Chile implemented the first system in 1981, a number of other Latin American countries incorporated privately managed individual accounts as part of their retirement income systems beginning in the 1990s. This article examines the subsequent "reform of the reform" of these pension systems, with a focus on the recent overhaul of the Chilean system and major reforms in Mexico, Peru, and Colombia. The authors analyze key elements of pension reform in the region relating to individual accounts: system coverage, fees, competition, investment, the impact of gender on benefits, financial education, voluntary savings, and payouts.

  6. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Reauthorization: Accountability and Personal Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, H. Rutherford

    2005-01-01

    The reauthorized Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a school-reform law closely aligned with the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB); a civil rights law; and a "cousin" of the 1996 welfare reform law. By imposing new or strengthened accountability expectations on students with disabilities and their parents, the reauthorized IDEA…

  7. 78 FR 37598 - Missing Participants in Individual Account Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ..., and the contours of diligent search requirements. DATES: Comments must be received on or before August... search.'' What ``diligent search'' requirements should apply for individual account plans? Should PBGC offer diligent search services for a fee or post on its Web site the names of private sector...

  8. Does Individual Development Account Participation Help the Poor? A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Kristin V.; Thyer, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to review the current empirical research regarding the financial effects of participation in Individual Development Account (IDA) programs. Methods: Peer-reviewed outcome studies identified through electronic bibliographic databases and manual searches of article reference lists are reviewed. A total of 1…

  9. Welfare Recipiency and Savings Outcomes in Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, Min; Sherraden, Michael; Schreiner, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined how welfare recipiency is associated with savings outcomes in individual development accounts (IDAs), a structured savings program for low-income people. They investigated whether welfare recipients can save if they are provided with incentives. Data for this study ore from the American Dream Demonstration (ADD), the first…

  10. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... beyond the life expectancy of the individual, or (D) A period certain not extending beyond the joint life and last survivor expectancy of the individual and spouse. (iv) The life expectancy of the individual or the joint life and last survivor expectancy of the individual and spouse cannot exceed the...

  11. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... beyond the life expectancy of the individual, or (D) A period certain not extending beyond the joint life and last survivor expectancy of the individual and spouse. (iv) The life expectancy of the individual or the joint life and last survivor expectancy of the individual and spouse cannot exceed the...

  12. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... beyond the life expectancy of the individual, or (D) A period certain not extending beyond the joint life and last survivor expectancy of the individual and spouse. (iv) The life expectancy of the individual or the joint life and last survivor expectancy of the individual and spouse cannot exceed the...

  13. The Impact of Individual Learning Accounts: A Study of the Early and Potential Impact of Individual Learning Accounts on Learning Providers and Learning. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Michael; Peters, Jane; Fletcher, Mick; Kirk, Gordon

    The impact of individual learning accounts (ILAs) on the success of learners in post-16 education sector in the United Kingdom was explored through an examination of available research on ILAs. The following were among the study's 12 messages for providers, the Department for Education and Skills, and the Individual Learning Account Centre: (1)…

  14. An Individual Educational Investment Account: A Swedish Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliasson, Gunnar

    1994-01-01

    For mature industrialized nations to meet the challenge of shifting to a high value added technology base, excellence in three areas is needed: (1) education, (2) labor market performance, and (3) social insurance. A Swedish proposal that would allow individuals to take responsibility for their own future is the individual educational investment…

  15. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the taxation of such contracts. The first sentence of this paragraph (b)(7) shall have no application... applicant will ascertain whether the fiduciary accounts have been administered in accordance with law, this paragraph, and sound fiduciary principles. The audits shall be conducted in accordance with...

  16. Accounting for taste: individual differences in preference for harmony.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Stephen E; Griscom, William S

    2013-06-01

    Although empirical research on aesthetics has had some success in explaining the average preferences of groups of observers, relatively little is known about individual differences in preference, and especially about how such differences might covary across different domains. In this study, we identified a new factor underlying aesthetic response-preference for harmonious stimuli-and examined how it varies over four domains (color, shape, spatial location, and music) across individuals with different levels of training in art and music. We found that individual preferences for harmony are strongly correlated across all four dimensions tested and decrease consistently with training in the relevant aesthetic domains. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that cross-domain preference for harmony is well-represented as a single, unified factor, with effects separate from those of training and of common personality measures. PMID:23242798

  17. Object Individuation and Physical Reasoning in Infancy: An Integrative Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baillargeon, Renee; Stavans, Maayan; Wu, Di; Gertner, Yael; Setoh, Peipei; Kittredge, Audrey K.; Bernard, Amelie

    2012-01-01

    Much of the research on object individuation in infancy has used a task in which two different objects emerge in alternation from behind a large screen, which is then removed to reveal either one or two objects. In their seminal work, Xu and Carey (1996) found that it is typically not until the end of the first year that infants detect a violation…

  18. Process and Protest: Accounting for Individual Protest Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schussman, Alan; Soule, Sarah Anne

    2005-01-01

    Using American Citizen Participation Survey data (Verba et al. 1995a), we perform logistic regression analyses to adjudicate between three core explanations for individual protest: biographical availability, political engagement and structural availability. We calculate estimated probabilities to weigh the relative effects of these factors on the…

  19. Individual Learning Accounts: A Strategy for Lifelong Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renkema, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Since the end of the previous century social partners in different branches of industry have laid down measures to stimulate individual learning and competence development of workers in collective labour agreements. Special attention is given to stimulating learning demand among traditional non-participants to lifelong learning, such as…

  20. 29 CFR 2550.404a-3 - Safe harbor for distributions from terminated individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... individual account plan only if— (i) In the case of an individual account plan that is an abandoned plan... entity described in paragraph (d)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section, and the investment of funds in...— (i) To an individual retirement plan within the meaning of section 7701(a)(37) of the Code; (ii)...

  1. 29 CFR 2550.404a-3 - Safe harbor for distributions from terminated individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... individual account plan only if— (i) In the case of an individual account plan that is an abandoned plan... entity described in paragraph (d)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section, and the investment of funds in...— (i) To an individual retirement plan within the meaning of section 7701(a)(37) of the Code; (ii)...

  2. An evacuation model accounting for elementary students' individual properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Chen, Liang; Guo, Ren-Yong; Shang, Hua-Yan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a cellular automata model for pedestrian flow to investigate the effects of elementary students' individual properties on the evacuation process in a classroom with two exits. In this model, each student's route choice behavior is determined by the capacity of his current route to each exit, the distance between his current position and the corresponding exit, the repulsive interactions between his adjacent students and him, and the congestion degree near each exit; the elementary students are sorted into rational and irrational students. The simulation results show that the irrational students' proportion has significant impacts on the evacuation process and efficiency, and that all students simultaneously evacuating may be inefficient.

  3. 26 CFR 11.408(a)(2)-1 - Trustee of individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 § 11.408(a)(2)-1 Trustee of individual retirement accounts. A person...

  4. 25 CFR 11.208 - May Individual Indian Money accounts be used for payment of judgments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Courts of Indian Offenses; Personnel; Administration § 11.208 May Individual Indian Money accounts be used for payment of judgments? (a) Any Court of... account of a defendant who has failed to satisfy a money judgment from the court to obtain payment of...

  5. Asset Building in Rural Communities: The Experience of Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Curley, Jami; Charles, Pajarita

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the unique experiences of low-income rural participants in an asset building program--the Individual Development Account. Using data from the American Dream Demonstration, this study addresses three main questions: (1) What are the individual characteristics associated with saving outcomes among rural IDA participants? (2) What…

  6. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No, however, individuals...

  7. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No, however, individuals...

  8. Individual retirement account balances, contributions, and rollovers, 2010: the EBRI IRA database.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Craig

    2012-05-01

    In 2010, IRA owners were more likely to be male, especially those whose accounts originated from a rollover or were a SEP/SIMPLE. Among all IRA owners in the database, nearly one-half (45.8 percent) were ages 45-64. The average and median IRA account balance in 2010 was $67,438 and $17,863, respectively, while the average and median IRA individual balance (all accounts from the same person combined) was $91,864 and $25,296. Individuals with a traditional-originating from rollovers had the highest average and median balance of $123,426 and $38,138, respectively. Roth owners had the lowest average and median balance at $22,437 and $11,471. The average and median individual IRA balance increased with age through age 70. The average amount contributed to an IRA in the database was $3,335 in 2010. The average contribution was highest for accounts owned by those ages 65-69, and more contributions were made to Roth accounts than to traditional accounts (both those originating from contributions and rollovers). However, the average contribution to a traditional account was higher, at $3,517, compared with $3,240 to a Roth account. Yet, a higher overall amount was contributed to Roths ($2.3 billion for Roths compared with $1.3 billion for traditional accounts). Focusing on those owning traditional or Roth IRAs, 9.3 percent of the accounts received contributions, and 12.1 percent of the individuals owning these IRA types contributed to them in 2010. Among traditional IRA owners, 5.2 percent contributed, while 24.0 percent of those owning a Roth contributed to it during 2010. Of those individuals contributing to an IRA, 43.5 percent contributed the maximum amount. Of those contributing to a traditional IRA, 48.7 percent maxed out their contribution, while 39.3 percent did so with a Roth. The average and median account balances increased from $54,863 and $15,756 respectively in 2008 to $67,438 and $17,863 in 2010. This represents an increase of 22.9 percent in the average

  9. Recent developments in radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Linam, Justin; Yang, Li-Xi

    2015-05-01

    Radiation therapy is essential for local tumor control for many types of cancer histologies. Technological advancements in recent years have allowed for precise irradiation of target tissues while minimizing the dose to non-target tissues. To enhance radiation damage to cancer cells and further limit the radiation effects on normal tissue, researchers have explored compounds that specifically target cancer cells and make them more sensitive to ionizing radiation. Recent radiosensitization research has focused on promising compounds that alter hypoxia, inhibit topoisomerases, interfere with microtubules, and activate caspases, among other mechanisms. Many such compounds have shown impressive results in pre-clinical trials against a variety of cell types, but their safety, efficacy and practicability in clinical trials remains to be demonstrated. This review seeks to provide an overview of recent research in radiosensitization, detailing some of the more successful compounds, and illustrating avenues for future research. PMID:25964520

  10. Individual social security accounts: issues in assessing administrative feasibility and costs.

    PubMed

    Olsen, K A; Salisbury, D L

    1998-11-01

    Whether to add individual accounts (IAs) to the Social Security system is a highly political issue. But almost lost in the debate so far have been any practical considerations about how to administer such accounts. Any discussion of whether to create individual accounts must also address the basic but critical questions of how they would work: Who would run them? What would they cost? Logistically, are they even possible? This EBRI Issue Brief provides an overview of the most salient administrative issues facing the current Social Security reform debate--issues that challenge proponents to carefully think through how their proposals could be implemented so as to achieve their policy goals. The options and difficulties in administering IAs raise concerns that cut across ideology. The object of this report is neither to dissuade the advocates nor support the critics of individual accounts. Rather, it is to bring practical considerations to a political debate that has largely ignored the pragmatic challenges of whether IAs would be too complex for participants to understand or too difficult for record keepers to administer. The major findings in this analysis include: Adding individual accounts to Social Security could be the largest undertaking in the history of the U.S. financial market, and no system to date has the capacity to administer such a system. The number of workers currently covered by Social Security--the largest single entitlement program in the nation--is at least four times higher than the combined number of all tax-favored employment-based retirement accounts in the United States, which are administered by hundreds of entities. Direct comparisons between employment-based retirement savings plans and Social Security reform are tenuous at best. Social Security covers workers and businesses that are disproportionately excluded from employment-based plans. Because of these differences, a system of individual Social Security accounts would be more

  11. Identification of Sensorimotor Components Accounting for Individual Variability in Zahlen-Verbindungs-Test (ZVT) Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rammsayer, Thomas H.; Stahl, Jutta

    2007-01-01

    The Zahlen-Verbindungs-Test (ZVT) represents a highly feasible measure of information-processing speed that correlates quite highly with standard psychometric tests of intelligence. The present study was designed to identify specific stages of the sensorimotor processing system that may account for individual differences in overall variability of…

  12. 29 CFR 2550.404a-3 - Safe harbor for distributions from terminated individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Revenue Code of 1986 (Code); or (ii) In the case of any other individual account plan, such plan is.... (f) Model notice. The appendix to this section contains a model notice that may be used to discharge the notification requirements under this section. Use of the model notice is not mandatory....

  13. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No,...

  14. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No,...

  15. 20 CFR 664.510 - Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... youth participants? 664.510 Section 664.510 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Concurrent Enrollment § 664.510 Are Individual Training Accounts allowed for youth participants? No,...

  16. Saving for Success: Financial Education and Savings Goal Achievement in Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstead, Mary L.; Mauldin, Teresa; Sabia, Joseph J.; Koonce, Joan; Palmer, Lance

    2011-01-01

    Using microdata from the American Dream Demonstration, the current study examines factors associated with savings and savings goal achievement (indicated by a matched withdrawal) among participants of individual development account (IDA) programs. Multinomial logit results show that hours of participation in financial education programs, higher…

  17. The Demand for Higher Education: A Static Structural Approach Accounting for Individual Heterogeneity and Nesting Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Darragh; O'Donoghue, Cathal

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we estimate a structural model of higher education participation and labour choices in a static setting that accounts for individual heterogeneity and possible nesting structures in the decision process. We assume that young people that complete upper secondary education are faced with three choices, go to higher education, not go to…

  18. 75 FR 34626 - Rules and Regulations for Abandoned Individual Account Plans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 29 CFR Part 2578 Rules and Regulations for Abandoned Individual Account Plans CFR Correction In Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1927 to End, revised as...

  19. 29 CFR 2578.1 - Termination of abandoned individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the meaning of section 3(16)(B) and (A) of the Act, respectively, to perform such acts. (b) Finding of abandonment. (1) A qualified termination administrator may find an individual account plan to be abandoned... paragraph (b)(1) of this section, a qualified termination administrator may not find a plan to be...

  20. 29 CFR 2578.1 - Termination of abandoned individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the meaning of section 3(16)(B) and (A) of the Act, respectively, to perform such acts. (b) Finding of abandonment. (1) A qualified termination administrator may find an individual account plan to be abandoned... paragraph (b)(1) of this section, a qualified termination administrator may not find a plan to be...

  1. 29 CFR 2578.1 - Termination of abandoned individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the meaning of section 3(16)(B) and (A) of the Act, respectively, to perform such acts. (b) Finding of abandonment. (1) A qualified termination administrator may find an individual account plan to be abandoned... paragraph (b)(1) of this section, a qualified termination administrator may not find a plan to be...

  2. Effects of Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) on Household Wealth and Saving Taste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    This study examines effects of individual development accounts (IDAs) on household wealth of low-income participants. Methods: This study uses longitudinal survey data from the American Dream Demonstration (ADD) involving experimental design (treatment group = 537, control group = 566). Results: Results from quantile regression analysis indicate…

  3. An Evaluation of the Individual Training Account/Eligible Training Provider Demonstration. Final Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Ronald; Martinez, Alexandria; Salzman, Jeffrey; Wagner, Robin

    In March 2000, thirteen grants were awarded as part of the Individual Training Account/Eligible Training Provider (ITA/ETP) Demonstration. In summer and fall of 2000, the grant recipients' activities were subjected to an interim evaluation. Site visits were made to each grantee to determine what ITA policies and practices were being formulated,…

  4. 45 CFR 263.20 - What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... means any business that does not contravene State law or public policy. Qualified business... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What definitions apply to Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)? 263.20 Section 263.20 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE...

  5. Problems and the potential direction of reforms for the current individual medical savings accounts in the Chinese health care system.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangjin; Yang, Yang; Gong, Fuqing; Zhao, Mingjie

    2012-12-01

    Individual health savings accounts are an important part of the current basic medical insurance system for urban workers in China. Since 1998 when the system of personal medical insurance accounts was first implemented, there has been considerable controversy over its function and significance within different social communities. This paper analyzes the main problems in the practical implementation of individual medical insurance accounts and discusses the social and cultural foundations for the establishment of family health savings accounts from the perspective of Chinese Confucian familism. Accordingly, it addresses the direction of the reform and the development of the current system of individual health insurance accounts in China.

  6. Intrinsic Radiosensitivity and Cellular Characterization of 27 Canine Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Froning, Coral E.; Brents, Colleen A.; Rose, Barbara J.; Thamm, Douglas H.; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2016-01-01

    Canine cancer cell lines have progressively been developed, but are still underused resources for radiation biology research. Measurement of the cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity is important because understanding the difference may provide a framework for further elucidating profiles for prediction of radiation therapy response. Our studies have focused on characterizing diverse canine cancer cell lines in vitro and understanding parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity. First, intrinsic radiosensitivity of 27 canine cancer cell lines derived from ten tumor types was determined using a clonogenic assay. The 27 cell lines had varying radiosensitivities regardless tumor type (survival fraction at 2 Gy, SF2 = 0.19–0.93). In order to understand parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity, we evaluated the relationships of cellular radiosensitivity with basic cellular characteristics of the cell lines. There was no significant correlation of SF2 with S-phase fraction, doubling time, chromosome number, ploidy, or number of metacentric chromosomes, while there was a statistically significant correlation between SF2 and plating efficiency. Next, we selected the five most radiosensitive cell lines as the radiosensitive group and the five most radioresistant cell lines as the radioresistant group. Then, we evaluated known parameters for cell killing by ionizing radiation, including radiation-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and apoptosis, in the radiosensitive group as compared to the radioresistant group. High levels of residual γ-H2AX foci at the sites of DSBs were present in the four out of the five radiosensitive canine cancer cell lines. Our studies suggested that substantial differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity exist in canine cancer cell lines, and radiation-induced DSB repair was related to radiosensitivity, which is consistent with previous human studies. These data may assist further investigations

  7. Intrinsic Radiosensitivity and Cellular Characterization of 27 Canine Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Junko; Froning, Coral E; Brents, Colleen A; Rose, Barbara J; Thamm, Douglas H; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2016-01-01

    Canine cancer cell lines have progressively been developed, but are still underused resources for radiation biology research. Measurement of the cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity is important because understanding the difference may provide a framework for further elucidating profiles for prediction of radiation therapy response. Our studies have focused on characterizing diverse canine cancer cell lines in vitro and understanding parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity. First, intrinsic radiosensitivity of 27 canine cancer cell lines derived from ten tumor types was determined using a clonogenic assay. The 27 cell lines had varying radiosensitivities regardless tumor type (survival fraction at 2 Gy, SF2 = 0.19-0.93). In order to understand parameters that might contribute to intrinsic radiosensitivity, we evaluated the relationships of cellular radiosensitivity with basic cellular characteristics of the cell lines. There was no significant correlation of SF2 with S-phase fraction, doubling time, chromosome number, ploidy, or number of metacentric chromosomes, while there was a statistically significant correlation between SF2 and plating efficiency. Next, we selected the five most radiosensitive cell lines as the radiosensitive group and the five most radioresistant cell lines as the radioresistant group. Then, we evaluated known parameters for cell killing by ionizing radiation, including radiation-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and apoptosis, in the radiosensitive group as compared to the radioresistant group. High levels of residual γ-H2AX foci at the sites of DSBs were present in the four out of the five radiosensitive canine cancer cell lines. Our studies suggested that substantial differences in intrinsic radiosensitivity exist in canine cancer cell lines, and radiation-induced DSB repair was related to radiosensitivity, which is consistent with previous human studies. These data may assist further investigations

  8. What is the role of individual accountability in patient safety? A multi-site ethnographic study.

    PubMed

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Parker, Michael; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2016-02-01

    An enduring debate concerns how responsibility for patient safety should be distributed between organisational systems and individual professionals. Though rule-based, calculus-like approaches intended to support a 'just culture' have become popular, they perpetuate an asocial and atomised account. In this article, we use insights from practice theory--which sees organisational phenomena as accomplished in everyday actions, with individual agency and structural conditions as a mutually constitutive, dynamic duality--along with contributions from the political science and ethics literature as a starting point for analysis. Presenting ethnographic data from five hospitals, three in one high-income country and two in low-income countries, we offer an empirically informed, normative rethinking of the role of personal accountability, identifying the collective nature of the healthcare enterprise and the extent to which patient safety depends on contributions from many hands. We show that moral responsibility for actions and behaviours is an irreducible element of professional practice, but that individuals are not somehow 'outside' and separate from 'systems': they create, modify and are subject to the social forces that are an inescapable feature of any organisational system; each element acts on the other. Our work illustrates starkly the structuring effects of the broader institutional and socioeconomic context on opportunities to 'be good'. These findings imply that one of the key responsibilities of organisations and wider institutions in relation to patient safety is the fostering of the conditions of moral community. PMID:26537016

  9. Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, David J., Ed.

    This monograph, prepared to assist Georgia elementary principals to better understand accountability and its implications for educational improvement, sets forth many of the theoretical and philosophical bases from which accountability is being considered. Leon M. Lessinger begins this 5-paper presentation by describing the need for accountability…

  10. Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This issue reviews publications that provide a starting point for principals looking for a way through the accountability maze. Each publication views accountability differently, but collectively these readings argue that even in an era of state-mandated assessment, principals can pursue proactive strategies that serve students' needs. James A.…

  11. Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Newsletter of the Comprehensive Center-Region VI, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Controversy surrounding the accountability movement is related to how the movement began in response to dissatisfaction with public schools. Opponents see it as one-sided, somewhat mean-spirited, and a threat to the professional status of teachers. Supporters argue that all other spheres of the workplace have accountability systems and that the…

  12. 19 CFR 201.29 - Commission disclosure of individual records, accounting of record disclosures, and requests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... disclosure required by 5 U.S.C. 552, the Privacy Act Officer shall keep an accurate accounting of: (1) The... individual requesting an accounting of disclosure of his or her records should make the request in writing to... and in the letter that it is a Privacy Act request for an accounting of disclosure of records....

  13. Catching and correcting near misses: the collective vigilance and individual accountability trade-off.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne Patricia; Lingard, Lorelei; Berta, Whitney; Baker, G Ross

    2012-03-01

    Despite the focus on patient safety and quality health care for the last two decades, there is still limited understanding of how interprofessional interactions at an organizational or work unit level influence how clinicians perceive and respond to safety events and errors. Within the rubric of safety events, there has been a growing interest in near misses as precursors to adverse events in health care. Given the interactive nature of the variety of professionals working together in the delivery of health care, understanding how the different clinicians experience and respond to near misses in practice is important. A constructivist grounded theory approach was employed for this study which included semi-structured interviews with 24 participants in a large teaching hospital in Canada. Findings from this study provide a deeper understanding into how different clinicians experience and respond to near misses in clinical practice. This understanding indicates that collective vigilance can potentially create risk by eroding individual professional accountability through reliance on other team members to catch and correct their errors. Further research is needed to explore in more depth the trade-offs between collective vigilance and individual accountability by relying on others to catch and correct the potentially harmful errors and avert negative outcomes. PMID:22214406

  14. Catching and correcting near misses: the collective vigilance and individual accountability trade-off.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne Patricia; Lingard, Lorelei; Berta, Whitney; Baker, G Ross

    2012-03-01

    Despite the focus on patient safety and quality health care for the last two decades, there is still limited understanding of how interprofessional interactions at an organizational or work unit level influence how clinicians perceive and respond to safety events and errors. Within the rubric of safety events, there has been a growing interest in near misses as precursors to adverse events in health care. Given the interactive nature of the variety of professionals working together in the delivery of health care, understanding how the different clinicians experience and respond to near misses in practice is important. A constructivist grounded theory approach was employed for this study which included semi-structured interviews with 24 participants in a large teaching hospital in Canada. Findings from this study provide a deeper understanding into how different clinicians experience and respond to near misses in clinical practice. This understanding indicates that collective vigilance can potentially create risk by eroding individual professional accountability through reliance on other team members to catch and correct their errors. Further research is needed to explore in more depth the trade-offs between collective vigilance and individual accountability by relying on others to catch and correct the potentially harmful errors and avert negative outcomes.

  15. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo; Yoo, Young-Do; Park, Won-Bong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Park, Gil Hong; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  16. Individualism, collectivism and ethnic identity: cultural assumptions in accounting for caregiving behaviour in Britain.

    PubMed

    Willis, Rosalind

    2012-09-01

    Britain is experiencing the ageing of a large number of minority ethnic groups for the first time in its history, due to the post-war migration of people from the Caribbean and the Indian subcontinent. Stereotypes about a high level of provision of informal caregiving among minority ethnic groups are common in Britain, as in the US, despite quantitative studies refuting this assumption. This paper reports on a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with older people from five different ethnic groups about their conceptualisation of their ethnic identity, and their attributions of motivations of caregiving within their own ethnic group and in other groups. It is argued that ethnic identity becomes salient after migration and becoming a part of an ethnic minority group in the new country. Therefore, White British people who have never migrated do not have a great sense of ethnic identity. Further, a strong sense of ethnic identity is linked with identifying with the collective rather than the individual, which explains why the White British participants gave an individualist account of their motivations for informal care, whereas the minority ethnic participants gave a collectivist account of their motivations of care. Crucially, members of all ethnic groups were providing or receiving informal care, so it was the attribution and not the behaviour which differed.

  17. Individualism, collectivism and ethnic identity: cultural assumptions in accounting for caregiving behaviour in Britain.

    PubMed

    Willis, Rosalind

    2012-09-01

    Britain is experiencing the ageing of a large number of minority ethnic groups for the first time in its history, due to the post-war migration of people from the Caribbean and the Indian subcontinent. Stereotypes about a high level of provision of informal caregiving among minority ethnic groups are common in Britain, as in the US, despite quantitative studies refuting this assumption. This paper reports on a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with older people from five different ethnic groups about their conceptualisation of their ethnic identity, and their attributions of motivations of caregiving within their own ethnic group and in other groups. It is argued that ethnic identity becomes salient after migration and becoming a part of an ethnic minority group in the new country. Therefore, White British people who have never migrated do not have a great sense of ethnic identity. Further, a strong sense of ethnic identity is linked with identifying with the collective rather than the individual, which explains why the White British participants gave an individualist account of their motivations for informal care, whereas the minority ethnic participants gave a collectivist account of their motivations of care. Crucially, members of all ethnic groups were providing or receiving informal care, so it was the attribution and not the behaviour which differed. PMID:22869345

  18. 20 CFR 903.4 - Procedures for access to records and accountings of disclosures from records, regarding individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for access to records and accountings of disclosures from records, regarding individuals. 903.4 Section 903.4 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES ACCESS TO RECORDS Records Pertaining to Individuals § 903.4 Procedures for access to records and...

  19. Effects of an Individual Development Account Program on Retirement Saving: Follow-up Evidence From a Randomized Experiment.

    PubMed

    Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Sherraden, Michael; Gale, William G; Rohe, William M; Schreiner, Mark; Key, Clinton; Oliphant, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    We examine the 10-year follow-up effects on retirement saving of an individual development account (IDA) program using data from a randomized experiment that ran from 1998 to 2003 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The IDA program included financial education, encouragement to save, and matching funds for several qualified uses of the saving, including contributions to retirement accounts. The results indicate that as of 2009, 6 years after the program ended, the IDA program had no impact on the propensity to hold a retirement account, the account balance, or the sufficiency of retirement balances to meet retirement expenses.

  20. The ongoing growth of defined contribution and individual account plans: issues and implications.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lynn

    2002-03-01

    This Issue Brief discusses the implications of the growth of defined contribution (DC) retirement plans and individual account plans and the subsequent impact on employers, employees, and retirement planning. It also presents a look at data regarding contributions to retirement plans, employer trends regarding retirement plans, and the potential impact of changes to the federal Social Security retirement system. The findings and data in this article are drawn from material presented at a policy forum sponsored by the Employee Benefit Research Institute Education and Research Fund (EBRI-ERF) Dec. 7, 2001, in Washington, DC. Today, prospective retirees need to be able to generate about 75 percent of their current income to maintain their standard of living in retirement, up from 63 percent of their income in 1997, according to the Replacement Ratio Study, by Aon Corporation and Georgia State University. However, the most recent data show a decline in the percentage of income that average employees are saving. While it is too early to quantify, it does not appear that the retirement provisions in the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA) are strongly influencing the movement to DC plans. However, employers appear very interested in the provisions of the new law with regard to both defined benefit (DB) retirement plans and DC plans. The number of large employers offering DB plans continues to decline, from 85 percent in 1990 to 73 percent in 2000, according to the Hewitt study. Although employers may have little influence over some factors that affect participation rates in voluntary retirement plans, they have various options to increase participation rates, such as "matching" employee contributions, offering loan features, and providing education to employees about the plans.

  1. On differences in radiosensitivity estimation: TCP experiments versus survival curves. A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrev, Pavel; Stavreva, Nadejda; Ruggieri, Ruggero; Nahum, Alan

    2015-08-01

    We have compared two methods of estimating the cellular radiosensitivity of a heterogeneous tumour, namely, via cell-survival and via tumour control probability (TCP) pseudo-experiments. It is assumed that there exists intra-tumour variability in radiosensitivity and that the tumour consists predominantly of radiosensitive cells and a small number of radio-resistant cells. Using a multi-component, linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell kill, a pseudo-experimental cell-survival versus dose curve is derived. This curve is then fitted with a mono-component LQ model describing the response of a homogeneous cell population. For the assumed variation in radiosensitivity it is shown that the composite pseudo-experimental survival curve is well approximated by the survival curve of cells with uniform radiosensitivity. For the same initial cell radiosensitivity distribution several pseudo-experimental TCP curves are simulated corresponding to different fractionation regimes. The TCP model used accounts for clonogen proliferation during a fractionated treatment. The set of simulated TCP curves is then fitted with a mono-component TCP model. As in the cell survival experiment the fit with a mono-component model assuming uniform radiosensitivity is shown to be highly acceptable. However, the best-fit values of cellular radiosensitivity produced via the two methods are very different. The cell-survival pseudo-experiment yields a high radiosensitivity value, while the TCP pseudo-experiment shows that the dose-response is dominated by the most resistant sub-population in the tumour, even when this is just a small fraction of the total.

  2. 5 CFR 1655.9 - Effect of loans on individual account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... contributions and attributable earnings, pro rata from each TSP Fund in which the account is invested and pro rata from tax-deferred and tax-exempt balances. (c) Loan payments, including both principal...

  3. Long-Term Effects of Individual Development Accounts on Postsecondary Education: Follow-Up Evidence from a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Sherraden, Michael; Gale, William G.; Rohe, William M.; Schreiner, Mark; Key, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents evidence from a randomized field experiment testing the impact of a 3-year matched savings program on educational outcomes 10 years after the start of the experiment. We examine the effect of an Individual Development Account (IDA) program on (1) educational enrollment, (2) degree completion, and (3) increased education level.…

  4. Individual Learning Account Pilot Initiative: A Learning Tool for the 21st Century. Report to the OPM Director.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Task Force on Federal Training Technology, Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) evaluated the feasibility of individual learning accounts (ILAs) as an approach to workforce development. Thirteen federal agencies volunteered to participate in the initiative. Together, they conducted a total of 17 pilot tests. Some pilot tests included all employees in the agency. Others targeted…

  5. 78 FR 23827 - Designation of Eighteen Individuals Pursuant to the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... (a.k.a. KRIVORUCHKO, Alex; a.k.a. KRIVORUCHKO, Alexei); DOB 25 Aug 1977; POB Moscow Region, Russia..., Olga G.; DOB 29 Jul 1962; POB Moscow, Russia (individual) . 5. DROGANOV, Aleksey O.; DOB 11 Oct 1975; POB Lesnoi Settlement, Pushkin Area, Moscow Region, Russia (individual) . 6. KARPOV, Pavel; DOB 27...

  6. Accounting utility for determining individual usage of production level software systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    An accounting package was developed which determines the computer resources utilized by a user during the execution of a particular program and updates a file containing accumulated resource totals. The accounting package is divided into two separate programs. The first program determines the total amount of computer resources utilized by a user during the execution of a particular program. The second program uses these totals to update a file containing accumulated totals of computer resources utilized by a user for a particular program. This package is useful to those persons who have several other users continually accessing and running programs from their accounts. The package provides the ability to determine which users are accessing and running specified programs along with their total level of usage.

  7. 26 CFR 54.4974-1 - Excise tax on accumulations in individual retirement accounts or annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the account over the joint life and last survivor expectancy of himself and his wife. On January 1... the joint life and last survivor expectancy of H and his wife is 22.0 years (see Table II of § 1.72-9... expectancy reduced by the number of whole years elapsed since the distributions were to commence. Date...

  8. 26 CFR 54.4974-1 - Excise tax on accumulations in individual retirement accounts or annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the account over the joint life and last survivor expectancy of himself and his wife. On January 1... the joint life and last survivor expectancy of H and his wife is 22.0 years (see Table II of § 1.72-9... expectancy reduced by the number of whole years elapsed since the distributions were to commence. Date...

  9. 26 CFR 54.4974-1 - Excise tax on accumulations in individual retirement accounts or annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the account over the joint life and last survivor expectancy of himself and his wife. On January 1... the joint life and last survivor expectancy of H and his wife is 22.0 years (see Table II of § 1.72-9... expectancy reduced by the number of whole years elapsed since the distributions were to commence. Date...

  10. 26 CFR 54.4974-1 - Excise tax on accumulations in individual retirement accounts or annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the account over the joint life and last survivor expectancy of himself and his wife. On January 1... the joint life and last survivor expectancy of H and his wife is 22.0 years (see Table II of § 1.72-9... expectancy reduced by the number of whole years elapsed since the distributions were to commence. Date...

  11. 26 CFR 54.4974-1 - Excise tax on accumulations in individual retirement accounts or annuities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the account over the joint life and last survivor expectancy of himself and his wife. On January 1... the joint life and last survivor expectancy of H and his wife is 22.0 years (see Table II of § 1.72-9... expectancy reduced by the number of whole years elapsed since the distributions were to commence. Date...

  12. Implementation of Assurance of Learning Plans: An Accounting Program and Individual Course Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Anne L.; Judd, Andrew J.; Nichols, Nancy B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors surveyed faculty at AACSB-accredited schools regarding the learning goals and measures for their accounting programs as well as course objectives for the introductory tax course. They found over 50% of respondents were still developing their learning goals and measures and only 18% of respondents had completed 2 or more rounds of…

  13. Encoding strategy accounts for individual differences in change detection measures of VSTM.

    PubMed

    Linke, A C; Vicente-Grabovetsky, A; Mitchell, D J; Cusack, R

    2011-05-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) capacity is often assessed using change detection tasks, and individual differences in performance have been shown to predict cognitive aptitudes across a range of domains in children and adults. We recently showed that intelligence correlates with an attentional component necessary for change detection rather than with memory capacity per se (Cusack, Lehmann, Veldsman, & Mitchell, 2009). It remained unclear, however, whether different attentional strategies during change detection have most impact during the encoding or maintenance of information. Here we present recent findings from our laboratory supporting the hypothesis that attentional selection during encoding dominates individual differences in change detection measures of visual short-term memory. In a first study, we unpredictably varied whether short-term memory was probed using change detection or whole report, encouraging participants to adopt the same encoding strategy throughout the tasks. Change detection performance of lower-IQ individuals improved. In a second study, we found that deficits in top-down attentional selectivity can be alleviated in participants with low change detection performance by providing helpful grouping information during encoding. Finally, a meta-analysis of neuroimaging data from 112 participants performing a variety of VSTM tasks showed that performance correlates with activity in several parietal and frontal regions during the encoding but not the maintenance phase. Taken together, these results support the notion that encoding strategy and not short-term memory capacity itself largely determines individual differences in visual change detection performance.

  14. The Transformative Individual School Counseling Model: An Accountability Model for Urban School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eschenauer, Robert; Chen-Hayes, Stuart F.

    2005-01-01

    The realities and needs of urban students, families, and educators have outgrown traditional individual counseling models. The American School Counselor Association's National Model and National Standards and the Education Trust's Transforming School Counseling Initiative encourage professional school counselors to shift roles toward implementing…

  15. A Cognitive Processing Account of Individual Differences in Novice Logo Programmers' Conceptualisation and Use of Recursion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Pamela

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated individual differences in the construction of mental models of recursion in LOGO programming. The learning process was investigated from the perspective of Norman's mental models theory and employed diSessa's ontology regarding distributed, functional, and surrogate mental models, and the Luria model of brain…

  16. Phonology and Grammatical Morphology in Specific Language Impairment: Accounting for Individual Variation in English and Italian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortolini, Umberta; Leonard, Laurence B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether individual differences observed in the grammatical morphology of children with specific language impairment (SLI) could be traced to another source, such as the use of weak syllables. Results show that imitations in prosody may restrict the degree of grammatical morpheme use by children with SLI.…

  17. Income-related inequity in healthcare utilisation among individuals with cardiovascular disease in England-accounting for vertical inequity.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Morris, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    Economic analyses of equity which focus solely on horizontal inequity offer a partial assessment of socioeconomic inequity in healthcare use. We analyse income-related inequity in cardiovascular disease-related healthcare utilisation by individuals reporting cardiovascular disease in England, including both horizontal and vertical aspects. For the analysis of vertical inequity, we use target groups to estimate the appropriate relationship between healthcare needs and use. We find that including vertical inequity considerations may lead us to draw different conclusions about the nature and extent of income-related inequity. After accounting for vertical inequity in addition to horizontal inequity, there is no longer evidence of inequity favouring the poor for nurse visits, whereas there is some evidence that doctor visits and inpatient stays are concentrated among richer individuals. The estimates of income-related inequity for outpatient visits, electrocardiography tests and heart surgery become even more pro-rich when accounting for vertical inequity.

  18. An Individual-Based Model of Zebrafish Population Dynamics Accounting for Energy Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudouin, Rémy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin; Augustine, Starrlight; Devillers, James; Brion, François; Péry, Alexandre R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model) was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model). Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level. PMID:25938409

  19. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  20. Pesticide Environmental Accounting: a method for assessing the external costs of individual pesticide applications.

    PubMed

    Leach, A W; Mumford, J D

    2008-01-01

    The Pesticide Environmental Accounting (PEA) tool provides a monetary estimate of environmental and health impacts per hectare-application for any pesticide. The model combines the Environmental Impact Quotient method and a methodology for absolute estimates of external pesticide costs in UK, USA and Germany. For many countries resources are not available for intensive assessments of external pesticide costs. The model converts external costs of a pesticide in the UK, USA and Germany to Mediterranean countries. Economic and policy applications include estimating impacts of pesticide reduction policies or benefits from technologies replacing pesticides, such as sterile insect technique. The system integrates disparate data and approaches into a single logical method. The assumptions in the system provide transparency and consistency but at the cost of some specificity and precision, a reasonable trade-off for a method that provides both comparative estimates of pesticide impacts and area-based assessments of absolute impacts. PMID:17604888

  1. Pesticide Environmental Accounting: a method for assessing the external costs of individual pesticide applications.

    PubMed

    Leach, A W; Mumford, J D

    2008-01-01

    The Pesticide Environmental Accounting (PEA) tool provides a monetary estimate of environmental and health impacts per hectare-application for any pesticide. The model combines the Environmental Impact Quotient method and a methodology for absolute estimates of external pesticide costs in UK, USA and Germany. For many countries resources are not available for intensive assessments of external pesticide costs. The model converts external costs of a pesticide in the UK, USA and Germany to Mediterranean countries. Economic and policy applications include estimating impacts of pesticide reduction policies or benefits from technologies replacing pesticides, such as sterile insect technique. The system integrates disparate data and approaches into a single logical method. The assumptions in the system provide transparency and consistency but at the cost of some specificity and precision, a reasonable trade-off for a method that provides both comparative estimates of pesticide impacts and area-based assessments of absolute impacts.

  2. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A.; Welsh, Jessemae L.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Allen, Bryan G.; Wagner, Brett A.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Doskey, Claire M.; Strother, Robert K.; Button, Anna M.; Mott, Sarah L.; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Buettner, Garry R.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pharmacological ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Since pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in non-tumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacological ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacological ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  3. Towards a new moral paradigm in health care delivery: accounting for individuals.

    PubMed

    Katz, Meir

    2010-01-01

    For years, commentators have debated how to most appropriately allocate scarce medical resources over large populations. In this paper, I abstract the major rationing schema into three general approaches: rationing by price, quantity, and prioritization. Each has both normative appeal and considerable weakness. After exploring them, I present what some commentators have termed the "moral paradigm" as an alternative to broader philosophies designed to encapsulate the universe of options available to allocators (often termed the market, professional, and political paradigms). While not itself an abstraction of any specific viable rationing scheme, it provides a strong basis for the development of a new scheme that offers considerable moral and political appeal often absent from traditionally employed rationing schema. As I explain, the moral paradigm, in its strong, absolute, and uncompromising version, is economically untenable. This paper articulates a modified version of the moral paradigm that is pluralist in nature rather than absolute. It appeals to the moral, emotional, and irrational sensibilities of each individual person. The moral paradigm, so articulated, can complement any health care delivery system that policy-makers adopt. It functions by granting individuals the ability to appeal to an administrative adjudicatory board designated for this purpose. The adjudicatory board would have the expertise and power to act in response to the complaints of individual aggrieved patients, including those complaints that stem from the moral, religious, ethical, emotional, irrational, or other subjective positions of the patient, and would have plenary power to affirm the denial of access to medical care or to mandate the provision of such care. The board must be designed to facilitate its intended function while creating structural limitations on abuse of power and other excess. I make some specific suggestions on matters of structure and function in the hope of

  4. Towards a new moral paradigm in health care delivery: accounting for individuals.

    PubMed

    Katz, Meir

    2010-01-01

    For years, commentators have debated how to most appropriately allocate scarce medical resources over large populations. In this paper, I abstract the major rationing schema into three general approaches: rationing by price, quantity, and prioritization. Each has both normative appeal and considerable weakness. After exploring them, I present what some commentators have termed the "moral paradigm" as an alternative to broader philosophies designed to encapsulate the universe of options available to allocators (often termed the market, professional, and political paradigms). While not itself an abstraction of any specific viable rationing scheme, it provides a strong basis for the development of a new scheme that offers considerable moral and political appeal often absent from traditionally employed rationing schema. As I explain, the moral paradigm, in its strong, absolute, and uncompromising version, is economically untenable. This paper articulates a modified version of the moral paradigm that is pluralist in nature rather than absolute. It appeals to the moral, emotional, and irrational sensibilities of each individual person. The moral paradigm, so articulated, can complement any health care delivery system that policy-makers adopt. It functions by granting individuals the ability to appeal to an administrative adjudicatory board designated for this purpose. The adjudicatory board would have the expertise and power to act in response to the complaints of individual aggrieved patients, including those complaints that stem from the moral, religious, ethical, emotional, irrational, or other subjective positions of the patient, and would have plenary power to affirm the denial of access to medical care or to mandate the provision of such care. The board must be designed to facilitate its intended function while creating structural limitations on abuse of power and other excess. I make some specific suggestions on matters of structure and function in the hope of

  5. Beyond price: individuals' accounts of deciding to pay for private healthcare treatment in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Delivering appropriate and affordable healthcare is a concern across the globe. As countries grapple with the issue of delivering healthcare with finite resources and populations continue to age, more health-related care services or treatments may become an optional 'extra' to be purchased privately. It is timely to consider how, and to what extent, the individual can act as both a 'patient' and a 'consumer'. In the UK the majority of healthcare treatments are free at the point of delivery. However, increasingly some healthcare treatments are being made available via the private healthcare market. Drawing from insights from healthcare policy and social sciences, this paper uses the exemplar of private dental implant treatment provision in the UK to examine what factors people considered when deciding whether or not to pay for a costly healthcare treatment for a non-fatal condition. Methods Qualitative interviews with people (n = 27) who considered paying for dental implants treatments in the UK. Data collection and analysis processes followed the principles of the constant comparative methods, and thematic analysis was facilitated through the use of NVivo qualitative data software. Results Decisions to pay for private healthcare treatments are not simply determined by price. Decisions are mediated by: the perceived 'status' of the healthcare treatment as either functional or aesthetic; how the individual determines and values their 'need' for the treatment; and, the impact the expenditure may have on themselves and others. Choosing a private healthcare provider is sometimes determined simply by personal rapport or extant clinical relationship, or based on the recommendation of others. Conclusions As private healthcare markets expand to provide more 'non-essential' services, patients need to develop new skills and to be supported in their new role as consumers. PMID:22397733

  6. Heterogeneous kinetics of AKT signaling in individual cells are accounted for by variable protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Meyer, René; D'Alessandro, Lorenza A; Kar, Sandip; Kramer, Bernhard; She, Bin; Kaschek, Daniel; Hahn, Bettina; Wrangborg, David; Karlsson, Johan; Kvarnström, Mats; Jirstrand, Mats; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Timmer, Jens; Höfer, Thomas; Klingmüller, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    In most solid cancers, cells harboring oncogenic mutations represent only a sub-fraction of the entire population. Within this sub-fraction the expression level of mutated proteins can vary significantly due to cellular variability limiting the efficiency of targeted therapy. To address the causes of the heterogeneity, we performed a systematic analysis of one of the most frequently mutated pathways in cancer cells, the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. Among others PI3K signaling is activated by the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) that regulates proliferation of hepatocytes during liver regeneration but also fosters tumor cell proliferation. HGF-mediated responses of PI3K signaling were monitored both at the single cell and cell population level in primary mouse hepatocytes and in the hepatoma cell line Hepa1_6. Interestingly, we observed that the HGF-mediated AKT responses at the level of individual cells is rather heterogeneous. However, the overall average behavior of the single cells strongly resembled the dynamics of AKT activation determined at the cell population level. To gain insights into the molecular cause for the observed heterogeneous behavior of individual cells, we employed dynamic mathematical modeling in a stochastic framework. Our analysis demonstrated that intrinsic noise was not sufficient to explain the observed kinetic behavior, but rather the importance of extrinsic noise has to be considered. Thus, distinct from gene expression in the examined signaling pathway fluctuations of the reaction rates has only a minor impact whereas variability in the concentration of the various signaling components even in a clonal cell population is a key determinant for the kinetic behavior. PMID:23226133

  7. Identifying individual changes in performance with composite quality indicators while accounting for regression to the mean.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Byron J; Dunton, Nancy

    2013-04-01

    Almost a decade ago Morton and Torgerson indicated that perceived medical benefits could be due to "regression to the mean." Despite this caution, the regression to the mean "effects on the identification of changes in institutional performance do not seem to have been considered previously in any depth" (Jones and Spiegelhalter). As a response, Jones and Spiegelhalter provide a methodology to adjust for regression to the mean when modeling recent changes in institutional performance for one-variable quality indicators. Therefore, in our view, Jones and Spiegelhalter provide a breakthrough methodology for performance measures. At the same time, in the interests of parsimony, it is useful to aggregate individual quality indicators into a composite score. Our question is, can we develop and demonstrate a methodology that extends the "regression to the mean" literature to allow for composite quality indicators? Using a latent variable modeling approach, we extend the methodology to the composite indicator case. We demonstrate the approach on 4 indicators collected by the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. A simulation study further demonstrates its "proof of concept." PMID:23035127

  8. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  9. 25 CFR 115.411 - What if the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...'s supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? 115.411 Section 115.411... regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo identification? If the individual making a request regarding a minor's supervised account does not have any verifiable photo...

  10. All individuals are not created equal; accounting for interindividual variation in fitting life-history responses to toxicants.

    PubMed

    Jager, Tjalling

    2013-02-01

    The individuals of a species are not equal. These differences frustrate experimental biologists and ecotoxicologists who wish to study the response of a species (in general) to a treatment. In the analysis of data, differences between model predictions and observations on individual animals are usually treated as random measurement error around the true response. These deviations, however, are mainly caused by real differences between the individuals (e.g., differences in physiology and in initial conditions). Understanding these intraspecies differences, and accounting for them in the data analysis, will improve our understanding of the response to the treatment we are investigating and allow for a more powerful, less biased, statistical analysis. Here, I explore a basic scheme for statistical inference to estimate parameters governing stress that allows individuals to differ in their basic physiology. This scheme is illustrated using a simple toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic model and a data set for growth of the springtail Folsomia candida exposed to cadmium in food. This article should be seen as proof of concept; a first step in bringing more realism into the statistical inference for process-based models in ecotoxicology. PMID:23293874

  11. Radiosensitivity of different tissues from carrot root at different phases of growth in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Degani, N.; Pickholtz, D.

    1980-09-01

    The present work compares the effect of ..gamma..-radiation dose and time in culture on the growth of cambium and phloem carrot (Daucus carota) root explants. It was found that the phloem is more radiosensitive than the cambium and that both tissues were more radiosensitive when irradiated on excision at the G/sub 1/ phase rather than at the end of the lag phase on the ninth day of growth in culture when cells were predominantly at the G/sub 2/ phase. The nuclear volumes of cells from both tissues were similar but were larger at the end of the more radioresistant lag phase than those of the G/sub 1/ phase on excision. However, nuclear volume could not account for the differences in radiosensitivity between either the tissues or irradiation times in culture.

  12. In Vitro-Pooled shRNA Screening to Identify Determinants of Radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ceroni, Alessandro; Higgins, Geoff S; Ebner, Daniel V

    2016-01-01

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-pooled screening is a valuable and cost-effective tool for assaying the contribution of individual genes to cell viability and proliferation on a genomic scale. Here we describe the key considerations for the design and execution of a pooled shRNA screen to identify determinants of radiosensitivity. PMID:27581288

  13. On the radiosensitivity of man in space.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R D; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Jones, T D

    2001-01-01

    Astronauts' radiation exposure limits are based on experimental and epidemiological data obtained on Earth. It is assumed that radiation sensitivity remains the same in the extraterrestrial space. However, human radiosensitivity is dependent upon the response of the hematopoietic tissue to the radiation insult. It is well known that the immune system is affected by microgravity. We have developed a mathematical model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis which includes the effect of microgravity on bone marrow kinetics. It is assumed that cellular radiosensitivity is not modified by the space environment, but repopulation rates of stem and stromal cells are reduced as a function of time in weightlessness. A realistic model of the space radiation environment, including the HZE component, is used to simulate the radiation damage. A dedicated computer code was written and applied to solar particle events and to the mission to Mars. The results suggest that altered myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis in microgravity might increase human radiosensitivity in space. PMID:11642296

  14. Educational Quality Is Measured by Individual Student Achievement Over Time. Mt. San Antonio College AB 1725 Model Accountability System Pilot Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    In December 1990, a project was begun at Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) in Walnut, California, to develop a model accountability system based on the belief that educational quality is measured by individual achievement over time. This proposal for the Accountability Model (AM) presents information on project methodology and organization in four…

  15. Azidothymidine Enhances Fluorodeoxyuridine-Mediated Radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-M.; Johnson, Monika; Smith, Brian J.; Dornfeld, Ken

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of DNA repair and altered thymidine analogues in altering the response to radiation during thymidine deprivation. Methods and Materials: Mismatch repair-deficient and -proficient cell lines HEC59 and HC-2.4 were treated with fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR), azidothymidine (AZT), and irradiation either alone or in combination, and outcomes of clonogenic survival and cell-cycle distributions were determined. Results: Survival outcomes for all treatments were similar for both cell lines, suggesting that hMSH2 does not significantly influence thymidine deprivation toxicity or radiosensitization. The chain-terminating thymidine analogue AZT increased the toxicity of FUdR and increased DNA fragmentation. The combination of FUdR and AZT afforded greater radiosensitization than either drug alone. Drug enhancement ratios, the degree of excess radiation-induced cell death in drug-treated cultures compared with radiation alone for HEC59, were 1.2, 1.4, and 1.8 for AZT, FUdR, and the combination, respectively. Enhancement ratios for HC-2.4 were 1.3, 1.5, and 1.8 for AZT, FUdR, and the combination, respectively. Conclusion: Azidothymidine, a chain-terminating thymidine analogue, can enhance the radiosensitizing affects of thymidine deprivation. Deoxyribonucleic acid strand breaks may play an important role in the mechanism of thymidine deprivation-induced radiosensitization.

  16. Radiosensitizing effects of neem (Azadirachta indica) oil.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Rao, A R; Kimura, H

    2002-02-01

    Radiosensitization by neem oil was studied using Balbc/3T3 cells and SCID cells. Neem oil enhanced the radiosensitivity of the cells when applied both during and after x-irradiation under aerobic conditions. Neem oil completely inhibited the repair of sublethal damage and potentially lethal damage repair in Balbc/3T3 cells. The cytofluorimeter data show that neem oil treatment before and after x-irradiation reduced the G(2) + M phase, thus inhibiting the expression of the radiation induced arrest of cells in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle. However, SCIK cells (derived from the SCID mouse), deficient in DSB repair, treated with neem oil did not show any enhancement in the radiosensitivity. There was no effect of neem oil on SLD repair or its inhibition in SCIK cells. These results suggest that neem oil enhanced the radiosensitivity of cells by interacting with residual damage after x-irradiation, thereby converting the sublethal damage or potentially lethal damage into lethal damage, inhibiting the double-strand break repair or reducing the G(2) phase of the cell cycle. PMID:11807971

  17. The "Individualised Accounting Questions" Technique: Using Excel to Generate Quantitative Exercises for Large Classes with Unique Individual Answers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nnadi, Matthias; Rosser, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The "individualised accounting questions" (IAQ) technique set out in this paper encourages independent active learning. It enables tutors to set individualised accounting questions and construct an answer grid that can be used for any number of students, with numerical values for each student's answers based on their student enrolment…

  18. Interfaces with Tunable Mechanical and Radiosensitizing Properties.

    PubMed

    Berg, Nora G; Pearce, Brady L; Snyder, Patrick J; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Nolan, Michael W; Adhikari, Prajesh; Khan, Saad A; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2016-08-31

    We report the fabrication of a composite containing nanostructured GaOOH and Matrigel with tunable radiosensitizing and stiffness properties. Composite characterization was done with microscopy and rheology. The utility of the interface was tested in vitro using fibroblasts. Cell viability and reactive oxygen species assays quantified the effects of radiation dosages and GaOOH concentrations. Fibroblasts' viability decreased with increasing concentration of GaOOH and composite stiffness. During ionizing radiation experiments the presence of the scintillating GaOOH triggered a different cellular response. Reactive oxygen species data demonstrated that one can reduce the amount of radiation needed to modulate the behavior of cells on interfaces with different stiffness containing a radiosensitizing material. PMID:26882455

  19. Daily rhythms of radiosensitivity of animals and several determining causes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druzhinin, Y. P.; Malyutina, T. S.; Seraya, V. M.; Rodina, G. P.; Vatsek, A.; Rakova, A.

    1974-01-01

    Daily rhythms of radiosensitivity in rats and mice were determined by survival rates after acute total radiation at the same dosage at different times of the day. Radiosensitivity differed in animals of different species and varieties. Inbred mice exhibited one or two increases in radiosensitivity during the dark, active period of the day. These effects were attributed to periodic changes in the state of stem hematopoietic cells.

  20. Radiosensitizing potential of epigenetic anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    De Schutter, Harlinde; Nuyts, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few decades, epigenetic tumor changes characterized by promoter hypermethylation and histone modifications have become a topic of intense research. Of particular interest is the potential reversibility of these processes that has led to the development of epigenetic anticancer drugs such as demethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC-I). Besides single agent clinical activity in both hematological and solid malignancies, combinations of both types of epigenetic drugs with classic chemotherapeutics have shown promising results. In addition, as demethylating agents and HDAC-I act synergistically to reverse gene silencing, treatment schedules combining both epigenetic strategies could theoretically enhance tumor response. This assumption has been validated in vitro and in vivo for several hematological and solid cancer types, and awaits further clinical investigation. Nowadays, the majority of patients with cancer are treated with radiotherapy. To optimize the results obtained with this treatment modality, efforts are being put in strategies enhancing tumor response selectively in favor of normal tissue response. The combination of epigenetic drugs with radiotherapy is particularly valuable since a drug- and dose-dependent radiosensitizing potential of several classes of HDAC-I has been proven in vitro and in vivo. The molecular mechanisms underlying this radiosensitization have not been fully clarified yet. In general, higher concentrations of HDAC-I are believed to exert cell cycle redistribution, induction of apoptosis, and downregulation of surviving signals. The radiosensitizing effect of lower, non-toxic doses of HDAC-I has been attributed to, at least in part, acetylation-induced changes leading to altered double strand break (DSB) formation and repair. Although promising so far, further research is needed before HDAC-I administered alone or in combination with demethylating agents will be implemented in the clinic to act as

  1. Immunodeficiency, radiosensitivity, and the XCIND syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Richard A; Boder, Elena; Good, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Through the analysis of a rare disorder called ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), many important biological lessons have been gleaned. Today, it is clear that the underlying defect of A-T lies in the nucleus, as an inability to repair or process double strand breaks. More important, by the A-T phenotype now allows us to appreciate a much more general distinction between immunodeficiencies that are radiosensitive and those that are not.

  2. Accountability for the Results of Educating Students with Disabilities: Assessment Conference Report on the New Assessment Provisions of the 1997 Amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ysseldyke, James E.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Kozleski, Elizabeth; Reschly, Daniel

    Based on the findings of a 1998 conference on the new assessment and accountability requirements in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), this report discusses critical issues that surround the assessment provisions included in the 1997 IDEA amendments and contains recommendations related to state and district-wide assessments…

  3. TNFSF10/TRAIL regulates human T4 effector memory lymphocyte radiosensitivity and predicts radiation-induced acute and subacute dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Baijer, Jan; Déchamps, Nathalie; Perdry, Hervé; Morales, Pablo; Kerns, Sarah; Vasilescu, Alexandre; Baulande, Sylvain; Azria, David; Roméo, Paul Henri; Schmitz, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity of T4 effector-memory (T4EM) lymphocytes to radiation-induced apoptosis shows heritability compatible with a Mendelian mode of transmission. Using gene expression studies and flow cytometry, we show a higher TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL/TNFSF10) mRNA level and a higher level of membrane bound TRAIL (mTRAIL) on radiosensitive compared to radioresistant T4EM lymphocytes. Functionally, we show that mTRAIL mediates a pro-apoptotic autocrine signaling after irradiation of T4EM lymphocytes linking mTRAIL expression to T4EM radiosensitivity. Using single marker and multimarker Family-Based Association Testing, we identified 3 SNPs in the TRAIL gene that are significantly associated with T4EM lymphocytes radiosensitivity. Among these 3 SNPs, two are also associated with acute and subacute dermatitis after radiotherapy in breast cancer indicating that T4EM lymphocytes radiosensitivity may be used to predict response to radiotherapy. Altogether, these results show that mTRAIL level regulates the response of T4EM lymphocytes to ionizing radiation and suggest that TRAIL/TNFSF10 genetic variants hold promise as markers of individual radiosensitivity. PMID:26982083

  4. 29 CFR 2550.404a-5 - Fiduciary requirements for disclosure in participant-directed individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... description of any “brokerage windows,” “self-directed brokerage accounts,” or similar plan arrangements that... relations orders, fees for investment advice, fees for brokerage windows, commissions, front- or back-end...-, and 10-calendar year periods (or for the life of the alternative, if shorter) ending on the date...

  5. 29 CFR 2550.404a-5 - Fiduciary requirements for disclosure in participant-directed individual account plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... description of any “brokerage windows,” “self-directed brokerage accounts,” or similar plan arrangements that... relations orders, fees for investment advice, fees for brokerage windows, commissions, front- or back-end...-, and 10-calendar year periods (or for the life of the alternative, if shorter) ending on the date...

  6. Relating Intercellular Variability in Nanoparticle Uptake with Biological Consequence: A Quantitative X-ray Fluorescence Study for Radiosensitization of Cells.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Tyron; Douglass, Michael; Paterson, David; Bezak, Eva; Thierry, Benjamin; Kempson, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Internalized gold nanoparticles were quantified in large numbers of individual prostate cancer cells using large area synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Cells were also irradiated with a 6 MV linear accelerator to assess the biological consequence of radiosensitization with gold nanoparticles. A large degree of heterogeneity in nanoparticle uptake between cells resulted in influenced biological effect.

  7. Individual Genetic Susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Hall

    2008-12-08

    Risk estimates derived from epidemiological studies of exposed populations, as well as the maximum permissible doses allowed for occupational exposure and exposure of the public to ionizing radiation are all based on the assumption that the human population is uniform in its radiosensitivity, except for a small number of individuals, such as ATM homozygotes who are easily identified by their clinical symptoms. The hypothesis upon which this proposal is based is that the human population is not homogeneous in radiosensitiviry, but that radiosensitive sub-groups exist which are not easy to identify. These individuals would suffer an increased incidence of detrimental radiation effects, and distort the shape of the dose response relationship. The radiosensitivity of these groups depend on the expression levels of specific proteins. The plan was to investigate the effect of 3 relatively rare, high penetrate genes available in mice, namely Atm, mRad9 & Brca1. The purpose of radiation protection is to prevent! deterministic effects of clinical significance and limit stochastic effects to acceptable levels. We plan, therefore to compare with wild type animals the radiosensitivity of mice heterozygous for each of the genes mentioned above, as well as double heterozygotes for pairs of genes, using two biological endpoints: a) Ocular cataracts as an important and relevant deterministic effect, and b) Oncogenic transformation in cultured embryo fibroblasts, as a surrogate for carcinogenesis, the most relevant stochastic effect.

  8. Association Between Genetic Polymorphisms in the XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, GSTM1, GSTT1, MSH2, MLH1, MSH3, and MGMT Genes and Radiosensitivity in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mangoni, Monica; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Carozzi, Francesca; Sani, Cristina; Biti, Giampaolo; Livi, Lorenzo; Barletta, Emanuela; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Clinical radiosensitivity varies considerably among patients, and radiation-induced side effects developing in normal tissue can be therapy limiting. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to correlate with hypersensitivity to radiotherapy. We conducted a prospective study of 87 female patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast surgery. We evaluated the association between acute skin reaction following radiotherapy and 11 genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes: XRCC1 (Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln), MSH2 (gIVS12-6T>C), MLH1 (Ile219Val), MSH3 (Ala1045Thr), MGMT (Leu84Phe), and in damage-detoxification GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes (allele deletion). Methods and Materials: Individual genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and single nucleotide primer extension for single nucleotide polymorphisms or by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for deletion polymorphisms. The development of severe acute skin reaction (moist desquamation or interruption of radiotherapy due to toxicity) associated with genetic polymorphisms was modeled using Cox proportional hazards, accounting for cumulative biologically effective radiation dose. Results: Radiosensitivity developed in eight patients and was increased in carriers of variants XRCC3-241Met allele (hazard ratio [HR] unquantifiably high), MSH2 gIVS12-6nt-C allele (HR = 53.36; 95% confidence intervals [95% CI], 3.56-798.98), and MSH3-1045Ala allele (HR unquantifiably high). Carriers of XRCC1-Arg194Trp variant allele in combination with XRCC1-Arg399Gln wild-type allele had a significant risk of radiosensitivity (HR = 38.26; 95% CI, 1.19-1232.52). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report to find an association between MSH2 and MSH3 genetic variants and the development of radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that mismatch repair mechanisms may be

  9. Standing Out and Fitting In: A Report on a Support Group for Individuals with Asperger Syndrome Using a Personal Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Andrea; Johnston, Paula

    2007-01-01

    In this article, Andrea MacLeod, lecturer in autism studies at the University of Birmingham, and Paula Johnston, a woman with Asperger syndrome who now focuses on writing and speaking about her condition, consider the function of specialist group interventions for individuals with Asperger syndrome. These authors report on one model--a discussion…

  10. Factors Affecting the Radiosensitivity of Hexaploid Wheat to -Irradiation: Radiosensitivity of Hexaploid Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Gu, Jiayu; Zhao, Linshu; Guo, Huijun; Xie, Yongdun; Zhao, Shirong; Song, Xiyun; Han, Longzhi; Liu, Luxiang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the radiosensitivity of plants, an important factor in crop mutation breeding programs, requires a thorough investigation of the factors that contribute to this trait. In this study, we used the highly radiosensitive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) variety HY1 and J411, a γ-irradiation-insensitive control, which were screened from a natural population, to examine the factors affecting radiosensitivity, including free radical content and total antioxidant capacity, as well as the expression of TaKu70 and TaKu80 (DNA repair-related genes) as measured by real-time PCR. We also investigated the alternative splicing of this gene in the wild-type wheat ecotype by sequence analysis. Free radical contents and total antioxidant capacity significantly increased upon exposure of HY1 wheat to γ-irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, in J411, the free radical contents exhibited a similar trend, but the total antioxidant capacity exhibited a downward trend upon increasing γ-irradiation. Additionally, we detected dose-dependent increases in TaKu70 and TaKu80 expression levels in γ-irradiated HY1, while in J411, TaKu70 expression levels increased, followed by a decline. We also detected alternative splicing of TaKu70 mRNA, namely, intron retention, in HY1 but not in J411. Our findings indicate that γ-irradiation induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in hexaploid wheat, resulting in growth retardation of seedlings, and they suggest that TaKu70 may play a causal role in radiosensitivity in HY1. Further studies are required to exploit these factors to improve radiosensitivity in other wheat varieties. PMID:27551965

  11. Taxonomic and developmental aspects of radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1996-11-01

    Considerable information is available on the effects of radioactivity on adult and early life stages of organisms. The preponderance of data is on mortality after a single irradiation with relatively high doses. Unfortunately, because experiments were carried out under different conditions and for different time periods, the validity of comparing the results from different laxonomic groups is questionable. In general, the conclusions are that there is a relationship (1) between radioresistance to high doses of acute radiation and taxonomy of the organism, primitive forms being more radioresistant than complex vertebrates and (2) between radiosensitivity and developmental stage, early life stages being more sensitive than later stages. The first conclusion may be related to the capability of the organism to repopulate cells and to differentiate and redifferentiate them; the second to the rate of cellular division and to the degree of differentiation. In question, however, is the relevance of the responses from high levels of acute radiation to that of the responses to long-term exposure to low levels of radiation, which are ecologically of more interest. Data from studies of the effects of acute and chronic exposure on development of gametes and zygotes indicate that, for some fishes and invertebrates, responses at the cellular and molecular levels show effect levels comparable to those observed in some mammals. Acute doses between 0,05 and 0.5Cy and dose rates between 0.02 to 0.2mCy/h appear to define critical ranges in which detrimental effects on fertility are first observed in a variety of radiosensitive organisms. To better understand inherent radiosensitivity, we need more information on the ability of cells to repopulate and differentiate and to prevent or repair damage to biological critical molecules, such as DNA, because these factors may alter significantly organisms` responses to radiation.

  12. On the mechanism of salivary gland radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Antonius W.T. . E-mail: a.w.t.konings@med.rug.nl; Coppes, Rob P.; Vissink, Arjan

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To contribute to the understanding of the enigmatic radiosensitivity of the salivary glands by analysis of appropriate literature, especially with respect to mechanisms of action of early radiation damage, and to supply information on the possibilities of amelioration of radiation damage to the salivary glands after radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Selected published data on the mechanism of salivary gland radiosensitivity and radioprotection were studied and analyzed. Results: From a classical point of view, the salivary glands should not respond as rapidly to radiation as they appear to do. Next to the suggestion of massive apoptosis, the leakage of granules and subsequent lysis of acinar cells was suggested to be responsible for the acute radiation-induced function loss of the salivary glands. The main problem with these hypotheses is that recently performed assays show no cell loss during the first days after irradiation, while saliva flow is dramatically diminished. The water secretion is selectively hampered during the first days after single-dose irradiation. Literature is discussed that shows that the compromised cells suffer selective radiation damage to the plasma membrane, disturbing signal transduction primarily affecting watery secretion. Although the cellular composition of the submandibular gland and the parotid gland are different, the damage response is very alike. The acute radiation-induced function loss in both salivary glands can be ameliorated by prophylactic treatment with specific receptor agonists. Conclusions: The most probable mechanism of action, explaining the enigmatic high radiosensitivity for early effects, is selective radiation damage to the plasma membrane of the secretory cells, disturbing muscarinic receptor stimulated watery secretion. Later damage is mainly due to classical mitotic cell death of progenitor cells, leading to a hampered replacement capacity of the gland for secretory cells

  13. Chromosomal Radiosensitivity in Lymphocytes of Cervix Cancer Patients—Correlation with Side Effect after Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Lankoff, Anna; Lisowska, Halina; Banasik-Nowak, Anna; Arabski, Michał; Kedzierawski, Piotr; Florek, Agnieszka; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that cancer patients receiving similar radiotherapy treatments differ widely in normal tissue reactions ranging from undetectable to unacceptably severe levels. Therefore, an important goal of radiobiological research is to establish a test which would allow identifying individual radiosensitivity of patients prior to radiotherapy. The aim of the presented study is to assess the relationship between lymphocyte intrinsic radiosensitivity in vitro and early reaction of normal tissue in cervix cancer patients treated by radiotherapy. The following endpoints are analyzed in vitro: frequency of micronuclei, the kinetics of DNA repair and apoptosis. Acute normal tissue reaction to radiotherapy in the skin, bladder and rectum are scored according to the EORTC/RTOG scale. Our results show a wide inter-individual variability in chromosomal radiosensitivity in vitro. The majority of patients show a Grade 0, 1 or 2 reaction for all organs studied. No statistically significant correlation has been observed between the in vitro results in lymphocytes and the degree of early normal tissue and organ reaction.

  14. Evaluation of nitrobenzimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Frank, L.R.; Bush, D.; Harrison, G.H.

    1983-07-01

    Radiobiological and pharmacokinetic assays were performed to determine the potential of 2-nitrobenzimidazole (NBI) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent. As judged by comparing survival curve slopes of Serratia marcescens irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions, the NBI enhancement ratio (ER) at 2 mM concentration was 2.4 +/- 0.2, compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3.3 +/- 0.3. 2,5-Dinitrobenzimidazole (DNBI) was investigated in vitro; its ER was 3.0 +/- 0.3 at 4 mM concentration. Very poor tissue penetration of DNBI precluded further testing in vivo. Acute toxic signs appeared in C3H/HeJ mice following ip injection of NBI at 100 mg/kg. These would be partly attributable to the stress caused by the high pH of the injection vehicle. The LD50 was estimated to be 125-150 mg/kg. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in the flanks of these mice exhibited maximum NBI levels at 5 min postinjection (ip). Peak tumor radiosensitization occurred in the interval between 5 and 10 min postinjection. The ER for tumor regrowth delay was 2.1 +/- 0.3 following 50 mg/kg injected into mice 5 min before irradiation. Functional evaluation up to 40 days after treatment revealed no evidence of neurological deficit.

  15. Evaluation of nitrobenzimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Frank, L.R.; Bush, D.; Harrison, G.H.

    1983-07-01

    Radiobiological and pharmacokinetic assays were performed to determine the potential of 2-nitrobenzimidazole (NBI) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent. As judged by comparing survival curve slopes of Serratia marcescens irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions, the NBI enhancement ratio (ER) at 2 mM concentration was 2.4 +- 0.2, compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3.3 +- 0.3. 2,5-Dinitrobenzimidazole (DNBI) was investigated in vitro; its ER was 3.0 +- 0.3 at 4 mM concentration. Very poor tissue penetration of DNBI precluded further testing in vivo. Acute toxic signs appeared in C3H/HeJ mice following ip injection of NBI at 100 mg/kg. These would be partly attributable to the stress caused by the high pH of the injection vehicle. The LD/sub 50/ was estimated to be 125 to 150 mg/kg. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in the flanks of these mice exhibited maximum NBI levels at 5 min postinjection (ip). Peak tumor radiosensitization occurred in the interval between 5 and 10 min postinjection. The ER for tumor regrowth delay was 2.1 +- 0.3 following 50 mg/kg injected into mice 5 min before irradiation. Functional evaluation up to 40 days after treatment revealed no evidence of neurological deficit.

  16. Evolving systems of care: Individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder in custody of civil and forensic psychiatric services.

    PubMed

    Crocker, A G; Côté, G

    2009-09-01

    Following psychiatric deinstitutionalization and changes in involuntary civil commitment laws, many individuals with severe mental disorders have been receiving mental health services through the back door, that is, the criminal justice system. Significant changes to the section of Criminal Code of Canada dealing with individuals with mental disorders have led to significant annual increases in the number of individuals declared Not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD), many of whom are directed to civil psychiatric settings. The goal of the present study was to describe the psychosociocriminological and risk characteristics of individuals found NCRMD remanded to civil psychiatric hospitals (CPH) compared to a forensic psychiatric hospital (FPH). This study was conducted between October 2004 and August 2006 in the sole FPH of the province of Québec and two large CPH in the Montréal metropolitan area. The final sample for the current study consisted of 96 men: 60 from the FPH and 36 from the two CPH. Results indicate that individuals in both settings have similar psychosociocriminal profiles, including PCL-R scores, but that individuals in CPH have higher scores in the Risk subscale of the HCR-20 than do their counterparts in the FPH. This difference is due to a higher score on two items: exposure to destabilizing factors and noncompliance with remediation attempts. Results are discussed in terms of the need for civil psychiatric settings to implement risk assessment and management programs into their services, and the need for further research into forensic mental health services.

  17. Evolution of aging: individual life history trade-offs and population heterogeneity account for mortality patterns across species.

    PubMed

    Le Cunff, Y; Baudisch, A; Pakdaman, K

    2014-08-01

    A broad range of mortality patterns has been documented across species, some even including decreasing mortality over age. Whether there exist a common denominator to explain both similarities and differences in these mortality patterns remains an open question. The disposable soma theory, an evolutionary theory of aging, proposes that universal intracellular trade-offs between maintenance/lifespan and reproduction would drive aging across species. The disposable soma theory has provided numerous insights concerning aging processes in single individuals. Yet, which specific population mortality patterns it can lead to is still largely unexplored. In this article, we propose a model exploring the mortality patterns which emerge from an evolutionary process including only the disposable soma theory core principles. We adapt a well-known model of genomic evolution to show that mortality curves producing a kink or mid-life plateaus derive from a common minimal evolutionary framework. These mortality shapes qualitatively correspond to those of Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, medflies, yeasts and humans. Species evolved in silico especially differ in their population diversity of maintenance strategies, which itself emerges as an adaptation to the environment over generations. Based on this integrative framework, we also derive predictions and interpretations concerning the effects of diet changes and heat-shock treatments on mortality patterns.

  18. Radiosensitization of human bronchogenic carcinoma cells by interferon beta

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, M.N.; Kakria, R.C.; Olson, S.; Borden, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of interferons on the radiosensitivity of in vitro human bronchogenic carcinoma cells was investigated. Human fibroblast-derived interferon (IFN-beta) was found to sensitize cells to gamma irradiation while either HuIFN-alpha or mouse IFN-alpha/beta did not. The observed radiosensitization was supra-additive and resulted in a decrease in the shoulder width of the radiation dose-cell survival curve but did not affect the slope. The degree of radiosensitization of the various IFNs tested paralleled the antiproliferative effects of these IFNs on this cell line.

  19. Change in radiosensitivity of rats during hypokinetic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, I. P.

    1980-01-01

    The laws governing stress modification of radiation sickness in relation to hypokinetic stress were investigated. It was found that gamma irradiation (800 rad) of rats on the third day of exposure to hypokinesia increased the radiosensitivity of the animals which was determined by the survival rate and the dynamics of body weight and the weight of some internal organs. The same radiation dose was given on the 20th day of hypokinesia and on the third day of recovery from the 20 day hypokinesia decreased the radiosensitivity of rats. It is concluded that the variations in the radiosensitivity observed may be due to a stress effect of hypokinesia.

  20. Radiosensitivity of Human Fibroblasts is Associated With Amino Acid Substitution Variants in Susceptible Genes And Correlates With The Number of Risk Alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbeih, Ghazi . E-mail: galsbeih@kfshrc.edu.sa; El-Sebaie, Medhat; Al-Harbi, Najla; Al-Buhairi, Muneera; Al-Hadyan, Khaled; Al-Rajhi, Nasser

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Genetic predictive markers of radiosensitivity are being sought for stratifying radiotherapy for cancer patients and risk assessment of radiation exposure. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes are associated with, and the number of risk alleles has incremental effect on, individual radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six amino acid substitution variants (ATM 1853 Asp/Asn G>A, p53 72 Arg/Pro G>C, p21 31 Ser/Arg C>A, XRCC1 399 Arg/Gln G>A, XRCC3 241 Thr/Met C>T, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu/Pro T>C) were genotyped by direct sequencing in 54 fibroblast strains of different radiosensitivity. Results: The clonogenic survival fraction at 2 Gy range was 0.15-0.50 (mean, 0.34, standard deviation, 0.08). The mean survival fraction at 2 Gy divided the cell strains into radiosensitive (26 cases) and normal (28 controls). A significant association was observed between the survival fraction at 2 Gy and ATM 1853 Asn, XRCC3 241 Met, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu alleles (p = 0.05, p = 0.02, and p = 0.02, respectively). The p53 72 Arg allele showed a borderline association (p = 0.07). The number of risk alleles increased with increasing radiosensitivity, and the group comparison showed a statistically significant difference between the radiosensitive and control groups (p {<=}0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes influence cellular radiation response and that the number of risk alleles has a combined effect on radiosensitivity. Individuals with multiple risk alleles could be more susceptible to radiation effects than those with fewer risk alleles. These results may have implications in predicting normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy and risk assessment of radiation exposure.

  1. Radiosensitivity of cultured insect cells: II. Diptera

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, T.M.

    1983-10-01

    The radiosensitivity of five dipteran cell lines representing three mosquito genera and one fruit fly genus were examined. These lines are: (1) ATC-10, Aedes aegypti; (2) RU-TAE-14, Toxorhynchites amboinensis; (3) RU-ASE-2A, Anopheles stephensi; (4) WR69-DM-1, Drosophila melanogaster; and (5) WR69-DM-2, Drosophila melanogaster. Population doubling times for these lines range from approximately 16 to 48 hr. Diploid chromosome numbers are six for the mosquito cells and eight for the fruit fly cells D/sub 0/ values are 5.1 and 6.5 Gy for the Drosophila cell lines and 3.6, 6.2, and 10.2 Gy for the mosquito cell lines. The results of this study demonstrate that dipteran insect cells are a few times more resistant to radiation than mammalian cells, but not nearly as radioresistant as lepidopteran cells.

  2. Ganetespib radiosensitization for liver cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Malek, Reem; Annadanam, Anvesh; Nugent, Katriana M.; Kato, Yoshinori; Wang, Hailun; Cades, Jessica A.; Taparra, Kekoa; Belcaid, Zineb; Ballew, Matthew; Manmiller, Sarah; Proia, David; Lim, Michael; Anders, Robert A.; Herman, Joseph M.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapies for liver cancer particularly those including radiation are still inadequate. Inhibiting the stress response machinery is an appealing anti-cancer and radiosensitizing therapeutic strategy. Heat-shock-protein-90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that is a prominent effector of the stress response machinery and is overexpressed in liver cancer cells. HSP90 client proteins include critical components of pathways implicated in liver cancer cell survival and radioresistance. The effects of a novel non-geldanamycin HSP90 inhibitor, ganetespib, combined with radiation were examined on 3 liver cancer cell lines, Hep3b, HepG2 and HUH7, using in vitro assays for clonogenic survival, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, γH2AX foci kinetics and client protein expression in pathways important for liver cancer survival and radioresistance. We then evaluated tumor growth delay and effects of the combined ganetespib-radiation treatment on tumor cell proliferation in a HepG2 hind-flank tumor graft model. Nanomolar levels of ganetespib alone exhibited liver cancer cell anti-cancer activity in vitro as shown by decreased clonogenic survival that was associated with increased apoptotic cell death, prominent G2-M arrest and marked changes in PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/MAPK client protein activity. Ganetespib caused a supra-additive radiosensitization in all liver cancer cell lines at low nanomolar doses with enhancement ratios between 1.33–1.78. These results were confirmed in vivo, where the ganetespib-radiation combination therapy produced supra-additive tumor growth delay compared with either therapy by itself in HepG2 tumor grafts. Our data suggest that combined ganetespib-radiation therapy exhibits promising activity against liver cancer cells, which should be investigated in clinical studies. PMID:26980196

  3. Development of a prediction model for radiosensitivity using the expression values of genes and long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-An; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Chuang, Eric Y

    2016-05-01

    Radiotherapy has become a popular and standard approach for treating cancer patients because it greatly improves patient survival. However, some of the patients receiving radiotherapy suffer from adverse effects and do not obtain survival benefits. This may be attributed to the fact that most radiation treatment plans are designed based on cancer type, without consideration of each individual's radiosensitivity. A model for predicting radiosensitivity would help to address this issue. In this study, the expression levels of both genes and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were used to build such a prediction model. Analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significant difference tests (P < 0.001) were utilized in immortalized B cells (GSE26835) to identify differentially expressed genes and lncRNAs after irradiation. A total of 41 genes and lncRNAs associated with radiation exposure were revealed by a network analysis algorithm. To develop a predictive model for radiosensitivity, the expression profiles of NCI-60 cell lines along, with their radiation parameters, were analyzed. A genetic algorithm was proposed to identify 20 predictors, and the support vector machine algorithm was used to evaluate their prediction performance. The model was applied to 2 datasets of glioblastoma, The Cancer Genome Atlas and GSE16011, and significantly better survival was observed in patients with greater predicted radiosensitivity.

  4. Development of a prediction model for radiosensitivity using the expression values of genes and long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-An; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy has become a popular and standard approach for treating cancer patients because it greatly improves patient survival. However, some of the patients receiving radiotherapy suffer from adverse effects and do not obtain survival benefits. This may be attributed to the fact that most radiation treatment plans are designed based on cancer type, without consideration of each individual's radiosensitivity. A model for predicting radiosensitivity would help to address this issue. In this study, the expression levels of both genes and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were used to build such a prediction model. Analysis of variance and Tukey's honest significant difference tests (P < 0.001) were utilized in immortalized B cells (GSE26835) to identify differentially expressed genes and lncRNAs after irradiation. A total of 41 genes and lncRNAs associated with radiation exposure were revealed by a network analysis algorithm. To develop a predictive model for radiosensitivity, the expression profiles of NCI-60 cell lines along, with their radiation parameters, were analyzed. A genetic algorithm was proposed to identify 20 predictors, and the support vector machine algorithm was used to evaluate their prediction performance. The model was applied to 2 datasets of glioblastoma, The Cancer Genome Atlas and GSE16011, and significantly better survival was observed in patients with greater predicted radiosensitivity. PMID:27050376

  5. Prediction of cellular radiosensitivity from DNA damage induced by gamma-rays and carbon ion irradiation in canine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Seiichi; Van Khoa, Tran; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Ueno, Shunji; Ito, Nobuhiko

    2005-11-01

    Diseases of companion animals are shifting from infectious diseases to neoplasms (cancer), and since radiation therapy is one of the effective choices available for cancer treatment, the application of radiotherapy in veterinary medicine is likely to increase. However tumor tissues have different radiosensitivities, and therefore it is important to determine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of tumors in individual patients in advance of radiotherapy. We have studied the relationship between the surviving cell fraction measured by a clonogenic assay and DNA double strand breaks detected by a comet assay under neutral conditions in three canine tumor cell lines, after gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation. In all the cell lines, cell death assessed by the clonogenic assay was much higher following irradiation with carbon ions than with gamma-rays. The initial and residual (4 hr) DNA damage due to gamma-ray and carbon ion irradiation were higher in a radiosensitive cell line than in a radioresistant cell line. The surviving cell fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) showed a tendency for correlation with both the initial and residual DNA damage. In particular, the residual damage per Gy was significantly correlated with SF2, regardless of the type of radiation. This indicates that cellular radiosensitivity can be predicted by detection of radiation-induced residual DNA damage.

  6. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as radiosensitizers for radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2004-07-06

    The present invention covers radiosensitizers containing as an active ingredient halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the structure ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron--capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these radiosensitizers in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  7. Evolving systems of care: Individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder in custody of civil and forensic psychiatric services.

    PubMed

    Crocker, A G; Côté, G

    2009-09-01

    Following psychiatric deinstitutionalization and changes in involuntary civil commitment laws, many individuals with severe mental disorders have been receiving mental health services through the back door, that is, the criminal justice system. Significant changes to the section of Criminal Code of Canada dealing with individuals with mental disorders have led to significant annual increases in the number of individuals declared Not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD), many of whom are directed to civil psychiatric settings. The goal of the present study was to describe the psychosociocriminological and risk characteristics of individuals found NCRMD remanded to civil psychiatric hospitals (CPH) compared to a forensic psychiatric hospital (FPH). This study was conducted between October 2004 and August 2006 in the sole FPH of the province of Québec and two large CPH in the Montréal metropolitan area. The final sample for the current study consisted of 96 men: 60 from the FPH and 36 from the two CPH. Results indicate that individuals in both settings have similar psychosociocriminal profiles, including PCL-R scores, but that individuals in CPH have higher scores in the Risk subscale of the HCR-20 than do their counterparts in the FPH. This difference is due to a higher score on two items: exposure to destabilizing factors and noncompliance with remediation attempts. Results are discussed in terms of the need for civil psychiatric settings to implement risk assessment and management programs into their services, and the need for further research into forensic mental health services. PMID:19720502

  8. Correlation between radiosensitivity, percentage hypoxic cells and pO2 measurements in one rodent and two human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C D; Chavaudra, N; Martin, L; Guichard, M

    1994-07-01

    Computerized pO2 histography has been used to measure the intratumor pO2 in patients for the past few years, and there is now evidence that these tumors contain hypoxic cells. One of the major questions that remains to be answered is the relevance of such data to radiosensitivity. The present study looks for a correlation between intratumor pO2, the percentage of hypoxic cells in the tumor and the radiosensitization induced by carbogen and/or the oxygen carrier, perflubron emulsion. Two human tumor xenografts (HRT18, Na11+) and one rodent tumor (EMT6) were used. The radiosensitivity (clonogenic assay) and the oxygen tension (computerized pO2 histography) were measured. All experiments were performed under similar conditions. Carbogen increased tumor radiosensitivity; sensitization was greatest when 4 ml/kg perflubron emulsion was used in conjunction with carbogen. The pO2 distribution was shifted to higher pO2 values in the tumors whatever the treatment; the shift was greater for perflubron emulsion plus carbogen. The low pO2 values (< 0.4 kPa) were lost for the HRT18 cells. A correlation (EMT6, HRT18) or a link (Na11+) between the radiosensitization and the oxygen tension measurements was found for values below 1.07 or 1.33 kPa. A trend between the percentage of hypoxic cells and pO2 measurements was found taking into account pO2 measurements comprised between 0.27 and 0.67 kPa. PMID:8016297

  9. Radiosensitivity of cultured insect cells: I. Lepidoptera

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, T.M.

    1983-10-01

    The radiosensitivity of five lepidopteran insect cell lines representing five different genera has been investigated. These lines are: (1) TN-368, Trichoplusia ni; (2) IPLB-SF-1254, Spodoptera frugiperda; (3) IPLB-1075, Heliothis zea; (4) MRRL-CHl, clone GVl, Manduca sexta; and (5) IAL-PID2, Plodia interpunctella. The cell lines grew at different rates and had population doubling times that ranged from 19 to 52 hr. All of the lines are highly heteroploid and have approximate chromosome numbers near or above 100. The chromosomes are very small. All of the lines are extremely radioresistant; cell populations are able to recover from 260 kVp X-ray exposures up to and including 400 Gy, the highest dose examined. Cell survival curves were obtainable for only the TN-368 and IPLB-SF-1254 lines. The TN-368 cells displayed a biphasic survival response with D/sub 0/, d/sub q/, and n values of 65.7 and 130.2 Gy, 9.0 and -36.1 Gy, and 1.2 and 0.8, respectively, for the steep and shallow portions of the curve. The IPLB-SF-1254 cells had a D/sub 0/ of 63.9 Gy. D/sub q/ of 19.0 Gy, and n value of 1.4. These studies provide definitive evidence of the radioresistance of lepidopteran cells, and suggest that this radioresistance is a characteristic of lepidopteran insects.

  10. Lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles for radiosensitization of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Konstantin; Bekah, Devesh; Cooper, Daniel; Shastry, Sathvik; Hill, Colin; Bradforth, Stephen; Nadeau, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Dense inorganic nanoparticles have recently been identified as promising radiosensitizers. In addition to dose enhancement through increased attenuation of ionizing radiation relative to biological tissue, scintillating nanoparticles can transfer energy to coupled photosensitizers to amplify production of reactive oxygen species, as well as provide UVvisible emission for optical imaging. Lanthanum fluoride is a transparent material that is easily prepared as nanocrystals, and which can provide radioluminescence at a number of wavelengths through simple substitution of lanthanum ions with other luminescent lanthanides. We have prepared lanthanum fluoride nanoparticles doped with cerium, terbium, or both, that have good spectral overlap with chlorine6 or Rose Bengal photosensitizer molecules. We have also developed a strategy for stable conjugation of the photosensitizers to the nanoparticle surface, allowing for high energy transfer efficiencies on a per molecule basis. Additionally, we have succeeded in making our conjugates colloidally stable under physiological conditions. Here we present our latest results, using nanoparticles and nanoparticle-photosensitizer conjugates to demonstrate radiation dose enhancement in B16 melanoma cells. The effects of nanoparticle treatment prior to 250 kVp x-ray irradiation were investigated through clonogenic survival assays and cell cycle analysis. Using a custom apparatus, we have also observed scintillation of the nanoparticles and conjugates under the same conditions that the cell samples are irradiated.

  11. Radiosensitizing Properties of Bortezomib Depend on Therapeutic Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Labussiere, Marianne; Pinel, Sophie; Vandamme, Marc; Plenat, Francois; Chastagner, Pascal

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of the bortezomib (BTZ) on malignant glioma radiosensitivity in two xenograft models. Methods and Materials: For TCG3 and U87 models, we evaluated the antitumor activity of BTZ, radiotherapy, and BTZ plus radiothearapy according to two therapeutic schedules: a 'nonfractionated' schedule corresponding to a single dose of treatment per week, and a 'fractionated' schedule corresponding to the same weekly dose divided into 5 fractions. Treatments influence on proliferation and apoptosis indexes, cell cycle distribution, and nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway were explored. Results: The radiosensitizing properties of BTZ observed with the nonfractionated schedule were lost with the fractionated schedule. Bortezomib-mediated radiosensitization was associated with an increased apoptosis response and major changes in cell proliferation, but the nuclear factor-{kappa}B pathway was not involved. Most of the cellular effects induced by BTZ when tumors received a single irradiation were cancelled out if radiotherapy was fractionated. Conclusion: The influence of BTZ on glioma radiosensitivity seems to depend on the treatment fractionation schedule, emphasizing the need to clarify the mechanisms underlying BTZ's radiosensitizing effects before further clinical trials are initiated.

  12. Homologous recombination as a potential target for caffeine radiosensitization in mammalian cells: reduced caffeine radiosensitization in XRCC2 and XRCC3 mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asaad, N. A.; Zeng, Z. C.; Guan, J.; Thacker, J.; Iliakis, G.

    2000-01-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of caffeine has been associated with the disruption of multiple DNA damage-responsive cell cycle checkpoints, but several lines of evidence also implicate inhibition of DNA repair. The role of DNA repair inhibition in caffeine radiosensitization remains uncharacterized, and it is unknown which repair process, or lesion, is affected. We show that a radiosensitive cell line, mutant for the RAD51 homolog XRCC2 and defective in homologous recombination repair (HRR), displays significantly diminished caffeine radiosensitization that can be restored by expression of XRCC2. Despite the reduced radiosensitization, caffeine effectively abrogates checkpoints in S and G2 phases in XRCC2 mutant cells indicating that checkpoint abrogation is not sufficient for radiosensitization. Another radiosensitive line, mutant for XRCC3 and defective in HRR, similarly shows reduced caffeine radiosensitization. On the other hand, a radiosensitive mutant (irs-20) of DNA-PKcs with a defect in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is radiosensitized by caffeine to an extent comparable to wild-type cells. In addition, rejoining of radiation-induced DNA DSBs, that mainly reflects NHEJ, remains unaffected by caffeine in XRCC2 and XRCC3 mutants, or their wild-type counterparts. These observations suggest that caffeine targets steps in HRR but not in NHEJ and that abrogation of checkpoint response is not sufficient to explain radiosensitization. Indeed, immortalized fibroblasts from AT patients show caffeine radiosensitization despite the checkpoint defects associated with ATM mutation. We propose that caffeine radiosensitization is mediated by inhibition of stages in DNA DSB repair requiring HRR and that checkpoint disruption contributes by allowing these DSBs to transit into irreparable states. Thus, checkpoints may contribute to genomic stability by promoting error-free HRR.

  13. Coculture with astrocytes reduces the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma stem-like cells and identifies additional targets for radiosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Barbara H; Wahba, Amy; Camphausen, Kevin; Tofilon, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Toward developing a model system for investigating the role of the microenvironment in the radioresistance of glioblastoma (GBM), human glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) were grown in coculture with human astrocytes. Using a trans-well assay, survival analyses showed that astrocytes significantly decreased the radiosensitivity of GSCs compared to standard culture conditions. In addition, when irradiated in coculture, the initial level of radiation-induced γH2AX foci in GSCs was reduced and foci dispersal was enhanced suggesting that the presence of astrocytes influenced the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. These data indicate that astrocytes can decrease the radiosensitivity of GSCs in vitro via a paracrine-based mechanism and further support a role for the microenvironment as a determinant of GBM radioresponse. Chemokine profiling of coculture media identified a number of bioactive molecules not present under standard culture conditions. The gene expression profiles of GSCs grown in coculture were significantly different as compared to GSCs grown alone. These analyses were consistent with an astrocyte-mediated modification in GSC phenotype and, moreover, suggested a number of potential targets for GSC radiosensitization that were unique to coculture conditions. Along these lines, STAT3 was activated in GSCs grown with astrocytes; the JAK/STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 enhanced the radiosensitivity of GSCs under coculture conditions and when grown as orthotopic xenografts. Further, this coculture system may also provide an approach for identifying additional targets for GBM radiosensitization. PMID:26518290

  14. The temporal organization of processes of cell reproduction and its connection with rhythms of radiosensitivity of the body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druzhinin, Y. P.; Romanov, Y. A.; Vatsek, A.

    1974-01-01

    Radiosensitivity of individual phases of the mitotic cycle was studied in synchronous cell cultures and in several biological objects. It was found that radiosensitivity changed essentially according to phases of the mitotic cycle, depending on the kind of cells, evaluation criteria and the radiation dosage. Tests on partially synchronized HeLa cell populations, according to the criterion of survival, showed them most sensitive during mitosis, as well as in later G sub 1- or early DNA-synthesizing stages. With radiation in doses of 300 rad, the proportion of surviving cells showed a sensitivity directly before DNA synthesis of approximately 4 times higher than the later S-phase and during the major portion of G sub 1- and G sub 2-periods. Sensitivity of cells in mitosis was approximately 3 times higher than in late G sub 1- and early S-phases.

  15. Differences in DNA Repair Capacity, Cell Death and Transcriptional Response after Irradiation between a Radiosensitive and a Radioresistant Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Borràs-Fresneda, Mireia; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Rössler, Ute; Armengol, Gemma; Barrios, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    Normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy shows variability between patients, indicating inter-individual differences in radiosensitivity. Genetic variation probably contributes to these differences. The aim of the present study was to determine if two cell lines, one radiosensitive (RS) and another radioresistant (RR), showed differences in DNA repair capacity, cell viability, cell cycle progression and, in turn, if this response could be characterised by a differential gene expression profile at different post-irradiation times. After irradiation, the RS cell line showed a slower rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance, a higher frequency of incomplete chromosomal aberrations, a reduced cell viability and a longer disturbance of the cell cycle when compared to the RR cell line. Moreover, a greater and prolonged transcriptional response after irradiation was induced in the RS cell line. Functional analysis showed that 24 h after irradiation genes involved in "DNA damage response", "direct p53 effectors" and apoptosis were still differentially up-regulated in the RS cell line but not in the RR cell line. The two cell lines showed different response to IR and can be distinguished with cell-based assays and differential gene expression analysis. The results emphasise the importance to identify biomarkers of radiosensitivity for tailoring individualized radiotherapy protocols.

  16. Differences in DNA Repair Capacity, Cell Death and Transcriptional Response after Irradiation between a Radiosensitive and a Radioresistant Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Borràs-Fresneda, Mireia; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc; Gomolka, Maria; Hornhardt, Sabine; Rössler, Ute; Armengol, Gemma; Barrios, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy shows variability between patients, indicating inter-individual differences in radiosensitivity. Genetic variation probably contributes to these differences. The aim of the present study was to determine if two cell lines, one radiosensitive (RS) and another radioresistant (RR), showed differences in DNA repair capacity, cell viability, cell cycle progression and, in turn, if this response could be characterised by a differential gene expression profile at different post-irradiation times. After irradiation, the RS cell line showed a slower rate of γ-H2AX foci disappearance, a higher frequency of incomplete chromosomal aberrations, a reduced cell viability and a longer disturbance of the cell cycle when compared to the RR cell line. Moreover, a greater and prolonged transcriptional response after irradiation was induced in the RS cell line. Functional analysis showed that 24 h after irradiation genes involved in “DNA damage response”, “direct p53 effectors” and apoptosis were still differentially up-regulated in the RS cell line but not in the RR cell line. The two cell lines showed different response to IR and can be distinguished with cell-based assays and differential gene expression analysis. The results emphasise the importance to identify biomarkers of radiosensitivity for tailoring individualized radiotherapy protocols. PMID:27245205

  17. Radiosensitization of hematoporphyrin derivative: clinical trial on 69 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shao-Yong; Yu, Tian-Hu

    1993-03-01

    Sixty-nine patients with various malignant tumors were treated with different regimens of radiotherapy or chemotherapy combined with HpD. The immediate response showed that the over-all response rate was 94.2% and complete response rate was 60.9%. The present study suggests that HpD be used as a radiosensitizer with mild side effects but no drug resistance on repeated administrations. Special effects of HpD on radio-resistant tumors, such as malignant melanoma, were observed. It may render radiation effective in advanced or recurrent lesions. Mechanism of radiosensitization of HpD is discussed. Tentative ideas for further investigations are put forward.

  18. TGF{beta}1 polymorphisms and late clinical radiosensitivity in patients treated for gynecologic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyck, Kim de . E-mail: kim.deruyck@UGent.be; Van Eijkeren, Marc; Claes, Kathleen; Bacher, Klaus; Vral, Anne; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the association between six transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGF{beta}1) polymorphisms (-1.552delAGG, -800G>A, -509C>T, Leu10Pro, Arg25Pro, Thr263Ile) and the occurrence of late normal tissue reactions after gynecologic radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight women with cervical or endometrial cancer and 140 control individuals were included in the study. According to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 (CTCAEv3.0) scale, 25 patients showed late adverse RT reactions (CTC2+), of whom 11 had severe complications (CTC3+). Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), single base extension and genotyping assays were performed to examine the polymorphic sites in TGF{beta}1. Results: Homozygous variant -1.552delAGG, -509TT, and 10Pro genotypes were associated with the risk of developing late severe RT reactions. Triple (variant) homozygous patients had a 3.6 times increased risk to develop severe RT reactions (p = 0.26). Neither the -800A allele, nor the 25Pro allele or the 263Ile allele were associated with clinical radiosensitivity. There was perfect linkage disequilibrium (LD) between the -1.552delAGG and the -509C>T polymorphisms, and tight LD between the -1.552/-509 and the Leu10Pro polymorphisms. Haplotype analysis revealed two major haplotypes but could not distinguish radiosensitive from nonradiosensitive patients. Conclusions: The present study shows that homozygous variant TGF{beta}1 -1.552delAGG, -509TT, and 10Pro genotypes may be associated with severe clinical radiosensitivity after gynecologic RT.

  19. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder. Part 5: How Essential Are Gender-Specific Forensic Psychiatric Services?

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Tonia L; Crocker, Anne G; Seto, Michael C; Wilson, Catherine M; Charette, Yanick; Côté, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To state the sociodemographic characteristics, mental health histories, index offence characteristics, and criminal histories of male and female forensic psychiatric patients. Clinicians and researchers advocate that mental health and criminal justice organizations implement gender-specific services; however, few studies have sampled forensic patients to evaluate the extent to which men’s and women’s treatment and management needs are different. Method: Data were collected from Review Board files from May 2000 to April 2005 in the 3 largest Canadian provinces. Using official criminal records, participants were followed for 3 to 8 years, until December 2008. The final sample comprised 1800 individuals: 15.6% were women and 84.4% were men. Results: There were few demographic differences, but women had higher psychosocial functioning than men. Both men and women had extensive mental health histories; women were more likely diagnosed with mood disorders and PDs and men were more likely diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and SUDs. The nature of the index offence did not differ by gender, except women were more likely to have perpetrated murders and attempted murders. For offences against a person, women were more likely to offend against offspring and partners and less likely to offend against strangers, compared with men. Women had significantly less extensive criminal histories than men. Conclusions: Not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder–accused women have a distinct psychosocial, clinical, and criminological profile from their male counterparts, which may suggest gender-specific assessment, risk management, and treatment in forensic services could benefit patients. The findings are also consistent with traditional models (Risk-Need-Responsivity) and ultimately demonstrate the importance of individual assessment and client-centred services. PMID:25886689

  20. Gay-Straight Alliances vary on dimensions of youth socializing and advocacy: factors accounting for individual and setting-level differences.

    PubMed

    Poteat, V Paul; Scheer, Jillian R; Marx, Robert A; Calzo, Jerel P; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2015-06-01

    Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are school-based youth settings that could promote health. Yet, GSAs have been treated as homogenous without attention to variability in how they operate or to how youth are involved in different capacities. Using a systems perspective, we considered two primary dimensions along which GSAs function to promote health: providing socializing and advocacy opportunities. Among 448 students in 48 GSAs who attended six regional conferences in Massachusetts (59.8 % LGBQ; 69.9 % White; 70.1 % cisgender female), we found substantial variation among GSAs and youth in levels of socializing and advocacy. GSAs were more distinct from one another on advocacy than socializing. Using multilevel modeling, we identified group and individual factors accounting for this variability. In the socializing model, youth and GSAs that did more socializing activities did more advocacy. In the advocacy model, youth who were more actively engaged in the GSA as well as GSAs whose youth collectively perceived greater school hostility and reported greater social justice efficacy did more advocacy. Findings suggest potential reasons why GSAs vary in how they function in ways ranging from internal provisions of support, to visibility raising, to collective social change. The findings are further relevant for settings supporting youth from other marginalized backgrounds and that include advocacy in their mission.

  1. Gay-Straight Alliances Vary on Dimensions of Youth Socializing and Advocacy: Factors Accounting for Individual and Setting-Level Differences

    PubMed Central

    Poteat, V. Paul; Scheer, Jillian R.; Marx, Robert A.; Calzo, Jerel P.; Yoshikawa, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are school-based youth settings that could promote health. Yet, GSAs have been treated as homogenous without attention to variability in how they operate or to how youth are involved in different capacities. Using a systems perspective, we considered two primary dimensions along which GSAs function to promote health: providing socializing and advocacy opportunities. Among 448 students in 48 GSAs who attended six regional conferences in Massachusetts (59.8% LGBQ; 69.9% White; 70.1% cisgender female), we found substantial variation among GSAs and youth in levels of socializing and advocacy. GSAs were more distinct from one another on advocacy than socializing. Using multilevel modeling, we identified group and individual factors accounting for this variability. In the socializing model, youth and GSAs that did more socializing activities did more advocacy. In the advocacy model, youth who were more actively engaged in the GSA as well as GSAs whose youth collectively perceived greater school hostility and reported greater social justice efficacy did more advocacy. Findings suggest potential reasons why GSAs vary in how they function in ways ranging from internal provisions of support, to visibility raising, to collective social change. The findings are further relevant for settings supporting youth from other marginalized backgrounds and that include advocacy in their mission. PMID:25855133

  2. Dynamic and static factors associated with discharge dispositions: the national trajectory project of individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in Canada.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Anne G; Nicholls, Tonia L; Charette, Yanick; Seto, Michael C

    2014-09-01

    The majority of individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in Canada spend some time in hospital before they are conditionally or absolutely (no conditions) discharged to the community by a legally mandated review board. By law, the decision to conditionally discharge an individual found NCRMD should be guided by the need to protect the public, the mental condition of the accused, and the other needs of the accused, especially regarding his/her community reintegration. At the time of this study, Canadian legislation and case law required that the review board disposition should be the "least onerous and least restrictive" possible for the accused. This means that, if there is no evidence that the person poses a significant risk to public safety, he/she must be released. However, the Canadian Criminal Code does not specify the criteria that must be considered when making this risk assessment. This leads to two questions. (1) What predicts review board dispositions? (2) To what extent do disposition determinations reflect evidence-based practices? The present study examined dynamic and static predictors of detention in custody, conditional discharge (CD), and absolute discharge (AD) dispositions among persons found NCRMD across the three largest provinces in Canada. The National Trajectory Project (NTP) examined men and women found NCRMD in British Columbia (BC), Québec (QC), and Ontario (ON) between May 2000 and April 2005, followed until December 2008. For the purposes of this study, individuals who had at least one hearing with a review board were extracted from the NTP dataset (N = 1794: QC = 1089, ON = 483, BC = 222). Over the course of the study, 6743 review board hearings were examined (QC = 3505, ON = 2185, BC = 1053). Despite advances in the risk assessment field, presentation of a comprehensive structured risk assessment to the review board was not the norm. Yet our findings suggest that

  3. Dynamic and static factors associated with discharge dispositions: the national trajectory project of individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in Canada.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Anne G; Nicholls, Tonia L; Charette, Yanick; Seto, Michael C

    2014-09-01

    The majority of individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in Canada spend some time in hospital before they are conditionally or absolutely (no conditions) discharged to the community by a legally mandated review board. By law, the decision to conditionally discharge an individual found NCRMD should be guided by the need to protect the public, the mental condition of the accused, and the other needs of the accused, especially regarding his/her community reintegration. At the time of this study, Canadian legislation and case law required that the review board disposition should be the "least onerous and least restrictive" possible for the accused. This means that, if there is no evidence that the person poses a significant risk to public safety, he/she must be released. However, the Canadian Criminal Code does not specify the criteria that must be considered when making this risk assessment. This leads to two questions. (1) What predicts review board dispositions? (2) To what extent do disposition determinations reflect evidence-based practices? The present study examined dynamic and static predictors of detention in custody, conditional discharge (CD), and absolute discharge (AD) dispositions among persons found NCRMD across the three largest provinces in Canada. The National Trajectory Project (NTP) examined men and women found NCRMD in British Columbia (BC), Québec (QC), and Ontario (ON) between May 2000 and April 2005, followed until December 2008. For the purposes of this study, individuals who had at least one hearing with a review board were extracted from the NTP dataset (N = 1794: QC = 1089, ON = 483, BC = 222). Over the course of the study, 6743 review board hearings were examined (QC = 3505, ON = 2185, BC = 1053). Despite advances in the risk assessment field, presentation of a comprehensive structured risk assessment to the review board was not the norm. Yet our findings suggest that

  4. Histone Deacetylation Critically Determines T-cell Subset Radiosensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Jason L.; Sukhina, Alona S.; Seed, Thomas M.; Manley, Nancy R.; Sempowski, Gregory A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Smithey, Megan J.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes are sensitive to ionizing radiation and naïve lymphocytes are more radiosensitive than their memory counterparts. Less is known about radiosensitivity of memory cell subsets. We examined the radiosensitivity of naïve (TN), effector memory (TEM), and central memory (TCM) T cell subsets in C57BL/6 mice, and found TEM to be more resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis than either TN or TCM. Surprisingly, we found no correlation between the extent of radiation-induced apoptosis in T cell subsets and : (i) levels of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members; or (ii) the H2-AX content and maximal γH2-AX fold change. Rather, TEM cell survival correlated with higher levels of immediate γH2-AX marking, immediate break binding and genome-wide open chromatin structure. T cells were able to mark DNA damage seemingly instantly (30 s), even if kept on ice. Relaxing chromatin with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid following radiation or etoposide treatment, improved the survival of TCM and TN cells up to levels seen in the resistant TEM cells, but did not improve survival from caspase-mediated apoptosis. We conclude that an open genome-wide chromatin state is the key determinant of efficient immediate repair of DNA damage in T cells, explaining the observed T cell subset radiosensitivity differences. PMID:24990082

  5. Targeted radiosensitization of cells expressing truncated DNA polymerase {beta}.

    PubMed

    Neijenhuis, Sari; Verwijs-Janssen, Manon; van den Broek, Lenie J; Begg, Adrian C; Vens, Conchita

    2010-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is an effective anticancer treatment, although failures still occur. To improve radiotherapy, tumor-targeted strategies are needed to increase radiosensitivity of tumor cells, without influencing normal tissue radiosensitivity. Base excision repair (BER) and single-strand break repair (SSBR) contribute to the determination of sensitivity to IR. A crucial protein in BER/SSBR is DNA polymerase β (polβ). Aberrant polβ expression is commonly found in human tumors and leads to inhibition of BER. Here, we show that truncated polβ variant (polβ-Δ)-expressing cells depend on homologous recombination (HR) for survival after IR, indicating that a considerable fraction of polβ-Δ-induced lesions are subject to repair by HR. Increased sensitization was found not to result from involvement in DNA-dependent protein kinase-dependent nonhomologous end joining, the other major double-strand break repair pathway. Caffeine and the ATM inhibitor Ku55933 cause polβ-Δ-dependent radiosensitization. Consistent with the observed HR dependence and the known HR-modulating activity of ATM, polβ-Δ-expressing cells showed increased radiosensitization after BRCA2 knockdown that is absent under ATM-inhibited conditions. Our data suggest that treatment with HR modulators is a promising therapeutic strategy for exploiting defects in the BER/SSBR pathway in human tumors. PMID:20978197

  6. Enhanced chromosomal radiosensitivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes of larynx cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowska, Halina; Lankoff, Anna; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Florek, Agnieszka; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Gozdz, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Andrzej . E-mail: awojcik@pu.kielce.pl

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The chromosomal radiosensitivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes of cancer patients was reported to be higher than that of healthy donors. This effect is especially prominent when aberrations induced in the G{sub 2} phase of the cell cycle are analyzed. The aim of our study was to investigate if the G{sub 2} aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of patients with larynx cancer are higher than in the case of control individuals. Also, we tested if the frequencies of G{sub 2} aberrations correlate with side effects of radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Peripheral blood of 38 patients was collected before the onset of radiotherapy, cultured for 72 h, and irradiated with 2 Gy after 67 h. Lymphocytes of 40 healthy donors were treated in the same way. Results: The spontaneous and radiation-induced aberration frequencies in lymphocytes of patients were on average higher than in those of healthy donors. No statistically significant correlation was observed between aberration frequencies in lymphocytes and the degree of both early and late normal tissue reactions. Conclusions: The chromosomal radiosensitivity of lymphocytes of patients with larynx cancer may be a marker of cancer predisposition; however, it does not appear to have a predictive value for the risk of developing side effects to radiotherapy.

  7. Disturbance of redox status enhances radiosensitivity of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chao; Wang, Zhen-hua; Liu, Xiong-xiong; Yang, Li-na; Wang, Yali; Liu, Yang; Mao, Ai-hong; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xin; Di, Cui-xia; Gan, Lu; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Aims: High constitutive expression of Nrf2 has been found in many types of cancers, and this high level of Nrf2 also favors resistance to drugs and radiation. Here we investigate how isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a natural antioxidant, inhibits the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant pathway and enhances the radiosensitivity of HepG2 cells and HepG2 xenografts. Results: Treatment of HepG2 cells with ISL for 6 h selectively enhanced transcription and expression of Keap1. Keap1 effectively induced ubiquitination and degradation of Nrf2, and inhibited translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. Consequently, expression of Nrf2 downstream genes was reduced, and the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant system was suppressed. Endogenous ROS was higher than before ISL treatment, causing redox imbalance and oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with ISL for 6 h followed by X-ray irradiation significantly increased γ-H2AX foci and cell apoptosis, and reduced clonogenic potential compared with cells irradiated with X-rays alone. In addition, HepG2 xenografts, ISL, and X-ray co-treatments induced greater apoptosis and tumor growth inhibition, when compared with X-ray treatments alone. Additionally, HepG2 xenografts, in which Nrf2 was expressed at very low levels due to ectopic expression of Keap1, showed that ISL-mediated radiosensitization was Keap1 dependent. Innovation and Conclusions: ISL inhibited the Nrf2-antioxidant pathway by increasing the levels of Keap1 and ultimately inducing oxidative stress via disturbance of the redox status. The antioxidant ISL possessed pro-oxidative properties, and enhanced the radiosensitivity of liver cancer cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, these results demonstrated the effectiveness of using ISL to decrease radioresistance, suggesting that ISL could be developed as an adjuvant radiosensitization drug. Disturbance of redox status could be a potential target for radiosensitization. PMID:26101703

  8. WE-G-BRE-08: Radiosensitization by Olaparib Eluting Nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Tangutoori, S; Kumar, R; Sridhar, S; Korideck, H; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate brachytherapy often uses inert bio-absorbable spacers to achieve the desired geometric distribution of sources within the prostate. Transforming these spacers into implantable nanoplatforms for chemo-radiation therapy (INCeRT) provides a means of providing sustained in-situ release of radiosensitizers in the prostate to enhance the therapeutic ratio of the procedure. Olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, suppresses DNA repair processes present during low dose rate continuous irradiation. This work investigates the radiosensitizing/DNA damage repair inhibition by NanoOlaparib eluting nanospheres. Methods: Human cell line PC3 (from ATCC), was maintained in F12-k medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum. Clonogenic assay kit (from Fischer Scientific) was used to fix and stain the cells to determine the long term effects of irradiation. Nanoparticle size and zeta potential of nanospheres were determined using a Zeta particle size analyzer. The incorporation of Olaparib in nanospheres was evaluated by HPLC. Irradiation was performed in a small animal irradiator operating at 220 KeV.The long term effects of radio-sensitization with olaparib and nanoolaparib was determined using the clonogenic assay at 2 Gy and 4 Gy doses. The cells were allowed to grow for around 10 doubling cycles, The colonies were fixed and stained using clonogenic assay kit. The excess stain was washed off using DI water and the images were taken using a digital camera. Results: Radiosensitization studies were carried out in prostate cancer cell line, PC3 radiation at 0, 2 and 4Gy doses. Strongest dose response was observed with nanoolaparib treated cells compared to untreated cells. Conclusion: A two stage drug release of drug eluting nanospheres from a biodegradable spacer has been suggested for sustained in-situ release of Olaparib to suppress DNA repair processes during prostate brachytherapy. The Olaparib eluting nanospheres had the same in-vitro radiosensitizing effect as

  9. Radiosensitivity to high energy iron ions is influenced by heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Lieberman, H. B.; Ludwig, T.; Hall, E. J.

    2010-09-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1 GeV/ n56Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation.

  10. Factors Affecting the Radiosensitivity of Hexaploid Wheat to γ-Irradiation: Radiosensitivity of Hexaploid Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linshu; Guo, Huijun; Xie, Yongdun; Zhao, Shirong; Song, Xiyun; Han, Longzhi; Liu, Luxiang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the radiosensitivity of plants, an important factor in crop mutation breeding programs, requires a thorough investigation of the factors that contribute to this trait. In this study, we used the highly radiosensitive wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) variety HY1 and J411, a γ-irradiation-insensitive control, which were screened from a natural population, to examine the factors affecting radiosensitivity, including free radical content and total antioxidant capacity, as well as the expression of TaKu70 and TaKu80 (DNA repair-related genes) as measured by real-time PCR. We also investigated the alternative splicing of this gene in the wild-type wheat ecotype by sequence analysis. Free radical contents and total antioxidant capacity significantly increased upon exposure of HY1 wheat to γ-irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, in J411, the free radical contents exhibited a similar trend, but the total antioxidant capacity exhibited a downward trend upon increasing γ-irradiation. Additionally, we detected dose-dependent increases in TaKu70 and TaKu80 expression levels in γ-irradiated HY1, while in J411, TaKu70 expression levels increased, followed by a decline. We also detected alternative splicing of TaKu70 mRNA, namely, intron retention, in HY1 but not in J411. Our findings indicate that γ-irradiation induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in hexaploid wheat, resulting in growth retardation of seedlings, and they suggest that TaKu70 may play a causal role in radiosensitivity in HY1. Further studies are required to exploit these factors to improve radiosensitivity in other wheat varieties. PMID:27551965

  11. Modification of radiosensitivity of mammalian cells by cyclic nucleotides. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, D.; Prasad, K.N.

    1981-07-06

    Some in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) may be one of the important factors in determining the radiosensitivity of certain mammalian cells; however, the role of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in radiosensitivity of mammalian cells is completely unknown. Recent data also suggest that the mechanism of radiation protection afforded by moderate hypoxia and SH-containing compounds may involve an alteration in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP. At least one in vivo study shows that cyclic AMP protects hair follicles and gut epithelial cells against radiation damage; however, it does not protect lymphosarcoma and breast carcinoma in mice. If a similar phenomenon is found in humans, an elevation of the intracellular level of cyclic AMP during radiation exposure may improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy in those cases where the radiation damage of normal tissue becomes the limiting factor for a continuation of the therapy program.

  12. Rockets, radiosensitizers, and RRx-001: an origin story part I.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Ning, Shoucheng; Peehl, Donna; Oronsky, Arnold; Cabrales, Pedro; Bednarski, Mark; Knox, Susan

    2016-03-01

    From Adam and Eve, to Darwinism, origin stories attempt to fill in the blanks, connect the dots, and define the turning points that are fundamental to subsequent developments. The purpose of this review is to present the origin story of a one-of-a-kind anticancer agent, RRx-001, which emerged from the aerospace industry as a putative radiosensitizer; not since the dynamite-to-dilator transformation of nitroglycerin in 1878 or the post-World War II explosive-to-elixir conversion of hydralazine, an ingredient in rocket fuel, to an antihypertensive, an antidepressant and an antituberculant, has energetic chemistry been harnessed for therapeutic purposes. This is Part 1 of the radiosensitization story; Parts 2 and 3, which detail the crossover activity of RRx-001 as a chemosensitizer in multiple tumor types and disease states including malaria, hemorrhagic shock and sickle cell anemia, are the subject of future reviews.

  13. Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Marples, Brian Collis, Spencer J.

    2008-04-01

    This review article discusses the biology of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) with reference to the molecular regulation of DNA repair and cell cycle control processes. Particular attention is paid to the significance of G2-phase cell cycle checkpoints in overcoming low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and the impact of HRS on low-dose rate radiobiology. The history of HRS from the original in vivo discovery to the most recent in vitro and clinical data are examined to present a unifying hypothesis concerning the molecular control and regulation of this important low dose radiation response. Finally, preclinical and clinical data are discussed, from a molecular viewpoint, to provide theoretical approaches to exploit HRS biology for clinical gain.

  14. Rockets, radiosensitizers, and RRx-001: an origin story part I.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Ning, Shoucheng; Peehl, Donna; Oronsky, Arnold; Cabrales, Pedro; Bednarski, Mark; Knox, Susan

    2016-03-01

    From Adam and Eve, to Darwinism, origin stories attempt to fill in the blanks, connect the dots, and define the turning points that are fundamental to subsequent developments. The purpose of this review is to present the origin story of a one-of-a-kind anticancer agent, RRx-001, which emerged from the aerospace industry as a putative radiosensitizer; not since the dynamite-to-dilator transformation of nitroglycerin in 1878 or the post-World War II explosive-to-elixir conversion of hydralazine, an ingredient in rocket fuel, to an antihypertensive, an antidepressant and an antituberculant, has energetic chemistry been harnessed for therapeutic purposes. This is Part 1 of the radiosensitization story; Parts 2 and 3, which detail the crossover activity of RRx-001 as a chemosensitizer in multiple tumor types and disease states including malaria, hemorrhagic shock and sickle cell anemia, are the subject of future reviews. PMID:27115167

  15. Radiosensitization of E. coli B/r by 9-anilinoacridines.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, P. B.; Denny, W. A.; Cain, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    Six anilinoacridine derivatives have been tested for the ability to act as radiosensitizers. Two gave good sensitization at concentrations of 100 microM or less. Both of these are known to possess significant activity against experimental tumours, and one (m-AMSA) is in Phase II clinical trial as a chemotherapeutic drug. Anilinoacridines may have potential as drugs with both a chemotherapeutic and radiosensitizing role. In spite of their structural similarity, the 2 derivatives which sensitize do so by different mechanisms. Compound VI behaves like a typical hypoxic cell sensitizer but Compound I (m-AMSA) interferes with the accumulation of sublethal damage in either the presence or absence of O2. The latter also displays a post-irradiation sensitizing effect. Differences in mechanism may be related to the relative DNA-binding abilities and electronic differences between the 2 drugs. PMID:387061

  16. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  17. Radiosensitization effect of zidovudine on human malignant glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fuxiang; Liao Zhengkai; Dai Jing; Xiong Jie; Xie CongHua; Luo Zhiguo; Liu Shiquan; Zhou Yunfeng . E-mail: yfzhouwhu@163.com

    2007-03-09

    Telomeres are shortened with each cell division and play an important role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and function. Telomerase, responsible for telomere synthesis, is activated in 90% of human tumor cells but seldom in normal somatic cells. Zidovudine (AZT) is a reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In this study, we have investigated the effects of {gamma}-radiation in combination with AZT on telomerase activity (TA), telomere length, DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and the changes in radiosensitivity of human malignant glioma cell line U251. The results showed that the TA was suppressed by AZT but enhanced by irradiation, resulting in a deceleration of restored rate of shortened telomere, decreased repair rate of DNA strand breaks, and increased radiosensitivity of U251 cells. Our results suggested that telomerase activity and telomere length may serve as markers for estimating the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy and reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as AZT, may be used clinically as a new radiosensitizer in cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Radiosensitization: enhancing the radiation inactivation of foodborne bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsa, J.; Lacroix, M.; Ouattara, B.; Chiasson, F.

    2004-09-01

    Irradiation of meat products to kill pathogens can be limited by radiation-induced detriment of sensory quality. Since such detriment is directly related to dose, one approach to reduce it is by devising means to lower the dose of radiation required for processing. Increasing the radiation sensitivity of the target microorganisms would lower the dose required for a given level of microbial kill. In this work, the radiation sensitivities of inoculated Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi in ground beef were examined under a variety of conditions. Results showed that specific manipulations of treatment conditions significantly increased the radiation sensitivity of the test organisms, ranging from a few percent to several-fold reduction in D10. In particular, radiation sensitization could be effected by certain additives, including carvacrol, thymol and trans-cinnamaldehyde, and also by certain compositions of modified atmosphere in the package headspace. A combination of additives and modified atmosphere effected a greater radiosensitization effect than could be achieved by either factor applied alone. Radiosensitization could be demonstrated with irradiation of either fresh or frozen ground meat. The radiosensitization phenomenon may be of practical utility in enhancing the technical effectiveness and feasibility of irradiation of a variety of meat and other food products.

  19. Repurposing cephalosporin antibiotics as pro-senescent radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Flor, Amy C.; Sutton, Harold G.; Kron, Stephen J.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy remains a significant therapeutic modality in the treatment of cancer. An attractive strategy would be to enhance the benefits of ionizing radiation (IR)with radiosensitizers. A high-content drug repurposing screen of approved and investigational agents, natural products and other small molecules has identified multiple candidates that blocked repair of IR damage in vitro. Here, we validated a subset of these hits in vitro and then examined effects on tumor growth after IR in a murine tumor model. Based on robust radiosensitization in vivo and other favorable properties of cephalexin, we conducted additional studies with other beta-lactam antibiotics. When combined with IR, each cephalosporin tested increased DNA damage and slowed tumor growth without affecting normal tissue toxicity. Our data implicate reactive oxygen species in the mechanism by which cephalosporins augment the effects of IR. This work provides a rationale for using commonly prescribed beta-lactam antibiotics as non-toxic radiosensitizers to enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiotherapy. PMID:27129153

  20. Polymeric Nanoparticles for Targeted Radiosensitization of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Jyothi U.; Tumati, Vasu; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Saha, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    One of the many issues of using radiosensitizers in a clinical setting is timing daily radiation treatments to coincide with peak drug concentration in target tissue. To overcome this deficit, we have synthesized a novel nanoparticle system consisting of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles conjugated with prostate cancer cell penetrating peptide-R11 and encapsulated with a potent radio-sensitizer 8-dibenzothiophen-4-yl-2-morpholin-4-yl-chromen-4-one (NU7441) to allow prostate cancer-specific targeting and sustained delivery over 3 weeks. Preliminary characterization studies showed that the R11-conjugated nanoparticles (R11-NU7441 NPs) had an average size of about 274 ± 80 nm and were stable for up to 5 days in de-ionized water and serum. The nanoparticles were cytocompatible with immortalized prostate cells (PZ-HPV-7). Further, the particles showed a bi-phasic release of encapsulated NU7441 and were taken up by PC3 prostate cancer cells in a dose- and magnetic field-dependent manner while not being taken up in non-prostate cancer cell lines. In addition, R11-NU7441 NPs were effective radiation sensitizers of prostate cancer cell lines in vitro. These results thus demonstrate the potential of R11-conjugated PLGA NPs as novel platforms for targeted radiosensitization of prostate cancer cells. PMID:25088162

  1. Repurposing cephalosporin antibiotics as pro-senescent radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Labay, Edwardine; Mauceri, Helena J; Efimova, Elena V; Flor, Amy C; Sutton, Harold G; Kron, Stephen J; Weichselbaum, Ralph R

    2016-06-01

    Radiation therapy remains a significant therapeutic modality in the treatment of cancer. An attractive strategy would be to enhance the benefits of ionizing radiation (IR)with radiosensitizers. A high-content drug repurposing screen of approved and investigational agents, natural products and other small molecules has identified multiple candidates that blocked repair of IR damage in vitro. Here, we validated a subset of these hits in vitro and then examined effects on tumor growth after IR in a murine tumor model. Based on robust radiosensitization in vivo and other favorable properties of cephalexin, we conducted additional studies with other beta-lactam antibiotics. When combined with IR, each cephalosporin tested increased DNA damage and slowed tumor growth without affecting normal tissue toxicity. Our data implicate reactive oxygen species in the mechanism by which cephalosporins augment the effects of IR. This work provides a rationale for using commonly prescribed beta-lactam antibiotics as non-toxic radiosensitizers to enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiotherapy. PMID:27129153

  2. Fibroblast radiosensitivity versus acute and late normal skin responses in patients treated for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, W.A.; Wike, J.; Tucker, S.L.

    1995-07-30

    To determine if the radiosensitivity of normal human skin fibroblasts, measured in early passage cultures, is significantly correlated with the degree of acute or late normal skin damage in patients treated for breast cancer with radiotherapy. To test assay reproducibility, SF2 values derived from paired biopsies of the same patient (12 cases) were compared. A reasonably good correlation (p = 0.075) was obtained for SF2s determined by high dose-rate irradiations with immediated plating, but not for delayed plating or low dose-rate treatments. The median coefficient of variation in the replicate SF2s after high dose-rate treatment and immediate plating was 13%, suggesting that the poor correlation in paired SF2 values is due to the magnitude of the uncertainty in SF2 relative to the overall spread in SF2 values between patients (CV = 28%). Individual SF2 values and averaged values from patients with data from two biopsies were compared with the acute and late clinical reactions. A significant negative correlation was found between SF2 and relative clinical response, but only when averaged high dose-rate SF2 values and telangiectasia scores were compared. There was no significant correlation between average SF2 values and acute responses or between individual SF2 measurements and either the acute or late clinical response. The results of this study suggest that the degree of late telangiectasia is at least partially dependent upon the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity of normal fibroblasts, but the relationship is not clear cut. Multiple replicate assays are necessary to obtain reliable estimates of fibroblast SF2 values using current techniques. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Antisense inhibition of cyclin D1 expression is equivalent to flavopiridol for radiosensitization of zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Duffy, Kevin T.; Davidson, William R.; Kari, Gabor; Dicker, Adam P.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Wickstrom, Eric . E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Flavopiridol, a small molecule pan-cyclin inhibitor, has been shown to enhance Radiation response of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The clinical utility of flavopiridol, however, is limited by toxicity, previously attributed to pleiotropic inhibitory effects on several targets affecting multiple signal transduction pathways. Here we used zebrafish embryos to investigate radiosensitizing effects of flavopiridol in normal tissues. Methods and Materials: Zebrafish embryos at the 1- to 4-cell stage were treated with 500 nM flavopiridol or injected with 0.5 pmol antisense hydroxylprolyl-phosphono nucleic acid oligomers to reduce cyclin D1 expression, then subjected to ionizing radiation (IR) or no radiation. Results: Flavopiridol-treated embryos demonstrated a twofold increase in mortality after exposure to 40 Gy by 96 hpf and developed distinct radiation-induced defects in midline development (designated as the 'curly up' phenotype) at higher rates when compared with embryos receiving IR only. Cyclin D1-deficient embryos had virtually identical IR sensitivity profiles when compared with embryos treated with flavopiridol. This was particularly evident for the IR-induced curly up phenotype, which was greatly exacerbated by both flavopriridol and cyclin D1 downregulation. Conclusions: Treatment of zebrafish embryos with flavopiridol enhanced radiation sensitivity of zebrafish embryos to a degree that was very similar to that associated with downregulation of cyclin D1 expression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of cyclin D1 is sufficient to account for the radiosensitizing action of flavopiridol in the zebrafish embryo vertebrate model.

  4. The Concept of Visual Acuity Ratio to the Maximum Level of Individual Visual Acuity—The Evaluation Method of Background Luminance and Visual Distance on Visibility Taking into Account of Individual Visual Acuity—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akizuki, Yuki; Inoue, Youko

    We use the maximum level of individual visual acuity (MVA) as an index for the individual visual ability. Also, we define the concept of the ratio of visual acuity under various environmental conditions for the MVA as Visual Acuity Ratio (VAR), in order to describe differences between individual visibilities. An experiment was carried out using various levels of background luminance and visual distance. The visual acuity of subjects in two age groups (Young and Aged) was measured by using Landolt’s eye chart (luminance contrast: 0.93). The Aged subjects’ vision was corrected by two kinds of spectacles: ones for myopia / presbyopia. Under conditions providing sufficient visual acuity, the subjects’ order of individual visual acuity was unchanged. Therefore, MVA can be used as an index for the visual ability of the individual. Regardless of corrected conditions, the individual visual acuity reaches the maximum level under 800cd/m2 and the corrected position. The results of the eyesight test can be used as a substitution for MVA. Visual acuity is changing under environmental conditions, and a degree of the changes varies with age, corrected conditions, and differences in visual acuity. Under the corrected position, the relationship between background luminance and VAR is constant regardless of age group, corrected conditions and differences of visual acuity. The relationship between visual distance and VAR differs by age and corrected conditions. However, in the neighborhood of the corrected position, the relationship between visual distance and VAR is constant regardless of differences between individual visibilities. The concept of VAR is applicable to past studies.

  5. Radiosensitivity enhancement of radioresistant glioblastoma by epidermal growth factor receptor antibody-conjugated iron-oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bouras, Alexandros; Kaluzova, Milota; Hadjipanayis, Costas G.

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor deletion variant EGFRvIII is known to be expressed in a subset of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) tumors that enhances tumorigenicity and also accounts for radiation and chemotherapy resistance. Targeting the EGFRvIII deletion mutant may lead to improved GBM therapy and better patient prognosis. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles serve as a potential clinical tool that can provide cancer cell targeted drug delivery, imaging, and therapy. Our previous studies have shown that an EGFRvIII-specific antibody and cetuximab (an EGFR- and EGFRvIII-specific antibody), when bioconjugated to IONPs (EGFRvIII-IONPs or cetuximab-IONPs respectively), can simultaneously provide sensitive cancer cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and targeted therapy of experimental GBM. In this study, we investigated whether cetuximab-IONPs can additionally allow for the radiosensitivity enhancement of GBM. Cetuximab-IONPs were used in combination with single (10Gy x 1) or multiple fractions (10Gy x 2) of ionizing radiation (IR) for radiosensitization of EGFRvIII-overexpressing human GBM cells in vitro and in vivo after convection-enhanced delivery (CED). A significant GBM antitumor effect was observed in vitro after treatment with cetuximab-IONPs and subsequent single or fractionated IR. A significant increase in overall survival of nude mice implanted with human GBM xenografts was found after treatment by cetuximab-IONP CED and subsequent fractionated IR. Increased DNA double strands breaks (DSBs), as well as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, were felt to represent the mediators of the observed radiosensitization effect with the combination therapy of IR and cetuximab-IONPs treatment. PMID:25981803

  6. Synthesis and radiosensitization properties of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md.; Mohamed, Faizal; Heng, Cheong Kai; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohamad, Hur Munawar Kabir

    2014-09-01

    Cancer cells which are large in size are resistant towards radiation therapy due to the presence of large amount of anti-oxidative enzymes and hypoxic cancer cells. Thus radiosensitizer agents have been developed to enhance the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy by increasing the sensitivity of these cancer cells towards radiation. This study is conducted to investigate the radiosensitization properties of radiosensitizer complex containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate. Combination with sodium hyaluronate may decrease reactivity of hydrogen peroxide but maintain the oxygen concentration needed for radiosensitizing effect. HepG2 cancer cells are cultured as the mean of test subject. Cancer cell samples which are targeted and not targeted with these radiosensitizers are irradiated with 2Gy single fractionated dose. Results obtained shows that the cancer cells which are not targeted with radiosensitizers has a cell viability of 98.80±0.37% after a time interval of 48 hours and has even repopulated over 100% after a 72 hour time interval. This shows that the cancer cells are resistant towards radiation. However, when the cancer cells are targeted with radiosensitizers prior to irradiation, there is a reduction of cell viability by 25.50±10.81% and 10.30±5.10% at time intervals of 48 and 72 hours respectively. This indicates that through the use of these radiosensitizers, cancer cells are more sensitive towards radiation.

  7. Synthesis and radiosensitization properties of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md.; Mohamed, Faizal; Heng, Cheong Kai; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohamad, Hur Munawar Kabir

    2014-09-03

    Cancer cells which are large in size are resistant towards radiation therapy due to the presence of large amount of anti-oxidative enzymes and hypoxic cancer cells. Thus radiosensitizer agents have been developed to enhance the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy by increasing the sensitivity of these cancer cells towards radiation. This study is conducted to investigate the radiosensitization properties of radiosensitizer complex containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate. Combination with sodium hyaluronate may decrease reactivity of hydrogen peroxide but maintain the oxygen concentration needed for radiosensitizing effect. HepG2 cancer cells are cultured as the mean of test subject. Cancer cell samples which are targeted and not targeted with these radiosensitizers are irradiated with 2Gy single fractionated dose. Results obtained shows that the cancer cells which are not targeted with radiosensitizers has a cell viability of 98.80±0.37% after a time interval of 48 hours and has even repopulated over 100% after a 72 hour time interval. This shows that the cancer cells are resistant towards radiation. However, when the cancer cells are targeted with radiosensitizers prior to irradiation, there is a reduction of cell viability by 25.50±10.81% and 10.30±5.10% at time intervals of 48 and 72 hours respectively. This indicates that through the use of these radiosensitizers, cancer cells are more sensitive towards radiation.

  8. Radiosensitization of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhi in ground beef.

    PubMed

    Chiasson, F; Borsa, J; Ouattara, B; Lacroix, M

    2004-06-01

    The radiosensitization of two pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhi, was evaluated in the presence of thyme and its principal essential oil constituents (carvacrol and thymol) in ground beef. Ground beef was inoculated with E. coli or Salmonella Typhi (10(5) CFU/g), and each compound was added separately at various concentrations (0 to 3.5%, wt/wt). The antimicrobial potential of carvacrol, thymol, and thyme was evaluated in unirradiated meat by determining the MIC in percentage (wt/wt) after 24 h of storage at 4 +/- 1 degree C. Results showed a MIC of 0.88 +/- 0.12%, 1.14 +/- 0.05%, and 2.33 +/- 0.32% for E. coli in the presence of carvacrol, thymol, and thyme, respectively. MICs of 1.15 +/- 0.02%, 1.60 +/- 0.01%, and 2.75 +/- 0.17% were observed for Salmonella Typhi in the presence of the same compounds, respectively. The best antimicrobial compound (i.e., carvacrol) was selected and added to the sterilized ground beef along with ascorbic acid (0.5%, wt/wt) and tetrasodium pyrophosphate (0.1%, wt/wt). Meat samples (10 g) were packed in air and then irradiated in a 60Co irradiator at doses of 0 to 0.7 kGy for the determination of E. coli radiation D10 and 0 to 2.25 kGy for the determination of Salmonella Typhi radiation D10. Addition of carvacrol increased the relative sensitivity of both bacteria 2.2 times. The radiation D10 was reduced from 0.126 +/- 0.0039 to 0.057 +/- 0.0015 kGy for E. coli and from 0.519 +/- 0.0308 to 0.235 +/- 0.0158 kGy for Salmonella Typhi. The addition of tetrasodium pyrophosphate did not affect significantly (P > 0.05) the radiosensitization of either bacterium. However, the presence of ascorbic acid in the media reduced significantly (P < or = 0.05) the radiosensitivity of both bacteria. An additive effect of carvacrol addition and packaging under modified atmosphere conditions (60% O2-30% CO2-10% N2) was also observed on bacterial radiosensitization at 4 degrees C. Compared with the control packed under air

  9. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles for theranostic MRI-radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Lux, François; Sancey, Lucie; Bianchi, Andrea; Crémillieux, Yannick; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    A rapid development of gadolinium-based nanoparticles is observed due to their attractive properties as MRI-positive contrast agents. Indeed, they display high relaxivity, adapted biodistribution and passive uptake in the tumor thanks to enhanced permeability and retention effect. In addition to these imaging properties, it has been recently shown that they can act as effective radiosensitizers under different types of irradiation (radiotherapy, neutron therapy or hadron therapy). These new therapeutic modalities pave the way to therapy guided by imaging and to personalized medicine.

  10. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder in Canada. Part 1: Context and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Anne G; Nicholls, Tonia L; Seto, Michael C; Côté, Gilles; Charette, Yanick; Caulet, Malijai

    2015-01-01

    The National Trajectory Project examined longitudinal data from a large sample of people found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) to assess the presence of provincial differences in the application of the law, to examine the characteristics of people with serious mental illness who come into conflict with the law and receive this verdict, and to investigate the trajectories of NCRMD–accused people as they traverse the mental health and criminal justice systems. Our paper describes the rationale for the National Trajectory Project and the methods used to collect data in Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia, the 3 most populous provinces in Canada and the 3 provinces with the most people found NCRMD. PMID:25886685

  11. The national trajectory project of individuals found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder in Canada. Part 1: context and methods.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Anne G; Nicholls, Tonia L; Seto, Michael C; Côté, Gilles; Charette, Yanick; Caulet, Malijai

    2015-03-01

    The National Trajectory Project examined longitudinal data from a large sample of people found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) to assess the presence of provincial differences in the application of the law, to examine the characteristics of people with serious mental illness who come into conflict with the law and receive this verdict, and to investigate the trajectories of NCRMD-accused people as they traverse the mental health and criminal justice systems. Our paper describes the rationale for the National Trajectory Project and the methods used to collect data in Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia, the 3 most populous provinces in Canada and the 3 provinces with the most people found NCRMD. PMID:25886685

  12. NLP-1: a DNA intercalating hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and cytotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Panicucci, R.; Heal, R.; Laderoute, K.; Cowan, D.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    The 2-nitroimidazole linked phenanthridine, NLP-1 (5-(3-(2-nitro-1-imidazoyl)-propyl)-phenanthridinium bromide), was synthesized with the rationale of targeting the nitroimidazole to DNA via the phenanthridine ring. The drug is soluble in aqueous solution (greater than 25 mM) and stable at room temperature. It binds to DNA with a binding constant 1/30 that of ethidium bromide. At a concentration of 0.5 mM, NLP-1 is 8 times more toxic to hypoxic than aerobic cells at 37 degrees C. This concentration is 40 times less than the concentration of misonidazole, a non-intercalating 2-nitroimidazole, required for the same degree of hypoxic cell toxicity. The toxicity of NLP-1 is reduced at least 10-fold at 0 degrees C. Its ability to radiosensitize hypoxic cells is similar to misonidazole at 0 degrees C. Thus the putative targeting of the 2-nitroimidazole, NLP-1, to DNA, via its phenanthridine group, enhances its hypoxic toxicity, but not its radiosensitizing ability under the present test conditions. NLP-1 represents a lead compound for intercalating 2-nitroimidazoles with selective toxicity for hypoxic cells.

  13. Advances in radiation biology: Radiosensitization in DNA and living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, S.; Sech, C. Le

    2009-06-01

    One fundamental goal of radiation biology is the evolution of concepts and methods for the elaboration of new approaches and protocols for the treatment of cancers. In this context, the use of fast ions as ionizing particles offers the advantage of optimizing cell killing inside the tumor whilst preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. One extremely promising strategy investigated recently is the addition of radiosensitizers in the targeted tissue. The optimization of radiotherapy with fast ions implies a multidisciplinary approach to ionizing radiation effects on complex living systems, ranging from studies on single molecules to investigations of entire organisms. In this article we review recent studies on ion induced damages in simple and complex biological systems, from DNA to living cells. The specific aspect of radiosensitization induced by metallic atoms is described. As a fundamental result, the addition of sensitizing compounds with ion irradiation may improve therapeutic index in cancer therapy. In conclusion, new perspectives are proposed based on the experience and contribution of different communities including Surface Sciences, to improve the development of radiation biology.

  14. Role of Natural Radiosensitizers and Cancer Cell Radioresistance: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Misbah; Qazi, Aamer; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Parveen, Gulshan; Waquar, Sulayman; Ashraf, Abdul Basit; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Cancer originates from genetic mutations accumulation. Cancer stem cells have been depicted as tumorigenic cells that can differentiate and self-renew. Cancer stem cells are thought to be resistant to conventional therapy like chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy damage carcinomic DNA cells. Because of the ability of cancer stem cells to self-renew and reproduce malignant tumors, they are the subject of intensive research. In this review, CSCs radioresistant mechanisms which include DNA damage response and natural radiosensitizers have been summed up. Reactive oxygen species play an important role in different physiological processes. ROS scavenging is responsible for regulation of reactive oxygen species generation. A researcher has proved that microRNAs regulate tumor radiation resistance. Ionizing radiation does not kill the cancer cells; rather, IR just slows down the signs and symptoms. Ionizing radiation damages DNA directly/indirectly. IR is given mostly in combination with other chemo/radiotherapies. We briefly described here the behavior of cancer stem cells and radioresistance therapies in cancer treatment. To overcome radioresistance in treatment of cancer, strategies like fractionation modification, treatment in combination, inflammation modification, and overcoming hypoxic tumor have been practiced. Natural radiosensitizers, for example, curcumin, genistein, and quercetin, are more beneficial than synthetic compounds. PMID:26998418

  15. The radiosensitivity index predicts for overall survival in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Fulp, William J.; Eschrich, Steven; Torres-Roca, Javier F.; Caudell, Jimmy J.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiosensitivity (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple cohorts and disease sites. We hypothesized RSI would identify glioblastoma patients who would respond to radiation and predict treatment outcomes. Clinical and array based gene expression (Affymetrix HT Human Genome U133 Array Plate Set) level 2 data was downloaded from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). A total of 270 patients were identified for the analysis: 214 who underwent radiotherapy and temozolomide and 56 who did not undergo radiotherapy. Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 9.1 months (range: 0.04–92.2 months). Patients who did not receive radiotherapy were more likely to be older (p < 0.001) and of poorer performance status (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, RSI is an independent predictor of OS (HR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.08–2.5; p = 0.02). Furthermore, on subset analysis, radiosensitive patients had significantly improved OS in the patients with high MGMT expression (unmethylated MGMT), 1 year OS 84.1% vs. 53.7% (p = 0.005). This observation held on MVA (HR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.19–3.31; p = 0.008), suggesting that RT has a larger therapeutic impact in these patients. In conclusion, RSI predicts for OS in glioblastoma. These data further confirm the value of RSI as a disease-site independent biomarker. PMID:26451615

  16. 5-Fluorouracil modulation of radiosensitivity in cultured human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Smalley, S R; Kimler, B F; Evans, R G

    1991-02-01

    We evaluated conventional pulse exposure versus continuous exposure models of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) radiosensitization in HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) and DU-145 (human prostate cancer adenocarcinoma) cell lines. Cell survival following treatment with drug and/or radiation was determined by colony formation assays. Radiation was delivered either by itself, approximately midway through a 1-hr exposure to 5-FU (10 micrograms/ml), or at various times following initiation of exposure to 5-FU (0.5 microgram/ml) present throughout the entire period of incubation. Drug concentrations were selected to approximate those achieved in vivo in humans. HT-29 cells showed a plating efficiency of 87% and similar cytotoxicity (survival reduced to 0.57-0.71) for all 5-FU conditions. The Do's of the radiation survival curves were not different for 1 hr of 5-FU exposure versus radiation alone. However, continuous exposure conditions demonstrated statistically significantly different Do's from radiation alone and pulse 5-FU exposure. DU-145 cells displayed a plating efficiency of 17% and cytotoxicities of 0.10-0.91 for the 5-FU conditions. DU-145 cells showed different radiation 5-FU interactions: 5-FU produced statistically significant changes in Do well as the differences between cell lines insofar as their radiosensitization by 5-FU underscore the caution required in extrapolating these radiobiologic models to the clinical setting. PMID:1991680

  17. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder in Canada. Part 3: Trajectories and Outcomes Through the Forensic System

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Anne G; Charette, Yanick; Seto, Michael C; Nicholls, Tonia L; Côté, Gilles; Caulet, Malijai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the processing and Review Board (RB) disposition outcomes of people found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) across the 3 most populous provinces in Canada. Although the Criminal Code is federally legislated, criminal justice is administered by provinces and territories. It follows that a person with mental illness who comes into conflict with the law and subsequently comes under the management of a legally mandated RB may experience different trajectories across jurisdictions. Method: The National Trajectory Project examined 1800 men and women found NCRMD in British Columbia (n = 222), Quebec (n = 1094), and Ontario (n = 484) between May 2000 and April 2005, followed until December 2008. Results: We found significant interprovincial differences in the trajectories of people found NCRMD, including time detained in hospital and time under the supervision of an RB. The odds of being conditionally or absolutely discharged by the RB varied across provinces, even after number of past offences, diagnosis at verdict, and most severe index offence (all covariates decreased likelihood of discharge) were considered. Conclusions: Considerable discrepancies in the application of NCRMD legislation and the processing of NCRMD cases through the forensic system across the provinces suggests that fair and equitable treatment under the law could be enhanced by increased national integration and collaboration. PMID:25886687

  18. Dietary Restraint Partially Mediates the Relationship between Impulsivity and Binge Eating Only in Lean Individuals: The Importance of Accounting for Body Mass in Studies of Restraint

    PubMed Central

    Coffino, Jaime A.; Orloff, Natalia C.; Hormes, Julia M.

    2016-01-01

    Binge eating is characteristic of eating and weight-related disorders such as binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, and obesity. In light of data suggest impulsivity is associated with overeating specifically in restrained eaters, this study sought to elucidate the exact nature of the associations between these variables, hypothesizing that the relationship between impulsivity and binge eating is mediated by restrained eating. We further hypothesized that the role of dietary restraint as a mediator would be moderated by body mass index (BMI). Study participants (n = 506, 50.6% female) were categorized based on self-reported BMI as under- and normal-weight (BMI < 25, 65.8%, n = 333) or overweight and obese (BMI ≥ 25, 34.2%, n = 173) and completed the “restrained eating” subscale of the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire, the “impulse control difficulties” subscale of the Difficulties with Emotion Regulation Scale, and the Binge Eating Scale. Findings provide initial evidence for the hypothesized moderated mediation model, with dietary restraint partially mediating the relationship between impulsivity and binge eating severity only in lean respondents. In respondents with overweight or obesity, impulsivity was significantly correlated with binge eating severity, but not with dietary restraint. Findings inform our conceptualization of dietary restraint as a possible risk factor for binge eating and highlight the importance of accounting for body mass in research on the impact of dietary restraint on eating behaviors. PMID:27757092

  19. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder in Canada. Part 4: Criminal Recidivism

    PubMed Central

    Charette, Yanick; Crocker, Anne G; Seto, Michael C; Salem, Leila; Nicholls, Tonia L; Caulet, Malijai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine criminal recidivism rates of a large sample of people found not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD) in Canada’s 3 most populous provinces, British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec. Public concern about the dangerousness of people found NCRMD has been fed by media attention on high-profile cases. However, little research is available on the rate of reoffending among people found NCRMD across Canadian provinces. Method: Using data from the National Trajectory Project, this study examined 1800 men and women in British Columbia (n = 222), Ontario (n = 484), and Quebec (n = 1094) who were found NCRMD between May 2000 and April 2005 and followed until December 2008. Results: Recidivism was relatively low after 3 years (17%). There were interprovincial differences after controlling for number of prior criminal offences, diagnosis, seriousness of the index offence, and supervision by the review boards. British Columbia (10%) and Ontario (9%) were similar, whereas Quebec had almost twice the recidivism (22%). People who had committed severe violent index offences were less likely to reoffend than those who had committed less severe offences. People from the sample were less likely to reoffend when under the purview of review boards, across all 3 provinces. Conclusion: The results of this study, along with other research on processing differences, suggest systemic differences in the trajectories and outcomes of persons found NCRMD need to be better understood to guide national policies and practices. PMID:25886688

  20. The National Trajectory Project of Individuals Found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder in Canada. Part 2: The People Behind the Label

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Anne G; Nicholls, Tonia L; Seto, Michael C; Charette, Yanick; Côté, Gilles; Caulet, Malijai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the psychosocio-criminological characteristics of not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder (NCRMD)–accused people and compare them across the 3 most populous provinces. In Canada, the number of people found NCRMD has risen during the past 20 years. The Criminal Code is federally legislated but provincially administered, and mental health services are provincially governed. Our study offers a rare opportunity to observe the characteristics and trajectories of NCRMD–accused people. Method: The National Trajectory Project examined 1800 men and women found NCRMD in British Columbia (n = 222), Quebec (n = 1094), and Ontario (n = 484) between May 2000 to April 2005, followed until December 2008. Results: The most common primary diagnosis was a psychotic spectrum disorder. One-third of NCRMD–accused people had a severe mental illness and a concomitant substance use disorder, with British Columbia having the highest rate of dually diagnosed NCRMD–accused people. Most accused people (72.4%) had at least 1 prior psychiatric hospitalization. Two-thirds of index NCRMD offences were against the person, with a wide range of severity. Family members, followed by professionals, such as police and mental health care workers, were the most frequent victims. Quebec had the highest proportion of people with a mood disorder and the lowest median offence severity. There were both interprovincial differences and similarities in the characteristics of NCRMD–accused people. Conclusions: Contrary to public perception, severe violent offenses such as murder, attempted murder or sexual offences represent a small proportion of all NCRMD verdict offences. The results reveal a heterogeneous population regarding mental health and criminological characteristics in need of hierarchically organized forensic mental health services and levels of security. NCRMD–accused people were well known to civil psychiatric services prior to being found NCRMD

  1. Anti-tubulin drugs conjugated to anti-ErbB antibodies selectively radiosensitize

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephen R.; Yang, Howard C.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Aguilera, Joe; Crisp, Jessica L.; Jones, Karra A.; Whitney, Michael A.; Lippman, Scott M.; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Advani, Sunil J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour resistance to radiotherapy remains a barrier to improving cancer patient outcomes. To overcome radioresistance, certain drugs have been found to sensitize cells to ionizing radiation (IR). In theory, more potent radiosensitizing drugs should increase tumour kill and improve patient outcomes. In practice, clinical utility of potent radiosensitizing drugs is curtailed by off-target side effects. Here we report potent anti-tubulin drugs conjugated to anti-ErbB antibodies selectively radiosensitize to tumours based on surface receptor expression. While two classes of potent anti-tubulins, auristatins and maytansinoids, indiscriminately radiosensitize tumour cells, conjugating these potent anti-tubulins to anti-ErbB antibodies restrict their radiosensitizing capacity. Of translational significance, we report that a clinically used maytansinoid ADC, ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), with IR prolongs tumour control in target expressing HER2+ tumours but not target negative tumours. In contrast to ErbB signal inhibition, our findings establish an alternative therapeutic paradigm for ErbB-based radiosensitization using antibodies to restrict radiosensitizer delivery. PMID:27698471

  2. Cancer predispostition, radiosensitivity and the risk of radiation-induced cancers. II. A mendelian single-locus model of cancer predisposition and radiosensitivity for predicting cancer risks in populations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Sankaranarayanan, K.

    1995-09-01

    Individuals genetically predisposed to cancer may be more sensitive to cancers induced by ionizing radiation than those who are not so predisposed. Should this be true, under conditions of radiation exposure, a population consisting of cancer-predisposed and non-predisposed individuals will be expected to respond with a higher total frequency of induced cancers than one in which all the individuals are assumed to have the same sensitivity to radiation-induced cancers. To study this problem quantitatively, we have developed a Mendelian autosomal one-locus, two-allele model; this model assumes that one of the alleles is mutant and the genotypes carrying the mutant allele(s) are cancer-predisposed and are also more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer. Formal analytical predictions as well as numerical illustrations of this model show that: (1) when such heterogeneity with respect to cancer predisposition and radiosensitivity is present in the population, irradiation results in a greater increase in the frequency of induced cancers than when it is absent; (2) this increase is detectable only when the proportion of cancers due to genetic predisposition is large and when the degree of predisposition is considerable; and (3) even when the effect is small, most of the radiation-induced cancers will occur in predisposed individuals. These conclusions are valid for models of cancer when predisposition and radiosensitivity may be either dominant or recessive. The published data on breast cancers in Japanese A-bomb survivors show that at 1 Sv, the radiation-related excess relative risk in women irradiated before age 20 is 13 compared to about 2 for those irradiated at later ages. We examined the application of our model to the above data using two assumptions, namely, that the proportion of cancers due to genetic susceptibility at the BRCA1 locus and the frequency of the mutant allele estimated for Western populations are valid for Japanese women. 14 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Differentiation and radiosensitivity of hemopoietic stem cells of mice during hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvets, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    The potential for differentiation and radiosensitivity of the stem hemopoietic cells (KOE) under conditions of initial and later hypokinesia is examined. It is established that in the initial period of hypokinesia (3 days) when a stress reaction prevails, changes occur in the erythroid differentiation and radiosensitivity of KOE. This effect is associated with redistribution of T-lymphocytes that increase in number in the bone marrow of mice during hypokinesia. At later periods of hypokinesia (30 days) when changes in the organism are related to hypokinesia proper, differentiation and radiosensitivity of KOE were normalized.

  4. Enhancement of radiosensitization by metal-based nanoparticles in cancer radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiang-Yu; Liu, Pei-Dang; Wu, Hao; Gu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy performs an important function in cancer treatment. However, resistance of tumor cells to radiation therapy still remains a serious concern, so the study of radiosensitizers has emerged as a persistent hotspot in radiation oncology. Along with the rapid advancement of nanotechnology in recent years, the potential value of nanoparticles as novel radiosensitizers has been discovered. This review summarizes the latest experimental findings both in vitro and in vivo and attempts to highlight the underlying mechanisms of response in nanoparticle radiosensitization. PMID:25009750

  5. Opportunities for Radiosensitization in the Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Era.

    PubMed

    Moding, Everett J; Mowery, Yvonne M; Kirsch, David G

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) utilizing a small number of high-dose radiation therapy fractions continues to expand in clinical application. Although many approaches have been proposed to radiosensitize tumors with conventional fractionation, how these radiosensitizers will translate to SBRT remains largely unknown. Here, we review our current understanding of how SBRT eradicates tumors, including the potential contributions of endothelial cell death and immune system activation. In addition, we identify several new opportunities for radiosensitization generated by the move toward high dose per fraction radiation therapy. PMID:27441746

  6. Acute skin reaction suggestive of pembrolizumab-induced radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Sibaud, Vincent; David, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Resseguier, Sarah; Radut, Roxana; Attal, Justine; Meyer, Nicolas; Delord, Jean-Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The combination of localized radiotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors represents a promising therapeutic strategy for various cancers, including metastatic melanoma. Radiation therapy may enhance tumor antigen presentation and cytokine release, which may optimize the systemic antitumor immune response induced by these immunotherapeutic antibodies, with a potential delayed abscopal effect. However, clinical experience of using immune checkpoint inhibitors with concurrent radiotherapy remains scarce. We report here for the first time a case suggestive of acute skin radiosensitization induced by pembrolizumab, with a suggestive time relationship between the completion of ionizing radiation, drug administration, and rapid onset of the skin reaction. This suggests that radiation therapy may also interact rapidly with anti-programmed-death 1 antibodies. Therefore, caution should be exercised when prescribing this combination therapy in advanced cancers.

  7. Silencing CDK4 radiosensitizes breast cancer cells by promoting apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The discovery of molecular markers associated with various breast cancer subtypes has greatly improved the treatment and outcome of breast cancer patients. Unfortunately, breast cancer cells acquire resistance to various therapies. Mounting evidence suggests that resistance is rooted in the deregulation of the G1 phase regulatory machinery. Methods To address whether deregulation of the G1 phase regulatory machinery contributes to radiotherapy resistance, the MCF10A immortalized human mammary epithelial cell line, ER-PR-Her2+ and ER-PR-Her2- breast cancer cell lines were irradiated. Colony formation assays measured radioresistance, while immunocytochemistry, Western blots, and flow cytometry measured the cell cycle, DNA replication, mitosis, apoptosis, and DNA breaks. Results Molecular markers common to all cell lines were overexpressed, including cyclin A1 and cyclin D1, which impinge on CDK2 and CDK4 activities, respectively. We addressed their potential role in radioresistance by generating cell lines stably expressing small hairpin RNAs (shRNA) against CDK2 and CDK4. None of the cell lines knocked down for CDK2 displayed radiosensitization. In contrast, all cell lines knocked down for CDK4 were significantly radiosensitized, and a CDK4/CDK6 inhibitor sensitized MDA-MB-468 to radiation induced apoptosis. Our data showed that silencing CDK4 significantly increases radiation induced cell apoptosis in cell lines without significantly altering cell cycle progression, or DNA repair after irradiation. Our results indicate lower levels of phospho-Bad at ser136 upon CDK4 silencing and ionizing radiation, which has been shown to signal apoptosis. Conclusion Based on our data we conclude that knockdown of CDK4 activity sensitizes breast cancer cells to radiation by activating apoptosis pathways. PMID:23886499

  8. Expression of hPNAS-4 Radiosensitizes Lewis Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Hui; Yuan Zhu; Zhu Hong; Li Lei; Shi Huashan; Wang Zi; Fan Yu; Deng Qian; Zeng Jianshuang; He Yinbo; Xiao Jianghong; Li Zhiping

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to transfer the hPNAS-4 gene, a novel apoptosis-related human gene, into Lewis lung cancer (LL2) and observe its radiosensitive effect on radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The hPNAS-4 gene was transfected into LL2 cells, and its expression was detected via western blot. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the growth and apoptosis of cells treated with irradiation/PNAS-4 in vitro. The hPNAS-4 gene was transferred into LL2-bearing mice through tail vein injection of the liposome/gene complex. The tumor volumes were recorded after radiation therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect the tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vivo. Results: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue, and its overexpressions were confirmed via western blot analysis. Compared with the control, empty plasmid, hPNAS-4, radiation, and empty plasmid plus radiation groups, the hPNAS-4 plus radiation group more significantly inhibited growth and enhanced apoptosis of LL2 cells in vitro and in vivo (P<.05). Conclusions: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue and was expressed in both LL2 cell and tumor tissue. The hPNAS-4 gene therapy significantly enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis of LL2 tumor cells by radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it may be a potential radiosensitive treatment of radiation therapy for lung cancer.

  9. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Tretiakova, Maria; Zhang Zhongfa; Li Yan; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Gao Yuanhong; Mai Weiyuan; Furge, Kyle; Qian Chaonan; Amato, Robert; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10{sup -8} for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10{sup -4} for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  10. Accountability for What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Rex; Knowles; Trudy

    2001-01-01

    Our emphasis on accountability overlooks children's differences. Half of all individuals who take a norm-referenced test will be below average. Should such students be pushed, mauled, and remediated or squeezed into a common learning mold? Holding teachers accountable for humane treatment of "whole children" is a worthier pursuit. (MLH)

  11. Educational Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincoffs, Edmund L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses educational accountability as the paradigm of performance contracting, presents some arguments for and against accountability, and discusses the goals of education and the responsibility of the teacher. (Author/PG)

  12. Suppression of autophagy augments the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition on human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Xiaopeng; Du, Jie; Hua, Song; Zhang, Haowen; Gu, Cheng; Wang, Jie; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jianfeng; Yu, Jiahua Liu, Fenju

    2015-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of the standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. To increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells is a feasible solution to improve the therapeutic effects. It has been suggested that inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) can radiosensitize glioma cells, probably via the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In this study, human malignant glioma cells, U251 and A172, were treated with an STAT3 inhibitor, WP1066, or a short hairpin RNA plasmid targeting STAT3 to suppress the activation of STAT3 signaling. The radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition were confirmed in glioma cells. Intriguingly, combination of ionizing radiation exposure and STAT3 inhibition triggered a pronounced increase of autophagy flux. To explore the role of autophagy, glioma cells were treated with 3-methyladenine or siRNA for autophagy-related gene 5, and it was demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy further strengthened the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition. Accordingly, more apoptotic cells were induced by the dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, our data revealed a protective role of autophagy in the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition, and inhibition of both autophagy and STAT3 might be a potential therapeutic strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells. - Highlights: • Inactivation of STAT3 signaling radiosensitizes malignant glioma cells. • STAT3 inhibition triggers a significant increase of autophagy flux induced by ionizing radiation in glioma cells. • Suppression of autophagy further strengthens the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition in glioma cells. • Dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 induce massive apoptotic cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  13. Radiosensitivity of CD45RO+ memory and CD45RO- naive T cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, A; Suzuki, G; Nakata, Y; Akashi, M; Ohyama, H; Akanuma, A

    1994-01-01

    Radiosensitivities of various human T-cell subsets were investigated by a proliferation assay and by a single-cell gel electrophoresis assay. Each T-cell subset was purified using a cell sorter and was induced to proliferate by ionomycin and interleukin 2. Unsorted T cells showed biphasic dose-survival curves, indicating the heterogeneity of T cells in terms of radiosensitivity. Purified CD4+ helper and CD8+ killer T cells showed similar biphasic dose-survival curves. Hence both T-cell subsets were composed of cells of different radiosensitivity. The T-cell subsets belonging to different activation stages such as CD45RO+ memory and CD45RO- naive T cells had different dose-survival curves. The former was more radiosensitive than the latter. The high radiosensitivity of CD45RO+ cells was also demonstrated by single-cell gel electrophoresis after irradiation. This is the first demonstration that a particular cell surface marker on T cells is correlated with greater radiosensitivity.

  14. Revamping High School Accounting Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Provides ideas for updating accounting courses: convert to semester length; focus on financial reporting/analysis, financial statements, the accounting cycle; turn textbook exercises into practice sets for the accounting cycle; teach about corporate accounting; and address individual line items on financial statements. (SK)

  15. Youth Individual Development Accounts: Retirement Planning Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shobe, Marcia A.; Sturm, Stephanie L.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in a privatized Social Security system and the lack of adequate retirement planning among many people in the United States, many households are often ill prepared for retirement. The outlook for low-income populations is even bleaker because they are often not privy to the same financial education and asset-building…

  16. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  17. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation of T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST and colony formation assay. No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  18. Increased radiosensitivity of a subpopulation ot T-lymphocyte progenitors from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, S.J.; Wilson, F.D.; Greenberg, B.R.; Shifrine, M.; Rosenblatt, L.S.; Reeves, J.D.; Misra, H.

    1981-06-01

    In vitro radiation survival of peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied in 15 clinically normal adults and 4 patients with Fanconi's anemia. Tritiated thymidine incorporation in a whole blood lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and a newly developed whole blood T-lymphocyte colony assay were used to measure lymphocyte blastogenesis and colony formation in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulation. Lymphocyte colony formation was found to be consistently more sensitive than the LST for detection of low-level radiation effects using both normal cells and lymphocytes from Fanconi's anemia patients. Lymphocytes from patients with Fanconi's anemia were significantly more sensitive to in vitro x-irradiation than lymphocytes from clinically normal individuals as measured by their ability to divide when stimulated by PHA in the LST (patients, D37 . 198 R; normals, D37 . 309 R, p . 0.057) and colony formation assay (patients, D37 . 53 R; normals, D37 . 109 R, p . 0.016). No significant difference in the radiosensitivity of the Con-A response was observed between the two groups. The PHA-responsive T-lymphocyte subpopulation in Fanconi's anemia patients appears to be intrinsically defective. The nature of this defect, significance in the disease process, and relevancy of these findings to the establishment of radiation protection standards are discussed.

  19. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT

  20. DNA-PKcs-Dependent Modulation of Cellular Radiosensitivity by a Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kodym, Elisabeth; Kodym, Reinhard; Chen, Benjamin P.; Chen, David J.; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Choy, Hak; Saha, Debabrata

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 has been shown to increase radiosensitivity. Recently, the suppression of radiation-induced DNA-dependant protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity by the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib was reported. Given the importance of DNA-PK for repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end-joining and the clinical use of the substance, we investigated the relevance of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) for the modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. Methods and Materials: We used a syngeneic model of Chinese hamster ovarian cell lines: AA8, possessing a wild-type DNK-PKcs; V3, lacking a functional DNA-PKcs; and V3/WT11, V3 stably transfected with the DNA-PKcs. The cells were treated with celecoxib (50 {mu}M) for 24 h before irradiation. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined using the colony formation assay. Results: Treatment with celecoxib increased the cellular radiosensitivity in the DNA-PKcs-deficient cell line V3 with a dose-enhancement ratio of 1.3 for a surviving fraction of 0.5. In contrast, clonogenic survival was increased in DNA-PKcs wild-type-expressing AA8 cells and in V3 cells transfected with DNA-PKcs (V3/WT11). The decrease in radiosensitivity was comparable to the radiosensitization in V3 cells, with a dose-enhancement ratio of 0.76 (AA8) and 0.80 (V3/WT11) for a survival of 0.5. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a DNA-PKcs-dependent differential modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. These effects might be attributed to alterations in signaling cascades downstream of DNA-PK toward cell survival. These findings offer an explanation for the poor outcomes in some recently published clinical trials.

  1. Radiosensitization Effect of STI-571 on Pancreatic Cancer Cells In Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hye Won; Wen, Jing; Lim, Jong-Baeck; Bang, Seung Min; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To examine STI-571-induced radiosensitivity in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: Three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Bxpc-3, Capan-1, and MiaPaCa-2) exhibiting different expression levels of c-Kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRbeta) and showing different K-ras mutation types were used. For evaluation of the antitumor activity of STI-571 in combination with radiation, clonogenic survival assays, Western blot analysis, and the annexin V/propidium iodide assay with microscopic evaluation by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole were conducted. Results: Dramatic phosphorylated (p)-c-Kit and p-PDGFRbeta attenuation, a modest dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition, and significant radiosensitization were observed after STI-571 treatment in view of apoptosis, although the levels of growth inhibition and increased radiosensitization were different according to cell lines. The grades of radiosensitivity corresponded to the attenuation levels of p-c-Kit and p-PDGFRbeta by STI-571, particularly to those of p-c-Kit, and the radiosensitivity was partially affected by K-ras mutation in pancreatic cancer cells. Among downstream pathways associated with c-Kit or PDGFRbeta, p-PLCgamma was more closely related to radiosensitivity compared with p-Akt1 or p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1. Conclusion: STI-571 enhances radiation response in pancreatic cancer cells. This effect is affected by the attenuation levels of p-c-Kit or p-PDGFRbeta, and K-ras mutation status. Among them, p-c-Kit plays more important roles in the radiosensitivity in pancreatic cancer compared with p-PDGFRbeta or K-ras mutation status.

  2. Inhibiting CD146 by its Monoclonal Antibody AA98 Improves Radiosensitivity of Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Huawen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cervical cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death of females worldwide. Radiotherapy is considered effective for cervical cancer treatment, but the low radiosensitivity found in some cases severely affects therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to reveal the role of CD146, an important adhesion molecule facilitating tumor angiogenesis, in regulating radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS CD146 protein expression was compared in normal cells, cervical cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity, and cervical cancer cells with higher sensitivity from cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients. Anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody AA98 was used to inhibit CD146 in human cervical cancer SiHa cells with relatively low radiosensitivity, and then the cell survival and apoptosis changes after radiation were detected by colony formation assay and flow cytometry. RESULTS CD146 protein was significantly up-regulated in cervical cancer cells (P<0.001), especially in cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity. The SiHa cells treated with AA98 showed more obvious inhibition in cell survival (P<0.05) and promotion in cell apoptosis (P<0.01) after radiation, compared to the untreated cells. More dramatic changes in apoptotic factors Caspase 3 and Bcl-XL were also detected in AA98-treated cells. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that inhibiting CD146 improves the effect of radiation in suppressing SiHa cells. This study shows the potential of CD146 as a target for increasing radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells, which might allow improvement in treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Further studies are necessary for understanding the detailed mechanism of CD146 in regulating radiosensitivity. PMID:27647179

  3. Inhibiting CD146 by its Monoclonal Antibody AA98 Improves Radiosensitivity of Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huawen

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death of females worldwide. Radiotherapy is considered effective for cervical cancer treatment, but the low radiosensitivity found in some cases severely affects therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to reveal the role of CD146, an important adhesion molecule facilitating tumor angiogenesis, in regulating radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells. Material/Methods CD146 protein expression was compared in normal cells, cervical cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity, and cervical cancer cells with higher sensitivity from cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients. Anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody AA98 was used to inhibit CD146 in human cervical cancer SiHa cells with relatively low radiosensitivity, and then the cell survival and apoptosis changes after radiation were detected by colony formation assay and flow cytometry. Results CD146 protein was significantly up-regulated in cervical cancer cells (P<0.001), especially in cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity. The SiHa cells treated with AA98 showed more obvious inhibition in cell survival (P<0.05) and promotion in cell apoptosis (P<0.01) after radiation, compared to the untreated cells. More dramatic changes in apoptotic factors Caspase 3 and Bcl-XL were also detected in AA98-treated cells. Conclusions These results indicate that inhibiting CD146 improves the effect of radiation in suppressing SiHa cells. This study shows the potential of CD146 as a target for increasing radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells, which might allow improvement in treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Further studies are necessary for understanding the detailed mechanism of CD146 in regulating radiosensitivity. PMID:27647179

  4. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Jayant S.; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies. PMID:27121513

  5. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Goda, Jayant S; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  6. Targeted Radiosensitization by the Chk1 Inhibitor SAR-020106

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; McLaughlin, Martin; Kyula, Joan N.; Neijenhuis, Sari; Khan, Aadil; Good, James; Zaidi, Shane; Powell, Ned G.; Meier, Pascal; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.; Verheij, Marcel; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To explore the activity of a potent Chk1 inhibitor (SAR-020106) in combination with radiation. Methods and Materials: Colony and mechanistic in vitro assays and a xenograft in vivo model. Results: SAR-020106 suppressed-radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and reduced clonogenic survival only in p53-deficient tumor cells. SAR-020106 promoted mitotic entry following irradiation in all cell lines, but p53-deficient cells were likely to undergo apoptosis or become aneuploid, while p53 wild-type cells underwent a postmitotic G{sub 1} arrest followed by subsequent normal cell cycle re-entry. Following combined treatment with SAR-020106 and radiation, homologous-recombination-mediated DNA damage repair was inhibited in all cell lines. A significant increase in the number of pan-γH2AX-staining apoptotic cells was observed only in p53-deficient cell lines. Efficacy was confirmed in vivo in a clinically relevant human head-and-neck cell carcinoma xenograft model. Conclusion: The Chk1 inhibitor SAR-020106 is a potent radiosensitizer in tumor cell lines defective in p53 signaling.

  7. Rejoining of prematurely condensed chromosomes in radiosensitive xrs-5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okayasu, R. |; Iliakis, G.

    1995-12-31

    Xrs-5 cells, a radiosensitive, DNA double strand break repair deficient mutant of CHO cells have been studied with the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. This mutant displayed a higher number of initial chromosome breaks with x-ray treatment as well as partial deficiency in the rejoining of interphase chromosome breaks with the standard PCC protocol. Moreover, hypertonic treatment during the incubation period which allowed for PCC did not change the yield of PCC breaks in x-irradiated xrs-5 cells. Notably the number of PCC breaks after treatment with hypertonic media is similar in CHO and xrs-5 cells. Recently, a gene product responsible for the xrs phenotype was identified as a Ku-like DNA end binding protein. The present paper summarizes completed information regarding the induction and repair of the {alpha}- and {beta}-forms of PCC breaks in xrs-5 cells and demonstrates that this gene product predominantly affects the fast form ({beta}-form) of interphase chromosome breaks.

  8. Clofarabine Acts as Radiosensitizer In Vitro and In Vivo by Interfering With DNA Damage Response

    SciTech Connect

    Cariveau, Mickael J.; Stackhouse, Murray; Cui Xiaoli; Tiwari, Kamal; Waud, William; Secrist, John A.; Xu Bo

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Combination treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy has emerged as the dominant form of cancer adjuvant regimens in recent years. Clofarabine, a newly approved drug for pediatric leukemia, is a second-generation purine nucleoside analogue that can block DNA synthesis and inhibit DNA repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that clofarabine could work synergistically with radiotherapy to increase the tumor cell response. Methods and Materials: The effects of clofarabine on radiosensitivity have been established in several tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo using colony-forming assays and tumor xenografts. The effect of clofarabine on the DNA damage response was also studied in vitro by measuring {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. Results: Clonogenic survival was significantly reduced in irradiated cells treated with clofarabine, demonstrating the strong radiosensitizing effect of clofarabine. Furthermore, clofarabine displayed a radiosensitizing effect that was greater than gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil. We also found that low doses of clofarabine can prolong the presence of radiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX nuclear focus formation, and high doses of clofarabine can induce DNA double-strand breaks, suggesting that clofarabine can interfere with DNA damage response pathways. In addition, clofarabine-induced radiosensitization was also established in vivo using a colorectal cancer model, DLD-1, in athymic nude mice. When combined with fractionated radiotherapy, a moderate dose of clofarabine led to a significant increase in tumor growth inhibition. Conclusion: Clofarabine acts as a powerful radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo by interfering with the DNA damage response.

  9. A novel NGR-conjugated peptide targets DNA damage responses for radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinlu; Zhang, Dan; Ying, Xia; Zhao, Ying; He, Chenchen; Zhu, Qing; Han, Suxia

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the important treatment strategies for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinomas. Developing novel sensitizers for radiotherapy is a key issue due to the low intrinsic radiosensitivity of hepatocellular carcinomas. It was reported the wild-type NBS1 inhibitory peptide (wtNIP) can increase radiosensitivity in several cancer cell lines by abrogating ATM-NBS1 interaction and interrupting cellular DNA damage response. Here, we developed a novel NGRconjugated peptide (NGR-sR9-wtNIP) through coupling the CNGRC angiogenic vessel-homing peptide NGR with the wtNIP peptide. Fusion peptide was tested for internalization, cytotoxicity in Hep3B cells and for tumor localization, and for toxicity in nude mice bearing human hepatocellular carcinomas xenografts. The radiosensitizing activity of NGR-sR9-wtNIP was investigated as well. We found that NGR-sR9-wtNIP can inhibit irradiation induced NBS1 phosphorylation and induce radiosensitization in Hep3B cells. When combined with IR, NGR-sR9-wtNIP suppressed tumor growth obviously in xenograft mice. In addition, the fusion peptide localized in tumor tissue specifically and barely led to any side effects on mice. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that NGRsR9- wtNIP has radiosensitizing potential for radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

  10. Radiosensitization by PARP inhibition to proton beam irradiation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Matsushita, Keiichiro; Nishio, Teiji; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2016-09-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 regulates DNA damage responses and promotes base excision repair. PARP inhibitors have been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation in various cancer cells and animal models. We have demonstrated that the PARP inhibitor (PARPi) AZD2281 is also an effective radiosensitizer for carbon-ion radiation; thus, we speculated that the PARPi could be applied to a wide therapeutic range of linear energy transfer (LET) radiation as a radiosensitizer. Institutes for biological experiments using proton beam are limited worldwide. This study was performed as a cooperative research at heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) in National Institute of Radiological Sciences. HIMAC can generate various ion beams; this enabled us to compare the radiosensitization effect of the PARPi on cells subjected to proton and carbon-ion beams from the same beam line. After physical optimization of proton beam irradiation, the radiosensitization effect of the PARPi was assessed in the human lung cancer cell line, A549, and the pancreatic cancer cell line, MIA PaCa-2. The effect of the PARPi, AZD2281, on radiosensitization to Bragg peak was more significant than that to entrance region. The PARPi increased the number of phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and enhanced G2/M arrest after proton beam irradiation. This result supports our hypothesis that a PARPi could be applied to a wide therapeutic range of LET radiation by blocking the DNA repair response. PMID:27425251

  11. 53BP1 foci as a marker of tumor cell radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Markova, E; Vasilyev, S; Belyaev, I

    2015-01-01

    Predicting tumor radiosensitivity has yet to be routinely integrated into radiotherapy. We analyzed the possibility to assess radiosensitivity of tumor cells based on endogenous and radiation-induced 53BP1 foci which are molecular markers of DNA double strand breaks (DSB). In eleven tumor cell lines of different origin, radiosensitivity was assessed by surviving cell fraction following irradiation with 2 Gy (SF2). 53BP1 foci were measured at 4 and 12 h post-irradiation by confocal laser microscopy and dedicated software. The correlation of 53BP1 foci and their post-irradiation kinetics with SF2 was assessed using Spearman rank test. The SF2 correlated with both excess of radiation-induced 53BP1 foci per cell at 4 h after irradiation and decay in number of 53BP1 foci from 4 to 12 h post-irradiation. The fraction of cells with multiple endogenous 53BP1 foci also correlated with SF2 of tumor cells. We conclude that the radiosensitivity of tumor cells can be predicted by kinetics of formation and decay of 53BP1 foci after irradiation. For the first time we report that the fraction of cells with multiple endogenous 53BP1 foci can be used as a marker of tumor cell radiosensitivity. PMID:26278144

  12. Synthesis, in vitro aerobic and hypoxic cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing activity of novel metronidazole tethered 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Several 2, 4-dinitrophenyl and 2,4-dinitrophenylamine tethered 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) compared to their components have shown minimal or no cytotoxicity to HT-29 cell line under aerobic conditions but high cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing effects under hypoxic conditions. In the present study the cytotoxicity and radiation potentiation of three novel analogues of these compounds by replacing 2,4-dinitrophenyl moiety with 2-methyl-5-nitroimidazole, a known radiosensitizer and cytotoxic agent was investigated. Methods Tethered compounds 7–9 were prepared by the reaction of 1-(t-butoxycarbonyl)-5-fluorouracil 6 with metronidazole esters 2–4 followed by removal of the t-butoxycarbonyl protecting group. Cytotoxicity of compounds in HT-29 cells with or without radiation were determined by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), propidium iodide (PI)-digitonin and clonogenic assays. Results Tethered compounds 7–9 induced time-and concentration–dependent cytotoxicity under hypoxia but had no significant effect under aerobic conditions. These compounds also showed selective and concentration- dependent radiosensitization effects under hypoxic conditions. Conclusion Tethered compounds 7–9 compared to 5-FU 5 showed minimal cytotoxicities under aerobic and selective radiosensitizing activities under hypoxic conditions. Also effects of these compounds were higher than those of metronidazole 1 which is a known cytotoxin and radiosensitizer under hypoxic conditions. PMID:24359860

  13. Accountability in delivering care.

    PubMed

    Castledine, G

    In the penultimate part of this series on issues in ward management facing charge nurses. George Castledine concentrates on the issue of accountability. The immensely powerful position of the charge nurse as arbitrator and co-ordinator of all health care given to the patient demands that helshe exercises this power responsibly and positively; hence, the crucial importance of accountability. The author explores this concept and also those of advocacy and conscientious objection. He concludes by suggesting that the ultimate area of accountability in nursing is the individual conscience of the practitioner and that in this may lie the key to the setting and maintenance of high standards of care.

  14. Standardized Testing and School Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the use of standardized tests to hold schools accountable. The history of testing for accountability is reviewed, and it is shown that currently between-school differences account for less than 10% of the variance in student scores, in part because the progress of individuals is small compared to the spread of achievement…

  15. Mastering the Vocabulary of Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tischler, Helene

    Developed for use by students in an introductory accounting course, these learning modules deal with mastering the vocabulary of accounting. Focus of the modules is on vocabulary appearing in the first six chapters of the text, "Accounting Principles" by Niswonger and Fess. Covered in the individual modules are the following topics: discovering…

  16. In Vitro Radiosensitization of Esophageal Cancer Cells with the Aminopeptidase Inhibitor CHR-2797.

    PubMed

    Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Biasoli, Deborah; Leszczynska, Katarzyna B; Mukherjee, Somnath; Hammond, Ester M

    2015-09-01

    With the increased incidence of esophageal cancer, chemoradiotherapy continues to play an important role in the management of this disease. Developing potent radiosensitizers is therefore critical for improving outcomes. The use of drugs that have already undergone clinical testing is an appealing approach once the side effects and tolerated doses are established. Here, we demonstrate that the aminopeptidase inhibitor, CHR-2797/tosedostat, increases the radiosensitivity of esophageal cancer cell lines (FLO-1 and OE21) in vitro in both normoxic and physiologically relevant low oxygen conditions. To our knowledge, the effective combination of CHR-2797 with radiation exposure has not been reported previously in any cancer cell type. The mechanism of increased radiosensitivity was not dependent on the induction of DNA damage or DNA repair kinetics. Our data support the need for further preclinical testing of CHR-2797 in combination with radiotherapy for the treatment of esophageal cancer.

  17. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Debin; Jia, Hui; Qin, Mengmeng; Dai, Wenjie; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Dong, Guofu; Wang, Zuojun; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Feng, Fan

    2015-01-01

    MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR) on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy. PMID:26389880

  18. Chitooligosaccharides promote radiosensitivity in colon cancer line SW480

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fu-Shi; Yang, Shi-Jie; Lin, Mou-Bin; Chen, Ying-Qun; Yang, Ping; Xu, Jin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-proliferation and radiosensitization effect of chitooligosaccharides (COS) on human colon cancer cell line SW480. METHODS: SW480 cells were treated with 0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 mg/mL of COS for 48 h. CCK-8 assay was employed to obtain the cell survival ratio of SW480 cells, and the anti-proliferation curve was observed with the inhibition ratio of COS on SW480 cells. The RAY + COS group was treated with 1.0 mg/mL of COS for 48 h, while both the RAY and RAY+COS groups were exposed to X-ray at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy, respectively. Clonogenic assay was used to analyze cell viability in the two groups at 10 d after treatment, and a cell survival curve was used to analyze the sensitization ratio of COS. The RAY group was exposed to X-ray at 6 Gy, while the RAY+COS group was treated with 1.0 mg/mL of COS for 48 h in advance and exposed to X-ray at 6 Gy. Flow cytometry was employed to detect cell cycle and apoptosis rate in the non-treatment group, as well as in the RAY and RAY + COS groups after 24 h of treatment. RESULTS: COS inhibited the proliferation of SW480 cells, and the inhibition rate positively correlated with the concentration of COS (P < 0.01). Cell viability decreased as radiation dose increased in the RAY and RAY+COS groups (P < 0.01). Cell viabilities in the RAY+COS group were lower than in the RAY group at all doses of X-ray exposure (P < 0.01), and the sensitization ratio of COS on SW480 cells was 1.39. Compared with the non-treatment group, there was a significant increase in apoptosis rate in both the RAY and RAY + COS groups; while the apoptosis rate in the RAY+COS group was significantly higher than in the RAY group (P < 0.01). In comparing these three groups, the percentage of G2/M phase in both the RAY and RAY + COS groups significantly increased, and the percentage of the S phase and G0/G1 phase was downregulated. Furthermore, the percentage in the G2/M phase was higher, and the percentage in the S phase and G0/G

  19. Enhanced tumor radiosensitivity by a survivin dominant-negative mutant.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Zhong; Wang, Chun-Ting; Mao, Yong-Qiu; Zhang, Peng; Shi, Hua-Shan; Li, Zhi-Yong; Pan, Li; Yu, Dan-Dan; Leng, Fei; Chen, Xiang; Ying, Wei; Xu, Jing-Hui; Li, Wei; Wu, Fan; Wen, Yuan; Ma, Tian-Tai; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2010-01-01

    Radiosensitivity of tumors is due to a complex interaction of various factors, it has been reported that survivin also acts as a constitutive and inducible radioresistance factor in a panel of tumor cells and approaches designed to inhibit survivin expression or function may lead to tumor sensitisation to chemical and physical agents. Previously, we found that the plasmid encoding the phosphorylation-defective mouse survivin threonine 34-->alanine mutant complexed to DOTAP-chol liposome (Lip-mS) can suppress murine primary breast carcinoma. However, little is known regarding the biological effect of Lip-mS combined with radiation. The present study was designed to determine whether Lip-mS could enhance the anti-tumor activity of radiation. The Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cells treated with a combination of Lip-mS and radiation displayed apparently increased apoptosis compared with those treated with Lip-mS or radiation alone. Mice bearing LLC tumors were treated with intravenous injections of Lip-mS and radiation, the combined treatment significantly reduced mean tumor volume compared with either treatment alone. Moreover, the anti-tumor effect of Lip-mS combined with radiation was greater than their additive effect when compared with the expected effect of the combined treatment. These data suggest that inhibition of survivin using a dominant-negative mutant, survivin T34A, could sensitize LLC cells to radiation efficiently and the synergistic anti-tumor activity may in part result from increasing the apoptosis of tumor cells, inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and inducing a tumor-protective immune response in the combined treatment. PMID:19956869

  20. Protein-directed modulation of high-LET hyperthermic radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.Y.

    1991-01-01

    A pair of Chinese Hamster Ovary cell lines, the wild-type CHO-SC1, and its temperature-sensitive mutant (CHO-tsH1) was used to examine the importance of protein synthesis in the development of thermotolerance. The classical biphasic thermotolerant survival response to hyperthermia was observed in the SC1 cells after continuous heating at 41.5C to 42.5C, while tsH1 showed no thermotolerance. In separate experiments, each cell line was triggered and challenged at 45C. The heat doses were separated with graded incubaton periods at 35C or 40C for thermotolerance development. SC1 cells expressed thermoresistance, with the synthesis of heat shock proteins, under both incubation conditions. tsH1 cells expressed thermotolerance similar to that seen in the SC1 cells when incubated at 35C, but the survival response with the non-permissive 40C incubation was much reduced in the absence of protein synthesis. The combined effects of heavy-ion radiation and hyperthermia were examined using the same cell system. A mild heat dose of 41.5C was used in conjunction with Neon particle radiation of various high LET values. The cell killing effects were highly dependent on the sequence of application of heat and Neon radiation. Heat applied immediately after Neon irradiation was more cytotoxic to SC1 cells than when heat was applied prior to the irradiation. The ability of cells to synthesize new proteins plays a key role in this sequence-dependent thermal radiosensitization. In the absence of protein synthesis in the tsH1 cells, the high-LET thermal enhancement for cell-killing was unchanged regardless of the sequence. In the presence of protein synthetic activity in the SC1 cells, the thermal enhancement of radiation-induced cell killing was LET-dependent.

  1. Enhanced radiosensitization of p53 mutant cells by oleamide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Chung, Da Yeon; Lee, Su-Jae; Ja Jhon, Gil; Lee, Yun-Sil . E-mail: yslee@kcch.re.kr

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Effect of oleamide, an endogenous fatty-acid primary amide, on tumor cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) has never before been explored. Methods and Materials: NCI H460, human lung cancer cells, and human astrocytoma cell lines, U87 and U251, were used. The cytotoxicity of oleamide alone or in combination with IR was determined by clonogenic survival assay, and induction of apoptosis was estimated by FACS analysis. Protein expressions were confirmed by Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis of Bax by use of confocal microscopy was also performed. The combined effect of IR and oleamide to suppress tumor growth was studied by use of xenografts in the thighs of nude mice. Results: Oleamide in combination with IR had a synergistic effect that decreased clonogenic survival of lung-carcinoma cell lines and also sensitized xenografts in nude mice. Enhanced induction of apoptosis of the cells by the combined treatment was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which resulted in the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3 accompanied by cytochrome c release and Bid cleavage. The synergistic effects of the combined treatment were more enhanced in p53 mutant cells than in p53 wild-type cells. In p53 wild-type cells, both oleamide and radiation induced Bax translocation to mitochondria. On the other hand, in p53 mutant cells, radiation alone slightly induced Bax translocation to mitochondria, whereas oleamide induced a larger translocation. Conclusions: Oleamide may exhibit synergistic radiosensitization in p53 mutant cells through p53-independent Bax translocation to mitochondria.

  2. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  3. Intra-arterial bromodeoxyuridine radiosensitization of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hegarty, T.J.; Thornton, A.F.; Diaz, R.F.; Chandler, W.F.; Ensminger, W.D.; Junck, L.; Page, M.A.; Gebarski, S.S.; Hood, T.W.; Stetson, P.L. )

    1990-08-01

    In the 1950's it was first observed that mammalian cells exposed to the halogenated deoxyuridines were more sensitive to ultraviolet light and radiation than untreated cells. This prompted early clinical trials with bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) which showed mixed results. More recently, several Phase I studies, while establishing the feasibility of continuous intravenous (IV) infusion of BUdR, have reported significant dose limiting skin and bone marrow toxicities and have questioned the optimal method of BUdR delivery. To exploit the high mitotic activity of malignant gliomas relative to surrounding normal brain tissue, we have developed a permanently implantable infusion pump system for safe, continuous intraarterial (IA) internal carotid BUdR delivery. Since July 1985, 23 patients with malignant brain tumors (18 grade 4, 5 grade 3) have been treated in a Phase I clinical trial using IA BUdR (400-600 mg/m2/day X 8 1/2 weeks) and focal external beam radiotherapy (59.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/day in 6 1/2 weeks). Following initial biopsy/surgery the infusion pump system was implanted; BUdR infusion began 2 weeks prior to and continued throughout the 6 1/2 week course of radiotherapy. There have been no vascular complications. Side-effects in all patients have included varying degrees of anorexia, fatigue, ipsilateral forehead dermatitis, blepharitis, and conjunctivitis. Myelosuppression requiring dose reduction occurred in one patient. An overall Kaplan-Meier estimated median survival of 20 months has been achieved. As in larger controlled series, histologic grade and age are prognostically significant. We have shown in a Phase I study that IA BUdR radiosensitization is safe, tolerable, may lead to improved survival, and appears to be an efficacious primary treatment of malignant gliomas.

  4. Microwave hyperthermia radiosensitized iridium-192 for recurrent brain malignancy.

    PubMed

    Borok, T L; Winter, A; Laing, J; Paglione, R; Sterzer, F; Sinclair, I; Plafker, J

    1988-03-01

    Twenty-one patients whose solitary detectable biopsy proven recurrent brain malignancies produced Central Nervous System (CNS) symptoms warranting further intervention received 60-minute 43 degrees C (180 degree-minute) interstitial 2450 MHz microwave hyperthermia fractions. All received brain teletherapy prior to recurrence. The first 15 received no brachytherapy and served as a toxicity pilot. All 15 enjoyed neurologic improvement, 12 symptomatic improvement, and 12 objective response as mass reduction and/or tumor necrosis. The next 6 patients were selected with more favorable Karnofsky performance status, no known active malignancy elsewhere, and received afterloading Ir-192 interstitial implantation juxtaposed to radiosensitizing hyperthermia. Volume dose varied from 1000 to 2245 rad, and dose rate from 40 to 100 rad/hr. Dose selected varied as a function of pre-recurrence teletherapy dose, general condition, histologic type, and volume. Neurosurgical debulking, if technically indicated through no additional aperture or trauma, was permitted if consistent with preservation of neurological function. Six enjoyed neurologic improvement, symptom reduction, and objective tumor response; three remain alive, and one experienced transient improvement. Complications, histologic subtypes, autopsy findings, stereotactic approach, thermal monitoring methods and CT follow-up of objective response are presented along with computer dosimetry and isotherm chart. Our microtraumatic universal catheter technique for CT guided stereotactic biopsy, aspiration, decompression, thermal sensory loop, thermalization antennae, and brachytherapy without multiple trauma nor changing catheters is stressed. The rationale for combined modes peculiar to the CNS will be outlined.2+ Proposal for incorporating controlled-release ARA-C chemotherapy polymer micro-rods into the interstitial format will be offered. The preceeding is an FDA-approved controlled clinical trial.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT

  5. Microwave hyperthermia radiosensitized iridium-192 for recurrent brain malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Borok, T.L.; Winter, A.; Laing, J.; Paglione, R.; Sterzer, F.; Sinclair, I.; Plafker, J. )

    1988-03-01

    Twenty-one patients whose solitary detectable biopsy proven recurrent brain malignancies produced Central Nervous System (CNS) symptoms warranting further intervention received 60-minute 43 degrees C (180 degree-minute) interstitial 2450 MHz microwave hyperthermia fractions. All received brain teletherapy prior to recurrence. The first 15 received no brachytherapy and served as a toxicity pilot. All 15 enjoyed neurologic improvement, 12 symptomatic improvement, and 12 objective response as mass reduction and/or tumor necrosis. The next 6 patients were selected with more favorable Karnofsky performance status, no known active malignancy elsewhere, and received afterloading Ir-192 interstitial implantation juxtaposed to radiosensitizing hyperthermia. Volume dose varied from 1000 to 2245 rad, and dose rate from 40 to 100 rad/hr. Dose selected varied as a function of pre-recurrence teletherapy dose, general condition, histologic type, and volume. Neurosurgical debulking, if technically indicated through no additional aperture or trauma, was permitted if consistent with preservation of neurological function. Six enjoyed neurologic improvement, symptom reduction, and objective tumor response; three remain alive, and one experienced transient improvement. Complications, histologic subtypes, autopsy findings, stereotactic approach, thermal monitoring methods and CT follow-up of objective response are presented along with computer dosimetry and isotherm chart. Our microtraumatic universal catheter technique for CT guided stereotactic biopsy, aspiration, decompression, thermal sensory loop, thermalization antennae, and brachytherapy without multiple trauma nor changing catheters is stressed. The rationale for combined modes peculiar to the CNS will be outlined.2+ Proposal for incorporating controlled-release ARA-C chemotherapy polymer micro-rods into the interstitial format will be offered.

  6. Radiosensitization of tumor cells through endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by PEGylated nanogel containing gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Hironobu; Takeuchi, Ryo; Nagane, Masaki; Meike, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Yoshinari; Yamamori, Tohru; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Kon, Yasuhiro; Murotani, Hiroki; Oishi, Motoi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Inanami, Osamu

    2014-05-28

    High atomic number molecules, such as gold and platinum, are known to enhance the biological effect of X-irradiation. This study was aimed to determine the radiosensitizing potential of PEGylated nanogel containing gold nanoparticles (GNG) and the cellular mechanism involved. GNG pretreatment increased the levels of reproductive cell death and apoptosis induced by X-irradiation. GNG accumulated in cytoplasm and increased the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related protein. GNG suppressed the repair capacity of DNA after X-irradiation by down-regulating DNA repair-related proteins. Our results suggest that GNG radiosensitized cells by enhancing apoptosis and impairing DNA repair capacity via ER stress induction.

  7. Differential radiosensitivity in cultured B-16 melanoma cells following interrupted melanogenesis induced by glucosamine

    SciTech Connect

    Mileo, A.M.; Mattei, E.; Fanuele, M.; Delpino, A.; Ferrini, U. )

    1989-05-01

    The relationship between cell pigmentation and radiosensitivity was investigated in a cell model in which melanogenesis was suppressed by a glycosylation inhibitor. It was found that X-irradiation of melanotic B-16 melanoma cells and their amelanotic counterparts, obtained by glucosamine treatment, showed an inverse correlation between radiosensitivity and melanin contents. Since melanogenesis interruption by glucosamine does not affect the DNA repair capacity of nonpigmented cells, it is likely that intracellular melanins play a role in the relative resistance of pigmented cells to X-irradiation.

  8. Intrinsic radio-sensitivity of tumours to low let radiations: a mathematical model in LQ formalism.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Sk Ayasuddin

    2013-12-01

    Intrinsic radio-sensitivity is the determinant of differential response of tumours to low LET ionising radiations. The probabilistic DNA fibril both model shows intrinsic radio-sensitivity factor [I] as function of nuclear diameter (Nd) and intra cellular hydrogen ion concentration [H+]. Linking probabilities of lethal and sub-lethal events to [I] further results in equations which show the LQ parameters namely alpha and beta are functions of (Nd), [H+] and repair constant (μ) mu. This model is able to explain radiobiological phenomena of OER and Do value of lymphocytes.

  9. The pharmacokinetics in mice and dogs of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.; Workman, P.; Owen, L.

    1982-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole (MISO) were examined. In dogs, 2 analogues showed comparable peak plasma concentrations with considerable shorter half-lives (t1/2) and reduced areas under curves (AUC). Benznidazole (R0 07-1051) had a much longer t1/2, a higher AUC, and somewhat higher peak concentrations. In mice tumor/plasma, brain/plasma, and tumor/brain ratios were generally similar to MISO, as was penetration of brain and peripheral nerve by benznidazole in dogs. Selection of lipophilic analogues with appropriate pharmacokinetic properties may facilitate accommodation of the potentially different requirements for improved radiosensitization or chemosensitization.

  10. Effect of anemia on tumor radiosensitivity under normo and hyperbaric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.; Smith, K.A.; Soranson, J.A.; Randhawa, V.S.; Stratford, M.R.; Denekamp, J.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of chronic anemia on tumor radiosensitivity in a murine tumor has been investigated. Anemia was induced by bilateral kidney irradiation given several months before tumor implantation. Anemic, anemic transfused, and normal non-anemic age-matched tumor bearing animals were irradiated with X rays (2 F/24 hr) either in air, air plus misonidazole, or under hyperbaric oxygen. The most resistant response was that of tumors grown in normal mice treated in air. Anemia produced an increase in radiosensitivity which was further enhanced by red blood cell replacement. The most sensitive overall response was seen in the anemic-transfused group treated with HBO.

  11. Accountability and Productivity: Some Longitudinal Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tausky, Curt; Chelte, Anthony F.

    1983-01-01

    Based on a nonobtrusive count of input, productivity in a metal-working shop is examined before implementing individual accountability, during intensified accountability, and after the accountability program was terminated. The data show quite clearly that when individual accountability was introduced, productivity rose steeply and then subsided…

  12. Accountability Overboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chieppo, Charles D.; Gass, James T.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that special interest groups opposed to charter schools and high-stakes testing have hijacked Massachusetts's once-independent board of education and stand poised to water down the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) tests and the accountability system they support. President Barack Obama and Massachusetts…

  13. Painless Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, R. W.; And Others

    The computerized Painless Accountability System is a performance objective system from which instructional programs are developed. Three main simplified behavioral response levels characterize this system: (1) cognitive, (2) psychomotor, and (3) affective domains. Each of these objectives are classified by one of 16 descriptors. The second major…

  14. Accounting Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication identifies 20 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of accounting specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 20 units are as follows:…

  15. Arkansas' Curriculum Guide. Competency Based Computerized Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. Div. of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This guide contains the essential parts of a total curriculum for a one-year secondary-level course in computerized accounting. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: the complete accounting cycle, computer operations for accounting, computerized accounting and general ledgers, computerized accounts payable,…

  16. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  17. Downregulation of a novel human gene, ROGDI, increases radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Fan; Cho, Jonathan J.; Huang, Tsai-Hua; Tseng, Chao-Neng; Huang, Eng-Yen; Cho, Chung-Lung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ROGDI is a protein that contains a leucine zipper domain and may be involved in cell proliferation. In addition, ROGDI is associated with genome stability by regulating the activity of a DNA damage marker, γ-H2AX. The role of ROGDI in tumor radiosensitization has not been investigated. Previous studies have indicated that radiosensitivity is associated with DNA repair and the cell cycle. In general, the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint is more sensitive to radiation, whereas the G1/S phase transition is more resistant to radiation. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) can lead to a halt of cell cycle progression and a stay at different phases or checkpoints. Our data show that the downregulation of ROGDI led to a decreased expression of CDK 1, 2, cyclin A, B and resulted in a G2/M phase transition block. In addition, the downregulation of ROGDI increased cell accumulation at the G2 phase as detected using flow cytometry and decreased cell survival as revealed by clonogenic assay in HeLa and C33A cells following irradiation. These findings suggest that the downregulation of ROGDI can mediate radiosensitivity by blocking cells at G2/M, the most radiosensitive phase of the cell cycle, as well as exerting deleterious effects in the form of DNA damage, as shown by increased γ-H2AX activation. PMID:27636029

  18. Differential Radiosensitizing Effect of Valproic Acid in Differentiation Versus Self-Renewal Promoting Culture Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Debeb, Bisrat G.; Xu Wei; Mok, Henry; Li Li; Robertson, Fredika; Ueno, Naoto T.; Reuben, Jim; Lucci, Anthony; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that valproic acid (VA) enhances the proliferation and self-renewal of normal hematopoietic stem cells and that breast cancer stem/progenitor cells can be resistant to radiation. From these data, we hypothesized that VA would fail to radiosensitize breast cancer stem/progenitor cells grown to three-dimensional (3D) mammospheres. Methods and Materials: We used the MCF7 breast cancer cell line grown under stem cell-promoting culture conditions (3D mammosphere) and standard nonstem cell monolayer culture conditions (two-dimensional) to examine the effect of pretreatment with VA on radiation sensitivity in clonogenic survival assays and on the expression of embryonic stem cell transcription factors. Results: 3D-cultured MCF-7 cells expressed higher levels of Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2. The 3D passage enriched self-renewal and increased radioresistance in the 3D mammosphere formation assays. VA radiosensitized adherent cells but radioprotected 3D cells in single-fraction clonogenic assays. Moreover, fractionated radiation sensitized VA-treated adherent MCF7 cells but did not have a significant effect on VA-treated single cells grown to mammospheres. Conclusion: We have concluded that VA might preferentially radiosensitize differentiated cells compared with those expressing stem cell surrogates and that stem cell-promoting culture is a useful tool for in vitro evaluation of novel cancer therapeutic agents and radiosensitizers.

  19. Influence of some methodological factors on the radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Grinfeld, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The experiments reported here were undertaken to investigate the influence of some methodological factors on the radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote. The following factors were studied: (1) the use of natural or hormone-stimulated ovulation; (2) the procedure followed for fertilization:mating overnight, or only during a short period in the morning after all oocytes have been ovulated, in vitro fertilization; (3) the type of irradiation, i.e., in vivo or in vitro irradiation. The radiosensitivity of the zygotes was estimated under the different experimental conditions by measuring the ability of the irradiated embryos to cleave and to develop further to the blastocyst stage. Our results suggest that the protocols used for mating and fertilization probably have a greater influence on embryonic survival following irradiation than the use of gonadotropins to stimulate ovulation. The highest degree of synchrony in the development of the embryos is achieved by restricting mating to a short period or by using in vitro fertilization. The very low LD50s obtained under such synchronous conditions confirm the high radiosensitivity of the mouse zygote at the early pronuclear stage. Comparison between the effects of in vivo and in vitro irradiation does not indicate a greater radiosensitivity of the embryo irradiated in vitro in comparison to the embryo irradiated in vivo.

  20. Optimal drug release schedule for in-situ radiosensitization of image guided permanent prostate implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormack, Robert A.; Nguyen, Paul L.; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Sridhar, Sri; Makrigiorgos, Mike

    2011-03-01

    Planned in-situ radiosensitization may improve the therapeutic ratio of image guided 125I prostate brachytherapy. Spacers used in permanent implants may be manufactured from a radiosensitizer-releasing polymer to deliver protracted localized sensitization of the prostate. Such devices will have a limited drug-loading capacity, and the drug release schedule that optimizes outcome, under such a constraint, is not known. This work determines the optimal elution schedules for 125I prostate brachytherapy. The interaction between brachytherapy dose distributions and drug distribution around drug eluting spacers is modeled using a linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell kill. Clinical brachytherapy plans were used to calculate the biologic effective dose (BED) for planned radiation dose distributions while adding the spatial distributions of radiosensitizer while varying the temporal release schedule subject to a constraint on the drug capacity of the eluting spacers. Results: The greatest increase in BED is achieved by schedules with the greatest sensitization early in the implant. Making brachytherapy spacers from radiosensitizer eluting polymer transforms inert parts of the implant process into a means of enhancing the effect of the brachytherapy radiation. Such an approach may increase the therapeutic ratio of prostate brachytherapy or offer a means of locally boosting the radiation effect without increasing the radiation dose to surrounding tissues.

  1. Radiosensitization by nicotinamide in tumors and normal tissues: the importance of tissue oxygenation status

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, M.R.; Hansen, P.V.; Overgaard, J.

    1989-05-01

    Nicotinamide induced radiosensitization of tumors has been suggested to be a consequence of a reduction in tumor hypoxia. We have investigated the possibility that nicotinamide may produce significant radiosensitization in a normal tissue in which the radiation response is also influenced by hypoxia. The normal tissue studied was testis and radiation damage was assessed by measuring survival of spermatogonial stem cells. The radiosensitizing action of nicotinamide in testis was compared to that observed in a C3H mammary carcinoma when assayed by both regrowth delay and local tumor control. Our results show that nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg; i.p.) enhanced radiation damage in both tissue types when the radiation was given up to at least 3 hr after drug injection. Enhancement ratios obtained when the drug and radiation were separated by a 1 hr time interval were between 1.1 to 1.2 for the testis and 1.0 to 1.5 for the tumor. The results suggest that nicotinamide will produce radiosensitization in testis, but the effect is small and less than that observed in tumors.

  2. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for potential application in radiosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayatullah, M.; Nurhasanah, I.; Budi, W. S.

    2016-03-01

    Radiosensitizer is a material that can increase the effects of radiation in radiotherapy application. Various materials with high effective atomic number have been developed as a radiosensitizer, such as metal, iron oxide and quantum dot. In this study, ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles are included in iron oxide class were synthesized by precipitation method from the solution of zinc nitrate and ferrite nitrate and followed by calcination at 700° C for 3 hours. The XRD pattern shows that most of the observed peaks can be indexed to the cubic phase of ZnFe2O4 with a lattice parameter of 8.424 Å. SEM image reveals that nanoparticles are the sphere-like shape with size in the range 84-107 nm. The ability of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizer was examined by loading those nanoparticles into Escherichia coli cell culture which irradiated with photon energy of 6 MV at a dose of 2 Gy. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles showed ability to increase the absorbed dose by 0.5 to 1.0 cGy/g. In addition, the presence of 1 g/L ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in an increase radiation effect by 6.3% higher than if exposed to radiation only. These results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles can be used as the radiosensitizer for increasing radiation effect in radiotherapy.

  3. Simultaneous Inhibition of EGFR and PI3K Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ping; Zhang Qing; Torossian, Artour; Li Zhaobin; Xu Wencai; Lu Bo; Fu Shen

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling transduction pathway are common in cancer. This pathway is imperative to the radiosensitivity of cancer cells. We aimed to investigate the radiosensitizing effects of the simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K in breast cancer cells. Methods and Materials: MCF-7 cell lines with low expression of EGFR and wild-type PTEN and MDA-MB-468 cell lines with high expression of EGFR and mutant PTEN were used. The radiosensitizing effects by the inhibition of EGFR with AG1478 and/or PI3K with Ly294002 were determined by colony formation assay, Western blot was used to investigate the effects on downstream signaling. Flow cytometry was used for apoptosis and cell cycle analysis. Mice-bearing xenografts of MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells were also used to observe the radiosensitizing effect. Results: Simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K greatly enhanced radiosensitizing effect in MDA-MB-468 in terms of apoptosis and mitotic death, either inhibition of EGFR or PI3K alone could enhance radiosensitivity with a dose-modifying factor (DMF{sub SF2}) of 1.311 and 1.437, radiosensitizing effect was further enhanced by simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K with a DMF{sub SF2} at 2.698. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that dual inhibition combined with irradiation significantly induced G0/G1 phase arrest in MDA-MB-468 cells. The expression of phosphor-Akt and phosphor-Erk1/2 (induced by irradiation and PI3K inhibitor) were fully attenuated by simultaneous treatment with both inhibitors in combination with irradiation. In addition, dual inhibition combined with irradiation induced dramatic tumor growth delay in MDA-MB-468 xenografts. Conclusions: Our study indicated that simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K could further sensitize the cancer cells to irradiation compared to the single inhibitor with irradiation in vitro and in vivo. The approach may have

  4. Short Hairpin RNA Suppression of Thymidylate Synthase Produces DNA Mismatches and Results in Excellent Radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, Sheryl A.; Cooper, Kristin S.; Mannava, Sudha; Nikiforov, Mikhail A.; Shewach, Donna S.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA)-mediated suppression of thymidylate synthase (TS) on cytotoxicity and radiosensitization and the mechanism by which these events occur. Methods and Materials: shRNA suppression of TS was compared with 5-fluoro-2 Prime -deoxyuridine (FdUrd) inactivation of TS with or without ionizing radiation in HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. Cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were measured by clonogenic assay. Cell cycle effects were measured by flow cytometry. The effects of FdUrd or shRNA suppression of TS on dNTP deoxynucleotide triphosphate imbalances and consequent nucleotide misincorporations into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography and as pSP189 plasmid mutations, respectively. Results: TS shRNA produced profound ({>=}90%) and prolonged ({>=}8 days) suppression of TS in HCT116 and HT29 cells, whereas FdUrd increased TS expression. TS shRNA also produced more specific and prolonged effects on dNTPs deoxynucleotide triphosphates compared with FdUrd. TS shRNA suppression allowed accumulation of cells in S-phase, although its effects were not as long-lasting as those of FdUrd. Both treatments resulted in phosphorylation of Chk1. TS shRNA alone was less cytotoxic than FdUrd but was equally effective as FdUrd in eliciting radiosensitization (radiation enhancement ratio: TS shRNA, 1.5-1.7; FdUrd, 1.4-1.6). TS shRNA and FdUrd produced a similar increase in the number and type of pSP189 mutations. Conclusions: TS shRNA produced less cytotoxicity than FdUrd but was equally effective at radiosensitizing tumor cells. Thus, the inhibitory effect of FdUrd on TS alone is sufficient to elicit radiosensitization with FdUrd, but it only partially explains FdUrd-mediated cytotoxicity and cell cycle inhibition. The increase in DNA mismatches after TS shRNA or FdUrd supports a causal and sufficient role for the depletion of dTTP thymidine triphosphate and consequent DNA

  5. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Corde, Stéphanie; Yagi, Naoto; Abdul Aziz, Siti Aishah; Annabell, Nathan; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z) and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30-100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3.47. The dose enhancement factor obtained at other energy levels followed the same direction as the theoretical calculations based on the ratio of the mass energy absorption coefficients of gold and water. This experimental evidence shows that the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles varies with photon energy as predicted from theoretical calculations. However, prediction based on theoretical assumptions is sometimes difficult due to the complexity of biological systems, so further study at the cellular level is required to fully characterize the effects

  6. The measurement of intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity in human tumours and normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, Patricia Ann

    Human tumour and normal cell radiosensitivity are thought to be important factors determining the response of tumour and normal tissues to radiotherapy, respectively. Clonogenic assays are the standard method for measuring radiosensitivity but they are of limited applicability for clinical use with fresh human tumours. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System (ATCCS), as a method for measuring the radiosensitivity of human tumours. A soft agar clonogenic assay, the modified Courtenay-Mills assay, was used as a standard to compare with the ATCCS. The demonstration that fibroblast contamination could occur with both assay methods led to the investigation of a new technique for removing unwanted fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions and to the use of a multiwell assay for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity. Established tumour cell lines were used to validate and optimise the ATCCS. Success rates with human tumour biopsy specimens were initially poor with both assay methods but further modifications led to success rates of ~70%. In a comparison of the modified Courtenay-Mills assay and the ATCCS there was close agreement between the measurements of surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) for established tumour cell lines but with primary tumour cultures the SF2 values were significantly lower in the ATCCS. The main limitations of the ATCCS for clinical use were inter-experimental variability and fibroblast contamination. Using antibody-coated magnetic beads as a method for removing fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions, some selectivity for fibroblasts was shown, but the specificity was too low for this method to be of value in its current form. The multiwell assay was found to be a satisfactory method for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity although inter-experimental variability may limit its clinical use as a predictive test for normal tissue damage in patients.

  7. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing gammaH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2mug/mL], Trinovin [10mug/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 mug/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10mug/mL) and Prostate Rx (6mug/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  8. DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase As Molecular Target for Radiosensitization of Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, M. Emmy M.; van der Ploeg, Ida; Koster, Jan; Bate-Eya, Laurel Tabe; Versteeg, Rogier; Caron, Huib N.; Molenaar, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells might resist therapy with ionizing radiation (IR) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of IR-induced double-strand breaks. One of the key players in NHEJ is DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK, i.e. DNA-PKcs, can be inhibited with the small-molecule inhibitor NU7026. In the current study, the in vitro potential of NU7026 to radiosensitize neuroblastoma cells was investigated. DNA-PKcs is encoded by the PRKDC (protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide) gene. We showed that PRKDC levels were enhanced in neuroblastoma patients and correlated with a more advanced tumor stage and poor prognosis, making DNA-PKcs an interesting target for radiosensitization of neuroblastoma tumors. Optimal dose finding for combination treatment with NU7026 and IR was performed using NGP cells. One hour pre-treatment with 10 μM NU7026 synergistically sensitized NGP cells to 0.63 Gy IR. Radiosensitizing effects of NU7026 increased in time, with maximum effects observed from 96 h after IR-exposure on. Combined treatment of NGP cells with 10 μM NU7026 and 0.63 Gy IR resulted in apoptosis, while no apoptotic response was observed for either of the therapies alone. Inhibition of IR-induced DNA-PK activation by NU7026 confirmed the capability of NGP cells to, at least partially, resist IR by NHEJ. NU7026 also synergistically radiosensitized other neuroblastoma cell lines, while no synergistic effect was observed for low DNA-PKcs-expressing non-cancerous fibroblasts. Results obtained for NU7026 were confirmed by PRKDC knockdown in NGP cells. Taken together, the current study shows that DNA-PKcs is a promising target for neuroblastoma radiosensitization. PMID:26716839

  9. DNMT (DNA methyltransferase) inhibitors radiosensitize human cancer cells by suppressing DNA repair activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histone modifications and DNA methylation are two major factors in epigenetic phenomenon. Unlike the histone deacetylase inhibitors, which are known to exert radiosensitizing effects, there have only been a few studies thus far concerning the role of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors as radiosensitizers. The principal objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of DNMT inhibitors on the radiosensitivity of human cancer cell lines, and to elucidate the mechanisms relevant to that process. Methods A549 (lung cancer) and U373MG (glioblastoma) cells were exposed to radiation with or without six DNMT inhibitors (5-azacytidine, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, zebularine, hydralazine, epigallocatechin gallate, and psammaplin A) for 18 hours prior to radiation, after which cell survival was evaluated via clonogenic assays. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed via flow cytometry. Expressions of DNMT1, 3A/3B, and cleaved caspase-3 were detected via Western blotting. Expression of γH2AX, a marker of radiation-induced DNA double-strand break, was examined by immunocytochemistry. Results Pretreatment with psammaplin A, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, and zebularine radiosensitized both A549 and U373MG cells. Pretreatment with psammaplin A increased the sub-G1 fraction of A549 cells, as compared to cells exposed to radiation alone. Prolongation of γH2AX expression was observed in the cells treated with DNMT inhibitors prior to radiation as compared with those treated by radiation alone. Conclusions Psammaplin A, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, and zebularine induce radiosensitivity in both A549 and U373MG cell lines, and suggest that this effect might be associated with the inhibition of DNA repair. PMID:22429326

  10. Celecoxib Enhances the Radiosensitizing Effect of 7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) in Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mee; Jeong, In-Hye; Pyo, Hongryull

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: 7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), a Chk1-specific inhibitor, showed promising in vitro and in vivo chemo- or radiosensitizing activity. However, there have been concerns about its limited therapeutic efficacy and risk of side effects. A method of enhancing the treatment efficacy of UCN-01 while not increasing its side effects on normal tissue may therefore be required to apply this drug in clinical settings. Celecoxib is a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-specific inhibitor that downregulates ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) protein, an upstream kinase of Chk1. In this study, we investigated whether the addition of celecoxib can potentiate the radiosensitizing effect of UCN-01. Methods and Materials: The cooperative radiosensitizing effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms of UCN-01 plus celecoxib were determined by clonogenic assay, tumor growth delay assay, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. Synergism of the three agents combined (UCN-01 plus celecoxib plus radiation) were evaluated using median drug effect analysis and drug-independent action model analysis. Results: The combination of UCN-01 and celecoxib could induce synergistic cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing effects in in vitro and in vivo systems. The combination of both drugs also cooperatively inhibited IR-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, and increased the G{sub 2} to mitotic transition. Conclusions: Combined treatment with UCN-01 and celecoxib can exert synergistically enhanced radiosensitizing effects via cooperative inhibition of the ionizing radiation-activated G{sub 2} checkpoint. We propose that this combination strategy may be useful in clinical applications of UCN-01 for radiotherapy of cancer patients.

  11. Iodine-125-labeled cRGD-gold nanoparticles as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer and imaging agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ning; Dang, Yajie; Liang, Guangli; Liu, Guizhi

    2015-04-01

    Research interests on radiosensitive property of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are rapidly raised because of the extensively proved in vitro effectiveness and clinical necessity. However, the issue of targeted accumulation of GNPs in tumor tissues hindered the transference to in vivo applications. In this study, hybrid nano-sized cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated GNPs (cRGD-GNPs) integrated with radioactive iodine-125 was fabricated as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer. Therapeutic effects, including acute apoptosis (2 days post treatment) and long-term influence (up to 21 days), were investigated on NCI-H446 tumor-bearing mice via Tc-99 m-Annexin V SPECT and volume measurements, respectively. Apoptosis and volume loss were consistent in showing that tumor growth was effectively suppressed via the treatment of 125I-cRGD-GNP sensitized radiotherapy (RT), a more significantly radiosensitive effect than the treatment of non-targeted GNPs with RT, RT treatment alone, and no treatment. SPECT/CT images showed that the uptake of cRGD-GNPs by tumor tissues reached the peak target/non-target value of 4.76 at around 2 h post injection, and dynamic radioactivity monitoring showed that 125I-cRGD-GNPs maintained about 2.5% of injected dosage at 55 h post injection. For long-term influence, a significant radiosensitized RT-induced volume loss was observed. Hence, cyclic RGD conjugation makes the GNP-based radiosensitizer tumor targeting, offering a new modality for enhancing radiotherapeutic efficacy. Additionally, the introduction of I-125 serves as both a therapeutic factor and a radiotracer for in vivo tracking of GNPs.

  12. Simulation on the molecular radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles in cells irradiated by x-rays.

    PubMed

    Xie, W Z; Friedland, W; Li, W B; Li, C Y; Oeh, U; Qiu, R; Li, J L; Hoeschen, C

    2015-08-21

    Abundant studies have focused on the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the cellular environment with x-ray irradiation. To better understand the physical foundation and to initially study the molecular radiosensitization effect within the nucleus, a simple cell model with detailed DNA structure in the central nucleus was set up and complemented with different distributions of single and multiple GNPs in this work. With the biophysical Monte Carlo simulation code PARTRAC, the radiosensitization effects on both physical quantities and primary biological responses (DNA strand breaks) were simulated. The ratios of results under situations with GNPs compared to those without GNPs were defined as the enhancement factors (EFs). The simulation results show that the presence of GNP can cause a notable enhancement effect on the energy deposition within a few micrometers from the border of GNP. The greatest upshot appears around the border and is mostly dominated by Auger electrons. The enhancement effect on the DNA strand breakage becomes smaller because of the DNA distribution inside the nucleus, and the corresponding EFs are between 1 and 1.5. In the present simulation, multiple GNPs on the nucleus surface, the 60 kVp x-ray spectrum and the diameter of 100 nm are relatively more effective conditions for both physical and biological radiosensitization effects. These results preliminarily indicate that GNP can be a good radiosensitizer in x-ray radiotherapy. Nevertheless, further biological responses (repair process, cell survival, etc) need to be studied to give more accurate evaluation and practical proposal on GNP's application in clinical treatment.

  13. Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wenshu; Lee Yijang; Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of {gamma}-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

  14. Simulation on the molecular radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles in cells irradiated by x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. Z.; Friedland, W.; Li, W. B.; Li, C. Y.; Oeh, U.; Qiu, R.; Li, J. L.; Hoeschen, C.

    2015-08-01

    Abundant studies have focused on the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in the cellular environment with x-ray irradiation. To better understand the physical foundation and to initially study the molecular radiosensitization effect within the nucleus, a simple cell model with detailed DNA structure in the central nucleus was set up and complemented with different distributions of single and multiple GNPs in this work. With the biophysical Monte Carlo simulation code PARTRAC, the radiosensitization effects on both physical quantities and primary biological responses (DNA strand breaks) were simulated. The ratios of results under situations with GNPs compared to those without GNPs were defined as the enhancement factors (EFs). The simulation results show that the presence of GNP can cause a notable enhancement effect on the energy deposition within a few micrometers from the border of GNP. The greatest upshot appears around the border and is mostly dominated by Auger electrons. The enhancement effect on the DNA strand breakage becomes smaller because of the DNA distribution inside the nucleus, and the corresponding EFs are between 1 and 1.5. In the present simulation, multiple GNPs on the nucleus surface, the 60 kVp x-ray spectrum and the diameter of 100 nm are relatively more effective conditions for both physical and biological radiosensitization effects. These results preliminarily indicate that GNP can be a good radiosensitizer in x-ray radiotherapy. Nevertheless, further biological responses (repair process, cell survival, etc) need to be studied to give more accurate evaluation and practical proposal on GNP’s application in clinical treatment.

  15. Garcinol, a Histone Acetyltransferase Inhibitor, Radiosensitizes Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Non-Homologous End Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Torikai, Kohta; Nakano, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), a major pathway used to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) generated by ionizing radiation (IR), requires chromatin remodeling at DSB sites through the acetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs). However, the effect of compounds with HAT inhibitory activities on the DNA damage response (DDR), including the NHEJ and cell cycle checkpoint, as well as on the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated whether garcinol, a HAT inhibitor found in the rinds of Garcinia indica fruit (called mangosteens), has effects on DDR, and whether it can be used for radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: The following assays were used to examine the effect of garcinol on the inhibition of DSB repair, including the following: a conventional neutral comet assay; a cell-based assay recently developed by us, in which NHEJ repair of DSBs on chromosomal DNA was evaluated; the micrococcal nuclease sensitivity assay; and immunoblotting for autophosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). We assessed the effect of garcinol on the cell cycle checkpoint after IR treatment by analyzing the phosphorylation levels of checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 and histone H3, and by cell cycle profile analysis using flow cytometry. The radiosensitizing effect of garcinol was assessed by a clonogenic survival assay, whereas its effects on apoptosis and senescence were examined by annexin V and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-Gal) staining, respectively. Results: We found that garcinol inhibits DSB repair, including NHEJ, without affecting cell cycle checkpoint. Garcinol radiosensitized A549 lung and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells with dose enhancement ratios (at 10% surviving fraction) of 1.6 and 1.5, respectively. Cellular senescence induced by IR was enhanced by garcinol. Conclusion: These results suggest that garcinol is a radiosensitizer that

  16. Rethinking evolutionary individuality

    PubMed Central

    Ereshefsky, Marc; Pedroso, Makmiller

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers whether multispecies biofilms are evolutionary individuals. Numerous multispecies biofilms have characteristics associated with individuality, such as internal integrity, division of labor, coordination among parts, and heritable adaptive traits. However, such multispecies biofilms often fail standard reproductive criteria for individuality: they lack reproductive bottlenecks, are comprised of multiple species, do not form unified reproductive lineages, and fail to have a significant division of reproductive labor among their parts. If such biofilms are good candidates for evolutionary individuals, then evolutionary individuality is achieved through other means than frequently cited reproductive processes. The case of multispecies biofilms suggests that standard reproductive requirements placed on individuality should be reconsidered. More generally, the case of multispecies biofilms indicates that accounts of individuality that focus on single-species eukaryotes are too restrictive and that a pluralistic and open-ended account of evolutionary individuality is needed. PMID:26039982

  17. First-Person Accounts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gribs, H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Personal accounts describe the lives of 2 individuals with deaf-blindness, one an 87-year-old woman who was deaf from birth and became totally blind over a 50-year period and the other of a woman who became deaf-blind as a result of a fever at the age of 7. Managing activities of daily life and experiencing sensory hallucinations are among topics…

  18. DNA double strand break repair inhibition as a cause of heat radiosensitization: re-evaluation considering backup pathways of NHEJ.

    PubMed

    Iliakis, George; Wu, Wenqi; Wang, Minli

    2008-02-01

    Heat shock is one of the most effective radiosensitizers known. As a result, combination of heat with ionizing radiation (IR) is considered a promising strategy in the management of human cancer. The mechanism of heat radiosensitization has been the subject of extensive work but a unifying mechanistic model is presently lacking. To understand the cause of excessive death in irradiated cells after heat exposure, it is necessary to characterize the lesion(s) underlying the effect and to determine which of the pathways processing this lesion are affected by heat. Since DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are the main cause for IR-induced cell death, inhibition of DSB processing has long been considered a major candidate for heat radiosensitization. However, effective radiosensitization of mutants with defects in homologous recombination repair (HRR), or in DNA-PK dependent non-homologous end joining (D-NHEJ), the two primary pathways of DSB repair, has led to the formulation of models excluding DSBs as a cause for this phenomenon and attributing heat radiosensitization to inhibition of base damage processing. Since direct evidence for a major role of base damage in heat radiosensitization, or in IR-induced killing for that matter, is scarce and new insights in DSB repair allow alternative interpretations of existing data with repair mutants, we attempt here a re-evaluation of the role of DSBs and their repair in heat radiosensitization. First, we reanalyse data obtained with various DSB repair mutants on first principles and in the light of the recent recognition that alternative pathways of NHEJ, operating as backup (B-NHEJ), substantially contribute to DSB repair and thus probably also to heat radiosensitization. Second, we review aspects of combined action of heat and radiation, such as modulation in the cell-cycle-dependent variation in radiosensitivity to killing, as well as heat radiosensitization as a function of LET, and examine whether the observed effects are

  19. [Individual response to ionising radiation: What predictive assay(s) to choose?].

    PubMed

    Granzotto, Adeline; Joubert, Aurélie; Viau, Muriel; Devic, Clément; Maalouf, Mira; Thomas, Charles; Vogin, Guillaume; Malek, Karim; Colin, Catherine; Balosso, Jacques; Foray, Nicolas

    2011-02-01

    Individual response to ionizing radiation is an important information required to apply an efficient radiotherapy treatment against tumour and to avoid any adverse effects in normal tissues. In 1981, Fertil and Malaise have demonstrated that the post-irradiation local tumor control determined in vivo is correlated with clonogenic cell survival assessed in vitro. Furthermore, these authors have reminded the relevance of the concept of intrinsic radiosensitivity that is specific to each individual organ (Fertil and Malaise, 1981) [1]. To date, since clonogenicity assays are too time-consuming and do not provide any other molecular information, a plethora of research groups have attempted to determine the molecular bases of intrinsic radiosensitivity in order to propose reliable and faster predictive assays. To this aim, several approaches have been developed. Notably, the recent revolution in genomic and proteomic technologies is providing a considerable number of data but their link with radiosensitivity still remains to be elucidated. On another hand, the systematic screening of some candidate genes potentially involved in the radiation response is highlighting the complexity of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of DNA damage sensoring and signalling and shows that an abnormal radiation response is not necessarily due to the impairment of one single protein. Finally, more modest approaches consisting in focusing some specific functions of DNA repair seem to provide more reliable clues to predict over-acute reactions caused by radiotherapy. In this review, we endeavoured to analyse the contributions of these major approaches to predict human radiosensitivity. PMID:21333944

  20. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  1. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  2. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  3. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  4. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  5. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  6. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  7. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  8. 32 CFR 310.25 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 310.25 Section 310.25....25 Disclosure accounting. (a) Disclosure accountings. (1) Keep an accurate record of all disclosures... accounting is required even if the individual has consented to the disclosure of the information....

  9. 14 CFR 152.305 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting records. 152.305 Section 152.305... AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.305 Accounting records. (a) Airport... individual project, an accounting record satisfactory to the Administrator which segregates cost...

  10. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps. PMID:27411781

  11. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps.

  12. A search for radiosensitive mouse mutants by use of the micronucleus technique.

    PubMed

    van Buul, P P; Tuinenburg-Bolraap, A; Searle, A G; Natarajan, A T

    1987-01-01

    In order to identify radiosensitive mutations in mice, 26 genetically well defined mutations in 26 different combinations of homozygous, hemizygous or heterozygous conditions, together with normal mice and mutagen-sensitive MS/Ae mice were analysed for the induction of micronuclei by X-rays in bone-marrow cells. For each mutant two doses of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, two sampling times of 18 and 27 h after irradiation and unirradiated controls were studied. Using our criteria, homozygous contrasted allele of steel (Slcon), scabby (scb), viable dominant spotting (Wv), quaking (qk), fidget (fi) and postaxial hemimelia (px), heterozygous lurcher (Lc), hemizygous gyro (Gy), the compounds Slcon/grizzle-belly (SlgbH) and Wv/rump-white (Rw) and MS/Ae mice, were regarded as radiosensitive, with Slcon/Slcon the highest in rank order. Homozygous wabbler-lethal (wl) and wasted (wst) showed hyposensitivity which for the latter may be connected with enhanced cell killing.

  13. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Maier, Patrick; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten

    2016-01-14

    During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  14. Radiosensitivity of chromosomes in two successive mitotic cycles of human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Luchnik, N.V.; Poryadkova, N.A.

    1988-11-01

    A culture of human lymphocytes was irradiated with /gamma/-quanta in a dose of 0.5 Gy with different ratios of cells in first (M1) and second (M2) mitotic cycle and the frequency of aberrations induced at stage G2 was analyzed. With increase in interval of time between the start of culturing and irradiation, total yield of aberrations increased in a regular way. However, if the M1:M2 ratio is considered, then it turns out that in M2 chromosomes are /approximately/1.5 times more sensitive than in M1: within the limits of each cycle, radiosensitivity is constant and does not depend on its duration. It was established in accordance with data of other authors that 5-bromodeoxyuridine (5-BdU) increases radiosensitivity materially.

  15. The High Radiosensitizing Efficiency of a Trace of Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dufort, Sandrine; Le Duc, Géraldine; Salomé, Murielle; Bentivegna, Valerie; Sancey, Lucie; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Requardt, Herwig; Lux, François; Coll, Jean-Luc; Perriat, Pascal; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed the synthesis of ultrasmall gadolinium-based nanoparticles (GBN), (hydrodynamic diameter <5 nm) characterized by a safe behavior after intravenous injection (renal clearance, preferential accumulation in tumors). Owing to the presence of gadolinium ions, GBN can be used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and as radiosensitizers. The attempt to determine the most opportune delay between the intravenous injection of GBN and the irradiation showed that a very low content of radiosensitizing nanoparticles in the tumor area is sufficient (0.1 μg/g of particles, i.e. 15 ppb of gadolinium) for an important increase of the therapeutic effect of irradiation. Such a promising and unexpected result is assigned to a suited distribution of GBN within the tumor, as revealed by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) maps. PMID:27411781

  16. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Patrick; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization. PMID:26784176

  17. Cytosine Deaminase/5-Fluorocytosine Exposure Induces Bystander and Radiosensitization Effects in Hypoxic Glioblastoma Cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jennifer K.; Hu, Lily J.; Wang Dongfang; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F. . E-mail: dennisdeen@juno.com

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is limited by therapeutic ratio; therefore, successful therapy must be specifically cytotoxic to cancer cells. Hypoxic cells are ubiquitous in GBM, and resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and, thus, are logical targets for gene therapy. In this study, we investigated whether cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) enzyme/prodrug treatment induced a bystander effect (BE) and/or radiosensitization in hypoxic GBM cells. Methods and Materials: We stably transfected cells with a gene construct consisting of the SV40 minimal promoter, nine copies of a hypoxia-responsive element, and the yeast CD gene. During hypoxia, a hypoxia-responsive element regulates expression of the CD gene and facilitates the conversion of 5-FC to 5-fluorouracil, a highly toxic antimetabolite. We used colony-forming efficiency (CFE) and immunofluorescence assays to assess for BE in co-cultures of CD-expressing clone cells and parent, pNeo- or green fluorescent protein-stably transfected GBM cells. We also investigated the radiosensitivity of CD clone cells treated with 5-FC under hypoxic conditions, and we used flow cytometry to investigate treatment-induced cell cycle changes. Results: Both a large BE and radiosensitization occurred in GBM cells under hypoxic conditions. The magnitude of the BE depended on the number of transfected cells producing CD, the functionality of the CD, the administered concentration of 5-FC, and the sensitivity of cell type to 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: Hypoxia-inducible CD/5-FC therapy in combination with radiation therapy shows both a pronounced BE and a radiosensitizing effect under hypoxic conditions.

  18. Histone deacetylase enzyme silencing using shRNAs enhances radiosensitivity of SW579 thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Jin, Tao; Dai, Xueming; Yan, Dongwang; Peng, Zhihai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to screen the enzymes that are associated with the radiosensitivity of SW579 thyroid cancer cells, and investigate whether radiation, combined with specific RNA interference on the screened enzymes, enhances radiosensitivity of SW579 thyroid cancer cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to analyze epigenetic enzyme expression changes before and after radiotherapy, and four enzymes, histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), HDAC2, HDAC4 and HDAC6 were screened. Western blot analysis was performed to analyze the change in HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC4 and HDAC6 protein expression following radiotherapy. Short hairpin RNA (ShRNA)-HDAC1, shRNA-HDAC2, shRNA-HDAC4 and shRNA-HDAC6 plasmids were constructed and SW579 cells were transfected with corresponding shRNA-HDACs. Reverse transcription-qPCR was used to detect whether downregulation of HDAC mRNAs had been effective. In addition, shRNA and shRNA negative control (NC) pools were established and transfected into the SW579 cells. The samples were divided into four groups; control, trichostatin A, shRNA pool and shRNA NC pool, to analyze the effective enhancement of specific shRNA on radiosensitivity in thyroid cancer cells. The morphological changes were observed in the SW579 cells, and the number of tumor cells decreased markedly in the shRNA pool group compared with that of the other three groups. Therefore, it was concluded that HDACs present a potential target for increasing the sensitivity of thyroid cancer cells to radiotherapy, and shRNA-HDAC interference combined with radiotherapy promotes the radiosensitivity of tumors. PMID:27600599

  19. Targeting radiosensitizers to DNA by attachment of an intercalating group: Nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridines

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, D.S.; Panicucci, R.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M. )

    1991-07-01

    The nitroimidazole-linked phenanthridine series of compounds (NLP-1, 2, and 3) were synthesized under the assumption that it should be possible to enhance the molar efficiency of 2-nitroimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and cytotoxins by targeting them to their likely site of action, DNA. The targeting group chosen was the phenanthridine moiety, the major component of the classical DNA intercalating compound, ethidium bromide. The sole difference between the compounds is the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the nitroimidazole to the phenanthridine. The phenanthridine group with a three-carbon side chain, P-1, was also synthesized to allow studies on the effect of the targeting group by itself. The ability of the compounds to bind to DNA is inversely proportional to their linker chain length with binding constant values ranging from approximately 1 {times} 10(5) mol-1 for NLP-2 to 6 {times} 10(5) mol-1 for NLP-3. The NLP compounds show selective toxicity to hypoxic cells at 37 degrees C at external drug concentrations 10-40 times lower than would be required for untargeted 2-nitroimidazoles such as misonidazole in vitro. Toxicity to both hypoxic and aerobic cells is dependent on the linker chain: the shorter the chain, the greater the toxicity. In addition, the NLP compounds radiosensitize hypoxic cells at external drug concentrations as low as 0.05 mM with almost the full oxygen effect being observed at a concentration of 0.5 mM. These concentrations are 10-100 times lower than would be required for similar radiosensitization using misonidazole. Radiosensitizing ability is independent of linker chain length. The present compounds represent prototypes for further studies of the efficacy and mechanism of action of 2-nitroimidazoles targeted to DNA by linkage to an intercalating group.

  20. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and γH2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  1. Rosiglitazone enhances the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Shu-Jun; Hsaio, Ching-Hui; Tseng, Ho-Hsing; Su, Yu-Han; Shih, Wen-Ling; Lee, Jeng-Woei; Chuah, Jennifer Qiu-Yu

    2010-04-09

    Combined-modality treatment has improved the outcome in cases of various solid tumors, and radiosensitizers are used to enhance the radiotherapeutic efficiency. Rosiglitazone, a synthetic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {gamma} used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce tumor growth and metastasis in human cancer cells, and may have the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer in radiotherapy for human colorectal cancer cells. In this study, rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of p53-wild type HCT116 cells but not p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Interestingly, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiosensitivity in p53-mutant HT-29 cells but not HCT116 cells, and prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and enhanced radiation-induced cell growth inhibition in HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with rosiglitazone also suppressed radiation-induced H2AX phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and AKT activation for cell survival; on the contrary, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiation-induced caspase-8, -9, and -3 activation and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells. In addition, pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk, attenuated the levels of caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in radiation-exposed cancer cells in combination with rosiglitazone pretreatment. Our results provide proof for the first time that rosiglitazone suppresses radiation-induced survival signals and DNA damage response, and enhances the radiation-induced apoptosis signaling cascade. These findings can assist in the development of rosiglitazone as a novel radiosensitizer.

  2. Radiosensitivity of human squamous carcinoma cell lines is associated with amount of spontaneous DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Polischouk, A G; Grénman, R; Granath, F; Lewensohn, R

    2001-01-01

    We asked whether the constitutive level of DNA strand breaks (SBs) in four human squamous carcinoma cell lines is associated with their radiosensitivity, measured by the clonogenic assay. Because impairment in DNA replication and the action of endogenous deoxyribonucleases are two major sources of DNA strand breaks under normal cell metabolism, we also analyzed DNA polymerase and DNA ligase activities as well as the functional status of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and nucleolytic degradation of genomic DNA. We showed that the two relatively radioresistant cell lines, UM-SCC-1 and UT-SCC-5, had a statistically significant lower constitutive level of DNA SBs, as measured by DNA precipitation technique, compared with the two relatively radiosensitive cell lines, UM-SCC-14A and UT-SCC-9. We found that cell lines with a higher level of broken DNA tended to have a higher constitutive level of DNA polymerase alpha activity, measured by incorporation of [(3)H]dTTP in DNase I-activated DNA. UM-SCC-1, UT-SCC-5, and UM-SCC-14A did not show any difference in DNA ligase activity when a nicked oligonucleotide was used as substrate. The most radiosensitive cell line, UT-SCC-9, had a significantly lower ligation efficiency compared to the other three cell lines. The functional status of the PARP was the same in the four cell lines. Although none of the four cell lines showed a characteristic apoptotic or necrotic degradation of genomic DNA, when tested with the "plasmid rejoining assay," a significant degradation of the plasmid DNA in UT-SCC-9 was detected. We conclude that the high fraction of DNA SBs for UT-SCC-9, the most radiosensitive cell line, is most likely a consequence of low ligation efficiency combined with a relatively high DNA polymerase alpha activity and the nuclease degradation of DNA. PMID:11992385

  3. Cell-Specific Radiosensitization by Gold Nanoparticles at Megavoltage Radiation Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Suneil; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Muir, Mark F.; Dickson, Glenn R.; Prise, Kevin M.; Currell, Fred J.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hirst, David G.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to cause sensitization with kilovoltage (kV) radiation. Differences in the absorption coefficient between gold and soft tissue, as a function of photon energy, predict that maximum enhancement should occur in the kilovoltage (kV) range, with almost no enhancement at megavoltage (MV) energies. Recent studies have shown that GNPs are not biologically inert, causing oxidative stress and even cell death, suggesting a possible biological mechanism for sensitization. The purpose of this study was to assess GNP radiosensitization at clinically relevant MV X-ray energies. Methods and Materials: Cellular uptake, intracellular localization, and cytotoxicity of GNPs were assessed in normal L132, prostate cancer DU145, and breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Radiosensitization was measured by clonogenic survival at kV and MV photon energies and MV electron energies. Intracellular DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction and DNA repair were determined and GNP chemosensitization was assessed using the radiomimetic agent bleomycin. Results: GNP uptake occurred in all cell lines and was greatest in MDA-MB-231 cells with nanoparticles accumulating in cytoplasmic lysosomes. In MDA-MB-231 cells, radiation sensitizer enhancement ratios (SERs) of 1.41, 1.29, and 1.16 were achieved using 160 kVp, 6 MV, and 15 MV X-ray energies, respectively. No significant effect was observed in L132 or DU145 cells at kV or MV energies (SER 0.97-1.08). GNP exposure did not increase radiation-induced DSB formation or inhibit DNA repair; however, GNP chemosensitization was observed in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with bleomycin (SER 1.38). Conclusions: We have demonstrated radiosensitization in MDA-MB-231 cells at MV X-ray energies. The sensitization was cell-specific with comparable effects at kV and MV energies, no increase in DSB formation, and GNP chemopotentiation with bleomycin, suggesting a possible biological mechanism of radiosensitization.

  4. Differential Radiosensitizing Potential of Temozolomide in MGMT Promoter Methylated Glioblastoma Multiforme Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nifterik, Krista A. van; Berg, Jaap van den; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lafleur, M. Vincent M.; Leenstra, Sieger; Slotman, Ben J.; Hulsebos, Theo J.M.; Sminia, Peter

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the radiosensitizing potential of temozolomide (TMZ) for human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines using single-dose and fractionated {gamma}-irradiation. Methods and Materials: Three genetically characterized human GBM cell lines (AMC-3046, VU-109, and VU-122) were exposed to various single (0-6 Gy) and daily fractionated doses (2 Gy per fraction) of {gamma}-irradiation. Repeated TMZ doses were given before and concurrent with irradiation treatment. Immediately plated clonogenic cell-survival curves were determined for both the single-dose and the fractionated irradiation experiments. To establish the net effect of clonogenic cell survival and cell proliferation, growth curves were determined, expressed as the number of surviving cells. Results: All three cell lines showed MGMT promoter methylation, lacked MGMT protein expression, and were sensitive to TMZ. The isotoxic TMZ concentrations used were in a clinically feasible range of 10 {mu}mol/L (AMC-3046), 3 {mu}mol/L (VU-109), and 2.5 {mu}mol/L (VU-122). Temozolomide was able to radiosensitize two cell lines (AMC 3046 and VU-122) using single-dose irradiation. A reduction in the number of surviving cells after treatment with the combination of TMZ and fractionated irradiation was seen in all three cell lines, but only AMC 3046 showed a radiosensitizing effect. Conclusions: This study on TMZ-sensitive GBM cell lines shows that TMZ can act as a radiosensitizer and is at least additive to {gamma}-irradiation. Enhancement of the radiation response by TMZ seems to be independent of the epigenetically silenced MGMT gen000.

  5. Effects of halogen substitution on Watson-Crick base pairing: a possible mechanism for radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Heshmati, Emran; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Mozdarani, Hossein; Sarvestani, Amir Sabet

    2009-09-01

    The halogen substituent effect on geometries and charge distributions of the A-T base pair derivatives was evaluated using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-31G* level. The results indicate that all of the substitutions affect geometries and charge distributions of the atoms contributing hydrogen bonds. These changes would be the reason of the radiosensitization of these compounds incorporating DNA. PMID:19643605

  6. HAP1 gene expression is associated with radiosensitivity in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Jun-ying; Yin, Li; Wu, Jian-zhong; Guo, Wen-jie; Wu, Jian-feng; Chen, Meng; Xia, You-you; Tang, Jin-hai; Ma, Yong-chao; He, Xia

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Overexpression of HAP1 gene promotes apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. • HAP1 reduces tumor volume in nude mice xenograft models after irradiation. • HAP1 increases radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells in vitro and vivo. - Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between huntingtin-associated protein1 (HAP1) gene and radiation therapy of breast cancer cells. Methods: HAP1 gene was transfected into breast cancer MCF-7 cells, which was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis (qRT-PCR) and Western blot in vitro. The changes of cell radiosensitivity were assessed by colony formation assay. Apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. The expressions of two radiation-induced genes were evaluated by Western blot. Tumor growth was investigated in nude mice xenograft models in vivo. Results: Our data showed that HAP1 gene expression was significantly increased in HAP1-transfected MCF-7 cells in comparison with the parental cells or negative control cells. The survival rate in MCF-7/HAP1 cells was significantly decreased after irradiation (0, 2, 4, 6, 8 Gy), compared to cells in MCF-7 and MCF-7/Pb groups in vitro. HAP1 gene increased apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after irradiation. Additionally, the tumor volume and weight in MCF-7/HAP1 + RT group were observably lower than in MCF-7/HAP1 group and MCF-7/Pb + RT group. Conclusion: The present study indicated that HAP1 gene expression was related to the radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells and may play an important role in the regulation of cellular radiosensitivity.

  7. Metronidazole as a radiosensitizer: a preliminary report on estimation in serum and saliva

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, A.B.M.F.; Faber, D.B.; Haas, R.E.; Hoekstra, F.H.; Njo, K.H.

    1980-09-01

    Some studies indicate the clinical benefit of hypoxic radiosensitizers in patients who are undergoing radiotherapy. Serum level of sensitizers are usualy advised; however they are very demanding on the patient. Saliva level of the sensitizers may be an alternative method. This study correlated serum level of metronidazole to the saliva level in 10 patients who were undergoing radiotherapy with the sensitizer. A change to the saliva level method appears to relieve the patients.

  8. Radiosensitizing effect of zinc oxide and silica nanocomposites on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Generalov, Roman; Kuan, Woo Boon; Chen, Wei; Kristensen, Solveig; Juzenas, Petras

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticulates responsive to X-rays offer increased efficacy of radiation therapy. However, successful demonstrations of such nanoparticle use are limited so far due to lack of significant radiosensitizing effects or poor nanoparticle stability in a biological system. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is the most promising biocompatible material for medicinal applications. In this paper, we report preparation and characterization of scintillating ZnO/SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles. The ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles absorb ultraviolet (UV) radiation (below 360nm) and emit green fluorescence (400-750nm, maximum 550nm). Under X-ray irradiation (200kVp), the nanoparticles scintillate emitting luminescence in the region 350-700nm (maximum 420nm). The synthesized ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles are stable in a biologically relevant environment (water and cell growth medium). The potential of the ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles for radiosensitization is demonstrated in human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines (LNCaP and Du145). The nanoparticles enhance radiation-induced reduction in cell survival about 2-fold for LNCaP and 1.5-fold for Du145 cells. Radiosensitizing effect can be attributed to X-ray-induced radiocatalysis by the nanoparticles. PMID:25829130

  9. Improving the Presage® polymer radiosensitivity for hot cell and glovebox 3D characterization.

    PubMed

    Adamovics, John; Farfán, Eduardo B; Coleman, J Rusty

    2013-01-01

    RadBall is a novel, passive, radiation detection device that provides 3D mapping of radiation from areas where measurements have not been possible previously due to lack of access or extremely high radiation doses. This kind of technology is beneficial when decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities occur. The key components of the RadBall technology include a tungsten outer shell that houses a radiosensitive PRESAGE polymer. The 1.0-cm-thick tungsten shell has a number of holes that allow photons to reach the polymer, thus generating radiation tracks that are analyzed to characterize the radiation sources within the contaminated area being considered. Facilities being mapped frequently have to be shut down to minimize radiation exposures to workers; therefore, reducing the mapping or characterization time is significant. The objective of this study was to reduce the RadBall deployment time by increasing the radiosensitivity of the PRESAGE formulation. The new formulation is four times more radiosensitive than the original formulation. Consequently, RadBall deployment times can be reduced fourfold, which is a considerable improvement.

  10. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine increase the radiosensitivity of human esophageal squamous cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan; Wang, Cong; Guan, Shanghui; Liu, Yuan; Han, Lihui; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase is a type of reverse transcriptase that is overexpressed in almost all human tumor cells, but not in normal tissues, which provides an opportunity for radiosensitization targeting telomerase. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine are reverse transcriptase inhibitors that have been applied in clinical practice for several years. We sought to explore the radiosensitization effect of these three drugs on human esophageal cancer cell lines. Eca109 and Eca9706 cells were treated with zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine for 48 h before irradiation was administered. Samples were collected 1 h after irradiation. Clonal efficiency assay was used to evaluate the effect of the combination of these drugs with radiation doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy. DNA damage was measured by comet assay. Telomerase activity (TA) and relative telomere length (TL) were detected and evaluated by real-time PCR. Apoptosis rates were assessed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that all the drugs tested sensitized the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines to radiation through an increase in radiation-induced DNA damage and cell apoptosis, deregulation of TA and decreasing the shortened TL caused by radiation. Each of the drugs investigated (zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine) could be used for sensitizing human esophageal cancer cell lines to radiation. Consequently, the present study supports the potential of these three drugs as therapeutic agents for the radiosensitization of esophageal squamous cell cancer. PMID:27220342

  11. Fundamental mechanisms of DNA radiosensitization: damage induced by low-energy electrons in brominated oligonucleotide trimers.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeunsoo; Polska, Katarzyna; Rak, Janusz; Wagner, J Richard; Sanche, Léon

    2012-08-16

    The replacement of nucleobases with brominated analogs enhances DNA radiosensitivity. We examine the chemistry of low-energy electrons (LEEs) in this sensitization process by experiments with thin films of the oligonucleotide trimers TBrXT, where BrX = 5-BrU (5-bromouracil), 5-BrC (5-bromocytosine), 8-BrA (8-bromoadenine), or 8-BrG (8-bromoguanine). The products induced from irradiation of thin (∼ 2.5 nm) oligonucleotide films, with 10 eV electrons, under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) are analyzed by HPLC-UV. The number of damaged brominated trimers ranges from about 12 to 15 × 10(-3) molecules per incident electron, whereas under the identical conditions, these numbers drop to 4-7 × 10(-3) for the same, but nonbrominated oligonucleotides. The results of HPLC analysis show that the main degradation pathway of trinucleotides containing brominated bases involve debromination (i.e., loss of the bromine atom and its replacement with a hydrogen atom). The electron-induced sum of products upon bromination increases by factors of 2.1 for the pyrimidines and 3.2 for the purines. Thus, substitution of any native nucleobase with a brominated one in simple models of DNA increases LEE-induced damage to DNA and hence its radiosensitivity. Furthermore, besides the brominated pyrimidines that have already been tested in clinical trials, brominated purines not only appear to be promising sensitizers for radiotherapy, but could provide a higher degree of radiosensitization.

  12. Improving the Presage® polymer radiosensitivity for hot cell and glovebox 3D characterization.

    PubMed

    Adamovics, John; Farfán, Eduardo B; Coleman, J Rusty

    2013-01-01

    RadBall is a novel, passive, radiation detection device that provides 3D mapping of radiation from areas where measurements have not been possible previously due to lack of access or extremely high radiation doses. This kind of technology is beneficial when decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear facilities occur. The key components of the RadBall technology include a tungsten outer shell that houses a radiosensitive PRESAGE polymer. The 1.0-cm-thick tungsten shell has a number of holes that allow photons to reach the polymer, thus generating radiation tracks that are analyzed to characterize the radiation sources within the contaminated area being considered. Facilities being mapped frequently have to be shut down to minimize radiation exposures to workers; therefore, reducing the mapping or characterization time is significant. The objective of this study was to reduce the RadBall deployment time by increasing the radiosensitivity of the PRESAGE formulation. The new formulation is four times more radiosensitive than the original formulation. Consequently, RadBall deployment times can be reduced fourfold, which is a considerable improvement. PMID:23192088

  13. Lin28-let7 Modulates Radiosensitivity of Human Cancer Cells With Activation of K-Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jee-Sun.; Kim, Jae-Jin; Byun, Ju-Yeon; Kim, In-Ah

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of targeting Lin28-let7 microRNA regulatory network for overcoming the radioresistance of cancer cells having activated K-Ras signaling. Methods and Materials: A549 lung carcinoma cells and ASPC1 pancreatic cancer cells possessing K-RAS mutation were transfected with pre-let7a microRNA or Lin28 siRNA, respectively. Clonogenic assay, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western analysis were performed. The effects of Lin28 on SQ20B cells having wild-type K-RAS, and a normal fibroblast were also assessed. Results: The overexpression of let-7a decreased expression of K-Ras and radiosensitized A549 cells. Inhibition of Lin28, a repressor of let-7, attenuated K-Ras expression and radiosensitized A549 and ASPC1 cells. Neither SQ20B cells expressing wild-type K-RAS nor HDF, the normal human fibroblasts, were radiosensitized by this approach. Conclusions: The Lin28-let7 regulatory network may be a potentially useful therapeutic target for overcoming the radioresistance of human cancers having activated K-Ras signaling.

  14. Effect of Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides Glucose Transporter-1 on Enhancement of Radiosensitivity of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sen-Xiang; Luo, Xing-Mei; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Bao, Yang-Yang; Fan, Jun; Lu, Zhong-Jie; Liao, Xin-Biao; Huang, Ya-Ping; Wu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Qin-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Laryngeal carcinomas always resist to radiotherapy. Hypoxia is an important factor in radioresistance of laryngeal carcinoma. Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) is considered to be a possible intrinsic marker of hypoxia in malignant tumors. We speculated that the inhibition of GLUT-1 expression might improve the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma. Methods: We assessed the effect of GLUT-1 expression on radioresistance of laryngeal carcinoma and the effect of GLUT-1 expressions by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) on the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Results: After transfection of GLUT-1 AS-ODNs: MTS assay showed the survival rates of radiation groups were reduced with the prolongation of culture time (p<0.05); Cell survival rates were significantly reduced along with the increasing of radiation dose (p<0.05). There was significant difference in the expression of GLUT-1mRNA and protein in the same X-ray dose between before and after X-ray radiation (p<0.05). In vivo, the expressions of GLUT-1 mRNA and protein after 8Gy radiation plus transfection of GLUT-1 AS-ODNs were significant decreased compared to 8Gy radiation alone (p<0.001). Conclusion: Radioresistance of laryngeal carcinoma may be associated with increased expression of GLUT-1 mRNA and protein. GLUT-1 AS-ODNs may enhance the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma mainly by inhibiting the expression of GLUT-1. PMID:23983599

  15. Novel chemical enhancers of heat shock increase thermal radiosensitization through a mitotic catastrophe pathway.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Konjeti R; Sonar, Vijayakumar N; Muthusamy, Venkatraj; Sasi, Soumya; Laszlo, Andrei; Sawani, Jamil; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Bristow, Robert G; Borrelli, Michael J; Crooks, Peter A; Lepock, James R; Roti Roti, Joseph L; Freeman, Michael L

    2007-01-15

    Radiation therapy combined with adjuvant hyperthermia has the potential to provide outstanding local-regional control for refractory disease. However, achieving therapeutic thermal dose can be problematic. In the current investigation, we used a chemistry-driven approach with the goal of designing and synthesizing novel small molecules that could function as thermal radiosensitizers. (Z)-(+/-)-2-(1-Benzenesulfonylindol-3-ylmethylene)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octan-3-ol was identified as a compound that could lower the threshold for Hsf1 activation and thermal sensitivity. Enhanced thermal sensitivity was associated with significant thermal radiosensitization. We established the structural requirements for activity: the presence of an N-benzenesulfonylindole or N-benzylindole moiety linked at the indolic 3-position to a 2-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octan-3-ol) or 2-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octan-3-one) moiety. These small molecules functioned by exploiting the underlying biophysical events responsible for thermal sensitization. Thermal radiosensitization was characterized biochemically and found to include loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, followed by mitotic catastrophe. These studies identified a novel series of small molecules that represent a promising tool for the treatment of recurrent tumors by ionizing radiation.

  16. Radiosensitizing and toxic effects of RSU-1069 on hypoxic cells in a murine tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Chaplin, D.J.; Durand, R.E.; Stratford, I.J.; Jenkins, T.C.

    1986-07-01

    RSU-1069 is one of a group of compounds of particular interest in radiobiology, since it combines the nitroimidazole ring with a side chain bearing a monofunctional alkylating agent. This compound has been shown to be a potent radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, it has recently been shown to be an effective hypoxic cell cytotoxin in vitro. Our studies have been carried out using the SCCVII squamous carcinoma implanted subcutaneously in C/sub 3/H mice, using a technique we recently developed which facilitates isolation of tumor cell subpopulations from known locations relative to the tumor blood supply. The response of the separated tumor subpopulations was assessed using a soft agar clonogenic assay. For radiosensitization studies, RSU-1069 was administered i.p. at 0.5 mumol/g 20 min before irradiation and the tumors excised 20 min after irradiation. For toxicity studies, tumors were excised 16-18 hr after RSU-1069 administration. The results obtained to date clearly demonstrate that RSU-1069 is an efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and cytotoxin in this murine tumor and has little effect on well perfused (i.e., oxic) cells.

  17. Radiosensitization by SAHA in Experimental Colorectal Carcinoma Models-In Vivo Effects and Relevance of Histone Acetylation Status

    SciTech Connect

    Folkvord, Sigurd; Ree, Anne Hansen; Furre, Torbjorn; Halvorsen, Thomas; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors are being evaluated as antitumor agents in ongoing clinical trials, and promising preclinical results, combined with favorable toxicity profiles, have rendered the drugs as interesting candidates for combination with other treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radiosensitizing properties of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and the possible requirement of histone hyperacetylation at radiation exposure. Methods and materials: Radiosensitization by SAHA was assessed in a colorectal carcinoma cell line and in two colorectal xenograft models by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Histone acetylation status at radiation exposure was evaluated by Western blot. Results: In vitro, radiosensitization was demonstrated when cells were preincubated with SAHA, and, in the xenografts, tumor growth was delayed when the mice were treated with fractionated radiation combined with daily SAHA injections compared with radiation alone. Surprisingly, the SAHA-dependent growth delay was still present when radiation was delivered at restored baseline acetylation levels compared with maximal histone hyperacetylation. Conclusion: SAHA was an effective radiosensitizer in experimental colorectal carcinoma models, suggesting that histone deacetylase inhibition might constitute a valuable supplement to current multimodal treatment strategies in rectal cancer. The presence of histone hyperacetylation at radiation was not required to obtain an increased radiation response, questioning the validity of using histone hyperacetylation as a molecular marker for radiosensitivity.

  18. Increased Chromosomal Radiosensitivity in Women Carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutations Assessed With the G2 Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ernestos, Beroukas; Nikolaos, Pandis; Koulis, Giannoukakos; Eleni, Rizou; Konstantinos, Beroukas; Alexandra, Giatromanolaki; Michael, Koukourakis

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Several in vitro studies suggest that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers present increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Different assays for the assessment of deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand break repair capacity have been used, but results are rather inconsistent. Given the concerns about the possible risks of breast screening with mammography in mutation carrier women and the potentially damaging effects of radiotherapy, the purpose of this study was to further investigate the radiosensitivity of this population. Methods and Materials: The G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assay was used to assess chromosomal breaks in lymphocyte cultures after exposure to 1 Gy. A group of familiar breast cancer patients carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene (n = 15) and a group of healthy mutation carriers (n = 5) were investigated and compared with a reference group of healthy women carrying no mutation (n = 21). Results: BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had a significantly higher number of mean chromatid breaks per cell (p = 0.006) and a higher maximum number of breaks (p = 0.0001) as compared with their matched controls. Both healthy carriers and carriers with a cancer history were more radiosensitive than controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.025, respectively). Age was not associated with increased radiosensitivity (p = 0.868). Conclusions: Our results indicate that BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers show enhanced radiosensitivity, presumably because of the involvement of the BRCA genes in deoxyribonucleic acid repair and cell cycle control mechanisms.

  19. Social Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornille, Thomas A.; Harrigan, John

    Relationships between individuals and society have often been presented from the perspective of the social institution. Social psychology has addressed the variables that affect the individual in relationships with larger groups. Social individualism is a conceptual framework that explores the relationship of the individual and society from the…

  20. Assessment of the radiosensitivity of ataxia-telangiectasia heterozygotes

    SciTech Connect

    Arlett, C.F.; Priestley, A.

    1985-01-01

    Heterozygotes of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) can, in certain parts of the world, represent a significant proportion of the population. Epidemiological studies suggest that they are more cancer prone than normal individuals. Fibroblasts of five AT heterozygotes are significantly more sensitive to gamma irradiation (mean D0 = 1.18 Gy) than five normals (mean D0 = 1.49 Gy) although some overlap in response is observed. Experiments designed to maximize differences in survival by allowing a period for the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD) showed that only one out of five AT heterozygotes was defective in the repair of PLD. This technique does not, therefore, permit an improved discrimination of AT heterozygotes. Two AT heterozygotes were tested for their ability to repair lesions that give rise to micronuclei. Both, like the homozygote, were seen to be defective in this capacity. Defects in the repair of chromosome damage may permit a cellular discrimination of the heterozygotes.

  1. Adenoviral Transduction of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase into Neo-Angiogenic Endothelium Radiosensitizes Tumor Cure

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, John D.; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; García-Barros, Mónica; Feldman, Regina; Rao, Shyam; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Harats, Dror; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Sadelain, Michel; Kolesnick, Richard

    2013-01-01

    These studies define a new mechanism-based approach to radiosensitize tumor cure by single dose radiotherapy (SDRT). Published evidence indicates that SDRT induces acute microvascular endothelial apoptosis initiated via acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) translocation to the external plasma membrane. Ensuing microvascular damage regulates radiation lethality of tumor stem cell clonogens to effect tumor cure. Based on this biology, we engineered an ASMase-producing vector consisting of a modified pre-proendothelin-1 promoter, PPE1(3x), and a hypoxia-inducible dual-binding HIF-2α-Ets-1 enhancer element upstream of the asmase gene, inserted into a replication-deficient adenovirus yielding the vector Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x)-ASMase. This vector confers ASMase over-expression in cycling angiogenic endothelium in vitro and within tumors in vivo, with no detectable enhancement in endothelium of normal tissues that exhibit a minute fraction of cycling cells or in non-endothelial tumor or normal tissue cells. Intravenous pretreatment with Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x)-ASMase markedly increases SDRT cure of inherently radiosensitive MCA/129 fibrosarcomas, and converts radiation-incurable B16 melanomas into biopsy-proven tumor cures. In contrast, Ad5H2E-PPE1(3x)-ASMase treatment did not impact radiation damage to small intestinal crypts as non-dividing small intestinal microvessels did not overexpress ASMase and were not radiosensitized. We posit that combination of genetic up-regulation of tumor microvascular ASMase and SDRT provides therapeutic options for currently radiation-incurable human tumors. PMID:23936314

  2. Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Etsuko ); Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta )

    1994-06-15

    In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions [times] three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions [times] five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Increased radiosensitivity of colorectal tumors with intra-tumoral injection of low dose of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Minghan; Paquette, Benoit; Thippayamontri, Thititip; Gendron, Louis; Guérin, Brigitte; Sanche, Léon

    2016-01-01

    The potential of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as radiosensitizers for the treatment of malignant tumors has been limited by the large quantities of GNPs that must be administered and the requirement for low-energy X-ray irradiation to optimize radiosensitization. In this study, we enhance the radiosensitivity of HCT116 human colorectal cells with tiopronin-coated GNPs (Tio-GNPs) combined with a low-energy X-ray (26 keV effective energy) source, similar to the Papillon 50 clinical irradiator used for topical irradiation of rectal tumors. Sensitizer enhancement ratios of 1.48 and 1.69 were measured in vitro, when the HCT116 cells were incubated with 0.1 mg/mL and 0.25 mg/mL of Tio-GNPs, respectively. In nude mice bearing the HCT116 tumor, intra-tumoral (IT) injection of Tio-GNPs allowed a 94 times higher quantity of Tio-GNPs to accumulate than was possible by intravenous injection and facilitated a significant tumor response. The time following irradiation, for tumors growing to four times their initial tumor volume (4Td) was 54 days for the IT injection of 366.3 μg of Tio-GNPs plus 10 Gy, compared to 37 days with radiation alone (P=0.0018). Conversely, no significant improvement was obtained when GNPs were injected intravenously before tumor irradiation (P=0.6547). In conclusion, IT injection of Tio-GNPs combined with low-energy X-rays can significantly reduce the growth of colorectal tumors. PMID:27789945

  4. Comparison of the radiosensitivities of neurons and glial cells derived from the same rat brain

    PubMed Central

    KUDO, SHIGEHIRO; SUZUKI, YOSHIYUKI; NODA, SHIN-EI; MIZUI, TOSHIYUKI; SHIRAI, KATSUYUKI; OKAMOTO, MASAHIKO; KAMINUMA, TAKUYA; YOSHIDA, YUKARI; SHIRAO, TOMOAKI; NAKANO, TAKASHI

    2014-01-01

    Non-proliferating cells, such as mature neurons, are generally believed to be more resistant to X-rays than proliferating cells, such as glial and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, the late adverse effects of radiotherapy on the brain have been attributed to the radiation-induced damage of glial and vascular endothelial cells. However, little is known about the radiosensitivities of neurons and glial cells due to difficulties in culturing these cells, particularly neurons, independently. In the present study, primary dissociated neurons and glial cultures were prepared separately from the hippocampi and cerebrum, respectively, which had been obtained from the same fetal rat on embryonic day 18. X-irradiations of 50 Gy were performed on the cultured neurons and glial cells at 7 and 21 days in vitro (DIV). The cells were fixed at 24 h after irradiation. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling was then performed to measure the apoptotic indices (AIs). The AIs of non-irradiated and irradiated neurons at 7 DIV were 23.7±6.7 and 64.9±4.8%, and those at 21 DIV were 52.1±17.4 and 44.6±12.5%, respectively. The AIs of non-irradiated and irradiated glial cells at 7 DIV were 5.8±1.5 and 78.4±3.3% and those at 21 DIV were 9.6±2.6 and 86.3±4.9%, respectively. Glial cells and neurons were radiosensitive at 7 DIV. However, while glial cells were radiosensitive at 21 DIV, neurons were not. PMID:25120594

  5. Replication-Dependent Radiosensitization of Human Glioma Cells by Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dungey, Fiona A.; Loeser, Dana A.; Chalmers, Anthony J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Current treatments for glioblastoma multiforme are inadequate and limited by the radiation sensitivity of normal brain. Because glioblastoma multiforme are rapidly proliferating tumors within nondividing normal tissue, the therapeutic ratio might be enhanced by combining radiotherapy with a replication-specific radiosensitizer. KU-0059436 (AZD2281) is a potent and nontoxic inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) undergoing a Phase II clinical trial as a single agent. Methods and Materials: Based on previous observations that the radiosensitizing effects of PARP inhibition are more pronounced in dividing cells, we investigated the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization of human glioma cells by KU-0059436, evaluating the replication dependence of this effect and its therapeutic potential. Results: KU-0059436 increased the radiosensitivity of four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, and U87-MG). Radiosensitization was enhanced in populations synchronized in S phase and abrogated by concomitant exposure to aphidicolin. Sensitization was further enhanced when the inhibitor was combined with a fractionated radiation schedule. KU-0059436 delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks and was associated with a replication-dependent increase in {gamma}H2AX and Rad51 foci. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that KU-0059436 increases radiosensitivity in a replication-dependent manner that is enhanced by fractionation. A mechanism is proposed whereby PARP inhibition increases the incidence of collapsed replication forks after ionizing radiation, generating persistent DNA double-strand breaks. These observations indicate that KU-0059436 is likely to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by radiotherapy in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. A Phase I clinical trial is in development.

  6. Targeting BRG1 chromatin remodeler via its bromodomain for enhanced tumor cell radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Su-Jung; Lee, Seul-Ki; Na, Juri; Lee, Shin-Ai; Lee, Han-Sae; Park, Ji-Hye; Chung, June-Key; Youn, Hyewon; Kwon, Jongbum

    2015-02-01

    Radiotherapy treats cancer by inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) in tumor cells using ionizing radiation. However, DNA repair in tumor cells often leads to radioresistance and unsuccessful outcome. Inhibition of DNA repair by targeting repair proteins can increase radiosensitivity of tumor cells. The BRG1 chromatin remodeling enzyme assists DSB repair by stimulating γ-H2AX formation and BRG1 binding to acetylated histones at DSBs via bromodomain (BRD) is critical for this activity. Here, we show that ectopic expression of BRG1-BRD inhibited γ-H2AX and DSB repair after irradiation and increased the radiosensitivity in various human cancer cells, including HT29 colon cancer. Dimerization of BRG1-BRD, increasing its chromatin binding affinity, aggravated the defects in γ-H2AX and DSB repair and further enhanced the radiosensitivity. While little affecting the upstream ATM activation, BRG1-BRD in irradiated HT29 cells inhibited the recruitment of 53BP1 to damaged chromatin, the downstream event of γ-H2AX, and compromised the G2-M checkpoint and increased apoptosis. Importantly, in a xenograft mouse model, BRG1-BRD increased the radiosensitivity of HT29 tumors, which was further enhanced by dimerization. These data suggest that BRG1-BRD radiosensitizes tumor cells by a dominant negative activity against BRG1, which disrupts γ-H2AX and its downstream 53BP1 pathways, leading to inefficient DNA repair, G2-M checkpoint defect, and increased apoptosis. This work therefore identifies BRG1-BRD as a novel tumor radiosensitizer and its action mechanism, providing the first example of chromatin remodeler as a target for improving cancer radiotherapy. PMID:25504753

  7. Identification of Novel Radiosensitizers in a High-Throughput, Cell-Based Screen for DSB Repair Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Goglia, Alexander G.; Delsite, Robert; Luz, Antonio N.; Shahbazian, David; Salem, Ahmed F.; Sundaram, Ranjini K.; Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Hendrikx, Petrus J.; Wilshire, Jennifer A.; Jasin, Maria; Kluger, Harriet; Glickman, J. Fraser; Powell, Simon N.; Bindra, Ranjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer therapies involve a component of treatment which inflicts DNA damage in tumor cells, such as double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered the most serious threat to genomic integrity. Complex systems have evolved to repair these lesions, and successful DSB repair is essential for tumor cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) and other DNA damaging agents. As such, inhibition of DNA repair is a potentially efficacious strategy for chemo- and radio-sensitization. Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) represent the two major pathways by DSBs are repaired in mammalian cells. Here, we report the design and execution of a high-throughput, cell-based small molecule screen for novel DSB repair inhibitors. We miniaturized our recently developed dual NHEJ and HR reporter system into a 384-well plate-based format and interrogated a diverse library of 20,000 compounds for molecules which selectively modulate NHEJ and HR repair in tumor cells. We identified a collection of novel hits which potently inhibit DSB repair, and we have validated their functional activity in comprehensive panel of orthogonal secondary assays. A selection of these inhibitors were found to radiosensitize cancer cell lines in vitro, which suggests they may be useful as novel chemo- and radio-sensitizers. Surprisingly, we identified several FDA-approved drugs, including the calcium channel blocker, mibefradil dihydrochloride, which demonstrated activity as DSB repair inhibitors and radiosensitizers. These findings suggest the possibility for repurposing them as tumor cell radiosensitizers in the future. Accordingly, we recently initiated a Phase I clinical trial testing mibefradil as glioma radiosensitizer. PMID:25512618

  8. Enhancement of radiosensitivity by dual inhibition of the HER family with ZD1839 ('Iressa') and trastuzumab ('Herceptin')

    SciTech Connect

    Fukutome, Mika . E-mail: fukutome@rad.twmu.ac.jp; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Nasu, Sachiko; Seki, Kaori; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to examine the effects of dual inhibition of 2 members of the HER family, the epidermoid growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2/neu, by gefitinib (ZD1839) and trastuzumab on radiosensitivity; and (2) to explore the molecular mechanism of radiosensitization especially focusing on the survival signal transduction pathways by using A431 human vulvar squamous carcinoma cells expressing EGFR and HER2/neu. Methods and Materials: The effects of inhibitors on Radiation-induced activation of EGFR and/or HER2/neu, and the intracellular proteins that are involved in their downstream signaling, were quantified by the Western blot. Radiosensitizing effects by the blockage of EGFR and/or HER2/neu were determined by a clonogenic assay. Results: Radiation-induced activation of the EGFR and HER2/neu was inhibited with ZD1839 and/or trastuzumab. ZD1839 also inhibited Radiation-induced phosphorylation of HER2/neu. Radiation in combination with the HER family inhibitors inhibited the activation of Akt and MEK1/2, the downstream survival signaling of the HER family. ZD1839 enhanced radiosensitivity with a dose-modifying factor (DMF) (SF3) of 1.45 and trastuzumab did so with a DMF (SF3) of 1.11. Simultaneous blockade of EGFR and HER2/neu induced a synergistic radiosensitizing effect with a DMF (SF3) of 2.29. Conclusions: The present data suggest that a dual EGFR and HER2/neu targeting may have potential for radiosensitization in tumors in which both of these pathways are active.

  9. Can Drugs Enhance Hypofractionated Radiotherapy? A Novel Method of Modeling Radiosensitization Using In Vitro Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Dicker, Adam P.; Lawrence, Yaacov Richard

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy (hRT) is being explored for a number of malignancies. The potential benefit of giving concurrent chemotherapy with hRT is not known. We sought to predict the effects of combined modality treatments by using mathematical models derived from laboratory data. Methods and Materials: Data from 26 published clonogenic survival assays for cancer cell lines with and without the use of radiosensitizing chemotherapy were collected. The first three data points of the RT arm of each assay were used to derive parameters for the linear quadratic (LQ) model, the multitarget (MT) model, and the generalized linear quadratic (gLQ) model. For each assay and model, the difference between the predicted and observed surviving fractions at the highest tested RT dose was calculated. The gLQ model was fitted to all the data from each RT cell survival assay, and the biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2s) of clinically relevant hRT regimens were calculated. The increase in cell kill conferred by the addition of chemotherapy was used to estimate the EQD2 of hRT along with a radiosensitizing agent. For comparison, this was repeated using conventionally fractionated RT regimens. Results: At a mean RT dose of 8.0 Gy, the average errors for the LQ, MT, and gLQ models were 1.63, 0.83, and 0.56 log units, respectively, favoring the gLQ model (p < 0.05). Radiosensitizing chemotherapy increased the EQD2 of hRT schedules by an average of 28% to 82%, depending on disease site. This increase was similar to the gains predicted for the addition of chemotherapy to conventionally fractionated RT. Conclusions: Based on published in vitro assays, the gLQ equation is superior to the LQ and MT models in predicting cell kill at high doses of RT. Modeling exercises demonstrate that significant increases in biologically equivalent dose may be achieved with the addition of radiosensitizing agents to hRT. Clinical study of this approach is warranted.

  10. [Optimization and Prognosis of Cell Radiosensitivity Enhancement in vitro and in vivo after Sequential Thermoradiactive Action].

    PubMed

    Belkina, S V; Petin, V G

    2016-01-01

    Previously developed mathematical model of simultaneous action of two inactivating agents has been adapted and tested to describe the results of sequential action. The possibility of applying the mathematical model to the interpretation and prognosis of the increase in radio-sensitivity of tumor cells as well as mammalian cells after sequential action of two high temperatures or hyperthermia and ionizing radiation is analyzed. The model predicts the value of the thermal enhancement ratio depending on the duration of thermal exposure, its greatest value, and the condition under which it is achieved. PMID:27534067

  11. Radiosensitization of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi in presence of active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, M.; Chiasson, F.; Borsa, J.; Ouattara, B.

    2004-09-01

    The radiosensitization of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi in ground beef was evaluated in the presence of 18 active compounds. Medium fat ground beef (23% fat) was inoculated with E. coli or S. typhi and each active compound was added separately at various concentrations. For E. coli, the most efficient compounds were trans-cinnamaldehyde, thymol and thyme. For S. typhi, the most efficient compounds was trans-cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol and thymol. The addition of tetrasodium pyrophosphate, carvacrol and ascorbic acid had no effect on the irradiation sensitivity of E. coli. For S. typhi, only ascorbic acid had no effect.

  12. In vivo study of breast carcinoma radiosensitization by targeting eIF4E

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hua; Li, Li-Wen; Shi, Mei; Wang, Jian-Hua; Xiao, Feng; Zhou, Bin; Diao, Li-Qiong; Long, Xiao-Li; Liu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Lin

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer eIF4E is associated with the formation and progression for breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pSecX-t4EBP1 can downregulated the expression of eIF4E in direct binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We transfected pSecX-t4EBP1 into a mouse xenograft model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can significantly inhibit tumor growth and enhance the radiosensitivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible mechanism is downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression. -- Abstract: Background: Eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E, an important regulator of translation, plays a crucial role in the malignant transformation, progression and radioresistance of many human solid tumors. The overexpression of this gene has been associated with tumor formation in a wide range of human malignancies, including breast cancer. In the present study, we attempted to explore the use of eIF4E as a therapeutic target to enhance radiosensitivity for breast carcinomas in a xenograft BALB/C mice model. Materials and methods: Ninety female BALB/C mice transfected with EMT-6 cells were randomly divided into six groups: control, irradiation (IR), pSecX-t4EBP1, pSecX-t4EBP1 + irradiation, pSecX and pSecX + irradiation. At the end of the experiments, all mice were sacrificed, the xenografts were harvested to measure the tumor volume and mass, and the tumor inhibition rates were calculated. Apoptosis was detected with a flow cytometric assay. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of HIF-1{alpha}. Results: The xenografts in pSecX-t4EBP1 mice showed a significantly delayed growth and smaller tumor volume, with a higher tumor inhibition rate compared with the control and pSecX groups. A similar result was obtained in the pSecX-t4EBP1 + IR group compared with IR alone and pSecX + irradiation. The expression of HIF-1{alpha} in the tumor cells was significantly decreased, while the apoptosis index was much higher. Conclusions: pSecX-t4EBP1 can

  13. Immunosuppression by hypoxic cell radiosensitizers: a phenomenon of potential clinical importance

    SciTech Connect

    Rockwell, S.; Kapp, D.S.

    1982-06-01

    The nitroimidazoles metronidazole, misonidazol, and desmethyl misonidazole are currently undergoing clinical trials as possible adjuncts to radiotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the effectiveness of these agents and also documenting the pharmacokinetics and toxicities of radiosensitizing doses of these drugs in man. A variety of toxic effects have been noted in man, including anorexia, nausea and vomiting, peripheral neuropathy, central nervous system symptoms, ototoxicity, allergy, and fear. Laboratory studies have also suggested that these agents have potential to be mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic. In the editorial presented, the author attempts to draw attention to an additional toxic effect of nitroimidazoles - the inhibition of cell-mediated immune responses. (JMT)

  14. 5 CFR 1640.4 - Account transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Account transactions. 1640.4 Section 1640... STATEMENTS § 1640.4 Account transactions. (a) Where relevant, the following transactions will be reported in each individual account statement: (1) Contributions; (2) Withdrawals; (3) Forfeitures; (4)...

  15. 5 CFR 1640.4 - Account transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Account transactions. 1640.4 Section 1640... STATEMENTS § 1640.4 Account transactions. (a) Where relevant, the following transactions will be reported in each individual account statement: (1) Contributions; (2) Withdrawals; (3) Forfeitures; (4)...

  16. 5 CFR 1640.4 - Account transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Account transactions. 1640.4 Section 1640... STATEMENTS § 1640.4 Account transactions. (a) Where relevant, the following transactions will be reported in each individual account statement: (1) Contributions; (2) Withdrawals; (3) Forfeitures; (4)...

  17. 5 CFR 1640.4 - Account transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Account transactions. 1640.4 Section 1640... STATEMENTS § 1640.4 Account transactions. (a) Where relevant, the following transactions will be reported in each individual account statement: (1) Contributions; (2) Withdrawals; (3) Forfeitures; (4)...

  18. 5 CFR 1640.4 - Account transactions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Account transactions. 1640.4 Section 1640... STATEMENTS § 1640.4 Account transactions. (a) Where relevant, the following transactions will be reported in each individual account statement: (1) Contributions; (2) Withdrawals; (3) Forfeitures; (4)...

  19. 32 CFR 701.111 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 701.111 Section 701.111... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.111 Disclosure accounting. Disclosure accounting allows the individual to determine what agencies or persons have been...

  20. 32 CFR 701.111 - Disclosure accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disclosure accounting. 701.111 Section 701.111... THE NAVY DOCUMENTS AFFECTING THE PUBLIC DON Privacy Program § 701.111 Disclosure accounting. Disclosure accounting allows the individual to determine what agencies or persons have been...

  1. Relationship between DNA double-strand break rejoining and cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation in human fibroblast strains with differing ATM/p53 status: Implications for evaluation of clinical radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Severin, Diane; Murray, David . E-mail: davem@cancerboard.ab.ca

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To better understand the impact of defects in the DNA damage-surveillance network on the various cell-based assays used for the prediction of patient radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We examined noncancerous human fibroblast strains from individuals with ataxia telangiectasia (ataxia telangiectasia mutated [ATM] deficient) or Li-Fraumeni syndrome (p53 deficient) using the neutral comet, H2AX phosphorylation, and clonogenic survival assays. Results: Using the comet assay, we found that, compared with normal fibroblasts, cells lacking either ATM or p53 function exhibited a reduced rate of double-strand break (DSB) rejoining early ({<=}4 h) after exposure to 8 Gy of {gamma}-radiation and also exhibited high levels of unrejoined DSBs later after irradiation. ATM-deficient and p53-deficient fibroblasts also exhibited abnormally increased levels of phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}-H2AX) at later intervals after irradiation. In the clonogenic assay, ATM-deficient cells exhibited marked radiosensitivity and p53-deficient cells had varying degrees of radioresistance compared with normal fibroblasts. Conclusion: Regardless of whether ataxia telangiectasia and Li-Fraumeni syndrome fibroblasts are DSB-repair deficient per se, it is apparent that p53 and ATM defects greatly influence the cellular phenotype as evidenced by the neutral comet and {gamma}-H2AX assays. Our data suggest that the {gamma}-H2AX levels observed at later intervals after irradiation may represent a reliable measure of the overall DSB rejoining capabilities of human fibroblasts. However, it appears that using this parameter as a predictor of radiosensitivity without knowledge of the cells' p53 status could lead to incorrect conclusions.

  2. Library Labor Cost Accounting System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Bois, Dan

    The Library Labor Cost Accounting System will provide visibility on current costs of manually processing library materials, at each campus as well as system-wide. The scope of the study includes the following: (1) 100 individual activities, grouped into 14 functional areas, e.g., Ordering, Receiving; and into 3 major operations: Acquisitions,…

  3. Dexamethasone acts as a radiosensitizer in three astrocytoma cell lines via oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs), which act on stress pathways, are well-established in the co-treatment of different kinds of tumors; however, the underlying mechanisms by which GCs act are not yet well elucidated. As such, this work investigates the role of glucocorticoids, specifically dexamethasone (DEXA), in the processes referred to as DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR), establishing a new approach in three astrocytomas cell lines (CT2A, APP.PS1 L.1 and APP.PS1 L.3). The results show that DEXA administration increased the basal levels of gamma-H2AX foci, keeping them higher 4h after irradiation (IR) of the cells, compared to untreated cells. This means that DEXA might cause increased radiosensitivity in these cell lines. On the other hand, DEXA did not have an apparent effect on the formation and disappearance of the 53BP1 foci. Furthermore, it was found that DEXA administered 2h before IR led to a radical change in DNA repair kinetics, even DEXA does not affect cell cycle. It is important to highlight that DEXA produced cell death in these cell lines compared to untreated cells. Finally and most important, the high levels of gamma-H2AX could be reversed by administration of ascorbic acid, a potent blocker of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that DEXA acts by causing DNA damage via oxidative stress. These exiting findings suggest that DEXA might promote radiosensitivity in brain tumors, specifically in astrocytoma-like tumors.

  4. Mitochondrial stress controls the radiosensitivity of the oxygen effect: Implications for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Richard B.; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2016-01-01

    It has been more than 60 years since the discovery of the oxygen effect that empirically demonstrates the direct association between cell radiosensitivity and oxygen tension, important parameters in radiotherapy. Yet the mechanisms underlying this principal tenet of radiobiology are poorly understood. Better understanding of the oxygen effect may explain difficulty in eliminating hypoxic tumor cells, a major cause of regrowth after therapy. Our analysis utilizes the Howard-Flanders and Alper formula, which describes the relationship of radiosensitivity with oxygen tension. Here, we assign and qualitatively assess the relative contributions of two important mechanisms. The first mechanism involves the emission of reactive oxygen species from the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which increases with oxygen tension. The second mechanism is related to an energy and repair deficit, which increases with hypoxia. Following a radiation exposure, the uncoupling of the oxidative phosphorylation system (proton leak) in mitochondria lowers the emission of reactive oxygen species which has implications for fractionated radiotherapy, particularly of hypoxic tumors. Our analysis shows that, in oxygenated tumor and normal cells, mitochondria, rather than the nucleus, are the primary loci of radiotherapy effects, especially for low linear energy transfer radiation. Therefore, the oxygen effect can be explained by radiation-induced effects in mitochondria that generate reactive oxygen species, which in turn indirectly target nuclear DNA. PMID:26894978

  5. Therapeutic Delivery of miR-200c Enhances Radiosensitivity in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Maria Angelica; Valdecanas, David; Zhang, Xiaochun; Zhan, Yanai; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Calin, George A; Komaki, Ritsuko; Giri, Dipak K; Quini, Caio C; Wolfe, Tatiana; Peltier, Heidi J; Bader, Andreas G; Heymach, John V; Meyn, Raymond E; Welsh, James W

    2014-01-01

    The microRNA (miR)-200s and their negative regulator ZEB1 have been extensively studied in the context of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Loss of miR-200s has been shown to enhance cancer aggressiveness and metastasis, whereas replacement of miR-200 miRNAs has been shown to inhibit cell growth in several types of tumors, including lung cancer. Here, we reveal a novel function of miR-200c, a member of the miR-200 family, in regulating intracellular reactive oxygen species signaling and explore a potential application for its use in combination with therapies known to increase oxidative stress such as radiation. We found that miR-200c overexpression increased cellular radiosensitivity by direct regulation of the oxidative stress response genes PRDX2, GAPB/Nrf2, and SESN1 in ways that inhibits DNA double-strand breaks repair, increase levels of reactive oxygen species, and upregulate p21. We used a lung cancer xenograft model to further demonstrate the therapeutic potential of systemic delivery of miR-200c to enhance radiosensitivity in lung cancer. Our findings suggest that the antitumor effects of miR-200c result partially from its regulation of the oxidative stress response; they further suggest that miR-200c, in combination with radiation, could represent a therapeutic strategy in the future. PMID:24791940

  6. Factors affecting the radiosensitization of Pseudomonas radiora O-1 by N/sub 2/O

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.; Iizuka, H.; Takehisa, M.

    1982-02-01

    The radiosensitization of Pseudomonas radiora O-1 by N/sub 2/O was affected primarily by three factors: cell concentration, dose rate, and irradiation temperature. The influence of cell concentration was observed at levels higher than 6 X 10/sup 7/ cells/ml, and the inactivation constant decreased with increasing cell concentration. The dose rate affected sensitization by N/sub 2/O in dense suspensions (10/sup 7/ cells/ml) but not in dilute suspensions (10/sup 5/ cells/ml). Sensitization by N/sub 2/O in dense suspensions was almost prevented below 25 Gy/min at O/sup 0/C, while desensitization at 20/sup 0/C occurred below 60 Gy/min. The catalase activity of cell suspensions increased with increasing cell concentration. However, cell suspensions up to 1 X 10/sup 6/ cells/ml could not reduce the concentration of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ accumulated by irradiation. In addition, an increase in catalase activity with rising temperature was almost identical to the change in dose-rate effects caused by a change in irradiation temperature. These results suggest that cellular catalase could correlate with factors affecting radiosensitization in the presence of N/sub 2/O.

  7. LET-dependent radiosensitization effects of gold nanoparticles for proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Penninckx, Sébastien; Karmani, Linda; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine; Watillon, Kassandra; Marega, Riccardo; Zola, Jerome; Corvaglia, Valentina; Genard, Geraldine; Gallez, Bernard; Feron, Olivier; Martinive, Philippe; Bonifazi, Davide; Michiels, Carine; Lucas, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    The development of new modalities and protocols is of major interest to improve the outcome of cancer treatment. Given the appealing physical properties of protons and the emerging evidence of biological relevance of the use of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), the radiosensitization effects of GNPs (5 or 10 nm) have been investigated in vitro in combination with a proton beam of different linear energy transfer (LET). After the incubation with GNPs for 24 h, nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of A431 cells exposed to 10 nm GNPs, and in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus of cells exposed to 5 nm GNPs. Cell uptake of 0.05 mg ml‑1 of GNPs led to 0.78 pg Au/cell and 0.30 pg Au/cell after 24 h incubation for 10 and 5 nm GNPs respectively. A marked radiosensitization effect of GNPs was observed with 25 keV μm‑1 protons, but not with 10 keV μm‑1 protons. This effect was more pronounced for 10 nm GNPs than for 5 nm GNPs. By using a radical scavenger, a major role of reactive oxygen species in the amplification of the death of irradiated cell was identified. All together, these results open up novel perspectives for using high-Z metallic NPs in protontherapy.

  8. In vitro radiosensitizing effects of ultrasmall gadolinium based particles on tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mowat, P; Mignot, A; Rima, W; Lux, F; Tillement, O; Roulin, C; Dutreix, M; Bechet, D; Huger, S; Humbert, L; Barberi-Heyob, M; Aloy, M T; Armandy, E; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Le Duc, G; Roux, S; Perriat, P

    2011-09-01

    Since radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment, it is essential to develop strategies which lower the irradiation burden while increasing efficacy and become efficient even in radio resistant tumors. Our new strategy is relying on the development of solid hybrid nanoparticles based on rare-earth such as gadolinium. In this paper, we then evidenced that gadolinium-based particles can be designed to enter efficiently into the human glioblastoma cell line U87 in quantities that can be tuned by modifying the incubation conditions. These sub-5 nm particles consist in a core of gadolinium oxide, a shell of polysiloxane and are functionalized by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Although photoelectric effect is maximal in the [10-100 keV] range, such particles were found to possess efficient in-vitro radiosensitizing properties at an energy of 660 keV by using the "single-cell gel electrophoresis comet assay," an assay that measures the number of DNA damage that occurs during irradiation. Even more interesting, the particles have been evidenced by MTT assays to be also efficient radiosensitizers at an energy of 6 MeV for doses comprised between 2 and 8 Gy. The properties of the gadolinium-based particles give promising opening to a particle-assisted radio-therapy by using irradiation systems already installed in the majority of hospitals.

  9. Transcription Factor HBP1 Enhances Radiosensitivity by Inducing Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yicheng; Wang, Yueping; Yu, Yanlan; Xu, Liwei; Zhang, Youyun; Yu, Shicheng; Li, Gonghui; Zhang, Zhigeng

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for prostate cancer has been gradually carried out in recent years; however, acquired radioresistance often occurred in some patients after radiotherapy. HBP1 (HMG-box transcription factor 1) is a transcriptional inhibitor which could inhibit the expression of dozens of oncogenes. In our previous study, we showed that the expression level of HBP1 was closely related to prostate cancer metastasis and prognosis, but the relationship between HBP1 and radioresistance for prostate cancer is largely unknown. In this study, the clinical data of patients with prostate cancer was compared, and the positive correlation was revealed between prostate cancer brachytherapy efficacy and the expression level of HBP1 gene. Through research on prostate cancer cells in vitro, we found that HBP1 expression levels were negatively correlated with oncogene expression levels. Furthermore, HBP1 overexpression could sensitize prostate cancer cells to radiation and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. In addition, animal model was employed to analyze the relationship between HBP1 gene and prostate cancer radiosensitivity in vivo; the result showed that knockdown of HBP1 gene could decrease the sensitivity to radiation of xenograft. These studies identified a specific molecular mechanism underlying prostate cancer radiosensitivity, which suggested HBP1 as a novel target in prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26942107

  10. MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 COMPLEX INHIBITOR MIRIN ENHANCES RADIOSENSITIVITY IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Kazuhiko; Mishima-Kaneko, Masayo; Kawata, Tetsuya; Saya, Hideyuki; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Yamada, Kouichi; Nishikawa, Ryo; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: (blind field) METHODS: Glioma cell lines (U251, LN229 and LN428) were irradiated with and without Mirin and then clonogenicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle change were examined. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the relative potency of Mirin to inhibit the radioresistance, through the signaling activity of AKT. We also examined the levels of H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), which is a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) using Western blot. RESULTS: Glioblastoma cells pretreated with Mirin demonstrated an enhanced sensitivity to radiation. FACS analysis revealed that Mirin and radiation caused the glioma cells to accumulate in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle and the combination of these two treatments further increased the G2/M fraction of the glioma cells. Mirin significantly enhanced radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Also, Mirin blocked the basal and increase of radiation-induced AKT phosphorylation. We observed that the combination of Mirin and radiation increased persistence of γH2AX at 24 h suggesting the inhibition of DNA DSBs repair. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that Mirin can effectively enhance glioma cell radiosensitivity. It suggests that Mirin is a potent radiosensitizer for treating glioma cells. SECONDARY CATEGORY: n/a.

  11. Investigation of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization mechanisms using a free radical scavenger and protons of different energies.

    PubMed

    Jeynes, J C G; Merchant, M J; Spindler, A; Wera, A-C; Kirkby, K J

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to x-ray radiation, particularly at kV energies where photoelectric interactions dominate and the high atomic number of gold makes a large difference to x-ray absorption. Protons have a high cross-section for gold at a large range of relevant clinical energies, and so potentially could be used with GNPs for increased therapeutic effect.Here, we investigate the contribution of secondary electron emission to cancer cell radiosensitization and investigate how this parameter is affected by proton energy and a free radical scavenger. We simulate the emission from a realistic cell phantom containing GNPs after traversal by protons and x-rays with different energies. We find that with a range of proton energies (1-250 MeV) there is a small increase in secondaries compared to a much larger increase with x-rays. Secondary electrons are known to produce toxic free radicals. Using a cancer cell line in vitro we find that a free radical scavenger has no protective effect on cells containing GNPs irradiated with 3 MeV protons, while it does protect against cells irradiated with x-rays. We conclude that GNP generated free radicals are a major cause of radiosensitization and that there is likely to be much less dose enhancement effect with clinical proton beams compared to x-rays.

  12. Daily variation in radiosensitivity of circulating blood cells and bone marrow cell density in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, R.N.

    1984-01-01

    Mice on a 12/12 light/dark cycle were bled during a twenty-four hour period each week for eight weeks to establish daily values of circulating blood cells. No significant daily variation was found in total red blood cells, hematocrit, or percentage of reticulocytes. A significant (P < 0.001) daily variation was found in total white blood cells, with the minimum occurring at 8 PM and the maximum occurring during the daylight hours from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mice were then exposed to 0 R, 20 R, 50 R, or 100 R of x-radiation to determine what dose significantly reduces the total white cell count in circulating blood. It was found that 100 R significantly (P < .05) reduces the total white cell count over a four week period post-exposure. To determine if circulating blood cells and bone marrow cells show a diurnal radiosensitivity, mice were exposed to 100 R or 200 R of x-radiation at noon or midnight. Hematocrits, reticulocyte and white blood cell counts, daily white blood cell rhythm, and bone marrow cell density indicate that these mice were more radiosensitive at night.

  13. Radiosensitivity of toxigenic Aspergillus isolated from spices and destruction of aflatoxins by gamma-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Ito, Hitoshi; Soedarman, Harsono; Ishigaki, Isao

    Radiosensitivities of Aspergillus flavus var columnaris isolated from spices were investigated. The D10 values and induction doses were 267-293 Gy and 75-165 Gy in wet conditions, respectively. In dry conditions, the survival curves were exponential and D10 values were 538-600 Gy. The survival curves of standard strain of A. parasiticus IFO 30179 were similar both in wet and dry conditions. The necessary dose of 8 kGy for the destruction of these toxigenic Aspergillus was calculated from these values. Two of 11 strains of A. flavus var columnaris produced aflatoxins and the content of B 1 was especially high. In the study of irradiation effect on aflatoxins produced on polished rice, aflatoxins G 1 and B 1 were more radiosensitive than G 2 and B 2. However, these aflatoxins were very stable to radiation and the dose required for destruction was found to be more than 500 kGy. It is therfore concluded that the decontamination of molds by irradiation is necessary prior to their production of aflatoxins.

  14. Molecularly Targeted Agents as Radiosensitizers in Cancer Therapy—Focus on Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alcorn, Sara; Walker, Amanda J.; Gandhi, Nishant; Narang, Amol; Wild, Aaron T.; Hales, Russell K.; Herman, Joseph M.; Song, Danny Y.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Tran, Phuoc T.

    2013-01-01

    As our understanding of the molecular pathways driving tumorigenesis improves and more druggable targets are identified, we have witnessed a concomitant increase in the development and production of novel molecularly targeted agents. Radiotherapy is commonly used in the treatment of various malignancies with a prominent role in the care of prostate cancer patients, and efforts to improve the therapeutic ratio of radiation by technologic and pharmacologic means have led to important advances in cancer care. One promising approach is to combine molecularly targeted systemic agents with radiotherapy to improve tumor response rates and likelihood of durable control. This review first explores the limitations of preclinical studies as well as barriers to successful implementation of clinical trials with radiosensitizers. Special considerations related to and recommendations for the design of preclinical studies and clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents combined with radiotherapy are provided. We then apply these concepts by reviewing a representative set of targeted therapies that show promise as radiosensitizers in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:23863691

  15. Slug inhibition increases radiosensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by upregulating PUMA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fangfang; Zhou, Lijie; Wei, Changbo; Zhao, Wei; Yu, Dongsheng

    2016-08-01

    As a new strategy, radio-gene therapy was widely used for the treatment of cancer patients in recent few years. Slug was involved in the radioresistance of various cancers and has been found to have an anti-apoptotic effect. This study aims to investigate whether the modulation of Slug expression by siRNA affects oral squamous cell carcinoma sensitivity to X-ray irradiation through upregulating PUMA. Two oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC3 and HSC6) were transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Slug and subjected to radiotherapy in vitro. After transfection with Slug siRNA, both HSC3 and HSC6 cells showed relatively lower expression of Slug and higher expression of PUMA. The Slug siRNA transfected cells showed decreased survival and proliferation rates, an increased apoptosis rate and enhanced radiosensitivity to X-ray irradiation. Our results revealed that Slug siRNA transfection in combination with radiation increased the expression of PUMA, which contributed to radiosensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Thus, controlling the expression of Slug might contribute to enhance sensitivity of HSC3 and HSC6 cells toward X-ray irradiation in vitro by upregulating PUMA.

  16. Radiosensitization of paclitaxel, etanidazole and paclitaxel+etanidazole nanoparticles on hypoxic human tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Bai, Ling; Wu, Hong; Tian, Furong; Guo, Guozhen

    2007-09-01

    Paclitaxel and etanidazole are hypoxic radiosensitizers that exhibit cytotoxic action at different mechanisms. The poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing paclitaxel, etanidazole and paclitaxel+etanidazole were prepared by o/w and w/o/w emulsification-solvent evaporation method. The morphology of the nanoparticles was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The drug encapsulation efficiency (EE) and release profile in vitro were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The cellular uptake of nanoparticles for the human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7) and the human carcinoma cervicis cells (HeLa) was evaluated by transmission electronic microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Cell viability was determined by the ability of single cell to form colonies in vitro. The prepared nanoparticles were spherical shape with size between 80 and 150 nm. The EE was higher for paclitaxel and lower for etanidazole. The drug release was controlled over time. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was observed. Co-culture of the two tumor cell lines with drug-loaded nanoparticles demonstrated that released drug effectively sensitized hypoxic tumor cells to radiation. The radiosensitization of paclitaxel+etanidazole nanoparticles was more significant than that of single drug-loaded nanoparticles. PMID:17509678

  17. DNA damage response (DDR) pathway engagement in cisplatin radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sears, Catherine R; Cooney, Sean A; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc S; Turchi, John J

    2016-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are commonly treated with a platinum-based chemotherapy such as cisplatin (CDDP) in combination with ionizing radiation (IR). Although clinical trials have demonstrated that the combination of CDDP and IR appear to be synergistic in terms of therapeutic efficacy, the mechanism of synergism remains largely uncharacterized. We investigated the role of the DNA damage response (DDR) in CDDP radiosensitization using two NSCLC cell lines. Using clonogenic survival assays, we determined that the cooperative cytotoxicity of CDDP and IR treatment is sequence dependent, requiring administration of CDDP prior to IR (CDDP-IR). We identified and interrogated the unique time and agent-dependent activation of the DDR in NSCLC cells treated with cisplatin-IR combination therapy. Compared to treatment with CDDP or IR alone, CDDP-IR combination treatment led to persistence of γH2Ax foci, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), for up to 24h after treatment. Interestingly, pharmacologic inhibition of DDR sensor kinases revealed the persistence of γ-H2Ax foci in CDDP-IR treated cells is independent of kinase activation. Taken together, our data suggest that delayed repair of DSBs in NSCLC cells treated with CDDP-IR contributes to CDDP radiosensitization and that alterations of the DDR pathways by inhibition of specific DDR kinases can augment CDDP-IR cytotoxicity by a complementary mechanism. PMID:26991853

  18. Radiosensitizing Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts by an Implantable Micro-Oxygen Generator.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ning; Song, Seung Hyun; Maleki, Teimour; Shaffer, Michael; Stantz, Keith M; Cao, Minsong; Kao, Chinghai; Mendonca, Marc S; Ziaie, Babak; Ko, Song-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decades, little progress has been made to improve the extremely low survival rates in pancreatic cancer patients. Extreme hypoxia observed in pancreatic tumors contributes to the aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and can reduce the effectiveness of conventional radiation therapy and chemotherapy. In an attempt to reduce hypoxia-induced obstacles to effective radiation treatment, we used a novel device, the implantable micro-oxygen generator (IMOG), for in situ tumor oxygenation. After subcutaneous implantation of human pancreatic xenograft tumors in athymic rats, the IMOG was wirelessly powered by ultrasonic waves, producing 30 μA of direct current (at 2.5 V), which was then utilized to electrolyze water and produce oxygen within the tumor. Significant oxygen production by the IMOG was observed and corroborated using the NeoFox oxygen sensor dynamically. To test the radiosensitization effect of the newly generated oxygen, the human pancreatic xenograft tumors were subcutaneously implanted in nude mice with either a functional or inactivated IMOG device. The tumors in the mice were then exposed to ultrasonic power for 10 min, followed by a single fraction of 5 Gy radiation, and tumor growth was monitored thereafter. The 5 Gy irradiated tumors containing the functional IMOG exhibited tumor growth inhibition equivalent to that of 7 Gy irradiated tumors that did not contain an IMOG. Our study confirmed that an activated IMOG is able to produce sufficient oxygen to radiosensitize pancreatic tumors, enhancing response to single-dose radiation therapy. PMID:27002539

  19. Radiosensitivity study and radiation effects on morphology characterization of grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Rosnani Abdul; Daud, Fauzi; Senafi, Sahidan; Awang, Mat Rasol; Mohamad, Azhar; Mutaat, Hassan Hamdani; Maskom, Mohd Meswan

    2014-09-01

    Radiosensitive dosage and morphology characterization of irradiated grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju by gamma rays was investigated due to effects of irradiation. In order to establish the effect, mycelium of P. sajor-caju was irradiated by gamma rays at dose 0.1 to 8.0 kGy with dose rate 0.227 Gy sec-1. The irradiation of mycelia was carried out at the radiation facility in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. The radiosensitivity study was performed by evaluating the percentage of survival irradiated mycelia. The lethal dose of the mycelium P. sajor-caju was determined at 4.0 kGy and LD50 to be equal at 2.2 kGy. The radiation effects on morphology were evaluated based on growth rate of irradiated mycelia, mycelia types, colonization period on substrate, morphology of fruit bodies and yields. The results shown growth rate of irradiated mycelium was slightly lower than the control and decreased as the dose increased. Irradiation was found can induced the primordia formation on PDA and the BE of irradiated seed is higher than to control. The irradiation is proven to be useful for generating new varieties of mushroom with commercial value to the industry.

  20. Slug inhibition increases radiosensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by upregulating PUMA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fangfang; Zhou, Lijie; Wei, Changbo; Zhao, Wei; Yu, Dongsheng

    2016-08-01

    As a new strategy, radio-gene therapy was widely used for the treatment of cancer patients in recent few years. Slug was involved in the radioresistance of various cancers and has been found to have an anti-apoptotic effect. This study aims to investigate whether the modulation of Slug expression by siRNA affects oral squamous cell carcinoma sensitivity to X-ray irradiation through upregulating PUMA. Two oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC3 and HSC6) were transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Slug and subjected to radiotherapy in vitro. After transfection with Slug siRNA, both HSC3 and HSC6 cells showed relatively lower expression of Slug and higher expression of PUMA. The Slug siRNA transfected cells showed decreased survival and proliferation rates, an increased apoptosis rate and enhanced radiosensitivity to X-ray irradiation. Our results revealed that Slug siRNA transfection in combination with radiation increased the expression of PUMA, which contributed to radiosensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Thus, controlling the expression of Slug might contribute to enhance sensitivity of HSC3 and HSC6 cells toward X-ray irradiation in vitro by upregulating PUMA. PMID:27277529

  1. Optimizing the radiosensitive liquid-core microcapsules for the targeting of chemotherapeutic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, S.; Ehara, S.; Ishii, K.; Yamazaki, H.; Matsuyama, S.; Kamiya, T.; Sakai, T.; Arakawa, K.; Sato, T.; Oikawa, S.

    2007-07-01

    Microcapsules consisting of alginate and hyaluronic acid that can be decomposed by radiation are currently under development. In this study, the composition of the microcapsule material was optimized by changing the amounts of alginate and hyaluronic acid. Solutions of 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.2%, or 0.4% (wt./vol.) hyaluronic acid were mixed into a 0.2% alginate solution. To these mixtures, carboplatin (0.2 mmol) was added and the resulting material was used for the capsule preparation. The capsules were prepared by spraying the material into a CaCl 2 solution (0.34 mol/l) using a microatomizer. These capsules were irradiated by a single dose of 2, 5, or 10 Gy 60Co γ-ray radiation. Immediately after irradiation, the releasing of core content of microcapsule was determined, using a micro particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) camera. The average diameter of the microcapsules was 22.3 ± 3.3 μm, and that of the liquid core was 10.2 ± 4.3 μm. The maximum radiation-induced content release was observed with liquid-core microcapsules containing 0.1% hyaluronic acid and 0.2% alginate. Our liquid-core microcapsules suggest a new potential use for radiation: the targeted delivery of the chemotherapeutic agents or radiosensitizers. This offers the prospect of increased combined effectiveness of radiation with chemotherapy or radiosensitization and decreased adverse side effects.

  2. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation.

  3. Investigation of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization mechanisms using a free radical scavenger and protons of different energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeynes, J. C. G.; Merchant, M. J.; Spindler, A.; Wera, A.-C.; Kirkby, K. J.

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to x-ray radiation, particularly at kV energies where photoelectric interactions dominate and the high atomic number of gold makes a large difference to x-ray absorption. Protons have a high cross-section for gold at a large range of relevant clinical energies, and so potentially could be used with GNPs for increased therapeutic effect. Here, we investigate the contribution of secondary electron emission to cancer cell radiosensitization and investigate how this parameter is affected by proton energy and a free radical scavenger. We simulate the emission from a realistic cell phantom containing GNPs after traversal by protons and x-rays with different energies. We find that with a range of proton energies (1-250 MeV) there is a small increase in secondaries compared to a much larger increase with x-rays. Secondary electrons are known to produce toxic free radicals. Using a cancer cell line in vitro we find that a free radical scavenger has no protective effect on cells containing GNPs irradiated with 3 MeV protons, while it does protect against cells irradiated with x-rays. We conclude that GNP generated free radicals are a major cause of radiosensitization and that there is likely to be much less dose enhancement effect with clinical proton beams compared to x-rays.

  4. Inhibition of HAS2 induction enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells via persistent DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yan Nan; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Chun-Ho; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •HAS2 may be a promising target for the radiosensitization of human cancer. •HAS2 is elevated (up to ∼10-fold) in irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cancer cells. •HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation. •HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptotic death. •Thus, the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. -- Abstract: Hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), a synthetic enzyme for hyaluronan, regulates various aspects of cancer progression, including migration, invasion and angiogenesis. However, the possible association of HAS2 with the response of cancer cells to anticancer radiotherapy, has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. Upon exposure to radiation, all of the tested human cancer cell lines exhibited marked (up to 10-fold) up-regulation of HAS2 within 24 h. Inhibition of HAS2 induction significantly reduced the survival of irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cells. Interestingly, HAS2 depletion rendered the cells to sustain irradiation-induced DNA damage, thereby leading to an increase of apoptotic death. These findings indicate that HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation via persistent DNA damage, further suggesting that the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. Thus, HAS2 could potentially be targeted for therapeutic interventions aimed at radiosensitizing cancer cells.

  5. Radiosensitivity study and radiation effects on morphology characterization of grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Rosnani Abdul; Awang, Mat Rasol; Mohamad, Azhar; Mutaat, Hassan Hamdani; Maskom, Mohd Meswan; Daud, Fauzi; Senafi, Sahidan

    2014-09-03

    Radiosensitive dosage and morphology characterization of irradiated grey oyster mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju by gamma rays was investigated due to effects of irradiation. In order to establish the effect, mycelium of P. sajor-caju was irradiated by gamma rays at dose 0.1 to 8.0 kGy with dose rate 0.227 Gy sec{sup −1}. The irradiation of mycelia was carried out at the radiation facility in Malaysian Nuclear Agency. The radiosensitivity study was performed by evaluating the percentage of survival irradiated mycelia. The lethal dose of the mycelium P. sajor-caju was determined at 4.0 kGy and LD{sub 50} to be equal at 2.2 kGy. The radiation effects on morphology were evaluated based on growth rate of irradiated mycelia, mycelia types, colonization period on substrate, morphology of fruit bodies and yields. The results shown growth rate of irradiated mycelium was slightly lower than the control and decreased as the dose increased. Irradiation was found can induced the primordia formation on PDA and the BE of irradiated seed is higher than to control. The irradiation is proven to be useful for generating new varieties of mushroom with commercial value to the industry.

  6. Silver nanoparticles outperform gold nanoparticles in radiosensitizing U251 cells in vitro and in an intracranial mouse model of glioma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peidang; Jin, Haizhen; Guo, Zhirui; Ma, Jun; Zhao, Jing; Li, Dongdong; Wu, Hao; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy performs an important function in the treatment of cancer, but resistance of tumor cells to radiation still remains a serious concern. More research on more effective radiosensitizers is urgently needed to overcome such resistance and thereby improve the treatment outcome. The goal of this study was to evaluate and compare the radiosensitizing efficacies of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on glioma at clinically relevant megavoltage energies. Both AuNPs and AgNPs potentiated the in vitro and in vivo antiglioma effects of radiation. AgNPs showed more powerful radiosensitizing ability than AuNPs at the same mass and molar concentrations, leading to a higher rate of apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, the combination of AgNPs with radiation significantly increased the levels of autophagy as compared with AuNPs plus radiation. These findings suggest the potential application of AgNPs as a highly effective nano-radiosensitizer for the treatment of glioma. PMID:27757033

  7. Dimethoxycurcumin, a metabolically stable analogue of curcumin enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells: Possible involvement of ROS and thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Patwardhan, R S; Pal, Debojyoti; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K

    2016-09-01

    Dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC), a structural analogue of curcumin, has been shown to have more stability, bioavailability, and effectiveness than its parent molecule curcumin. In this paper the radiosensitizing effect of DIMC has been investigated in A549 lung cancer cells. As compared to its parent molecule curcumin, DIMC showed a very potent radiosensitizing effect as seen by clonogenic survival assay. DIMC in combination with radiation significantly increased the apoptosis and mitotic death in A549 cells. This combinatorial treatment also lead to effective elimination of cancer stem cells. Further, there was a significant increase in cellular ROS, decrease in GSH to GSSG ratio and also significant slowdown in DNA repair when DIMC was combined with radiation. In silico docking studies and in vitro studies showed inhibition of thioredoxin reductase enzyme by DIMC. Overexpression of thioredoxin lead to the abrogation of radiosensitizing effect of DIMC underscoring the role of thioredoxin reductase in radiosensitization. Our results clearly demonstrate that DIMC can synergistically enhance the cancer cell killing when combined with radiation by targeting thioredoxin system. PMID:27381867

  8. MiR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme cells through targeting of ataxia–telangiectasia mutated

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Pin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei; Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Liemei; Qiu, Yongming; Mao, Qing

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is notoriously resistant to radiation, and consequently, new radiosensitizers are urgently needed. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous gene modulators with emerging roles in DNA repair. We found that overexpression of miR-26a can enhance radiosensitivity and reduce the DNA repair ability of U87 cells. However, knockdown miR-26a in U87 cells could act the converse manner. Mechanistically, this effect is mediated by direct targeting of miR-26a to the 3′UTR of ATM, which leads to reduced ATM levels and consequent inhibition of the homologous recombination repair pathway. These results suggest that miR-26a may act as a new radiosensitizer of GBM. - Highlights: ●miR-26a directly target ATM in GBM cells. ●miR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of GBM cells. ●miR-26a could reduce the DNA repair capacity of GBM cells.

  9. Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xiaonan; Yang Chunying; Liu Hai; Wang Qi; Wu Shixiu; Li Xia; Xie Tian; Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian; Xu Bo; Zheng, Shu

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

  10. Radiosensitization of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum using basil essential oil and ionizing radiation for food decontamination.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of basil oil, was determined for two pathogenic fungi of rice, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. The antifungal activity of the basil oil in combination with ionising radiation was then investigated to determine if basil oil caused radiosensit...

  11. Cellular Redox Status Regulates Emodin-Induced Radiosensitization of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Huaxin; Li, Danrong; Cheng, Daohai; Li, Li; Liu, Ying; Zhou, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report that regulation of cellular redox status is required for radiosensitization of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells by emodin. We evaluated emodin's radiosensitivity-enhancing ability by using NPC cells in vitro and xenografts in vivo. A clonogenic assay was performed to evaluate NPC cell survival and to determine dose modification factors. Flow cytometry, western blot analysis, and in vivo radiation-induced tumor regrowth delay assays were performed to characterize emodin's effects. Exposure of CNE-1 NPC cells to emodin enhanced their radiosensitivity. HIF-1α expression significantly increased under hypoxic conditions but did not change after treatment with emodin alone. Emodin downregulated mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α. Cells exposed to radiation and emodin underwent significant cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. The percentage of apoptotic cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were significantly higher in the group exposed to emodin and radiation hypoxic group than in the other groups. Compared to the CNE-1 xenografts exposed to radiation alone, CNE-1 xenografts exposed to radiation with emodin showed significantly enhanced radiation effects. Our data suggest that emodin effectively enhanced the radiosensitivity of CNE-1 cells in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism appears to involve ROS generation and ROS-mediated inhibition of HIF-1α expression. PMID:26555969

  12. Chemosensitization and radiosensitization of a lung cancer cell line A549 induced by a composite polymer micelle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Bi-Cheng; Li, Xiang-Long; Xu, Wen-Hong; Zhou, Juan; Shen, Li; Wei, Qi-Chun

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to Doxorubicin (DOX) remains a major obstacle to successful cancer treatment. The present study sought to overcome the MDR of lung cancer cells and achieve radiosensitization by developing a composite DOX-loaded micelle (M-DOX). M-DOX containing PEG-PCL/Pluronic P105 was prepared by the solvent evaporation method. Lung cancer cell line A549 was adopted in this study. In vitro cytotoxicity, cellular uptake behavior, subcellular distribution, and radiosensitivity were evaluated by the treatment with M-DOX, and free DOX was used as a control. A549 cells treated with M-DOX as opposed to free DOX showed greater cellular uptake as well as greater cytotoxicity. Furthermore, M-DOX reached the mitochondria and lysosome effectively after cellular uptake, and fluorescence used to track M-DOX was found to be surrounding the nucleus. Finally, colony-forming assays demonstrated that M-DOX treatment improved radiosensitization when compared to free DOX. Based on the increased cytotoxicity and radiosensitization, M-DOX could be considered as a promising drug delivery system to overcome MDR in lung cancer therapy. PMID:27585226

  13. Health savings accounts and health reimbursement arrangements: assets, account balances, and rollovers, 2006-2011.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, Paul

    2012-01-01

    ASSET LEVELS GROWING: In 2011, there was $12.4 billion in health savings accounts (HSAs) and health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs), spread across 8.4 million accounts, according to data from the 2011 EBRI/MGA Consumer Engagement in Health Care Survey, sponsored by EBRI and Matthew Greenwald & Associates. This is up from 2006, when there were 1.3 million accounts with $873.4 million in assets, and 2010, when 5.4 million accounts held $7.3 billion in assets. AFTER LEVELING OFF, AVERAGE ACCOUNT BALANCES INCREASED: After average account balances leveled off in 2008 and 2009, and fell slightly in 2010, they increased in 2011. In 2006, account balances averaged $696. They increased to $1,320 in 2007, a 90 percent increase. Account balances averaged $1,356 in 2008 and $1,419 in 2009, 3 percent and 5 percent increases, respectively. In 2010, average account balances fell to $1,355, down 4.5 percent from the previous year. In 2011, average account balances increased to $1,470, a 9 percent increase from 2010. TOTAL AND AVERAGE ROLLOVERS INCREASE: After declining to $1,029 in 2010, average rollover amounts increased to $1,208 in 2011. Total assets being rolled over increased as well: $6.7 billion was rolled over in 2011, up from $3.7 billion in 2010. The percentage of individuals without a rollover remained at 13 percent in 2011. HEALTHY BEHAVIOR DOES NOT MEAN HIGHER ACCOUNT BALANCES AND HIGHER ROLLOVERS: Individuals who smoke have more money in their accounts than those who do not smoke. In contrast, obese individuals have less money in their account than the nonobese. There is very little difference in account balances by level of exercise. Very small differences were found in account balances and rollover amounts between individuals who used cost or quality information, compared with those who did not use such information. However, next to no relationship was found between either account balance or rollover amounts and various cost-conscious behaviors. When a difference

  14. Individual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsini, Raymond

    1981-01-01

    Paper presented at the 66th Convention of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, October 20, 1980, Baltimore, Maryland, describes individual education based on the principles of Alfred Adler. Defines six advantages of individual education, emphasizing student responsibility, mutual respect, and allowing students to progress at…

  15. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V modulates radiosensitivity and migration of small cell lung cancer through epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunyue; Huang, Miaojuan; Chen, Wenxia; Zhu, Weiliang; Meng, Hui; Guo, Linlang; Wei, Ting; Zhang, Jian

    2015-11-01

    N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (Gnt-V) has been linked to the migration of various human cancers. Recently we have found that inhibition of Gnt-V increases the radiosensitivity of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms by which Gnt-V mediates radiosensitivity and migration, especially in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remain unknown. In our study, two SCLC cell lines (H1688 and H146) were used to investigate whether Gnt-V modulated the radiosensitivity and migration of SCLC cells through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The results showed that the expression of Gnt-V correlated with the N stage in patients with SCLC. Overexpression of Gnt-V led to a further increase in the relative viable cell number and survival fraction with a decrease in apoptosis rate and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, when the cells were treated with irradiation. By contrast, knockdown of Gnt-V with irradiation resulted in a further decrease in the relative viable cell number and survival fraction but an increase in apoptosis rate and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Cells expressing high levels of Gnt-V increased migration whereas low levels of Gnt-V suppressed cell migration. Besides, the transient knockdown of ZEB2 led to an increase in radiosensitivity and an inhibition in the migration of SCLC cells. Furthermore, Gnt-V was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression but positively correlated with N-cadherin, vimentin and ZEB2 expression. Finally, an in vivo study revealed that upregulation of Gnt-V caused tumour growth more quickly, as well as the expression of EMT-related markers (N-cadherin, vimentin and ZEB2). Taken together, the study suggested that an elevation of Gnt-V could lead to the radiosensitivity and migration of SCLC cells by inducing EMT, thereby highlighting Gnt-V as a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of EMT-associated tumour radioresistance and migration.

  16. Genome-wide siRNA Screen Identifies the Radiosensitizing Effect of Downregulation of MASTL and FOXM1 in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Remco; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Buijze, Marijke; van den Berg, Jaap; van der Meulen, Ida H; Hodzic, Jasmina; Piersma, Sander R; Pham, Thang V; Jiménez, Connie R; van Beusechem, Victor W; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and on top of that has a very poor prognosis, which is reflected by a 5-year survival rate of 5% to 15%. Radiotherapy is an integral part of most treatment regimens for this type of tumor, often combined with radiosensitizing cytotoxic drugs. In this study, we identified many genes that could potentially be exploited for targeted radiosensitization using a genome-wide siRNA screen in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. The screen identified 433 siRNAs that potentially sensitize lung cancer cells to radiation. Validation experiments showed that knockdown of expression of Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) or microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like (MASTL) indeed causes radiosensitization in a panel of NSCLC cells. Strikingly, this effect was not observed in primary human fibroblasts, suggesting that the observed radiosensitization is specific for cancer cells. Phosphoproteomics analyses with and without irradiation showed that a number of cell-cycle-related proteins were significantly less phosphorylated after MASTL knockdown in comparison to the control, while there were no changes in the levels of phosphorylation of DNA damage response proteins. Subsequent analyses showed that MASTL knockdown cells respond differently to radiation, with a significantly shortened G2-M phase arrest and defects in cytokinesis, which are followed by a cell-cycle arrest. In summary, we have identified many potential therapeutic targets that could be used for radiosensitization of NSCLC cells, with MASTL being a very promising and druggable target to combine with radiotherapy. PMID:25808837

  17. Radiosensitization of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. in ready-to-eat baby spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Carmen; Moreira, Rosana G; Castell-Perez, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The FDA recently approved irradiation treatment of leafy greens such as spinach up to 1 kGy; however, it is important to reduce the dose required to decontaminate the produce while maintaining its quality. Thus, the objectives of this study were: (1) to assess the radiation sensitivities of Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. inoculated in ready-to-eat baby spinach leaves under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) and irradiated using a 1.35-MeV Van de Graff accelerator (the leaves were irradiated both at room temperature and at -5 °C); and (2) to understand and optimize the synergistic effect of MAP and irradiation by studying the radiolysis of ozone formation under different temperatures, the effect of dose rate on its formation, and its decomposition. Results showed that increased concentrations of oxygen in the packaging significantly increased the radiation sensitivity of the test organisms, ranging from 7% up to 25% reduction in D(10)-values. In particular, radiosensitization could be effected (P < 0.05) by production of ozone, which increases with increasing dose-rate and oxygen concentration, and reducing temperatures. Radiosensitization was demonstrated for both microorganisms with irradiation of either fresh or frozen (-5 °C) baby spinach. These results suggest that low-dose (below 1 kGy) e-beam radiation under modified atmosphere packaging (100% O(2) and N(2):O(2)[1:1]) may be a viable tool for reducing microbial populations or eliminating Salmonella spp. and Listeria spp. from baby spinach. A suggested treatment to achieve a 5-log reduction of the test organisms would be irradiation at room temperature under 100% O(2) atmosphere at a dose level of 0.7 kGy. Practical Application: Decontamination of minimally processed fruits and vegetables from food-borne pathogens presents technical and economical challenges to the produce industry. Internalized microorganisms cannot be eliminated by the current procedure (water-washed or treated with 200-ppm chlorine

  18. Resistance to heat radiosensitization and protein damage in thermotolerant and thermoresistant cells.

    PubMed

    Kampinga, H H; Konings, A W; Evers, A J; Brunsting, J F; Misfud, N; Anderson, R L

    1997-03-01

    Recently, randomized phase III trials have indicated that hyperthermia combined with radiation leads to significantly better tumour control of certain malignancies than does radio-therapy alone. Yet, the full capacity of such combined treatments might not have been optimally exploited as in vitro data indicate that repeated beating of cells can result in either the development of a transient heat resistance (thermotolerance) and/or the selection/induction of a stable heat resistant cell population. Although the mechanism of thermotolerance and its effect on thermo-radiotherapy has been studied extensively, little data are available on the mechanism of stable heat resistance and its impact on combined heat and radiation treatments. In the current study, a comprehensive analysis was made of the differences and similarities between thermotolerance (TT) and stable heat resistance (TR) in terms of the mechanism of resistance to the direct toxic action of heat and in terms of the impact on the extent of thermal radiosensitization. Using heat resistant mutants previously derived from a murine radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1), it was observed that these cells were resistant to protein denaturation and aggregation in the cytoplasmic/membrane compartment (measured by ESR (electron spin resonance) analysis and by in situ thermal denaturation of the foreign firefly luciferase targeted to the cytoplasm) but not in the nuclear compartment (measured by TX-100 insoluble nuclear proteins and by in situ thermal denaturation of luciferase targeted to the nucleus). RIF-1-TT cells, in contrast, were resistant for a 1 end-points tested. The lack of protection of nuclear heat damage in the RIF-TR cells could not be explained by a failure of one or more of the HSP70 isoforms to enter the nuclei of these cells. In relation to the absence or presence of heat resistance in the nucleus, the extent of heat radiosensitization was reduced in RIF-1-TT but not RIF-TR cells. This implies that

  19. International Accounting and the Accounting Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laribee, Stephen F.

    The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) has been instrumental in internationalizing the accounting curriculum by means of accreditation requirements and standards. Colleges and universities have met the AACSB requirements either by providing separate international accounting courses or by integrating international topics…

  20. A Harmonious Accounting Duo?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schapperle, Robert F.; Hardiman, Patrick F.

    1992-01-01

    Accountants have urged "harmonization" of standards between the Governmental Accounting Standards Board and the Financial Accounting Standards Board, recommending similar reporting of like transactions. However, varying display of similar accounting events does not necessarily indicate disharmony. The potential for problems because of differing…

  1. Effects of gamma radiation on solid trisodium citrate dihydrate: radical kinetics, radiosensitivity and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tuner, H; Korkmaz, M

    2010-11-01

    In the present work, radiosensitivity and dosimetric potential of solid trisodium citrate dihydrate (SC) were explored through a detailed electron spin resonance (ESR) study performed at various temperatures. Irradiated SC was observed to exhibit an ESR spectrum consisting of many intense and weak resonance lines spread over a magnetic field range of 7 mT and centered at g = 2.0039. An evaluation technique based on the variations of the characteristic resonance line intensities and the spectrum area under different experimental conditions was adopted, to determine the spectroscopic, kinetic and dosimetric features of radical species responsible for the observed experimental ESR spectrum. Radicals exhibiting similar ESR characteristics to those reported in the literature for irradiated tricarboxilic acids and their organic compounds were shown to be also produced in gamma-irradiated SC.

  2. Misonidazole and MTDQ in combination: cytotoxic and radiosensitizing properties in hypoxic mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Astor, M.; Hall, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    A combination of misonidazole and MTDQ (6,6'-methylene-bis-2,2,4 trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline) has been tested for its radiation-sensitizing properties and cytotoxicity, using Chinese hamster V79 cells cultured in vitro. Both compounds sensitize hypoxic cells to the effects of X-rays, and when used in combination their sensitizing properties are additive. By contrast, the presence of MTDQ completely inhibits the cytotoxicity that misonidazole exhibits towards hypoxic cells. These experiments shed some light on the mechanism of action of electron-affinic hypoxic cell sensitizers, and the combination of radiosensitizers suggested may have an application in human cancer radiotherapy by eliminating the neurotoxicity experienced by patients receiving misonidazole during radiotherapy. PMID:486306

  3. [The chromosomal radiosensitivity of children whose parents were exposed to antitumor radiochemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vorobtsova, I E; Vorob'eva, M V

    1992-12-01

    The effect of gamma radiation was studied on routine stained chromosomes from lymphocytes of children born to Hodgkin's disease patients after cancer therapy (CP) in comparison to children from healthy parents (HP). Irradiation (0, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 1.50 Gy) of the whole blood was performed in culture medium. Metaphases were obtained from 52-h cultures. Chromosomal aberrations were used as an endpoint. Aberrations of both chromosomal and chromatid types were scored in 150-200 metaphases for estimation of spontaneous level of cytogenetic injuries and in 100 metaphases of induced one. It is found that chromosomes of CP children are more radiosensitive than chromosomes of HP ones, the spontaneous frequency of chromosome aberrations being equal in both groups. PMID:1292705

  4. Eighth annual Juan del Regato lecture. Chemical modifiers of radiosensitivity--theory and reality: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.F.

    1985-04-01

    In this review the poor clinical gains from hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and misonidazole (MISO) are discussed critically. The biggest factor reducing clinical gains is almost certainly reoxygenation. Other possible reasons include vasoconstrictive self-limitation of HBO and neurotoxicity of MISO, so that the radiosensitization of any hypoxic cells in human tumors was not adequate. Nevertheless, there have been some positive clinical results, so that hypoxic cells can sometimes be a problem in some tumors, especially those of the head and neck, even after multiple fraction radiotherapy. While hypoxic cell radioresistance is obviously only one form of radioresistance it is a large factor of resistance when hypoxic cells are present. Current developments are briefly reviewed: the new clinical sensitizers Ro-03-8799 and SR-2508 which should be 3 to 10 times more efficient than MISO if viable hypoxic cells are present; and methods of measuring which human tumors might have significant numbers of hypoxic viable cells. 77 references.

  5. Radiosensitization in head and neck cancer: do we have an alternative to platins? Role of taxanes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Bindhu; Vishwanath, Lokesh; Venugopal, Bindu K

    2014-03-01

    In the past few decades, concurrent chemoradiation has conclusively been established as the standard of care in resectable, locally advanced head and neck cancer. Platins until now have been the established radiosensitizer in all concurrent settings, including postoperative high-risk scenarios. However, retrospective and evolving data suggest that they have their limitations in terms of compatibility, toxicity, and intrinsic resistance. There is therefore the need to explore the scope of other agents that may address these issues through a different mode of action, a better toxicity profile, or preferably a combination of both. In recent years, taxanes have emerged as an effective chemotherapeutic agent for head and neck cancer for recurrent or metastatic disease and chemoinduction for downstaging before definitive treatment. In this article, the authors review the potential of taxanes as an alternative to platins in the concurrent setting. PMID:24388535

  6. DOUGLAS LEA MEMORIAL LECTURE: From targets to genes: a brief history of radiosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, G. Gordon

    1996-02-01

    The biological work of Douglas Lea spanned the period from 1934 to his early death in 1947, and during this short period he made important contributions to the theory of radiation action. He interpreted experimental data relating to the effects of radiation on viruses, bacteria, bean roots, etc in terms of the inactivation of discrete targets, which he identified with cellular genes. He thus laid the foundation of much subsequent research. It is now well recognized that mammalian cells differ substantially in radiosensitivity, especially in the low-dose region of the survival curve. The dependence of radiosensitivity on dose rate has been widely studied; this has practical significance for clinical radiotherapy as well as mechanistic implications. Since Lea's time there have been a number of efforts to describe models that can relate cell killing to radiation dose, dose rate, and track structure. So far these have not led to a comprehensive and widely accepted picture. Microdosimetric considerations lead to the concept of differing severity of lesions induced in DNA. Much is known about the sequence of processes that subsequently lead to cell inactivation: this can be divided into phases of induction, processing, and manifestation. Chromosomal events are currently attracting much attention, as they did in Lea's time. Considerable progress has also been made in identifying genes that control the repair of radiation damage. It has been found that mutation is frequently associated with the loss of a large segment of the genome around the damage site and this will have important implications for interactive processes between particle tracks.

  7. Radiosensitization of p53 mutant cells by PD0166285, a novel G(2) checkpoint abrogator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Li, J; Booher, R N; Kraker, A; Lawrence, T; Leopold, W R; Sun, Y

    2001-11-15

    The lack of functional p53 in many cancer cells offers a therapeutic target for treatment. Cells lacking p53 would not be anticipated to demonstrate a G(1) checkpoint and would depend on the G(2) checkpoint to permit DNA repair prior to undergoing mitosis. We hypothesized that the G(2) checkpoint abrogator could preferentially kill p53-inactive cancer cells by removing the only checkpoint that protects these cells from premature mitosis in response to DNA damage. Because Wee1 kinase is crucial in maintaining G(2) arrest through its inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2, we developed a high-throughput mass screening assay and used it to screen chemical library for Wee1 inhibitors. A pyridopyrimidine class of molecule, PD0166285 was identified that inhibited Wee1 at a nanomolar concentration. At the cellular level, 0.5 microM PD0166285 dramatically inhibits irradiation-induced Cdc2 phosphorylation at the Tyr-15 and Thr-14 in seven of seven cancer cell lines tested. PD0166285 abrogates irradiation-induced G(2) arrest as shown by both biochemical markers and fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis and significantly increases mitotic cell populations. Biologically, PD0166285 acts as a radiosensitizer to sensitize cells to radiation-induced cell death with a sensitivity enhancement ratio of 1.23 as shown by standard clonogenic assay. This radiosensitizing activity is p53 dependent with a higher efficacy in p53-inactive cells. Thus, G(2) checkpoint abrogators represent a novel class of anticancer drugs that enhance cell killing of conventional cancer therapy through the induction of premature mitosis.

  8. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meidanchi, Alireza; Akhavan, Omid; Khoei, Samideh; Shokri, Ali A; Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khansari, Nakisa

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ~1 min for 2 mg mL(-1) of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (~1T). The ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of (60)Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL(-1), in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in ~53% inactivation of the cells (~17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy.

  9. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy Should Be Combined With a Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. Martin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tumor hypoxia on the expected level of cell killing by regimens of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and to determine the extent to which the negative effect of hypoxia could be prevented using a clinically available hypoxic cell radiosensitizer. Results and Discussion: We have calculated the expected level of tumor cell killing from regimens of SABR, both with and without the assumption that 20% of the tumor cells are hypoxic, using the standard linear quadratic model and the universal survival curve modification. We compare the results obtained with our own clinical data for lung tumors of different sizes and with published data from other studies. We also have calculated the expected effect on cell survival of adding the hypoxic cell sensitizer etanidazole at clinically achievable drug concentrations. Modeling tumor cell killing with any of the currently used regimens of SABR produces results that are inconsistent with the majority of clinical findings if tumor hypoxia is not considered. However, with the assumption of tumor hypoxia, the expected level of cell killing is consistent with clinical data. For only some of the smallest tumors are the clinical data consistent with no tumor hypoxia, but there could be other reasons for the sensitivity of these tumors. The addition of etanidazole at clinically achievable tumor concentrations produces a large increase in the expected level of tumor cell killing from the large radiation doses used in SABR. Conclusions: The presence of tumor hypoxia is a major negative factor in limiting the curability of tumors by SABR at radiation doses that are tolerable to surrounding normal tissues. However, this negative effect of hypoxia could be overcome by the addition of clinically tolerable doses of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer etanidazole.

  10. Radiosensitivity of polyamine-depleted HeLa cells and modulation by the aminothiol WR-1065

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.D.; Schroeder, K.K.

    1994-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of cultured HeLa cells was increased upon depletion of the natural cellular polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine through treatment of cultures with inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis. This increased radiosensitivity was manifested as a decrease in the D{sub 0} and by the absence of a shoulder in the survival curves. However, our previous studies have shown that the initial yield of X-ray-induced DNA damage did not appear to be elevated in polyamine-depleted cells. In addition, polyamine-depleted cells exhibited markedly altered X-ray-induced changes in the distribution of cells in the phases of the cell cycle characterized by increased time of onset and lengthened duration of G{sub 2}-phase delay. Addition of polyamines to cultures for short periods prior to irradiation restored normal radioresistence and reversed the anomalous features of the G{sub 2}-phase delay profile. Polyamine supplementation experiments as well as studies in which combinations of inhibitors were employed to modulate specific polyamine levels suggest that spermidine may play a primary role in governing cellular radioresponsiveness. The radioprotective aminothiol WR-1065 protected normal and polyamine-depleted cells to a proportionately similar extent (protection factor of 2.4 and 2.8, respectively) but had no apparent ability to restore the shoulder or alter the G{sub 2}-phase delay markedly in polyamine-depleted cells. The findings reported here extend our previous observations that polyamine depletion results in a compromised ability to respond to X irradiation and suggest that a defect in repair and/or the G{sub 2}-phase delay response may be the determining factors. 34 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Radiosensitivity of polyamine-depleted HeLa cells and modulation by the aminothiol WR-1065.

    PubMed

    Snyder, R D; Schroeder, K K

    1994-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of cultured HeLa cells was increased upon depletion of the natural cellular polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine through treatment of cultures with inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis. This increased radiosensitivity was manifested as a decrease in the D0 and by the absence of a shoulder in the survival curves. However, our previous studies have shown that the initial yield of X-ray-induced DNA damage did not appear to be elevated in polyamine-depleted cells. In addition, polyamine-depleted cells exhibited markedly altered X-ray-induced changes in the distribution of cells in the phases of the cell cycle characterized by increased time of onset and lengthened duration of G2-phase delay. Addition of polyamines to cultures for short periods prior to irradiation restored normal radioresistance and reversed the anomalous features of the G2-phase delay profile. Polyamine supplementation experiments as well as studies in which combinations of inhibitors were employed to modulate specific polyamine levels suggest that spermidine may play a primary role in governing cellular radioresponsiveness. The radioprotective aminothiol WR-1065 protected normal and polyamine-depleted cells to a proportionately similar extent (protection factor of 2.4 and 2.8, respectively) but had no apparent ability to restore the shoulder or alter the G2-phase delay markedly in polyamine-depleted cells. The findings reported here extend our previous observations that polyamine depletion results in a compromised ability to respond to X irradiation and suggest that a defect in repair and/or the G2-phase delay response may be the determining factors. PMID:8265790

  12. Cytosolic PhospholipaseA2 Inhibition with PLA-695 Radiosensitizes Tumors in Lung Cancer Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Daniel J.; Kotipatruni, Rama P.; Bhave, Sandeep R.; Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the rest of the world. The advent of molecularly directed therapies holds promise for improvement in therapeutic efficacy. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is associated with tumor progression and radioresistance in mouse tumor models. Utilizing the cPLA2 specific inhibitor PLA-695, we determined if cPLA2 inhibition radiosensitizes non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and tumors. Treatment with PLA-695 attenuated radiation induced increases of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt in endothelial cells. NSCLC cells (LLC and A549) co-cultured with endothelial cells (bEND3 and HUVEC) and pre-treated with PLA-695 showed radiosensitization. PLA-695 in combination with irradiation (IR) significantly reduced migration and proliferation in endothelial cells (HUVEC & bEND3) and induced cell death and attenuated invasion by tumor cells (LLC &A549). In a heterotopic tumor model, the combination of PLA-695 and radiation delayed growth in both LLC and A549 tumors. LLC and A549 tumors treated with a combination of PLA-695 and radiation displayed reduced tumor vasculature. In a dorsal skin fold model of LLC tumors, inhibition of cPLA2 in combination with radiation led to enhanced destruction of tumor blood vessels. The anti-angiogenic effects of PLA-695 and its enhancement of the efficacy of radiotherapy in mouse models of NSCLC suggest that clinical trials for its capacity to improve radiotherapy outcomes are warranted. PMID:23894523

  13. Cytosolic phospholipaseA2 inhibition with PLA-695 radiosensitizes tumors in lung cancer animal models.

    PubMed

    Thotala, Dinesh; Craft, Jeffrey M; Ferraro, Daniel J; Kotipatruni, Rama P; Bhave, Sandeep R; Jaboin, Jerry J; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the rest of the world. The advent of molecularly directed therapies holds promise for improvement in therapeutic efficacy. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is associated with tumor progression and radioresistance in mouse tumor models. Utilizing the cPLA2 specific inhibitor PLA-695, we determined if cPLA2 inhibition radiosensitizes non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and tumors. Treatment with PLA-695 attenuated radiation induced increases of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt in endothelial cells. NSCLC cells (LLC and A549) co-cultured with endothelial cells (bEND3 and HUVEC) and pre-treated with PLA-695 showed radiosensitization. PLA-695 in combination with irradiation (IR) significantly reduced migration and proliferation in endothelial cells (HUVEC & bEND3) and induced cell death and attenuated invasion by tumor cells (LLC &A549). In a heterotopic tumor model, the combination of PLA-695 and radiation delayed growth in both LLC and A549 tumors. LLC and A549 tumors treated with a combination of PLA-695 and radiation displayed reduced tumor vasculature. In a dorsal skin fold model of LLC tumors, inhibition of cPLA2 in combination with radiation led to enhanced destruction of tumor blood vessels. The anti-angiogenic effects of PLA-695 and its enhancement of the efficacy of radiotherapy in mouse models of NSCLC suggest that clinical trials for its capacity to improve radiotherapy outcomes are warranted.

  14. Upregulation of microRNA-98 increases radiosensitivity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ying-Ying; Chen, Qing-Juan; Wei, Yang; Wang, Ya-Li; Wang, Zhong-Wei; Xu, Kun; He, Yun; Ma, Hong-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Although radiation resistance is a common challenge in the clinical treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), an effective treatment strategy has yet to be developed. Aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is responsible for cancer sensitivity to radiation. In this study, we aimed to identify the miRNAs that are associated with radioresistance in ESCC. We used a miRNA microarray to perform a comparison of miRNA expression in both ESCC parental and acquired radioresistance cell lines. qRT-PCR was used to confirm the alterations. Cell radiosensitivity was determined with a survival fraction assay. Functional analyses of the identified miRNA in ESCC cells with regard to metastasis and apoptosis were performed by transwell assays and flow cytometry. The miRNA targets were identified with pathway analysis and confirmed with a luciferase assay. miR-98 was recognized as the most downregulated miRNA in established radioresistant cell line. AmiR-98 mimic enforced the expression of miRNA-98 and made ESCC cells sensitive to radiotherapy, while anti-miR-98 reversed this process. Optimal results were achieved by decreasing cellular proliferation, decreasing cell migration and inducing apoptosis. The luciferase target gene analysis results showed that the overexpression of miRNA-98 inhibited tumor growth and resistance tolerance by directly binding to the BCL-2 gene. Our study indicated that increasing miRNA-98 expression can be used as a potential radiosensitive therapeutic strategy for treating esophageal cancer cells. PMID:27422937

  15. Bacterial radiosensitization by using radiation processing in combination with essential oil: Mechanism of action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Monique; Caillet, Stéphane; Shareck, Francois

    2009-07-01

    Spice extracts under the form of essential oils were tested for their efficiency to increase the relative radiosensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157H7 in culture media. The two pathogens were treated by gamma-irradiation alone or in combination with oregano essential oil to evaluate their mechanism of action. The membrane murein composition, and the intracellular and extracellular concentration of ATP was determined. The bacterial strains were treated with two irradiation doses: 1.2 kGy to induce cell damage and 3.5 kGy to cause cell death for L. monocytogenes. A dose of 0.4 kGy to induce cell damages, 1.1 kGy to obtain viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state and 1.3 kGy to obtain a lethal dose was also applied on E. coli O157H7. Oregano essential oil was used at 0.020% and 0.025% (w/v), which is the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for L. monocytogenes. For E. coli O157H7, a concentration of 0.006% and 0.025% (w/v) which is the minimum inhibitory concentration was applied. The use of essential oils in combination with irradiation has permitted an increase of the bacterial radiosensitization by more than 3.1 times. All treatments had also a significant effect ( p⩽0.05) on the murein composition, although some muropeptides did not seem to be affected by the treatment. Each treatment influenced differently the relative percentage and number of muropeptides. There was a significant ( p⩽0.05) correlation between the reduction of intracellular ATP and increase in extracellular ATP following treatment of the cells with oregano oil. The reduction of intracellular ATP was even more important when essential oil was combined with irradiation, but irradiation of L. monocytogenes alone induced a significant decrease ( p⩽0.05) of the internal ATP without affecting the external ATP.

  16. Cytosolic phospholipaseA2 inhibition with PLA-695 radiosensitizes tumors in lung cancer animal models.

    PubMed

    Thotala, Dinesh; Craft, Jeffrey M; Ferraro, Daniel J; Kotipatruni, Rama P; Bhave, Sandeep R; Jaboin, Jerry J; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States and the rest of the world. The advent of molecularly directed therapies holds promise for improvement in therapeutic efficacy. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) is associated with tumor progression and radioresistance in mouse tumor models. Utilizing the cPLA2 specific inhibitor PLA-695, we determined if cPLA2 inhibition radiosensitizes non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and tumors. Treatment with PLA-695 attenuated radiation induced increases of phospho-ERK and phospho-Akt in endothelial cells. NSCLC cells (LLC and A549) co-cultured with endothelial cells (bEND3 and HUVEC) and pre-treated with PLA-695 showed radiosensitization. PLA-695 in combination with irradiation (IR) significantly reduced migration and proliferation in endothelial cells (HUVEC & bEND3) and induced cell death and attenuated invasion by tumor cells (LLC &A549). In a heterotopic tumor model, the combination of PLA-695 and radiation delayed growth in both LLC and A549 tumors. LLC and A549 tumors treated with a combination of PLA-695 and radiation displayed reduced tumor vasculature. In a dorsal skin fold model of LLC tumors, inhibition of cPLA2 in combination with radiation led to enhanced destruction of tumor blood vessels. The anti-angiogenic effects of PLA-695 and its enhancement of the efficacy of radiotherapy in mouse models of NSCLC suggest that clinical trials for its capacity to improve radiotherapy outcomes are warranted. PMID:23894523

  17. Radioprotection and Cell Cycle Arrest of Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Darinaparsin, a Tumor Radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Junqiang; Doi, Hiroshi; Saar, Matthias; Santos, Jennifer; Li, Xuejun; Peehl, Donna M.; Knox, Susan J.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: It was recently reported that the organic arsenic compound darinaparsin (DPS) is a cytotoxin and radiosensitizer of tumor cells in vitro and in subcutaneous xenograft tumors. Surprisingly, it was also found that DPS protects normal intestinal crypt epithelial cells (CECs) from clonogenic death after ionizing radiation (IR). Here we tested the DPS radiosensitizing effect in a clinically relevant model of prostate cancer and explored the radioprotective effect and mechanism of DPS on CECs. Methods and Materials: The radiation modification effect of DPS was tested in a mouse model of orthotopic xenograft prostate cancer and of IR-induced acute gastrointestinal syndrome. The effect of DPS on CEC DNA damage and DNA damage responses was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results: In the mouse model of IR-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, DPS treatment before IR accelerated recovery from body weight loss and increased animal survival. DPS decreased post-IR DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that the radioprotective effect was mediated by enhanced DNA damage repair. Shortly after DPS injection, significant cell cycle arrest was observed in CECs at both G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, which was accompanied by the activation of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45 alpha (GADD45A). Further investigation revealed that DPS activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an important inducer of DNA damage repair and cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: DPS selectively radioprotected normal intestinal CECs and sensitized prostate cancer cells in a clinically relevant model. This effect may be, at least in part, mediated by DNA damage response activation and has the potential to significantly increase the therapeutic index of radiation therapy.

  18. The Myb-p300-CREB axis modulates intestine homeostasis, radiosensitivity and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sampurno, S; Bijenhof, A; Cheasley, D; Xu, H; Robine, S; Hilton, D; Alexander, W S; Pereira, L; Mantamadiotis, T; Malaterre, J; Ramsay, R G

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium is constantly renewing, depending upon the intestinal stem cells (ISC) regulated by a spectrum of transcription factors (TFs), including Myb. We noted previously in mice with a p300 mutation (plt6) within the Myb-interaction-domain phenocopied Myb hypomorphic mutant mice with regard to thrombopoiesis, and here, changes in GI homeostasis. p300 is a transcriptional coactivator for many TFs, most prominently cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and also Myb. Studies have highlighted the importance of CREB in proliferation and radiosensitivity, but not in the GI. This prompted us to directly investigate the p300–Myb–CREB axis in the GI. Here, the role of CREB has been defined by generating GI-specific inducible creb knockout (KO) mice. KO mice show efficient and specific deletion of CREB, with no evident compensation by CREM and ATF1. Despite complete KO, only modest effects on proliferation, radiosensitivity and differentiation in the GI under homeostatic or stress conditions were evident, even though CREB target gene pcna (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) was downregulated. creb and p300 mutant lines show increased goblet cells, whereas a reduction in enteroendocrine cells was apparent only in the p300 line, further resembling the Myb hypomorphs. When propagated in vitro, crebKO ISC were defective in organoid formation, suggesting that the GI stroma compensates for CREB loss in vivo, unlike in MybKO studies. Thus, it appears that p300 regulates GI differentiation primarily through Myb, rather than CREB. Finally, active pCREB is elevated in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells and adenomas, and is required for the expression of drug transporter, MRP2, associated with resistance to Oxaliplatin as well as several chromatin cohesion protein that are relevant to CRC therapy. These data raise the prospect that CREB may have a role in GI malignancy as it does in other cancer types, but unlike Myb, is not critical for GI

  19. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meidanchi, Alireza; Akhavan, Omid; Khoei, Samideh; Shokri, Ali A; Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khansari, Nakisa

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ~1 min for 2 mg mL(-1) of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (~1T). The ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of (60)Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL(-1), in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in ~53% inactivation of the cells (~17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy. PMID:25492003

  20. Dexamethasone acts as a radiosensitizer in three astrocytoma cell lines via oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs), which act on stress pathways, are well-established in the co-treatment of different kinds of tumors; however, the underlying mechanisms by which GCs act are not yet well elucidated. As such, this work investigates the role of glucocorticoids, specifically dexamethasone (DEXA), in the processes referred to as DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR), establishing a new approach in three astrocytomas cell lines (CT2A, APP.PS1 L.1 and APP.PS1 L.3). The results show that DEXA administration increased the basal levels of gamma-H2AX foci, keeping them higher 4 h after irradiation (IR) of the cells, compared to untreated cells. This means that DEXA might cause increased radiosensitivity in these cell lines. On the other hand, DEXA did not have an apparent effect on the formation and disappearance of the 53BP1 foci. Furthermore, it was found that DEXA administered 2 h before IR led to a radical change in DNA repair kinetics, even DEXA does not affect cell cycle. It is important to highlight that DEXA produced cell death in these cell lines compared to untreated cells. Finally and most important, the high levels of gamma-H2AX could be reversed by administration of ascorbic acid, a potent blocker of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that DEXA acts by causing DNA damage via oxidative stress. These exiting findings suggest that DEXA might promote radiosensitivity in brain tumors, specifically in astrocytoma-like tumors. PMID:26160768

  1. ADC response to radiation therapy correlates with induced changes in radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Larocque, Matthew P.; Syme, Alasdair; Allalunis-Turner, Joan; Fallone, B. Gino

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare the responses of human glioma tumor xenografts to a single fraction of radiation, where a change in radiosensitivity was induced by use of a suture-based ligature. Methods: Ischemia was induced by use of a suture-based ligature. Six mice were treated with 800 cGy of 200 kVp x rays while the ligature was applied. An additional six mice had the ligature applied for the same length of time but were not irradiated. Quantitative maps of each tumor were produced of water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and transverse relaxation time (T2). Mice were imaged before and at multiple points after treatment. Volumetric, ADC, and T2 responses of the ligated groups were compared to previously measured responses of the same tumor model to the same radiation treatment, as well as those from an untreated control group. Results: Application of the ligature without irradiation did not affect tumor ADC values, but did produce a temporary decrease in tumor T2 values. Average tumor T2 was reduced by 6.2% 24 h after the ligature was applied. Average tumor ADC increased by 9.6% 7 days after irradiation with a ligature applied. This response was significantly less than that observed in the same tumor model when no ligature is present (21.8% at 7 days after irradiation). Conclusions: These observations indicate that the response of ADC to radiation therapy is not determined entirely by physical dose deposition, but at least in part by radiosensitivity and resultant biological response.

  2. Radiosensitization of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein E6*I

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ervinna; Delic, Naomi C.; Hong, Angela; Zhang Mei; Rose, Barbara R.; Lyons, J. Guy

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) whose disease is associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have a significantly better outcome than those with HPV-negative disease, but the reasons for the better outcome are not known. We postulated that they might relate to an ability of HPV proteins to confer a better response to radiotherapy, a commonly used treatment for OSCC. Methods and Materials: We stably expressed the specific splicing-derived isoforms, E6*I and E6*II, or the entire E6 open reading frame (E6total), which gives rise to both full length and E6*I isoforms, in OSCC cell lines. Radiation resistance was measured in clonogenicity assays, p53 activity was measured using transfected reporter genes, and flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis. Results: E6*I and E6total sensitized the OSCC cells to irradiation, E6*I giving the greatest degree of radiosensitization (approximately eightfold lower surviving cell fraction at 10 Gy), whereas E6*II had no effect. In contrast to radiosensitivity, E6*I was a weaker inhibitor than E6total of tumor suppressor p53 transactivator activity in the same cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that irradiated E6*I expressing cells had a much higher G2M:G1 ratio than control cells, indicating that, after G2, cells were diverted from the cell cycle to programmed cell death. Conclusion: This study supports a role for E6*I in the enhanced responsiveness of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas to p53-independent radiation-induced death.

  3. Mutations in Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit C Increase Radiosensitivity and Bystander Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongning; Hei, Tom K.

    Although radiation-induced bystander effect is well studied in the past decade, the precise mech-anisms are still unclear. It is likely that a combination of pathways involving both primary and secondary signaling processes is involved in producing a bystander effect. There is recent evidence that mitochondria play a critical role in bystander responses. Recently studies found that a mutation in succinate dehydrogenese subunit C (SDHC), an integral membrane protein in complex II of the electron transport chain, resulted in increased superoxide, oxidative stress, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and genomic instability, indicating that SDHC play a critical role in maintaining mitochondrial function. In the present study, using Chinese hamster fibroblasts (B1 cells) and the mutants (B9 cells) containing a single base substitution that produced a premature stop codon resulting in a 33-amino acid COOH-terminal truncation of the SDHC protein, we found that B9 cells had an increase in intracellular superoxide content, nitric oxide species, and mitochondrial membrane potential when compared with wild type cells. After irradiated with a grade of doses of gamma rays, B9 cells show an increased radiosensitivity, especially at high doses. The HPRT- mutant yield after gamma-ray irradiation in B9 cells was significantly higher than that of B1 cells. A single, 3Gy dose of gamma-rays increased the background mutant level by more than 4 fold. In contrast, the mutant induction was less than 2 fold in B1 cells. In addition, B9 cells produced a higher bystander mutagenesis after alpha particle irradiation than the B1 cells. Furthermore, pretreated with carboxy-2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO), a nitric oxide scavenger, significantly decreased the bystander effect. Our findings demonstrate that a mutation in SDHC increases radiosensitivity in both directly irradiated cells and in neighboring bystander cells, and mito-chondrial function play an essential role in

  4. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  5. Volume effects and region-dependent radiosensitivity of the parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Antonius W.T. . E-mail: a.w.t.konings@med.rug.nl; Cotteleer, Femmy; Faber, Hette; Luijk, Peter van; Meertens, Harm; Coppes, Rob P.

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To detect volume effects and possible regional differences in radiosensitivity of the rat parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Parotid glands of male albino Wistar rats were locally X-irradiated, with collimators with conformal radiation portals used to supply 100% volume and 50% cranial/caudal partial volumes. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging was used to provide the outlines of the parotid glands. Single doses of up to 40 Gy were applied, and the effects on saliva secretion, measured with the aid of miniaturized Lashley cups, were followed up to 365 days after the irradiation. Results: Under conditions of equal mean absorbed doses and small variations in dose distribution, a pertinent volume effect was observed for late but not for early radiation damage. The late effects were different for the cranial part as compared with the caudal part of the parotid gland. The reduction in flow rate was much more severe after irradiation in the cranial part. After a single dose of 30 Gy, the reductions in flow rates were approximately 65% and 25% for the cranial and caudal parts, respectively. At that dose, no saliva flow was observed after irradiation of 100% of the gland. Conclusion: From the rat model studies presented, it is concluded that late radiation damage after partial irradiation of parotid glands shows region-dependent volume effects. This finding is expected to be relevant to the radiosensitivity of human salivary glands, and it implies that the predictive power of the mean dose concept in radiotherapeutic practice is limited. The finding of region-dependent late radiation damage also challenges the basic assumptions of most current normal tissue complication probability models for parotid gland function.

  6. Individualizing Medicare.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds.

  7. Individualizing Medicare.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds. PMID:10915458

  8. Modulation of Sonic hedgehog signaling and WW domain containing oxidoreductase WOX1 expression enhances radiosensitivity of human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ming-Fu; Chen, Hsin-Hong; Chi, Chih-Wen; Sze, Chun-I; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Lin, Chin-Ping; Tsai, Jo-Ting

    2015-01-01

    WW domain containing oxidoreductase, designated WWOX, FOR or WOX1, is a known pro-apoptotic factor when ectopically expressed in various types of cancer cells, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The activation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, especially paracrine Shh secretion in response to radiation, is associated with impairing the effective irradiation of cancer cells. Here, we examined the role of Shh signaling and WOX1 overexpression in the radiosensitivity of human GBM cells. Our results showed that ionizing irradiation (IR) increased the cytoplasmic Shh and nuclear Gli-1 content in GBM U373MG and U87MG cells. GBM cells with exogenous Shh treatment exhibited similar results. Pretreatment with Shh peptides protected U373MG and U87MG cells against IR in a dose-dependent manner. Cyclopamine, a Hedgehog/Smoothened (SMO) inhibitor, reversed the protective effect of Shh in U87MG cells. Cyclopamine increased Shh plus IR-induced H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, in these cells. To verify the role of Shh signaling in the radiosensitivity of GBM cells, we tested the effect of the Gli family zinc finger 1 (Gli-1) inhibitor zerumbone and found that it could sensitize GBM cells to IR. We next examined the role of WOX1 in radiosensitivity. Overexpression of WOX1 enhanced the radiosensitivity of U87MG (possessing wild type p53 or WTp53) but not U373MG (harboring mutant p53 or MTp53) cells. Pretreatment with Shh peptides protected both WOX1-overexpressed U373MG and U87MG cells against IR and increased the cytoplasmic Shh and nuclear Gli-1 content. Zerumbone enhanced the radiosensitivity of WOX1-overexpressed U373MG and U87MG cells. In conclusion, overexpression of WOX1 preferentially sensitized human GBM cells possessing wild type p53 to radiation therapy. Blocking of Shh signaling may enhance radiosensitivity independently of the expression of p53 and WOX1. The crosstalk between Shh signaling and WOX1 expression in human glioblastoma warrants further

  9. Radiosensitization of TPGS-emulsified docetaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles in CNE-1 and A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Yuan, Yin; Chu, Min; Zhao, Shuang; Song, Qingle; Mu, Xiaoqian; Xu, Shuangbing; Zhang, Zhiping; Yang, Kunyu

    2016-03-01

    Docetaxel is among the most effective radiosensitizers. It is widely used as radiosensitizer in many tumors, including head and neck carcinoma. Nevertheless, poor solubility and severe hypersensitivity limit its clinical use and its therapeutic effect remains to be improved. In this study, docetaxel-loaded polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation method to be new radiosensitizer with lower side effects and higher efficacy. The physiochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles were studied. Two human tumor cell lines which are resistant to radiotherapy were used in this research. We have compared the radioenhancement efficacy of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles with docetaxel in A549 and CNE-1 cells. Compared with docetaxel, radiosensitization of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles was improved significantly (sensitization enhancement ratio in A549 increased 1.24-fold to 1.68-fold when the radiation was applied 2 h after the drug, p < 0.01, sensitization enhancement ratio in CNE-1 increased 1.32-fold to 1.61-fold, p < 0.05). We explored the mechanisms for the radiosensitization efficiency and the difference between docetaxel and docetaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The improved radiosensitization efficacy was associated with enhanced G2/M arrest, promoted apoptosis and the role of D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate which will enhance the cell uptake and inhibit the multiple drug resistance. Moreover, the radiosensitization efficacy of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles was more prominent than docetaxel. In conclusion, tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-emulsified docetaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were more efficacious and fewer adverse effects were observed than with the commercial docetaxel formulation. Thus, PLGA nanoparticles hold promise as a radiosensitizing agent. PMID:26608458

  10. The radiosensitizing effect of immunoadjuvant OM-174 requires cooperation between immune and tumor cells through interferon-gamma and inducible nitric oxide synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Ridder, Mark de . E-mail: Mark.De.Ridder@vub.ac.be; Verovski, Valeri N.; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Berge, Dirk L. van den; Monsaert, Christinne; Law, Kalun; Storme, Guy A.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To explore whether antitumor immunoadjuvant OM-174 can stimulate immune cells to produce interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and thereby radiosensitize tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Splenocytes from BALB/c mice were stimulated by OM-174 at plasma-achievable concentrations (0.03-3 {mu}g/mL), and afterward analyzed for the expression and secretion of IFN-{gamma} by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Stimulated splenocytes were used as a source of IFN-{gamma} to radiosensitize hypoxic EMT-6 tumor cells through the cytokine-inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Results: OM-174 activated the production of IFN-{gamma} at high levels that reached 70 ng/mL in normoxia (21% oxygen) and 27 ng/mL in tumor-relevant hypoxia (1% oxygen). This caused up to 2.1-fold radiosensitization of EMT-6 tumor cells, which was associated with the iNOS-mediated production of the radiosensitizing molecule nitric oxide, as confirmed by accumulation of its oxidative metabolite nitrite, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Both iNOS activation and radiosensitization were counteracted by neutralizing antibodies against IFN-{gamma}. The same mechanism of radiosensitization through the IFN-{gamma} secretion pathway was identified for IL-12 + IL-18, which are known to mediate IFN-{gamma} responses. Hypoxia displayed a dual effect on the immune-tumor cell interaction, by downregulating the expression of the IFN-{gamma} gene while upregulating iNOS at transcriptional level. Conclusion: Immunoadjuvant OM-174 is an efficient radiosensitizer of tumor cells through activation of the IFN-{gamma} secretion pathway in immune cells. This finding indicates a rationale for combining immunostimulatory and radiosensitizing strategies and extends the potential therapeutic applications of OM-174.

  11. Comparison between in vitro radiosensitivity and in vivo radioresponse of murine tumor cell lines. I: Parameters of in vitro radiosensitivity and endogenous cellular glutathione levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, R.G.; Hardy, P.A.; Hill, R.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that differences in the initial low-dose region of the radiation survival curves for human tumor cells might explain the differences in clinical response of tumors to fractionated radiation treatment. In this study, which is described in two companion papers, we investigated this hypothesis directly using animal model systems. In the present paper we determined in vitro radiation survival curves for eight murine tumor cell lines of varying histopathological type and: (a) measured survival at the 2 Gy and 8 Gy dose levels, (b) fitted parameters to the linear quadratic and two component multi-target equation models of cellular survival and (c) calculated mean inactivation doses. We found that the choice of the data fitting procedure affected the absolute value, relative ranking, and power to discriminate between the cell lines of these calculated parameters. A detailed statistical study indicated that the measured surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) was the best discriminant of intrinsic radiosensitivity between the eight tumor cell lines. When these same cell lines were assayed for intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, no correlation was found between levels of GSH and the SF2 value. Determining the SF2 value may be the method of choice to describe the low-dose region of the radiation survival curve, as it precludes the necessity of choosing a model to fit the survival data, it has excellent discriminatory powers, and it represents the survival in the radiotherapeutically relevant region of the in vitro radiation survival curve. Furthermore, as demonstrated in the companion paper, it correlates with cell survival in the tumors following 10 fractions of 2 Gy given in vivo.

  12. Identification of vitamin B1 metabolism as a tumor-specific radiosensitizing pathway using a high-throughput colony formation screen

    PubMed Central

    Buffa, Francesca M.; Yu, Sheng; Ebner, Daniel V.; Howarth, Alison; Folkes, Lisa K.; Budwal, Balam; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Durrant, Lisa; Muschel, Ruth J.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Higgins, Geoff S.

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation is the gold standard assay for determining reproductive cell death after radiation treatment, since effects on proliferation often do not reflect survival. We have developed a high-throughput radiosensitivity screening method based on clonogenicity and screened a siRNA library against kinases. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK1), a key component of Vitamin B1/thiamine metabolism, was identified as a target for radiosensitization. TPK1 knockdown caused significant radiosensitization in cancer but not normal tissue cell lines. Other means of blocking this pathway, knockdown of thiamine transporter-1 (THTR1) or treatment with the thiamine analogue pyrithiamine hydrobromide (PyrH) caused significant tumor specific radiosensitization. There was persistent DNA damage in cells irradiated after TPK1 and THTR1 knockdown or PyrH treatment. Thus this screen allowed the identification of thiamine metabolism as a novel radiosensitization target that affects DNA repair. Short-term modulation of thiamine metabolism could be a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor specific radiosensitization. PMID:25788274

  13. Identification of vitamin B1 metabolism as a tumor-specific radiosensitizing pathway using a high-throughput colony formation screen.

    PubMed

    Tiwana, Gaganpreet S; Prevo, Remko; Buffa, Francesca M; Yu, Sheng; Ebner, Daniel V; Howarth, Alison; Folkes, Lisa K; Budwal, Balam; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Durrant, Lisa; Muschel, Ruth J; McKenna, W Gillies; Higgins, Geoff S

    2015-03-20

    Colony formation is the gold standard assay for determining reproductive cell death after radiation treatment, since effects on proliferation often do not reflect survival. We have developed a high-throughput radiosensitivity screening method based on clonogenicity and screened a siRNA library against kinases. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK1), a key component of Vitamin B1/thiamine metabolism, was identified as a target for radiosensitization. TPK1 knockdown caused significant radiosensitization in cancer but not normal tissue cell lines. Other means of blocking this pathway, knockdown of thiamine transporter-1 (THTR1) or treatment with the thiamine analogue pyrithiamine hydrobromide (PyrH) caused significant tumor specific radiosensitization. There was persistent DNA damage in cells irradiated after TPK1 and THTR1 knockdown or PyrH treatment. Thus this screen allowed the identification of thiamine metabolism as a novel radiosensitization target that affects DNA repair. Short-term modulation of thiamine metabolism could be a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor specific radiosensitization.

  14. [Individualizing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, William J.

    The individually guided education (IGE) program developed by the Kettering Foundation was implemented in September of 1973 at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Junior High School in Woburn, Massachusetts. The components of the program described in this speech include pupil and teacher scheduling, physical layout, pupil selection and adjustment,…

  15. Holding Individuals Accountable and Deterring Money Laundering Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Waters, Maxine [D-CA-43

    2013-10-23

    01/09/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Shallow Semantic Processing of Text: An Individual-Differences Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Brenda; Daneman, Meredyth

    2004-01-01

    We used Barton and Sanford's (1993) anomaly detection task to investigate text processing differences between skilled and less-skilled readers. The results of 2 experiments showed that many readers had the tendency to process text in a shallow or incomplete manner, frequently failing to detect anomalous nouns or noun phrases (NPs) in text such as…

  17. 26 CFR 1.408-2 - Individual retirement accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the interests of a large number of variable annuity contract holders. (4) Fitness to handle funds—(i... Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, 29 U.S.C. 1023(a)(3)(D), who is independent of...

  18. Accounting for Individual Variability in Inversion Shortcut Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Adam K.; Robinson, Katherine M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether children's inversion shortcut use (i.e., reasoning that no calculations are required for the problem 4 x 8 divided by 8, as the answer is the first number) is related to their analogical reasoning ability, short-term memory capacity, and working memory capacity. Children from Grades 6 and 8 solved multiplication and…

  19. Saving Performance in Individual Development Accounts: Does Marital Status Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstein-Weiss, Michal; Zhan, Min; Sherraden, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Research indicates that marriage has a large effect on reducing the risk of poverty and is associated with a higher probability of attaining affluence over the life course when compared with nonmarriage. Using data from the American Dream Demonstration (N = 2,364), this study compares savings performances of married and unmarried low-income…

  20. NASA Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA is piloting fiscal year (FY) 1997 Accountability Reports, which streamline and upgrade reporting to Congress and the public. The document presents statements by the NASA administrator, and the Chief Financial Officer, followed by an overview of NASA's organizational structure and the planning and budgeting process. The performance of NASA in four strategic enterprises is reviewed: (1) Space Science, (2) Mission to Planet Earth, (3) Human Exploration and Development of Space, and (4) Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology. Those areas which support the strategic enterprises are also reviewed in a section called Crosscutting Processes. For each of the four enterprises, there is discussion about the long term goals, the short term objectives and the accomplishments during FY 1997. The Crosscutting Processes section reviews issues and accomplishments relating to human resources, procurement, information technology, physical resources, financial management, small and disadvantaged businesses, and policy and plans. Following the discussion about the individual areas is Management's Discussion and Analysis, about NASA's financial statements. This is followed by a report by an independent commercial auditor and the financial statements.

  1. Negotiations and Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, Charles R.

    1971-01-01

    School boards by state statutes are alone accountable for the education of their communities' youth. What's needed, the writer contends, is a rectification of the statutes so that all parties to negotiations are accountable. (Editor)

  2. LMAL Accounting Office 1936

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Accounting Office: The Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory's accounting office, 1936, with photographs of the Wright brothers on the wall. Although the Lab was named after Samuel P. Langley, most of the NACA staff held the Wrights as their heroes.

  3. The enhancement of radiosensitivity in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells by zoledronic acid and its potential mechanism.

    PubMed

    You, Yanjie; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Yuan; Ran, Yonggang; Guo, Xu; Liu, Huimin; Wang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a low 5-year patient survival rate. Radiotherapy, as a preoperative or postoperative treatment of surgery, has a crucial role in improving local control and survival of ESCC. Various chemotherapeutic and biologic agents have been used as radio-sensitizers in combination with radiotherapy. Here, we demonstrate that zoledronic acid (ZOL) has a radio-sensitizing effect on ESCC cells. Exposure of ESCC cancer cells to ZOL plus radiation resulted in increased cell death through arresting the cell cycle between S and G2/M phases. ZOL appeared to inhibit proliferation, tube formation and invasion of endothelial cells. These anti-angiogenetic effects were more marked concurrently with irradiation. In addition, synergistic suppressive effects on VEGF expression were observed after combined treatment. Our data suggest that the combination of ZOL and radiation is a promising therapeutic strategy to enhance radiation therapy for ESCC patients.

  4. Temperature dependence of anisotonic NaC1 effect on radiosensitization and ultrastructure of V79 Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.G.; Raaphorst, G.P.; Lobreau, A.U.; Azzam, E.I.; Copps, T.P.

    1983-01-01

    Isodose radiation survival of V79 Chinese hamster cells, pretreated with strongly hypertonic concentrations of NaC1 at 22 degrees C, or at 37 degrees C, has been determined and correlated with ultrastructural changes within the nucleus. After an exposure of less than 10 min to 1.5 M NaC1, at both temperatures, the cells are radioprotected, but after longer exposures, the cells treated at 37 degrees C are radiosensitive, whereas those treated at 22 degrees C still show protection. The cells are radiosensitized at both temperatures by pretreatment with 0.5 M and 0.05 M NaC1. The ultrastructure of the nucleus observed after the anisotonic treatments suggests that contraction or swelling of chromatin may be associated with the observed variation in radiation sensitivity.

  5. A deficiency in DNA repair and DNA-PKcs expression in the radiosensitive BALB/c mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okayasu, R.; Suetomi, K.; Yu, Y.; Silver, A.; Bedford, J. S.; Cox, R.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the efficiency of DNA double strand break (DSB) rejoining in primary cells from mouse strains that show large differences in in vivo radiosensitivity and tumor susceptibility. Cells from radiosensitive, cancer-prone BALB/c mice showed inefficient end joining of gamma ray-induced DSBs as compared with cells from all of the other commonly used strains and F1 hybrids of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. The BALB/c repair phenotype was accompanied by a significantly reduced expression level of DNA-PKcs protein as well as a lowered DNA-PK activity level as compared with the other strains. In conjunction with published reports, these data suggest that natural genetic variation in nonhomologous end joining processes may have a significant impact on the in vivo radiation response of mice.

  6. Temperature dependence of anisotonic NaC1 effect on radiosensitization and ultrastructure of V79 Chinese hamster cells.

    PubMed

    Szekely, J G; Raaphorst, G P; Lobreau, A U; Azzam, E I; Copps, T P

    1983-01-01

    Isodose radiation survival of V79 Chinese hamster cells, pretreated with strongly hypertonic concentrations of NaC1 at 22 degrees C, or at 37 degrees C, has been determined and correlated with ultrastructural changes within the nucleus. After an exposure of less than 10 min to 1.5 M NaC1, at both temperatures, the cells are radioprotected, but after longer exposures, the cells treated at 37 degrees C are radiosensitive, whereas those treated at 22 degrees C still show protection. The cells are radiosensitized at both temperatures by pretreatment with 0.5 M and 0.05 M NaC1. The ultrastructure of the nucleus observed after the anisotonic treatments suggests that contraction or swelling of chromatin may be associated with the observed variation in radiation sensitivity.

  7. Managerial Accounting. Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plachta, Leonard E.

    This self-instructional study guide is part of the materials for a college-level programmed course in managerial accounting. The study guide is intended for use by students in conjuction with a separate textbook, Horngren's "Accounting for Management Control: An Introduction," and a workbook, Curry's "Student Guide to Accounting for Management…

  8. Accounting & Computing Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avani, Nathan T.; And Others

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching a competency-based accounting and computing course that is designed to prepare students for employability in the following occupational areas: inventory control clerk, invoice clerk, payroll clerk, traffic clerk, general ledger bookkeeper, accounting clerk, account information clerk,…

  9. Accounting Education in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Karen F.; Reed, Ronald O.; Greiman, Janel

    2011-01-01

    Almost on a daily basis new accounting rules and laws are put into use, creating information that must be known and learned by the accounting faculty and then introduced to and understood by the accounting student. Even with the 150 hours of education now required for CPA licensure, it is impossible to teach and learn all there is to learn. Over…

  10. The Accounting Capstone Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrod, Henry; Norris, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Capstone courses in accounting programs bring students experiences integrating across the curriculum (University of Washington, 2005) and offer unique (Sanyal, 2003) and transformative experiences (Sill, Harward, & Cooper, 2009). Students take many accounting courses without preparing complete sets of financial statements. Accountants not only…

  11. Individualized Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    IntelliWeb and IntelliPrint, products from MicroMass Communications, utilize C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), a development and delivery expert systems tool developed at Johnson Space Center. IntelliWeb delivers personalized messages by dynamically creating single web pages or entire web sites based on information provided by each website visitor. IntelliPrint is a product designed to create tailored, individualized messages via printed media. The software uses proprietary technology to generate printed messages that are personally relevant and tailored to meet each individual's needs. Intelliprint is in use in many operations including Brystol-Myers Squibb's personalized newsletter, "Living at Your Best," geared to each recipient based on a health and lifestyle survey taken earlier; and SmithKline Beecham's "Nicorette Committed Quitters Program," in which customized motivational materials support participants in their attempt to quit smoking.

  12. Health savings accounts and health reimbursement arrangements: assets, account balances, and rollovers, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    ASSET LEVELS GROWING: In 2010, there was $7.7 billion in health savings accounts (HSAs) and health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs), spread across 5.7 million accounts. This is up from 2006, when there were 1.2 million accounts with $835.4 million in assets, and 2009, when 5 million accounts held $7.1 billion in assets. AFTER LEVELING OFF, AVERAGE ACCOUNT BALANCE DROPS SLIGHTLY: Increases in average account balances leveled off in 2008 and 2009, and fell slightly in 2010. In 2006, account balances averaged $696. They increased to $1,320 in 2007, a 90 percent increase. Account balances averaged $1,356 in 2008 and $1,419 in 2009, 3 percent and 5 percent increases, respectively. In 2010, average account balances fell to $1,355, down 4.5 percent from the previous year. AVERAGE ROLLOVER DECLINES, WHILE TOTAL ROLLOVERS INCREASE: Despite a decline in the average rollover amount in 2010, total assets being rolled over have been increasing. $4.2 billion was rolled over in 2010, up from $4 billion in 2009. The average rollover increased from $592 in 2006 to $1,295 in 2009, and fell to $1,029 in 2010. The percentage of individuals without a rollover decreased from 23 percent in 2006 to 10 percent in 2009 and increased slightly to 13 percent in 2010. HEALTHY BEHAVIOR MEANS HIGHER ACCOUNT BALANCES AND HIGHER ROLLOVERS: Individuals who exercised, those who did not smoke, and those who were not obese had higher account balances and higher rollovers than those with less healthy behaviors. It was also found that individuals who used cost or quality information had higher account balances and higher rollovers compared with those who did not use such information. However, no relationship was found between either account balance or rollover amounts and various cost-conscious behaviors such as checking pricing before getting services or asking for generic drugs instead of brand names, among other things. DIFFERENCES IN ACCOUNT BALANCES: Men have higher account balances than women

  13. Individual Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Andersen, Ture; Poulsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that hearing loss does not only lead to a reduction of hearing sensitivity. Large individual differences are typically observed among listeners with hearing impairment in a wide range of suprathreshold auditory measures. In many cases, audiometric thresholds cannot fully account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR), held in Nyborg, Denmark, in August 2015. The following collection of papers results from some of the work that was presented and discussed at the symposium. PMID:27566802

  14. RT-21Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 COMPLEX INHIBITOR MIRIN ENHANCES RADIOSENSITIVITY IN HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Kazuhiko; Mishima-Kaneko, Masayo; Saya, Hideyuki; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Yamada, Kouichi; Fukada, Junichi; Nishikawa, Ryo; Kawata, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Radiation therapy plays a central part in the treatment of glioblastoma, however, it is not curative due to the high tumor radioresistance. Therefore, increasing the sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to radiation is a promising approach to improve survival in patients with glioblastoma. The Mre11, Rad 50 and Nbs1 proteins form a complex (MRN) that has a critical role in DNA damage detection and signaling. Because defects in MRN enhance radiosensitivity, it has been proposed that small molecule inhibitors targeted to these proteins might be used as radiosensitizers. Here, we investigated the effects of the MRN complex inhibitor, Mirin, on radiation response of human glioma cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Glioma cell lines (U251, LN229 and LN428) were irradiated with and without Mirin and then clonogenicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle change were examined. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the relative potency of Mirin to inhibit the radioresistance, through the signaling activity of AKT. We also examined the levels of H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), which is a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) using Western blot. RESULTS: Glioblastoma cells pretreated with Mirin demonstrated an enhanced sensitivity to radiation. FACS analysis revealed that Mirin and radiation caused the glioma cells to accumulate in the G2/M-phase of the cell cycle and the combination of these two treatments further increased the G2/M fraction of the glioma cells. Mirin significantly enhanced radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Also, Mirin blocked the basal and increase of radiation-induced AKT phosphorylation. We observed that the combination of Mirin and radiation increased persistence of γH2AX at 24 h suggesting the inhibition of DNA DSBs repair. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that Mirin can effectively enhance glioma cell radiosensitivity. It suggests that Mirin is a potent radiosensitizer for treating glioma cells.

  15. Comparison of the Radiosensitizing Effect of ATR, ATM and DNA-PK Kinase Inhibitors on Cervical Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Vávrová, J; Zárybnická, L; Jošt, P; Tichý, A; Řezáčová, M; Šinkorová, Z; Pejchal, J

    2016-01-01

    Here, we compared the effects of inhibitors of three phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-related kinases, ATM, ATR a DNA-PK, on radiosensitization of cervical carcinoma cells. We demonstrated that DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441 enhanced phosphorylation of Chk1 and Chk2 kinases 2 h after irradiation of HeLa cells at a dose of 8 Gy in contrast to ATM kinase inhibitor KU55933, which completely blocked the Chk2 kinase phosphorylation on threonine 68, and ATR kinase inhibitor VE-821, which blocked the Chk1 kinase phosphorylation on serine 345. Most HeLa cells were accumulated in G2 phase of the cell cycle 24 h after irradiation at a high dose of 15 Gy, which was even potentiated after adding the inhibitors NU7441 and KU55933. Compared to all other irradiated groups, inhibitor VE-821 increased the number of cells in S phase and reduced the number of cells in G2 phase 24 h after irradiation at the high dose of 15 Gy. HeLa cells entered the mitotic cycle with unrepaired DNA, which resulted in cell death and the radiosensitizing effect of VE-821. Short-term application of the inhibitors (2 h before and 30 min after the irradiation by the dose of 8 Gy) significantly decreased the colony-forming ability of HeLa cells. Using real-time monitoring of cell proliferation by the xCELLigence system we demonstrated that while the radiosensitizing effect of VE-821 (ATR inhibitor) is manifested early after the irradiation, the radiosensitizing effect of KU55933 (ATM inhibitor) and NU7441 (DNA-PK inhibitor) is only observed as late as 72 h after the irradiation. PMID:27643582

  16. The Effects of G2-Phase Enrichment and Checkpoint Abrogation on Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Sarah A.; Wilson, George D.; Piasentin, Evano; Joiner, Michael C.; Marples, Brian

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: An association between low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and the 'early' G2/M checkpoint has been established. An improved molecular understanding of the temporal dynamics of this relationship is needed before clinical translation can be considered. This study was conducted to characterize the dose response of the early G2/M checkpoint and then determine whether low-dose radiation sensitivity could be increased by synchronization or chemical inhibition of the cell cycle. Methods and Materials: Two related cell lines with disparate HRS status were used (MR4 and 3.7 cells). A double-thymidine block technique was developed to enrich the G2-phase population. Clonogenic cell survival, radiation-induced G2-phase cell cycle arrest, and deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand break repair were measured in the presence and absence of inhibitors to G2-phase checkpoint proteins. Results: For MR4 cells, the dose required to overcome the HRS response (approximately 0.2 Gy) corresponded with that needed for the activation of the early G2/M checkpoint. As hypothesized, enriching the number of G2-phase cells in the population resulted in an enhanced HRS response, because a greater proportion of radiation-damaged cells evaded the early G2/M checkpoint and entered mitosis with unrepaired deoxyribonucleic acid double-strand breaks. Likewise, abrogation of the checkpoint by inhibition of Chk1 and Chk2 also increased low-dose radiosensitivity. These effects were not evident in 3.7 cells. Conclusions: The data confirm that HRS is linked to the early G2/M checkpoint through the damage response of G2-phase cells. Low-dose radiosensitivity could be increased by manipulating the transition of radiation-damaged G2-phase cells into mitosis. This provides a rationale for combining low-dose radiation therapy with chemical synchronization techniques to improve increased radiosensitivity.

  17. Autotaxin and LPA receptors represent potential molecular targets for the radiosensitization of murine glioma through effects on tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Stephen M; Thotala, Dinesh K; Linkous, Amanda G; Hu, Rong; Leahy, Kathleen M; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M; Hallahan, Dennis E

    2011-01-01

    Despite wide margins and high dose irradiation, unresectable malignant glioma (MG) is less responsive to radiation and is uniformly fatal. We previously found that cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA(2)) is a molecular target for radiosensitizing cancer through the vascular endothelium. Autotaxin (ATX) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors are downstream from cPLA(2) and highly expressed in MG. Using the ATX and LPA receptor inhibitor, α-bromomethylene phosphonate LPA (BrP-LPA), we studied ATX and LPA receptors as potential molecular targets for the radiosensitization of tumor vasculature in MG. Treatment of Human Umbilical Endothelial cells (HUVEC) and mouse brain microvascular cells bEND.3 with 5 µmol/L BrP-LPA and 3 Gy irradiation showed decreased clonogenic survival, tubule formation, and migration. Exogenous addition of LPA showed radioprotection that was abrogated in the presence of BrP-LPA. In co-culture experiments using bEND.3 and mouse GL-261 glioma cells, treatment with BrP-LPA reduced Akt phosphorylation in both irradiated cell lines and decreased survival and migration of irradiated GL-261 cells. Using siRNA to knock down LPA receptors LPA1, LPA2 or LPA3 in HUVEC, we demonstrated that knockdown of LPA2 but neither LPA1 nor LPA3 led to increased viability and proliferation. However, knockdown of LPA1 and LPA3 but not LPA2 resulted in complete abrogation of tubule formation implying that LPA1 and LPA3 on endothelial cells are likely targets of BrP-LPA radiosensitizing effect. Using heterotopic tumor models of GL-261, mice treated with BrP-LPA and irradiation showed a tumor growth delay of 6.8 days compared to mice treated with irradiation alone indicating that inhibition of ATX and LPA receptors may significantly improve malignant glioma response to radiation therapy. These findings identify ATX and LPA receptors as molecular targets for the development of radiosensitizers for MG.

  18. What is accountability in health care?

    PubMed

    Emanuel, E J; Emanuel, L L

    1996-01-15

    Accountability has become a major issue in health care. Accountability entails the procedures and processes by which one party justifies and takes responsibility for its activities. The concept of accountability contains three essential components: 1) the loci of accountability--health care consists of at least 11 different parties that can be held accountable or hold others accountable; 2) the domains of accountability--in health care, parties can be held accountable for as many as six activities: professional competence, legal and ethical conduct, financial performance, adequacy of access, public health promotion, and community benefit; and 3) the procedures of accountability, including formal and informal procedures for evaluating compliance with domains and for disseminating the evaluation and responses by the accountable parties. Different models of accountability stress different domains, evaluative criteria, loci, and procedures. We characterize and compare three dominant models of accountability: 1) the professional model, in which the individual physician and patient participate in shared decision making and physicians are held accountable to professional colleagues and to patients; 2) the economic model, in which the market is brought to bear in health care and accountability is mediated through consumer choice of providers; and 3) the political model, in which physicians and patients interact as citizen-members within a community and in which physicians are accountable to a governing board elected from the members of the community, such as the board of a managed care plan. We argue that no single model of accountability is appropriate to health care. Instead, we advocate a stratified model of accountability in which the professional model guides the physician-patient relationship, the political model operates within managed care plans and other integrated health delivery networks, and the economic and political models operate in the relations between

  19. 12 CFR 330.6 - Single ownership accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Single ownership accounts. 330.6 Section 330.6... DEPOSIT INSURANCE COVERAGE § 330.6 Single ownership accounts. (a) Individual accounts. Funds owned by a natural person and deposited in one or more deposit accounts in his or her own name shall be...

  20. Ethical accountability in the cyberspace

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, K.L.; Strohmaier, M.

    1994-12-31

    Conformance with ethical behavior consists of adherence to the standards of conduct for any given group. When standards are not formalized, there can exist ethical disparity from which many diverse problems can result. These problems are especially evident in the cyberspace. Within the cyberspace, the {open_quote}given group{close_quote} is culturally and ethnically diverse. As such, it $8 difficult to hold the individuals to a nonformalized set of standards. Several important issues need to be addressed in order to balance each individual`s dual needs for freedom of expression and protection in the cyberspace. These issues include development of formalized standards, a general protocol for cross- cultural interaction, and ethical accountability.

  1. Highly efficient radiosensitization of human glioblastoma and lung cancer cells by a G-quadruplex DNA binding compound.

    PubMed

    Merle, Patrick; Gueugneau, Marine; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Amiard, Simon; Chautard, Emmanuel; Guetta, Corinne; Dedieu, Véronique; Communal, Yves; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Gallego, Maria; White, Charles; Verrelle, Pierre; Tchirkov, Andreï

    2015-11-06

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures at the end of chromosomes which stabilize and protect them from nucleotidic degradation and end-to-end fusions. The G-rich telomeric single-stranded DNA overhang can adopt a four-stranded G-quadruplex DNA structure (G4). Stabilization of the G4 structure by binding of small molecule ligands enhances radiosensitivity of tumor cells, and this combined treatment represents a novel anticancer approach. We studied the effect of the platinum-derived G4-ligand, Pt-ctpy, in association with radiation on human glioblastoma (SF763 and SF767) and non-small cell lung cancer (A549 and H1299) cells in vitro and in vivo. Treatments with submicromolar concentrations of Pt-ctpy inhibited tumor proliferation in vitro with cell cycle alterations and induction of apoptosis. Non-toxic concentrations of the ligand were then combined with ionizing radiation. Pt-ctpy radiosensitized all cell lines with dose-enhancement factors between 1.32 and 1.77. The combined treatment led to increased DNA breaks. Furthermore, a significant radiosensitizing effect of Pt-ctpy in mice xenografted with glioblastoma SF763 cells was shown by delayed tumor growth and improved survival. Pt-ctpy can act in synergy with radiation for efficient killing of cancer cells at concentrations at which it has no obvious toxicity per se, opening perspectives for future therapeutic applications.

  2. Radiosensitization of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells via abrogating the G2 checkpoint and inhibiting DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Lai, Song-Tao; Ma, Ning-Yi; Deng, Yun; Liu, Yong; Wei, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Dong; Jiang, Guo-Liang

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidences have demonstrated the potential of metformin as a novel agent for cancer prevention and treatment. Here, we investigated its ability of radiosensitization and the underlying mechanisms in human pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, we found that metformin at 5 mM concentration enhanced the radiosensitivity of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, with sensitization enhancement ratios of 1.39 and 1.27, respectively. Mechanistically, metformin caused abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and increase of mitotic catastrophe, associated with suppression of Wee1 kinase and in turn CDK1 Tyr15 phosphorylation. Furthermore, metformin inhibited both expression and irradiation-induced foci formation of Rad51, a key player in homologous recombination repair, ultimately leading to persistent DNA damage, as reflected by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 signaling. Finally, metformin-mediated AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K was identified as a possible upstream pathway controlling translational regulation of Wee1 and Rad51. Our data suggest that metformin radiosensitizes pancreatic cancer cells in vitro via abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and inhibition of DNA damage repair. However, the in vivo study is needed to further confirm the findings from the in vitro study. PMID:26304716

  3. miR-494-3p Induces Cellular Senescence and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jui-Hung; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Lee, Yueh-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Chang, Wen-Wei; Kuo, Yu-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of head and neck. Although radiotherapy is used for OSCC treatment, the occurrence of radioresistant cancer cells limits its efficiency. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs with lengths of 18–25 base pairs and known to be involved in carcinogenesis. We previously demonstrated that by targeting B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi1), miR-494-3p functions as a putative tumor suppressor miRNA in OSCC. In this study, we further discovered that miR-494-3p could enhance the radiosensitivity of SAS OSCC cells and induce cellular senescence. The overexpression of miR-494-3p in SAS cells increased the population of senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells, the expression of p16INK4a and retinoblastoma 1 (RB1), as well as downregulated Bmi1. The knockdown of Bmi1 by lentiviral-mediated delivery of specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) also enhanced the radiosensitivity of SAS cells and the activation of the senescence pathway. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between Bmi1 and miR-494-3p expression was observed among OSCC tissues. Results suggest that miR-494-3p could increase the radiosensitivity of OSCC cells through the induction of cellular senescence caused by the downregulation of Bmi1. PMID:27399693

  4. Highly efficient radiosensitization of human glioblastoma and lung cancer cells by a G-quadruplex DNA binding compound

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Patrick; Gueugneau, Marine; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Amiard, Simon; Chautard, Emmanuel; Guetta, Corinne; Dedieu, Véronique; Communal, Yves; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Gallego, Maria; White, Charles; Verrelle, Pierre; Tchirkov, Andreï

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures at the end of chromosomes which stabilize and protect them from nucleotidic degradation and end-to-end fusions. The G-rich telomeric single-stranded DNA overhang can adopt a four-stranded G-quadruplex DNA structure (G4). Stabilization of the G4 structure by binding of small molecule ligands enhances radiosensitivity of tumor cells, and this combined treatment represents a novel anticancer approach. We studied the effect of the platinum-derived G4-ligand, Pt-ctpy, in association with radiation on human glioblastoma (SF763 and SF767) and non-small cell lung cancer (A549 and H1299) cells in vitro and in vivo. Treatments with submicromolar concentrations of Pt-ctpy inhibited tumor proliferation in vitro with cell cycle alterations and induction of apoptosis. Non-toxic concentrations of the ligand were then combined with ionizing radiation. Pt-ctpy radiosensitized all cell lines with dose-enhancement factors between 1.32 and 1.77. The combined treatment led to increased DNA breaks. Furthermore, a significant radiosensitizing effect of Pt-ctpy in mice xenografted with glioblastoma SF763 cells was shown by delayed tumor growth and improved survival. Pt-ctpy can act in synergy with radiation for efficient killing of cancer cells at concentrations at which it has no obvious toxicity per se, opening perspectives for future therapeutic applications. PMID:26542881

  5. miR-494-3p Induces Cellular Senescence and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jui-Hung; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Lee, Yueh-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Chang, Wen-Wei; Kuo, Yu-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of head and neck. Although radiotherapy is used for OSCC treatment, the occurrence of radioresistant cancer cells limits its efficiency. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs with lengths of 18-25 base pairs and known to be involved in carcinogenesis. We previously demonstrated that by targeting B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi1), miR-494-3p functions as a putative tumor suppressor miRNA in OSCC. In this study, we further discovered that miR-494-3p could enhance the radiosensitivity of SAS OSCC cells and induce cellular senescence. The overexpression of miR-494-3p in SAS cells increased the population of senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells, the expression of p16(INK4a) and retinoblastoma 1 (RB1), as well as downregulated Bmi1. The knockdown of Bmi1 by lentiviral-mediated delivery of specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) also enhanced the radiosensitivity of SAS cells and the activation of the senescence pathway. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between Bmi1 and miR-494-3p expression was observed among OSCC tissues. Results suggest that miR-494-3p could increase the radiosensitivity of OSCC cells through the induction of cellular senescence caused by the downregulation of Bmi1. PMID:27399693

  6. Biomarkers of Radiosensitivity in A-Bomb Survivors Pregnant at the Time of Bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Edward F.; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kamada, Naoko; Nakashima, Eiji; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Seed, Thomas; Kusonoki, Yoichiro; Nakachi, Kei; Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Neriishi, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. There is evidence in the literature of increased maternal radiosensitivity during pregnancy. Materials and Methods. We tested this hypothesis using information from the atomic-bomb survivor cohort, that is, the Adult Health Study database at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, which contains data from a cohort of women who were pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Previous evaluation has demonstrated long-term radiation dose-response effects. Results/Conclusions. Data on approximately 250 women were available to assess dose-response rates for serum cholesterol, white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and serum hemoglobin, and on approximately 85 women for stable chromosome aberrations, glycophorin A locus mutations, and naïve CD4 T-cell counts. Although there is no statistically significant evidence of increased radiosensitivity in pregnant women, the increased slope of the linear trend line in the third trimester with respect to stable chromosome aberrations is suggestive of an increased radiosensitivity. PMID:21637355

  7. Radiosensitization of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells via abrogating the G2 checkpoint and inhibiting DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Lai, Song-Tao; Ma, Ning-Yi; Deng, Yun; Liu, Yong; Wei, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Dong; Jiang, Guo-Liang

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidences have demonstrated the potential of metformin as a novel agent for cancer prevention and treatment. Here, we investigated its ability of radiosensitization and the underlying mechanisms in human pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, we found that metformin at 5 mM concentration enhanced the radiosensitivity of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, with sensitization enhancement ratios of 1.39 and 1.27, respectively. Mechanistically, metformin caused abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and increase of mitotic catastrophe, associated with suppression of Wee1 kinase and in turn CDK1 Tyr15 phosphorylation. Furthermore, metformin inhibited both expression and irradiation-induced foci formation of Rad51, a key player in homologous recombination repair, ultimately leading to persistent DNA damage, as reflected by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 signaling. Finally, metformin-mediated AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K was identified as a possible upstream pathway controlling translational regulation of Wee1 and Rad51. Our data suggest that metformin radiosensitizes pancreatic cancer cells in vitro via abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and inhibition of DNA damage repair. However, the in vivo study is needed to further confirm the findings from the in vitro study.

  8. Biomarkers of Radiosensitivity in A-Bomb Survivors Pregnant at the Time of Bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    DOE PAGES

    Miles, Edward F.; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kamada, Naoko; Nakashima, Eiji; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Seed, Thomas; Kusonoki, Yoichiro; Nakachi, Kei; Fujiwara, Saeko; et al

    2011-01-01

    Purpose . There is evidence in the literature of increased maternal radiosensitivity during pregnancy. Materials and Methods . We tested this hypothesis using information from the atomic-bomb survivor cohort, that is, the Adult Health Study database at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, which contains data from a cohort of women who were pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Previous evaluation has demonstrated long-term radiation dose-response effects. Results/Conclusions . Data on approximately 250 women were available to assess dose-response rates for serum cholesterol, white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and serum hemoglobin, and onmore » approximately 85 women for stable chromosome aberrations, glycophorin A locus mutations, and naïve CD4 T-cell counts. Although there is no statistically significant evidence of increased radiosensitivity in pregnant women, the increased slope of the linear trend line in the third trimester with respect to stable chromosome aberrations is suggestive of an increased radiosensitivity.« less

  9. Effect of restoration of retinoblastoma gene function on the radiosensitivity of cells of human tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, N.M.; Little, J.B.

    1994-11-01

    To assess the role of expression of the retinoblastoma (RB) gene on the sensitivity of cells to the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, we transfected a normal RB gene into cells of RB{sup +} and RB{sup {minus}} osteosarcoma cell lines and an RB{sup {minus}} prostate carcinoma line and studied the radiosensitivity of the cells before and after transfection. Four transfected clones were isolated from the two RB{sup {minus}} tumor cell lines that expressed the product of the transfected normal RB gene and contained no mutations in the pocket and C-terminal regions by sequencing. A small increase in radiosensitivity was observed in cell lines transfected with the pDOL plasmid vector alone, containing the neo gene and a long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. However, no significant change in radiosensitivity occurred in transfected cells expressing the normal RB gene compared to controls transfected with an RB{sup {minus}} plasmid. Based on this and other information, we conclude that RB gene function is not involved in the response of these human tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of radiation. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Radiosensitization of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Inhibition of TGF-β1 Signaling With SB431542 Is Dependent on p53 Status.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yifan; Wang, Longxiao; Huang, Qianyi; Jiang, Youqin; Wang, Jingdong; Zhang, Liyuan; Tian, Ye; Yang, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Although medically inoperable patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC) are often treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy, its efficacy can be compromised due to poor radiosensitivity of cancer cells. Inhibition of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) using LY364947 and LY2109761 has been demonstrated to radiosensitize cancer cells such as breast cancer, glioblastoma, and lung cancer. Our previous results have demonstrated that another potent and selective inhibitor of TGF-β1 receptor kinases, SB431542, could radiosensitize H460 cells both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated whether SB431542 could radiosensitize other NSCLC cell lines, trying to explore the potential implication of this TGF-β1 inhibitor in radiotherapy for NSCLC patients. The results showed that A549 cells were significantly radiosensitized by SB431542, whereas no radiosensitizing effect was observed in H1299 cells. Interestingly, both H460 and A549 cells have wild-type p53, while H1299 cells have deficient p53. To study whether the radiosensitizing effect of SB431542 was associated with p53 status of cancer cells, the p53 of H460 cells was silenced using shRNA transfection. Then it was found that the radiosensitizing effect of SB431542 on H460 cells was not observed in H460 cells with silenced p53. Moreover, X-irradiation caused rapid Smad2 activation in H460 and A549 cells but not in H1299 and H460 cells with silenced p53. The Smad2 activation postirradiation could be abolished by SB431542. This may explain the lack of radiosensitizing effect of SB431542 in H1299 and H460 cells with silenced p53. Thus, we concluded that the radiosensitizing effect of inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling in NSCLC cells by SB431542 was p53 dependent, suggesting that using TGF-β1 inhibitor in radiotherapy may be more complicated than previously thought and may need further investigation. PMID:27178816

  11. Effects of autophagy regulation of tumor-associated macrophages on radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Le-Ning; Zhu, Bao-Song; Xing, Chun-Gen; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Young, Wu; Cao, Jian-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Tumor‑associated macrophages (TAMs), a major component of the tumor microenvironment, are crucial to the processes of tumor growth, infiltration and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. The importance of TAMs in radiation resistance of colorectal cancer remains unclear. To investigate the effects of autophagy regulation of TAMs on the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells, the current study induced TAM formation from THP‑1 monocyte cells. Sequential treatment of THP‑1 cells with PMA for 72 h and human recombinant interleukin‑4 for 24 h was used to stimulate THP‑1 differentiation to TAMs. Expression of the cell surface markers CD68, CD204 and CD206, and changes to cell morphology were used to confirm successful differentiation. The TAMs were stimulated to promote or inhibit autophagy during co‑culture with LoVo colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were irradiated, with subsequent measurement of LoVo colony formation and apoptosis. Additionally, the expression of p53, Bcl‑2, survivin and Smac proteins was assessed by western blotting. Monodansylcadaverin staining was used to analyze the presence of autophagic vacuoles in TAM, and western blot analysis was used to assess the expression of Beclin‑1, LC3B I and II, ATG‑3, ‑5 and ‑7. The results demonstrated TAM autophagy to be markedly altered by rapamycin and bafilomycin A1 treatment. Following co‑culture with TAMs, the colony formation rate and survival fraction of LoVo cells were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). It was further demonstrated that the regulation of autophagy in TAMs was able to inhibit the colony formation of LoVo colorectal cancer cells. Upregulation of TAM autophagy using rapamycin exhibited more effective inhibition of LoVo colony formation than autophagy downregulation. Notably, apoptosis was significantly increased in LoVo cells when co‑cultured with TAMs only, or with rapamycin‑mediated autophagy upregulated TAMs

  12. Preclinical Evaluation of Genexol-PM, a Nanoparticle Formulation of Paclitaxel, as a Novel Radiosensitizer for the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Michael E.; Cummings, Natalie D.; Sethi, Manish; Wang, Edina C.; Sukumar, Rohit; Moore, Dominic T.; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: A key research objective in radiation oncology is to identify agents that can improve chemoradiation therapy. Nanoparticle (NP) chemotherapeutics possess several properties, such as preferential accumulation in tumors, that are uniquely suited for chemoradiation therapy. To facilitate the clinical translation of NP chemotherapeutics in chemoradiation therapy, we conducted preclinical evaluation of Genexol-PM, the only clinically approved NP chemotherapeutic with a controlled drug release profile, as a radiosensitizer using non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a model disease. Methods and Materials: The physical characteristics and drug release profile of Genexol-PM were characterized. Genexol-PM's efficacy as a radiosensitizer was evaluated in vitro using NSCLC cell lines and in vivo using mouse xenograft models of NSCLC. Paclitaxel dose to normal lung and liver after Genexol-PM administration were quantified and compared with that after Taxol administration. Results: Genexol-PM has a size of 23.91 ± 0.41 nm and surface charge of −8.1 ± 3.1 mV. It releases paclitaxel in a controlled release profile. In vitro evaluation of Genexol-PM as a radiosensitizer showed it is an effective radiosensitizer and is more effective than Taxol, its small molecule counterpart, at the half maximal inhibitory concentration. In vivo study of Genexol-PM as a radiosensitizer demonstrated that it is more effective as a radiosensitizer than Taxol. We also found that Genexol-PM leads to lower paclitaxel exposure to normal lung tissue than Taxol at 6 hours postadministration. Conclusions: We have demonstrated that Genexol-PM is more effective than Taxol as a radiosensitizer in the preclinical setting and holds high potential for clinical translation. Our data support the clinical evaluation of Genexol-PM in chemoradiation therapy for NSCLC.

  13. Curcumin and trans-resveratrol exert cell cycle-dependent radioprotective or radiosensitizing effects as elucidated by the PCC and G2-assay.

    PubMed

    Sebastià, N; Montoro, A; Hervás, D; Pantelias, G; Hatzi, V I; Soriano, J M; Villaescusa, J I; Terzoudi, G I

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin and trans-resveratrol are well-known antioxidant polyphenols with radiomodulatory properties, radioprotecting non-cancerous cells while radiosensitizing tumor cells. This dual action may be the result of their radical scavenging properties and their effects on cell-cycle checkpoints that are activated in response to radiation-induced chromosomal damage. It could be also caused by their effect on regulatory pathways with impact on detoxification enzymes, the up-regulation of endogenous protective systems, and cell-cycle-dependent processes of DNA damage. This work aims to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the dual action of these polyphenols and investigates under which conditions they exhibit radioprotecting or radiosensitizing properties. The peripheral blood lymphocyte test system was used, applying concentrations ranging from 1.4 to 140μM curcumin and 2.2 to 220μM trans-resveratrol. The experimental design focuses first on their radioprotective effects in non-cycling lymphocytes, as uniquely visualized using cell fusion-mediated premature chromosome condensation, excluding, thus, cell-cycle interference to repair processes and activation of checkpoints. Second, the radiosensitizing potential of these chemicals on the induction of chromatid breaks in cultured lymphocytes following G2-phase irradiation was evaluated by a standardized G2-chromosomal radiosensitivity predictive assay. This assay uses caffeine for G2-checkpoint abrogation and it was applied to obtain an internal control for radiosensitivity testing, which simulates conditions similar to those of the highly radiosensitive lymphocytes of AT patients. The results demonstrate for the first time the cell-cycle-dependent action of these polyphenols. When non-cycling cells are irradiated, the radioprotective properties of curcumin and trans-resveratrol are more prominent. However, when cycling cells are irradiated during G2-phase, the radiosensitizing features of these compounds are more

  14. Celecoxib Induced Tumor Cell Radiosensitization by Inhibiting Radiation Induced Nuclear EGFR Transport and DNA-Repair: A COX-2 Independent Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, Klaus H. Mayer, Claus; Ohneseit, Petra A.; Raju, Uma; Andratschke, Nickolaus H.; Milas, Luka; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms mediating radiosensitization of human tumor cells by the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed using bronchial carcinoma cells A549, transformed fibroblasts HH4dd, the FaDu head-and-neck tumor cells, the colon carcinoma cells HCT116, and normal fibroblasts HSF7. Effects of celecoxib treatment were assessed by clonogenic cell survival, Western analysis, and quantification of residual DNA damage by {gamma}H{sub 2}AX foci assay. Results: Celecoxib treatment resulted in a pronounced radiosensitization of A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells, whereas FaDu and HH4dd cells were not radiosensitized. The observed radiosensitization could neither be correlated with basal COX-2 expression pattern nor with basal production of prostaglandin E2, but was depended on the ability of celecoxib to inhibit basal and radiation-induced nuclear transport of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The nuclear EGFR transport was strongly inhibited in A549-, HSF7-, and COX-2-deficient HCT116 cells, which were radiosensitized, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells, which resisted celecoxib-induced radiosensitization. Celecoxib inhibited radiation-induced DNA-PK activation in A549, HSF7, and HCT116 cells, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells. Consequentially, celecoxib increased residual {gamma}H2AX foci after irradiation, demonstrating that inhibition of DNA repair has occurred in responsive A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells only. Conclusions: Celecoxib enhanced radiosensitivity by inhibition of EGFR-mediated mechanisms of radioresistance, a signaling that was independent of COX-2 activity. This novel observation may have therapeutic implications such that COX-2 inhibitors may improve therapeutic efficacy of radiation even in patients whose tumor radioresistance is not dependent on COX-2.

  15. The potential value of the neutral comet assay and the expression of genes associated with DNA damage in assessing the radiosensitivity of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Bhilwade, Hari N; Pandey, Badri N; Sandur, Santosh K; Chaubey, Ramesh C

    2012-10-01

    The assessment of tumor radiosensitivity would be particularly useful in optimizing the radiation dose during radiotherapy. Therefore, the degree of correlation between radiation-induced DNA damage, as measured by the alkaline and the neutral comet assays, and the clonogenic survival of different human tumor cells was studied. Further, tumor radiosensitivity was compared with the expression of genes associated with the cellular response to radiation damage. Five different human tumor cell lines were chosen and the radiosensitivity of these cells was established by clonogenic assay. Alkaline and neutral comet assays were performed in γ-irradiated cells (2-8Gy; either acute or fractionated). Quantitative PCR was performed to evaluate the expression of DNA damage response genes in control and irradiated cells. The relative radiosensitivity of the cell lines assessed by the extent of DNA damage (neutral comet assay) immediately after irradiation (4Gy or 6Gy) was in agreement with radiosensitivity pattern obtained by the clonogenic assay. The survival fraction of irradiated cells showed a better correlation with the magnitude of DNA damage measured by the neutral comet assay (r=-0.9; P<0.05; 6Gy) than evaluated by alkaline comet assay (r=-0.73; P<0.05; 6Gy). Further, a significant correlation between the clonogenic survival and DNA damage was observed in cells exposed to fractionated doses of radiation. Of 15 genes investigated in the gene expression study, HSP70, KU80 and RAD51 all showed significant positive correlations (r=0.9; P<0.05) with tumor radiosensitivity. Our study clearly demonstrated that the neutral comet assay was better than alkaline comet assay for assessment of radiosensitivities of tumor cells after acute or fractionated doses of irradiation.

  16. Individualized Marriage and the Integration of Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Sean R.; Yodanis, Carrie

    2011-01-01

    In individualized marriages, spouses maintain independence in their relationship. In individualized marriages, do married couples manage their money in pooled accounts or do they keep separate accounts? We answer this question with the 2002 International Social Survey Programme (N = 18,587;31 country contexts) and examine how variation in the…

  17. Emerging accounting trends accounting for leases.

    PubMed

    Valletta, Robert; Huggins, Brian

    2010-12-01

    A new model for lease accounting can have a significant impact on hospitals and healthcare organizations. The new approach proposes a "right-of-use" model that involves complex estimates and significant administrative burden. Hospitals and health systems that draw heavily on lease arrangements should start preparing for the new approach now even though guidance and a final rule are not expected until mid-2011. This article highlights a number of considerations from the lessee point of view.

  18. Retinal degeneration in rats induced by CI-1010, a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Breider, M A; Pilcher, G D; Graziano, M J; Gough, A W

    1998-01-01

    The anti-cancer compound CI-1010, designated as (R)-alpha-([(2-bromoethyl)amino]methyl)-2-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol monohydrobromide, has a proposed dual mechanism of action due to alkylating and radiosensitizing activities. To assess potential toxicity, adult Wistar rats were treated with a single intravenous injection (0, 50, 100, 150, 225, or 350 mg/kg) and necropsied at 4 or 29 days following treatment. In a repeated dose experiment, rats were injected daily (0, 10, 40, or 80 mg/kg; 5 doses/wk) for 3 wk and necropsied at the end of week 3 or 7. CI-1010 induced retinal degeneration by 4 days after a single injection of > or = 225 mg/kg or by 3 wk of repeated injections of > or = 40 mg/kg. The locally extensive to diffuse retinal degeneration involved the photoreceptor and outer nuclear layer. The photoreceptor layer was vacuolated and compressed corresponding to ultrastructural evidence of inner segment swelling and outer segment fragmentation. The outer nuclear layer was thinned due to loss of nuclei and contained numerous pyknotic or karyorrhectic nuclei. These nuclear changes were morphologically consistent with apoptosis and many outer nuclear layer nuclei labeled with in situ TdT-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (Apoptag). The retinal degeneration was nonreversible, evidenced by increased lesion severity and incidence after CI-1010 was withdrawn for either 25 or 28 days.

  19. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F.; Jeggo, Penny A.; Martin, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  20. Proteasome Inhibitors Block DNA Repair and Radiosensitize Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Deepa S.; Hsieh, Grace; Merzon, Dmitry; Rameseder, Jonathan; Chen, Clark C.; D’Andrea, Alan D.; Kozono, David

    2013-01-01

    Despite optimal radiation therapy (RT), chemotherapy and/or surgery, a majority of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) fail treatment. To identify novel gene targets for improved tumor control, we performed whole genome RNAi screens to identify knockdowns that most reproducibly increase NSCLC cytotoxicity. These screens identified several proteasome subunits among top hits, including the topmost hit PSMA1, a component of the core 20 S proteasome. Radiation and proteasome inhibition showed synergistic effects. Proteasome inhibition resulted in an 80–90% decrease in homologous recombination (HR), a 50% decrease in expression of NF-κB-inducible HR genes BRCA1 and FANCD2, and a reduction of BRCA1, FANCD2 and RAD51 ionizing radiation-induced foci. IκBα RNAi knockdown rescued NSCLC radioresistance. Irradiation of mice with NCI-H460 xenografts after inducible PSMA1 shRNA knockdown markedly increased murine survival compared to either treatment alone. Proteasome inhibition is a promising strategy for NSCLC radiosensitization via inhibition of NF-κB-mediated expression of Fanconi Anemia/HR DNA repair genes. PMID:24040035

  1. Synthesis of PEGylated Ferrocene Nanoconjugates as the Radiosensitizer of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Chen, Jie; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Xu; He, Jinlin; Ni, Peihong; Pan, Yue

    2016-06-15

    Radiation is one of the most widely used methods for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein, we report a new type of radiation sensitizer (Fc-PEG) by a facile one-step reaction of conjugating the hydrophilic PEG chain with hydrophobic ferrocene molecule. The chemical composition and structure of Fc-PEG have been thoroughly characterized by FT-IR, NMR, GPC, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. This Fc-PEG conjugate could self-assemble in aqueous solution into spherical aggregates, and it was found that the exposure to 4 Gy of X-ray radiation have little influence on the shape and size of these aggregates. After the chemical bonding with PEG chains, the uptake level of Fe element could be enhanced via the formation of aggregates. The live/dead, CCK-8, as well as apoptosis assays, indicated that the death of cancer cells can be obviously increased by X-ray radiation after the incubation of these Fc-based nanoconjugates, which might be served as the radiation sensitizer toward cancer cells. We suggest that this radiosensitizing effect comes from the enhancement of reactive oxygen specimen (ROS) level as denoted by both flow cytometric and fluorescence microscopic analysis. The enhanced radiation sensitivity of cancer cells is contributed by the synergic effect of Fe-induced radiation-sensitizing and the increased uptake of nanoconjugates after polymeric grafting.

  2. Betulinyl Sulfamates as Anticancer Agents and Radiosensitizers in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Bache, Matthias; Münch, Christin; Güttler, Antje; Wichmann, Henri; Theuerkorn, Katharina; Emmerich, Daniel; Paschke, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA), a natural compound of birch bark, is cytotoxic for many tumors. Recently, a betulinyl sulfamate was described that inhibits carbonic anhydrases (CA), such as CAIX, an attractive target for tumor-selective therapy strategies in hypoxic cancer cells. Data on combined CAIX inhibition with radiotherapy are rare. In the human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231 and MCF7, the effects of BA and betulinyl sulfamates on cellular and radiobiological behavior under normoxia and hypoxia were evaluated. The two most effective betulinyl sulfamates CAI 1 and CAI 3 demonstrated a 1.8-2.8-fold higher cytotoxicity than BA under normoxia in breast cancer cells, with IC50 values between 11.1 and 18.1 µM. BA exhibits its strongest cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 8.2 and 16.4 µM under hypoxia. All three substances show a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis, inhibition of migration, and inhibition of hypoxia-induced gene expression. In combination with irradiation, betulinyl sulfamates act as radiosensitizers, with DMF10 values of 1.47 (CAI 1) and 1.75 (CAI 3) under hypoxia in MDA-MB231 cells. BA showed additive effects in combination with irradiation. Taken together; our results suggest that BA and betulinyl sulfamates seem to be attractive substances to combine with radiotherapy; particularly for hypoxic breast cancer. PMID:26540049

  3. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/μm) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ˜ 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  4. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.; Manzoli, L.; Papa, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

  5. Enhancement of radiosensitivity in H1299 cancer cells by actin-associated protein cofilin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-J. . E-mail: lee_yi_jang@hotmail.com; Sheu, T.-J.; Keng, Peter C.

    2005-09-23

    Cofilin is an actin-associated protein that belongs to the actin depolymerization factor/cofilin family and is important for regulation of actin dynamics. Cofilin can import actin monomers into the nucleus under certain stress conditions, however the biological effects of nuclear transport are unclear. In this study, we found that over-expression of cofilin led to increased radiation sensitivity in human non-small lung cancer H1299 cells. Cell survival as determined by colony forming assay showed that cells over-expressing cofilin were more sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) than normal cells. To determine whether the DNA repair capacity was altered in cofilin over-expressing cells, comet assays were performed on irradiated cells. Repair of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation was detected in cofilin over-expressing cells after 24 h of recovery. Consistent with this observation, the key components for repair of DNA double-strand breaks, including Rad51, Rad52, and Ku70/Ku80, were down-regulated in cofilin over-expressing cells after IR exposure. These findings suggest that cofilin can influence radiosensitivity by altering DNA repair capacity.

  6. Autophagy inhibition radiosensitizes in vitro, yet reduces radioresponses in vivo due to deficient immunogenic signalling

    PubMed Central

    Ko, A; Kanehisa, A; Martins, I; Senovilla, L; Chargari, C; Dugue, D; Mariño, G; Kepp, O; Michaud, M; Perfettini, J-L; Kroemer, G; Deutsch, E

    2014-01-01

    Clinical oncology heavily relies on the use of radiotherapy, which often leads to merely transient responses that are followed by local or distant relapse. The molecular mechanisms explaining radioresistance are largely elusive. Here, we identified a dual role of autophagy in the response of cancer cells to ionizing radiation. On one hand, we observed that the depletion of essential autophagy-relevant gene products, such as ATG5 and Beclin 1, increased the sensitivity of human or mouse cancer cell lines to irradiation, both in vitro (where autophagy inhibition increased radiation-induced cell death and decreased clonogenic survival) and in vivo, after transplantation of the cell lines into immunodeficient mice (where autophagy inhibition potentiated the tumour growth-inhibitory effect of radiotherapy). On the other hand, when tumour proficient or deficient for autophagy were implanted in immunocompetent mice, it turned out that defective autophagy reduced the efficacy of radiotherapy. Indeed, radiotherapy elicited an anti-cancer immune response that was dependent on autophagy-induced ATP release from stressed or dying tumour cells and was characterized by dense lymphocyte infiltration of the tumour bed. Intratumoural injection of an ecto-ATPase inhibitor restored the immune infiltration of autophagy-deficient tumours post radiotherapy and improved the growth-inhibitory effect of ionizing irradiation. Altogether, our results reveal that beyond its cytoprotective function, autophagy confers immunogenic properties to tumours, hence amplifying the efficacy of radiotherapy in an immunocompetent context. This has far-reaching implications for the development of pharmacological radiosensitizers. PMID:24037090

  7. miR-25 modulates NSCLC cell radio-sensitivity through directly inhibiting BTG2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhiwei Liu, Yi Xiao, Bing Qian, Xiaosen

    2015-02-13

    A large proportion of the NSCLC patients were insensitive to radiotherapy, but the exact mechanism is still unclear. This study explored the role of miR-25 in regulating sensitivity of NSCLC cells to ionizing radiation (IR) and its downstream targets. Based on measurement in tumor samples from NSCLC patients, this study found that miR-25 expression is upregulated in both NSCLC and radio-resistant NSCLC patients compared the healthy and radio-sensitive controls. In addition, BTG expression was found negatively correlated with miR-25a expression in the both tissues and cells. By applying luciferase reporter assay, we verified two putative binding sites between miR-25 and BTG2. Therefore, BTG2 is a directly target of miR-25 in NSCLC cancer. By applying loss-and-gain function analysis in NSCLC cell lines, we demonstrated that miR-25-BTG2 axis could directly regulated BTG2 expression and affect radiotherapy sensitivity of NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • miR-25 is upregulated, while BTG2 is downregulated in radioresistant NSCLC patients. • miR-25 modulates sensitivity to radiation induced apoptosis. • miR-25 directly targets BTG2 and suppresses its expression. • miR-25 modulates sensitivity to radiotherapy through inhibiting BTG2 expression.

  8. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F; Jeggo, Penny A; Martin, Olga A

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  9. Probing NMR parameters, structure and dynamics of 5-nitroimidazole derivatives. Density functional study of prototypical radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Teodorico C; Bühl, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The 15N chemical shifts of metronidazole (1), secnidazole (2), nimorazole (3) and tinidazole (4), radiosensitizers based on the 5-nitroimidazole motif, are reported. A detailed computational study of 1 is presented, calling special attention to the performance of various theoretical methods in reproducing the 13C and 15N data observed in solution. The most sophisticated approach involves density functional-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations (CPMD) of 1 in aqueous solution (BP86 level) and averaging chemical shifts over snapshots from the trajectory. In the NMR calculations for these snapshots (performed at the B3LYP level), a small number of discrete water molecules are retained, and the remaining bulk solution effects are included via a polarizable continuum model (PCM). A similarly good accord with experiment is obtained from much less involved, static geometry optimization and NMR computation of pristine 1 employing a PCM approach. Solvent effects on delta(15N), which are of the order of up to 20 ppm, are not due to changes in geometric parameters upon solvation, but arise from the direct response of the electronic wavefunction to the presence of the solvent, which can be represented by discrete molecules and/or the dielectric bulk. PMID:15558660

  10. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  11. Mannose Phosphate Isomerase Regulates Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Family Signaling and Glioma Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cazet, Aurélie; Charest, Jonathan; Bennett, Daniel C.; Sambrooks, Cecilia Lopez; Contessa, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycosylation is an endoplasmic reticulum co- and post- translational modification that enables the transit and function of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) glycoproteins. To gain insight into the regulatory role of glycosylation enzymes on RTK function, we investigated shRNA and siRNA knockdown of mannose phosphate isomerase (MPI), an enzyme required for mature glycan precursor biosynthesis. Loss of MPI activity reduced phosphorylation of FGFR family receptors in U-251 and SKMG-3 malignant glioma cell lines and also resulted in significant decreases in FRS2, Akt, and MAPK signaling. However, MPI knockdown did not affect ligand-induced activation or signaling of EGFR or MET RTKs, suggesting that FGFRs are more susceptible to MPI inhibition. The reductions in FGFR signaling were not caused by loss of FGF ligands or receptors, but instead were caused by interference with receptor dimerization. Investigations into the cellular consequences of MPI knockdown showed that cellular programs driven by FGFR signaling, and integral to the clinical progression of malignant glioma, were impaired. In addition to a blockade of cellular migration, MPI knockdown also significantly reduced glioma cell clonogenic survival following ionizing radiation. Therefore our results suggest that targeted inhibition of enzymes required for cell surface receptor glycosylation can be manipulated to produce discrete and limited consequences for critical client glycoproteins expressed by tumor cells. Furthermore, this work identifies MPI as a potential enzymatic target for disrupting cell surface receptor-dependent survival signaling and as a novel approach for therapeutic radiosensitization. PMID:25314669

  12. Health savings accounts and health reimbursement arrangements: assets, account balances, and rollovers, 2006-2009.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, Paul

    2010-06-01

    ASSET LEVELS GROWING: In 2009, there was $7.1 billion in consumer-driven health plans (CDHPs), which include health savings accounts (or HSAs) and health reimbursement arrangements (or HRAs), spread across 5 million accounts. This is up from 2006, when there were 1.2 million accounts with $835.4 million in assets, and 2008, when 4.2 million accounts held $5.7 billion in assets. AVERAGE ACCOUNT BALANCE LEVELING OFF: Increases in average account balances appear to have leveled off. In 2006, account balances averaged $696. They increased to $1320 in 2007, a 90 percent increase. Account balances averaged $1356 in 2008 and $1419 in 2009, 3 percent and 5 percent increases, respectively. TYPICAL ENROLLEE: The typical CDHP enrollee was more likely than traditional plan enrollees to be young, unmarried, higher-income, educated, and exhibit healthy behavior. No differences were found between CDHPs enrollees and traditional plan enrollees with respect to gender, race, and presence of children. MORE ROLLOVERS: Overall, the number of people with a rollover, as well as the total level of assets being rolled over, have been increasing. The average rollover increased from $592 in 2006 to $1295 in 2009. DIFFERENCES IN ACCOUNT BALANCES: Men tend to have higher account balances than women, account balances increase with household income, education has a significant impact on account balances independent of income and other variables, and no statistically significant differences in account balances were found by smoking, obesity, or the presence of chronic health conditions. Individuals who developed a budget to manage their health care expenses had a higher account balance ($1726) than those who did not ($1428), but otherwise, no statistically significant differences in average account balances were found between individuals who exhibited various aspects of cost-conscious decision-making behaviors and those who did not. DIFFERENCES IN ROLLOVER AMOUNTS: Men rolled over more money than

  13. Public Accountancy Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern public accountancy practice in New York State is presented. In addition to identifying licensing requirements/procedures for certified public accountants, general provisions of Title VIII of the Education Law are covered, along with state management, professional misconduct, and…

  14. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  15. Public Accountancy Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The laws, rules and regulations of the State Education Department governing public accountancy practice in New York State are provided in this handbook. Licensure requirements are also described, and the forms for obtaining a license and first registration as a certified public accountant are provided. The booklet is divided into the following…

  16. Leadership for Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    2001-01-01

    This document explores issues of leadership for accountability and reviews five resources on the subject. These include: (1) "Accountability by Carrots and Sticks: Will Incentives and Sanctions Motivate Students, Teachers, and Administrators for Peak Performance?" (Larry Lashway); (2) "Organizing Schools for Teacher Learning" (Judith Warren…

  17. The Accountability Illusion: Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  18. The Accountability Illusion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  19. The Accountability Illusion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  20. Teaching Accounting with Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaoul, Jean

    This paper addresses the numerous ways that computers may be used to enhance the teaching of accounting and business topics. It focuses on the pedagogical use of spreadsheet software to improve the conceptual coverage of accounting principles and practice, increase student understanding by involvement in the solution process, and reduce the amount…

  1. The Accountability Illusion: California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  2. The Evolution of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, P. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Campus 2020: Thinking ahead is a policy in British Columbia (BC), Canada, that attempted to hold universities accountable to performance. Within, I demonstrate how this Canadian articulation of educational accountability intended to develop "governmentality constellations" to control the university and regulate its knowledge output. This research…

  3. Accountability in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chippendale, P. R., Ed.; Wilkes, Paula V., Ed.

    This collection of papers delivered at a conference on accountability held at Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education in Australia examines the meaning of accountability in education for teachers, lecturers, government, parents, administrators, education authorities, and the society at large. In Part 1, W. G. Walker attempts to answer the…

  4. Radiosensitivity of fibroblasts obtained from a cafe-au-lait spot and normal-appearing skin of a patient with neurofibromatosis (NF-6)

    SciTech Connect

    Hannan, M.A.; Smith, B.P.; Sigut, D.; Sackey, K. )

    1990-07-15

    Fibroblast cells derived from a cafe-au-lait spot and normal-appearing skin of a neurofibromatosis (NF-6) patient were studied for radiosensitivity in comparison with two normal cell lines used as controls. No difference in radiosensitivity was observed between the patient's cell lines and the controls using acute gamma-irradiation. However, a markedly increased radiosensitivity of the fibroblasts obtained from the patient's skin of normal appearance was demonstrated after chronic gamma-irradiation. The cells from the cafe-au-lait spot showed intermediate sensitivity to chronic irradiation as compared with the control cell lines and the fibroblasts derived from the normal skin of the patient. These results showed the usefulness of chronic irradiation in detecting increased cellular radiosensitivity which may result from a unique DNA repair defect in an NF patient. We suggest that enhanced genetic changes in radiosensitive NF patients may lead to formation of cafe-au-lait lesions and certain tumors. Such a transformation may be associated with production of radiotolerant cells.

  5. Development of a Novel Enzyme-Targeting Radiosensitizer (New KORTUC) Using a Gelatin-Based Hydrogel Instead of a Sodium Hyaluronate

    PubMed Central

    Morita-Tokuhiro, Shiho; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yokota, Norikazu; Tsuzuki, Akira; Oda, Hideki; Ishida, Naoya; Aoyama, Nobutaka; Nishioka, Akihito

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas (KORTUC) as a strategy to increase intratumoral oxygen concentrations and degrade antioxidant enzymes such as peroxidase and catalase. We then developed KORTUC II, which uses sodium hyaluronate containing hydrogen peroxide as a radiosensitizer. KORTUC II requires twice-weekly administration to sustain its effects, but decreasing the frequency of radiosensitizer injections to once-weekly would reduce the burden on the patients and the physicians. The goal of this study was thus to develop a new formulation of KORTUC (New KORTUC) that only requires once-weekly administration. We performed experimental studies using a mouse tumor model and biodegradable hydrogel. C3H/He mice were allocated to control, KORTUC, or hydrogel groups. At 72 h after injection, each tumor was irradiated with a 6 MeV electron beam to a total dose of 30 Gy. During a 62-day observation period, changes in tumor volume and survival rates were assessed in each group. Tumor growth rate was slowest in the hydrogel groups. These data suggest that hydrogel could represent a useful adjunct as a long-acting radiosensitizer in place of sodium hyaluronate. New KORTUC, which contains hydrogen peroxide and hydrogel, exerted a radiosensitizing effect that persisted beyond 72 h following injection of the agent. Use of this new formulation allows radiosensitizer injections to be performed once-weekly with good effect. PMID:26751477

  6. Accountability and Primary Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  7. Accountability and primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  8. The selective hypoxia inducible factor-1 inhibitor PX-478 provides in vivo radiosensitization through tumor stromal effects

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David L.; Powis, Garth; Thitai-Kumar, Arun; He, Yi; Bankson, James; Williams, Ryan; Lemos, Robert; Oh, Junghwan; Volgin, Andrei; Soghomonyan, Suren; Nishii, Ryuichi; Alauddin, Mian; Mukhopadhay, Uday; Peng, Zhenghong; Bornmann, William; Gelovani, Juri

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) promotes tumor cell adaptation to microenvironmental stress. HIF-1 is up-regulated in irradiated tumors and serves as a promising target for radiosensitization. We initially confirmed that the orally bioavailable HIF-1 inhibitor PX-478 reduces HIF-1 protein levels and signaling in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and provides direct radiosensitization of hypoxic cancer cells in clonogenic survival assays using C6 glioma, HN5 and UMSCCa10 squamous cells, and Panc-1 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. However, PX-478 yields striking in vivo tumor sensitization to single-dose irradiation, which cannot be explained by incremental improvement in direct tumor cell killing. We show that PX-478 prevents postradiation HIF-1 signaling and abrogates downstream stromal adaptation in C6 and HN5 reporter xenografts as measured by serial ultrasound, vascular magnetic resonance imaging, and hypoxia response element–specific micro–positron emission tomography imaging. The primacy of indirect PX-478 in vivo effects was corroborated by our findings that (a) either concurrent or early postradiation sequencing of PX-478 provides roughly equivalent sensitization and (b) constitutive vascular endothelial growth factor expression maintains refractory tumor vessel function and progression following combined radiation and PX-478. These results confirm that disruption of postradiation adaptive HIF-1 signaling by PX-478 imparts increased therapeutic efficacy through blockade of HIF-1–dependent reconstitution of tumor stromal function. Successful translation of targeted HIF-1 radiosensitization to the clinical setting will require specific consideration of tumor microenvironmental effects and mechanisms. PMID:19372568

  9. MicroRNA-148b enhances the radiosensitivity of non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma cells by promoting radiation-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Liu, Guo-Long; Liu, Si-Hong; Wang, Cai-Xia; Xu, Yan-Li; Ying, Yi; Mao, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulating cellular radiosensitivity. This study aimed to explore the role of miRNAs in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) radiosensitivity. Microarray was employed to compare the miRNA expression profiles in B cell lymphoma cell line Raji before and after a 2-Gy dose of radiation. A total of 20 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified including 10 up-regulated and 10 down-regulated (defined as P < 0.05). Among the differentially expressed miRNAs, miR-148b was up-regulated 1.53-fold in response to radiation treatment. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay confirmed the up-regulation of miR-148b after radiation. Transient transfection experiments showed that miR-148b was up-regulated by miR-148b mimic and down-regulated by miR-148b inhibitor in the Raji cells. A proliferation assay showed that miR-148b could inhibit the proliferation of Raji cells before and after radiation. A clonogenic assay demonstrated that miR-148b sensitized Raji cells to radiotherapy. MiR-148b did not affect the cell cycle profile of post-radiation Raji cells compared with controls. An apoptosis assay showed that miR-148b enhanced apoptosis of Raji cells after irradiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that miR-148b increased the radiosensitivity of NHL cells probably by promoting radiation-induced apoptosis, which suggests that miR-148b plays an important role in the response of NHL to ionizing radiation. PMID:22843616

  10. Intranuclear Delivery of a Novel Antibody-Derived Radiosensitizer Targeting the DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Hairong; Lee, Robert J.; Haura, Eric B.; Edwards, John G.; Dynan, William S.; Li Shuyi

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To inhibit DNA double-strand break repair in tumor cells by delivery of a single-chain antibody variable region fragment (ScFv 18-2) to the cell nucleus. ScFv 18-2 binds to a regulatory region of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), an essential enzyme in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, and inhibits DNA end-joining in a cell-free system and when microinjected into single cells. Development as a radiosensitizer has been limited by the lack of a method for intranuclear delivery to target cells. We investigated a delivery method based on folate receptor-mediated endocytosis. Methods and Materials: A recombinant ScFv 18-2 derivative was conjugated to folate via a scissile disulfide linker. Folate-ScFv 18-2 was characterized for its ability to be internalized by tumor cells and to influence the behavior of ionizing radiation-induced repair foci. Radiosensitization was measured in a clonogenic survival assay. Survival curves were fitted to a linear-quadratic model, and between-group differences were evaluated by an F test. Sensitization ratios were determined based on mean inhibitory dose. Results: Human KB and NCI-H292 lung cancer cells treated with folate-conjugated ScFv 18-2 showed significant radiosensitization (p < 0.001). Sensitization enhancement ratios were 1.92 {+-} 0.42 for KB cells and 1.63 {+-} 0.13 for NCI-H292 cells. Studies suggest that treatment inhibits repair of radiation-induced DSBs, as evidenced by the persistence of {gamma}-H2AX-stained foci and by inhibition of staining with anti-DNA-PKcs phosphoserine 2056. Conclusions: Folate-mediated endocytosis is an effective method for intranuclear delivery of an antibody-derived DNA repair inhibitor.

  11. Sodium Selenite Radiosensitizes Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer Xenograft Tumors but Not Intestinal Crypt Cells In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Junqiang; Ning Shouchen; Knox, Susan J.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that sodium selenite (SSE) increases radiation-induced cell killing of human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. In this study we further evaluated the in vivo radiosensitizing effect of SSE in prostate cancer xenograft tumors and normal radiosensitive intestinal crypt cells. Methods and Materials: Immunodeficient (SCID) mice with hormone-independent LAPC-4 (HI-LAPC-4) and PC-3 xenograft tumors (approximately 200 mm{sup 3}) were divided into four groups: control (untreated), radiation therapy (XRT, local irradiation), SSE (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, 3 times/week), and XRT plus SSE. The XRT was given at the beginning of the regimen as a single dose of 5 Gy for HI-LAPC-4 tumors and a single dose of 7 Gy followed by a fractional dose of 3 Gy/d for 5 days for PC-3 tumors. The tumor volume was measured 3 times per week. The radiosensitizing effect of SSE on normal intestinal epithelial cells was assessed by use of a crypt cell microcolony assay. Results: In the efficacy study, SSE alone significantly inhibited the tumor growth in HI-LAPC-4 tumors but not PC-3 tumors. Sodium selenite significantly enhanced the XRT-induced tumor growth inhibition in both HI-LAPC-4 and PC-3 tumors. In the toxicity study, SSE did not affect the intestinal crypt cell survival either alone or in combination with XRT. Conclusions: Sodium selenite significantly enhances the effect of radiation on well-established hormone-independent prostate tumors and does not sensitize the intestinal epithelial cells to radiation. These results suggest that SSE may increase the therapeutic index of XRT for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  12. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Ridder, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes.

  13. Poor Prognosis Associated With Human Papillomavirus α7 Genotypes in Cervical Carcinoma Cannot Be Explained by Intrinsic Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, John S.; Iype, Rohan; Armenoult, Lucile S.C.; Taylor, Janet; Miller, Crispin J.; Davidson, Susan; Sanjose, Silvia de; Bosch, Xavier; Stern, Peter L.; West, Catharine M.L.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype and outcome after radiation therapy and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: HPV genotyping was performed on cervix biopsies by polymerase chain reaction using SPF-10 broad-spectrum primers, followed by deoxyribonucleic acid enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by reverse hybridization line probe assay (LiPA{sub 25}) (version 1) (n=202). PapilloCheck and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to genotype cervix cancer cell lines (n=16). Local progression-free survival after radiation therapy alone was assessed using log-rank and Cox proportionate hazard analyses. Intrinsic radiosensitivity was measured as surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) using clonogenic assays. Results: Of the 202 tumors, 107 (53.0%) were positive for HPV16, 29 (14.4%) for HPV18, 9 (4.5%) for HPV45, 23 (11.4%) for other HPV genotypes, and 22 (10.9%) were negative; 11 (5.5%) contained multiple genotypes, and 1 tumor was HPV X (0.5%). In 148 patients with outcome data, those with HPVα9-positive tumors had better local progression-free survival compared with α7 patients in univariate (P<.004) and multivariate (hazard ratio 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.76, P=.021) analyses. There was no difference in the median SF2 of α9 and α7 cervical tumors (n=63). In the cell lines, 9 were α7 and 4 α9 positive and 3 negative. There was no difference in SF2 between α9 and α7 cell lines (n=14). Conclusion: The reduced radioresponsiveness of α7 cervical tumors is not related to intrinsic radiosensitivity.

  14. Radiosensitizing Effect of a Phenylbutyrate-Derived Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yen-Shen; Chou, Chia-Hung; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Gao, Ming; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kulp, Samuel K.; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is integrated into the multimodal treatment of localized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) refractory to conventional treatment. Tumor control remains unsatisfactory and the sublethal effect associates with secondary spread. The use of an effective molecularly targeted agent in combination with radiotherapy is a potential therapeutic approach. Our aim was to assess the effect of combining a phenylbutyrate-derived histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, AR-42, with radiotherapy in in vitro and in vivo models of human HCC. Methods and Materials: Human HCC cell lines (Huh-7 and PLC-5) were used to evaluate the in vitro synergism of combining AR-42 with irradiation. Flow cytometry analyzed the cell cycle changes, whereas Western blot investigated the protein expressions after the combined treatment. Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice bearing ectopic and orthotopic HCC xenografts were treated with AR-42 and/or radiotherapy for the in vivo response. Results: AR-42 significantly enhanced radiation-induced cell death by the inhibition of the DNA end-binding activity of Ku70, a highly versatile regulatory protein for DNA repair, telomere maintenance, and apoptosis. In ectopic xenografts of Huh-7 and PLC-5, pretreatment with AR-42 significantly enhanced the tumor-suppressive effect of radiotherapy by 48% and 66%, respectively. A similar combinatorial effect of AR-42 (10 and 25 mg/kg) and radiotherapy was observed in Huh-7 orthotopic model of tumor growth by 52% and 82%, respectively. This tumor suppression was associated with inhibition of intratumoral Ku70 activity as well as reductions in markers of HDAC activity and proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Conclusion: AR-42 is a potent, orally bioavailable inhibitor of HDAC with therapeutic value as a radiosensitizer of HCC.

  15. Radiosensitive Hematopoietic Cells Determine the Extent of Skin Inflammation in Experimental Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiroaki; Witte, Mareike; Samavedam, Unni Krishna S R L; Gupta, Yask; Shimizu, Atsushi; Ishiko, Akira; Schröder, Tobias; Seeger, Karsten; Dahlke, Markus; Rades, Dirk; Zillikens, Detlef; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2015-09-01

    Animal models have enhanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. For these models, genetically identical, inbred mice have commonly been used. Different inbred mouse strains, however, show a high variability in disease manifestation. Identifying the factors that influence this disease variability could provide unrecognized insights into pathogenesis. We established a novel Ab transfer-induced model of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), an autoimmune disease characterized by (muco)-cutaneous blistering caused by anti-type VII collagen (COL7) autoantibodies. Blistering after anti-COL7 IgG (directed against the von Willebrand factor A-like domain 2) transfer showed clear variability among inbred mouse strains, that is, severe cutaneous blistering and inflammation in C57BL/6J and absence of skin lesions in MRL/MpJ mice. The transfer of anti-COL7 IgG into irradiated, EBA-resistant MRL/MpJ mice, rescued by transplantation with bone marrow from EBA-susceptible B6.AK-H2k mice, induced blistering. To the contrary, irradiated EBA-susceptible B6.AK-H2k mice that were rescued using MRL/MpJ bone marrow were devoid of blistering. In vitro, immune complex activation of neutrophils from C57BL/6J or MRL/MpJ mice showed an impaired reactive oxygen species release from the latter, whereas no differences were observed after PMA activation. This finding was paralleled by divergent expression profiles of immune complex-activated neutrophils from either C57BL/6J or MRL/MpJ mice. Collectively, we demonstrate that radiosensitive cells determine the varying extent of skin inflammation and blistering in the end-stage effector phase of EBA. PMID:26202985

  16. Radiosensitizing effects of TMZ observed in vivo only in a subset of MGMT methylated GBM xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Brett L.; Grogan, Patrick T.; Mladek, Ann C.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Kitange, Gaspar J.; Decker, Paul A.; Giannini, Caterina; Wu, Wenting; Ballman, Karla A.; James, C. David; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT) followed by adjuvant TMZ is standard treatment for patients with GBM, although the relative contribution of concurrent versus adjuvant TMZ is unknown. In this study, the efficacy of TMZ/RT was tested in a panel of 20 primary GBM xenografts. Methods and Materials Mice with intracranial xenografts were treated with TMZ, RT, TMZ/RT, or placebo. Survival ratio for a given treatment/line was defined as the ratio of median survival for treatment vs. placebo. Results The median survival ratio was significantly higher for MGMT methylated tumors versus unmethylated tumors following treatment with TMZ (median survival ratio 3.6 vs. 1.5, respectively; p=0.008) or TMZ/RT (5.7 vs. 2.3, respectively; p=0.001), but not RT alone (1.7 vs. 1.6; p=0.47). In an ANOVA analysis, MGMT methylation status and p53 mutation status were significantly associated with treatment response. In analyzing the additional survival benefit conferred specifically by combined therapy, only a subset (5 of 11) MGMT methylated tumors derived substantial additional benefit from combined therapy, while none of the MGMT unmethylated tumors did. Consistent with a true radiosensitizing effect of TMZ, sequential treatment, in which RT (week 1) was followed by TMZ (week 2), proved significantly less effective than TMZ followed by RT or concurrent TMZ / RT (survival ratios of 4.0, 9.6, and 12.9, respectively; p<0.0001). Conclusions Concurrent treatment with TMZ and RT provides significant survival benefit only in a subset of MGMT methylated tumors, and provides superior anti-tumor activity relative to sequential administration of RT and TMZ. PMID:19695438

  17. WE-G-BRE-02: Biological Modeling of Gold Nanoparticle Radiosensitization for Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to investigate the radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (GNP) in a proton beam. A computational model was built using the Local Effect Model (LEM) to predict the biological outcome of gold nanoparticle (GNP) sensitization. We present the results using a clinical proton beam, 6MV photon beam and two kilovoltage photon beams. Methods: First, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in the vicinity of GNPs. The dose distribution was then used as an input for LEM, which predicts dose-response curves for high linear energy transfer radiation using the track structure. The cell survival curves were evaluated for three particle sources (proton beam, MV photon beam and kV photon beam), various treatment depths for each particle source, various GNP uptakes and two different GNP sizes. Results: For proton therapy, the GNP sensitization effect is highly dependent on the treatment depth due to the energy-dependent interaction probability. We predict that if GNPs can be taken up by the cell nucleus, proton therapy can be significantly enhanced. If GNPs are only internalized into the cytoplasm, proton therapy can still be enhanced by GNPs and if GNPs are not internalized into cells, there will be no direct damage to the nucleus. For the same GNP uptake and concentration, the cell survival at 2Gy is reduced by 80% using kilovoltage photons, 50% using protons and only 2% using clinical MV photons. Finally, for the same weight of GNPs taken up by the cells, 10 nm GNPs causes 3 times more damage than 50 nm GNPs. Conclusion: We showed that GNPs have potential to be used to enhance radiation therapy for clinical proton beams.

  18. ATM-Dependent Hyper-Radiosensitivity in Mammalian Cells Irradiated by Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Lian; Yu Dong Furusawa, Yoshiya; Cao Jianping; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fan Saijun

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) and the later appearing radioresistance (termed induced radioresistance [IRR]) was mainly studied in low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation with survival observation. The aim of this study was to find out whether equivalent hypersensitivity occurred in high LET radiation, and the roles of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. Methods and Materials: Survival and mutation were measured by clonogenic assay and HPRT mutation assay. ATM Ser1981 activation was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. Pretreatment of specific ATM inhibitor (10 {mu}M KU55933) and activator (20 {mu}g/mL chloroquine) before carbon radiation were adopted to explore the involvement of ATM. The roles of ATM were also investigated in its G2/M checkpoint function with histone H3 phosphorylation analysis and flow cytometric assay, and DNA double strand break (DSB) repair function measured using {gamma}-H2AX foci assay. Results: HRS/IRR was observed with survival and mutation in normal human skin fibroblast cells by carbon ions, while impaired in cells with intrinsic ATM deficiency or normal cells modified with specific ATM activator or inhibitor before irradiation. The dose-response pattern of ATM kinase activation was concordant with the transition from HRS to IRR. The ATM-dependent 'early' G2 checkpoint arrest and DNA DSB repair efficiency could explain the difference between HRS and IRR. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the HRS/IRR by carbon ion radiation is an ATM-dependent phenomenon in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  19. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  20. Downregulation of peroxiredoxin-1 by β-elemene enhances the radiosensitivity of lung adenocarcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoquan; Xie, Bingbing; Li, Xiaolong; Chen, Yinghai; Xu, Yinghui; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Zou, Lijuan

    2015-03-01

    β-elemene, the active component of elemene (1-methyl-1-vinyl-2,4-diisopropenyl-cyclohexane), is a naturally occurring compound isolated from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Curcuma wenyujin. Studies have confirmed that β-elemene enhances the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cell lines such as A549, by multiple pathways; however, their underlying mechanisms and pathways are yet to be elucidated. In the present study, two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry were used to profile the different proteins in A549 cell xenograft models of both treatment groups. The protein/mRNA expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting techniques in tumor samples from all treatment groups. As a critical player in redox regulation of cancer cells, inhibition of peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx-1) may be an effective option for enhancing the tumor response to radiation. We further verified Prx-1 expression at the transcription and translation levels. β-elemene at a dose of 45 mg/kg had little effect on the Prx-1 protein expression, which was correlated with a moderate antitumor effect. However, a 45 mg/kg dose of β-elemene significantly inhibited the Prx-1 mRNA expression, thereby suggesting a possible influence on the transcriptional process, and radiation significantly increased the Prx-1 mRNA/protein expression compared to the control group (p<0.01). Notably, Prx-1 mRNA/protein expression was significantly lower in the β-elemene/radiation co-treatment group compared to the baseline levels in the control group (p<0.01). These results suggest that radiation-induced Prx-1 expression is directly or indirectly suppressed by β-elemene, thus suggesting a new pathway by which to reverse radioresistance.