Science.gov

Sample records for account numerical results

  1. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  2. Engineering Accountability for Results into Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lessinger, Leon

    "Accountability" is a classical term in management theory, but new in education. It is the product of the process of performance contracting, in which a public authority grants money to a local educational agency to contract with private enterprise to achieve specific goals within a specific period for specific costs. This process can be…

  3. Numerical taxonomy on data: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.; Farach, M.

    1997-12-01

    The numerical taxonomy problems associated with most of the optimization criteria described above are NP - hard [3, 5, 1, 4]. In, the first positive result for numerical taxonomy was presented. They showed that if e is the distance to the closest tree metric under the L{sub {infinity}} norm. i.e., e = min{sub T} [L{sub {infinity}} (T-D)], then it is possible to construct a tree T such that L{sub {infinity}} (T-D) {le} 3e, that is, they gave a 3-approximation algorithm for this problem. We will refer to this algorithm as the Single Pivot (SP) heuristic.

  4. Sheet Hydroforming Process Numerical Model Improvement Through Experimental Results Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Papadia; Antonio, Del Prete; Alfredo, Anglani

    2010-06-01

    The increasing application of numerical simulation in metal forming field has helped engineers to solve problems one after another to manufacture a qualified formed product reducing the required time [1]. Accurate simulation results are fundamental for the tooling and the product designs. The wide application of numerical simulation is encouraging the development of highly accurate simulation procedures to meet industrial requirements. Many factors can influence the final simulation results and many studies have been carried out about materials [2], yield criteria [3] and plastic deformation [4,5], process parameters [6] and their optimization. In order to develop a reliable hydromechanical deep drawing (HDD) numerical model the authors have been worked out specific activities based on the evaluation of the effective stiffness of the blankholder structure [7]. In this paper after an appropriate tuning phase of the blankholder force distribution, the experimental activity has been taken into account to improve the accuracy of the numerical model. In the first phase, the effective capability of the blankholder structure to transfer the applied load given by hydraulic actuators to the blank has been explored. This phase ended with the definition of an appropriate subdivision of the blankholder active surface in order to take into account the effective pressure map obtained for the given loads configuration. In the second phase the numerical results obtained with the developed subdivision have been compared with the experimental data of the studied model. The numerical model has been then improved, finding the best solution for the blankholder force distribution.

  5. Numerical simulations of catastrophic disruption: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, W.; Asphaug, E.; Ryan, E. V.

    1994-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to study high velocity two-body impacts. In this paper, a two-dimensional Largrangian finite difference hydro-code and a three-dimensional smooth particle hydro-code (SPH) are described and initial results reported. These codes can be, and have been, used to make specific predictions about particular objects in our solar system. But more significantly, they allow us to explore a broad range of collisional events. Certain parameters (size, time) can be studied only over a very restricted range within the laboratory; other parameters (initial spin, low gravity, exotic structure or composition) are difficult to study at all experimentally. The outcomes of numerical simulations lead to a more general and accurate understanding of impacts in their many forms.

  6. Anisotropic halo model: implementation and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgró, Mario A.; Paz, Dante J.; Merchán, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    In the present work, we extend the classic halo model for the large-scale matter distribution including a triaxial model for the halo profiles and their alignments. In particular, we derive general expressions for the halo-matter cross-correlation function. In addition, by numerical integration, we obtain instances of the cross-correlation function depending on the directions given by halo shape axes. These functions are called anisotropic cross-correlations. With the aim of comparing our theoretical results with the simulations, we compute averaged anisotropic correlations in cones with their symmetry axis along each shape direction of the centre halo. From these comparisons we characterize and quantify the alignment of dark matter haloes on the Λcold dark matter context by means of the presented anisotropic halo model. Since our model requires multidimensional integral computation we implement a Monte Carlo method on GPU hardware which allows us to increase the precision of the results and it improves the performance of the computation.

  7. Testing Numerical Dynamo Models Against Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gissinger, C. J.; Fauve, S.; Dormy, E.

    2007-12-01

    Significant progress has been achieved over the past few years in describing the geomagnetic field using computer models for dynamo action. Such models are so far limited to parameter regimes which are very remote from actual values relevant to the Earth core or any liquid metal (the magnetic Prandtl number is always over estimated by a factor at least 104). While existing models successfully reproduce many of the magnetic observations, it is difficult to assert their validity. The recent success of an experimental homogeneous unconstrained dynamo (VKS) provides a new way to investigate dynamo action in turbulent conducting flows, but it also offers a chance to test the validity of exisiting numerical models. We use a code originaly written for the Geodynamo (Parody) and apply it to the experimental configuration. The direct comparison of simulations and experiments is of great interest to test the predictive value of numerical simulations for dynamo action. These turbulent simulations allow us to approach issues which are very relevant for geophysical dynamos, especially the competition between different magnetic modes and the dynamics of reversals.

  8. Numerical modeling of gravity-driven bubble flows with account of polydispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, A. S.; Schmidt, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The present study is focused on the investigation of motion of bubble-liquid medium inside the bubble columns or vertical pipes with account of polydisperse phenomena by the means of numerical simulation. The underlying mathematical model is based on the Euler- Euler approach with interphase interaction described by the momentum and mass transfer between phases, along with the k-w-SST turbulence model which includes turbulence generation by the bubble motion and bubble path dispersion. Polydispersion is taken into account by the multi-class model with piecewise-constant distribution of bubble sizes per cell. Simulation of downward flow inside the straight vertical pipe resulted in maximum of the bubble void fraction close to the pipe center which is in good correlation with the experimental data. Simulation of multiphase flow inside rectangular bubble column with off-center sparger resulted in vertical bubble-liquid jet which is biased towards nearby wall with the correct prediction of attachment point location.

  9. Including Alternate Assessment Results in Accountability Decisions. NCEO Policy Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quenemoen, Rachel; Thurlow, Martha

    Alternate assessments provide a mechanism for students with complex disabilities to be included in assessment systems. An integral part of maximizing the benefits of assessing students is to include the results of alternate assessments in school accountability systems. This report addresses policy options for including the results of alternate…

  10. Ranking Accounting Authors and Departments in Accounting Education: Different Methodologies--Significantly Different Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardi, Richard A.; Zamojcin, Kimberly A.; Delande, Taylor L.

    2016-01-01

    This research tests whether Holderness Jr., D. K., Myers, N., Summers, S. L., & Wood, D. A. [(2014). "Accounting education research: Ranking institutions and individual scholars." "Issues in Accounting Education," 29(1), 87-115] accounting-education rankings are sensitive to a change in the set of journals used. It provides…

  11. A DRDC Management Accountability Framework: Results of Cycle 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    assessment and improvement of business processes . Future plans: The following recommendations arise from this report: 1. Defence R&D Canada should...18 3.2.2 Vision of a Steady-State DRDC MAF .......................................................... 20 3.2.2.1 The Process ...Dalhousie University supported a cyclic development process for a DRDC management accountability framework (MAF), as follows: Cycle ‘zero’, which

  12. A Road to Results: Results-Based Accountability in the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manno, Bruno V.

    2006-01-01

    This report details the Annie E. Casey Foundation's four-year effort to develop a "results-based accountability" (RBA) approach to its K-12 education portfolio. Though still a work in progress, the Foundation's experience with RBA can help other philanthropic organizations and individual donors develop their own approaches to producing and…

  13. Numerical results for extended field method applications. [thin plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, B. K.; Chander, S.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical results obtained when a new method of analysis, called the extended field method, was applied to several thin plate problems including one with non-rectangular geometry, and one problem involving both beams and a plate. The numerical results show that the quality of the single plate solutions was satisfactory for all cases except those involving a freely deflecting plate corner. The results for the beam and plate structure were satisfactory even though the structure had a freely deflecting corner.

  14. Numerical Results of 3-D Modeling of Moon Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod; Antipin, Alexandr

    2014-05-01

    For the last time for the model of the Moon usually had been used the model of mega impact in which the forming of the Earth and its sputnik had been the consequence of the Earth's collision with the body of Mercurial mass. But all dynamical models of the Earth's accumulation and the estimations after the Pb-Pb system, lead to the conclusion that the duration of the planet accumulation was about 1 milliard years. But isotopic results after the W-Hf system testify about a very early (5-10) million years, dividing of the geochemical reservoirs of the core and mantle. In [1,2] it is shown, that the account of energy dissipating by the decay of short living radioactive elements and first of all Al26,it is sufficient for heating even small bodies with dimensions about (50-100) km up to the iron melting temperature and can be realized a principal new differentiation mechanism. The inner parts of the melted preplanets can join and they are mainly of iron content, but the cold silicate fragments return to the supply zone and additionally change the content of Moon forming to silicates. Only after the increasing of the gravitational radius of the Earth, the growing area of the future Earth's core can save also the silicate envelope fragments [3]. For understanding the further system Earth-Moon evolution it is significant to trace the origin and evolution of heterogeneities, which occur on its accumulation stage.In that paper we are modeling the changing of temperature,pressure,velocity of matter flowing in a block of 3d spherical body with a growing radius. The boundary problem is solved by the finite-difference method for the system of equations, which include equations which describe the process of accumulation, the Safronov equation, the equation of impulse balance, equation Navier-Stocks, equation for above litho static pressure and heat conductivity in velocity-pressure variables using the Businesque approach.The numerical algorithm of the problem solution in velocity

  15. Kentucky School and District Accountability Results. Accountability Cycle 3 (1994-95 to 1997-98). Briefing Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort.

    This briefing packet contains data on the school and district accountability results for Kentucky's state assessment system, the Kentucky Instructional Results Information System, for 1994-1995 through its last use in 1997-1998. The first section contains state and regional accountability indices by grade level, with number of students tested and…

  16. Numerical prediction of a draft tube flow taking into account uncertain inlet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugiere, O.; Balarac, G.; Corre, C.; Metais, O.; Flores, E.; Pleroy

    2012-11-01

    The swirling turbulent flow in a hydroturbine draft tube is computed with a non-intrusive uncertainty quantification (UQ) method coupled to Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modelling in order to take into account in the numerical prediction the physical uncertainties existing on the inlet flow conditions. The proposed approach yields not only mean velocity fields to be compared with measured profiles, as is customary in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) practice, but also variance of these quantities from which error bars can be deduced on the computed profiles, thus making more significant the comparison between experiment and computation.

  17. Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This issue reviews publications that provide a starting point for principals looking for a way through the accountability maze. Each publication views accountability differently, but collectively these readings argue that even in an era of state-mandated assessment, principals can pursue proactive strategies that serve students' needs. James A.…

  18. Advanced Numerical Imaging Procedure Accounting for Non-Ideal Effects in GPR Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comite, Davide; Galli, Alessandro; Catapano, Ilaria; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The capability to provide fast and reliable imaging of targets and interfaces in non-accessible probed scenarios is a topic of great scientific interest, and many investigations have shown that Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can provide an efficient technique to conduct this kind of analysis in various applications of geophysical nature and civil engineering. In these cases, the development of an efficient and accurate imaging procedure is strongly dependent on the capability of accounting for the incident field that activates the scattering phenomenon. In this frame, based on a suitable implementation of an electromagnetic (EM) CAD tool (CST Microwave Studio), it has been possible to accurately and efficiently model the radiation pattern of real antennas in environments typically considered in GPR surveys [1]. A typical scenario of our interest is constituted by targets hidden in a ground medium, described by certain EM parameters and probed by a movable GPR using interfacial antennas [2]. The transmitting and receiving antennas considered here are Vivaldi ones, but a wide variety of other antennas can be modeled and designed, similar to those ones available in commercial GPR systems. Hence, an advanced version of a well-known microwave tomography approach (MTA) [3] has been implemented, both in the canonical 2D scalar case and in the more realistic 3D vectorial one. Such an approach is able to account for the real distribution of the radiated and scattered EM fields. Comparisons of results obtained by means of a 'conventional' implementation of the MTA, where the antennas are modeled as ideal line sources, and by means of our 'advanced' approach, which instead takes into account the radiation features of the chosen antenna type, have been carried out and discussed. Since the antenna radiation patterns are modified by the probed environment, whose EM features and the possible stratified structure usually are not exactly known, the imaging capabilities of the MTA

  19. Numerical Results of Earth's Core Accumulation 3-D Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod

    2013-04-01

    For a long time as a most convenient had been the model of mega impact in which the early forming of the Earth's core and mantle had been the consequence of formed protoplanet collision with the body of Mercurial mass. But all dynamical models of the Earth's accumulation and the estimations after the Pb-Pb system, lead to the conclusion that the duration of the planet accumulation was about 1 milliard years. But isotopic results after the W-Hf system testify about a very early (5-10) million years, dividing of the geochemical reservoirs of the core and mantle. In [1,3] it is shown, that the account of energy dissipating by the decay of short living radioactive elements and first of all Al,it is sufficient for heating even small bodies with dimensions about (50-100) km up to the iron melting temperature and can be realized a principal new differentiation mechanism. The inner parts of the melted preplanets can join and they are mainly of iron content, but the cold silicate fragments return to the supply zone. Only after the increasing of the gravitational radius, the growing area of the future core can save also the silicate envelope fragments. All existing dynamical accumulation models are constructed by using a spherical-symmetrical model. Hence for understanding the further planet evolution it is significant to trace the origin and evolution of heterogeneities, which occur on the planet accumulation stage. In that paper we are modeling distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity of matter flowing in a block of 3D- spherical body with a growing radius. The boundary problem is solved by the finite-difference method for the system of equations, which include equations which describe the process of accumulation, the Safronov equation, the equation of impulse balance, equation Navier-Stocks, equation for above litho static pressure and heat conductivity in velocity-pressure variables using the Businesque approach. The numerical algorithm of the problem solution in

  20. Numerical Simulation of Micronozzles with Comparison to Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornber, B.; Chesta, E.; Gloth, O.; Brandt, R.; Schwane, R.; Perigo, D.; Smith, P.

    2004-10-01

    A numerical analysis of conical micronozzle flows has been conducted using the commercial software package CFD-RC FASTRAN [13]. The numerical results have been validated by comparison with direct thrust and mass flow measurements recently performed in ESTEC Propulsion Laboratory on Polyflex Space Ltd. 10mN Cold-Gas thrusters in the frame of ESA CryoSat mission. The flow is viscous dominated, with a throat Reynolds number of 5000, and the relatively large length of the nozzle causes boundary layer effects larger than usual for nozzles of this size. This paper discusses in detail the flow physics such as boundary layer growth and structure, and the effects of rarefaction. Furthermore a number of different domain sizes and exit boundary conditions are used to determine the optimum combination of computational time and accuracy.

  1. The New Oregon Trail: Accountability for Results. Special Report #7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne; Dunkle, Margaret

    This report was designed to help policy makers and concerned citizens understand the context, culture, and history that set the stage for Oregon's efforts to reform state government, including those areas of government that affect education. This text offers a "snapshot" of what Oregon is doing to improve results, such as setting…

  2. Reinforcement learning accounts for moody conditional cooperation behavior: experimental results

    PubMed Central

    Horita, Yutaka; Takezawa, Masanori; Inukai, Keigo; Kita, Toshimasa; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    In social dilemma games, human participants often show conditional cooperation (CC) behavior or its variant called moody conditional cooperation (MCC), with which they basically tend to cooperate when many other peers have previously cooperated. Recent computational studies showed that CC and MCC behavioral patterns could be explained by reinforcement learning. In the present study, we use a repeated multiplayer prisoner’s dilemma game and the repeated public goods game played by human participants to examine whether MCC is observed across different types of game and the possibility that reinforcement learning explains observed behavior. We observed MCC behavior in both games, but the MCC that we observed was different from that observed in the past experiments. In the present study, whether or not a focal participant cooperated previously affected the overall level of cooperation, instead of changing the tendency of cooperation in response to cooperation of other participants in the previous time step. We found that, across different conditions, reinforcement learning models were approximately as accurate as a MCC model in describing the experimental results. Consistent with the previous computational studies, the present results suggest that reinforcement learning may be a major proximate mechanism governing MCC behavior. PMID:28071646

  3. Reinforcement learning accounts for moody conditional cooperation behavior: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Horita, Yutaka; Takezawa, Masanori; Inukai, Keigo; Kita, Toshimasa; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-01-10

    In social dilemma games, human participants often show conditional cooperation (CC) behavior or its variant called moody conditional cooperation (MCC), with which they basically tend to cooperate when many other peers have previously cooperated. Recent computational studies showed that CC and MCC behavioral patterns could be explained by reinforcement learning. In the present study, we use a repeated multiplayer prisoner's dilemma game and the repeated public goods game played by human participants to examine whether MCC is observed across different types of game and the possibility that reinforcement learning explains observed behavior. We observed MCC behavior in both games, but the MCC that we observed was different from that observed in the past experiments. In the present study, whether or not a focal participant cooperated previously affected the overall level of cooperation, instead of changing the tendency of cooperation in response to cooperation of other participants in the previous time step. We found that, across different conditions, reinforcement learning models were approximately as accurate as a MCC model in describing the experimental results. Consistent with the previous computational studies, the present results suggest that reinforcement learning may be a major proximate mechanism governing MCC behavior.

  4. Numerical tool to take nonlocal effects into account in metallo-dielectric multilayers.

    PubMed

    Benedicto, Jessica; Pollès, Rémi; Ciracì, Cristian; Centeno, Emmanuel; Smith, David R; Moreau, Antoine

    2015-08-01

    We provide a numerical tool to quantitatively study the impact of nonlocality arising from free electrons in metals on the optical properties of metallo-dielectric multilayers. We found that scattering matrices are particularly well suited to take into account the electron response through the application of the hydrodynamic model. Though effects due to nonlocality are, in general, quite small, they, nevertheless, can be important for very thin (typically below 10 nm) metallic layers, as in those used in structures characterized by exotic dispersion curves. Such structures include those with a negative refractive index, hyperbolic metamaterials, and near-zero index materials. Higher wave vectors mean larger nonlocal effects, so that it is not surprising that subwavelength imaging capabilities of hyperbolic metamaterials are found to be sensitive to nonlocal effects. We find in all cases that the inclusion of nonlocal effects leads to at least a 5% higher transmission through the considered structure.

  5. Accounting for elite indoor 200 m sprint results

    PubMed Central

    Usherwood, James R; Wilson, Alan M

    2005-01-01

    Times for indoor 200 m sprint races are notably worse than those for outdoor races. In addition, there is a considerable bias against competitors drawn in inside lanes (with smaller bend radii). Centripetal acceleration requirements increase average forces during sprinting around bends. These increased forces can be modulated by changes in duty factor (the proportion of stride the limb is in contact with the ground). If duty factor is increased to keep limb forces constant, and protraction time and distance travelled during stance are unchanging, bend-running speeds are reduced. Here, we use results from the 2004 Olympics and World Indoor Championships to show quantitatively that the decreased performances in indoor competition, and the bias by lane number, are consistent with this ‘constant limb force’ hypothesis. Even elite athletes appear constrained by limb forces. PMID:17148323

  6. Path Integrals and Exotic Options:. Methods and Numerical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormetti, G.; Montagna, G.; Moreni, N.; Nicrosini, O.

    2005-09-01

    In the framework of Black-Scholes-Merton model of financial derivatives, a path integral approach to option pricing is presented. A general formula to price path dependent options on multidimensional and correlated underlying assets is obtained and implemented by means of various flexible and efficient algorithms. As an example, we detail the case of Asian call options. The numerical results are compared with those obtained with other procedures used in quantitative finance and found to be in good agreement. In particular, when pricing at the money (ATM) and out of the money (OTM) options, path integral exhibits competitive performances.

  7. Modeling extracellular electrical stimulation: II. Computational validation and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, Bahman; Meffin, Hamish; Dokos, Socrates; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B

    2012-12-01

    The validity of approximate equations describing the membrane potential under extracellular electrical stimulation (Meffin et al 2012 J. Neural Eng. 9 065005) is investigated through finite element analysis in this paper. To this end, the finite element method is used to simulate a cylindrical neurite under extracellular stimulation. Laplace's equations with appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically in three dimensions and the results are compared to the approximate analytic solutions. Simulation results are in agreement with the approximate analytic expressions for longitudinal and transverse modes of stimulation. The range of validity of the equations describing the membrane potential for different values of stimulation and neurite parameters are presented as well. The results indicate that the analytic approach can be used to model extracellular electrical stimulation for realistic physiological parameters with a high level of accuracy.

  8. Analysis of Numerical Simulation Results of LIPS-200 Lifetime Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juanjuan; Zhang, Tianping; Geng, Hai; Jia, Yanhui; Meng, Wei; Wu, Xianming; Sun, Anbang

    2016-06-01

    Accelerator grid structural and electron backstreaming failures are the most important factors affecting the ion thruster's lifetime. During the thruster's operation, Charge Exchange Xenon (CEX) ions are generated from collisions between plasma and neutral atoms. Those CEX ions grid's barrel and wall frequently, which cause the failures of the grid system. In order to validate whether the 20 cm Lanzhou Ion Propulsion System (LIPS-200) satisfies China's communication satellite platform's application requirement for North-South Station Keeping (NSSK), this study analyzed the measured depth of the pit/groove on the accelerator grid's wall and aperture diameter's variation and estimated the operating lifetime of the ion thruster. Different from the previous method, in this paper, the experimental results after the 5500 h of accumulated operation of the LIPS-200 ion thruster are presented firstly. Then, based on these results, theoretical analysis and numerical calculations were firstly performed to predict the on-orbit lifetime of LIPS-200. The results obtained were more accurate to calculate the reliability and analyze the failure modes of the ion thruster. The results indicated that the predicted lifetime of LIPS-200's was about 13218.1 h which could satisfy the required lifetime requirement of 11000 h very well.

  9. An extended macro traffic flow model accounting for the driver's bounded rationality and numerical tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Huang, Hai-Jun; Shang, Hua-Yan

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a macro traffic flow model to explore the effects of the driver's bounded rationality on the evolutions of traffic waves (which include shock and rarefaction waves) and small perturbation, and on the fuel consumption and emissions (that include CO, HC and NOX) during the evolution process. The numerical results illustrate that considering the driver's bounded rationality can prominently smooth the wavefront of the traffic waves and improve the stability of traffic flow, which shows that the driver's bounded rationality has positive impacts on traffic flow; but considering the driver's bounded rationality reduces the fuel consumption and emissions only at the upstream of the rarefaction wave while enhances the fuel consumption and emissions under other situations, which shows that the driver's bounded rationality has positive impacts on the fuel consumption and emissions only at the upstream of the rarefaction wave, while negative effects on the fuel consumption and emissions under other situations. In addition, the numerical results show that the driver's bounded rationality has little prominent impact on the total fuel consumption, and emissions during the whole evolution of small perturbation.

  10. Velocity distribution of meteoroids colliding with planets and satellites. II. Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholshevnikov, K. V.; Shor, V. A.

    In the first part of the paper we proposed algorithm for describing velocity distribution of meteoroids colliding with planets and satellites. In the present part we show numerical characteristics of the distribution function. Namely, for each of terrestrial planets and their satellites we consider a swarm of encountering particles of asteroidal origin. They form a field of relative collisional velocities v. We consider momenta k (mathematical expectation of vk), k = -1, 1, 2, 3, 4. The data are calculated under two different assumptions: taking into account gravitation of target body or without it. The main results are presented in a series of tables each containing five numbers and several useful functions of them.

  11. Busted Butte: Achieving the Objectives and Numerical Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Soll; M. Kearney; P. Stauffer; P. Tseng; H.J. Turin; Z. Lu

    2002-10-07

    The Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) at Busted Butte is a mesoscale field/laboratory/modeling investigation designed to address uncertainties associated with flow and transport in the UZ site-process models for Yucca Mountain. The UZTT test facility is located approximately 8 km southeast of the potential Yucca Mountain repository area. The UZTT was designed in two phases, to address five specific objectives in the UZ: the effect of heterogeneities, flow and transport (F&T) behavior at permeability contrast boundaries, migration of colloids , transport models of sorbing tracers, and scaling issues in moving from laboratory scale to field scale. Phase 1A was designed to assess the influence of permeability contrast boundaries in the hydrologic Calico Hills. Visualization of fluorescein movement , mineback rock analyses, and comparison with numerical models demonstrated that F&T are capillary dominated with permeability contrast boundaries distorting the capillary flow. Phase 1B was designed to assess the influence of fractures on F&T and colloid movement. The injector in Phase 1B was located at a fracture, while the collector, 30 cm below, was placed at what was assumed to be the same fracture. Numerical simulations of nonreactive (Br) and reactive (Li) tracers show the experimental data are best explained by a combination of molecular diffusion and advective flux. For Phase 2, a numerical model with homogeneous unit descriptions was able to qualitatively capture the general characteristics of the system. Numerical simulations and field observations revealed a capillary dominated flow field. Although the tracers showed heterogeneity in the test block, simulation using heterogeneous fields did not significantly improve the data fit over homogeneous field simulations. In terms of scaling, simulations of field tracer data indicate a hydraulic conductivity two orders of magnitude higher than measured in the laboratory. Simulations of Li, a weakly sorbing tracer

  12. Numerical calculations of high-altitude differential charging: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laframboise, J. G.; Godard, R.; Prokopenko, S. M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A two dimensional simulation program was constructed in order to obtain theoretical predictions of floating potential distributions on geostationary spacecraft. The geometry was infinite-cylindrical with angle dependence. Effects of finite spacecraft length on sheath potential profiles can be included in an approximate way. The program can treat either steady-state conditions or slowly time-varying situations, involving external time scales much larger than particle transit times. Approximate, locally dependent expressions were used to provide space charge, density profiles, but numerical orbit-following is used to calculate surface currents. Ambient velocity distributions were assumed to be isotropic, beam-like, or some superposition of these.

  13. Numerical simulations to account for boulder movements on Lanyu Island, Taiwan: tsunami or storm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Mamoru; Arashiro, Yasuhisa; Shiga, Shota

    2014-12-01

    Boulders that originated from the Holocene coral terrace and coral reef are distributed on the coral terrace or talus on the shore of Lanyu Island, Taiwan. We employed numerical simulation of storm waves and estimated whether the boulders could be moved by storm waves with a return period of 50 years, by larger storm waves with return periods of hundreds of years, or by tsunamis. The coral boulders are distributed between 36 and 128 m from the shoreline at elevations of 2.7 to 9.3 m. The sizes of the boulders are in the range 0.3 to 6.4 m. The boulder volume and a-axis length versus distance from the shore show weak and moderate correlation ( r = 0.21 and 0.48), respectively. We reproduced the runup of waves using the equation of continuity for a two-dimensional non-compressive fluid and the Navier-Stokes formula. In order to handle the free surface of the fluid, the volume of fluid method was applied. For the flow velocity to move the boulder, we employed the theoretical formula for the transport of boulders. We used the wave height for a return period of 50 years and set the height of the input wave to 13.1 m. The results show that all the large boulders on Lanyu Island could be moved by storm waves with a return period of 50 years. Moreover, the computations show that most of the boulders could not have been transported by tsunamis generated by the Mw8.7 earthquakes. The ages of two boulders indicate that they were transported after 340 and 6,330 years ago. If these boulders were moved by tsunamis several hundred years ago, they would have been relocated subsequently by storm waves.

  14. Swinging Atwood Machine: Experimental and numerical results, and a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, O.; Pérez, J. P.; Ramis, J. P.; Simó, C.; Simon, S.; Weil, J. A.

    2010-06-01

    A Swinging Atwood Machine ( SAM) is built and some experimental results concerning its dynamic behaviour are presented. Experiments clearly show that pulleys play a role in the motion of the pendulum, since they can rotate and have non-negligible radii and masses. Equations of motion must therefore take into account the moment of inertia of the pulleys, as well as the winding of the rope around them. Their influence is compared to previous studies. A preliminary discussion of the role of dissipation is included. The theoretical behaviour of the system with pulleys is illustrated numerically, and the relevance of different parameters is highlighted. Finally, the integrability of the dynamic system is studied, the main result being that the machine with pulleys is non-integrable. The status of the results on integrability of the pulley-less machine is also recalled.

  15. Theoretical and numerical results on effects of attenuation on correlation functions of ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2013-09-01

    We study analytically and numerically effects of attenuation on cross-correlation functions of ambient noise in a 2-D model with different attenuation constants between and outside a pair of stations. The attenuation is accounted for by quality factor Q(ω) and complex phase velocity. The analytical results are derived for isotropic far-field source distribution assuming the Fresnel approximation and mild attenuation. More general situations including cases with non-isotropic source distributions are examined with numerical simulations. The results show that homogeneous attenuation in the interstation regions produces symmetric amplitude decay of the causal and anticausal parts of the noise cross-correlation function. The attenuation between the receivers and far-field sources generates symmetric exponential amplitude decay and may also cause asymmetric reduction of the causal/anticausal parts that increases with frequency. This frequency dependence can be used to distinguish asymmetric amplitudes due to attenuation from frequency-independent asymmetry in noise correlations generated by non-isotropic source distribution. The attenuations both between and outside station pairs also produce phase shifts that could affect measurements of group and phase velocities. In terms of noise cross-spectra, the interstation attenuation is governed by Struve functions while the attenuation between the far-field sources and receivers is associated with exponential decay and the imaginary part of complex Bessel function. These results are fundamentally different from previous studies of attenuated coherency that append the Bessel function with an exponential decay that depends on the interstation distance.

  16. Comparison Between Numerical and Experimental Results on Mechanical Stirrer and Bubbling in a Cylindrical Tank - 13047

    SciTech Connect

    Lima da Silva, M.; Sauvage, E.; Brun, P.; Gagnoud, A.; Fautrelle, Y.; Riva, R.

    2013-07-01

    The process of vitrification in a cold crucible heated by direct induction is used in the fusion of oxides. Its feature is the production of high-purity materials. The high-level of purity of the molten is achieved because this melting technique excludes the contamination of the charge by the crucible. The aim of the present paper is to analyze the hydrodynamic of the vitrification process by direct induction, with the focus in the effects associated with the interaction between the mechanical stirrer and bubbling. Considering the complexity of the analyzed system and the goal of the present work, we simplified the system by not taking into account the thermal and electromagnetic phenomena. Based in the concept of hydraulic similitude, we performed an experimental study and a numerical modeling of the simplified model. The results of these two studies were compared and showed a good agreement. The results presented in this paper in conjunction with the previous work contribute to a better understanding of the hydrodynamics effects resulting from the interaction between the mechanical stirrer and air bubbling in the cold crucible heated by direct induction. Further works will take into account thermal and electromagnetic phenomena in the presence of mechanical stirrer and air bubbling. (authors)

  17. Aeolian Simulations: A Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, O.; Burr, D. M.; Bridges, N. T.; Lyne, J. E.; Marshall, J. R.; Greeley, R.; White, B. R.; Hills, J.; Smith, K.; Prissel, T. C.; Aliaga-Caro, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Aeolian processes are a major geomorphic agent on solid planetary bodies with atmospheres (Earth, Mars, Venus, and Titan). This paper describes preliminary efforts to model aeolian saltation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and to compare the results with those obtained in wind tunnel testing conducted in the Planetary Aeolian Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center at ambient pressure. The end goal of the project is to develop an experimentally validated CFD approach for modeling aeolian sediment transport on Titan and other planetary bodies. The MARSWIT open-circuit tunnel in this work was specifically designed for atmospheric boundary layer studies. It is a variable-speed, continuous flow tunnel with a test section 1.0 m by 1.2 m in size; the tunnel is able to operate at pressures from 10 millibar to one atmosphere. Flow trips near the tunnel inlet ensure a fully developed, turbulent boundary layer in the test section. Wind speed and axial velocity profiles can be measured with a traversing pitot tube. In this study, sieved walnut shell particles (Greeley et al. 1976) with a density of ~1.1 g/cm3 were used to correlate the low gravity conditions and low sediment density on a body of interest to that of Earth. This sediment was placed in the tunnel, and the freestream airspeed raised to 5.4 m/s. A Phantom v12 camera imaged the resulting particle motion at 1000 frames per second, which was analyzed with ImageJ open-source software (Fig. 1). Airflow in the tunnel was modeled with FLUENT, a commercial CFD program. The turbulent scheme used in FLUENT to obtain closed-form solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations was a 1st Order, k-epsilon model. These methods produced computational velocity profiles that agree with experimental data to within 5-10%. Once modeling of the flow field had been achieved, a Euler-Lagrangian scheme was employed, treating the particles as spheres and tracking each particle at its center. The particles are assumed to interact with

  18. Sediment Pathways Across Trench Slopes: Results From Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, M. H.; Seeber, L.; McHugh, C. M.; Fujiwara, T.; Kanamatsu, T.; King, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Until the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake, the role of earthquakes as agents of sediment dispersal and deposition at erosional trenches was largely under-appreciated. A series of cruises carried out after the 2011 event has revealed a variety of unsuspected sediment transport mechanisms, such as tsunami-triggered sheet turbidites, suggesting that great earthquakes may in fact be important agents for dispersing sediments across trench slopes. To complement these observational data, we have modeled the pathways of sediments across the trench slope based on bathymetric grids. Our approach assumes that transport direction is controlled by slope azimuth only, and ignores obstacles smaller than 0.6-1 km; these constraints are meant to approximate the behavior of turbidites. Results indicate that (1) most pathways issued from the upper slope terminate near the top of the small frontal wedge, and thus do not reach the trench axis; (2) in turn, sediments transported to the trench axis are likely derived from the small frontal wedge or from the subducting Pacific plate. These results are consistent with the stratigraphy imaged in seismic profiles, which reveals that the slope apron does not extend as far as the frontal wedge, and that the thickness of sediments at the trench axis is similar to that of the incoming Pacific plate. We further applied this modeling technique to the Cascadia, Nankai, Middle-America, and Sumatra trenches. Where well-defined canyons carve the trench slopes, sediments from the upper slope may routinely reach the trench axis (e.g., off Costa Rica and Cascadia). In turn, slope basins that are isolated from the canyons drainage systems must mainly accumulate locally-derived sediments. Therefore, their turbiditic infill may be diagnostic of seismic activity only - and not from storm or flood activity. If correct, this would make isolated slope basins ideal targets for paleoseismological investigation.

  19. A theory of scintillation for two-component power law irregularity spectra: Overview and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Rino, Charles L.

    2016-06-01

    We extend the power law phase screen theory for ionospheric scintillation to account for the case where the refractive index irregularities follow a two-component inverse power law spectrum. The two-component model includes, as special cases, an unmodified power law and a modified power law with spectral break that may assume the role of an outer scale, intermediate break scale, or inner scale. As such, it provides a framework for investigating the effects of a spectral break on the scintillation statistics. Using this spectral model, we solve the fourth moment equation governing intensity variations following propagation through two-dimensional field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere. A specific normalization is invoked that exploits self-similar properties of the structure to achieve a universal scaling, such that different combinations of perturbation strength, propagation distance, and frequency produce the same results. The numerical algorithm is validated using new theoretical predictions for the behavior of the scintillation index and intensity correlation length under strong scatter conditions. A series of numerical experiments are conducted to investigate the morphologies of the intensity spectrum, scintillation index, and intensity correlation length as functions of the spectral indices and strength of scatter; retrieve phase screen parameters from intensity scintillation observations; explore the relative contributions to the scintillation due to large- and small-scale ionospheric structures; and quantify the conditions under which a general spectral break will influence the scintillation statistics.

  20. An Early Childhood Special Education Research Agenda in a Culture of Accountability for Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carta, Judith J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reacts to testimony on early childhood special education research before the President's Commission on Excellence in Special Education (EC 632 080). Noting the Commission's emphasis on accountability and results, it stresses the importance of being clear about desired outcomes, the need for sensitive and accurate ways of measuring…

  1. Flow and transport in highly heterogeneous formations: 3. Numerical simulations and comparison with theoretical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, I.; Fiori, A.; Dagan, G.

    2003-09-01

    results are in the comparison of the macrodispersivities, computed with the aid of the Lagrangian velocity covariances, as functions of travel time. For the longitudinal macrodispersivity, the SC approximation yields results close to the numerical ones in 2-D for n = 0.4 but underestimates them for n = 0.9. The asymptotic, large travel time values of macrodispersivities in the SC and FO approximations are close for low to moderate σY2, as shown and explained in part 1. However, while the slow tendency to Fickian behavior is well reproduced by SC, it is much quicker in the FO approximation. In 3-D the SC approximation is closer to numerical one for the highest n = 0.7 and the different σY2 = 2, 4, 8, and the comparison improves if molecular diffusion is taken into account. Transverse macrodispersivity for small travel times is underestimated by SC in 2-D and is closer to numerical results in 3-D, whereas FO overestimates them. Transverse macrodispersivity asymptotically tends to zero in 2-D for large travel times. In 3-D the numerical simulations lead to a small but persistent transverse macrodispersivity for large travel times, whereas it tends to zero in the approximate solutions. The results suggest that the self-consistent semianalytical approximation provides a valuable tool to model transport in highly heterogeneous isotropic formations of a 3-D structure in terms of trajectories statistical moments. It captures effects like slow transition to Fickian behavior and to Gaussian trajectory distribution, which are neglected by the first-order approximation.

  2. Account of near-cathode sheath in numerical models of high-pressure arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, M. S.; Almeida, N. A.; Baeva, M.; Cunha, M. D.; Benilova, L. G.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-06-01

    Three approaches to describing the separation of charges in near-cathode regions of high-pressure arc discharges are compared. The first approach employs a single set of equations, including the Poisson equation, in the whole interelectrode gap. The second approach employs a fully non-equilibrium description of the quasi-neutral bulk plasma, complemented with a newly developed description of the space-charge sheaths. The third, and the simplest, approach exploits the fact that significant power is deposited by the arc power supply into the near-cathode plasma layer, which allows one to simulate the plasma-cathode interaction to the first approximation independently of processes in the bulk plasma. It is found that results given by the different models are generally in good agreement, and in some cases the agreement is even surprisingly good. It follows that the predicted integral characteristics of the plasma-cathode interaction are not strongly affected by details of the model provided that the basic physics is right.

  3. Accounting for Long Term Sediment Storage in a Watershed Scale Numerical Model for Suspended Sediment Routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, J. J.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Skalak, K.; Karwan, D. L.; Benthem, A.; Ackerman, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the delivery of suspended sediment from upland sources to downstream receiving waters is important for watershed management, but current routing models fail to accurately represent lag times in delivery resulting from sediment storage. In this study, we route suspended sediment tagged by a characteristic tracer using a 1-dimensional model that implicitly includes storage and remobilization processes and timescales. From an input location where tagged sediment is added, the model advects suspended sediment downstream at the velocity of the stream (adjusted for the intermittency of transport events). Deposition rates are specified by the fraction of the suspended load stored per kilometer of downstream transport (presumably available from a sediment budget). Tagged sediment leaving storage is evaluated from a convolution equation based on the probability distribution function (pdf) of sediment storage waiting times; this approach avoids the difficulty of accurately representing complex processes of sediment remobilization from floodplain and other deposits. To illustrate the role of storage on sediment delivery, we compare exponential and bounded power-law waiting time pdfs with identical means of 94 years. In both cases, the median travel time for sediment to reach the depocenter in fluvial systems less than 40km long is governed by in-channel transport and is unaffected by sediment storage. As the channel length increases, however, the median sediment travel time reflects storage rather than in-channel transport; travel times do not vary significantly between the two different waiting time functions. At distances of 50, 100, and 200 km, the median travel time for suspended sediment is 36, 136, and 325 years, orders of magnitude slower than travel times associated with in-channel transport. These computations demonstrate that storage can be neglected for short rivers, but for longer systems, storage controls the delivery of suspended sediment.

  4. Some Numerical Results of Multipoints Bomndary Value Problems Arise in Environmental Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Daniel N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate two problems arise in pollutant transport in rivers, and we give some numerical results to approximate this solutions. We determined the approximate solutions using two numerical methods: 1. B-splines combined with Runge-Kutta methods, 2. BVP4C solver of MATLAB and then we compare the run-times.

  5. Problems Resulting from the Implementation of a Pilot Program in Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David A.

    The concept of accountability has become very important recently to both teachers and administrators. Despite this, very few experimental projects dealing with accountability have been attempted--especially in the field of physical education. A program of accountability was conducted at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, in the Department of…

  6. Bad-good constraints on a polarity correspondence account for the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) and markedness association of response codes (MARC) effects.

    PubMed

    Leth-Steensen, Craig; Citta, Richie

    2016-01-01

    Performance in numerical classification tasks involving either parity or magnitude judgements is quicker when small numbers are mapped onto a left-sided response and large numbers onto a right-sided response than for the opposite mapping (i.e., the spatial-numerical association of response codes or SNARC effect). Recent research by Gevers et al. [Gevers, W., Santens, S., Dhooge, E., Chen, Q., Van den Bossche, L., Fias, W., & Verguts, T. (2010). Verbal-spatial and visuospatial coding of number-space interactions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 139, 180-190] suggests that this effect also arises for vocal "left" and "right" responding, indicating that verbal-spatial coding has a role to play in determining it. Another presumably verbal-based, spatial-numerical mapping phenomenon is the linguistic markedness association of response codes (MARC) effect whereby responding in parity tasks is quicker when odd numbers are mapped onto left-sided responses and even numbers onto right-sided responses. A recent account of both the SNARC and MARC effects is based on the polarity correspondence principle [Proctor, R. W., & Cho, Y. S. (2006). Polarity correspondence: A general principle for performance of speeded binary classification tasks. Psychological Bulletin, 132, 416-442]. This account assumes that stimulus and response alternatives are coded along any number of dimensions in terms of - and + polarities with quicker responding when the polarity codes for the stimulus and the response correspond. In the present study, even-odd parity judgements were made using either "left" and "right" or "bad" and "good" vocal responses. Results indicated that a SNARC effect was indeed present for the former type of vocal responding, providing further evidence for the sufficiency of the verbal-spatial coding account for this effect. However, the decided lack of an analogous SNARC-like effect in the results for the latter type of vocal responding provides an important

  7. Numerical results using the conforming VEM for the convection-diffusion-reaction equation with variable coefficients.

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Cangiani, Andrea; Sutton, Oliver

    2014-10-02

    This document presents the results of a set of preliminary numerical experiments using several possible conforming virtual element approximations of the convection-reaction-diffusion equation with variable coefficients.

  8. Numerical modelling of emission of a two-level atom near a metal nanoparticle with account for tunnelling of an electron from an atom into a particle

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorovich, S V; Protsenko, I E

    2016-01-31

    We report the results of numerical modelling of emission of a two-level atom near a metal nanoparticle under resonant interaction of light with plasmon modes of the particle. Calculations have been performed for different polarisations of light by a dipole approximation method and a complex multipole method. Depending on the distance between a particle and an atom, the contribution of the nonradiative process of electron tunnelling from a two-level atom into a particle, which is calculated using the quasi-classical approximation, has been taken into account and assessed. We have studied spherical gold and silver particles of different diameters (10 – 100 nm). The rates of electron tunnelling and of spontaneous decay of the excited atomic state are found. The results can be used to develop nanoscale plasmonic emitters, lasers and photodetectors. (nanooptics)

  9. Comparison of results of experimental research with numerical calculations of a model one-sided seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimiak, Damian; Krzyślak, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents the results of experimental and numerical research of a model segment of a labyrinth seal for a different wear level. The analysis covers the extent of leakage and distribution of static pressure in the seal chambers and the planes upstream and downstream of the segment. The measurement data have been compared with the results of numerical calculations obtained using commercial software. Based on the flow conditions occurring in the area subjected to calculations, the size of the mesh defined by parameter y+ has been analyzed and the selection of the turbulence model has been described. The numerical calculations were based on the measurable thermodynamic parameters in the seal segments of steam turbines. The work contains a comparison of the mass flow and distribution of static pressure in the seal chambers obtained during the measurement and calculated numerically in a model segment of the seal of different level of wear.

  10. A Terrestrial Ecosystem Full Verified Carbon Accounting for Russian Land: Results and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvidenko, A.; Schepaschenko, D.; Maksyutov, S.

    2010-12-01

    We present a terrestrial full carbon account (FCA) for Russian land in a spatially explicit form for 2009 and aggregated country-wide annual estimates for 2004-2008. The integrated methodology of the FCA takes into account the fuzzy character of the studied systems. IIASA’s landscape-ecosystem approach (LEA) is used for designing the account boundaries and assessment of major pools and fluxes. An Integrated Land Information System (ILIS) serves as the information background of the FCA. The ILIS is based on a system integration of all available ground data and multi-sensor remote sensing applications. The ILIS includes a georeferenced hybrid land cover (~500 land classes, resolution 1 x 1 km), corresponding attributive datasets and sets of empirical and semi-empirical ecosystem and landscape models. The latter are based on long-period measurements of ecological parameters with corrections - if necessary - due to weather specifics of individual growth seasons. On average, terrestrial ecosystems of Russia served as a sink of roughly 0.6 Pg C yr-1 during the last five years which exceeds the technosphere’s emissions of the country by about one third. Two major fluxes (net primary production and heterotrophic respiration) for all productive lands of the country are estimated at 323 and 204 g C yr-1 m-2, respectively. Disturbance and consumption of plant products comprise from 15 to 20% of the net primary production. Forests serve as a major component of the sink (~85% of the country’s total). Disturbed forests and peatlands, as well as cultivated agricultural lands, are a relatively small carbon source. The interannual variability of the net ecosystem carbon balance are mostly driven by climatic conditions and natural disturbance (fire, insects) of the growth periods and is in limits of 10-15% for the country as a whole, but could exceed 25-30% for large regions with weather anomalies of the vegetation periods. Uncertainty within the LEA was assessed for all

  11. Exact and numerical results for a dimerized coupled spin- 1/2 chain

    PubMed

    Martins; Nienhuis

    2000-12-04

    We establish exact results for coupled spin-1/2 chains for special values of the four-spin interaction V and dimerization parameter delta. The first exact result is at delta = 1/2 and V = -2. Because we find a very small but finite gap in this dimerized chain, this can serve as a very strong test case for numerical and approximate analytical techniques. The second result is for the homogeneous chain with V = -4 and gives evidence that the system has a spontaneously dimerized ground state. Numerical diagonalization and bosonization techniques indicate that the interplay between dimerization and interaction could result in gapless phases in the regime 0

  12. Role of numerical scheme choice on the results of mathematical modeling of combustion and detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovenko, I. S.; Kiverin, A. D.; Pinevich, S. G.; Ivanov, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    The present study discusses capabilities of dissipation-free CABARET numerical method application to unsteady reactive gasdynamic flows modeling. In framework of present research the method was adopted for reactive flows governed by real gas equation of state and applied for several typical problems of unsteady gas dynamics and combustion modeling such as ignition and detonation initiation by localized energy sources. Solutions were thoroughly analyzed and compared with that derived by using of the modified Euler-Lagrange method of “coarse” particles. Obtained results allowed us to distinguish range of phenomena where artificial effects of numerical approach may counterfeit their physical nature and to develop guidelines for numerical approach selection appropriate for unsteady reactive gasdynamic flows numerical modeling.

  13. Comparison of experimental results with numerical simulations for pulsed thermographic NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripragash, Letchuman; Sundaresan, Mannur

    2017-02-01

    This paper examines pulse thermographic nondestructive evaluation of flat bottom holes of isotropic materials. Different combinations of defect diameters and depths are considered. Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) method is used to analyze these results. In addition, a new normalization procedure is used to remove the dependence of thermographic results on the material properties and instrumentation settings during these experiments. Hence the normalized results depend only on the geometry of the specimen and the defects. These thermographic NDE procedures were also simulated using finite element technique for a variety of defect configurations. The data obtained from numerical simulations were also processed using the normalization scheme. Excellent agreement was seen between the results obtained from experiments and numerical simulations. Therefore, the scheme is extended to introduce a correlation technique by which numerical simulations are used to quantify the defect parameters.

  14. Integration of Substance Abuse Treatment Organizations into Accountable Care Organizations: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    D’Aunno, Thomas; Friedmann, Peter D.; Chen, Qixuan; Wilson, Donna M.

    2016-01-01

    To meet their aims of managing population health to improve the quality and cost of health care in the United States, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will need to focus on coordinating care for individuals with substance abuse disorders. The prevalence of these disorders is high, and these individuals often suffer from comorbid chronic medical and social conditions. This article examines the extent to which the nation’s fourteen thousand specialty substance abuse treatment (SAT) organizations, which have a daily census of more than 1 million patients, are contracting with ACOs across the country; we also examine factors associated with SAT organization involvement with ACOs. We draw on data from a recent (2014) nationally representative survey of executive directors and clinical supervisors from 635 SAT organizations. Results show that only 15 percent of these organizations had signed contracts with ACOs. Results from multivariate analyses show that directors’ perceptions of market competition, organizational ownership, and geographic location are significantly related to SATinvolvement with ACOs. We discuss implications for integrating the SAT specialty system with the mainstream health care system. PMID:26124307

  15. Integration of Substance Abuse Treatment Organizations into Accountable Care Organizations: Results from a National Survey.

    PubMed

    D'Aunno, Thomas; Friedmann, Peter D; Chen, Qixuan; Wilson, Donna M

    2015-08-01

    To meet their aims of managing population health to improve the quality and cost of health care in the United States, accountable care organizations (ACOs) will need to focus on coordinating care for individuals with substance abuse disorders. The prevalence of these disorders is high, and these individuals often suffer from comorbid chronic medical and social conditions. This article examines the extent to which the nation's fourteen thousand specialty substance abuse treatment (SAT) organizations, which have a daily census of more than 1 million patients, are contracting with ACOs across the country; we also examine factors associated with SAT organization involvement with ACOs. We draw on data from a recent (2014) nationally representative survey of executive directors and clinical supervisors from 635 SAT organizations. Results show that only 15 percent of these organizations had signed contracts with ACOs. Results from multivariate analyses show that directors' perceptions of market competition, organizational ownership, and geographic location are significantly related to SAT involvement with ACOs. We discuss implications for integrating the SAT specialty system with the mainstream health care system.

  16. Global access to safe water: accounting for water quality and the resulting impact on MDG progress.

    PubMed

    Onda, Kyle; LoBuglio, Joe; Bartram, Jamie

    2012-03-01

    Monitoring of progress towards the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) drinking water target relies on classification of water sources as "improved" or "unimproved" as an indicator for water safety. We adjust the current Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) estimate by accounting for microbial water quality and sanitary risk using the only-nationally representative water quality data currently available, that from the WHO and UNICEF "Rapid Assessment of Drinking Water Quality". A principal components analysis (PCA) of national environmental and development indicators was used to create models that predicted, for most countries, the proportions of piped and of other-improved water supplies that are faecally contaminated; and of these sources, the proportions that lack basic sanitary protection against contamination. We estimate that 1.8 billion people (28% of the global population) used unsafe water in 2010. The 2010 JMP estimate is that 783 million people (11%) use unimproved sources. Our estimates revise the 1990 baseline from 23% to 37%, and the target from 12% to 18%, resulting in a shortfall of 10% of the global population towards the MDG target in 2010. In contrast, using the indicator "use of an improved source" suggests that the MDG target for drinking-water has already been achieved. We estimate that an additional 1.2 billion (18%) use water from sources or systems with significant sanitary risks. While our estimate is imprecise, the magnitude of the estimate and the health and development implications suggest that greater attention is needed to better understand and manage drinking water safety.

  17. Cenosphere formation from heavy fuel oil: a numerical analysis accounting for the balance between porous shells and internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Vanteru M.; Rahman, Mustafa M.; Gandi, Appala N.; Elbaz, Ayman M.; Schrecengost, Robert A.; Roberts, William L.

    2016-01-01

    and 430 µm respectively, for 700, 900 and 1100 µm HFO droplets. The present numerical model is validated with experimental results available from the literature. Total variation between computational and experimental results is in the range of 3-7%.

  18. Numerical modeling of on-orbit propellant motion resulting from an impulsive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, John C.; Mjolsness, Raymond C.; Torrey, Martin D.; Hochstein, John I.

    1987-01-01

    In-space docking and separation maneuvers of spacecraft that have large fluid mass fractions may cause undesirable spacecraft motion in response to the impulsive-acceleration-induced fluid motion. An example of this potential low gravity fluid management problem arose during the development of the shuttle/Centaur vehicle. Experimentally verified numerical modeling techniques were developed to establish the propellant dynamics, and subsequent vehicle motion, associated with the separation of the Centaur vehicle from the shuttle orbiter cargo bay. Although the shuttle/Centaur development activity was suspended, the numerical modeling techniques are available to predict on-orbit liquid motion resulting from impulsive accelerations for other missions and spacecraft.

  19. Numerical modeling of on-orbit propellant motion resulting from an impulsive acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, John C.; Mjolsness, Raymond C.; Torrey, Martin D.; Hochstein, John I.

    1986-01-01

    In-space docking and separation maneuvers of spacecraft that have large fluid mass fractions may cause undersirable spacecraft motion in response to the impulsive-acceleration-induced fluid motion. An example of this potential low gravity fluid management problem arose during the development of the shuttle/Centaur vehicle. Experimentally verified numerical modeling techniques were developed to establish the propellant dynamics, and subsequent vehicle motion, associated with the separation of the Centaur vehicle from the shuttle orbiter cargo bay. Although the shuttle/Centaur development activity was suspended, the numerical modeling techniques are available to predict on-orbit liquid motion resulting from impulsive accelerations for other missions and spacecraft.

  20. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Equatorial Spread F: Results and Observations in the Pacific Sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveiro, H. C.; Hysell, D. L.; Caton, R. G.; Groves, K. M.; Klenzing, J.; Pfaff, R. F.; Stoneback, R.; Heelis, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of plasma density irregularities in the postsunset equatorial F region ionosphere leading to equatorial spread F (ESF) is described. The simulation evolves under realistic background conditions including bottomside plasma shear flow and vertical current. It also incorporates C/NOFS satellite data which partially specify the forcing. A combination of generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability (GRT) and collisional shear instability (CSI) produces growing waveforms with key features that agree with C/NOFS satellite and ALTAIR radar observations in the Pacific sector, including features such as gross morphology and rates of development. The transient response of CSI is consistent with the observation of bottomside waves with wavelengths close to 30 km, whereas the steady state behavior of the combined instability can account for the 100+ km wavelength waves that predominate in the F region.

  1. Motivations, Costs and Results of AOL: Perceptions of Accounting and Economics Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eschenfelder, Mark J.; Bryan, Lois D.; Lee, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    The emphasis of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) on improving student learning through Assurance of Learning (AOL) makes faculty involvement in the process at AACSB accredited schools important. This study examines the attitudes of accounting and economics faculty at AACSB accredited institutions toward the AOL…

  2. Accountability for Results: The Realities of Data-Driven Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaw, Donna; Watkins, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The format of this book addresses the most salient questions administrators, school board members, and community stakeholders need to ask to ensure academic and fiscal accountability, providing definitions, background information and the current research. Readers will be provided with sufficient knowledge to effectively question the financial…

  3. Exploring vortex dynamics in the presence of dissipation: Analytical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, D.; Carretero-González, R.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Proukakis, N. P.; Spirn, D.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we examine the dynamical properties of vortices in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in the presence of phenomenological dissipation, used as a basic model for the effect of finite temperatures. In the context of this so-called dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii model, we derive analytical results for the motion of single vortices and, importantly, for vortex dipoles, which have become very relevant experimentally. Our analytical results are shown to compare favorably to the full numerical solution of the dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation where appropriate. We also present results on the stability of vortices and vortex dipoles, revealing good agreement between numerical and analytical results for the internal excitation eigenfrequencies, which extends even beyond the regime of validity of this equation for cold atoms.

  4. Spatial evapotranspiration, rainfall and land use data in water accounting - Part 2: Reliability of water accounting results for policy decisions in the Awash basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, P.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Sood, A.; Hoogeveen, J.; Peiser, L.; Bastidas-Obando, E.; Dost, R.

    2014-01-01

    Water Accounting Plus (WA+) is a framework that summarizes complex hydrological processes and water management issues in river basins. The framework is designed to use satellite based measurements of land and water as input data. A concern associated with the use of satellite measurements is their accuracy. This study focuses on the impact of the error in remote sensing measurements on water accounting and information provided to policy makers. The Awash basin in the central rift valley in Ethiopia is used as a case study to explore the reliability of WA+ outputs, in the light of input data errors. The Monte Carlo technique was used for stochastic simulation of WA+ outputs over a period of three years. The results show that the stochastic mean of the majority of WA+ parameters and performance indicators are within 5% deviation from the original values. Stochastic simulation can be used as part of a standard procedure for WA+ water accounting because it provides the error bandwidth for every WA+ output, which is essential information for sound decision making. The majority of WA+ parameters and performance indicators have a Coefficient of Variation (CV) of less than 20% which implies that they are reliable. The results also indicate that the "utilized flow" and "basin closure fraction" (the degree to which available water in a basin is utilized) have a high margin of error and thus a low reliability. As such it is recommended that they are not used to formulate important policy decisions.

  5. Improving the trust in results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Cappello, Franck; Constantinescu, Emil; Hovland, Paul; Peterka, Tom; Phillips, Carolyn; Snir, Marc; Wild, Stefan

    2015-04-30

    This white paper investigates several key aspects of the trust that a user can give to the results of numerical simulations and scientific data analytics. In this document, the notion of trust is related to the integrity of numerical simulations and data analytics applications. This white paper complements the DOE ASCR report on Cybersecurity for Scientific Computing Integrity by (1) exploring the sources of trust loss; (2) reviewing the definitions of trust in several areas; (3) providing numerous cases of result alteration, some of them leading to catastrophic failures; (4) examining the current notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics; (5) providing a gap analysis; and (6) suggesting two important research directions and their respective research topics. To simplify the presentation without loss of generality, we consider that trust in results can be lost (or the results’ integrity impaired) because of any form of corruption happening during the execution of the numerical simulation or the data analytics application. In general, the sources of such corruption are threefold: errors, bugs, and attacks. Current applications are already using techniques to deal with different types of corruption. However, not all potential corruptions are covered by these techniques. We firmly believe that the current level of trust that a user has in the results is at least partially founded on ignorance of this issue or the hope that no undetected corruptions will occur during the execution. This white paper explores the notion of trust and suggests recommendations for developing a more scientifically grounded notion of trust in numerical simulation and scientific data analytics. We first formulate the problem and show that it goes beyond previous questions regarding the quality of results such as V&V, uncertainly quantification, and data assimilation. We then explore the complexity of this difficult problem, and we sketch complementary general

  6. Parametric Evaluation of Absorption Losses and Comparison of Numerical Results to Boeing 707 Aircraft Experimental HIRF Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaygorsky, J.; Amburgey, C.; Elliott, J. R.; Fisher, R.; Perala, R. A.

    A broadband (100 MHz-1.2 GHz) plane wave electric field source was used to evaluate electric field penetration inside a simplified Boeing 707 aircraft model with a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method using EMA3D. The role of absorption losses inside the simplified aircraft was investigated. It was found that, in this frequency range, none of the cavities inside the Boeing 707 model are truly reverberant when frequency stirring is applied, and a purely statistical electromagnetics approach cannot be used to predict or analyze the field penetration or shielding effectiveness (SE). Thus it was our goal to attempt to understand the nature of losses in such a quasi-statistical environment by adding various numbers of absorbing objects inside the simplified aircraft and evaluating the SE, decay-time constant τ, and quality factor Q. We then compare our numerical results with experimental results obtained by D. Mark Johnson et al. on a decommissioned Boeing 707 aircraft.

  7. Impulse propagation over a complex site: a comparison of experimental results and numerical predictions.

    PubMed

    Dragna, Didier; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Poisson, Franck

    2014-03-01

    Results from outdoor acoustic measurements performed in a railway site near Reims in France in May 2010 are compared to those obtained from a finite-difference time-domain solver of the linearized Euler equations. During the experiments, the ground profile and the different ground surface impedances were determined. Meteorological measurements were also performed to deduce mean vertical profiles of wind and temperature. An alarm pistol was used as a source of impulse signals and three microphones were located along a propagation path. The various measured parameters are introduced as input data into the numerical solver. In the frequency domain, the numerical results are in good accordance with the measurements up to a frequency of 2 kHz. In the time domain, except a time shift, the predicted waveforms match the measured waveforms with a close agreement.

  8. Numerical simulation of electromagnetic fields and impedance of CERN LINAC4 H(-) source taking into account the effect of the plasma.

    PubMed

    Grudiev, A; Lettry, J; Mattei, S; Paoluzzi, M; Scrivens, R

    2014-02-01

    Numerical simulation of the CERN LINAC4 H(-) source 2 MHz RF system has been performed taking into account a realistic geometry from 3D Computer Aided Design model using commercial FEM high frequency simulation code. The effect of the plasma has been added to the model by the approximation of a homogenous electrically conducting medium. Electric and magnetic fields, RF power losses, and impedance of the circuit have been calculated for different values of the plasma conductivity. Three different regimes have been found depending on the plasma conductivity: (1) Zero or low plasma conductivity results in RF electric field induced by the RF antenna being mainly capacitive and has axial direction; (2) Intermediate conductivity results in the expulsion of capacitive electric field from plasma and the RF power coupling, which is increasing linearly with the plasma conductivity, is mainly dominated by the inductive azimuthal electric field; (3) High conductivity results in the shielding of both the electric and magnetic fields from plasma due to the skin effect, which reduces RF power coupling to plasma. From these simulations and measurements of the RF power coupling on the CERN source, a value of the plasma conductivity has been derived. It agrees well with an analytical estimate calculated from the measured plasma parameters. In addition, the simulated and measured impedances with and without plasma show very good agreement as well demonstrating validity of the plasma model used in the RF simulations.

  9. Forecasting Energy Market Contracts by Ambit Processes: Empirical Study and Numerical Results

    PubMed Central

    Di Persio, Luca; Marchesan, Michele

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we exploit the theory of ambit processes to develop a model which is able to effectively forecast prices of forward contracts written on the Italian energy market. Both short-term and medium-term scenarios are considered and proper calibration procedures as well as related numerical results are provided showing a high grade of accuracy in the obtained approximations when compared with empirical time series of interest. PMID:27437500

  10. Landau-Zener transitions in a dissipative environment: numerically exact results.

    PubMed

    Nalbach, P; Thorwart, M

    2009-11-27

    We study Landau-Zener transitions in a dissipative environment by means of the numerically exact quasiadiabatic propagator path integral. It allows to cover the full range of the involved parameters. We discover a nonmonotonic dependence of the transition probability on the sweep velocity which is explained in terms of a simple phenomenological model. This feature, not captured by perturbative approaches, results from a nontrivial competition between relaxation and the external sweep.

  11. Macroscopic laws for immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: Results From numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Daniel H.

    1990-06-01

    Flow through porous media may be described at either of two length scales. At the scale of a single pore, fluids flow according to the Navier-Stokes equations and the appropriate boundary conditions. At a larger, volume-averaged scale, the flow is usually thought to obey a linear Darcy law relating flow rates to pressure gradients and body forces via phenomenological permeability coefficients. Aside from the value of the permeability coefficient, the slow flow of a single fluid in a porous medium is well-understood within this framework. The situation is considerably different, however, for the simultaneous flow of two or more fluids: not only are the phenomenological coefficients poorly understood, but the form of the macroscopic laws themselves is subject to question. I describe a numerical study of immiscible two-phase flow in an idealized two-dimensional porous medium constructed at the pore scale. Results show that the macroscopic flow is a nonlinear function of the applied forces for sufficiently low levels of forcing, but linear thereafter. The crossover, which is not predicted by conventional models, occurs when viscous forces begin to dominate capillary forces; i.e., at a sufficiently high capillary number. In the linear regime, the flow may be described by the linear phenomenological law ui = ΣjLijfj, where the flow rate ui of the ith fluid is related to the force fj applied to the jth fluid by the matrix of phenomenological coefficients Lij which depends on the relative concentrations of the two fluids. The diagonal terms are proportional to quantities commonly referred to as "relative permeabilities." The cross terms represent viscous coupling between the two fluids; they are conventionally assumed to be negligible and require special experimental procedures to observe in a laboratory. In contrast, in this numerical study the cross terms are straightforward to measure and are found to be of significant size. The cross terms are additionally observed to

  12. A method for data handling numerical results in parallel OpenFOAM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, Alin; Muntean, Sebastian

    2015-12-31

    Parallel computational fluid dynamics simulations produce vast amount of numerical result data. This paper introduces a method for reducing the size of the data by replaying the interprocessor traffic. The results are recovered only in certain regions of interest configured by the user. A known test case is used for several mesh partitioning scenarios using the OpenFOAM toolkit{sup ®}[1]. The space savings obtained with classic algorithms remain constant for more than 60 Gb of floating point data. Our method is most efficient on large simulation meshes and is much better suited for compressing large scale simulation results than the regular algorithms.

  13. Numerical results of the shape optimization problem for the insulation barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salač, Petr

    2016-12-01

    The contribution deals with the numerical results for the shape optimization problem of the system mould, glass piece, plunger, insulation barrier and plunger cavity used in glass forming industry, which was formulated in details at AMEE'15. We used the software FreeFem++ to compute the numerical example for the real vase made from lead crystal glassware of the height 267 [mm] and of the mass 1, 55 [kg]. The plunger and the mould were made from steal, the insulation barrier was made from Murpec with the coefficient of thermal conductivity k = 2, 5 [W/m.K] and the coefficient of heat-transfer between the mould and the environment was chosen to be α = 14 [W/m2.K]. The cooling was implemented by the volume V = 10 [l/min] of water with the temperature 15°C at the entrance and the temperature 100°C at the exit. The results of the numerical optimization to required target temperature 800°C of the outward plunger surface together with the distribution of temperatures on the interface between the plunger and heat source before and after the optimization process are presented.

  14. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wojcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-03-09

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm{sup 2}, duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between

  15. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wójcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm2, duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between the

  16. Model of stacked long Josephson junctions: Parallel algorithm and numerical results in case of weak coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Bashashin, M. V.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Atanasova, P. Kh.; Volokhova, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a model of system of long Josephson junctions (LJJ) with inductive and capacitive coupling. Corresponding system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by means of the standard three-point finite-difference approximation in the spatial coordinate and utilizing the Runge-Kutta method for solution of the resulting Cauchy problem. A parallel algorithm is developed and implemented on a basis of the MPI (Message Passing Interface) technology. Effect of the coupling between the JJs on the properties of LJJ system is demonstrated. Numerical results are discussed from the viewpoint of effectiveness of parallel implementation.

  17. Electrostatic modes in dense dusty plasmas with high fugacity: Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. N.

    2000-08-01

    The existence of ultra low-frequency wave modes in dusty plasmas has been investigated over a wide range of dust fugacity [defined by f≡4πnd0λD2R, where nd0 is the dust number density, λD is the plasma Debye length, and R is the grain size (radius)] and the grain charging frequency (ω1) by numerically solving the dispersion relation obtained from the kinetic (Vlasov) theory. A detailed comparison between the numerical and the analytical results applicable for the tenuous (low fugacity, f≪1), the dilute (medium fugacity, f˜1), and the dense (high fugacity, f≫1) regimes has been carried out. In the long wavelength limit and for frequencies ω≪ω1, the dispersion curves obtained from the numerical solutions of the real as well as the complex (kinetic) dispersion relations agree, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with the analytical expressions derived from the fluid and the kinetic theories, and are thus identified with the ultra low-frequency electrostatic dust modes, namely, the dust-acoustic wave (DAW), the dust charge-density wave (DCDW) and the dust-Coulomb wave (DCW) discussed earlier [N. N. Rao, Phys. Plasmas 6, 4414 (1999); 7, 795 (2000)]. In particular, the analytical scaling between the phase speeds of the DCWs and the DAWs predicted from theoretical considerations, namely, (ω/k)DCW=(ω/k)DAW/√fδ (where δ is the ratio of the charging frequencies) is in excellent agreement with the numerical results. A simple physical picture of the DCWs has been proposed by defining an effective pressure called "Coulomb pressure" as PC≡nd0qd02/R, where qd0 is the grain surface charge. Accordingly, the DCW dispersion relation is given, in the lowest order, by (ω/k)DCW=√PC/ρdδ , where ρd≡nd0md is the dust mass density. Thus, the DCWs which are driven by the Coulomb pressure can be considered as the electrostatic analogue of the hydromagnetic (Alfvén or magnetoacoustic) waves which are driven by the magnetic field pressure. For the frequency

  18. Network model to study physiological processes of hypobaric decompression sickness: New numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueco, Joaquín; López-González, Luis María

    2016-04-01

    We have studied decompression processes when pressure changes that take place, in blood and tissues using a technical numerical based in electrical analogy of the parameters that involved in the problem. The particular problem analyzed is the behavior dynamics of the extravascular bubbles formed in the intercellular cavities of a hypothetical tissue undergoing decompression. Numerical solutions are given for a system of equations to simulate gas exchanges of bubbles after decompression, with particular attention paid to the effect of bubble size, nitrogen tension, nitrogen diffusivity in the intercellular fluid and in the tissue cell layer in a radial direction, nitrogen solubility, ambient pressure and specific blood flow through the tissue over the different molar diffusion fluxes of nitrogen per time unit (through the bubble surface, between the intercellular fluid layer and blood and between the intercellular fluid layer and the tissue cell layer). The system of nonlinear equations is solved using the Network Simulation Method, where the electric analogy is applied to convert these equations into a network-electrical model, and a computer code (electric circuit simulator, Pspice). In this paper, numerical results new (together to a network model improved with interdisciplinary electrical analogies) are provided.

  19. Some analytical and numerical approaches to understanding trap counts resulting from pest insect immigration.

    PubMed

    Bearup, Daniel; Petrovskaya, Natalia; Petrovskii, Sergei

    2015-05-01

    Monitoring of pest insects is an important part of the integrated pest management. It aims to provide information about pest insect abundance at a given location. This includes data collection, usually using traps, and their subsequent analysis and/or interpretation. However, interpretation of trap count (number of insects caught over a fixed time) remains a challenging problem. First, an increase in either the population density or insects activity can result in a similar increase in the number of insects trapped (the so called "activity-density" problem). Second, a genuine increase of the local population density can be attributed to qualitatively different ecological mechanisms such as multiplication or immigration. Identification of the true factor causing an increase in trap count is important as different mechanisms require different control strategies. In this paper, we consider a mean-field mathematical model of insect trapping based on the diffusion equation. Although the diffusion equation is a well-studied model, its analytical solution in closed form is actually available only for a few special cases, whilst in a more general case the problem has to be solved numerically. We choose finite differences as the baseline numerical method and show that numerical solution of the problem, especially in the realistic 2D case, is not at all straightforward as it requires a sufficiently accurate approximation of the diffusion fluxes. Once the numerical method is justified and tested, we apply it to the corresponding boundary problem where different types of boundary forcing describe different scenarios of pest insect immigration and reveal the corresponding patterns in the trap count growth.

  20. Laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds - Experimental and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccanti, Giovanni; Bruscaglioni, Piero; Gurioli, Massimo; Sansoni, Paola

    1993-03-01

    The experimental results of laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds are presented. Measurements were carried out on laboratory-scaled cloud models by using a picosecond laser and a streak-camera system. The turbid structures simulating clouds were suspensions of polystyrene spheres in water. The geometrical situation was similar to that of an actual lidar sounding a cloud 1000 m distant and with a thickness of 300 m. Measurements were repeated for different concentrations and different sizes of spheres. The results show how the effect of multiple scattering depends on the scattering coefficient and on the phase function of the diffusers. The depolarization introduced by multiple scattering was also investigated. The results were also compared with numerical results obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Substantially good agreement between numerical and experimental results was found. The measurements showed the adequacy of modern electro-optical systems to study the features of multiple-scattering effects on lidar echoes from atmosphere or ocean by means of experiments on well-controlled laboratory-scaled models. This adequacy provides the possibility of studying the influence of different effects in the laboratory in well-controlled situations.

  1. Laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds: experimental and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Zaccanti, G; Bruscaglioni, P; Gurioli, M; Sansoni, P

    1993-03-20

    The experimental results of laboratory simulations of lidar returns from clouds are presented. Measurements were carried out on laboratory-scaled cloud models by using a picosecond laser and a streak-camera system. The turbid structures simulating clouds were suspensions of polystyrene spheres in water. The geometrical situation was similar to that of an actual lidar sounding a cloud 1000 m distant and with a thickness of 300 m. Measurements were repeated for different concentrations and different sizes of spheres. The results show how the effect of multiple scattering depends on the scattering coefficient and on the phase function of the diffusers. The depolarization introduced by multiple scattering was also investigated. The results were also compared with numerical results obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Substantially good agreement between numerical and experimental results was found. The measurements showed the adequacy of modern electro-optical systems to study the features of multiple-scattering effects on lidar echoes from atmosphere or ocean by means of experiments on well-controlled laboratory-scaled models. This adequacy provides the possibility of studying the influence of different effects in the laboratory in well-controlled situations.

  2. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  3. Simulation of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue: the influence of plaque material model on numerical results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the limited number of experimental studies that mechanically characterise human atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the femoral arteries, a recent trend has emerged in current literature whereby one set of material data based on aortic plaque tissue is employed to numerically represent diseased femoral artery tissue. This study aims to generate novel vessel-appropriate material models for femoral plaque tissue and assess the influence of using material models based on experimental data generated from aortic plaque testing to represent diseased femoral arterial tissue. Methods Novel material models based on experimental data generated from testing of atherosclerotic femoral artery tissue are developed and a computational analysis of the revascularisation of a quarter model idealised diseased femoral artery from a 90% diameter stenosis to a 10% diameter stenosis is performed using these novel material models. The simulation is also performed using material models based on experimental data obtained from aortic plaque testing in order to examine the effect of employing vessel appropriate material models versus those currently employed in literature to represent femoral plaque tissue. Results Simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic aortic tissue exhibit much higher maximum principal stresses within the plaque than simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic femoral tissue. Specifically, employing a material model based on calcified aortic tissue, instead of one based on heavily calcified femoral tissue, to represent diseased femoral arterial vessels results in a 487 fold increase in maximum principal stress within the plaque at a depth of 0.8 mm from the lumen. Conclusions Large differences are induced on numerical results as a consequence of employing material models based on aortic plaque, in place of material models based on femoral plaque, to represent a diseased femoral vessel. Due to these large

  4. Numerical computation of the effective-one-body potential q using self-force results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; van de Meent, Maarten

    2016-03-01

    The effective-one-body theory (EOB) describes the conservative dynamics of compact binary systems in terms of an effective Hamiltonian approach. The Hamiltonian for moderately eccentric motion of two nonspinning compact objects in the extreme mass-ratio limit is given in terms of three potentials: a (v ) , d ¯ (v ) , q (v ) . By generalizing the first law of mechanics for (nonspinning) black hole binaries to eccentric orbits, [A. Le Tiec, Phys. Rev. D 92, 084021 (2015).] recently obtained new expressions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in terms of quantities that can be readily computed using the gravitational self-force approach. Using these expressions we present a new computation of the EOB potential q (v ) by combining results from two independent numerical self-force codes. We determine q (v ) for inverse binary separations in the range 1 /1200 ≤v ≲1 /6 . Our computation thus provides the first-ever strong-field results for q (v ) . We also obtain d ¯ (v ) in our entire domain to a fractional accuracy of ≳10-8 . We find that our results are compatible with the known post-Newtonian expansions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in the weak field, and agree with previous (less accurate) numerical results for d ¯(v ) in the strong field.

  5. Propagation of CMEs in the interplanetary medium: Numerical and analytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Esparza, J. A.; Cantó, J.; González, R. F.; Lara, A.; Raga, A. C.

    2003-08-01

    We study the propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMES) from near the Sun to 1 AU by comparing results from two different models: a 1-D, hydrodynamic, single-fluid, numerical model (González-Esparza et al., 2003a) and an analytical model to study the dynamical evolution of supersonic velocity's fluctuations at the base of the solar wind applied to the propagation of CMES (Cantó et al., 2002). Both models predict that a fast CME moves initially in the inner heliosphere with a quasi-constant velocity (which has an intermediate value between the initial CME velocity and the ambient solar wind velocity ahead) until a 'critical distance' at which the CME velocity begins to decelerate approaching to the ambient solar wind velocity. This critical distance depends on the characteristics of the CME (initial velocity, density and temperature) as well as of the ambient solar wind. Given typical parameters based on observations, this critical distance can vary from 0.3 to beyond 1 AU from the Sun. These results explain the radial evolution of the velocity of fast CMEs in the inner heliosphere inferred from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations (Manoharan et al., 2001, 2003, Tokumaru et al., 2003). On the other hand, the numerical results show that a fast CME and its associated interplanetary (IP) shock follow different heliocentric evolutions: the IP shock always propagates faster than its CME driver and the latter begins to decelerate well before the shock.

  6. A collaborative accountable care model in three practices showed promising early results on costs and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Richard B; Sanderson, Mark I; Walters, Barbara A; Kennedy, Karen; Flores, Robert C; Muney, Alan M

    2012-11-01

    Cigna's Collaborative Accountable Care initiative provides financial incentives to physician groups and integrated delivery systems to improve the quality and efficiency of care for patients in commercial open-access benefit plans. Registered nurses who serve as care coordinators employed by participating practices are a central feature of the initiative. They use patient-specific reports and practice performance reports provided by Cigna to improve care coordination, identify and close care gaps, and address other opportunities for quality improvement. We report interim quality and cost results for three geographically and structurally diverse provider practices in Arizona, New Hampshire, and Texas. Although not statistically significant, these early results revealed favorable trends in total medical costs and quality of care, suggesting that a shared-savings accountable care model and collaborative support from the payer can enable practices to take meaningful steps toward full accountability for care quality and efficiency.

  7. Parameter sampling capabilities of sequential and simultaneous data assimilation: II. Statistical analysis of numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, Kristian; Mannseth, Trond

    2014-11-01

    We assess and compare parameter sampling capabilities of one sequential and one simultaneous Bayesian, ensemble-based, joint state-parameter (JS) estimation method. In the companion paper, part I (Fossum and Mannseth 2014 Inverse Problems 30 114002), analytical investigations lead us to propose three claims, essentially stating that the sequential method can be expected to outperform the simultaneous method for weakly nonlinear forward models. Here, we assess the reliability and robustness of these claims through statistical analysis of results from a range of numerical experiments. Samples generated by the two approximate JS methods are compared to samples from the posterior distribution generated by a Markov chain Monte Carlo method, using four approximate measures of distance between probability distributions. Forward-model nonlinearity is assessed from a stochastic nonlinearity measure allowing for sufficiently large model dimensions. Both toy models (with low computational complexity, and where the nonlinearity is fairly easy to control) and two-phase porous-media flow models (corresponding to down-scaled versions of problems to which the JS methods have been frequently applied recently) are considered in the numerical experiments. Results from the statistical analysis show strong support of all three claims stated in part I.

  8. Noninvasive assessment of mitral inertness: clinical results with numerical model validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; McCarthy, P. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial forces (Mdv/dt) are a significant component of transmitral flow, but cannot be measured with Doppler echo. We validated a method of estimating Mdv/dt. Ten patients had a dual sensor transmitral (TM) catheter placed during cardiac surgery. Doppler and 2D echo was performed while acquiring LA and LV pressures. Mdv/dt was determined from the Bernoulli equation using Doppler velocities and TM gradients. Results were compared with numerical modeling. TM gradients (range: 1.04-14.24 mmHg) consisted of 74.0 +/- 11.0% inertial forcers (range: 0.6-12.9 mmHg). Multivariate analysis predicted Mdv/dt = -4.171(S/D (RATIO)) + 0.063(LAvolume-max) + 5. Using this equation, a strong relationship was obtained for the clinical dataset (y=0.98x - 0.045, r=0.90) and the results of numerical modeling (y=0.96x - 0.16, r=0.84). TM gradients are mainly inertial and, as validated by modeling, can be estimated with echocardiography.

  9. Re-Computation of Numerical Results Contained in NACA Report No. 496

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III

    2015-01-01

    An extensive examination of NACA Report No. 496 (NACA 496), "General Theory of Aerodynamic Instability and the Mechanism of Flutter," by Theodore Theodorsen, is described. The examination included checking equations and solution methods and re-computing interim quantities and all numerical examples in NACA 496. The checks revealed that NACA 496 contains computational shortcuts (time- and effort-saving devices for engineers of the time) and clever artifices (employed in its solution methods), but, unfortunately, also contains numerous tripping points (aspects of NACA 496 that have the potential to cause confusion) and some errors. The re-computations were performed employing the methods and procedures described in NACA 496, but using modern computational tools. With some exceptions, the magnitudes and trends of the original results were in fair-to-very-good agreement with the re-computed results. The exceptions included what are speculated to be computational errors in the original in some instances and transcription errors in the original in others. Independent flutter calculations were performed and, in all cases, including those where the original and re-computed results differed significantly, were in excellent agreement with the re-computed results. Appendix A contains NACA 496; Appendix B contains a Matlab(Reistered) program that performs the re-computation of results; Appendix C presents three alternate solution methods, with examples, for the two-degree-of-freedom solution method of NACA 496; Appendix D contains the three-degree-of-freedom solution method (outlined in NACA 496 but never implemented), with examples.

  10. Educators' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the Desired Results System: A Study of the California Department of Education Accountability Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaleghi, Farahnaz

    2010-01-01

    The deluge of early child development research over the past 20 years has sparked an unprecedented public interest in the first years of children's lives. Research indicates that quality early education promotes the overall development of a healthy child. The Desired Results System, a standards-based accountability initiative of the California…

  11. Carbon fiber composites inspection and defect characterization using active infrared thermography: numerical simulations and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Henrique; Zhang, Hai; Figueiredo, Alisson; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Guimarares, Gilmar; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Composite materials are widely used in the aeronautic industry. One of the reasons is because they have strength and stiffness comparable to metals, with the added advantage of significant weight reduction. Infrared thermography (IT) is a safe nondestructive testing technique that has a fast inspection rate. In active IT, an external heat source is used to stimulate the material being inspected in order to generate a thermal contrast between the feature of interest and the background. In this paper, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers are inspected using IT. More specifically, carbon/PEEK (polyether ether ketone) laminates with square Kapton inserts of different sizes and at different depths are tested with three different IT techniques: pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and line scan thermography. The finite element method is used to simulate the pulsed thermography experiment. Numerical results displayed a very good agreement with experimental results.

  12. "It's Not All about Grades": Accounting for Gendered Degree Results in Geography at Brunel University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Fiona

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the results of an 18-month study at Brunel University that aimed to explain the significant gendered differences in academic performance amongst geography students. Male students are doing considerably less well than their female peers, being awarded far fewer first class and upper second class degrees, a phenomenon that cannot…

  13. Asymptotic expansion for stellarator equilibria with a non-planar magnetic axis: Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey; Cerfon, Antoine; Parra, Felix

    2012-10-01

    We have recently presented a new asymptotic expansion for stellarator equilibria that generalizes the classic Greene-Johnson expansion [1] to allow for 3D equilibria with a non-planar magnetic axis [2]. Our expansion achieves the two goals of reducing the complexity of the three-dimensional MHD equilibrium equations and of describing equilibria in modern stellarator experiments. The end result of our analysis is a set of two coupled partial differential equations for the plasma pressure and the toroidal vector potential which fully determine the stellarator equilibrium. Both equations are advection equations in which the toroidal angle plays the role of time. We show that the method of characteristics, following magnetic field lines, is a convenient way of solving these equations, avoiding the difficulties associated with the periodicity of the solution in the toroidal angle. By combining the method of characteristics with Green's function integrals for the evaluation of the magnetic field due to the plasma current, we obtain an efficient numerical solver for our expansion. Numerical equilibria thus calculated will be given.[4pt] [1] J.M. Greene and J.L. Johnson, Phys. Fluids 4, 875 (1961)[0pt] [2] A.J. Cerfon, J.P. Freidberg, and F.I. Parra, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 16 GP9.00081 (2011)

  14. Verification of Numerical Weather Prediction Model Results for Energy Applications in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sīle, Tija; Cepite-Frisfelde, Daiga; Sennikovs, Juris; Bethers, Uldis

    2014-05-01

    A resolution to increase the production and consumption of renewable energy has been made by EU governments. Most of the renewable energy in Latvia is produced by Hydroelectric Power Plants (HPP), followed by bio-gas, wind power and bio-mass energy production. Wind and HPP power production is sensitive to meteorological conditions. Currently the basis of weather forecasting is Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. There are numerous methodologies concerning the evaluation of quality of NWP results (Wilks 2011) and their application can be conditional on the forecast end user. The goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of Weather Research and Forecast model (Skamarock 2008) implementation over the territory of Latvia, focusing on forecasting of wind speed and quantitative precipitation forecasts. The target spatial resolution is 3 km. Observational data from Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre are used. A number of standard verification metrics are calculated. The sensitivity to the model output interpretation (output spatial interpolation versus nearest gridpoint) is investigated. For the precipitation verification the dichotomous verification metrics are used. Sensitivity to different precipitation accumulation intervals is examined. Skamarock, William C. and Klemp, Joseph B. A time-split nonhydrostatic atmospheric model for weather research and forecasting applications. Journal of Computational Physics. 227, 2008, pp. 3465-3485. Wilks, Daniel S. Statistical Methods in the Atmospheric Sciences. Third Edition. Academic Press, 2011.

  15. Numerical study of RF exposure and the resulting temperature rise in the foetus during a magnetic resonance procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, J. W.; Li, Y.; Hajnal, J. V.

    2010-02-01

    Numerical simulations of specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature changes in a 26-week pregnant woman model within typical birdcage body coils as used in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI scanners are described. Spatial distributions of SAR and the resulting spatial and temporal changes in temperature are determined using a finite difference time domain method and a finite difference bio-heat transfer solver that accounts for discrete vessels. Heat transfer from foetus to placenta via the umbilical vein and arteries as well as that across the foetal skin/amniotic fluid/uterine wall boundaries is modelled. Results suggest that for procedures compliant with IEC normal mode conditions (maternal whole-body averaged SARMWB <= 2 W kg-1 (continuous or time-averaged over 6 min)), whole foetal SAR, local foetal SAR10g and average foetal temperature are within international safety limits. For continuous RF exposure at SARMWB = 2 W kg-1 over periods of 7.5 min or longer, a maximum local foetal temperature >38 °C may occur. However, assessment of the risk posed by such maximum temperatures predicted in a static model is difficult because of frequent foetal movement. Results also confirm that when SARMWB = 2 W kg-1, some local SAR10g values in the mother's trunk and extremities exceed recommended limits.

  16. Numerical study of RF exposure and the resulting temperature rise in the foetus during a magnetic resonance procedure.

    PubMed

    Hand, J W; Li, Y; Hajnal, J V

    2010-02-21

    Numerical simulations of specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature changes in a 26-week pregnant woman model within typical birdcage body coils as used in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI scanners are described. Spatial distributions of SAR and the resulting spatial and temporal changes in temperature are determined using a finite difference time domain method and a finite difference bio-heat transfer solver that accounts for discrete vessels. Heat transfer from foetus to placenta via the umbilical vein and arteries as well as that across the foetal skin/amniotic fluid/uterine wall boundaries is modelled. Results suggest that for procedures compliant with IEC normal mode conditions (maternal whole-body averaged SAR(MWB) < or = 2 W kg(-1) (continuous or time-averaged over 6 min)), whole foetal SAR, local foetal SAR(10 g) and average foetal temperature are within international safety limits. For continuous RF exposure at SAR(MWB) = 2 W kg(-1) over periods of 7.5 min or longer, a maximum local foetal temperature >38 degrees C may occur. However, assessment of the risk posed by such maximum temperatures predicted in a static model is difficult because of frequent foetal movement. Results also confirm that when SAR(MWB) = 2 W kg(-1), some local SAR(10g) values in the mother's trunk and extremities exceed recommended limits.

  17. Experimental and numerical results for CO2 concentration and temperature profiles in an occupied room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotel, Aline; Junghans, Lars; Wang, Xiaoxiang

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, a recognition of the scope of the negative environmental impact of existing buildings has spurred academic and industrial interest in transforming existing building design practices and disciplinary knowledge. For example, buildings alone consume 72% of the electricity produced annually in the United States; this share is expected to rise to 75% by 2025 (EPA, 2009). Significant reductions in overall building energy consumption can be achieved using green building methods such as natural ventilation. An office was instrumented on campus to acquire CO2 concentrations and temperature profiles at multiple locations while a single occupant was present. Using openFOAM, numerical calculations were performed to allow for comparisons of the CO2 concentration and temperature profiles for different ventilation strategies. Ultimately, these results will be the inputs into a real time feedback control system that can adjust actuators for indoor ventilation and utilize green design strategies. Funded by UM Office of Vice President for Research.

  18. Lateral and axial resolutions of an angle-deviation microscope for different numerical apertures: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ming-Hung; Lai, Chin-Fa; Tan, Chen-Tai; Lin, Yi-Zhi

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the lateral and axial resolutions of a transmission laser-scanning angle-deviation microscope (TADM) with different numerical aperture (NA) values. The TADM is based on geometric optics and surface plasmon resonance principles. The surface height is proportional to the phase difference between two marginal rays of the test beam, which is passed through the test medium. We used common-path heterodyne interferometry to measure the phase difference in real time, and used a personal computer to calculate and plot the surface profile. The experimental results showed that the best lateral and axial resolutions for NA = 0.41 were 0.5 μm and 3 nm, respectively, and the lateral resolution breaks through the diffraction limits.

  19. Numerical simulation and experimental results of filament wound CFRP tubes tested under biaxial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, A.; Giannuzzi, M.; Marchetti, M.; Miliozzi, A.

    1992-10-01

    The analysis of angle ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites when subjected to uniaxial and biaxial stresses is presented. Three classes of interwoven pattern filament wound cylindrical specimens are studied in order to compare the influence of angle on the mechanical behavior of the laminate. Three dimensional finite element and thin shell analyses were first applied to the problem in order to predict global elastic behavior of specimens subjected to uniaxial loads. Different failure criteria were then adopted to investigate specimens' failure and experimental tests were carried out for a comparison with numerical results. Biaxial stress conditions were produced by applying combinations of internal pressure and axial tensile and compressive loads to the specimens.

  20. Dynamics of Tachyon Fields and Inflation - Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results with Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, M.; Dimitrijević, D. D.; Djordjević, G. S.; Stojanović, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    The role tachyon fields may play in evolution of early universe is discussed in this paper. We consider the evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe governed by a tachyon scalar field with the DBI-type action and calculate the slow-roll parameters of inflation, scalar spectral index (n), and tensor-scalar ratio (r) for the given potentials. We pay special attention to the inverse power potential, first of all to V(x)˜ x^{-4}, and compare the available results obtained by analytical and numerical methods with those obtained by observation. It is shown that the computed values of the observational parameters and the observed ones are in a good agreement for the high values of the constant X_0. The possibility that influence of the radion field can extend a range of the acceptable values of the constant X_0 to the string theory motivated sector of its values is briefly considered.

  1. Lagrangian methods for blood damage estimation in cardiovascular devices--How numerical implementation affects the results.

    PubMed

    Marom, Gil; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluated the influence of various numerical implementation assumptions on predicting blood damage in cardiovascular devices using Lagrangian methods with Eulerian computational fluid dynamics. The implementation assumptions that were tested included various seeding patterns, stochastic walk model, and simplified trajectory calculations with pathlines. Post processing implementation options that were evaluated included single passage and repeated passages stress accumulation and time averaging. This study demonstrated that the implementation assumptions can significantly affect the resulting stress accumulation, i.e., the blood damage model predictions. Careful considerations should be taken in the use of Lagrangian models. Ultimately, the appropriate assumptions should be considered based the physics of the specific case and sensitivity analysis, similar to the ones presented here, should be employed.

  2. Lagrangian methods for blood damage estimation in cardiovascular devices - How numerical implementation affects the results

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Gil; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Summary This paper evaluated the influence of various numerical implementation assumptions on predicting blood damage in cardiovascular devices using Lagrangian methods with Eulerian computational fluid dynamics. The implementation assumptions that were tested included various seeding patterns, stochastic walk model, and simplified trajectory calculations with pathlines. Post processing implementation options that were evaluated included single passage and repeated passages stress accumulation and time averaging. This study demonstrated that the implementation assumptions can significantly affect the resulting stress accumulation, i.e., the blood damage model predictions. Careful considerations should be taken in the use of Lagrangian models. Ultimately, the appropriate assumptions should be considered based the physics of the specific case and sensitivity analysis, similar to the ones presented here, should be employed. PMID:26679833

  3. Interacting steps with finite-range interactions: Analytical approximation and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Diego Felipe; Téllez, Gabriel; González, Diego Luis; Einstein, T. L.

    2013-05-01

    We calculate an analytical expression for the terrace-width distribution P(s) for an interacting step system with nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions. Our model is derived by mapping the step system onto a statistically equivalent one-dimensional system of classical particles. The validity of the model is tested with several numerical simulations and experimental results. We explore the effect of the range of interactions q on the functional form of the terrace-width distribution and pair correlation functions. For physically plausible interactions, we find modest changes when next-nearest neighbor interactions are included and generally negligible changes when more distant interactions are allowed. We discuss methods for extracting from simulated experimental data the characteristic scale-setting terms in assumed potential forms.

  4. Ultimate tensile strength of embedded I-sections: a comparison of experimental and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heristchian, Mahmoud; Pourakbar, Pouyan; Imeni, Saeed; Ramezani, M. Reza Adib

    2014-12-01

    Exposed baseplates together with anchor bolts are the customary method of connection of steel structures to the concrete footings. Post-Kobe studies revealed that the embedded column bases respond better to the earthquake uplift forces. The embedded column bases also, offer higher freedom in achieving the required strength, rigidity and ductility. The paper presents the results of the pullout failure of three embedded IPE140 sections, tested under different conditions. The numerical models are then, generated in Abaqus 6.10-1 software. It is concluded that, the steel profiles could be directly anchored in concrete without using anchor bolts as practiced in the exposed conventional column bases. Such embedded column bases can develop the required resistance against pullout forces at lower constructional costs.

  5. Effects of boundary conditions and partial drainage on cyclic simple shear test results - a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Popescu, Radu; Prevost, Jean H.

    2004-08-01

    Owing to imperfect boundary conditions in laboratory soil tests and the possibility of water diffusion inside the soil specimen in undrained tests, the assumption of uniform stress/strain over the sample is not valid. This study presents a qualitative assessment of the effects of non-uniformities in stresses and strains, as well as effects of water diffusion within the soil sample on the global results of undrained cyclic simple shear tests. The possible implications of those phenomena on the results of liquefaction strength assessment are also discussed. A state-of-the-art finite element code for transient analysis of multi-phase systems is used to compare results of the so-called element tests (numerical constitutive experiments assuming uniform stress/strain/pore pressure distribution throughout the sample) with results of actual simulations of undrained cyclic simple shear tests using a finite element mesh and realistic boundary conditions. The finite element simulations are performed under various conditions, covering the entire range of practical situations: (1) perfectly drained soil specimen with constant volume, (2) perfectly undrained specimen, and (3) undrained test with possibility of water diffusion within the sample. The results presented here are restricted to strain-driven tests performed for a loose uniform fine sand with relative density Dr=40%. Effects of system compliance in undrained laboratory simple shear tests are not investigated here. Copyright

  6. Electron Beam Return-Current Losses in Solar Flares: Initial Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated electrons play an important role in the energetics of solar flares. Understanding the process or processes that accelerate these electrons to high, nonthermal energies also depends on understanding the evolution of these electrons between the acceleration region and the region where they are observed through their hard X-ray or radio emission. Energy losses in the co-spatial electric field that drives the current-neutralizing return current can flatten the electron distribution toward low energies. This in turn flattens the corresponding bremsstrahlung hard X-ray spectrum toward low energies. The lost electron beam energy also enhances heating in the coronal part of the flare loop. Extending earlier work by Knight & Sturrock (1977), Emslie (1980), Diakonov & Somov (1988), and Litvinenko & Somov (1991), I have derived analytical and semi-analytical results for the nonthermal electron distribution function and the self-consistent electric field strength in the presence of a steady-state return-current. I review these results, presented previously at the 2009 SPD Meeting in Boulder, CO, and compare them and computed X-ray spectra with numerical results obtained by Zharkova & Gordovskii (2005, 2006). The phYSical significance of similarities and differences in the results will be emphasized. This work is supported by NASA's Heliophysics Guest Investigator Program and the RHESSI Project.

  7. Performance, Accountability, and Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Peter F.

    1992-01-01

    Although technology might greatly increase school performance, the economics will be hard to manage and explain to a tax-paying public. As in hospitals, technology is an expensive investment that will not replace people. Schooling's true challenge is not handling machinery but creating a multicultural society. To succeed, schools must emphasize…

  8. Numerical modeling of 1D heterogeneous combustion in porous media under free convection taking into account dependence of permeability on porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsenko, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    Using numerical experiment the one-dimensional unsteady process of heterogeneous combustion in porous object under free convection is considered when the dependence of permeability on porosity is taken into account. The combustion is due to exothermic reaction between the fuel in the solid porous medium and oxidizer contained in the gas flowing through the porous object. In the present work the process is considered under natural convection, i.e. when the flow rate and velocity of the gas at the inlet to the porous objects are unknown, but the gas pressure at object boundaries is known. The influence of changing of permeability due to the changing of porosity on the solution is investigated using original numerical method, which is based on a combination of explicit and implicit finite-difference schemes. It was shown that taking into account the dependence of permeability on porosity, which is described by some known equations, can significantly change the solution in one-dimensional case. The changing of permeability due to the changing of porosity leads to the speed increasing of both cocurrent and the countercurrent combustion waves, and to the temperature increasing in the combustion zone of countercurrent combustion wave.

  9. Newest Results from the Investigation of Polymer-Induced Drag Reduction through Direct Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Costas D.; Beris, Antony N.; Sureshkumar, R.; Handler, Robert A.

    1998-11-01

    This work continues our attempts to elucidate theoretically the mechanism of polymer-induced drag reduction through direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow, using an independently evaluated rheological model for the polymer stress. Using appropriate scaling to accommodate effects due to viscoelasticity reveals that there exists a great consistency in the results for different combinations of the polymer concentration and chain extension. This helps demonstrate that our obervations are applicable to very dilute systems, currently not possible to simulate. It also reinforces the hypothesis that one of the prerequisites for the phenomenon of drag reduction is sufficiently enhanced extensional viscosity, corresponding to the level of intensity and duration of extensional rates typically encountered during the turbulent flow. Moreover, these results motivate a study of the turbulence structure at larger Reynolds numbers and for different periodic computational cell sizes. In addition, the Reynolds stress budgets demonstrate that flow elasticity adversely affects the activities represented by the pressure-strain correlations, leading to a redistribution of turbulent kinetic energy amongst all directions. Finally, we discuss the influence of viscoelasticity in reducing the production of streamwise vorticity.

  10. Researchers' choice of the number and range of levels in experiments affects the resultant variance-accounted-for effect size.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kensuke; Hoshino, Takahiro

    2016-08-08

    In psychology, the reporting of variance-accounted-for effect size indices has been recommended and widely accepted through the movement away from null hypothesis significance testing. However, most researchers have paid insufficient attention to the fact that effect sizes depend on the choice of the number of levels and their ranges in experiments. Moreover, the functional form of how and how much this choice affects the resultant effect size has not thus far been studied. We show that the relationship between the population effect size and number and range of levels is given as an explicit function under reasonable assumptions. Counterintuitively, it is found that researchers may affect the resultant effect size to be either double or half simply by suitably choosing the number of levels and their ranges. Through a simulation study, we confirm that this relation also applies to sample effect size indices in much the same way. Therefore, the variance-accounted-for effect size would be substantially affected by the basic research design such as the number of levels. Simple cross-study comparisons and a meta-analysis of variance-accounted-for effect sizes would generally be irrational unless differences in research designs are explicitly considered.

  11. Experimental and numerical investigations of internal heat transfer in an innovative trailing edge blade cooling system: stationary and rotation effects, part 2: numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniaiche, Ahmed; Ghenaiet, Adel; Carcasci, Carlo; Facchini, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a numerical validation of the aero-thermal study of a 30:1 scaled model reproducing an innovative trailing edge with one row of enlarged pedestals under stationary and rotating conditions. A CFD analysis was performed by means of commercial ANSYS-Fluent modeling the isothermal air flow and using k- ω SST turbulence model and an isothermal air flow for both static and rotating conditions (Ro up to 0.23). The used numerical model is validated first by comparing the numerical velocity profiles distribution results to those obtained experimentally by means of PIV technique for Re = 20,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. The second validation is based on the comparison of the numerical results of the 2D HTC maps over the heated plate to those of TLC experimental data, for a smooth surface for a Reynolds number = 20,000 and 40,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. Two-tip conditions were considered: open tip and closed tip conditions. Results of the average Nusselt number inside the pedestal ducts region are presented too. The obtained results help to predict the flow field visualization and the evaluation of the aero-thermal performance of the studied blade cooling system during the design step.

  12. Tsunami Hazards along the Eastern Australian Coast from Potential Earthquakes: Results from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, H. L.; Ding, R. W.; Yuen, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    Australia is surrounded by the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean and, thus, may suffer from tsunamis due to its proximity to the subduction earthquakes around the boundary of Australian Plate. Potential tsunami risks along the eastern coast, where more and more people currently live, are numerically investigated through a scenario-based method to provide an estimation of the tsunami hazard in this region. We have chosen and calculated the tsunami waves generated at the New Hebrides Trench and the Puysegur Trench, and we further investigated the relevant tsunami hazards along the eastern coast and their sensitivities to various sea floor frictions and earthquake parameters (i.e. the strike, the dip and the slip angles and the earthquake magnitude/rupture length). The results indicate that the Puysegur trench possesses a seismic threat causing wave amplitudes over 1.5 m along the coast of Tasmania, Victoria, and New South Wales, and even reaching over 2.6 m at the regions close to Sydney, Maria Island, and Gabo Island for a certain worse case, while the cities along the coast of Queensland are potentially less vulnerable than those on the southeastern Australian coast.

  13. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Numerical Results for a Polytropic Cosmology Interpreted as a Dust Universe Producing Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, J.; Cervantes-Cota, J.; Chauvet, P.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. A nivel cosmol6gico pensamos que se ha estado prodticiendo radiaci6n gravitacional en cantidades considerables dentro de las galaxias. Si los eventos prodnctores de radiaci6n gravitatoria han venido ocurriendo desde Ia epoca de Ia formaci6n de las galaxias, cuando menos, sus efectos cosmol6gicos pueden ser tomados en cuenta con simplicidad y elegancia al representar la producci6n de radiaci6n y, por consiguiente, su interacci6n con materia ordinaria fenomenol6gicamente a trave's de una ecuaci6n de estado politr6pica, como lo hemos mostrado en otros trabajos. Presentamos en este articulo resultados nunericos de este modelo. ABSTRACT A common believe in cosmology is that gravitational radiation in considerable quantities is being produced within the galaxies. Ifgravitational radiation production has been running since the galaxy formation epoch, at least, its cosmological effects can be assesed with simplicity and elegance by representing the production of radiation and, therefore, its interaction with ordinary matter phenomenologically through a polytropic equation of state as shown already elsewhere. We present in this paper the numerical results of such a model. K words: COSMOLOGY - GRAVITATION

  15. Thermodiffusion in concentrated ferrofluids: Experimental and numerical results on magnetic thermodiffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, Lisa Lange, Adrian; Odenbach, Stefan

    2014-02-15

    Ferrofluids consist of magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a carrier liquid. Their strong thermodiffusive behaviour, characterised by the Soret coefficient, coupled with the dependency of the fluid's parameters on magnetic fields is dealt with in this work. It is known from former experimental investigations on the one hand that the Soret coefficient itself is magnetic field dependent and on the other hand that the accuracy of the coefficient's experimental determination highly depends on the volume concentration of the fluid. The thermally driven separation of particles and carrier liquid is carried out with a concentrated ferrofluid (φ = 0.087) in a horizontal thermodiffusion cell and is compared to equally detected former measurement data. The temperature gradient (1 K/mm) is applied perpendicular to the separation layer. The magnetic field is either applied parallel or perpendicular to the temperature difference. For three different magnetic field strengths (40 kA/m, 100 kA/m, 320 kA/m) the diffusive separation is detected. It reveals a sign change of the Soret coefficient with rising field strength for both field directions which stands for a change in the direction of motion of the particles. This behaviour contradicts former experimental results with a dilute magnetic fluid, in which a change in the coefficient's sign could only be detected for the parallel setup. An anisotropic behaviour in the current data is measured referring to the intensity of the separation being more intense in the perpendicular position of the magnetic field: S{sub T‖} = −0.152 K{sup −1} and S{sub T⊥} = −0.257 K{sup −1} at H = 320 kA/m. The ferrofluiddynamics-theory (FFD-theory) describes the thermodiffusive processes thermodynamically and a numerical simulation of the fluid's separation depending on the two transport parameters ξ{sub ‖} and ξ{sub ⊥} used within the FFD-theory can be implemented. In the case of a parallel aligned magnetic field, the parameter can

  16. A Hydrodynamic Theory for Spatially Inhomogeneous Semiconductor Lasers. 2; Numerical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jianzhong; Ning, C. Z.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present numerical results of the diffusion coefficients (DCs) in the coupled diffusion model derived in the preceding paper for a semiconductor quantum well. These include self and mutual DCs in the general two-component case, as well as density- and temperature-related DCs under the single-component approximation. The results are analyzed from the viewpoint of free Fermi gas theory with many-body effects incorporated. We discuss in detail the dependence of these DCs on densities and temperatures in order to identify different roles played by the free carrier contributions including carrier statistics and carrier-LO phonon scattering, and many-body corrections including bandgap renormalization and electron-hole (e-h) scattering. In the general two-component case, it is found that the self- and mutual- diffusion coefficients are determined mainly by the free carrier contributions, but with significant many-body corrections near the critical density. Carrier-LO phonon scattering is dominant at low density, but e-h scattering becomes important in determining their density dependence above the critical electron density. In the single-component case, it is found that many-body effects suppress the density coefficients but enhance the temperature coefficients. The modification is of the order of 10% and reaches a maximum of over 20% for the density coefficients. Overall, temperature elevation enhances the diffusive capability or DCs of carriers linearly, and such an enhancement grows with density. Finally, the complete dataset of various DCs as functions of carrier densities and temperatures provides necessary ingredients for future applications of the model to various spatially inhomogeneous optoelectronic devices.

  17. Numerical and experimental results on the spectral wave transfer in finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benassai, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Determination of the form of the one-dimensional surface gravity wave spectrum in water of finite depth is important for many scientific and engineering applications. Spectral parameters of deep water and intermediate depth waves serve as input data for the design of all coastal structures and for the description of many coastal processes. Moreover, the wave spectra are given as an input for the response and seakeeping calculations of high speed vessels in extreme sea conditions and for reliable calculations of the amount of energy to be extracted by wave energy converters (WEC). Available data on finite depth spectral form is generally extrapolated from parametric forms applicable in deep water (e.g., JONSWAP) [Hasselmann et al., 1973; Mitsuyasu et al., 1980; Kahma, 1981; Donelan et al., 1992; Zakharov, 2005). The present paper gives a contribution in this field through the validation of the offshore energy spectra transfer from given spectral forms through the measurement of inshore wave heights and spectra. The wave spectra on deep water were recorded offshore Ponza by the Wave Measurement Network (Piscopia et al.,2002). The field regressions between the spectral parameters, fp and the nondimensional energy with the fetch length were evaluated for fetch-limited sea conditions. These regressions gave the values of the spectral parameters for the site of interest. The offshore wave spectra were transfered from the measurement station offshore Ponza to a site located offshore the Gulf of Salerno. The offshore local wave spectra so obtained were transfered on the coastline with the TMA model (Bouws et al., 1985). Finally the numerical results, in terms of significant wave heights, were compared with the wave data recorded by a meteo-oceanographic station owned by Naples Hydrographic Office on the coastline of Salerno in 9m depth. Some considerations about the wave energy to be potentially extracted by Wave Energy Converters were done and the results were discussed.

  18. Numerical results on noise-induced dynamics in the subthreshold regime for thermoacoustic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Kabiraj, Lipika

    2017-03-01

    Thermoacoustic instability is a serious issue in practical combustion systems. Such systems are inherently noisy, and hence the influence of noise on the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability is an aspect of practical importance. The present work is motivated by a recent report on the experimental observation of coherence resonance, or noise-induced coherence with a resonance-like dependence on the noise intensity as the system approaches the stability margin, for a prototypical premixed laminar flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Phys. Rev. E, 4 (2015)). We numerically investigate representative thermoacoustic models for such noise-induced dynamics. Similar to the experiments, we study variation in system dynamics in response to variations in the noise intensity and in a critical control parameter as the systems approach their stability margins. The qualitative match identified between experimental results and observations in the representative models investigated here confirms that coherence resonance is a feature of thermoacoustic systems. We also extend the experimental results, which were limited to the case of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, to the case of supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We identify that the phenomenon has qualitative differences for the systems undergoing transition via subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations. Two important practical implications are associated with the findings. Firstly, the increase in noise-induced coherence as the system approaches the onset of thermoacoustic instability can be considered as a precursor to the instability. Secondly, the dependence of noise-induced dynamics on the bifurcation type can be utilised to distinguish between subcritical and supercritical bifurcation prior to the onset of the instability.

  19. Effects of heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and biomass on biodegradation rate calculations - Results from numerical simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations were used to examine the effects of heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity (K) and intrinsic biodegradation rate on the accuracy of contaminant plume-scale biodegradation rates obtained from field data. The simulations were based on a steady-state BTEX contaminant plume-scale biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions, with the electron acceptor in excess. Biomass was either uniform or correlated with K to model spatially variable intrinsic biodegradation rates. A hydraulic conductivity data set from an alluvial aquifer was used to generate three sets of 10 realizations with different degrees of heterogeneity, and contaminant transport with biodegradation was simulated with BIOMOC. Biodegradation rates were calculated from the steady-state contaminant plumes using decreases in concentration with distance downgradient and a single flow velocity estimate, as is commonly done in site characterization to support the interpretation of natural attenuation. The observed rates were found to underestimate the actual rate specified in the heterogeneous model in all cases. The discrepancy between the observed rate and the 'true' rate depended on the ground water flow velocity estimate, and increased with increasing heterogeneity in the aquifer. For a lognormal K distribution with variance of 0.46, the estimate was no more than a factor of 1.4 slower than the true rate. For aquifer with 20% silt/clay lenses, the rate estimate was as much as nine times slower than the true rate. Homogeneous-permeability, uniform-degradation rate simulations were used to generate predictions of remediation time with the rates estimated from heterogeneous models. The homogeneous models were generally overestimated the extent of remediation or underestimated remediation time, due to delayed degradation of contaminants in the low-K areas. Results suggest that aquifer characterization for natural attenuation at contaminated sites should include assessment of the presence

  20. Recombination in liquid filled ionisation chambers with multiple charge carrier species: Theoretical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, P.; González-Castaño, D. M.; Gómez, F.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid-filled ionisation chambers (LICs) are used in radiotherapy for dosimetry and quality assurance. Volume recombination can be quite important in LICs for moderate dose rates, causing non-linearities in the dose rate response of these detectors, and needs to be corrected for. This effect is usually described with Greening and Boag models for continuous and pulsed radiation respectively. Such models assume that the charge is carried by two different species, positive and negative ions, each of those species with a given mobility. However, LICs operating in non-ultrapure mode can contain different types of electronegative impurities with different mobilities, thus increasing the number of different charge carriers. If this is the case, Greening and Boag models can be no longer valid and need to be reformulated. In this work we present a theoretical and numerical study of volume recombination in parallel-plate LICs with multiple charge carrier species, extending Boag and Greening models. Results from a recent publication that reported three different mobilities in an isooctane-filled LIC have been used to study the effect of extra carrier species on recombination. We have found that in pulsed beams the inclusion of extra mobilities does not affect volume recombination much, a behaviour that was expected because Boag formula for charge collection efficiency does not depend on the mobilities of the charge carriers if the Debye relationship between mobilities and recombination constant holds. This is not the case in continuous radiation, where the presence of extra charge carrier species significantly affects the amount of volume recombination.

  1. Modeling the Fracturing of Rock by Fluid Injection - Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Fluid-rock interactions are mechanically fundamental to many earth processes, including fault zones and hydrothermal/volcanic systems, and to future green energy solutions such as enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Modeling these processes is challenging because of the strong coupling between rock fracture evolution and the consequent large changes in the hydraulic properties of the system. In this talk, we present results of a numerical model that includes poro-elastic plastic rheology (with hardening, softening, and damage), and coupled to a non-linear diffusion model for fluid pressure propagation and two-phase fluid flow. Our plane strain model is based on the poro- elastic plastic behavior of porous rock and is advanced with hardening, softening and damage using the Mohr- Coulomb failure criteria. The effective stress model of Biot (1944) is used for coupling the pore pressure and the rock behavior. Frictional hardening and cohesion softening are introduced following Vermeer and de Borst (1984) with the angle of internal friction and the cohesion as functions of the principal strain rates. The scalar damage coefficient is assumed to be a linear function of the hardening parameter. Fluid injection is modeled as a two phase mixture of water and air using the Richards equation. The theoretical model is solved using finite differences on a staggered grid. The model is benchmarked with experiments on the laboratory scale in which fluid is injected from below in a critically-stressed, dry sandstone (Stanchits et al. 2011). We simulate three experiments, a) the failure a dry specimen due to biaxial compressive loading, b) the propagation a of low pressure fluid front induced from the bottom in a critically stressed specimen, and c) the failure of a critically stressed specimen due to a high pressure fluid intrusion. Comparison of model results with the fluid injection experiments shows that the model captures most of the experimental

  2. Water-waves on linear shear currents. A comparison of experimental and numerical results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bruno; Seez, William; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of water waves can be described for uniformly sheared current conditions. Indeed, some mathematical simplifications remain applicable in the study of waves whether there is no current or a linearly sheared current. However, the widespread use of mathematical wave theories including shear has rarely been backed by experimental studies of such flows. New experimental and numerical methods were both recently developed to study wave current interactions for constant vorticity. On one hand, the numerical code can simulate, in two dimensions, arbitrary non-linear waves. On the other hand, the experimental methods can be used to generate waves with various shear conditions. Taking advantage of the simplicity of the experimental protocol and versatility of the numerical code, comparisons between experimental and numerical data are discussed and compared with linear theory for validation of the methods. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement, France) is acknowledged for its financial support through the ANR grant N° ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  3. Chaotic structures of nonlinear magnetic fields. I - Theory. II - Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Nam C.; Parks, George K.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the evolutionary properties of nonlinear magnetic fields in flowing MHD plasmas is presented to illustrate that nonlinear magnetic fields may involve chaotic dynamics. It is shown how a suitable transformation of the coupled equations leads to Duffing's form, suggesting that the behavior of the general solution can also be chaotic. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear magnetic field equations that have been cast in the form of Duffing's equation are presented.

  4. Experimental and numerical results on a shear layer excited by a sound pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of a sound in a jet was investigated. It is verified that the far-field acoustic power increased with flow velocity for the lower and medium frequency range. Experimentally, an attenuation at higher frequencies is also observed. This increase is found numerically to be due primarily to the interactions between the mean vorticity and the fluctuation velocities. Spectral decomposition of the real time data indicates that the power increase occurs in the low and middle frequency range, where the local instability waves have the largest spatial growth rate. The connection between this amplification and the local instability waves is discussed.

  5. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  6. Estimation of geopotential from satellite-to-satellite range rate data: Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thobe, Glenn E.; Bose, Sam C.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for high-resolution geopotential field estimation by recovering the harmonic coefficients from satellite-to-satellite range rate data is presented and tested against both a controlled analytical simulation of a one-day satellite mission (maximum degree and order 8) and then against a Cowell method simulation of a 32-day mission (maximum degree and order 180). Innovations include: (1) a new frequency-domain observation equation based on kinetic energy perturbations which avoids much of the complication of the usual Keplerian element perturbation approaches; (2) a new method for computing the normalized inclination functions which unlike previous methods is both efficient and numerically stable even for large harmonic degrees and orders; (3) the application of a mass storage FFT to the entire mission range rate history; (4) the exploitation of newly discovered symmetries in the block diagonal observation matrix which reduce each block to the product of (a) a real diagonal matrix factor, (b) a real trapezoidal factor with half the number of rows as before, and (c) a complex diagonal factor; (5) a block-by-block least-squares solution of the observation equation by means of a custom-designed Givens orthogonal rotation method which is both numerically stable and tailored to the trapezoidal matrix structure for fast execution.

  7. Nonlinear instability and chaos in plasma wave-wave interactions. II. Numerical methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Kueny, C.S.; Morrison, P.J.

    1995-05-01

    In Part I of this work and Physics of Plasmas, June 1995, the behavior of linearly stable, integrable systems of waves in a simple plasma model was described using a Hamiltonian formulation. It was shown that explosive instability arises from nonlinear coupling between modes of positive and negative energy, with well-defined threshold amplitudes depending on the physical parameters. In this concluding paper, the nonintegrable case is treated numerically. Several sets of waves are considered, comprising systems of two and three degrees of freedom. The time evolution is modelled with an explicit symplectic integration algorithm derived using Lie algebraic methods. When initial wave amplitudes are large enough to support two-wave decay interactions, strongly chaotic motion destroys the separatrix bounding the stable region for explosive triplets. Phase space orbits then experience diffusive growth to amplitudes that are sufficient for explosive instability, thus effectively reducing the threshold amplitude. For initial amplitudes too small to drive decay instability, small perturbations might still grow to arbitrary size via Arnold diffusion. Numerical experiments do not show diffusion in this case, although the actual diffusion rate is probably underestimated due to the simplicity of the model.

  8. Elasticity of mechanical oscillators in nonequilibrium steady states: Experimental, numerical, and theoretical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Livia; De Gregorio, Paolo; Bonaldi, Michele; Borrielli, Antonio; Crivellari, Michele; Karapetyan, Gagik; Poli, Charles; Serra, Enrico; Thakur, Ram-Krishna; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2012-06-01

    We study experimentally, numerically, and theoretically the elastic response of mechanical resonators along which the temperature is not uniform, as a consequence of the onset of steady-state thermal gradients. Two experimental setups and designs are employed, both using low-loss materials. In both cases, we monitor the resonance frequencies of specific modes of vibration, as they vary along with variations of temperatures and of temperature differences. In one case, we consider the first longitudinal mode of vibration of an aluminum alloy resonator; in the other case, we consider the antisymmetric torsion modes of a silicon resonator. By defining the average temperature as the volume-weighted mean of the temperatures of the respective elastic sections, we find out that the elastic response of an object depends solely on it, regardless of whether a thermal gradient exists and, up to 10% imbalance, regardless of its magnitude. The numerical model employs a chain of anharmonic oscillators, with first- and second-neighbor interactions and temperature profiles satisfying Fourier's Law to a good degree. Its analysis confirms, for the most part, the experimental findings and it is explained theoretically from a statistical mechanics perspective with a loose notion of local equilibrium.

  9. Interaction of a mantle plume and a segmented mid-ocean ridge: Results from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgen, Jennifer E.

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations have proposed that changes in lithospheric thickness across a transform fault, due to the juxtaposition of seafloor of different ages, can impede lateral dispersion of an on-ridge mantle plume. The application of this “transform damming” mechanism has been considered for several plume-ridge systems, including the Reunion hotspot and the Central Indian Ridge, the Amsterdam-St. Paul hotspot and the Southeast Indian Ridge, the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the Iceland hotspot and the Kolbeinsey Ridge, the Afar plume and the ridges of the Gulf of Aden, and the Marion/Crozet hotspot and the Southwest Indian Ridge. This study explores the geodynamics of the transform damming mechanism using a three-dimensional finite element numerical model. The model solves the coupled steady-state equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, including thermal buoyancy and viscosity that is dependent on pressure and temperature. The plume is introduced as a circular thermal anomaly on the bottom boundary of the numerical domain. The center of the plume conduit is located directly beneath a spreading segment, at a distance of 200 km (measured in the along-axis direction) from a transform offset with length 100 km. Half-spreading rate is 0.5 cm/yr. In a series of numerical experiments, the buoyancy flux of the modeled plume is progressively increased to investigate the effects on the temperature and velocity structure of the upper mantle in the vicinity of the transform. Unlike earlier studies, which suggest that a transform always acts to decrease the along-axis extent of plume signature, these models imply that the effect of a transform on plume dispersion may be complex. Under certain ranges of plume flux modeled in this study, the region of the upper mantle undergoing along-axis flow directed away from the plume could be enhanced by the three-dimensional velocity and temperature structure associated with ridge

  10. The evolution of misoscale circulations in a downburst-producing storm and comparison to numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessinger, C. J.; Wilson, J. W.; Weisman, M.; Klemp, J.

    1984-01-01

    Data from three NCAR radars are used in both single and dual Doppler analyses to trace the evolution of a June 30, 1982 Colorado convective storm containing downburst-type winds and strong vortices 1-2 km in diameter. The analyses show that a series of small circulations formed along a persistent cyclonic shear boundary; at times as many as three misocyclones were present with vertical vorticity values as large as 0.1/s using a 0.25 km grid interval. The strength of the circulations suggests the possibility of accompanying tornadoes or funnels, although none were observed. Dual-Doppler analyses show that strong, small-scale downdrafts develop in close proximity to the misocyclones. A midlevel mesocyclone formed in the same general region of the storm where the misocylones later developed. The observations are compared with numerical simulations from a three-dimensional cloud model initialized with sounding data from the same day.

  11. The spectroscopic search for the trace aerosols in the planetary atmospheres - the results of numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecka, Maria I.

    2010-05-01

    The passive remote spectrometric methods are important in examinations the atmospheres of planets. The radiance spectra inform us about values of thermodynamical parameters and composition of the atmospheres and surfaces. The spectral technology can be useful in detection of the trace aerosols like biological substances (if present) in the environments of the planets. We discuss here some of the aspects related to the spectroscopic search for the aerosols and dust in planetary atmospheres. Possibility of detection and identifications of biological aerosols with a passive InfraRed spectrometer in an open-air environment is discussed. We present numerically simulated, based on radiative transfer theory, spectroscopic observations of the Earth atmosphere. Laboratory measurements of transmittance of various kinds of aerosols, pollens and bacterias were used in modeling.

  12. Estimation of catchment-scale evapotranspiration from baseflow recession data: Numerical model and practical application results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Gribovszki, Zoltan; Kalicz, Peter

    2007-03-01

    SummaryBy applying a nonlinear reservoir approach for groundwater drainage, catchment-scale evapotranspiration (ET) during flow recessions can be expressed with the help of the lumped version of the water balance equation for the catchment. The attractiveness of the approach is that ET, in theory, can be obtained by the sole use of observed flow values for which relatively abundant and long records are available. A 2D finite element numerical model of subsurface flow in the unsaturated and saturated zones, capable of simulating moisture removal by vegetation, was first successfully employed to verify the water balance approach under ideal conditions. Subsequent practical applications over four catchments with widely varying climatic conditions however showed large disparities in comparison with monthly ET estimates of Morton's WREVAP model.

  13. Distribution of Steps with Finite-Range Interactions: Analytic Approximations and Numerical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GonzáLez, Diego Luis; Jaramillo, Diego Felipe; TéLlez, Gabriel; Einstein, T. L.

    2013-03-01

    While most Monte Carlo simulations assume only nearest-neighbor steps interact elastically, most analytic frameworks (especially the generalized Wigner distribution) posit that each step elastically repels all others. In addition to the elastic repulsions, we allow for possible surface-state-mediated interactions. We investigate analytically and numerically how next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions and, more generally, interactions out to q'th nearest neighbor alter the form of the terrace-width distribution and of pair correlation functions (i.e. the sum over n'th neighbor distribution functions, which we investigated recently.[2] For physically plausible interactions, we find modest changes when NNN interactions are included and generally negligible changes when more distant interactions are allowed. We discuss methods for extracting from simulated experimental data the characteristic scale-setting terms in assumed potential forms.

  14. Are More Stringent NCLB State Accountability Systems Associated with Better Student Outcomes? An Analysis of NAEP Results across States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Xin

    2012-01-01

    This study developed a comprehensive measure of the stringency level of NCLB states' accountability systems, including the strength of their annual measurable objectives, confidence intervals, performance indexing, retesting, minimum subgroup size, and the difficulty levels of proficiency standards. This study related accountability stringency in…

  15. Sound absorption of porous substrates covered by foliage: experimental results and numerical predictions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lei; Van Renterghem, Timothy; Botteldooren, Dick; Horoshenkov, Kirill; Khan, Amir

    2013-12-01

    The influence of loose plant leaves on the acoustic absorption of a porous substrate is experimentally and numerically studied. Such systems are typical in vegetative walls, where the substrate has strong acoustical absorbing properties. Both experiments in an impedance tube and theoretical predictions show that when a leaf is placed in front of such a porous substrate, its absorption characteristics markedly change (for normal incident sound). Typically, there is an unaffected change in the low frequency absorption coefficient (below 250 Hz), an increase in the middle frequency absorption coefficient (500-2000 Hz) and a decrease in the absorption at higher frequencies. The influence of leaves becomes most pronounced when the substrate has a low mass density. A combination of the Biot's elastic frame porous model, viscous damping in the leaf boundary layers and plate vibration theory is implemented via a finite-difference time-domain model, which is able to predict accurately the absorption spectrum of a leaf above a porous substrate system. The change in the absorption spectrum caused by the leaf vibration can be modeled reasonably well assuming the leaf and porous substrate properties are uniform.

  16. Mode analysis for a microwave driven plasma discharge: A comparison between analytical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeremley, Daniel; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Zimmermanns, Marc; Rolfes, Ilona; Eremin, Denis; Ruhr-University Bochum, Theoretical Electrical Engineering Team; Ruhr-University Bochum, Institute of Microwave Systems Team

    2015-09-01

    The market shows in recent years a growing demand for bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Therefore, fast and efficient sterilization processes as well as barrier coatings to decrease gas permeation are required. A specialized microwave plasma source - referred to as the plasmaline - has been developed to allow for depositing thin films of e.g. silicon oxid on the inner surface of such PET bottles. The plasmaline is a coaxial waveguide combined with a gas-inlet which is inserted into the empty bottle and initiates a reactive plasma. To optimize and control the different surface processes, it is essential to fully understand the microwave power coupling to the plasma and the related heating of electrons inside the bottle and thus the electromagnetic wave propagation along the plasmaline. In this contribution, we present a detailed dispersion analysis based on a numerical approach. We study how modes of guided waves are propagating under different conditions, if at all. The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the framework of the collaborative research centre TRR87.

  17. Displacement-Based Seismic Design Procedure for Framed Buildings with Dissipative Braces Part II: Numerical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Fabio; Vulcano, Alfonso

    2008-07-01

    For a widespread application of dissipative braces to protect framed buildings against seismic loads, practical and reliable design procedures are needed. In this paper a design procedure based on the Direct Displacement-Based Design approach is adopted, assuming the elastic lateral storey-stiffness of the damped braces proportional to that of the unbraced frame. To check the effectiveness of the design procedure, presented in an associate paper, a six-storey reinforced concrete plane frame, representative of a medium-rise symmetric framed building, is considered as primary test structure; this structure, designed in a medium-risk region, is supposed to be retrofitted as in a high-risk region, by insertion of diagonal braces equipped with hysteretic dampers. A numerical investigation is carried out to study the nonlinear static and dynamic responses of the primary and the damped braced test structures, using step-by-step procedures described in the associate paper mentioned above; the behaviour of frame members and hysteretic dampers is idealized by bilinear models. Real and artificial accelerograms, matching EC8 response spectrum for a medium soil class, are considered for dynamic analyses.

  18. Preliminary Results from Numerical Experiments on the Summer 1980 Heat Wave and Drought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, N.; Atlas, R.; Sud, Y. C.

    1985-01-01

    During the summer of 1980, a prolonged heat wave and drought affected the United States. A preliminary set of experiments has been conducted to study the effect of varying boundary conditions on the GLA model simulation of the heat wave. Five 10-day numerical integrations with three different specifications of boundary conditions were carried out: a control experiment which utilized climatological boundary conditions, an SST experiment which utilized summer 1980 sea-surface temperatures in the North Pacific, but climatological values elsewhere, and a Soil Moisture experiment which utilized the values of Mintz-Serafini for the summer, 1980. The starting dates for the five forecasts were 11 June, 7 July, 21 July, 22 August, and 6 September of 1980. These dates were specifically chosen as days when a heat wave was already established in order to investigate the effect of soil moistures or North Pacific sea-surface temperatures on the model's ability to maintain the heat wave pattern. The experiments were evaluated in terms of the heat wave index for the South Plains, North Plains, Great Plains and the entire U.S. In addition a subjective comparison of map patterns has been performed.

  19. Reynolds number effects on shock-wave turbulent boundary-layer interactions - A comparison of numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, C. C.; Settles, G. S.; Vas, I. E.; Bogdonoff, S. M.; Hung, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment is described that tests and guides computations of a shock-wave turbulent boundary-layer interaction flow over a 20-deg compression corner at Mach 2.85. Numerical solutions of the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for the entire flow field, employing various turbulence models, are compared with the data. Each model is critically evaluated by comparisons with the details of the experimental data. Experimental results for the extent of upstream pressure influence and separation location are compared with numerical predictions for a wide range of Reynolds numbers and shock-wave strengths.

  20. Investigating role of ice-ocean interaction on glacier dynamic: Results from numerical modeling applied to Petermann Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, F. M.; van der Veen, C. J.; Vieli, A.; Pattyn, F.; Hubbard, A.; Box, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Calving of icebergs and bottom melting from ice shelves accounts for roughly half the ice transferred from the Greenland Ice Sheet into the surrounding ocean, and virtually all of the ice loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Petermann Glacier (north Greenland) with its ~17 km wide and ~ 60 km long floating ice-shelf is experiencing high rates of bottom melting. The recent partial disintegration of its shelf (in August 2010) presents a natural experiment to investigate the dynamic response of the ice sheet to its shelf retreat. We apply a numerical ice flow model using a physically-based calving criterion based on crevasse depth to investigate the contribution of processes such as shelf disintegration, bottom melting, sea ice or sikkusak disintegration and surface run off to the mass balance of Petermann Glacier and assess its stability. Our modeling study provides insights into the role of ice-ocean interaction, and on response of Petermann Glacier to its recent massive ice loss.

  1. Role of ice-ocean interaction on glacier instability: Results from numerical modelling applied to Petermann Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, Faezeh M.; Hubbard, Alun; van der Veen, Kees; Vieli, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Calving of icebergs and bottom melting from ice shelves accounts for roughly half the ice transferred from the Greenland Ice Sheet into the surrounding ocean, and virtually all of the ice loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Petermann Glacier (north Greenland) with its 16 km wide and 80 km long floating tongue, experiences massive bottom melting. We apply a numerical ice flow model using a physically-based calving criterion based on crevasse depth to investigate the contribution of processes such as bottom melting, sea ice or sikkusak disintegration, surface run off and iceberg calving to the mass balance and instability of Petermann Glacier and its ice shelf. Our modelling study provides insights into the role of ice-ocean interaction, and on how to incorporate calving in ice sheet models, improving our ability to predict future ice sheet change.

  2. Role of ice-ocean interaction on glacier instability: Results from numerical modeling applied to Petermann Glacier (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, F.; Hubbard, A.; Vieli, A.; van der Veen, C. J.; Box, J. E.; Bates, R.; Luckman, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    Calving of icebergs and bottom melting from ice shelves accounts for roughly half the ice transferred from the Greenland Ice Sheet into the surrounding ocean, and virtually all of the ice loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet. Petermann Glacier (north Greenland) with its 16 km wide and 80 km long floating tongue, experiences massive bottom melting. We apply a numerical ice flow model using a physically-based calving criterion based on crevasse depth to investigate the contribution of processes such as bottom melting, sea ice or sikkusak disintegration, surface run off and iceberg calving to the mass balance and instability of Petermann Glacier and its ice shelf. Our modeling study provides insights into the role of ice-ocean interaction, and on how to incorporate calving in ice sheet models, improving our ability to predict future ice sheet change.

  3. Impaired cell envelope resulting from arcA mutation largely accounts for enhanced sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fen; Mao, Yinting; Dong, Yangyang; Ju, Lili; Wu, Genfu; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major challenges that Shewanella encounter routinely because they thrive in redox-stratified environments prone to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, letting alone that ROS can be generated endogenously. As respiration is the predominant process for endogenous ROS, regulators mediating respiration have been demonstrated and/or implicated to play a role in oxidative stress response. In our efforts to unveil the involvement of global regulators for respiration in the oxidative stress response, we found that loss of the Arc system increases S. oneidensis sensitivity to H2O2 whereas neither Fnr nor Crp has a significant role. A comparison of transcriptomic profiles of the wild-type and its isogenic arcA mutant revealed that the OxyR regulon is independent of the Arc system. We then provided evidence that the enhanced H2O2 sensitivity of the arcA mutant is due to an increased H2O2 uptake rate, a result of a cell envelope defect. Although one of three proteases of the ArcA regulon when in excess is partially accountable for the envelope defect, the major contributors remain elusive. Overall, our data indicate that the Arc system influences the bacterial cell envelope biosynthesis, a physiological aspect that has not been associated with the regulator before. PMID:25975178

  4. A DGTD method for the numerical modeling of the interaction of light with nanometer scale metallic structures taking into account non-local dispersion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Nikolai; Scheid, Claire; Lanteri, Stéphane; Moreau, Antoine; Viquerat, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    's equations coupled to a linearized non-local dispersion model relevant to plasmonics. While the method is presented in the general 3D case, numerical results are given for 2D simulation settings.

  5. A DGTD method for the numerical modeling of the interaction of light with nanometer scale metallic structures taking into account non-local dispersion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Nikolai; Scheid, Claire; Lanteri, Stéphane; Moreau, Antoine; Viquerat, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    's equations coupled to a linearized non-local dispersion model relevant to plasmonics. While the method is presented in the general 3D case, numerical results are given for 2D simulation settings.

  6. The vertical age profile in sea ice: Theory and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietaer, Olivier; Deleersnijder, Eric; Fichefet, Thierry; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Comblen, Richard; Bouillon, Sylvain; Legat, Vincent

    The sea ice age is an interesting diagnostic tool because it may provide a proxy for the sea ice thickness and is easier to infer from observations than the sea ice thickness. Remote sensing algorithms and modeling approaches proposed in the literature indicate significant methodological uncertainties, leading to different ice age values and physical interpretations. In this work, we focus on the vertical age distribution in sea ice. Based on the age theory developed for marine modeling, we propose a vertically-variable sea ice age definition which gives a measure of the time elapsed since the accretion of the ice particle under consideration. An analytical solution is derived from Stefan's law for a horizontally homogeneous ice layer with a periodic ice thickness seasonal cycle. Two numerical methods to solve the age equation are proposed. In the first one, the domain is discretized adaptively in space thanks to Lagrangian particles in order to capture the age profile and its discontinuities. The second one focuses on the mean age of the ice using as few degrees of freedom as possible and is based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) spatial discretization and the finite element method. We observe an excellent agreement between the Lagrangian particles and the analytical solution. The mean value and the standard deviation of the finite element solution agree with the analytical solution and a linear approximation is found to represent the age profile the better, the older the ice gets. Both methods are finally applied to a stand-alone thermodynamic sea ice model of the Arctic. Computing the vertically-averaged ice age reduces by a factor of about 2 the simulated ice age compared to the oldest particle of the ice columns. A high correlation is found between the ice thickness and the age of the oldest particle. However, whether or not this will remain valid once ice dynamics is included should be investigated. In addition, the present study, based on

  7. Image restoration by the method of convex projections: part 2 applications and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Sezan, M I; Stark, H

    1982-01-01

    The image restoration theory discussed in a previous paper by Youla and Webb [1] is applied to a simulated image and the results compared with the well-known method known as the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm. The results show that the method of image restoration by projection onto convex sets, by providing a convenient technique for utilizing a priori information, performs significantly better than the Gerchberg-Papoulis method.

  8. Multi-Country Experience in Delivering a Joint Course on Software Engineering--Numerical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budimac, Zoran; Putnik, Zoran; Ivanovic, Mirjana; Bothe, Klaus; Zdravkova, Katerina; Jakimovski, Boro

    2014-01-01

    A joint course, created as a result of a project under the auspices of the "Stability Pact of South-Eastern Europe" and DAAD, has been conducted in several Balkan countries: in Novi Sad, Serbia, for the last six years in several different forms, in Skopje, FYR of Macedonia, for two years, for several types of students, and in Tirana,…

  9. Community Accountability for Quality Schools: Results of the 2008 National Poll and the Civic Index for Quality Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Education Network, 2008

    2008-01-01

    For many years, policymakers and the public have been holding students and schools accountable for improvement, but there was no way to determine whether the public and its elected officials and community organizations were doing their part to strengthen public schools. To address this shortcoming, Public Education network (PEN), with funding from…

  10. Getting to the Bottom Line: How Using Evaluation Results to Enhance Extension Programs Can Lead to Greater Levels of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Alexa J.; Israel, Glenn D.; Harder, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Extension has enhanced the lives of U.S. citizens through adult education in a myriad of ways. However, as budgets get tighter, accountability becomes increasingly more important. Over the years, Extension has reported low level impacts rather than the long-term successes that those working within the system know are occurring. Without enhanced…

  11. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(21)-1 - Pre-1954 adjustments resulting from change in method of accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the rate of $2,000 each year. On November 1, 1963, all the assets of X Corporation are acquired by Y Corporation in a transaction to which section 381(a) applies. Y Corporation reports its income on a fiscal year ending June 30. X and Y Corporations must take into account the $20,000 adjustment at the rate...

  12. Results from a limited area mesoscale numerical simulation for 10 April 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented from a nine-hour limited area fine mesh (35-km) mesoscale model simulation initialized with SESAME-AVE I radiosonde data for Apr. 10, 1979 at 2100 GMT. Emphasis is on the diagnosis of mesoscale structure in the mass and precipitation fields. Along the Texas/Oklahoma border, independent of the short wave, convective precipitation formed several hours into the simulation and was organized into a narrow band suggestive of the observed April 10 squall line.

  13. Numerical simulations of soft and hard turbulence - Preliminary results for two-dimensional convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, E. E.; Werne, J.; Rosner, R.; Cattaneo, F.

    1990-01-01

    Results on the transition from soft to hard turbulence in simulations of two-dimensional Boussinesq convection are reported. The computed probability densities for temperature fluctuations are exponential in form in both soft and hard turbulence, unlike what is observed in experiments. In contrast, a change is obtained in the Nusselt number scaling on Rayleigh number in good agreement with the three-dimensional experiments.

  14. Increased heat transfer to elliptical leading edges due to spanwise variations in the freestream momentum: Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the effect of spanwise variation in momentum on leading edge heat transfer is discussed. Numerical and experimental results are presented for both a circular leading edge and a 3:1 elliptical leading edge. Reynolds numbers in the range of 10,000 to 240,000 based on leading edge diameter are investigated. The surface of the body is held at a constant uniform temperature. Numerical and experimental results with and without spanwise variations are presented. Direct comparison of the two-dimensional results, that is, with no spanwise variations, to the analytical results of Frossling is very good. The numerical calculation, which uses the PARC3D code, solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, assuming steady laminar flow on the leading edge region. Experimentally, increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficient as high as 50 percent above the two-dimensional value were observed. Numerically, the heat transfer coefficient was seen to increase by as much as 25 percent. In general, under the same flow conditions, the circular leading edge produced a higher heat transfer rate than the elliptical leading edge. As a percentage of the respective two-dimensional values, the circular and elliptical leading edges showed similar sensitivity to span wise variations in momentum. By equating the root mean square of the amplitude of the spanwise variation in momentum to the turbulence intensity, a qualitative comparison between the present work and turbulent results was possible. It is shown that increases in leading edge heat transfer due to spanwise variations in freestream momentum are comparable to those due to freestream turbulence.

  15. CRSP, numerical results for an electrical resistivity array to detect underground cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Amin; Ramazi, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the application of the Combined Resistivity Sounding and Profiling electrode configuration (CRSP) to detect underground cavities. Electrical resistivity surveying is among the most favorite geophysical methods due to its nondestructive and economical properties in a wide range of geosciences. Several types of the electrode arrays are applied to detect different certain objectives. In one hand, the electrode array plays an important role in determination of output resolution and depth of investigations in all resistivity surveys. On the other hand, they have their own merits and demerits in terms of depth of investigations, signal strength, and sensitivity to resistivity variations. In this article several synthetic models, simulating different conditions of cavity occurrence, were used to examine the responses of some conventional electrode arrays and also CRSP array. The results showed that CRSP electrode configuration can detect the desired objectives with a higher resolution rather than some other types of arrays. Also a field case study was discussed in which electrical resistivity approach was conducted in Abshenasan expressway (Tehran, Iran) U-turn bridge site for detecting potential cavities and/or filling loose materials. The results led to detect an aqueduct tunnel passing beneath the study area.

  16. Geometrical optics approach to the nematic liquid crystal grating: numerical results.

    PubMed

    Kosmopoulos, J A; Zenginoglou, H M

    1987-05-01

    The problem of the grating action of a periodically distorted nematic liquid crystal layer, in the geometrical optics ray approximation is considered, and a theory for the calculation of the fringe powers is proposed. A nonabsorbing nematic phase is assumed, and the direction of incidence is taken to be normal to the layer. The powers of the resulting diffraction fringes are related to the spatial and angular deviation of the rays propagating across the layer and to the perturbation of the phase of the wave associated with the ray. The theory is applied to the simple case of a harmonically distorted nematic layer. In the case of a weakly distorted nematic layer the results agree with the predictions of Carroll's model, where only even-order fringes are important. As the distortion becomes larger, odd-order fringes (with the exception of the first order) become equally important, and particularly those at relatively large orders (e.g., seven and nine) exhibit maxima greater than that of the even-order neighbors. Finally, the dependence of the powers of odd-order fringes on the distortion angle is quite different from that of the even-order fringes.

  17. Numerical predictions and experimental results of a dry bay fire environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Gill, Walter; Black, Amalia Rebecca

    2003-11-01

    The primary objective of the Safety and Survivability of Aircraft Initiative is to improve the safety and survivability of systems by using validated computational models to predict the hazard posed by a fire. To meet this need, computational model predictions and experimental data have been obtained to provide insight into the thermal environment inside an aircraft dry bay. The calculations were performed using the Vulcan fire code, and the experiments were completed using a specially designed full-scale fixture. The focus of this report is to present comparisons of the Vulcan results with experimental data for a selected test scenario and to assess the capability of the Vulcan fire field model to accurately predict dry bay fire scenarios. Also included is an assessment of the sensitivity of the fire model predictions to boundary condition distribution and grid resolution. To facilitate the comparison with experimental results, a brief description of the dry bay fire test fixture and a detailed specification of the geometry and boundary conditions are included. Overall, the Vulcan fire field model has shown the capability to predict the thermal hazard posed by a sustained pool fire within a dry bay compartment of an aircraft; although, more extensive experimental data and rigorous comparison are required for model validation.

  18. Analytical and Numerical Results for an Adhesively Bonded Joint Subjected to Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Lundgren, Eric

    2006-01-01

    A one-dimensional, semi-analytical methodology that was previously developed for evaluating adhesively bonded joints composed of anisotropic adherends and adhesives that exhibit inelastic material behavior is further verified in the present paper. A summary of the first-order differential equations and applied joint loading used to determine the adhesive response from the methodology are also presented. The method was previously verified against a variety of single-lap joint configurations from the literature that subjected the joints to cases of axial tension and pure bending. Using the same joint configuration and applied bending load presented in a study by Yang, the finite element analysis software ABAQUS was used to further verify the semi-analytical method. Linear static ABAQUS results are presented for two models, one with a coarse and one with a fine element meshing, that were used to verify convergence of the finite element analyses. Close agreement between the finite element results and the semi-analytical methodology were determined for both the shear and normal stress responses of the adhesive bondline. Thus, the semi-analytical methodology was successfully verified using the ABAQUS finite element software and a single-lap joint configuration subjected to pure bending.

  19. [Implementation results of emission standards of air pollutants for thermal power plants: a numerical simulation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhan-Shan; Pan, Li-Bo

    2014-03-01

    The emission inventory of air pollutants from the thermal power plants in the year of 2010 was set up. Based on the inventory, the air quality of the prediction scenarios by implementation of both 2003-version emission standard and the new emission standard were simulated using Models-3/CMAQ. The concentrations of NO2, SO2, and PM2.5, and the deposition of nitrogen and sulfur in the year of 2015 and 2020 were predicted to investigate the regional air quality improvement by the new emission standard. The results showed that the new emission standard could effectively improve the air quality in China. Compared with the implementation results of the 2003-version emission standard, by 2015 and 2020, the area with NO2 concentration higher than the emission standard would be reduced by 53.9% and 55.2%, the area with SO2 concentration higher than the emission standard would be reduced by 40.0%, the area with nitrogen deposition higher than 1.0 t x km(-2) would be reduced by 75.4% and 77.9%, and the area with sulfur deposition higher than 1.6 t x km(-2) would be reduced by 37.1% and 34.3%, respectively.

  20. Accounting for female space sharing in St. Kilda Soay sheep (Ovis aries) results in little change in heritability estimates.

    PubMed

    Regan, C E; Pilkington, J G; Bérénos, C; Pemberton, J M; Smiseth, P T; Wilson, A J

    2017-01-01

    When estimating heritability in free-living populations, it is common practice to account for common environment effects, because of their potential to generate phenotypic covariance among relatives thereby biasing heritability estimates. In quantitative genetic studies of natural populations, however, philopatry, which results in relatives being clustered in space, is rarely accounted for. The two studies that have been carried out so far suggest absolute declines in heritability estimates of up to 43% when accounting for space sharing by relatives. However, due to methodological limitations these estimates may not be representative. We used data from the St. Kilda Soay sheep population to estimate heritabilities with and without accounting for space sharing for five traits for which there is evidence for additive genetic variance (birthweight, birth date, lamb August weight, and female post-mortem jaw and metacarpal length). We accounted for space sharing by related females by separately incorporating spatial autocorrelation, and a home range similarity matrix. Although these terms accounted for up to 18% of the variance in these traits, heritability estimates were only reduced by up to 7%. Our results suggest that the bias caused by not accounting for space sharing may be lower than previously thought. This suggests that philopatry does not inevitably lead to a large bias if space sharing by relatives is not accounted for. We hope our work stimulates researchers to model shared space when relatives in their study population share space, as doing so will enable us to better understand when bias may be of particular concern.

  1. Numerical Predictions and Experimental Results of Air Flow in a Smooth Quarter-Scale Nacelle

    SciTech Connect

    BLACK, AMALIA R.; SUO-ANTTILA, JILL M.; GRITZO, LOUIS A.; DISIMILE, PETER J.; TUCKER, JAMES R.

    2002-06-01

    Fires in aircraft engine nacelles must be rapidly suppressed to avoid loss of life and property. The design of new and retrofit suppression systems has become significantly more challenging due to the ban on production of Halon 1301 for environmental concerns. Since fire dynamics and the transport of suppressants within the nacelle are both largely determined by the available air flow, efforts to define systems using less effective suppressants greatly benefit from characterization of nacelle air flow fields. A combined experimental and computational study of nacelle air flow therefore has been initiated. Calculations have been performed using both CFD-ACE (a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model with a body-fitted coordinate grid) and WLCAN (a CFD-based fire field model with a Cartesian ''brick'' shaped grid). The flow conditions examined in this study correspond to the same Reynolds number as test data from the full-scale nacelle simulator at the 46 Test Wing. Pre-test simulations of a quarter-scale test fixture were performed using CFD-ACE and WLCAN prior to fabrication. Based on these pre-test simulations, a quarter-scale test fixture was designed and fabricated for the purpose of obtaining spatially-resolved measurements of velocity and turbulence intensity in a smooth nacelle. Post-test calculations have been performed for the conditions of the experiment and compared with experimental results obtained from the quarter-scale test fixture. In addition, several different simulations were performed to assess the sensitivity of the predictions to the grid size, to the turbulence models, and to the use of wall functions. In general, the velocity predictions show very good agreement with the data in the center of the channel but deviate near the walls. The turbulence intensity results tend to amplify the differences in velocity, although most of the trends are in agreement. In addition, there were some differences between WLCAN and CFD-ACE results in the angled

  2. Experimental and numerical results for a generic axisymmetric single-engine afterbody with tails at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, J. R., II; Carlson, J. R.; Henderson, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    Static pressure measurements were made on the afterbody, nozzle and tails of a generic single-engine axisymmetric fighter configuration. Data were recorded at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2. NPR was varied from 1.0 to 8.0 and angle of attack was varied from -3 deg. to 9 deg. Experimental data were compared with numerical results from two state-of-the-art computer codes.

  3. New numerical results and novel effective string predictions for Wilson loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billó, M.; Caselle, M.; Pellegrini, R.

    2012-01-01

    We compute the prediction of the Nambu-Goto effective string model for a rectangular Wilson loop up to three loops. This is done through the use of an operatorial, first order formulation and of the open string analogues of boundary states. This result is interesting since there are universality theorems stating that the predictions up to three loops are common to all effective string models. To test the effective string prediction, we use a Montecarlo evaluation, in the 3 d Ising gauge model, of an observable (the ratio of two Wilson loops with the same perimeter) for which boundary effects are relatively small. Our simulation attains a level of precision which is sufficient to test the two-loop correction. The three-loop correction seems to go in the right direction, but is actually yet beyond the reach of our simulation, since its effect is comparable with the statistical errors of the latter.

  4. Bathymetry Determination via X-Band Radar Data: A New Strategy and Numerical Results

    PubMed Central

    Serafino, Francesco; Lugni, Claudio; Borge, Jose Carlos Nieto; Zamparelli, Virginia; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with the question of sea state monitoring using marine X-band radar images and focuses its attention on the problem of sea depth estimation. We present and discuss a technique to estimate bathymetry by exploiting the dispersion relation for surface gravity waves. This estimation technique is based on the correlation between the measured and the theoretical sea wave spectra and a simple analysis of the approach is performed through test cases with synthetic data. More in detail, the reliability of the estimate technique is verified through simulated data sets that are concerned with different values of bathymetry and surface currents for two types of sea spectrum: JONSWAP and Pierson-Moskowitz. The results show how the estimated bathymetry is fairly accurate for low depth values, while the estimate is less accurate as the bathymetry increases, due to a less significant role of the bathymetry on the sea surface waves as the water depth increases. PMID:22163565

  5. Numerical modeling approach taking into account the influence of delamination for performance capacity of reinforced concrete beam strengthened in bending by CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, Supardi

    2017-03-01

    Reinforced concrete members strengthened in bending by externally bonding of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) may present several failure modes: failure of material or failure of the interface between concrete-CFRP. Nevertheless, experience gained from testing confirms that in most cases delamination prevails over the other possible rupture modes. Delamination in CFRP strengthened sections is difficult to model because it involves multiple parameters such as FRP stiffness, adhesive material properties, presence of cracks in concrete, among others. A simplified numerical model to predict flexural capacity of reinforced concrete beam strengthened by CFRP at failure is presented in this paper. The experimental validation is presented as well. Based on the result of the proposed model, an equation for the prediction of ultimate flexural capacity to prevent CFRP debonding is proposed.

  6. Tsunami hazard assessment in the Ionian Sea due to potential tsunamogenic sources - results from numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselentis, G.-A.; Stavrakakis, G.; Sokos, E.; Gkika, F.; Serpetsidaki, A.

    2010-05-01

    In spite of the fact that the great majority of seismic tsunami is generated in ocean domains, smaller basins like the Ionian Sea sometimes experience this phenomenon. In this investigation, we study the tsunami hazard associated with the Ionian Sea fault system. A scenario-based method is used to provide an estimation of the tsunami hazard in this region for the first time. Realistic faulting parameters related to four probable seismic sources, with tsunami potential, are used to model expected coseismic deformation, which is translated directly to the water surface and used as an initial condition for the tsunami propagation. We calculate tsunami propagation snapshots and mareograms for the four seismic sources in order to estimate the expected values of tsunami maximum amplitudes and arrival times at eleven tourist resorts along the Ionian shorelines. The results indicate that, from the four examined sources, only one possesses a seismic threat causing wave amplitudes up to 4 m at some tourist resorts along the Ionian shoreline.

  7. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-07-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) deepening in the area of the back arc-basin after initial collision. This collisional mantle dynamic basin (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate causes the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. This uplift and subsidence pattern correlates well with our modelled topography changes.

  8. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  9. Linking stress field deflection to basement structures in southern Ontario: Results from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Alan F.; McKinnon, Stephen D.

    2007-03-01

    Analysis of stress measurement data from the near-surface to crustal depths in southern Ontario show a misalignment between the direction of tectonic loading and the orientation of the major horizontal principal stress. The compressive stress field instead appears to be oriented sub-parallel to the major terrane boundaries such as the Grenville Front, the Central Metasedimentary Belt boundary zone and the Elzevir Frontenac boundary zone. This suggests that the stress field has been modified by these deep crustal scale deformation zones. In order to test this hypothesis, a geomechanical model was constructed using the three-dimensional discontinuum stress analysis code 3DEC. The model consists of a 45 km thick crust of southern Ontario in which the major crustal scale deformation zones are represented as discrete faults. Lateral velocity boundary conditions were applied to the sides of the model in the direction of tectonic loading in order to generate the horizontal compressive stress field. Modelling results show that for low strength (low friction angle and cohesion), fault slip causes the stress field to rotate toward the strike of the faults, consistent with the observed direction of misalignment with the tectonic loading direction. Observed distortions to the regional stress field may be explained by this relatively simple mechanism of slip on deep first-order structures in response to the neotectonic driving forces.

  10. Reinforcing mechanism of anchors in slopes: a numerical comparison of results of LEM and FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Fei; Ugai, Keizo

    2003-06-01

    This paper reports the limitation of the conventional Bishop's simplified method to calculate the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors, and proposes a new approach to considering the reinforcing effect of anchors on the safety factor. The reinforcing effect of anchors can be explained using an additional shearing resistance on the slip surface. A three-dimensional shear strength reduction finite element method (SSRFEM), where soil-anchor interactions were simulated by three-dimensional zero-thickness elasto-plastic interface elements, was used to calculate the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors to verify the reinforcing mechanism of anchors. The results of SSRFEM were compared with those of the conventional and proposed approaches for Bishop's simplified method for various orientations, positions, and spacings of anchors, and shear strengths of soil-grouted body interfaces. For the safety factor, the proposed approach compared better with SSRFEM than the conventional approach. The additional shearing resistance can explain the influence of the orientation, position, and spacing of anchors, and the shear strength of soil-grouted body interfaces on the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors.

  11. Restricted diffusion in a model acinar labyrinth by NMR: Theoretical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, D. S.; Guillot, G.; Sapoval, B.

    2007-01-01

    A branched geometrical structure of the mammal lungs is known to be crucial for rapid access of oxygen to blood. But an important pulmonary disease like emphysema results in partial destruction of the alveolar tissue and enlargement of the distal airspaces, which may reduce the total oxygen transfer. This effect has been intensively studied during the last decade by MRI of hyperpolarized gases like helium-3. The relation between geometry and signal attenuation remained obscure due to a lack of realistic geometrical model of the acinar morphology. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations of restricted diffusion in a realistic model acinus to compute the signal attenuation in a diffusion-weighted NMR experiment. We demonstrate that this technique should be sensitive to destruction of the branched structure: partial removal of the interalveolar tissue creates loops in the tree-like acinar architecture that enhance diffusive motion and the consequent signal attenuation. The role of the local geometry and related practical applications are discussed.

  12. The Formation of Asteroid Satellites in Catastrophic Impacts: Results from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durda, D. D.; Bottke, W. F., Jr.; Enke, B. L.; Asphaug, E.; Richardson, D. C.; Leinhardt, Z. M.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed new simulations of the formation of asteroid satellites by collisions, using a combination of hydrodynamical and gravitational dynamical codes. This initial work shows that both small satellites and ejected, co-orbiting pairs are produced most favorably by moderate-energy collisions at more direct, rather than oblique, impact angles. Simulations so far seem to be able to produce systems qualitatively similar to known binaries. Asteroid satellites provide vital clues that can help us understand the physics of hypervelocity impacts, the dominant geologic process affecting large main belt asteroids. Moreover, models of satellite formation may provide constraints on the internal structures of asteroids beyond those possible from observations of satellite orbital properties alone. It is probable that most observed main-belt asteroid satellites are by-products of cratering and/or catastrophic disruption events. Several possible formation mechanisms related to collisions have been identified: (i) mutual capture following catastrophic disruption, (ii) rotational fission due to glancing impact and spin-up, and (iii) re-accretion in orbit of ejecta from large, non-catastrophic impacts. Here we present results from a systematic investigation directed toward mapping out the parameter space of the first and third of these three collisional mechanisms.

  13. Multi-temperature representation of electron velocity distribution functions. I. Fits to numerical results

    SciTech Connect

    Haji Abolhassani, A. A.; Matte, J.-P.

    2012-10-15

    Electron energy distribution functions are expressed as a sum of 6-12 Maxwellians or a sum of 3, but each multiplied by a finite series of generalized Laguerre polynomials. We fitted several distribution functions obtained from the finite difference Fokker-Planck code 'FPI'[Matte and Virmont, Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1936 (1982)] to these forms, by matching the moments, and showed that they can represent very well the coexistence of hot and cold populations, with a temperature ratio as high as 1000. This was performed for two types of problems: (1) the collisional relaxation of a minority hot component in a uniform plasma and (2) electron heat flow down steep temperature gradients, from a hot to a much colder plasma. We find that the multi-Maxwellian representation is particularly good if we accept complex temperatures and coefficients, and it is always better than the representation with generalized Laguerre polynomials for an equal number of moments. For the electron heat flow problem, the method was modified to also fit the first order anisotropy f{sub 1}(x,v,t), again with excellent results. We conclude that this multi-Maxwellian representation can provide a viable alternative to the finite difference speed or energy grid in kinetic codes.

  14. A comparative study between experimental results and numerical predictions of multi-wall structural response to hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Peck, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last three decades, multiwall structures have been analyzed extensively, primarily through experiment, as a means of increasing the protection afforded to spacecraft structure. However, as structural configurations become more varied, the number of tests required to characterize their response increases dramatically. As an alternative, numerical modeling of high-speed impact phenomena is often being used to predict the response of a variety of structural systems under impact loading conditions. This paper presents the results of a preliminary numerical/experimental investigation of the hypervelocity impact response of multiwall structures. The results of experimental high-speed impact tests are compared against the predictions of the HULL hydrodynamic computer code. It is shown that the hypervelocity impact response characteristics of a specific system cannot be accurately predicted from a limited number of HULL code impact simulations. However, if a wide range of impact loadings conditions are considered, then the ballistic limit curve of the system based on the entire series of numerical simulations can be used as a relatively accurate indication of actual system response.

  15. RESULTS FROM A DEMONSTRATION OF RF-BASED UF6 CYLINDER ACCOUNTING AND TRACKING SYSTEM INSTALLED AT A USEC FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, Chris A; Kovacic, Donald N; Morgan, Jim; Younkin, James R; Carrick, Bernie; Ken, Whittle; Johns, R E

    2008-09-01

    Approved industry-standard cylinders are used globally for storing and transporting uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at uranium enrichment plants and processing facilities. To verify that no diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material involving UF{sub 6} cylinders at the facility has occurred, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts periodic, labor-intensive physical inspections to validate facility records, cylinder identities, and cylinder weights. A reliable cylinder monitoring system that would improve overall inspector effectiveness would be a significant improvement to the current international safeguards inspection regime. Such a system could include real-time unattended monitoring of cylinder movements, situation-specific rules-based event detection algorithms, and the capability to integrate with other types of safeguards technologies. This type of system could provide timely detection of abnormal operational activities that may be used to ensure more appropriate and efficient responses by the IAEA. A system of this type can reduce the reliance on paper records and have the additional benefit of facilitating domestic safeguards at the facilities at which it is installed. A radio-frequency (RF)-based system designed to track uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders during processing operations was designed, assembled, and tested at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) facility in Portsmouth, Ohio, to determine the operational feasibility and durability of RF technology. The overall objective of the effort was to validate the robustness of RF technology for potential use as a future international safeguards tool for tracking UF6 cylinders at uranium-processing facilities. The results to date indicate that RF tags represent a feasible technique for tracking UF{sub 6} cylinders in operating facilities. Additional work will be needed to improve the operational robustness of the tags for repeated autoclave processing and to

  16. Numerical Modeling of Anti-icing Systems and Comparison to Test Results on a NACA 0012 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Potapczuk, Mark G.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experimental tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis IRT on an electro-thermally heated NACA 0012 airfoil. Quantitative comparisons between the experimental results and those predicted by a computer simulation code were made to assess the validity of a recently developed anti-icing model. An infrared camera was utilized to scan the instantaneous temperature contours of the skin surface. Despite some experimental difficulties, good agreement between the numerical predictions and the experiment results were generally obtained for the surface temperature and the possibility for each runback to freeze. Some recommendations were given for an efficient operation of a thermal anti-icing system.

  17. A budget and accounting of metals at z ∼ 0: Results from the COS-Halos survey

    SciTech Connect

    Peeples, Molly S.; Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    2014-05-01

    We present a budget and accounting of metals in and around star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 0. We combine empirically derived star formation histories with updated supernova and asymptotic giant branch yields and rates to estimate the total mass of metals produced by galaxies with present-day stellar mass of 10{sup 9.3}-10{sup 11.6} M{sub ☉}. On the accounting side of the ledger, we show that a surprisingly constant 20%-25% mass fraction of produced metals remain in galaxies' stars, interstellar gas and interstellar dust, with little dependence of this fraction on the galaxy stellar mass (omitting those metals immediately locked up in remnants). Thus, the bulk of metals are outside of galaxies, produced in the progenitors of today's L* galaxies. The COS-Halos survey is uniquely able to measure the mass of metals in the circumgalactic medium (CGM, to impact parameters of <150 kpc) of low-redshift ∼L* galaxies. Using these data, we map the distribution of CGM metals as traced by both the highly ionized O VI ion and a suite of low-ionization species; combined with constraints on circumgalactic dust and hotter X-ray emitting gas out to similar impact parameters, we show that ∼40% of metals produced by M {sub *} ∼ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} galaxies can be easily accounted for out to 150 kpc. With the current data, we cannot rule out a constant mass of metals within this fixed physical radius. This census provides a crucial boundary condition for the eventual fate of metals in galaxy evolution models.

  18. Recent Experimental and Numerical Results on Turbulence, Flows and Global Stability Under Biasing in a Magnetized Linear Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, M.; Desjardins, T. R.; Fisher, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    Ongoing experiments and numerical modeling on the effects of flow shear on electrostatic turbulence in the presence of electrode biasing are being conducted in helicon plasmas in the linear HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) device. It is found that changes in flow shear, affected by electrode biasing through Er x Bz rotation, can strongly affect fluctuation dynamics, including fully suppressing the fluctuations or inducing chaos. The fundamental underlying instability, at least in the case of low magnetic field, is identified as a hybrid resistive drift-Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. At higher magnetic fields, multiple modes (resistive drift, rotation-driven interchange and/or Kelvin-Helmholtz) are present, and interact nonlinearly. At high positive electrode bias (V >10Te), a large amplitude, global instability, identified as the potential relaxation instability is observed. Numerical modeling is also being conducted, using a 3 fluid global Braginskii solver for no or moderate bias cases, and a 1D PIC code for high bias cases. Recent experimental and numerical results will be presented. Supported by U.S. National Science Foundation Award 1500423.

  19. Keeping Accountability Systems Accountable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Martha

    2007-01-01

    The standards and accountability movement in education has undeniably transformed schooling throughout the United States. Even before President Bush signed the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act into law in January 2002, mandating annual public school testing in English and math for grades 3-8 and once in high school, most states had already…

  20. A Direct Experience in a New Accountable Care Organization: Results, Challenges, and the Role of the Neurosurgeon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong H; Lloyd, Christopher; Fernandez, Douglas K; Spielman, Amanda; Bradshaw, David

    2017-04-01

    The passage of the Affordable Care Act saw the creation of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), a new approach to healthcare delivery moving from fee-for-service toward population health. This paper presents a case study of the Memorial Hermann ACO (MHACO), launched in response to the Medicare Shared Savings Program, with goals to align physician and hospital incentives, practice evidence-based medicine, develop care coordination, and increase efficiency. Building blocks included an affiliated primary care network, a clinical integration program (involving shared electronic medical record platforms and quality data reporting), and significant investments in information technology. Presented is the approach taken to form MHACO; the management structure, technology developed, and a 2-year experience. Incorporated in July 2012, the MHACO involved 22 000 Medicare patients. In 2015, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released data showing a composite quality score between 80 and 85 (from a maximum 100) and nearly $53 million in total savings (or 11% of expected expenditure), making MHACO one of the most successful nationally.1 In fewer than 5 years, almost 500 ACOs have developed, and by some estimates, a quarter of Medicare patients are currently enrolled in an ACO. Although ACOs to date have focused on primary care, the future will increasingly involve specialists. At Memorial Hermann, neurosurgeons took an early role in forming collaborative partnerships with the hospital, and started programs that served as precursors to the ACO model. This paper ends with an overview of ACO development, likely changes going forward, and a discussion of the role of specialists in general, and of neurosurgeons in particular.

  1. Comparison of numerical simulation with experimental result for small scale one seater wing in ground effect (WIG) craft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharun, A. Tarmizi; Maimun, Adi; Ahmed, Yasser M.; Mobassher, M.; Nakisa, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, three dimensional data and behavior of incompressible and steady air flow around a small scale Wing in Ground Effect Craft (WIG) were investigated and studied numerically then compared to the experimental result and also published data. This computational simulation (CFD) adopted two turbulence models, which were k-ɛ and k-ω in order to determine which model produces minimum difference to the experimental result of the small scale WIG tested in wind tunnel. Unstructured mesh was used in the simulation and data of drag coefficient (Cd) and lift coefficient (Cl) were obtained with angle of attack (AoA) of the WIG model as the parameter. Ansys ICEM was used for the meshing process while Ansys Fluent was used for solution. Aerodynamic forces, Cl, Cd and Cl/Cd along with fluid flow pattern of the small scale WIG craft was shown and discussed.

  2. PINTEX Data: Numeric results from the Polarized Internal Target Experiments (PINTEX) at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility

    DOE Data Explorer

    Meyer, H. O.

    The PINTEX group studied proton-proton and proton-deuteron scattering and reactions between 100 and 500 MeV at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). More than a dozen experiments made use of electron-cooled polarized proton or deuteron beams, orbiting in the 'Indiana Cooler' storage ring, and of a polarized atomic-beam target of hydrogen or deuterium in the path of the stored beam. The collaboration involved researchers from several midwestern universities, as well as a number of European institutions. The PINTEX program ended when the Indiana Cooler was shut down in August 2002. The website contains links to some of the numerical results, descriptions of experiments, and a complete list of publications resulting from PINTEX.

  3. Validation and Analysis of Numerical Results for a Two-Pass Trapezoidal Channel With Different Cooling Configurations of Trailing Edge.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Waseem; El-Gabry, Lamyaa; Shevchuk, Igor V; Fransson, Torsten H

    2013-01-01

    High inlet temperatures in a gas turbine lead to an increase in the thermal efficiency of the gas turbine. This results in the requirement of cooling of gas turbine blades/vanes. Internal cooling of the gas turbine blade/vanes with the help of two-pass channels is one of the effective methods to reduce the metal temperatures. In particular, the trailing edge of a turbine vane is a critical area, where effective cooling is required. The trailing edge can be modeled as a trapezoidal channel. This paper describes the numerical validation of the heat transfer and pressure drop in a trapezoidal channel with and without orthogonal ribs at the bottom surface. A new concept of ribbed trailing edge has been introduced in this paper which presents a numerical study of several trailing edge cooling configurations based on the placement of ribs at different walls. The baseline geometries are two-pass trapezoidal channels with and without orthogonal ribs at the bottom surface of the channel. Ribs induce secondary flow which results in enhancement of heat transfer; therefore, for enhancement of heat transfer at the trailing edge, ribs are placed at the trailing edge surface in three different configurations: first without ribs at the bottom surface, then ribs at the trailing edge surface in-line with the ribs at the bottom surface, and finally staggered ribs. Heat transfer and pressure drop is calculated at Reynolds number equal to 9400 for all configurations. Different turbulent models are used for the validation of the numerical results. For the smooth channel low-Re k-ɛ model, realizable k-ɛ model, the RNG k-ω model, low-Re k-ω model, and SST k-ω models are compared, whereas for ribbed channel, low-Re k-ɛ model and SST k-ω models are compared. The results show that the low-Re k-ɛ model, which predicts the heat transfer in outlet pass of the smooth channels with difference of +7%, underpredicts the heat transfer by -17% in case of ribbed channel compared to

  4. Ion velocity distribution functions in argon and helium discharges: detailed comparison of numerical simulation results and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir S.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Mustafaev, Alexander S.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Monte Carlo collision method, we have performed simulations of ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) taking into account both elastic collisions and charge exchange collisions of ions with atoms in uniform electric fields for argon and helium background gases. The simulation results are verified by comparison with the experiment data of the ion mobilities and the ion transverse diffusion coefficients in argon and helium. The recently published experimental data for the first seven coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the ion energy and angular distribution functions are used to validate simulation results for IVDF. Good agreement between measured and simulated IVDFs shows that the developed simulation model can be used for accurate calculations of IVDFs.

  5. Role of the sample thickness on the performance of cholesteric liquid crystal lasers: Experimental, numerical, and analytical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Enguita, G.; Ortega, J.; Folcia, C. L.; Aramburu, I.; Etxebarria, J.

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the performance characteristics of a dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) laser as a function of the sample thickness. The study has been carried out both from the experimental and theoretical points of view. The theoretical model is based on the kinetic equations for the population of the excited states of the dye and for the power of light generated within the laser cavity. From the equations, the threshold pump radiation energy Eth and the slope efficiency η are numerically calculated. Eth is rather insensitive to thickness changes, except for small thicknesses. In comparison, η shows a much more pronounced variation, exhibiting a maximum that determines the sample thickness for optimum laser performance. The predictions are in good accordance with the experimental results. Approximate analytical expressions for Eth and η as a function of the physical characteristics of the CLC laser are also proposed. These expressions present an excellent agreement with the numerical calculations. Finally, we comment on the general features of CLC layer and dye that lead to the best laser performance.

  6. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    DOE PAGES

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; ...

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification ofmore » uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.« less

  7. Solutions of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: Benchmarks and results from a wide range of numerical algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, J. P. F.; Antipov, Andrey E.; Becca, Federico; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Chung, Chia -Min; Deng, Youjin; Ferrero, Michel; Henderson, Thomas M.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Kozik, E.; Liu, Xuan -Wen; Millis, Andrew J.; Prokof’ev, N. V.; Qin, Mingpu; Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Shi, Hao; Svistunov, B. V.; Tocchio, Luca F.; Tupitsyn, I. S.; White, Steven R.; Zhang, Shiwei; Zheng, Bo -Xiao; Zhu, Zhenyue; Gull, Emanuel

    2015-12-14

    Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies) of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification of uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Furthermore, cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.

  8. The accountable health care act of Massachusetts: mixed results for an experiment in universal health care coverage.

    PubMed

    Norbash, Alexander; Hindson, David; Heineke, Janelle

    2012-10-01

    The affordable health care act of Massachusetts, signed into law in 2006, resulted in 98% of Massachusetts residents' having some form of insurance coverage by 2011, the highest coverage rate for residents of any state in the nation. With a strong economy, a low unemployment rate, a robust health care delivery system, an extremely low number of undocumented immigrants, and a low baseline uninsured rate, Massachusetts was well positioned for such an effort. Ingredients included mandates, the creation of separate insurance vehicles directed to both poverty-level and non-poverty-level residents, and the reallocation of the former free care pool. The mandates included consumer mandates and employer mandates; the consumer mandate applies to all Massachusetts residents at the risk of losing personal state tax exemptions, and the employer mandate applies to all Massachusetts businesses with 10 or more employees at the risk of per employee financial penalties. The insurance vehicles were created with premiums allocated on the basis of ability to pay by income classes. Unexpected effects included escalating taxpayer health care costs, with taxpayers shouldering the burden for the newly insured, continuing escalating health care costs at a rate greater than the national average, overburdening primary caregivers as newly insured sought new primary care gatekeepers in a system with primary caregiver shortages, and deprivation of support to the safety-net hospitals as a result of siphoned commonwealth free care pool funds. This exercise demonstrates specific benefits and shortfalls of the Massachusetts health care reform experiment, given the conditions and circumstances found in Massachusetts at the time of implementation.

  9. Optimization of SiO2-TiNxOy-Cu interference absorbers: numerical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarov, Michel P.; Sizmann, R.; Frei, Ulrich

    1993-10-01

    SiO2 - TiNxOy-Cu absorbers were prepared with activated reactive evaporation (ARE). The deposition parameters for the ARE process were adjusted according to the results of the numerical optimizations by a genetic algorithm. We present spectral reflectance, calorimetric and grazing incidence X-ray reflection (GXR) measurements. Best coatings for applications as selective absorber in the range of T equals 100 (DOT)(DOT)(DOT) 200 degree(s)C exhibit a solar absorptance of 0.94 and a near normal emittance of 0.044 at 100 degree(s)C. This emittance is correlated with the hemispherical emittance of 0.061 obtained from calorimetric measurements at 200 degree(s)C. First results on lifetime studies show that the coatings are thermally stable under vacuum up to 400 degree(s)C. The SiO2 film passivates the absorber, a substantial slow down of degradation in dry air is observed. Our tests demonstrate that the coating will withstand break down in cooling fluid and vacuum if mounted in an evacuated collector.

  10. Experimental results and numerical modeling of a high-performance large-scale cryopump. I. Test particle Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Xueli; Day, Christian; Haas, Horst; Varoutis, Stylianos

    2011-07-15

    For the torus of the nuclear fusion project ITER (originally the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, but also Latin: the way), eight high-performance large-scale customized cryopumps must be designed and manufactured to accommodate the very high pumping speeds and throughputs of the fusion exhaust gas needed to maintain the plasma under stable vacuum conditions and comply with other criteria which cannot be met by standard commercial vacuum pumps. Under an earlier research and development program, a model pump of reduced scale based on active cryosorption on charcoal-coated panels at 4.5 K was manufactured and tested systematically. The present article focuses on the simulation of the true three-dimensional complex geometry of the model pump by the newly developed ProVac3D Monte Carlo code. It is shown for gas throughputs of up to 1000 sccm ({approx}1.69 Pa m{sup 3}/s at T = 0 deg. C) in the free molecular regime that the numerical simulation results are in good agreement with the pumping speeds measured. Meanwhile, the capture coefficient associated with the virtual region around the cryogenic panels and shields which holds for higher throughputs is calculated using this generic approach. This means that the test particle Monte Carlo simulations in free molecular flow can be used not only for the optimization of the pumping system but also for the supply of the input parameters necessary for the future direct simulation Monte Carlo in the full flow regime.

  11. The Trichoderma harzianum demon: complex speciation history resulting in coexistence of hypothetical biological species, recent agamospecies and numerous relict lineages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The mitosporic fungus Trichoderma harzianum (Hypocrea, Ascomycota, Hypocreales, Hypocreaceae) is an ubiquitous species in the environment with some strains commercially exploited for the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi. Although T. harzianum is asexual (or anamorphic), its sexual stage (or teleomorph) has been described as Hypocrea lixii. Since recombination would be an important issue for the efficacy of an agent of the biological control in the field, we investigated the phylogenetic structure of the species. Results Using DNA sequence data from three unlinked loci for each of 93 strains collected worldwide, we detected a complex speciation process revealing overlapping reproductively isolated biological species, recent agamospecies and numerous relict lineages with unresolved phylogenetic positions. Genealogical concordance and recombination analyses confirm the existence of two genetically isolated agamospecies including T. harzianum sensu stricto and two hypothetical holomorphic species related to but different from H. lixii. The exact phylogenetic position of the majority of strains was not resolved and therefore attributed to a diverse network of recombining strains conventionally called 'pseudoharzianum matrix'. Since H. lixii and T. harzianum are evidently genetically isolated, the anamorph - teleomorph combination comprising H. lixii/T. harzianum in one holomorph must be rejected in favor of two separate species. Conclusions Our data illustrate a complex speciation within H. lixii - T. harzianum species group, which is based on coexistence and interaction of organisms with different evolutionary histories and on the absence of strict genetic borders between them. PMID:20359347

  12. Time-dependent thermocapillary convection in a Cartesian cavity - Numerical results for a moderate Prandtl number fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, L. J.; Biringen, S.

    1993-01-01

    The present numerical simulation explores a thermal-convective mechanism for oscillatory thermocapillary convection in a shallow Cartesian cavity for a Prandtl number 6.78 fluid. The computer program developed for this simulation integrates the two-dimensional, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation by a time-accurate method on a stretched, staggered mesh. Flat free surfaces are assumed. The instability is shown to depend upon temporal coupling between large scale thermal structures within the flow field and the temperature sensitive free surface. A primary result of this study is the development of a stability diagram presenting the critical Marangoni number separating steady from the time-dependent flow states as a function of aspect ratio for the range of values between 2.3 and 3.8. Within this range, a minimum critical aspect ratio near 2.3 and a minimum critical Marangoni number near 20,000 are predicted below which steady convection is found.

  13. Accounting Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickett, Charlotte

    This curriculum guide describes the accounting curriculum in the following three areas: accounting clerk, bookkeeper, and nondegreed accountant. The competencies and tasks complement the Arizona validated listing in these areas. The guide lists 24 competencies for nondegreed accountants, 10 competencies for accounting clerks, and 11 competencies…

  14. Results from a Field Trial of the Radio Frequency Based Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System at the Global Nuclear Fuel Americas Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, Peter; Laughter, Mark D; Martyn, Rose; Pickett, Chris A; Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R; Shephard, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    The Cylinder Accountability and Tracking System (CATS) is a tool designed for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to improve overall inspector efficiency through real-time unattended monitoring of cylinder movements, site specific rules-based event detection, and the capability to integrate many types of monitoring technologies. The system is based on the tracking of cylinder movements using (radio frequency) RF tags, and the collection of data, such as accountability weights, that can be associated with the cylinders. This presentation will cover the installation and evaluation of the CATS at the Global Nuclear Fuels (GNF) fuel fabrication facility in Wilmington, NC. This system was installed to evaluate its safeguards applicability, operational durability under operating conditions, and overall performance. An overview of the system design and elements specific to the GNF deployment will be presented along with lessons learned from the installation process and results from the field trial.

  15. Source contributions to PM2.5 in Guangdong province, China by numerical modeling: Results and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaohong; Huang, Zhijiong; Zheng, Junyu; Yuan, Zibing; Zhu, Wenbo; Huang, Xiaobo; Chen, Duohong

    2017-04-01

    As one of the most populous and developed provinces in China, Guangdong province (GD) has been experiencing regional haze problems. Identification of source contributions to ambient PM2.5 level is essential for developing effective control strategies. In this study, using the most up-to-date emission inventory and validated numerical model, source contributions to ambient PM2.5 from eight emission source sectors (agriculture, biogenic, dust, industry, power plant, residential, mobile and others) in GD in 2012 were quantified. Results showed that mobile sources are the dominant contributors to the ambient PM2.5 (24.0%) in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, the central and most developed area of GD, while industry sources are the major contributors (21.5% 23.6%) to those in the Northeastern GD (NE-GD) region and the Southwestern GD (SW-GD) region. Although many industries have been encouraged to move from the central GD to peripheral areas such as NE-GD and SW-GD, their emissions still have an important impact on the PM2.5 level in the PRD. In addition, agriculture sources are responsible for 17.5% to ambient PM2.5 in GD, indicating the importance of regulations on agricultural activities, which has been largely ignored in the current air quality management. Super-regional contributions were also quantified and their contributions to the ambient PM2.5 in GD are significant with notable seasonal differences. But they might be overestimated and further studies are needed to better quantify the transport impacts.

  16. A Study of The Eastern Mediterranean Hydrology and Circulation By Comparing Observation and High Resolution Numerical Model Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhammoud, B.; Béranger, K.; Mortier, L.; Crépon, M.

    The Eastern Mediterranean hydrology and circulation are studied by comparing the results of a high resolution primitive equation model (described in dedicated session: Béranger et al.) with observations. The model has a horizontal grid mesh of 1/16o and 43 z-levels in the vertical. The model was initialized with the MODB5 climatology and has been forced during 11 years by the daily sea surface fluxes provided by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analysis in a perpetual year mode corresponding to the year March 1998-February 1999. At the end of the run, the numerical model is able to accurately reproduce the major water masses of the Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Levantine Surface Water, modi- fied Atlantic Water, Levantine Intermediate Water, and Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water). Comparisons with the POEM observations reveal good agreement. While the initial conditions of the model are somewhat different from POEM observations, dur- ing the last year of the simulation, we found that the water mass stratification matches that of the observations quite well in the seasonal mean. During the 11 years of simulation, the model drifts slightly in the layers below the thermocline. Nevertheless, many important physical processes were reproduced. One example is that the dispersal of Adriatic Deep Water into the Levantine Basin is rep- resented. In addition, convective activity located in the northern part of the Levantine Basin occurs in Spring as expected. The surface circulation is in agreement with in-situ and satellite observations. Some well known mesoscale features of the upper thermocline circulation are shown. Sea- sonal variability of transports through Sicily, Otranto and Cretan straits are inves- tigated as well. This work was supported by the french MERCATOR project and SHOM.

  17. On the role of numerical simulations in studies of reduced gravity-induced physiological effects in humans. Results from NELME.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni

    Computer simulations are becoming a promising research line of work, as physiological models become more and more sophisticated and reliable. Technological advances in state-of-the-art hardware technology and software allow nowadays for better and more accurate simulations of complex phenomena, such as the response of the human cardiovascular system to long-term exposure to microgravity. Experimental data for long-term missions are difficult to achieve and reproduce, therefore the predictions of computer simulations are of a major importance in this field. Our approach is based on a previous model developed and implemented in our laboratory (NELME: Numercial Evaluation of Long-term Microgravity Effects). The software simulates the behaviour of the cardiovascular system and different human organs, has a modular archi-tecture, and allows to introduce perturbations such as physical exercise or countermeasures. The implementation is based on a complex electrical-like model of this control system, using inexpensive development frameworks, and has been tested and validated with the available experimental data. The objective of this work is to analyse and simulate long-term effects and gender differences when individuals are exposed to long-term microgravity. Risk probability of a health impairement which may put in jeopardy a long-term mission is also evaluated. . Gender differences have been implemented for this specific work, as an adjustment of a number of parameters that are included in the model. Women versus men physiological differences have been therefore taken into account, based upon estimations from the physiology bibliography. A number of simulations have been carried out for long-term exposure to microgravity. Gravity varying continuosly from Earth-based to zero, and time exposure are the two main variables involved in the construction of results, including responses to patterns of physical aerobic ex-ercise and thermal stress simulating an extra

  18. Numerical analysis of wellbore integrity: results from a field study of a natural CO2 reservoir production well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, W.; Gasda, S. E.; Williams, D. B.; Celia, M. A.; Carey, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    An important aspect of the risk associated with geological CO2 sequestration is the integrity of existing wellbores that penetrate geological layers targeted for CO2 injection. CO2 leakage may occur through multiple pathways along a wellbore, including through micro-fractures and micro-annuli within the "disturbed zone" surrounding the well casing. The effective permeability of this zone is a key parameter of wellbore integrity required for validation of numerical models. This parameter depends on a number of complex factors, including long-term attack by aggressive fluids, poor well completion and actions related to production of fluids through the wellbore. Recent studies have sought to replicate downhole conditions in the laboratory to identify the mechanisms and rates at which cement deterioration occurs. However, field tests are essential to understanding the in situ leakage properties of the millions of wells that exist in the mature sedimentary basins in North America. In this study, we present results from a field study of a 30-year-old production well from a natural CO2 reservoir. The wellbore was potentially exposed to a 96% CO2 fluid from the time of cement placement, and therefore cement degradation may be a significant factor leading to leakage pathways along this wellbore. A series of downhole tests was performed, including bond logs and extraction of sidewall cores. The cores were analyzed in the laboratory for mineralogical and hydrologic properties. A pressure test was conducted over an 11-ft section of well to determine the extent of hydraulic communication along the exterior of the well casing. Through analysis of this pressure test data, we are able estimate the effective permeability of the disturbed zone along the exterior of wellbore over this 11-ft section. We find the estimated range of effective permeability from the field test is consistent with laboratory analysis and bond log data. The cement interfaces with casing and/or formation are

  19. Numerical Investigation of Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Michael; Tanguy, Sebastien; Colin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    In this work, boiling is numerically investigated, using two phase flow direct numerical simulation based on a level set / Ghost Fluid method. Nucleate boiling implies both thermal issue and multiphase dynamics issues at different scales and at different stages of bubble growth. As a result, the different phenomena are investigated separately, considering their nature and the scale at which they occur. First, boiling of a static bubble immersed in an overheated liquid is analysed. Numerical simulations have been performed at different Jakob numbers in the case of strong density discontinuity through the interface. The results show a good agreement on bubble radius evolution between the theoretical evolution and numerical simulation. After the validation of the code for the Scriven test case, interaction of a bubble with a wall is studied. A numerical method taking into account contact angle is evaluated by comparing simulations of the spreading of a liquid droplet impacting on a plate, with experimental data. Then the heat transfer near the contact line is investigated, and simulations of nucleate boiling are performed considering different contact angles values. Finally, the relevance of including a model to take into account the evaporation of the micro layer is discussed.

  20. An open-loop ground-water heat pump system: transient numerical modeling and site experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Russo, S.; Taddia, G.; Gnavi, L.

    2012-04-01

    KEY WORDS: Open-loop ground water heat pump; Feflow; Low-enthalpy; Thermal Affected Zone; Turin; Italy The increasing diffusion of low-enthalpy geothermal open-loop Groundwater Heat Pumps (GWHP) providing buildings air conditioning requires a careful assessment of the overall effects on groundwater system, especially in the urban areas where several plants can be close together and interfere. One of the fundamental aspects in the realization of an open loop low-enthalpy geothermal system is therefore the capacity to forecast the effects of thermal alteration produced in the ground, induced by the geothermal system itself. The impact on the groundwater temperature in the surrounding area of the re-injection well (Thermal Affected Zone - TAZ) is directly linked to the aquifer properties. The transient dynamic of groundwater discharge and temperature variations should be also considered to assess the subsurface environmental effects of the plant. The experimental groundwater heat pump system used in this study is installed at the "Politecnico di Torino" (NW Italy, Piedmont Region). This plant provides summer cooling needs for the university buildings. This system is composed by a pumping well, a downgradient injection well and a control piezometer. The system is constantly monitored by multiparameter probes measuring the dynamic of groundwater temperature. A finite element subsurface flow and transport simulator (FEFLOW) was used to investigate the thermal aquifer alteration. Simulations were continuously performed during May-October 2010 (cooling period). The numerical simulation of the heat transport in the aquifer was solved with transient conditions. The simulation was performed by considering only the heat transfer within the saturated aquifer, without any heat dispersion above or below the saturated zone due to the lack of detailed information regarding the unsaturated zone. Model results were compared with experimental temperature data derived from groundwater

  1. On the Improvement of Numerical Weather Prediction by Assimilation of Hub Height Wind Information in Convection-Resulted Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Declair, Stefan; Stephan, Klaus; Potthast, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Determining the amount of weather dependent renewable energy is a demanding task for transmission system operators (TSOs). In the project EWeLiNE funded by the German government, the German Weather Service and the Fraunhofer Institute on Wind Energy and Energy System Technology strongly support the TSOs by developing innovative weather- and power forecasting models and tools for grid integration of weather dependent renewable energy. The key in the energy prediction process chain is the numerical weather prediction (NWP) system. With focus on wind energy, we face the model errors in the planetary boundary layer, which is characterized by strong spatial and temporal fluctuations in wind speed, to improve the basis of the weather dependent renewable energy prediction. Model data can be corrected by postprocessing techniques such as model output statistics and calibration using historical observational data. On the other hand, latest observations can be used in a preprocessing technique called data assimilation (DA). In DA, the model output from a previous time step is combined such with observational data, that the new model data for model integration initialization (analysis) fits best to the latest model data and the observational data as well. Therefore, model errors can be already reduced before the model integration. In this contribution, the results of an impact study are presented. A so-called OSSE (Observation Simulation System Experiment) is performed using the convective-resoluted COSMO-DE model of the German Weather Service and a 4D-DA technique, a Newtonian relaxation method also called nudging. Starting from a nature run (treated as the truth), conventional observations and artificial wind observations at hub height are generated. In a control run, the basic model setup of the nature run is slightly perturbed to drag the model away from the beforehand generated truth and a free forecast is computed based on the analysis using only conventional

  2. Spatial evapotranspiration, rainfall and land use data in water accounting - Part 2: Reliability of water acounting results for policy decisions in the Awash Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, P.; Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Sood, A.; Hoogeveen, J.; Peiser, L.; Bastidas-Obando, E.; Dost, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Water Accounting Plus (WA+) is a framework that summarizes complex hydrological processes and water management issues in river basins. The framework is designed to use satellite-based measurements of land and water variables and processes as input data. A general concern associated with the use of satellite measurements is their accuracy. This study focuses on the impact of the error in remote sensing measurements on water accounting and information provided to policy makers. The Awash Basin in the central Rift Valley in Ethiopia is used as a case study to explore the reliability of WA+ outputs, in the light of input data errors. The Monte Carlo technique was used for stochastic simulation of WA+ outputs over a period of 3 yr. The results show that the stochastic mean of the majority of WA+ parameters and performance indicators are within 5% deviation from the original WA+ values based on one single calculation. Stochastic computation is proposed as a standard procedure for WA+ water accounting because it provides the uncertainty bandwidth for every WA+ output, which is essential information for sound decision-making processes. The majority of WA+ parameters and performance indicators have a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 20%, which implies that they are reliable and provide consistent information on the functioning of the basin. The results of the Awash Basin also indicate that the utilized flow and basin closure fraction (the degree to which available water in a basin is utilized) have a high margin of error and thus a low reliability. As such, the usefulness of them in formulating important policy decisions for the Awash Basin is limited. Other river basins will usually have a more accurate assessment of the discharge in the river mouth.

  3. Antecedents of Teachers Fostering Effort within Two Different Management Regimes: An Assessment-Based Accountability Regime and Regime without External Pressure on Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Knut-Andreas; Elstad, Eyvind; Turmo, Are

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the comparison of organizational antecedents of teachers' fostering of students' effort in two quite different accountability regimes: one management regime with an external-accountability system and one with no external accountability devices. The methodology involves cross-sectional surveys from two different management…

  4. Thermodiffusion in concentrated ferrofluids: A review and current experimental and numerical results on non-magnetic thermodiffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, Lisa Lange, Adrian; Odenbach, Stefan

    2013-12-15

    Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions consisting of magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a carrier liquid. Their thermodiffusive behaviour is rather strong compared to molecular binary mixtures, leading to a Soret coefficient (S{sub T}) of 0.16 K{sup −1}. Former experiments with dilute magnetic fluids have been done with thermogravitational columns or horizontal thermodiffusion cells by different research groups. Considering the horizontal thermodiffusion cell, a former analytical approach has been used to solve the phenomenological diffusion equation in one dimension assuming a constant concentration gradient over the cell's height. The current experimental work is based on the horizontal separation cell and emphasises the comparison of the concentration development in different concentrated magnetic fluids and at different temperature gradients. The ferrofluid investigated is the kerosene-based EMG905 (Ferrotec) to be compared with the APG513A (Ferrotec), both containing magnetite nanoparticles. The experiments prove that the separation process linearly depends on the temperature gradient and that a constant concentration gradient develops in the setup due to the separation. Analytical one dimensional and numerical three dimensional approaches to solve the diffusion equation are derived to be compared with the solution used so far for dilute fluids to see if formerly made assumptions also hold for higher concentrated fluids. Both, the analytical and numerical solutions, either in a phenomenological or a thermodynamic description, are able to reproduce the separation signal gained from the experiments. The Soret coefficient can then be determined to 0.184 K{sup −1} in the analytical case and 0.29 K{sup −1} in the numerical case. Former theoretical approaches for dilute magnetic fluids underestimate the strength of the separation in the case of a concentrated ferrofluid.

  5. Randomly Accountable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Thomas J.; Staiger, Douglas O.; Geppert, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    The accountability debate tends to devolve into a battle between the pro-testing and anti-testing crowds. When it comes to the design of a school accountability system, the devil is truly in the details. A well-designed accountability plan may go a long way toward giving school personnel the kinds of signals they need to improve performance.…

  6. Numerical simulations - Some results for the 2- and 3-D Hubbard models and a 2-D electron phonon model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; White, S. R.; Bickers, N. E.; Scalettar, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations on the half-filled three-dimensional Hubbard model clearly show the onset of Neel order. Simulations of the two-dimensional electron-phonon Holstein model show the competition between the formation of a Peierls-CDW state and a superconducting state. However, the behavior of the partly filled two-dimensional Hubbard model is more difficult to determine. At half-filling, the antiferromagnetic correlations grow as T is reduced. Doping away from half-filling suppresses these correlations, and it is found that there is a weak attractive pairing interaction in the d-wave channel. However, the strength of the pair field susceptibility is weak at the temperatures and lattice sizes that have been simulated, and the nature of the low-temperature state of the nearly half-filled Hubbard model remains open.

  7. Preliminary numerical simulations of the 27 February 2010 Chile tsunami: first results and hints in a tsunami early warning perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, S.; Tonini, R.; Armigliato, A.; Zaniboni, F.; Pagnoni, G.; Gallazzi, Sara; Bressan, Lidia

    2010-05-01

    The tsunamigenic earthquake (M 8.8) that occurred offshore central Chile on 27 February 2010 can be classified as a typical subduction-zone earthquake. The effects of the ensuing tsunami have been devastating along the Chile coasts, and especially between the cities of Valparaiso and Talcahuano, and in the Juan Fernandez islands. The tsunami propagated across the entire Pacific Ocean, hitting with variable intensity almost all the coasts facing the basin. While the far-field propagation was quite well tracked almost in real-time by the warning centres and reasonably well reproduced by the forecast models, the toll of lives and the severity of the damage caused by the tsunami in the near-field occurred with no local alert nor warning and sadly confirms that the protection of the communities placed close to the tsunami sources is still an unresolved problem in the tsunami early warning field. The purpose of this study is two-fold. On one side we perform numerical simulations of the tsunami starting from different earthquake models which we built on the basis of the preliminary seismic parameters (location, magnitude and focal mechanism) made available by the seismological agencies immediately after the event, or retrieved from more detailed and refined studies published online in the following days and weeks. The comparison with the available records of both offshore DART buoys and coastal tide-gauges is used to put some preliminary constraints on the best-fitting fault model. The numerical simulations are performed by means of the finite-difference code UBO-TSUFD, developed and maintained by the Tsunami Research Team of the University of Bologna, Italy, which can solve both the linear and non-linear versions of the shallow-water equations on nested grids. The second purpose of this study is to use the conclusions drawn in the previous part in a tsunami early warning perspective. In the framework of the EU-funded project DEWS (Distant Early Warning System), we will

  8. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations and Frequencies in AN Accretion Disk and Comparison with the Numerical Results from Non-Rotating Black Hole Computed by the Grh Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Orhan

    The shocked wave created on the accretion disk after different physical phenomena (accretion flows with pressure gradients, star-disk interaction etc.) may be responsible observed Quasi Periodic Oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries. We present the set of characteristics frequencies associated with accretion disk around the rotating and non-rotating black holes for one particle case. These persistent frequencies are results of the rotating pattern in an accretion disk. We compare the frequency's from two different numerical results for fluid flow around the non-rotating black hole with one particle case. The numerical results are taken from Refs. 1 and 2 using fully general relativistic hydrodynamical code with non-selfgravitating disk. While the first numerical result has a relativistic tori around the black hole, the second one includes one-armed spiral shock wave produced from star-disk interaction. Some physical modes presented in the QPOs can be excited in numerical simulation of relativistic tori and spiral waves on the accretion disk. The results of these different dynamical structures on the accretion disk responsible for QPOs are discussed in detail.

  9. Static correlations in macro-ionic suspensions: Analytic and numerical results in a hypernetted-chain-mean-spherical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sheema; Morton, Thomas L.; Ronis, David

    1987-05-01

    The static correlations in highly charged colloidal and micellar suspensions, with and without added electrolyte, are examined using the hypernetted-chain approximation (HNC) for the macro-ion-macro-ion correlations and the mean-spherical approximation for the other correlations. By taking the point-ion limit for the counter-ions, an analytic solution for the counter-ion part of the problem can be obtained; this maps the macro-ion part of the problem onto a one-component problem where the macro-ions interact via a screened Coulomb potential with the Gouy-Chapman form for the screening length and an effective charge that depends on the macro-ion-macro-ion pair correlations. Numerical solutions of the effective one-component equation in the HNC approximation are presented, and in particular, the effects of macro-ion charge, nonadditive core diameters, and added electrolyte are examined. As we show, there can be a strong renormalization of the effective macro-ion charge and reentrant melting in colloidal crystals.

  10. Risk-standardized Acute Admission Rates Among Patients With Diabetes and Heart Failure as a Measure of Quality of Accountable Care Organizations: Rationale, Methods, and Early Results

    PubMed Central

    Spatz, Erica S.; Lipska, Kasia J.; Dai, Ying; Bao, Haikun; Lin, Zhenqiu; Parzynski, Craig S.; Altaf, Faseeha K.; Joyce, Erin K.; Montague, Julia A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Bernheim, Susannah M.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Drye, Elizabeth E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Population-based measures of admissions among patients with chronic conditions are important quality indicators of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), yet there are challenges in developing measures that enable fair comparisons among providers. Methods Based on consensus standards for outcome measure development and with expert and stakeholder input on methods decisions, we developed and tested two models of risk-standardized acute admission rates (RSAARs) for patients with diabetes and heart failure using 2010–2012 Medicare claims data. Model performance was assessed with deviance R-squared; score reliability was tested with intraclass correlation coefficient. We estimated RSAARs for 114 Shared Savings Program ACOs in 2012 and we assigned ACOs to 3 performance categories: no different, worse than, and better than the national rate. Results The diabetes and heart failure cohorts included 6.5 and 2.6 million Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries aged ≥65 years, respectively. Risk-adjustment variables were age, comorbidities and condition-specific severity variables, but not socioeconomic status or other contextual factors. We selected hierarchical negative binomial models with the outcome of acute, unplanned hospital admissions per 100 person-years. For the diabetes and heart failure measures respectively, the models accounted for 22% and 12% of the deviance in outcomes and score reliability was 0.89 and 0.77. For the diabetes measure, 51 (44.7%) ACOs were no different, 45 (39.5%) were better, and 18 (15.8%) were worse than the national rate. The distribution of performance for the heart failure measure was: 61 (53.5%);,37 (32.5%) and 16 (14.0%), respectively. Conclusion Measures of RSAARs for patients with diabetes and heart failure meet criteria for scientific soundness and reveal important variation in quality across ACOs. PMID:26918404

  11. Ephemeral liquid water at the surface of the martian North Polar Residual Cap: Results of numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Czechowski, Leszek; Velbel, Michael A.

    2015-12-01

    Gypsum, a mineral that requires water to form, is common on the surface of Mars. Most of it originated before 3.5 Gyr when the Red Planet was more humid than now. However, occurrences of gypsum dune deposits around the North Polar Residual Cap (NPRC) seem to be surprisingly young: late Amazonian in age. This shows that liquid water was present on Mars even at times when surface conditions were as cold and dry as the present-day. A recently proposed mechanism for gypsum formation involves weathering of dust within ice (e.g., Niles, P.B., Michalski, J. [2009]. Nat. Geosci. 2, 215-220.). However, none of the previous studies have determined if this process is possible under current martian conditions. Here, we use numerical modelling of heat transfer to show that during the warmest days of the summer, solar irradiation may be sufficient to melt pure water ice located below a layer of dark dust particles (albedo ⩽ 0.13) lying on the steepest sections of the equator-facing slopes of the spiral troughs within martian NPRC. During the times of high irradiance at the north pole (every 51 ka; caused by variation of orbital and rotational parameters of Mars e.g., Laskar, J. et al. [2002]. Nature 419, 375-377.) this process could have taken place over larger parts of the spiral troughs. The existence of small amounts of liquid water close to the surface, even under current martian conditions, fulfils one of the main requirements necessary to explain the formation of the extensive gypsum deposits around the NPRC. It also changes our understanding of the degree of current geological activity on Mars and has important implications for estimating the astrobiological potential of Mars.

  12. Analysis of the global free infra-gravity wave climate for the SWOT mission, and preliminary results of numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, A.; Aucan, J.; Ardhuin, F.

    2012-12-01

    All sea level variations of the order of 1 cm at scales under 30 km are of great interest for the future Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. That satellite should provide high-resolution maps of the sea surface height for analysis of meso to sub-mesoscale currents, but that will require a filtering of all gravity wave motions in the data. Free infragravity waves (FIGWs) are generated and radiate offshore when swells and/or wind seas and their associated bound infragravity waves impact exposed coastlines. Free infragravity waves have dominant periods comprised between 1 and 10 minutes and horizontal wavelengths of up to tens of kilometers. Given the length scales of the infragravity waves wavelength and amplitude, the infragravity wave field will can a significant fraction the signal measured by the future SWOT mission. In this study, we analyze the data from recovered bottom pressure recorders of the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) program. This analysis includes data spanning several years between 2006 and 2010, from stations at different latitudes in the North and South Pacific, the North Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. We present and discuss the following conclusions: (1) The amplitude of free infragravity waves can reach several centimeters, higher than the precision sought for the SWOT mission. (2) The free infragravity signal is higher in the Eastern North Pacific than in the Western North Pacific, possibly due to smaller incident swell and seas impacting the nearby coastlines. (3) Free infragravity waves are higher in the North Pacific than in the North Atlantic, possibly owing to different average continental shelves configurations in the two basins. (4) There is a clear seasonal cycle at the high latitudes North Atlantic and Pacific stations that is much less pronounced or absent at the tropical stations, consistent with the generation mechanism of free infragravity waves. Our numerical model

  13. Full Accounting for Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Marie-Louise

    1988-01-01

    Given the curriculum's importance in the educational process, curriculum evaluation should be considered as essential as a district financial audit. When Fenwick English conducted a 1979 curriculum audit of Columbus, Ohio, schools, the accounting firm encountered numerous problems concerning development, review, and management practices. Planning…

  14. Evaluation of ground-penetrating radar to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in fractured rocks - Results of numerical modeling and physical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W.; Buursink, M.L.; Haeni, F.P.; Versteeg, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in bedrock fractures was evaluated using numerical modeling and physical experiments. The results of one- and two-dimensional numerical modeling at 100 megahertz indicate that GPR reflection amplitudes are relatively insensitive to fracture apertures ranging from 1 to 4 mm. The numerical modeling and physical experiments indicate that differences in the fluids that fill fractures significantly affect the amplitude and the polarity of electromagnetic waves reflected by subhorizontal fractures. Air-filled and hydrocarbon-filled fractures generate low-amplitude reflections that are in-phase with the transmitted pulse. Water-filled fractures create reflections with greater amplitude and opposite polarity than those reflections created by air-filled or hydrocarbon-filled fractures. The results from the numerical modeling and physical experiments demonstrate it is possible to distinguish water-filled fracture reflections from air- or hydrocarbon-filled fracture reflections, nevertheless subsurface heterogeneity, antenna coupling changes, and other sources of noise will likely make it difficult to observe these changes in GPR field data. This indicates that the routine application of common-offset GPR reflection methods for detection of hydrocarbon-filled fractures will be problematic. Ideal cases will require appropriately processed, high-quality GPR data, ground-truth information, and detailed knowledge of subsurface physical properties. Conversely, the sensitivity of GPR methods to changes in subsurface physical properties as demonstrated by the numerical and experimental results suggests the potential of using GPR methods as a monitoring tool. GPR methods may be suited for monitoring pumping and tracer tests, changes in site hydrologic conditions, and remediation activities.The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons

  15. Relaxation dynamics of Sierpinski hexagon fractal polymer: Exact analytical results in the Rouse-type approach and numerical results in the Zimm-type approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurjiu, Aurel; Galiceanu, Mircea; Farcasanu, Alexandru; Chiriac, Liviu; Turcu, Flaviu

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we focus on the relaxation dynamics of Sierpinski hexagon fractal polymer. The relaxation dynamics of this fractal polymer is investigated in the framework of the generalized Gaussian structure model using both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse-type approach, by performing real-space renormalization transformations, we determine analytically the complete eigenvalue spectrum of the connectivity matrix. Based on the eigenvalues obtained through iterative algebraic relations we calculate the averaged monomer displacement and the mechanical relaxation moduli (storage modulus and loss modulus). The evaluation of the dynamical properties in the Rouse-type approach reveals that they obey scaling in the intermediate time/frequency domain. In the Zimm-type approach, which includes the hydrodynamic interactions, the relaxation quantities do not show scaling. The theoretical findings with respect to scaling in the intermediate domain of the relaxation quantities are well supported by experimental results.

  16. Direct Numerical Simulation of Liquid Nozzle Spray with Comparison to Shadowgraphy and X-Ray Computed Tomography Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Poppel, Bret; Owkes, Mark; Nelson, Thomas; Lee, Zachary; Sowell, Tyler; Benson, Michael; Vasquez Guzman, Pablo; Fahrig, Rebecca; Eaton, John; Kurman, Matthew; Kweon, Chol-Bum; Bravo, Luis

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we present high-fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results of liquid fuel injection from a pressure-swirl atomizer and compare the simulations to experimental results obtained using both shadowgraphy and phase-averaged X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The CFD and experimental results focus on the dense near-nozzle region to identify the dominant mechanisms of breakup during primary atomization. Simulations are performed using the NGA code of Desjardins et al (JCP 227 (2008)) and employ the volume of fluid (VOF) method proposed by Owkes and Desjardins (JCP 270 (2013)), a second order accurate, un-split, conservative, three-dimensional VOF scheme providing second order density fluxes and capable of robust and accurate high density ratio simulations. Qualitative features and quantitative statistics are assessed and compared for the simulation and experimental results, including the onset of atomization, spray cone angle, and drop size and distribution.

  17. Numerical evaluation of cavitation shedding structure around 3D Hydrofoil: Comparison of PANS, LES and RANS results with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, B.; Peng, X. X.; Long, X. P.; Luo, X. W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Results of cavitating turbulent flow simulation around a twisted hydrofoil were presented in the paper using the Partially-Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method (Ji et al. 2013a), Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) (Ji et al. 2013b) and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The results are compared with available experimental data (Foeth 2008). The PANS and LES reasonably reproduce the cavitation shedding patterns around the twisted hydrofoil with primary and secondary shedding, while the RANS model fails to simulate the unsteady cavitation shedding phenomenon and yields an almost steady flow with a constant cavity shape and vapor volume. Besides, it is noted that the predicted shedding vapor cavity by PANS is more turbulent and the shedding vortex is stronger than that by LES, which is more consistent with experimental photos.

  18. Influence of the quantum well models on the numerical simulation of planar InGaN/GaN LED results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgórski, J.; Woźny, J.; Lisik, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Within this paper, we present electric model of a light emitting diode (LED) made of gallium nitride (GaN) followed by examples of simulation results obtained by means of Sentaurus software, which is the part of the TCAD package. The aim of this work is to answer the question of whether physical models of quantum wells used in commercial software are suitable for a correct analysis of the lateral LEDs made of GaN.

  19. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  20. Reaction Matrix Calculations in Neutron Matter with Alternating-Layer-Spin Structure under π0 Condensation. II ---Numerical Results---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamiya, K.; Tamagaki, R.

    1981-10-01

    Results obtained by applying a formulation based on the reaction matrix theory developed in I are given. Calculations by making use of a modified realistic potential, the Reid soft-core potential with the OPEP-part enhanced due to the isobar (Δ)-mixing, show that the transition to the [ALS] phase of quasi-neutrons corresponding to a typical π0 condensation occurs in the region of (2 ˜ 3) times the nuclear density. The most important ingredients responsible for this transition are the growth of the attractive 3P2 + 3F2 contribution mainly from the spin-parallel pairs in the same leyers and the reduction of the repulsive 3P1 contribution mainly from the spin-antiparallel pairs in the nearest layers; these mainfest themselves as the [ALS]-type localization develops. Properties of the matter under the new phase thus obtained such as the shape of the Fermi surface and the effective mass are discussed.

  1. Viscous effects in rapidly rotating stars with application to white-dwarf models. III - Further numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1975-01-01

    Improved viscous evolutionary sequences of differentially rotating, axisymmetric, nonmagnetic, zero-temperature white-dwarf models are constructed using the relativistically corrected degenerate electron viscosity. The results support the earlier conclusion that angular momentum transport due to viscosity does not lead to overall uniform rotation in many interesting cases. Qualitatively different behaviors are obtained, depending on how the total mass M and angular momentum J compare with the M and J values for which uniformly rotating models exist. Evolutions roughly determine the region in M and J for which models with a particular initial angular momentum distribution can reach carbon-ignition densities in 10 b.y. Such models may represent Type I supernova precursors.

  2. Application of the dynamic model of Saeman to an industrial rotary kiln incinerator: numerical and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, L G; Caillat, S; Chinnayya, A; Gambier, D; Baudoin, B

    2010-07-01

    In order to simulate granular materials structure in a rotary kiln under the steady-state regime, a mathematical model has been developed by Saeman (1951). This model enables the calculation of the bed profiles, the axial velocity and solids flow rate along the kiln. This model can be coupled with a thermochemical model, in the case of a reacting moving bed. This dynamic model was used to calculate the bed profile for an industrial size kiln and the model projections were validated by measurements in a 4 m diameter by 16 m long industrial rotary kiln. The effect of rotation speed under solids bed profile and the effect of the feed rate under filling degree were established. On the basis of the calculations and the experimental results a phenomenological relation for the residence time estimation was proposed for the rotary kiln.

  3. Full-dimensional quantum calculations of vibrational spectra of six-atom molecules. I. Theory and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hua-Gen

    2004-02-01

    Two quantum mechanical Hamiltonians have been derived in orthogonal polyspherical coordinates, which can be formed by Jacobi and/or Radau vectors etc., for the study of the vibrational spectra of six-atom molecules. The Hamiltonians are expressed in an explicit Hermitian form in the spatial representation. Their matrix representations are described in both full discrete variable representation (DVR) and mixed DVR/nondirect product finite basis representation (FBR) bases. The two-layer Lanczos iteration algorithm [H.-G. Yu, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 8190 (2002)] is employed to solve the eigenvalue problem of the system. A strategy regarding how to carry out the Hamiltonian-vector products for a high-dimensional problem is discussed. By exploiting the inversion symmetry of molecules, a unitary sequential 1D matrix-vector multiplication algorithm is proposed to perform the action of the Hamiltonian on the wavefunction in a symmetrically adapted DVR or FBR basis in the azimuthal angular variables. An application to the vibrational energy levels of the molecular hydrogen trimer (H2)3 in full dimension (12D) is presented. Results show that the rigid-H2 approximation can underestimate the binding energy of the trimer by 27%. Finally, it is demonstrated that the two-layer Lanczos algorithm is also capable of computing the eigenvectors of the system with minor effort.

  4. Initialization of a Numerical Mesoscale Model with ALEXI-derived Volumetric Soil Moisture: Case Results and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecikalski, J. R.; Hain, C. R.; Anderson, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    behavior of the four layers used in the land-surface models. This presentation will first overview how volumetric soil moisture estimates from ALEXI, NAM (EDAS), and LDAS will be validated against observations taken over the continental United States during the years of 2003/2004. Results will be quantified through statistical techniques. Second, upon successful validation of ALEXI-derived volumetric soil moisture, these estimates will be used to initialize mesoscale simulations using both the Weather and Forecasting Model (WRF) and MM5. The process used is a unique implementation of GOES satellite-estimated soil moisture, a process which has not yet been attempted. The focus of this presentation is to examine the effects of ALEXI-derived volumetric soil moisture on the simulations during several case study days in 2003 and 2004. The soil moisture estimates from ALEXI will initially be used to initialize these models at a spatial resolution of 10 km. Initialization of high-resolution land-surface characteristic datasets within our model simulations such as fraction of vegetative cover and leaf area index (LAI) will also be examined as these datasets are native to the calculation of parameters used in the derivation of ALEXI soil moisture. This process will help to quantify the sensitivity and importance of a higher-resolution soil moisture dataset, and one that does not rely on the assimilation of antecedent precipitation. Results will be quantified through statistical verification techniques.

  5. SLAC E155 and E155x Numeric Data Results and Data Plots: Nucleon Spin Structure Functions

    DOE Data Explorer

    The nucleon spin structure functions g1 and g2 are important tools for testing models of nucleon structure and QCD. Experiments at CERN, DESY, and SLAC have measured g1 and g2 using deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons on polarized nucleon targets. The results of these experiments have established that the quark component of the nucleon helicity is much smaller than naive quark-parton model predictions. The Bjorken sum rule has been confirmed within the uncertainties of experiment and theory. The experiment E155 at SLAC collected data in March and April of 1997. Approximately 170 million scattered electron events were recorded to tape. (Along with several billion inclusive hadron events.) The data were collected using three independent fixed-angle magnetic spectrometers, at approximately 2.75, 5.5, and 10.5 degrees. The momentum acceptance of the 2.75 and 5.5 degree spectrometers ranged from 10 to 40 GeV, with momentum resolution of 2-4%. The 10.5 degree spectrometer, new for E155, accepted events of 7 GeV to 20 GeV. Each spectrometer used threshold gas Cerenkov counters (for particle ID), a segmented lead-glass calorimeter (for energy measurement and particle ID), and plastic scintillator hodoscopes (for tracking and momentum measurement). The polarized targets used for E155 were 15NH3 and 6LiD, as targets for measuring the proton and deuteron spin structure functions respectively. Experiment E155x recently concluded a successful two-month run at SLAC. The experiment was designed to measure the transverse spin structure functions of the proton and deuteron. The E155 target was also recently in use at TJNAF's Hall C (E93-026) and was returned to SLAC for E155x. E155x hopes to reduce the world data set errors on g2 by a factor of three. [Copied from http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e155/e155_nickeltour.html, an information summary linked off the E155 home page at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e155/e155_home.html. The extension run, E155x, also makes

  6. Numerical analysis of intensity signals resulting from genotyping pooled DNA samples in beef cattle and broiler chicken.

    PubMed

    Reverter, A; Henshall, J M; McCulloch, R; Sasazaki, S; Hawken, R; Lehnert, S A

    2014-05-01

    these approaches are applied to the estimation of allele frequencies, the resulting estimates allow for the development of cost-effective and reliable GWAS.

  7. Computer code for scattering from impedance bodies of revolution. Part 3: Surface impedance with s and phi variation. Analytical and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uslenghi, Piergiorgio L. E.; Laxpati, Sharad R.; Kawalko, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    The third phase of the development of the computer codes for scattering by coated bodies that has been part of an ongoing effort in the Electromagnetics Laboratory of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago is described. The work reported discusses the analytical and numerical results for the scattering of an obliquely incident plane wave by impedance bodies of revolution with phi variation of the surface impedance. Integral equation formulation of the problem is considered. All three types of integral equations, electric field, magnetic field, and combined field, are considered. These equations are solved numerically via the method of moments with parametric elements. Both TE and TM polarization of the incident plane wave are considered. The surface impedance is allowed to vary along both the profile of the scatterer and in the phi direction. Computer code developed for this purpose determines the electric surface current as well as the bistatic radar cross section. The results obtained with this code were validated by comparing the results with available results for specific scatterers such as the perfectly conducting sphere. Results for the cone-sphere and cone-cylinder-sphere for the case of an axially incident plane were validated by comparing the results with the results with those obtained in the first phase of this project. Results for body of revolution scatterers with an abrupt change in the surface impedance along both the profile of the scatterer and the phi direction are presented.

  8. A Pariah Profession? Some Student Perceptions of Accounting and Accountancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Roy; Murphy, Vivienne

    1995-01-01

    Existing literature and a survey of 106 undergraduate accounting students in the United Kingdom were analyzed for perceptions of the accounting profession and the academic discipline of accounting. Results suggest that among accounting and nonaccounting students alike, there exist coexisting perceptions of accounting as having high status and low…

  9. Accountability and Institutional Research: Measuring Results. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (24th, Hartford, Connecticut, November 1-4, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings document is comprised of the 12 papers, panel presentations, and work shares presented at a 1997 conference on institutional research. The papers are: (1) "What Does Accountability in Higher Education Mean to You?" (William R. Dyson, Andrew G. De Rocco, John R. Doyle, and Merle W. Harris); (2) "The University of Delaware…

  10. Accounting Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication identifies 20 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of accounting specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 20 units are as follows:…

  11. Painless Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, R. W.; And Others

    The computerized Painless Accountability System is a performance objective system from which instructional programs are developed. Three main simplified behavioral response levels characterize this system: (1) cognitive, (2) psychomotor, and (3) affective domains. Each of these objectives are classified by one of 16 descriptors. The second major…

  12. Accountability Overboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chieppo, Charles D.; Gass, James T.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that special interest groups opposed to charter schools and high-stakes testing have hijacked Massachusetts's once-independent board of education and stand poised to water down the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) tests and the accountability system they support. President Barack Obama and Massachusetts…

  13. Why do humans have such a prominent nose? The final result of phylogenesis: a significant reduction of the splanchocranium on account of the neurocranium.

    PubMed

    Mladina, Ranko; Skitarelić, Neven; Vuković, Katarina

    2009-09-01

    During the last few decades several authors tried to clarify the anthropological aspects of the shape of the human nose and why it has so emphasized projection. Our hypothesis suggests the essentiality of the role of morphologic changes of the human skull which occurred during the phylogenesis. It seems that erectile posture of the man caused remarkable morphological changes of the skull base shape thus being a part of morphologic evolution. The changes in the shape of the human spine from birth to adulthood show a philogenesis in short: a newborn has an almost flat spine like quadrupeds (except in the sacro-coccigeal region), but the spine gets increasingly bent as the person grows (lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, cervical lordosis). It is well known that the sphenoidal angle was less emphasized in prehistoric man than in modern man. In addition, the cervical spine position in the gorilla, Neanderthal man and modern man is quite different in terms of anterior inclination. Accordingly, there is a great degree of maxillary and mandible reduction in humans. The same differences can be seen when comparing the skull shapes of gorilla, gibbons, Neanderthals and modern man. A major reason for the maxillary and mandible reduction in humans is that their way of feeding has changed remarkably with time. In lower primates and other animals, nasal function, particularly olfaction, may be essential for day-to day survival. In humans, however, this is less important although both impaired nasal breathing and olfaction may affect the function in the other body organs and, of course, influence the quality of life. Nasal configuration in recent humans seems to be associated with the internal nasal cavity wideness and nasal bridge elevation which just happened because of newly developed physiological needs. The skull base angulation leads directly to obvious changes in splanchocranium on the account of neurocranium, since previous is getting "squeezed", by angulation of the

  14. Simultaneous Raman-Rayleigh-LIF Measurements and Numerical Modeling Results of a Lifted H2/N2 Turbulent Jet Flame in a Vitiated Coflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabra, R.; Chen, J. Y.; Dibble, R. W.; Hamano, Y.; Karpetis, A. N.; Barlow, R. S.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation is presented of a H2/N2 turbulent jet flame burner that has a novel vitiated coflow. The vitiated coflow emulates the recirculation region of most combustors, such as gas turbines or furnaces. Additionally, since the vitiated gases are coflowing, the burner allows for exploration of recirculation chemistry without the corresponding fluid mechanics of recirculation. Thus the vitiated coflow burner design facilitates the development of chemical kinetic combustion models without the added complexity of recirculation fluid mechanics. Scalar measurements are reported for a turbulent jet flame of H2/N2 in a coflow of combustion products from a lean ((empty set) = 0.25) H2/Air flame. The combination of laser-induced fluorescence, Rayleigh scattering, and Raman scattering is used to obtain simultaneous measurements of the temperature, major species, as well as OH and NO. Laminar flame calculation with equal diffusivity do agree when the premixing and preheating that occurs prior to flame stabilization is accounted for in the boundary conditions. Also presented is an exploratory pdf model that predicts the flame's axial profiles fairly well, but does not accurately predict the lift-off height.

  15. On the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient and spectra of inner radiation belt particles - Analytic solutions and comparison with numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphalen, H.; Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical method by which the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient may be deduced from spectral observations of the particle population at the inner edge of the earth's radiation belts is presented. This region has previously been analyzed with numerical techniques; in this report an analytical treatment that illustrates characteristic limiting cases in the L shell range where the time scale of Coulomb losses is substantially shorter than that of radial diffusion (L approximately 1-2) is given. It is demonstrated both analytically and numerically that the particle spectra there are shaped by the energy dependence of the radial diffusion coefficient regardless of the spectral shapes of the particle populations diffusing inward from the outer radiation zone, so that from observed spectra the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient can be determined. To insure realistic simulations, inner zone data obtained from experiments on the DIAL, AZUR, and ESRO 2 spacecraft have been used as boundary conditions. Excellent agreement between analytic and numerical results is reported.

  16. 10,000-fold concentration increase in proteins in a cascade microchip using anionic ITP by a 3-D numerical simulation with experimental results.

    PubMed

    Bottenus, Danny; Jubery, Talukder Zaki; Dutta, Prashanta; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes both the experimental application and 3-D numerical simulation of isotachophoresis (ITP) in a 3.2 cm long "cascade" poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic chip. The microchip includes 10 × reductions in both the width and depth of the microchannel, which decreases the overall cross-sectional area by a factor of 100 between the inlet (cathode) and outlet (anode). A 3-D numerical simulation of ITP is outlined and is a first example of an ITP simulation in three dimensions. The 3-D numerical simulation uses COMSOL Multiphysics v4.0a to concentrate two generic proteins and monitor protein migration through the microchannel. In performing an ITP simulation on this microchip platform, we observe an increase in concentration by over a factor of more than 10,000 due to the combination of ITP stacking and the reduction in cross-sectional area. Two fluorescent proteins, green fluorescent protein and R-phycoerythrin, were used to experimentally visualize ITP through the fabricated microfluidic chip. The initial concentration of each protein in the sample was 1.995 μg/mL and, after preconcentration by ITP, the final concentrations of the two fluorescent proteins were 32.57 ± 3.63 and 22.81 ± 4.61 mg/mL, respectively. Thus, experimentally the two fluorescent proteins were concentrated by over a factor of 10,000 and show good qualitative agreement with our simulation results.

  17. The influence of variability of calculation grids on the results of numerical modeling of geothermal doublets - an example from the Choszczno area, north-western Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachowicz-Pyzik, A.; Sowiżdżał, A.; Pająk, L.

    2016-09-01

    The numerical modeling enables us to reduce the risk related to the selection of best localization of wells. Moreover, at the stage of production, modeling is a suitable tool for optimization of well operational parameters, which guarantees the long life of doublets. The thorough selection of software together with relevant methodology applied to generation of numerical models significantly improve the quality of obtained results. In the following paper, we discuss the impact of density of calculation grid on the results of geothermal doublet simulation with the TOUGH2 code, which applies the finite-difference method. The study area is located between the Szczecin Trough and the Fore-sudetic Monocline, where the Choszczno IG-1 well has been completed. Our research was divided into the two stages. At the first stage, we examined the changes of density of polygon calculation grids used in computations of operational parameters of geothermal doublets. At the second stage, we analyzed the influence of distance between the production and the injection wells on variability in time of operational parameters. The results demonstrated that in both studied cases, the largest differences occurred in pressures measured in production and injection wells whereas the differences in temperatures were less pronounced.

  18. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  19. Simultaneous Laser Raman-rayleigh-lif Measurements and Numerical Modeling Results of a Lifted Turbulent H2/N2 Jet Flame in a Vitiated Coflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabra, R.; Chen, J. Y.; Dibble, R. W.; Myhrvold, T.; Karpetis, A. N.; Barlow, R. S.

    2002-01-01

    An experiment and numerical investigation is presented of a lifted turbulent H2/N2 jet flame in a coflow of hot, vitiated gases. The vitiated coflow burner emulates the coupling of turbulent mixing and chemical kinetics exemplary of the reacting flow in the recirculation region of advanced combustors. It also simplifies numerical investigation of this coupled problem by removing the complexity of recirculating flow. Scalar measurements are reported for a lifted turbulent jet flame of H2/N2 (Re = 23,600, H/d = 10) in a coflow of hot combustion products from a lean H2/Air flame ((empty set) = 0.25, T = 1,045 K). The combination of Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence is used to obtain simultaneous measurements of temperature and concentrations of the major species, OH, and NO. The data attest to the success of the experimental design in providing a uniform vitiated coflow throughout the entire test region. Two combustion models (PDF: joint scalar Probability Density Function and EDC: Eddy Dissipation Concept) are used in conjunction with various turbulence models to predict the lift-off height (H(sub PDF)/d = 7,H(sub EDC)/d = 8.5). Kalghatgi's classic phenomenological theory, which is based on scaling arguments, yields a reasonably accurate prediction (H(sub K)/d = 11.4) of the lift-off height for the present flame. The vitiated coflow admits the possibility of auto-ignition of mixed fluid, and the success of the present parabolic implementation of the PDF model in predicting a stable lifted flame is attributable to such ignition. The measurements indicate a thickened turbulent reaction zone at the flame base. Experimental results and numerical investigations support the plausibility of turbulent premixed flame propagation by small scale (on the order of the flame thickness) recirculation and mixing of hot products into reactants and subsequent rapid ignition of the mixture.

  20. Response of major Greenland outlet glaciers to oceanic and atmospheric forcing: Results from numerical modeling on Petermann, Jakobshavn and Helheim Glacier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, F. M.; Vieli, A.; Pattyn, F.; Van de Wal, R.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic forcing has been suggested as a major trigger for dynamic changes of Greenland outlet glaciers. Significant melting near their calving front or beneath the floating tongue and reduced support from sea ice or ice melange in front of their calving front can result in retreat of the terminus or the grounding line, and an increase in calving activities. Depending on the geometry and basal topography of the glacier, these oceanic forcing can affect the glacier dynamic differently. Here, we carry out a comparison study between three major outlet glaciers in Greenland and investigate the impact of a warmer ocean on glacier dynamics and ice discharge. We present results from a numerical ice-flow model applied to Petermann Glacier in the north, Jakobshavn Glacier in the west, and Helheim Glacier in the southeast of Greenland.

  1. The measurement of enhancement in mathematical abilities as a result of joint cognitive trainings in numerical and visual- spatial skills: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agus, M.; Mascia, M. L.; Fastame, M. C.; Melis, V.; Pilloni, M. C.; Penna, M. P.

    2015-02-01

    A body of literature shows the significant role of visual-spatial skills played in the improvement of mathematical skills in the primary school. The main goal of the current study was to investigate the impact of a combined visuo-spatial and mathematical training on the improvement of mathematical skills in 146 second graders of several schools located in Italy. Participants were presented single pencil-and-paper visuo-spatial or mathematical trainings, computerised version of the above mentioned treatments, as well as a combined version of computer-assisted and pencil-and-paper visuo-spatial and mathematical trainings, respectively. Experimental groups were presented with training for 3 months, once a week. All children were treated collectively both in computer-assisted or pencil-and-paper modalities. At pre and post-test all our participants were presented with a battery of objective tests assessing numerical and visuo-spatial abilities. Our results suggest the positive effect of different types of training for the empowerment of visuo-spatial and numerical abilities. Specifically, the combination of computerised and pencil-and-paper versions of visuo-spatial and mathematical trainings are more effective than the single execution of the software or of the pencil-and-paper treatment.

  2. Development of a system for the numerical simulation of Euler flows, with results of preliminary 3-D propeller-slipstream/exhaust-jet calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of a computer program system for the numerical simulation of Euler flows is presented. Preliminary test calculation results are shown. They concern the three-dimensional flow around a wing-nacelle-propeller-outlet configuration. The system is constructed to execute four major tasks: block decomposition of the flow domain around given, possibly complex, three-dimensional aerodynamic surfaces; grid generation on the blocked flow domain; Euler-flow simulation on the blocked grid; and graphical visualization of the computed flow on the blocked grid, and postprocessing. The system consists of about 20 codes interfaced by files. Most of the required tasks can be executed. The geometry of complex aerodynamic surfaces in three-dimensional space can be handled. The validation test showed that the system must be improved to increase the speed of the grid generation process.

  3. Readability of Accounting Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razek, Joseph R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This article describes the results of a survey of the readability of most of the intermediate and advanced accounting textbooks currently in use at colleges and universities throughout the United States. (CT)

  4. Active compensation of aperture discontinuities for WFIRST-AFTA: analytical and numerical comparison of propagation methods and preliminary results with a WFIRST-AFTA-like pupil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin; N'Diaye, Mamadou; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-03-01

    The new frontier in the quest for the highest contrast levels in the focal plane of a coronagraph is now the correction of the large diffraction artifacts introduced at the science camera by apertures of increasing complexity. Indeed, the future generation of space- and ground-based coronagraphic instruments will be mounted on on-axis and/or segmented telescopes; the design of coronagraphic instruments for such observatories is currently a domain undergoing rapid progress. One approach consists of using two sequential deformable mirrors (DMs) to correct for aberrations introduced by secondary mirror structures and segmentation of the primary mirror. The coronagraph for the WFIRST-AFTA mission will be the first of such instruments in space with a two-DM wavefront control system. Regardless of the control algorithm for these multiple DMs, they will have to rely on quick and accurate simulation of the propagation effects introduced by the out-of-pupil surface. In the first part of this paper, we present the analytical description of the different approximations to simulate these propagation effects. In Appendix A, we prove analytically that in the special case of surfaces inducing a converging beam, the Fresnel method yields high fidelity for simulations of these effects. We provide numerical simulations showing this effect. In the second part, we use these tools in the framework of the active compensation of aperture discontinuities (ACAD) technique applied to pupil geometries similar to WFIRST-AFTA. We present these simulations in the context of the optical layout of the high-contrast imager for complex aperture telescopes, which will test ACAD on a optical bench. The results of this analysis show that using the ACAD method, an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph, and the performance of our current DMs, we are able to obtain, in numerical simulations, a dark hole with a WFIRST-AFTA-like. Our numerical simulation shows that we can obtain contrast better than 2×10-9 in

  5. Using High-Fidelity Analysis Methods and Experimental Results to Account for the Effects of Imperfections on the Buckling Response of Composite Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Hilburger, Mark W.

    2003-01-01

    The results of an experimental and analytical study of the effects of initial imperfections on the buckling response of unstiffened thin-walled compression-loaded graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells are presented. The analytical results include the effects of traditional and nontraditional initial imperfections and uncertainties in the values of selected shell parameters on the buckling loads of the shells. The nonlinear structural analysis results correlate very well with the experimental results. The high-fidelity nonlinear analysis procedure used to generate the analytical results can also be used to form the basis of a new shell design procedure that could reduce the traditional dependence on empirical results in the shell design process. KEYWORDS: high-fidelity nonlinear structural analysis, composite shells, shell stability, initial imperfections

  6. Use of borehole radar reflection logging to monitor steam-enhanced remediation in fractured limestone-results of numerical modelling and a field experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, C.; Joesten, P.K.; Lane, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar is an efficient geophysical method for the detection and location of fractures and fracture zones in electrically resistive rocks. In this study, the use of down-hole (borehole) radar reflection logs to monitor the injection of steam in fractured rocks was tested as part of a field-scale, steam-enhanced remediation pilot study conducted at a fractured limestone quarry contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons at the former Loring Air Force Base, Limestone, Maine, USA. In support of the pilot study, borehole radar reflection logs were collected three times (before, during, and near the end of steam injection) using broadband 100 MHz electric dipole antennas. Numerical modelling was performed to predict the effect of heating on radar-frequency electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity, attenuation, and fracture reflectivity. The modelling results indicate that EM wave velocity and attenuation change substantially if heating increases the electrical conductivity of the limestone matrix. Furthermore, the net effect of heat-induced variations in fracture-fluid dielectric properties on average medium velocity is insignificant because the expected total fracture porosity is low. In contrast, changes in fracture fluid electrical conductivity can have a significant effect on EM wave attenuation and fracture reflectivity. Total replacement of water by steam in a fracture decreases fracture reflectivity of a factor of 10 and induces a change in reflected wave polarity. Based on the numerical modelling results, a reflection amplitude analysis method was developed to delineate fractures where steam has displaced water. Radar reflection logs collected during the three acquisition periods were analysed in the frequency domain to determine if steam had replaced water in the fractures (after normalizing the logs to compensate for differences in antenna performance between logging runs). Analysis of the radar reflection logs from a borehole where the temperature

  7. Flow Matching Results of an MHD Energy Bypass System on a Supersonic Turbojet Engine Using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2011-01-01

    Flow matching has been successfully achieved for an MHD energy bypass system on a supersonic turbojet engine. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment helped perform a thermodynamic cycle analysis to properly match the flows from an inlet employing a MHD energy bypass system (consisting of an MHD generator and MHD accelerator) on a supersonic turbojet engine. Working with various operating conditions (such as the applied magnetic field, MHD generator length and flow conductivity), interfacing studies were conducted between the MHD generator, the turbojet engine, and the MHD accelerator. This paper briefly describes the NPSS environment used in this analysis. This paper further describes the analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with an MHD generator/accelerator energy bypass system. Results from this study have shown that using MHD energy bypass in the flow path of a supersonic turbojet engine increases the useful Mach number operating range from 0 to 3.0 Mach (not using MHD) to a range of 0 to 7.0 Mach with specific net thrust range of 740 N-s/kg (at ambient Mach = 3.25) to 70 N-s/kg (at ambient Mach = 7). These results were achieved with an applied magnetic field of 2.5 Tesla and conductivity levels in a range from 2 mhos/m (ambient Mach = 7) to 5.5 mhos/m (ambient Mach = 3.5) for an MHD generator length of 3 m.

  8. Life in the Pressure Cooker--School League Tables and English and Mathematics Teachers' Responses to Accountability in a Results-Driven Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perryman, Jane; Ball, Stephen; Maguire, Meg; Braun, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on case-study research in four English secondary schools. It explores the pressure placed on English and mathematics departments because of their results being reported in annual performance tables. It examines how English and maths departments enact policies of achievement, the additional power and extra resources the pressure…

  9. 3D Air Quality and the Clean Air Interstate Rule: Lagrangian Sampling of CMAQ Model Results to Aid Regional Accountability Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Szykman, Jim; Pierce, Robert B.; Gilliland, A. B.; Engel-Cox, Jill; Weber, Stephanie; Kittaka, Chieko; Al-Saadi, Jassim A.; Scheffe, Rich; Dimmick, Fred; Tikvart, Joe

    2008-01-01

    The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) is expected to reduce transport of air pollutants (e.g. fine sulfate particles) in nonattainment areas in the Eastern United States. CAIR highlights the need for an integrated air quality observational and modeling system to understand sulfate as it moves in multiple dimensions, both spatially and temporally. Here, we demonstrate how results from an air quality model can be combined with a 3d monitoring network to provide decision makers with a tool to help quantify the impact of CAIR reductions in SO2 emissions on regional transport contributions to sulfate concentrations at surface monitors in the Baltimore, MD area, and help improve decision making for strategic implementation plans (SIPs). We sample results from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model using ensemble back trajectories computed with the NASA Langley Research Center trajectory model to provide Lagrangian time series and vertical profile information, that can be compared with NASA satellite (MODIS), EPA surface, and lidar measurements. Results are used to assess the regional transport contribution to surface SO4 measurements in the Baltimore MSA, and to characterize the dominant source regions for low, medium, and high SO4 episodes.

  10. Initial Flow Matching Results of MHD Energy Bypass on a Supersonic Turbojet Engine Using the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary flow matching has been demonstrated for a MHD energy bypass system on a supersonic turbojet engine. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment was used to perform a thermodynamic cycle analysis to properly match the flows from an inlet to a MHD generator and from the exit of a supersonic turbojet to a MHD accelerator. Working with various operating conditions such as the enthalpy extraction ratio and isentropic efficiency of the MHD generator and MHD accelerator, interfacing studies were conducted between the pre-ionizers, the MHD generator, the turbojet engine, and the MHD accelerator. This paper briefly describes the NPSS environment used in this analysis and describes the NPSS analysis of a supersonic turbojet engine with a MHD generator/accelerator energy bypass system. Results from this study have shown that using MHD energy bypass in the flow path of a supersonic turbojet engine increases the useful Mach number operating range from 0 to 3.0 Mach (not using MHD) to an explored and desired range of 0 to 7.0 Mach.

  11. Micro-scale finite element modeling of ultrasound propagation in aluminum trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms: A comparison between numerical simulation and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Vafaeian, B; Le, L H; Tran, T N H T; El-Rich, M; El-Bialy, T; Adeeb, S

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the accuracy of micro-scale finite element modeling for simulating broadband ultrasound propagation in water-saturated trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms. To this end, five commercially manufactured aluminum foam samples as trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms were utilized for ultrasonic immersion through-transmission experiments. Based on micro-computed tomography images of the same physical samples, three-dimensional high-resolution computational samples were generated to be implemented in the micro-scale finite element models. The finite element models employed the standard Galerkin finite element method (FEM) in time domain to simulate the ultrasonic experiments. The numerical simulations did not include energy dissipative mechanisms of ultrasonic attenuation; however, they expectedly simulated reflection, refraction, scattering, and wave mode conversion. The accuracy of the finite element simulations were evaluated by comparing the simulated ultrasonic attenuation and velocity with the experimental data. The maximum and the average relative errors between the experimental and simulated attenuation coefficients in the frequency range of 0.6-1.4 MHz were 17% and 6% respectively. Moreover, the simulations closely predicted the time-of-flight based velocities and the phase velocities of ultrasound with maximum relative errors of 20 m/s and 11 m/s respectively. The results of this study strongly suggest that micro-scale finite element modeling can effectively simulate broadband ultrasound propagation in water-saturated trabecular bone-mimicking structures.

  12. Distribution of Groundwater Ages at Public-Supply Wells: Comparison of Results from Lumped Parameter and Numerical Inverse Models with Multiple Environmental Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberts, S.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    Estimates of groundwater age distributions at public-supply wells can provide insight into the vulnerability of these wells to contamination. Such estimates can be used to explore past and future water-quality trends and contaminant peak concentrations when combined with information on contaminant input at the water table. Information on groundwater age distributions, however, is not routinely applied to water quality issues at public-supply wells. This may be due, in part, to the difficulty in obtaining such estimates from poorly characterized aquifers with limited environmental tracer data. To this end, we compared distributions of groundwater ages in discharge from public-supply wells estimated from age tracer data (SF6, CFCs, 3H, 3He) using two different inverse modeling approaches: relatively simple lumped parameter models and more complex distributed-parameter numerical flow models with particle tracking. These comparisons were made in four contrasting hydrogeologic settings across the United States: unconsolidated alluvial fan sediments, layered confined unconsolidated sediments, unconsolidated valley-fill sediments, and carbonate rocks. In all instances, multiple age tracer measurements for the public-supply well of interest were available. We compared the following quantities, which were derived from simulated breakthrough curves that were generated using the various estimated age distributions for the selected wells and assuming the same hypothetical contaminant input: time lag to peak concentration, dilution at peak concentration, and contaminant arrival and flush times. Apparent tracer-based ages and mean and median simulated ages also were compared. For each setting, both types of models yielded similar age distributions and concentration trends, when based on similar conceptual models of local hydrogeology and calibrated to the same tracer measurements. Results indicate carefully chosen and calibrated simple lumped parameter age distribution models

  13. The role of indigenous traditional counting systems in children's development of numerical cognition: results from a study in Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matang, Rex A. S.; Owens, Kay

    2014-09-01

    The Government of Papua New Guinea undertook a significant step in developing curriculum reform policy that promoted the use of Indigenous knowledge systems in teaching formal school subjects in any of the country's 800-plus Indigenous languages. The implementation of the Elementary Cultural Mathematics Syllabus is in line with the above curriculum emphasis. Given the aims of the reform, the research reported here investigated the influence of children's own mother tongue (Tok Ples) and traditional counting systems on their development of early number knowledge formally taught in schools. The study involved 272 school children from 22 elementary schools in four provinces. Each child participated in a task-based assessment interview focusing on eight task groups relating to early number knowledge. The results obtained indicate that, on average, children learning their traditional counting systems in their own language spent shorter time and made fewer mistakes in solving each task compared to those taught without Tok Ples (using English and/or the lingua franca, Tok Pisin). Possible reasons accounting for these differences are also discussed.

  14. Statistical methods applied to the study of opinion formation models: a brief overview and results of a numerical study of a model based on the social impact theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordogna, Clelia María; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold. On the one hand we present a brief overview on the application of statistical physics methods to the modelling of social phenomena focusing our attention on models for opinion formation. On the other hand, we discuss and present original results of a model for opinion formation based on the social impact theory developed by Latané. The presented model accounts for the interaction among the members of a social group under the competitive influence of a strong leader and the mass media, both supporting two different states of opinion. Extensive simulations of the model are presented, showing that they led to the observation of a rich scenery of complex behaviour including, among others, critical behaviour and phase transitions between a state of opinion dominated by the leader and another dominated by the mass media. The occurrence of interesting finite-size effects reveals that, in small communities, the opinion of the leader may prevail over that of the mass media. This observation is relevant for the understanding of social phenomena involving a finite number of individuals, in contrast to actual physical phase transitions that take place in the thermodynamic limit. Finally, we give a brief outlook of open questions and lines for future work.

  15. Numerical simulation of precipitation formation in the case orographically induced convective cloud: Comparison of the results of bin and bulk microphysical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, N.; Geresdi, I.; Thompson, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, results of bulk and bin microphysical schemes are compared in the case of idealized simulations of pre-frontal orographic clouds with enhanced embedded convection. The description graupel formation by intensive riming of snowflakes was improved compared to prior versions of each scheme. Two methods of graupel melting coincident with collisions with water drops were considered: (1) all simulated melting and collected water drops increase the amount of melted water on the surface of graupel particles with no shedding permitted; (2) also no shedding permitted due to melting, but the collision with the water drops can induce shedding from the surface of the graupel particles. The results of the numerical experiments show: (i) The bin schemes generate graupel particles more efficiently by riming than the bulk scheme does; the intense riming of snowflakes was the most dominant process for the graupel formation. (ii) The collision-induced shedding significantly affects the evolution of the size distribution of graupel particles and water drops below the melting level. (iii) The three microphysical schemes gave similar values for the domain integrated surface precipitation, but the patterns reveal meaningful differences. (iv) Sensitivity tests using the bulk scheme show that the depth of the melting layer is sensitive to the description of the terminal velocity of the melting snow. (v) Comparisons against Convair-580 flight measurements suggest that the bin schemes simulate well the evolution of the pristine ice particles and liquid drops, while some inaccuracy can occur in the description of snowflakes riming. (vi) The bin scheme with collision-induced shedding reproduced well the quantitative characteristics of the observed bright band.

  16. Topography and tectonics of the central New Madrid seismic zone: Results of numerical experiements using a three-dimensional boundary element program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, Joan; Ellis, Michael

    1994-01-01

    We present results of a series of numerical experiments designed to test hypothetical mechanisms that derive deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone. Experiments are constrained by subtle topography and the distribution of seismicity in the region. We use a new boundary element algorithm that permits calcuation of the three-dimensional deformation field. Surface displacement fields are calculated for the New Madrid zone under both far-field (plate tectonics scale) and locally derived driving strains. Results demonstrate that surface displacement fields cannot distinguish between either a far-field simple or pure shear strain field or one that involves a deep shear zone beneath the upper crustal faults. Thus, neither geomorphic nor geodetic studies alone are expected to reveal the ultimate driving mechanism behind the present-day deformation. We have also tested hypotheses about strain accommodation within the New Madrid contractional step-over by including linking faults, two southwest dipping and one vertical, recently inferred from microearthquake data. Only those models with step-over faults are able to predict the observed topography. Surface displacement fields for long-term, relaxed deformation predict the distribution of uplift and subsidence in the contractional step-over remarkably well. Generation of these displacement fields appear to require slip on both the two northeast trending vertical faults and the two dipping faults in the step-over region, with very minor displacements occurring during the interseismic period when the northeast trending vertical faults are locked. These models suggest that the gently dippling central step-over fault is a reverse fault and that the steeper fault, extending to the southeast of the step-over, acts as a normal fault over the long term.

  17. Dynamics of plume-triple junction interaction: Results from a series of three-dimensional numerical models and implications for the formation of oceanic plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dordevic, Mladen; Georgen, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Mantle plumes rising in the vicinity of mid-ocean ridges often generate anomalies in melt production and seafloor depth. This study investigates the dynamical interactions between a mantle plume and a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction, using a parameter space approach and a suite of steady state, three-dimensional finite element numerical models. The top domain boundary is composed of three diverging plates, with each assigned half-spreading rates with respect to a fixed triple junction point. The bottom boundary is kept at a constant temperature of 1350°C except where a two-dimensional, Gaussian-shaped thermal anomaly simulating a plume is imposed. Models vary plume diameter, plume location, the viscosity contrast between plume and ambient mantle material, and the use of dehydration rheology in calculating viscosity. Importantly, the model results quantify how plume-related anomalies in mantle temperature pattern, seafloor depth, and crustal thickness depend on the specific set of parameters. To provide an example, one way of assessing the effect of conduit position is to calculate normalized area, defined to be the spatial dispersion of a given plume at specific depth (here selected to be 50 km) divided by the area occupied by the same plume when it is located under the triple junction. For one particular case modeled where the plume is centered in an intraplate position 100 km from the triple junction, normalized area is just 55%. Overall, these models provide a framework for better understanding plateau formation at triple junctions in the natural setting and a tool for constraining subsurface geodynamical processes and plume properties.

  18. Fast prediction of pulsed nonlinear acoustic fields from clinically relevant sources using time-averaged wave envelope approach: comparison of numerical simulations and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, J; Kujawska, T; Nowicki, A; Lewin, P A

    2008-12-01

    The primary goal of this work was to verify experimentally the applicability of the recently introduced time-averaged wave envelope (TAWE) method [J. Wójcik, A. Nowicki, P.A. Lewin, P.E. Bloomfield, T. Kujawska, L. Filipczyński, Wave envelopes method for description of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation, Ultrasonics 44 (2006) 310-329.] as a tool for fast prediction of four dimensional (4D) pulsed nonlinear pressure fields from arbitrarily shaped acoustic sources in attenuating media. The experiments were performed in water at the fundamental frequency of 2.8 MHz for spherically focused (focal length F=80 mm) square (20 x 20 mm) and rectangular (10 x 25mm) sources similar to those used in the design of 1D linear arrays operating with ultrasonic imaging systems. The experimental results obtained with 10-cycle tone bursts at three different excitation levels corresponding to linear, moderately nonlinear and highly nonlinear propagation conditions (0.045, 0.225 and 0.45 MPa on-source pressure amplitude, respectively) were compared with those yielded using the TAWE approach [J. Wójcik, A. Nowicki, P.A. Lewin, P.E. Bloomfield, T. Kujawska, L. Filipczyński, Wave envelopes method for description of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation, Ultrasonics 44 (2006) 310-329.]. The comparison of the experimental results and numerical simulations has shown that the TAWE approach is well suited to predict (to within+/-1 dB) both the spatial-temporal and spatial-spectral pressure variations in the pulsed nonlinear acoustic beams. The obtained results indicated that implementation of the TAWE approach enabled shortening of computation time in comparison with the time needed for prediction of the full 4D pulsed nonlinear acoustic fields using a conventional (Fourier-series) approach [P.T. Christopher, K.J. Parker, New approaches to nonlinear diffractive field propagation, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90 (1) (1991) 488-499.]. The reduction in computation time depends on several parameters

  19. Professional Capital as Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael; Rincón-Gallardo, Santiago; Hargreaves, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This paper seeks to clarify and spells out the responsibilities of policy makers to create the conditions for an effective accountability system that produces substantial improvements in student learning, strengthens the teaching profession, and provides transparency of results to the public. The authors point out that U.S. policy makers will need…

  20. Accounting Fundamentals for Non-Accountants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this module is to provide an introduction and overview of accounting fundamentals for non-accountants. The module also covers important topics such as communication, internal controls, documentation and recordkeeping.

  1. Accounting: Accountants Need Verbal Skill Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Bruce L.

    1978-01-01

    Verbal skills training is one aspect of accounting education not usually included in secondary and postsecondary accounting courses. The author discusses the need for verbal competency and methods of incorporating it into accounting courses, particularly a variation of the Keller plan of individualized instruction. (MF)

  2. The effects of boundary conditions on the steady-state response of three hypothetical ground-water systems; results and implications of numerical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, O. Lehn; Reilly, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    The most critical and difficult aspect of defining a groundwater system or problem for conceptual analysis or numerical simulation is the selection of boundary conditions . This report demonstrates the effects of different boundary conditions on the steady-state response of otherwise similar ground-water systems to a pumping stress. Three series of numerical experiments illustrate the behavior of three hypothetical groundwater systems that are rectangular sand prisms with the same dimensions but with different combinations of constant-head, specified-head, no-flow, and constant-flux boundary conditions. In the first series of numerical experiments, the heads and flows in all three systems are identical, as are the hydraulic conductivity and system geometry . However, when the systems are subjected to an equal stress by a pumping well in the third series, each differs significantly in its response . The highest heads (smallest drawdowns) and flows occur in the systems most constrained by constant- or specified-head boundaries. These and other observations described herein are important in steady-state calibration, which is an integral part of simulating many ground-water systems. Because the effects of boundary conditions on model response often become evident only when the system is stressed, a close match between the potential distribution in the model and that in the unstressed natural system does not guarantee that the model boundary conditions correctly represent those in the natural system . In conclusion, the boundary conditions that are selected for simulation of a ground-water system are fundamentally important to groundwater systems analysis and warrant continual reevaluation and modification as investigation proceeds and new information and understanding are acquired.

  3. A Simple Strategy to Mitigate the Aliasing Effect in X-band Marine Radar Data: Numerical Results for a 2D Case

    PubMed Central

    Serafino, Francesco; Lugni, Claudio; Nieto Borge, Josè Carlos; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    For moderate and high speed values of the sea surface current, an aliasing phenomenon, due to an under-sampling in the time-domain, can strongly affect the reconstruction of the sea surface elevation derived from X-band radar images. Here, we propose a de-aliasing strategy that exploits the physical information provided by the dispersion law for gravity waves. In particular, we utilize simplifying hypotheses and numerical tests with synthetic data are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented method. PMID:22346616

  4. Numerical accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1988-12-01

    A framework is provided for numerical accuracy assessment. The purpose of numerical flow simulations is formulated. This formulation concerns the classes of aeronautical configurations (boundaries), the desired flow physics (flow equations and their properties), the classes of flow conditions on flow boundaries (boundary conditions), and the initial flow conditions. Next, accuracy and economical performance requirements are defined; the final numerical flow simulation results of interest should have a guaranteed accuracy, and be produced for an acceptable FLOP-price. Within this context, the validation of numerical processes with respect to the well known topics of consistency, stability, and convergence when the mesh is refined must be done by numerical experimentation because theory gives only partial answers. This requires careful design of text cases for numerical experimentation. Finally, the results of a few recent evaluation exercises of numerical experiments with a large number of codes on a few test cases are summarized.

  5. A novel method to decrease electric field and SAR using an external high dielectric sleeve at 3 T head MRI: numerical and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Park, Bu S; Rajan, Sunder S; Guag, Joshua W; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2015-04-01

    Materials with high dielectric constant (HDC) have been used in high field MRI to decrease specific absorption rate (SAR), increase magnetic field intensity, and increase signal-to-noise ratio. In previous studies, the HDC materials were placed inside the RF coil decreasing the space available. This study describes an alternative approach that considers an HDC-based sleeve placed outside the RF coil. The effects of an HDC on the electromagnetic (EM) field were studied using numerical simulations with a coil unloaded and loaded with a human head model. In addition, experimental EM measurements at 128 MHz were performed inside a custom-made head coil, fitted with a distilled water sleeve. The numerical simulations showed up to 40% decrease in maximum 10 g-avg. SAR on the surface of the head model with an HDC material of barium titanate. Experimental measurements also showed up to 20% decrease of maximum electric field using an HDC material of distilled water. The proposed method can be incorporated in the design of high field transmit RF coils.

  6. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  7. Hindi Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, William

    In most languages encountered by linguists, the numerals, considered as a paradigmatic set, constitute a morpho-syntactic problem of only moderate complexity. The Indo-Aryan language family of North India, however, presents a curious contrast. The relatively regular numeral system of Sanskrit, as it has developed historically into the modern…

  8. Numerical orbit generators of artificial earth satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugar, H. K.; Dasilva, W. C. C.

    1984-04-01

    A numerical orbit integrator containing updatings and improvements relative to the previous ones that are being utilized by the Departmento de Mecanica Espacial e Controle (DMC), of INPE, besides incorporating newer modellings resulting from the skill acquired along the time is presented. Flexibility and modularity were taken into account in order to allow future extensions and modifications. Characteristics of numerical accuracy, processing quickness, memory saving as well as utilization aspects were also considered. User's handbook, whole program listing and qualitative analysis of accuracy, processing time and orbit perturbation effects were included as well.

  9. First-Person Accounts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gribs, H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Personal accounts describe the lives of 2 individuals with deaf-blindness, one an 87-year-old woman who was deaf from birth and became totally blind over a 50-year period and the other of a woman who became deaf-blind as a result of a fever at the age of 7. Managing activities of daily life and experiencing sensory hallucinations are among topics…

  10. MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM

    SciTech Connect

    Hasty, T.

    2009-06-14

    Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

  11. Numerical impact simulation of gradually increased kinetic energy transfer has the potential to break up folded protein structures resulting in cytotoxic brain tissue edema.

    PubMed

    von Holst, Hans; Li, Xiaogai

    2013-07-01

    Although the consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its treatment have been improved, there is still a substantial lack of understanding the mechanisms. Numerical simulation of the impact can throw further lights on site and mechanism of action. A finite element model of the human head and brain tissue was used to simulate TBI. The consequences of gradually increased kinetic energy transfer was analyzed by evaluating the impact intracranial pressure (ICP), strain level, and their potential influences on binding forces in folded protein structures. The gradually increased kinetic energy was found to have the potential to break apart bonds of Van der Waals in all impacts and hydrogen bonds at simulated impacts from 6 m/s and higher, thereby superseding the energy in folded protein structures. Further, impacts below 6 m/s showed none or very slight increase in impact ICP and strain levels, whereas impacts of 6 m/s or higher showed a gradual increase of the impact ICP and strain levels reaching over 1000 KPa and over 30%, respectively. The present simulation study shows that the free kinetic energy transfer, impact ICP, and strain levels all have the potential to initiate cytotoxic brain tissue edema by unfolding protein structures. The definition of mild, moderate, and severe TBI should thus be looked upon as the same condition and separated only by a gradual severity of impact.

  12. International Accounting and the Accounting Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laribee, Stephen F.

    The American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) has been instrumental in internationalizing the accounting curriculum by means of accreditation requirements and standards. Colleges and universities have met the AACSB requirements either by providing separate international accounting courses or by integrating international topics…

  13. Managing global accounts.

    PubMed

    Yip, George S; Bink, Audrey J M

    2007-09-01

    Global account management--which treats a multinational customer's operations as one integrated account, with coherent terms for pricing, product specifications, and service--has proliferated over the past decade. Yet according to the authors' research, only about a third of the suppliers that have offered GAM are pleased with the results. The unhappy majority may be suffering from confusion about when, how, and to whom to provide it. Yip, the director of research and innovation at Capgemini, and Bink, the head of marketing communications at Uxbridge College, have found that GAM can improve customer satisfaction by 20% or more and can raise both profits and revenues by at least 15% within just a few years of its introduction. They provide guidelines to help companies achieve similar results. The first steps are determining whether your products or services are appropriate for GAM, whether your customers want such a program, whether those customers are crucial to your strategy, and how GAM might affect your competitive advantage. If moving forward makes sense, the authors' exhibit, "A Scorecard for Selecting Global Accounts," can help you target the right customers. The final step is deciding which of three basic forms to offer: coordination GAM (in which national operations remain relatively strong), control GAM (in which the global operation and the national operations are fairly balanced), and separate GAM (in which a new business unit has total responsibility for global accounts). Given the difficulty and expense of providing multiple varieties, the vast majority of companies should initially customize just one---and they should be careful not to start with a choice that is too ambitious for either themselves or their customers to handle.

  14. Functional and numerical response in prey-predator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Y. Abu; Alebraheem, J.

    2015-03-01

    Two of the important terms describing the relationship in a prey-predator system of equations are the functional and numerical responses. The standard functional response used by theoretical and field ecologists is the Holling type-2 functional response. This function was later modified to take into account predator interference as a result of an increase in predator density. In this paper, we introduce a model that can take into account the predator interactions through the numerical response, without modifying the Holling functional response. The correctness of the model and its dynamical behaviour is discussed. Comparisons are made with model with a standard response.

  15. Numerical Analysis Using WRF-SBM for the Cloud Microphysical Structures in the C3VP Field Campaign: Impacts of Supercooled Droplets and Resultant Riming on Snow Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Takamichi; Matsui, Toshihisa; Shi, Jainn J.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Khain, Alexander P.; Hao, Arthur; Cifelli, Robert; Heymsfield, Andrew; Tokay, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Two distinct snowfall events are observed over the region near the Great Lakes during 19-23 January 2007 under the intensive measurement campaign of the Canadian CloudSat/CALIPSO validation project (C3VP). These events are numerically investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with a spectral bin microphysics (WRF-SBM) scheme that allows a smooth calculation of riming process by predicting the rimed mass fraction on snow aggregates. The fundamental structures of the observed two snowfall systems are distinctly characterized by a localized intense lake-effect snowstorm in one case and a widely distributed moderate snowfall by the synoptic-scale system in another case. Furthermore, the observed microphysical structures are distinguished by differences in bulk density of solid-phase particles, which are probably linked to the presence or absence of supercooled droplets. The WRF-SBM coupled with Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit (G-SDSU) has successfully simulated these distinctive structures in the three-dimensional weather prediction run with a horizontal resolution of 1 km. In particular, riming on snow aggregates by supercooled droplets is considered to be of importance in reproducing the specialized microphysical structures in the case studies. Additional sensitivity tests for the lake-effect snowstorm case are conducted utilizing different planetary boundary layer (PBL) models or the same SBM but without the riming process. The PBL process has a large impact on determining the cloud microphysical structure of the lake-effect snowstorm as well as the surface precipitation pattern, whereas the riming process has little influence on the surface precipitation because of the small height of the system.

  16. A Harmonious Accounting Duo?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schapperle, Robert F.; Hardiman, Patrick F.

    1992-01-01

    Accountants have urged "harmonization" of standards between the Governmental Accounting Standards Board and the Financial Accounting Standards Board, recommending similar reporting of like transactions. However, varying display of similar accounting events does not necessarily indicate disharmony. The potential for problems because of…

  17. Custom accounts receivable modeling.

    PubMed

    Veazie, J

    1994-04-01

    In hospital and clinic management, accounts are valued as units and handled equally--a $20 account receives the same minimum number of statements as a $20,000 account. Quite often, the sheer number of accounts a hospital or clinic has to handle forces executives to manage accounts by default and failure--accounts mature on an aging track and, if left unpaid by patients, eventually are sent to collections personnel. Of the bad-debt accounts placed with collections agencies, many are misclassified as charity or hardship cases, while others could be collected by hospital or clinic staff with a limited amount of additional effort.

  18. Training within the Accounting Firm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Beth; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey received 509 responses from 2,000 randomly selected accounting employees about which training topics are receiving the most attention and who is receiving the training. Results prove that training has become an integral part of a certified public accountant's job; topics most often covered were tax related--individual and corporate income…

  19. School Centered Evidence Based Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Achievement scores drive much of the effort in today's accountability system, however, there is much more that occurs in every school, every day. School Centered Evidence Based Accountability can be used from micro to macro giving School Boards and Administration a process for monitoring the results of the entire school operation effectively and…

  20. Analysis of observations and results of numerical modeling of meteorological parameters and atmospheric air pollution under weak wind conditions in the city of Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, Alexander V.; Bart, Andrey A.; Kizhner, Lyubov I.; Barashkova, Nadezhda K.; Volkova, Marina A.; Zhuravlev, Georgi G.; Kuzhevskaya, Irina V.; Terenteva, Maria V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of calculation of meteorological parameters using a meteorological model, TSU-NM3, as well as prediction of some indices of atmospheric air pollution in the city of Tomsk obtained from a mesoscale photochemical model are presented. The calculation results are compared with observational data on the atmosphere and pollutants.

  1. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  2. Demonstrating marketing accountability.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, William R; Britt, Jason; Taylor, Jan; Riggs, Karen; Wray, Tanya; Adkins, Wanda; Springate, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Pressure on health care marketers to demonstrate effectiveness of their strategies and show their contribution to organizational goals is growing. A seven-tiered model based on the concepts of structure (having the right people, systems), process (doing the right things in the right way), and outcomes (results) is discussed. Examples of measures for each tier are provided and the benefits of using the model as a tool for measuring, organizing, tracking, and communicating appropriate information are provided. The model also provides a framework for helping management understand marketing's value and can serve as a vehicle for demonstrating marketing accountability.

  3. Numerical Models of Broad Bandwidth Nanosecond Optical Parametric Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M.S.; Gehr, R.J.; Smith, A.V.

    1998-10-14

    We describe results from three new methods of numerically modeling broad-bandwidth, nanosecond OPO's in the plane-wave approximate ion. They account for differences in group velocities among the three mixing waves, and also include a qutt~ttun noise model.

  4. The Changing Role of the Management Accountant: The Impact Upon Accounting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Le Thi; Buchanan, Phillip G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the results and the implications for accounting education of a questionnaire sent to members of the National Association of Accountants. The study was made to determine management accountants' perception of their role(s) in the organization. The author also comments on accounting curriculum and the role of the accounting educator. (CT)

  5. Accounting Students' Performance and Personality Types.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nourayi, Mahmoud M.; Cherry, Alan A.

    1993-01-01

    Completion of the Myers Briggs Type Inventory by 103 accounting majors revealed no significant differences among personality types in achievement, except that sensing types perform better in accounting in general. Results seem to belie the suggestion that accounting attracts introverts and that the intuitive type is best suited to accounting in…

  6. 10 CFR 75.22 - Accounting records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accounting records. 75.22 Section 75.22 Energy NUCLEAR... Accounting and Control for Facilities § 75.22 Accounting records. (a) The accounting records required by § 75... determination of the book inventory at any time; (2) All measurement results that are used for determination...

  7. Effect of the thickness variation and initial imperfection on buckling of composite cylindrical shells: Asymptotic analysis and numerical results by BOSOR4 and PANDA2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yi-Wei; Elishakoff, Isaac; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Bushnell, David

    1998-01-01

    This study is an extension of a previous investigation of the combined effect of axisymmetric thickness variation and axisymmetric initial geometric imperfection on buckling of isotropic shells under uniform axial compression. Here the anisotropic cylindrical shells are investigated by means of Koiter's energy criterion. An asymptotic formula is derived which can be used to determine the critical buckling load for composite shells with combined initial geometric imperfection and thickness variation. Results are compared with those obtained by the software packages BOSOR4 and PANDA2.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigations of internal heat transfer in an innovative trailing edge blade cooling system: stationary and rotation effects, part 1—experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniaiche, Ahmed; Ghenaiet, Adel; Facchini, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    The aero-thermal behavior of the flow field inside 30:1 scaled model reproducing an innovative smooth trailing edge of shaped wedge discharge duct with one row of enlarged pedestals have been investigated in order to determine the effect of rotation, inlet velocity and blowing conditions effects, for Re = 20,000 and 40,000 and Ro = 0-0.23. Two configurations are presented: with and without open tip configurations. Thermo-chromic liquid crystals technique is used to ensure a local measurement of the heat transfer coefficient on the blade suction side under stationary and rotation conditions. Results are reported in terms of detailed 2D HTC maps on the suction side surface as well as the averaged Nusselt number inside the pedestal ducts. Two correlations are proposed, for both closed and open tip configurations, based on the Re, Pr, Ro and a new non-dimensional parameter based on the position along the radial distance, to assess a reliable estimation of the averaged Nusselt number at the inter-pedestal region. A good agreement is found between prediction and experimental data with about ±10 to ±12 % of uncertainty, for the simple form correlation, and about ±16 % using a complex form. The obtained results help to predict the flow field visualization and the evaluation of the aero-thermal performance of the studied blade cooling system during the design step.

  9. The Symbol Grounding Problem Revisited: A Thorough Evaluation of the ANS Mapping Account and the Proposal of an Alternative Account Based on Symbol–Symbol Associations

    PubMed Central

    Reynvoet, Bert; Sasanguie, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a lot of studies in the domain of numerical cognition have been published demonstrating a robust association between numerical symbol processing and individual differences in mathematics achievement. Because numerical symbols are so important for mathematics achievement, many researchers want to provide an answer on the ‘symbol grounding problem,’ i.e., how does a symbol acquires its numerical meaning? The most popular account, the approximate number system (ANS) mapping account, assumes that a symbol acquires its numerical meaning by being mapped on a non-verbal and ANS. Here, we critically evaluate four arguments that are supposed to support this account, i.e., (1) there is an evolutionary system for approximate number processing, (2) non-symbolic and symbolic number processing show the same behavioral effects, (3) non-symbolic and symbolic numbers activate the same brain regions which are also involved in more advanced calculation and (4) non-symbolic comparison is related to the performance on symbolic mathematics achievement tasks. Based on this evaluation, we conclude that all of these arguments and consequently also the mapping account are questionable. Next we explored less popular alternative, where small numerical symbols are initially mapped on a precise representation and then, in combination with increasing knowledge of the counting list result in an independent and exact symbolic system based on order relations between symbols. We evaluate this account by reviewing evidence on order judgment tasks following the same four arguments. Although further research is necessary, the available evidence so far suggests that this symbol–symbol association account should be considered as a worthy alternative of how symbols acquire their meaning. PMID:27790179

  10. LMAL Accounting Office 1936

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1936-01-01

    Accounting Office: The Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory's accounting office, 1936, with photographs of the Wright brothers on the wall. Although the Lab was named after Samuel P. Langley, most of the NACA staff held the Wrights as their heroes.

  11. Comparison of the Structurally Controlled Landslides Numerical Model Results to the M 7.2 2013 Bohol Earthquake Co-seismic Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macario Galang, Jan Albert; Narod Eco, Rodrigo; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    The M 7.2 October 15, 2013 Bohol earthquake is the most destructive earthquake to hit the Philippines since 2012. The epicenter was located in Sagbayan municipality, central Bohol and was generated by a previously unmapped reverse fault called the "Inabanga Fault". Its name, taken after the barangay (village) where the fault is best exposed and was first seen. The earthquake resulted in 209 fatalities and over 57 billion USD worth of damages. The earthquake generated co-seismic landslides most of which were related to fault structures. Unlike rainfall induced landslides, the trigger for co-seismic landslides happen without warning. Preparedness against this type of landslide therefore, relies heavily on the identification of fracture-related unstable slopes. To mitigate the impacts of co-seismic landslide hazards, morpho-structural orientations or discontinuity sets were mapped in the field with the aid of a 2012 IFSAR Digital Terrain Model (DTM) with 5-meter pixel resolution and < 0.5 meter vertical accuracy. Coltop 3D software was then used to identify similar structures including measurement of their dip and dip directions. The chosen discontinuity sets were then keyed into Matterocking software to identify potential rock slide zones due to planar or wedged discontinuities. After identifying the structurally-controlled unstable slopes, the rock mass propagation extent of the possible rock slides was simulated using Conefall. The results were compared to a post-earthquake landslide inventory of 456 landslides. Out the total number of landslides identified from post-earthquake high-resolution imagery, 366 or 80% intersect the structural-controlled hazard areas of Bohol. The results show the potential of this method to identify co-seismic landslide hazard areas for disaster mitigation. Along with computer methods to simulate shallow landslides, and debris flow paths, located structurally-controlled unstable zones can be used to mark unsafe areas for settlement. The

  12. Numerical Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    fisica matematica . ABSTRACT - We consider a new method for the numerical solution both of non- linear systems of equations and of cornplementauity... Matematica , Serie V11 Volume 9 , Roma (1989), 521-543 An Inexact Continuous Method for the Solution of Large Systems of Equations and Complementarity...34 - 00185 Roma - Italy APPENDIX 2 A Quadratically Convergent Method for Unear Programming’ Stefano Herzel Dipartimento di Matematica -G. Castelnuovo

  13. Intelligent Accountability in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Onora

    2013-01-01

    Systems of accountability are "second order" ways of using evidence of the standard to which "first order" tasks are carried out for a great variety of purposes. However, more accountability is not always better, and processes of holding to account can impose high costs without securing substantial benefits. At their worst,…

  14. Accounting Education in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Karen F.; Reed, Ronald O.; Greiman, Janel

    2011-01-01

    Almost on a daily basis new accounting rules and laws are put into use, creating information that must be known and learned by the accounting faculty and then introduced to and understood by the accounting student. Even with the 150 hours of education now required for CPA licensure, it is impossible to teach and learn all there is to learn. Over…

  15. Automated Accounting. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Duane R.

    This curriculum guide was developed to assist business instructors using Dac Easy Accounting College Edition Version 2.0 software in their accounting programs. The module consists of four units containing assignment sheets and job sheets designed to enable students to master competencies identified in the area of automated accounting. The first…

  16. Accounting & Computing Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avani, Nathan T.; And Others

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching a competency-based accounting and computing course that is designed to prepare students for employability in the following occupational areas: inventory control clerk, invoice clerk, payroll clerk, traffic clerk, general ledger bookkeeper, accounting clerk, account information clerk,…

  17. The Accounting Capstone Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrod, Henry; Norris, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Capstone courses in accounting programs bring students experiences integrating across the curriculum (University of Washington, 2005) and offer unique (Sanyal, 2003) and transformative experiences (Sill, Harward, & Cooper, 2009). Students take many accounting courses without preparing complete sets of financial statements. Accountants not only…

  18. Accounting: "Balancing Out" the Accounting Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, Coleen

    1979-01-01

    The vocational accounting laboratory is a viable, meaningful educational experience for high school seniors, due to the uniqueness of its educational approach and the direct involvement of the professional and business community. A balance of experiences is provided to match individual needs and goals of students. (CT)

  19. Emerging accounting trends accounting for leases.

    PubMed

    Valletta, Robert; Huggins, Brian

    2010-12-01

    A new model for lease accounting can have a significant impact on hospitals and healthcare organizations. The new approach proposes a "right-of-use" model that involves complex estimates and significant administrative burden. Hospitals and health systems that draw heavily on lease arrangements should start preparing for the new approach now even though guidance and a final rule are not expected until mid-2011. This article highlights a number of considerations from the lessee point of view.

  20. The Relationship between Self-Perceptions of Accountability by High School Principals and Student Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koester, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    The high school principalship has been designated an area of professional shortage by many states. Resignations and terminations have been numerous as a result of poor student test performance. The purpose of this ex post facto correlation study was to investigate the self-perceptions of accountability by high school principals as they related to…

  1. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  2. Leadership for Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    2001-01-01

    This document explores issues of leadership for accountability and reviews five resources on the subject. These include: (1) "Accountability by Carrots and Sticks: Will Incentives and Sanctions Motivate Students, Teachers, and Administrators for Peak Performance?" (Larry Lashway); (2) "Organizing Schools for Teacher Learning"…

  3. The Choreography of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, P. Taylor

    2006-01-01

    The prevailing performance discourse in education claims school improvements can be achieved through transparent accountability procedures. The article identifies how teachers generate performances of their work in order to satisfy accountability demands. By identifying sources of teachers' knowledge that produce choreographed performances, I…

  4. Cluster Guide. Accounting Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverton School District 48, OR.

    Based on a recent task inventory of key occupations in the accounting cluster taken in the Portland, Oregon, area, this curriculum guide is intended to assist administrators and teachers in the design and implementation of high school accounting cluster programs. The guide is divided into four major sections: program organization and…

  5. The Accountability Illusion: Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  6. The Accountability Illusion: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  7. The Accountability Illusion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  8. The Accountability Illusion: Wisconsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  9. The Accountability Illusion: Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  10. The Evolution of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, P. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Campus 2020: Thinking ahead is a policy in British Columbia (BC), Canada, that attempted to hold universities accountable to performance. Within, I demonstrate how this Canadian articulation of educational accountability intended to develop "governmentality constellations" to control the university and regulate its knowledge output. This…

  11. The Coming Accounting Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Tim V.

    2007-01-01

    The accounting profession is facing a potential crisis not only from the overall shortage of accounting faculty driven by smaller numbers of new faculty entering the profession as many existing faculty retire but also from changes that have been less well documented. This includes: (1) changes in attitude towards the roles of teaching, service and…

  12. Accountability in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chippendale, P. R., Ed.; Wilkes, Paula V., Ed.

    This collection of papers delivered at a conference on accountability held at Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education in Australia examines the meaning of accountability in education for teachers, lecturers, government, parents, administrators, education authorities, and the society at large. In Part 1, W. G. Walker attempts to answer the…

  13. The Accountability Illusion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  14. 77 FR 43542 - Cost Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413-Cost Accounting Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... BUDGET Office of Federal Procurement Policy 48 CFR Part 9904 Cost Accounting Standards: Cost Accounting Standards 412 and 413--Cost Accounting Standards Pension Harmonization Rule AGENCY: Cost Accounting... correcting amendments. SUMMARY: The Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP), Cost Accounting...

  15. Human Resource Accounting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    I AD-RI54 787 HUMAN RESOURCE ACCOUNTING (U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 1/2 F MONTEREY CR J C MARTINS DEC 84 1UNCLASSIFIED /G 5/9 NL -~~ .. 2. . L...Monterey, California JUN1im THESISG HUMAN RESOURCE ACCOUNTING by Joaquim C. Martins LLJ.. December 1984 Thesis Advisor: R.A. McGonigal Approved for...REPORT & PECRI00 COVERED Master’s Thesis; Human Resource Accounting Dcme 94- ’ 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTOR(*) . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER

  16. Government Accounting Standards: Past, Present and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmer, W. Gary

    1993-01-01

    States that government accounting is the product of mixing together budget-oriented and accounting-oriented voices. Presents a history of governmental accounting including the groups involved. An organization chart describes the current standard-setting structure. Accomplishments that improve reporting operations results are listed. (MLF)

  17. Ideas for the Accounting Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerby, Debra; Romine, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Innovative ideas for accounting education include having students study accounting across historical periods, using businesses for student research, exploring nontraditional accounting careers, and collaborating with professional associations. (SK)

  18. Accounting Equals Applied Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Sondra

    1997-01-01

    Argues that students should be given mathematics credits for completing accounting classes. Demonstrates that, although the terminology is different, the mathematical concepts are the same as those used in an introductory algebra class. (JOW)

  19. Numerical and analytic results showing the suppression of secondary electron emission from velvet and foam, and a geometric view factor model to guide the development of a surface to suppress SEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Charles; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2016-09-01

    The technique of suppressing secondary electron emission (SEE) from a surface by texturing it is developing rapidly in recent years. We have specific and general results in support of this technique: We have performed numerical and analytic calculations for determining the effective secondary electron yield (SEY) from velvet, which is an array of long cylinders on the micro-scale, and found velvet to be suitable for suppressing SEY from a normally incident primary distribution. We have performed numerical and analytic calculations also for metallic foams, which are an isotropic lattice of fibers on the micro-scale, and found foams to be suitable for suppressing SEY from an isotropic primary distribution. More generally, we have created a geometric weighted view factor model for determining the SEY suppression of a given surface geometry, which has optimization of SEY as a natural application. The optimal surface for suppressing SEY does not have finite area and has no smallest feature size, making it fractal in nature. This model gives simple criteria for a physical, non-fractal surface to suppress SEY. We found families of optimal surfaces to suppress SEY given a finite surface area. The research is supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFSOR).

  20. Effect of uniaxial stress on electroluminescence, valence band modification, optical gain, and polarization modes in tensile strained p-AlGaAs/GaAsP/n-AlGaAs laser diode structures: Numerical calculations and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, E. V.; Minina, N. Ya.; Tomm, J. W.; Kissel, H.

    2012-11-01

    The effects of uniaxial compression in [110] direction on energy-band structures, heavy and light hole mixing, optical matrix elements, and gain in laser diodes with "light hole up" configuration of valence band levels in GaAsP quantum wells with different widths and phosphorus contents are numerically calculated. The development of light and heavy hole mixing caused by symmetry lowering and converging behavior of light and heavy hole levels in such quantum wells under uniaxial compression is displayed. The light or heavy hole nature of each level is established for all considered values of uniaxial stress. The results of optical gain calculations for TM and TE polarization modes show that uniaxial compression leads to a significant increase of the TE mode and a minor decrease of the TM mode. Electroluminescence experiments were performed under uniaxial compression up to 5 kbar at 77 K on a model laser diode structure (p-AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs1-yPy/n-AlxGa1-xAs) with y = 0.16 and a quantum well width of 14 nm. They reveal a maximum blue shift of 27 meV of the electroluminescence spectra that is well described by the calculated change of the optical gap and the increase of the intensity being referred to a TE mode enhancement. Numerical calculations and electroluminescence data indicate that uniaxial compression may be used for a moderate wavelength and TM/TE intensity ratio tuning.

  1. 18 CFR 367.1840 - Account 184, Clearing accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Deferred Debits § 367.1840 Account 184, Clearing accounts. This account must include undistributed balances in clearing accounts at the date of the balance sheet... accounts. 367.1840 Section 367.1840 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...

  2. Health care programs: fraud and abuse; revised OIG civil money penalties resulting from the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996--Office of Inspector General (OIG), HHS. Notice of proposed rulemaking.

    PubMed

    1998-03-25

    This proposed rule would revise the OIG's civil money penalty (CMP) authorities, in conjunction with new and revised provisions set forth in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. Among other provisions, this proposed rulemaking would codify new CMPs for: Excluded individuals retaining ownership or control interest in an entity; upcoding and claims for medically unnecessary services; offering inducements to beneficiaries; and false certification of eligibility for home health services. This rule would also codify a number of technical and conforming changes consistent with the OIG's existing sanction authorities.

  3. Accounting for the environment.

    PubMed

    Lutz, E; Munasinghe, M

    1991-03-01

    Environmental awareness in the 1980s has led to efforts to improve the current UN System of National Accounts (SNA) for better measurement of the value of environmental resources when estimating income. National governments, the UN, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank are interested in solving this issue. The World Bank relies heavily on national aggregates in income accounts compiled by means of the SNA that was published in 1968 and stressed gross domestic product (GDP). GDP measures mainly market activity, but it takes does not consider the consumption of natural capital, and indirectly inhibits sustained development. The deficiencies of the current method of accounting are inconsistent treatment of manmade and natural capital, the omission of natural resources and their depletion from balance sheets, and pollution cleanup costs from national income. In the calculation of GDP pollution is overlooked, and beneficial environmental inputs are valued at zero. The calculation of environmentally adjusted net domestic product (EDP) and environmentally adjusted net income (ENI) would lower income and growth rate, as the World Resources Institute found with respect to Indonesia for 1971-84. When depreciation for oil, timber, and top soil was included the net domestic product (NDP) was only 4% compared with a 7.1% GDP. The World Bank has advocated environmental accounting since 1983 in SNA revisions. The 1989 revised Blue Book of the SNA takes environment concerns into account. Relevant research is under way in Mexico and Papua New Guinea using the UN Statistical Office framework as a system for environmentally adjusted economic accounts that computes EDP and ENI and integrates environmental data with national accounts while preserving SNA concepts.

  4. Accountability: A New Disneyland Fantasy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Robert F.

    1974-01-01

    Parents, professional educators, boards of education, legislators, and the general public are justifiably questioning the monies spent on education, school efficiency, what schools are actually accomplishing, and who controls the results of schooling. However, accountability, as envisioned by its major supporters, will address none of these…

  5. Frontiers in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charles R.; Finn, Lee S.; Hobill, David W.

    2011-06-01

    Preface; Participants; Introduction; 1. Supercomputing and numerical relativity: a look at the past, present and future David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 2. Computational relativity in two and three dimensions Stuart L. Shapiro and Saul A. Teukolsky; 3. Slowly moving maximally charged black holes Robert C. Ferrell and Douglas M. Eardley; 4. Kepler's third law in general relativity Steven Detweiler; 5. Black hole spacetimes: testing numerical relativity David H. Bernstein, David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 6. Three dimensional initial data of numerical relativity Ken-ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 7. Initial data for collisions of black holes and other gravitational miscellany James W. York, Jr.; 8. Analytic-numerical matching for gravitational waveform extraction Andrew M. Abrahams; 9. Supernovae, gravitational radiation and the quadrupole formula L. S. Finn; 10. Gravitational radiation from perturbations of stellar core collapse models Edward Seidel and Thomas Moore; 11. General relativistic implicit radiation hydrodynamics in polar sliced space-time Paul J. Schinder; 12. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics in spherically symmetric spacetimes A. Mezzacappa and R. A. Matzner; 13. Constraint preserving transport for magnetohydrodynamics John F. Hawley and Charles R. Evans; 14. Enforcing the momentum constraints during axisymmetric spacelike simulations Charles R. Evans; 15. Experiences with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm in numerical relativity Matthew W. Choptuik; 16. The multigrid technique Gregory B. Cook; 17. Finite element methods in numerical relativity P. J. Mann; 18. Pseudo-spectral methods applied to gravitational collapse Silvano Bonazzola and Jean-Alain Marck; 19. Methods in 3D numerical relativity Takashi Nakamura and Ken-ichi Oohara; 20. Nonaxisymmetric rotating gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation Richard F. Stark; 21. Nonaxisymmetric neutron star collisions: initial results using smooth particle hydrodynamics

  6. Thinking about Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Accountability is a key component of healthcare reforms, in Canada and internationally, but there is increasing recognition that one size does not fit all. A more nuanced understanding begins with clarifying what is meant by accountability, including specifying for what, by whom, to whom and how. These papers arise from a Partnership for Health System Improvement (PHSI), funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), on approaches to accountability that examined accountability across multiple healthcare subsectors in Ontario. The partnership features collaboration among an interdisciplinary team, working with senior policy makers, to clarify what is known about best practices to achieve accountability under various circumstances. This paper presents our conceptual framework. It examines potential approaches (policy instruments) and postulates that their outcomes may vary by subsector depending upon (a) the policy goals being pursued, (b) governance/ownership structures and relationships and (c) the types of goods and services being delivered, and their production characteristics (e.g., contestability, measurability and complexity). PMID:25305385

  7. A Numerical Method for Incompressible Flow with Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sa, Jong-Youb; Kwak, Dochan

    1997-01-01

    A numerical method for the convective heat transfer problem is developed for low speed flow at mild temperatures. A simplified energy equation is added to the incompressible Navier-Stokes formulation by using Boussinesq approximation to account for the buoyancy force. A pseudocompressibility method is used to solve the resulting set of equations for steady-state solutions in conjunction with an approximate factorization scheme. A Neumann-type pressure boundary condition is devised to account for the interaction between pressure and temperature terms, especially near a heated or cooled solid boundary. It is shown that the present method is capable of predicting the temperature field in an incompressible flow.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Electroacoustic Logging Including Joule Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchenkov, Boris D.; Nikitin, Anatoly A.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    It is well known that electromagnetic field excites acoustic wave in a porous elastic medium saturated with fluid electrolyte due to electrokinetic conversion effect. Pride's equations describing this process are written in isothermal approximation. Update of these equations, which allows to take influence of Joule heating on acoustic waves propagation into account, is proposed here. This update includes terms describing the initiation of additional acoustic waves excited by thermoelastic stresses and the heat conduction equation with right side defined by Joule heating. Results of numerical modeling of several problems of propagation of acoustic waves excited by an electric field source with and without consideration of Joule heating effect in their statements are presented. From these results, it follows that influence of Joule heating should be taken into account at the numerical simulation of electroacoustic logging and at the interpretation of its log data.

  9. Viewpoints on Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Innovators Press, Tucson, AZ.

    This booklet contains five papers which examine the activities, successes, and pitfalls encountered by educators who are introducing accountability techniques into instructional programs where they did not exist in the past. The papers are based on actual programs and offer possible solutions in the areas considered, which are 1) performance…

  10. Making Accountability Really Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Lauren B.

    2006-01-01

    Standards-based education has now reached a stage where it is possible to evaluate its overall effectiveness. Several earlier papers in the special issue of "Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice" on "Test Scores and State Accountability" (Volume 24, Number 4) examined specific state policies and their effects on schools…

  11. Accountability Update, March 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    This report provides the Washington State legislature, the Governor, and other interested parties with an update on the accountability performance of each of the state's public baccalaureate institutions (Central Washington University, Eastern Washington University, Evergreen State College, Washington State University, Western Washington…

  12. Educational Accounting Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidwell, Sam B.

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" reviews the functions, procedures, and reports with which school business officials must be familiar in order to interpret and make decisions regarding the school district's financial position. Among the accounting functions discussed are financial management, internal auditing,…

  13. Accountability for Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Productivity gains in higher education won't be made just by improving cost effectiveness or even performance. They need to be documented, communicated, and integrated into a strategic agenda to increase attainment. This requires special attention to "accountability" for productivity, meaning public presentation and communication of evidence about…

  14. Legal responsibility and accountability.

    PubMed

    Cox, Chris

    2010-06-01

    Shifting boundaries in healthcare roles have led to anxiety among some nurses about their legal responsibilities and accountabilities. This is partly because of a lack of education about legal principles that underpin healthcare delivery. This article explains the law in terms of standards of care, duty of care, vicarious liability and indemnity insurance.

  15. Democracy, Accountability, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Meira

    2011-01-01

    Educational standards, assessments, and accountability systems are of immense political moment around the world. But there is no developed theory exploring the role that these systems should play within a democratic polity in particular. On the one hand, well-designed standards are public goods, supported by assessment and accountability…

  16. Community Accountability Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsborne, Margaret

    Community Accountability Conferencing (CAC) was first introduced in Queensland, Australia schools in early 1994 after a serious assault in the school community. Some family members, students, and staff were dissatisfied with the solution of suspending the offenders. Seeking an alternative, comprehensive intervention strategy, the school community…

  17. Planning for Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneo, Tim; Bell, Shareen; Welsh-Gray, Carol

    1999-01-01

    Through its Challenge 2000 program, Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network's 21st Century Education Initiative has been working with K-12 schools to improve student performance in literature, math, and science. Clearly stated standards, appropriate assessments, formal monitoring, critical friends, and systemwide accountability are keys to success.…

  18. Institutional Accountability Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL. Office of Institutional Research and Planning.

    This document discusses Santa Fe Community College's (SFCC) (Florida) five accountability measures. The type of data available provided on these measures is as follows: (1) District High School Enrollment Report and Retention and Success Rate Report; (2) Associate of Arts Degree Transfer Performance in the State University System; (3) Licensure…

  19. Fiscal Accounting Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Housing and Community Development, Sacramento. Indian Assistance Program.

    Written in simple, easy to understand form, the manual provides a vehicle for the untrained person in bookkeeping to control funds received from grants for Indian Tribal Councils and Indian organizations. The method used to control grants (federal, state, or private) is fund accounting, designed to organize rendering services on a non-profit…

  20. Curtail Accountability, Cultivate Attainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wraga, William G.

    2011-01-01

    The current test-driven accountability movement, codified in the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 ([NCLB] 2002), was a misguided idea that will have the effect not of improving the education of children and youth, but of indicting the public school system of the United States. To improve education in the United States, politicians, policy makers,…

  1. Higher Education Accountability Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Washington state's public four-year universities and college have submitted their 2003-05 accountability plans to the Higher Education Coordinating Board (HECB). The state operating budget directs the Board to review these plans and set biennial performance targets for each institution. For 2003-05, the four-year institutions are reporting on a…

  2. Accounting 202, 302.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This teaching guide consists of guidelines for conducting two secondary-level introductory accounting courses. Intended for vocational business education students, the courses are designed to introduce financial principles and practices important to personal and business life, to promote development of clerical and bookkeeping skills sufficient…

  3. Student Attendance Accounting Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitas, Joseph M.

    In response to state legislation authorizing procedures for changes in academic calendars and measurement of student workload in California community colleges, this manual from the Chancellor's Office provides guidelines for student attendance accounting. Chapter 1 explains general items such as the academic calendar, admissions policies, student…

  4. Excel in the Accounting Curriculum: Perceptions from Accounting Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramachandran Rackliffe, Usha; Ragland, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Public accounting firms emphasize the importance of accounting graduates being proficient in Excel. Since many accounting graduates often aspire to work in public accounting, a question arises as to whether there should be an emphasis on Excel in accounting education. The purpose of this paper is to specifically look at this issue by examining…

  5. 18 CFR 367.1420 - Account 142, Customer accounts receivable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Account 142, Customer... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Assets § 367.1420 Account 142, Customer accounts receivable. (a) This account must include amounts due from customers for service, and...

  6. An Empirical Investigation of the Relevant Skills of Forensic Accountants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGabriele, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The author investigated whether views of the relevant skills of forensic accountants differ among forensic accounting practitioners, accounting academics, and users of forensic accounting services. Universities and colleges are currently considering adding forensic accounting courses to their curriculum. The results of the present study provide…

  7. The Nature and Origins of Students' Perceptions of Accountants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Steven C.; Falgiani, A. Anthony; Intrieri, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    In this research, the authors examined accounting and nonaccounting majors' impressions of accountants through a survey listing 58 characteristics. The results show that many students stereotypically perceived accountants as numbers crunchers and that nonaccounting majors held more negative perceptions of accountants than did accounting majors.…

  8. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF NATURAL GAS-SWIRL BURNER

    SciTech Connect

    Ala Qubbaj

    2005-03-01

    A numerical simulation of a turbulent natural gas jet diffusion flame at a Reynolds number of 9000 in a swirling air stream is presented. The numerical computations were carried out using the commercially available software package CFDRC. The instantaneous chemistry model was used as the reaction model. The thermal, composition, flow (velocity), as well as stream function fields for both the baseline and air-swirling flames were numerically simulated in the near-burner region, where most of the mixing and reactions occur. The results were useful to interpret the effects of swirl in enhancing the mixing rates in the combustion zone as well as in stabilizing the flame. The results showed the generation of two recirculating regimes induced by the swirling air stream, which account for such effects. The present investigation will be used as a benchmark study of swirl flow combustion analysis as a step in developing an enhanced swirl-cascade burner technology.

  9. Accounting for Every Kilowatt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Equation 1. One estimate of the energy density of diesel fuel (ρdiesel) coupled with the efficiency (η) of a 60-kilowatt generator op- erating at...are going. Reduc- ing demand without reducing our capability requires appliance -level feedback, which current smart-meter technology does not...event. Accountability Soldiers need appliance -level feedback to reduce electrical consumption. Specifically, they need to know what loads are currently

  10. Integrated Cost Accounting System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-27

    few other companies. Harvard Business Review contained articles explaining the ideas behind the new costing methods and examples of applications...technical report. Peter Drucker in an article in Harvard Business Review ’carefully explains that accounting must change in response to the changes in...Kaplan in a Harvard Business Review article develop the idea of four levels of activities: facility sustaining activities; product-sustaining activities

  11. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  12. Achieving excellence in the management of accounts receivable.

    PubMed

    Ladewig, T L; Hecht, B A

    1993-09-01

    Recent changes in healthcare reimbursement rules and practices have made the task of accounts receivable management a particularly demanding one for most financial managers. One multihospital system, after pursuing numerous strategies to reduce its accounts receivable with only marginal levels of success, launched a systemwide initiative to share both the positive and the negative accounts receivable management experiences of each department at each hospital in the system with all patient accounting staff. The objective of the initiative was to use the lessons learned from those experiences to attain excellence in accounts receivable management throughout the system. The ultimate success of the initiative is detailed in the following article.

  13. Inflation Accounting Methods and their Effectiveness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    accounting and current cost accounting are explained as the major inflation accounting methods. Inflation accounting standards announced in the United...inflation accounting, constant purchasing power accounting, constant dollar accounting, current cost accounting , current value.

  14. Test-Based Teacher Evaluations: Accountability vs. Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolyard, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    Gert Biesta contends that managerial accountability, which focuses on efficiency and competition, dominates the current political arena in education. Such accountability has influenced states' developments of test-based teacher evaluations in an attempt to quantify teachers' efficacy on student learning. With numerous state policies requiring the…

  15. The Integration of Behavioral Accounting in Undergraduate Accounting Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Phillip G.; Cao, Le Thi

    1986-01-01

    The study reported here is part of a continuing project with the goal of determining the place of behavioral accounting in the accounting curricula. While the first two studies focused on the graduate accounting curricula and the practitioners' opinions on the subject, this study concentrates on the behavioral accounting content of undergraduate…

  16. New Frontiers: Training Forensic Accountants within the Accounting Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswamy, Vinita

    2007-01-01

    Accountants have recently been subject to very unpleasant publicity following the collapse of Enron and other major companies. There has been a plethora of accounting failures and accounting restatements of falsified earnings, with litigations and prosecutions taking place every day. As the FASB struggles to tighten the loopholes in accounting,…

  17. Numerical Relativistic Quantum Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-08

    Introduction 1 II. Relativistic Wave Equations 2 III. Stationary States 4 A. Analytical Solutions for Coulomb Potentials 4 B. Numerical Solutions...C. Relativistic Ionization Example 15 V. Computational Performance 18 VI. Conclusions 21 VII. Acknowledgements 22 References 23 1 I. INTRODUCTION ...peculiar result that B0 = 1 TG is a weak field. At present, such fields are observed only in connection with astrophysical phenomena [14]. The highest

  18. Numerical simulation of Bootstrap Current

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanlin; White, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    The neoclassical theory of Bootstrap Current in toroidal systems is calculated in magnetic flux coordinates and confirmed by numerical simulation. The effects of magnetic ripple, loop voltage, and magnetic and electrostatic perturbations on bootstrap current for the cases of zero and finite plasma pressure are studied. The numerical results are in reasonable agreement with analytical estimates.

  19. Numerical simulation of dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1995-09-01

    The numerical simulation of physical processes in dusty plasmas is reviewed, with emphasis on recent results and unresolved issues. Three areas of research are discussed: grain charging, weak dust-plasma interactions, and strong dust-plasma interactions. For each area, we review the basic concepts that are tested by simulations, present some appropriate examples, and examine numerical issues associated with extending present work.

  20. Performance and Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Fiscal Year 2002 Performance and Accountability Report is presented. Over the past year, significant changes have been implemented to greatly improve NASA's management while continuing to break new ground in science and technology. Excellent progress has been made in implementing the President's Management Agenda. NASA is leading the government in its implementation of the five government-wide initiatives. NASA received an unqualified audit opinion on FY 2002 financial statements. The vast majority of performance goals have been achieved, furthering each area of NASA's mission. The contents include: 1) NASA Vision and Mission; 2) Management's Discussion and Analysis; 3) Performance; and 4) Financial.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Mud Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, N. A.; Testik, F. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid mud bottom gravity currents are simulated numerically using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, ANSYS-Fluent. In this study, Eulerian-Eulerian multi-fluid method is selected since this method treats all phases in a multiphase system as interpenetrated continua. There are three different phases in the computational model constructed for this study: water, fluid mud, and air. Water and fluid mud are defined as two miscible fluids and the mass and momentum transfers between these two phases are taken into account. Fluid mud, which is a dense suspension of clay particles and water, is defined as a single-phase non-Newtonian fluid via user-defined-functions. These functions define the physical characteristics (density, viscosity, etc.) of the fluid mud and these characteristics vary with changing suspension concentration due to mass transfer between the fluid mud and the water phase. Results of this two-dimensional numerical model are verified with data obtained from experiments conducted in a laboratory flume with a lock-release set-up. Numerical simulations are currently being conducted to elucidate turbulent entrainment of ambient water into fluid mud gravity currents. This study is motivated by coastal dredge disposal operations.

  2. Experimental and numerical investigations on melamine wedges.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S

    2008-09-01

    Melamine wedges are often used as acoustic lining material for anechoic chambers. It was proposed here to study the effects of the mounting conditions on the acoustic properties of the melamine wedges used in the large anechoic chamber at the LMA. The results of the impedance tube measurements carried out show that the mounting conditions must be taken into account when assessing the quality of an acoustic lining. As it can be difficult to simulate these mounting conditions in impedance tube experiments, a numerical method was developed, which can be used to complete the experiments or for parametric studies. By combining the finite and the boundary element method, it is possible to investigate acoustic linings with almost no restrictions as to the geometry, material behavior, or mounting conditions. The numerical method presented here was used to study the acoustic properties of the acoustic lining installed in the anechoic chamber at the LMA. Further experiments showed that the behavior of the melamine foam is anisotropic. Numerical simulations showed that this anisotropy can be used to advantage when designing an acoustic lining.

  3. Computerized accounting methods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report summarizes the results of the research performed under the Task Order on computerized accounting methods in a period from 03 August to 31 December 1994. Computerized nuclear material accounting methods are analyzed and evaluated. Selected methods are implemented in a hardware-software complex developed as a prototype of the local network-based CONMIT system. This complex has been put into trial operation for test and evaluation of the selected methods at two selected ``Kurchatov Institute`` Russian Research Center (``KI`` RRC) nuclear facilities. Trial operation is carried out since the beginning of Initial Physical Inventory Taking in these facilities that was performed in November 1994. Operation of CONMIT prototype system was demonstrated in the middle of December 1994. Results of evaluation of CONMIT prototype system features and functioning under real operating conditions are considered. Conclusions are formulated on the ways of further development of computerized nuclear material accounting methods. The most important conclusion is a need to strengthen computer and information security features supported by the operating environment. Security provisions as well as other LANL Client/Server System approaches being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory are recommended for selection of software and hardware components to be integrated into production version of CONMIT system for KI RRC.

  4. Numerical inversion of the Laplace transform in some problems of granular media dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavich, Nikolay B.

    2004-04-01

    Approximated value for the vertical displacement of a surface bounding a half space and a layer laying on rigid foundation filled with granular medium caused by a vertical symmetric load is received here. The results obtained for Kandaurov standard linear medium model are used. This model takes in account an internal friction. The Papoulis method of numerical inversion of the Laplace transform is applied.

  5. Numerical simulation of the process of production of single crystals by the Verneuil method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzymkowski, Radoslaw; Mochnacki, Bohdan; Suchy, Josef

    1985-12-01

    The paper presents the mathematical model of non-stationary crystallization of Al 2O 3 by Verneuil method, while taking into account the bilateral conjugation of this process with the admixture segregation phenomenon (Cr + for example). The numerical results are also shown.

  6. Chloride diffusivity in hardened cement paste from microscale analyses and accounting for binding effects.

    PubMed

    Carrara, P; De Lorenzis, L; Bentz, D P

    2016-08-01

    The diffusion of chloride ions in hardened cement paste (HCP) under steady-state conditions and accounting for the highly heterogeneous nature of the material is investigated. The HCP microstructures are obtained through segmentation of X-ray images of real samples as well as from simulations using the cement hydration model CEMHYD3D. Moreover, the physical and chemical interactions between chloride ions and HCP phases (binding), along with their effects on the diffusive process, are explicitly taken into account. The homogenized diffusivity of the HCP is then derived through a least square homogenization technique. Comparisons between numerical results and experimental data from the literature are presented.

  7. Chloride diffusivity in hardened cement paste from microscale analyses and accounting for binding effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, P.; De Lorenzis, L.; Bentz, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    The diffusion of chloride ions in hardened cement paste (HCP) under steady-state conditions and accounting for the highly heterogeneous nature of the material is investigated. The three-dimensional HCP microstructures are obtained through segmentation of x-ray images of real samples as well as from simulations using the cement hydration model CEMHYD3D. Moreover, the physical and chemical interactions between chloride ions and HCP phases (binding), along with their effects on the diffusive process, are explicitly taken into account. The homogenized diffusivity of the HCP is then derived through a least square homogenization technique. Comparisons between numerical results and experimental data from the literature are presented.

  8. Automated Accounting. Payroll. Instructor Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Duane R.

    This teacher's guide was developed to assist business instructors using Dac Easy Accounting Payroll Version 3.0 edition software in their accounting programs. The module contains assignment sheets and job sheets designed to enable students to master competencies identified in the area of automated accounting--payroll. Basic accounting skills are…

  9. Where Are the Accounting Professors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Jui-Chin; Sun, Huey-Lian

    2008-01-01

    Accounting education is facing a crisis of shortage of accounting faculty. This study discusses the reasons behind the shortage and offers suggestions to increase the supply of accounting faculty. Our suggestions are as followings. First, educators should begin promoting accounting academia as one of the career choices to undergraduate and…

  10. Revamping High School Accounting Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Provides ideas for updating accounting courses: convert to semester length; focus on financial reporting/analysis, financial statements, the accounting cycle; turn textbook exercises into practice sets for the accounting cycle; teach about corporate accounting; and address individual line items on financial statements. (SK)

  11. Influence of Hydraulic Design on Stability and on Pressure Pulsations in Francis Turbines at Overload, Part Load and Deep Part Load based on Numerical Simulations and Experimental Model Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoli, M. V.; Maiwald, M.

    2014-03-01

    Francis turbines have been running more and more frequently in part load conditions, in order to satisfy the new market requirements for more dynamic and flexible energy generation, ancillary services and grid regulation. The turbines should be able to be operated for longer durations with flows below the optimum point, going from part load to deep part load and even speed-no-load. These operating conditions are characterised by important unsteady flow phenomena taking place at the draft tube cone and in the runner channels, in the respective cases of part load and deep part load. The current expectations are that new Francis turbines present appropriate hydraulic stability and moderate pressure pulsations at overload, part load, deep part load and speed-no-load with high efficiency levels at normal operating range. This study presents series of investigations performed by Voith Hydro with the objective to improve the hydraulic stability of Francis turbines at overload, part load and deep part load, reduce pressure pulsations and enlarge the know-how about the transient fluid flow through the turbine at these challenging conditions. Model test measurements showed that distinct runner designs were able to influence the pressure pulsation level in the machine. Extensive experimental investigations focused on the runner deflector geometry, on runner features and how they could reduce the pressure oscillation level. The impact of design variants and machine configurations on the vortex rope at the draft tube cone at overload and part load and on the runner channel vortex at deep part load were experimentally observed and evaluated based on the measured pressure pulsation amplitudes. Numerical investigations were employed for improving the understanding of such dynamic fluid flow effects. As example for the design and experimental investigations, model test observations and pressure pulsation curves for Francis machines in mid specific speed range, around nqopt = 50 min

  12. Changes to the Intermediate Accounting Course Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lesley H.; Francisco, William H.

    2009-01-01

    There is an ever-growing amount of information that must be covered in Intermediate Accounting courses. Due to recent accounting standards and the implementation of IFRS this trend is likely to continue. This report incorporates the results of a recent survey to examine the trend of spending more course time to cover this additional material.…

  13. Faculty Perceptions of Online Accounting Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Amanda M.; Johnson, Leigh R.

    2015-01-01

    The perceptions of faculty members, who design and evaluate online accounting coursework content, are an important consideration in determining the quality inherent in such content. This study reports the results of a survey which examines accounting faculty members' attitudes towards online education (measured as their willingness to accept…

  14. How to Refocus Accounting Content and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, John

    1993-01-01

    A survey of businesses (n=42) determined hiring practices and job responsibilities of entry-level accountants and found out the course content, computer application requirements, and qualities needed. Results indicate that beginning accounting employees need to be technically literate, strong communicators, and problem solvers. (JOW)

  15. High School Guidance for College Accounting Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Virginia; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a study conducted to determine articulation constraints and limitations that prevent students from making a smooth transition and adjustment from high school to college accounting. The results indicated that academic performance, quantitative skills, and verbal skills were vital to achieve success in college accounting. (CT)

  16. Accountants and Teachers: Education Aims Are Similar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behm, Robert J.; Limberg, Steven T.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison of accounting instructors and practicing accountants indicates that both groups agree on the emphasis instructors should place on course content items. The results also indicate that the Q-sort is a powerful tool for assessing certain aspects of occupational curricula. (Author/JH)

  17. Water Accounting from Ungauged Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiaanssen, W. G.; Savenije, H.

    2014-12-01

    Water scarcity is increasing globally. This requires a more accurate management of the water resources at river basin scale and understanding of withdrawals and return flows; both naturally and man-induced. Many basins and their tributaries are, however, ungauged or poorly gauged. This hampers sound planning and monitoring processes. While certain countries have developed clear guidelines and policies on data observatories and data sharing, other countries and their basin organization still have to start on developing data democracies. Water accounting quantifies flows, fluxes, stocks and consumptive use pertaining to every land use class in a river basin. The objective is to derive a knowledge base with certain minimum information that facilitates decision making. Water Accounting Plus (WA+) is a new method for water resources assessment reporting (www.wateraccounting.org). While the PUB framework has yielded several deterministic models for flow prediction, WA+ utilizes remote sensing data of rainfall, evaporation (including soil, water, vegetation and interception evaporation), soil moisture, water levels, land use and biomass production. Examples will be demonstrated that show how remote sensing and hydrological models can be smartly integrated for generating all the required input data into WA+. A standard water accounting system for all basins in the world - with a special emphasis on data scarce regions - is under development. First results of using remote sensing measurements and hydrological modeling as an alternative to expensive field data sets, will be presented and discussed.

  18. Results of correlations for transition location on a clean-up glove installed on an F-14 aircraft and design studies for a laminar glove for the X-29 aircraft accounting for spanwise pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, S. H.; Bobbitt, P. J.; Morgan, H. L.; Ferris, J. C.; Harvey, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Results of correlative and design studies for transition location, laminar and turbulent boundary-layer parameters, and wake drag for forward swept and aft swept wings are presented. These studies were performed with the use of an improved integral-type boundary-layer and transition-prediction methods. Theoretical predictions were compared with flight measurements at subsonic and transonic flow conditions for the variable aft swept wing F-14 aircraft for which experimental pressure distributions, transition locations, and turbulent boundary-layer velocity profiles were measured. Flight data were available at three spanwise stations for several values of sweep, freestream unit Reynolds number, Mach numbers, and lift coefficients. Theory/experiment correlations indicate excellent agreement for both transition location and turbulent boundary-layer parameters. The results of parametric studies performed during the design of a laminar glove for the forward swept wing X-29 aircraft are also presented. These studies include the effects of a spanwise pressure gradient on transition location and wake drag for several values of freestream Reynolds numbers at a freestream Mach number of 0.9.

  19. Pain: A Statistical Account

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Michael A.; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2017-01-01

    Perception is seen as a process that utilises partial and noisy information to construct a coherent understanding of the world. Here we argue that the experience of pain is no different; it is based on incomplete, multimodal information, which is used to estimate potential bodily threat. We outline a Bayesian inference model, incorporating the key components of cue combination, causal inference, and temporal integration, which highlights the statistical problems in everyday perception. It is from this platform that we are able to review the pain literature, providing evidence from experimental, acute, and persistent phenomena to demonstrate the advantages of adopting a statistical account in pain. Our probabilistic conceptualisation suggests a principles-based view of pain, explaining a broad range of experimental and clinical findings and making testable predictions. PMID:28081134

  20. Automated attendance accounting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automated accounting system useful for applying data to a computer from any or all of a multiplicity of data terminals is disclosed. The system essentially includes a preselected number of data terminals which are each adapted to convert data words of decimal form to another form, i.e., binary, usable with the computer. Each data terminal may take the form of a keyboard unit having a number of depressable buttons or switches corresponding to selected data digits and/or function digits. A bank of data buffers, one of which is associated with each data terminal, is provided as a temporary storage. Data from the terminals is applied to the data buffers on a digit by digit basis for transfer via a multiplexer to the computer.

  1. Financial accounting for radiology executives.

    PubMed

    Seidmann, Abraham; Mehta, Tushar

    2005-03-01

    The authors review the role of financial accounting information from the perspective of a radiology executive. They begin by introducing the role of pro forma statements. They discuss the fundamental concepts of accounting, including the matching principle and accrual accounting. The authors then explore the use of financial accounting information in making investment decisions in diagnostic medical imaging. The paper focuses on critically evaluating the benefits and limitations of financial accounting for decision making in a radiology practice.

  2. Numerical analysis of heat conduction problems on irregular domains by means of a collocation meshless method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamolo, R.; Nobile, E.

    2017-01-01

    A Least Squares Collocation Meshless Method based on Radial Basis Function (RBF) interpolation is used to solve steady state heat conduction problems on 2D polygonal domains using MATLAB® environment. The point distribution process required by the numerical method can be fully automated, taking account of boundary conditions and geometry of the problem to get higher point distribution density where needed. Several convergence tests have been carried out comparing the numerical results to the corresponding analytical solutions to outline the properties of this numerical approach, considering various combinations of parameters. These tests showed favorable convergence properties in the simple cases considered: along with the geometry flexibility, these features confirm that this peculiar numerical approach can be an effective tool in the numerical simulation of heat conduction problems.

  3. NASA Accountability Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA is piloting fiscal year (FY) 1997 Accountability Reports, which streamline and upgrade reporting to Congress and the public. The document presents statements by the NASA administrator, and the Chief Financial Officer, followed by an overview of NASA's organizational structure and the planning and budgeting process. The performance of NASA in four strategic enterprises is reviewed: (1) Space Science, (2) Mission to Planet Earth, (3) Human Exploration and Development of Space, and (4) Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology. Those areas which support the strategic enterprises are also reviewed in a section called Crosscutting Processes. For each of the four enterprises, there is discussion about the long term goals, the short term objectives and the accomplishments during FY 1997. The Crosscutting Processes section reviews issues and accomplishments relating to human resources, procurement, information technology, physical resources, financial management, small and disadvantaged businesses, and policy and plans. Following the discussion about the individual areas is Management's Discussion and Analysis, about NASA's financial statements. This is followed by a report by an independent commercial auditor and the financial statements.

  4. Spills, drills, and accountability

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    NRDC seeks preventive approaches to oil pollution on U.S. coasts. The recent oil spills in Spain and Scotland have highlighted a fact too easy to forget in a society that uses petroleum every minute of every day: oil is profoundly toxic. One tiny drop on a bald eagle`s egg has been known to kill the embryo inside. Every activity involving oil-drilling for it, piping it, shipping it-poses risks that must be taken with utmost caution. Moreover, oil production is highly polluting. It emits substantial air pollution, such as nitrogen oxides that can form smog and acid rain. The wells bring up great quantities of toxic waste: solids, liquids and sludges often contaminated by oil, toxic metals, or even radioactivity. This article examines the following topics focusing on oil pollution control and prevention in coastal regions of the USA: alternate energy sources and accountability of pollutor; ban on offshore drilling as exemplified by the energy policy act; tanker free zones; accurate damage evaluations. Policy of the National Resource Defence Council is articulated.

  5. Accounting: The Integration of Computers into the Accounting Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dorothy Lee

    1980-01-01

    Since computers are universally accepted in business today, the accounting classroom is the appropriate place to teach their use. A California high school accounting committee's recommendation led to the school's development of a computer processing program within the accounting department. The program's curriculum is described. (CT)

  6. 18 CFR 367.2320 - Account 232, Accounts payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... payable. This account must include all amounts payable by the service company within one year that are not... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Account 232, Accounts payable. 367.2320 Section 367.2320 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...

  7. 18 CFR 367.1430 - Account 143, Other accounts receivable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Assets § 367.1430 Account 143, Other... accounts receivable. 367.1430 Section 367.1430 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF...

  8. 76 FR 53378 - Cost Accounting Standards: Accounting for Insurance Costs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... the measurement and allocation of the cost of infrequent and difficult to predict events. The FAR at... BUDGET Office of Federal Procurement Policy 48 CFR Part 9904 Cost Accounting Standards: Accounting for Insurance Costs AGENCY: Cost Accounting Standards Board (Board), Office of Federal Procurement Policy...

  9. Accounting Issues: An Essay Series. Part II--Accounts Receivable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    This is the second in a series of articles designed to help academics refocus the introductory accounting course on the theoretical underpinnings of accounting. Intended as a supplement for the principles course, this article connects the asset Accounts Receivable to the essential theoretical constructs, discusses the inherent tradeoffs and…

  10. Solving Accounting Problems: Differences between Accounting Experts and Novices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, P. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Performance of 90 accounting experts (faculty and practitioners) and 60 novices (senior accounting majors) was compared. Experts applied more accounting principles to solving problems. There were no differences in types of principles applied and no correlation between (1) principles applied and number of breadth comments or (2) importance placed…

  11. 17 CFR 210.2-01 - Qualifications of accountants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... relationships between an accountant and an audit client and restrictions on an accountant providing certain non... standard, the Commission looks in the first instance to whether a relationship or the provision of a... accountant in the position of auditing his or her own work; results in the accountant acting as management...

  12. Multidimensional numerical scheme for resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2007-12-01

    The paper describes a new upwind conservative numerical scheme for special relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics with scalar resistivity. The magnetic field is kept approximately divergence free and the divergence of the electric field is kept consistent with the electric charge distribution via the method of Generalized Lagrange Multiplier. The hyperbolic fluxes are computed using the Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL) prescription and the source terms are accounted via the time-splitting technique. The results of test simulations show that the scheme can handle equally well both resistive current sheets and shock waves, and thus can be a useful tool for studying phenomena of relativistic astrophysics that involve both colliding supersonic flows and magnetic reconnection.

  13. Numerical simulation of electrophoresis separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganjoo, D. K.; Tezduyar, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    A new Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation has been proposed for transient convection-diffusion problems. Most Petrov-Galerkin formulations take into account the spatial discretization, and the weighting functions so developed give satisfactory solutions for steady state problems. Though these schemes can be used for transient problems, there is scope for improvement. The schemes proposed here, which consider temporal as well as spatial discretization, provide improved solutions. Electrophoresis, which involves the motion of charged entities under the influence of an applied electric field, is governed by equations similiar to those encountered in fluid flow problems, i.e., transient convection-diffusion equations. Test problems are solved in electrophoresis and fluid flow. The results obtained are satisfactory. It is also expected that these schemes, suitably adapted, will improve the numerical solutions of the compressible Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. Accountability for Better Results ? A National Imperative for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Higher Education Executive Officers, 2005

    2005-01-01

    For over fifty years, speaker after speaker ? university presidents, business leaders, Presidents of the United States ? have praised our system of higher education as the finest in the world,but even as we bask in the afterglow of past achievements a starker reality is emerging on the horizon. For the first time in decades the United States no…

  15. Accounting for Results: How Conservation Organizations Report Performance Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissman, Adena R.; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council—US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness.

  16. Accounting for results: how conservation organizations report performance information.

    PubMed

    Rissman, Adena R; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council-US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness.

  17. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive finger convection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Vacher, H.L.

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid finite element, integrated finite difference numerical model is developed for the simulation of double-diffusive and multicomponent flow in two and three dimensions. The model is based on a multidimensional, density-dependent, saturated-unsaturated transport model (SUTRA), which uses one governing equation for fluid flow and another for solute transport. The solute-transport equation is applied sequentially to each simulated species. Density coupling of the flow and solute-transport equations is accounted for and handled using a sequential implicit Picard iterative scheme. High-resolution data from a double-diffusive Hele-Shaw experiment, initially in a density-stable configuration, is used to verify the numerical model. The temporal and spatial evolution of simulated double-diffusive convection is in good agreement with experimental results. Numerical results are very sensitive to discretization and correspond closest to experimental results when element sizes adequately define the spatial resolution of observed fingering. Numerical results also indicate that differences in the molecular diffusivity of sodium chloride and the dye used to visualize experimental sodium chloride concentrations are significant and cause inaccurate mapping of sodium chloride concentrations by the dye, especially at late times. As a result of reduced diffusion, simulated dye fingers are better defined than simulated sodium chloride fingers and exhibit more vertical mass transfer. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. On the Numerical Dispersion of Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Code : Finite Grid Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Michael David; Huang, Chengkun; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Sunghwan; Albright, Brian James

    2014-07-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the electromagnetic PIC algorithm to analyze the origin of these instabilities. We rigorously derive the faithful 3D numerical dispersion of the PIC algorithm, and then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we account for the manner in which the PIC algorithm updates and samples the fields and distribution function. Temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme are also explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical 1D modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction.

  19. Accountability report - fiscal year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Toshio; Tanahashi, Mamoru

    In this paper, we present two results of direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting flows. One is direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting two-dimensional mixing layer and the other is direct numerical simulation of chemically reacting compressible isotropic turbulence. As for the mixing layer, a low Mach number approximation was used to take into account the variable density effects on the flow fields and to clarify the effects of heat release and density difference of a mean flow. In the case of density difference, expansion and baroclinic torque has a negative contribution to the local vorticity transport in the high density side and a positive contribution in the low density side which results in an asymmetric vortical structure structure. Thes density difference suppresses the growth of mixing layer and causes the overshoot of mean velocity only in the high density side which coincides with an experimental result. Coupling effects of heat release and desnity difference are also investigated. As for the homogeneous turbulence, fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved to clarify the interaction between turbulence and chemical reaction in turbulent diffusion flame. The chemical reaction is suppressed by the increase of heat release because of the decrease of density and local Reynolds number. However, the decay of enstrophy with heat release is slower than that without heat release because of strong baroclinic torque which is generated near the reaction zone. Also, large amount of heat release causes increase in turbulent energy through the pressure dilatation term. The pressure dilatation term shows the periodic fluctuation which has an acoustic time scale. The fluctuation is enhanced by the heat release and travels in the turbulent field as pressure and dilatation waves.

  1. The Impact of a Participant-Based Accounting Cycle Course on Student Performance in Intermediate Financial Accounting I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siagian, Ferdinand T.; Khan, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated whether students in an Intermediate Financial Accounting I course who took a 1-credit, participant-based accounting cycle course performed better than students who did not take the accounting cycle course. Results indicate a higher likelihood of earning a better grade for students who took the accounting cycle course even…

  2. Numerical solutions for unsteady subsonic vortical flows around loaded cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, J.; Atassi, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    A frequency domain linearized unsteady aerodynamic analysis is presented for three-dimensional unsteady vortical flows around a cascade of loaded airfoils. The analysis fully accounts for the distortion of the impinging vortical disturbances by the mean flow. The entire unsteady flow field is calculated in response to upstream three-dimensional harmonic disturbances. Numerical results are presented for two standard cascade configurations representing turbine and compressor bladings for a reduced frequency range from 0.1 to 5. Results show that the upstream gust conditions and blade sweep strongly affect the unsteady blade response.

  3. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accounting. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME... Sec. 5 Accounting. The General Agent shall record the amounts of compensation paid from the NSA... Accounting Office, at which time the Maritime Administration will take custody of the records....

  4. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accounting. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME... Sec. 5 Accounting. The General Agent shall record the amounts of compensation paid from the NSA... Accounting Office, at which time the Maritime Administration will take custody of the records....

  5. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accounting. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME... Sec. 5 Accounting. The General Agent shall record the amounts of compensation paid from the NSA... Accounting Office, at which time the Maritime Administration will take custody of the records....

  6. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accounting. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME... Sec. 5 Accounting. The General Agent shall record the amounts of compensation paid from the NSA... Accounting Office, at which time the Maritime Administration will take custody of the records....

  7. Accounting Instruction Builds Economic Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albaugh, Thomas A.; Porreca, Anthony G.

    1985-01-01

    A study of 236 11th-grade accounting students was conducted to measure the economic literacy of students enrolled in high school business education. It was found that those students who had accounting instruction had mean scores that were higher than those students who did not have accounting instruction. (CT)

  8. Vocational Accounting and Computing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avani, Nathan T.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an "Accounting and Computing" program in Michigan that emphasizes computerized accounting procedures. This article describes the program curriculum and duty areas (such as handling accounts receivable), presents a list of sample tasks in each duty area, and specifies components of each task. Computer equipment necessary for this program…

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 5 - Accounting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accounting. Sec. 5 Section 5 Shipping MARITIME... Sec. 5 Accounting. The General Agent shall record the amounts of compensation paid from the NSA... Accounting Office, at which time the Maritime Administration will take custody of the records....

  10. A DRDC Management Accountability Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    difficult to hold subordinates to account . Level 3 123 Atlantic, Valcartier, Ottawa, Toronto, and...Canada A DRDC Management Accountability Framework Final Report Contract Project Manager: Dr. Fazley Siddiq, 902-494-8802 Contract Number: W7707...B3H 3J5 This page intentionally left blank.   A DRDC Management Accountability Framework Final Report Judy A. Baroni Research

  11. Model Accounting Program. Adopters Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverton School District 48, OR.

    The accounting cluster demonstration project conducted at Aloha High School in the Beaverton, Oregon, school district developed a model curriculum for high school accounting. The curriculum is based on interviews with professionals in the accounting field and emphasizes the use of computers. It is suitable for use with special needs students as…

  12. Mastering the Vocabulary of Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tischler, Helene

    Developed for use by students in an introductory accounting course, these learning modules deal with mastering the vocabulary of accounting. Focus of the modules is on vocabulary appearing in the first six chapters of the text, "Accounting Principles" by Niswonger and Fess. Covered in the individual modules are the following topics:…

  13. Standardized Testing and School Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiliam, Dylan

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the use of standardized tests to hold schools accountable. The history of testing for accountability is reviewed, and it is shown that currently between-school differences account for less than 10% of the variance in student scores, in part because the progress of individuals is small compared to the spread of achievement…

  14. Numerical Optimization Using Computer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosset, Michael W.; Torczon, Virginia

    1997-01-01

    Engineering design optimization often gives rise to problems in which expensive objective functions are minimized by derivative-free methods. We propose a method for solving such problems that synthesizes ideas from the numerical optimization and computer experiment literatures. Our approach relies on kriging known function values to construct a sequence of surrogate models of the objective function that are used to guide a grid search for a minimizer. Results from numerical experiments on a standard test problem are presented.

  15. Numerical modeling of preburner flowfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, A. S.; Mo, J. D.; Jin, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    This work is intended to numerically predict the flowfields inside the preburner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The computer code (FDNS) based on pressure correction method is modified and adapted with an elliptic grid generator. The original configuration of the preburner in conjunction with downstream gas turbines has been simplified geometrically and numerically modeled at its full power in this work. The computational results are presented and qualitatively discussed with test data collected in NASA/MSFC.

  16. Unit days in accounts receivable: a management tool.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L

    1984-10-01

    The importance and usefulness of the statistic "Days in accounts receivable" are well known among patient accounts managers. The same principles that apply to that well-known statistic may also be effectively applied to a single unit within any patient accounting department. With the calculation of a unit days in accounts receivable, the same evaluation and measurements of efficiency may be applied to individual files and patient accounts representatives. The results allow individual employees participation in the same measurable goals and objectives as are applied to the overall operation of the department, as well as supplying the patient accounts manager an additional valuable tool in analyzing total accounts receivable.

  17. Numerical models of steady-state and pulsating flows of self-ionizing gas in plasma accelerator channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Kozlov, A. N.; Konovalov, V. S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper continues the series of numerical investigations of self-ionizing gas flows in plasma accelerator channels with an azimuthal magnetic field. The mathematical model is based on the equations of dynamics of a three-component continuous medium consisting of atoms, ions, and electrons; the model is supplemented with the equation of ionization and recombination kinetics within the diffusion approximation with account for photoionization and photorecombination. It also takes into account heat exchange, which in this case is caused by radiative heat conductance. Upon a short history of the issue, the proposed model, numerical methods, and results for steady-state and pulsating flows are described.

  18. Numerical Boundary Condition Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Topics include numerical procedures for treating inflow and outflow boundaries, steady and unsteady discontinuous surfaces, far field boundaries, and multiblock grids. In addition, the effects of numerical boundary approximations on stability, accuracy, and convergence rate of the numerical solution are discussed.

  19. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion

    PubMed Central

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s−1). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction. PMID:26442139

  20. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-10-06

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s(-1)). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction.

  1. Engineering Codes' Numerical Benchmarks for RBMK-1000 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Davidov, V.K.; Rozhdestvenskij, M.I.; Druzhinin, V.E.; Kashevarov, F.Yu.; Gorodkov, S.S.; Kvator, V.M.

    2002-07-01

    Solutions to a number of neutron transport problems, typical for RBMK-1000 reactor calculations were developed with the MCU-REA code, based on a Monte-Carlo method approximately 400 relatively simple problem variants - infinite height cylindrical and square cells and some poly-cells were considered. At that stage sole simplification of the complex internal structure of the RBMK cells was the homogenization of the fuel rods spacers. The burnup calculations were carried out with the detailed account of circa 50 isotopes history. The obtained results are supposed to be used as numerical benchmarks for the verification of engineering code complexes and their separate modules for RBMK-1000 calculations. They can also be considered as results of numerical experiments and analyzed to achieve better understanding of complex fine features of neutron physics processes in reactor. (authors)

  2. Theoretical and numerical studies of density modulated whistlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2004-09-01

    Recently, observations from laboratory experiments, which are relevant to space observations as well, have conclusively revealed the amplitude modulation of whistlers by low-frequency perturbations. Our objective here is to present theoretical and simulation studies of amplitude modulated whistler packets on account of their interaction with background low-frequency density perturbations that are reinforced by the whistler ponderomotive force. Specifically, we show that nonlinear interactions between whistlers and finite amplitude density perturbations are governed by a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the modulated whistlers, and a set of equations for arbitrary large amplitude density perturbations in the presence of the whistler ponderomotive force. The governing equations are solved numerically to show the existence of large scale density perturbations that are self-consistently created by localized modulated whistler wavepackets. Our numerical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental results, as well as have relevance to observations from magnetized space plasmas.

  3. 40 CFR 97.520 - Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts. 97.520 Section 97.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... persons who have an ownership interest with respect to TR NOX Ozone Season allowances held in the...

  4. 40 CFR 97.720 - Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts. 97.720 Section 97.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... persons who have an ownership interest with respect to TR SO2 Group 2 allowances held in the...

  5. 40 CFR 97.420 - Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts. 97.420 Section 97.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... persons who have an ownership interest with respect to TR NOX Annual allowances held in the...

  6. 40 CFR 97.420 - Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts. 97.420 Section 97.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... persons who have an ownership interest with respect to TR NOX Annual allowances held in the...

  7. 40 CFR 97.620 - Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts. 97.620 Section 97.620 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... persons who have an ownership interest with respect to TR SO2 Group 1 allowances held in the...

  8. 40 CFR 97.620 - Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts. 97.620 Section 97.620 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... persons who have an ownership interest with respect to TR SO2 Group 1 allowances held in the...

  9. 40 CFR 97.720 - Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts. 97.720 Section 97.720 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... persons who have an ownership interest with respect to TR SO2 Group 2 allowances held in the...

  10. 40 CFR 97.520 - Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Establishment of compliance accounts, assurance accounts, and general accounts. 97.520 Section 97.520 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... persons who have an ownership interest with respect to TR NOX Ozone Season allowances held in the...

  11. Numerical model of Fanuc AM100iB robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholewa, A.; Świder, J.; Zbilski, A.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents a numerical model of Fanuc AM 100iB robot, prepared in the form of a block diagram in Simulink software, using the SimMechanics toolbox. The main task of the numerical model of Fanuc AM 100iB robot is to calculate the value of torques putting a load on motor shafts, and to calculate the values of kinematic parameters of the robot's arms in real time and in interactive mode. The values and format of torques putting a load on subsequent joints, and then on the motor shafts, resulted from the effect of the simultaneous action of all torques and the delay, resulting from the implementation of numerical calculations in real time. The numerical model developed is a result of design focused on recreating the effects of simultaneous action of all these factors, which are present in the actual drives and affect the consumption of electricity. A very important criterion, taken into account when designing the model, was also its computational efficiency. In addition, the model was used to visualise the work of the tested machine in three-dimensional space.

  12. Processing biobased polymers using plasticizers: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desplentere, Frederik; Cardon, Ludwig; Six, Wim; Erkoç, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In polymer processing, the use of biobased products shows lots of possibilities. Considering biobased materials, biodegradability is in most cases the most important issue. Next to this, bio based materials aimed at durable applications, are gaining interest. Within this research, the influence of plasticizers on the processing of the bio based material is investigated. This work is done for an extrusion grade of PLA, Natureworks PLA 2003D. Extrusion through a slit die equipped with pressure sensors is used to compare the experimental pressure values to numerical simulation results. Additional experimental data (temperature and pressure data along the extrusion screw and die are recorded) is generated on a dr. Collin Lab extruder producing a 25mm diameter tube. All these experimental data is used to indicate the appropriate functioning of the numerical simulation tool Virtual Extrusion Laboratory 6.7 for the simulation of both the industrial available extrusion grade PLA and the compound in which 15% of plasticizer is added. Adding the applied plasticizer, resulted in a 40% lower pressure drop over the extrusion die. The combination of different experiments allowed to fit the numerical simulation results closely to the experimental values. Based on this experience, it is shown that numerical simulations also can be used for modified bio based materials if appropriate material and process data are taken into account.

  13. Numerical and experimental investigation of aeroviscoelastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Polliana C. O.; Guimarães, Thiago A. M.; Pereira, Daniel de A.; Marques, Flávio D.; Rade, Domingos A.

    2017-02-01

    Viscoelastic materials have been widely used for the purpose of passive vibration mitigation in various types of mechanical systems, including, industrial machinery, civil structures and vehicles. In this paper, the use of those materials in aeroelastic systems is investigated, with emphasis placed on the influence of the viscoelastic behavior on the flutter speeds of two-degree-of-freedom typical section models, in which viscoelastic elements are introduced in addition to elastic elements associated to heave and pitch motions. The equations of motion of the aeroelastic system are modified to account for the dependence of the viscoelastic behavior on frequency and temperature, by using the concepts of complex modulus and shift factor. The aerodynamic forces and moments in subsonic regime are modeled according to Theodorsen's method. Numerical simulations are conducted to evaluate the influence of the addition of viscoelastic elements on the flutter speed and elucidate the separated influences of stiffness and damping additions. An experimental wind tunnel setup consisting of a rigid wing supported by flexible elements in pitch and plunge motions has been modified to enable the introduction of viscoelastic elements in parallel to those flexible elements. For various configurations of viscoelastic additions, the flutter instability is characterized from vibration measurements performed for increasing flow speeds in the vicinity of the stability boundary. The experimental results are used to validate the numerical model derived for the aeroviscoelastic system and confirm both qualitatively and quantitatively the predictions of the simulations, especially the possibility of increasing the flutter speed by the inclusion of viscoelastic materials.

  14. Accountability that Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Joseph; Coker, Connie Pullum; Buchanan, Christy; Newsome, Debbie; Milner, Jonathan; Allen, Rodney; Williams, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    The North Carolina Governor's School offers a six-week residential summer program for four hundred academically talented rising juniors. This article measures the school's impact on these students in four fundamental areas: cognitive maturity, moral reasoning, personal learning style, and projections for the future. The results showed that…

  15. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with the aerospace industry, other government agencies, and academia, is leading the effort to develop an advanced multidisciplinary analysis environment for aerospace propulsion systems called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. The initial development of NPSS focused on the analysis and design of airbreathing aircraft engines, but the resulting NPSS framework may be applied to any system, for example: aerospace, rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and even human system modeling. NPSS provides increased flexibility for the user, which reduces the total development time and cost. It is currently being extended to support the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Fundamental Aeronautics Program and the Advanced Virtual Engine Test Cell (AVETeC). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer with numerical zooming on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS development includes capabilities to facilitate collaborative engineering. The NPSS will provide improved tools to develop custom components and to use capability for zooming to higher fidelity codes, coupling to multidiscipline codes, transmitting secure data, and distributing simulations across different platforms. These powerful capabilities extend NPSS from a zero-dimensional simulation tool to a multi-fidelity, multidiscipline system-level simulation tool for the full development life cycle.

  16. Ethical accountability in the cyberspace

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, K.L.; Strohmaier, M.

    1994-12-31

    Conformance with ethical behavior consists of adherence to the standards of conduct for any given group. When standards are not formalized, there can exist ethical disparity from which many diverse problems can result. These problems are especially evident in the cyberspace. Within the cyberspace, the {open_quote}given group{close_quote} is culturally and ethnically diverse. As such, it $8 difficult to hold the individuals to a nonformalized set of standards. Several important issues need to be addressed in order to balance each individual`s dual needs for freedom of expression and protection in the cyberspace. These issues include development of formalized standards, a general protocol for cross- cultural interaction, and ethical accountability.

  17. Aerospace laser sensing of cloudiness: numerical statistical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, A. B.; Kargin, B. A.; Lavrov, M. V.

    2013-08-01

    In the numerical modeling of laser radiation transfer in optically dense cloudy media it is necessary to take into account multiple scattering effects, which alter the spatiotemporal structure of light pulses. The Monte Carlo method makes it possible to achieve the most complete account of these effects in the solution of direct problems of laser sensing of scattering media. This work considers two problems. The first is connected with construction of an adequate optical model of crystalline clouds which takes account their optical anisotropy. The second touches on questions of Monte Carlo modeling of laser radiation transfer in optically anisotropic media. A number of results of numerical experiments are presented which establish a quantitative connection between some cloud parameters and the magnitude and shape of the time convolution of a non-stationary laser return signal reflected by a single-layer continuous crystalline or liquid-droplet cloud and by two-level continuous cloudiness, when the crystalline cloud is located above the liquid-droplet cloud.

  18. Maturity Effects on Students' Perceptions of How Accounting Scandals Impact the Accounting Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theuri, Peter; Weickgenannt, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the impact of recent ethical scandals on business students' perceptions of the accounting profession and related regulatory reforms, and whether such perceptions may be differentiated by maturity. Student maturity is distinguished by age, class standing, and number of accounting classes taken so far. The study results are based…

  19. Numerical model for combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in annular packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiuto, K.; Saito, S.; Ito, K. . Dept. of Production Systems Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    A numerical model is developed for quantitatively analyzing combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in concentric annular packed beds. A packed bed is considered to be a continuous medium for heat transfer, but the porosity distribution within a packed bed is taken into account. To examine the validity of the proposed model, combined conductive and radiative heat transfer through annular packed beds of cordierite or porcelain beads is analyzed numerically using finite differences under conditions corresponding to heat transfer experiments of these packed beds. The resultant temperature profiles and heat transfer characteristics are compared with the experimental results.

  20. Toward Reflective Accountability: Using NSSE for Accountability and Transparency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Alexander C.

    2009-01-01

    Accountability pressures in higher education are not new; they are part of an enduring public policy discourse about the costs and benefits, both individual and social, of higher education. What is relatively new, however, is the prominent place that issues of accountability now occupy on the nation's higher education agenda. There is an important…

  1. Community Accountability: A Theory of Information, Accountability, and School Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Gary T.

    1996-01-01

    Punitive accountability systems rely on eternally induced motives (avoiding sanctions) to improve low-rung educational performance. Community accountability uses information to bring the public and its schools together and improve total school performance. Emphasis is on positive, internal mechanisms to motivate performance and use of market…

  2. Diffraction patterns from multiple tilted laser apertures: numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Anton V.; Polyakov, Vadim M.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a Rayleigh-Sommerfeld based method for numerical calculation of multiple tilted apertures near and far field diffraction patterns. Method is based on iterative procedure of fast Fourier transform based circular convolution of the initial field complex amplitudes distribution and impulse response function modified in order to account aperture and observation planes mutual tilt. The method is computationally efficient and has good accordance with the results of experimental diffraction patterns and can be applied for analysis of spatial noises occurring in master oscillator power amplifier laser systems. The example of diffraction simulation for a Phobos-Ground laser rangefinder amplifier is demonstrated.

  3. Numerical simulations of an oblique detonation wave engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Adelman, Henry; Menees, Gene P.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the numerical methods employed in a code for the simulation of supersonic combustion, which is then applied to the simulation of attached detonations and flames associated with the oblique-detonation wave supersonic combustor concept. The addition of heat by a detonation wave results in a shorter combustor than can be obtained in more conventional scramjet designs. Pure oblique detonations have been produced in a stoichiometric, uniformly mixed hydrogen/air stream; the wave rotates upstream with energy release, according to simple analytical arguments. Flow visualization maps for Mach number and temperature are presented.

  4. A numerical algorithm for endochronic plasticity and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valanis, K. C.; Fan, J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical algorithm based on the finite element method of analysis of the boundary value problem in a continuum is presented, in the case where the plastic response of the material is given in the context of endochronic plasticity. The relevant constitutive equation is expressed in incremental form and plastic effects are accounted for by the method of an induced pseudo-force in the matrix equations. The results of the analysis are compared with observed values in the case of a plate with two symmetric notches and loaded longitudinally in its own plane. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent.

  5. Numerical simulation of magnetic nanofluid natural convection in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2017-02-01

    Free convection of magnetic nanofluid in a porous curved cavity is investigated. Influence of external magnetic source is taken into account. Innovative numerical approach, namely CVFEM, is applied. Impacts of Darcy number (Da), Rayleigh (Ra), Hartmann (Ha) numbers and volume fraction of Fe3O4 (ϕ) on hydrothermal characteristics are examined. Results indicate that heat transfer augmentation augments with rise of Ha and reduces with rise of Da , Ra . Lorentz forces make the nanofluid motion to decrease and enhance the thermal boundary layer thickness. Temperature gradient enhances with increase of Da , Ra , ϕ, but it reduces with rise of Ha.

  6. Numerical simulation of variable thrust engine combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tsung L.; Chiang, Wei-Tang; Jang, Shyh-Dihng

    1992-07-01

    Numerical computations have been conducted for the combustion and fluid-dynamic processes of a variable thrust engine's combustion chamber at the choking condition for two different power levels. The engine in question is to be used by an orbital-maneuvering vehicle. Physical submodels are used in order to account for the two-phase interaction between bipropellant droplet flows and gas-phase flow; nozzle throat conditions are determined by both mass-conservation and thermodynamic relations. In view of the results obtained, the conventional association between fineness of fuel spray and the maximization of combustor efficiency requires reassessment.

  7. The Cyclical Relationship Approach in Teaching Basic Accounting Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golen, Steven

    1981-01-01

    Shows how teachers can provide a more meaningful presentation of various accounting principles by illustrating them through a cyclical relationship approach. Thus, the students see the entire accounting relationship as a result of doing business. (CT)

  8. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  9. Numerical Analysis on Double Dome Stretching Tests of Woven Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonoh; Cao, Jian; Chen, Julie; Sherwood, James

    2007-04-01

    As a result of international corporative benchmark works, material characterization of the woven fabric reinforced composites has been examined to better understand their mechanical properties and to provide the process design information for numerical analysis. Here, in order to predict thermo-forming behaviors of woven composites, the double dome stretching tests have been numerically performed for the balanced plain weave. To account for the change of fiber orientation under the large deformation, the non-orthogonal constitutive model has been utilized and nonlinear friction behavior is incorporated in the simulation. Also the equivalent material properties based on the contact status have been used for the thermo-stamping process. Blank draw-in, punch force history and fiber orientation after forming will be reported.

  10. Newest insights from MHD numerical modeling of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, B.; Del Zanna, L.; Amato, E.; Bucciantini, N.; Bandiera, R.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical MHD models are considered very successful in accounting for many of the observed properties of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), especially those concerning the high energy emission morphology and the inner nebula dynamics. Although PWNe are known to be among the most powerful accelerators in nature, producing particles up to PeV energies, the mechanisms responsible of such an efficient acceleration are still a deep mystery. Indeed, these processes take place in one of the most hostile environment for particle acceleration: the relativistic and highly magnetized termination shock of the pulsar wind. The newest results from numerical simulations of the Crab Nebula, the PWN prototype, will be presented, with special attention to the problem of particle acceleration. In particular it will be shown how a multi-wavelengths analysis of the wisps properties can be used to constrain the particle acceleration mechanisms working at the Crab's termination shock, by identifying the particle acceleration site at the shock front.

  11. The Accountability Illusion: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  12. Efficacy and Accountability in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitzug, Ulrich C.

    This study examined the relationship among accountability, efficacy, and organizational effectiveness by integrating findings from 17 research and development reports on Management by Objectives (MBO), an intervention that incorporates elements and processes of both accountability (goal-setting, measuring and monitoring, feedback) and efficacy…

  13. Teacher Accountability: Trends and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Allan C.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the growing public demand for holding teachers accountable for student performance. Asserts that this position assumes that effectiveness can be measured, whereas the incluence teachers have on student achievement is complex and variable, and may be less than that of family and peers. Describes various State-effort accountability plans.…

  14. Integrating Systems into Accounting Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heatherington, Ralph

    1980-01-01

    By incorporating a discussion of systems into the beginning accounting class, students will have a more accurate picture of business and the role accounting plays in it. Students should understand the purpose of forms, have a basic knowledge of flowcharting principles and symbols, and know how source documents are created. (CT)

  15. Reengineering Elementary Accounting. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Chico.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of a 3-year project at California State University Chico (CSUC) to reengineer the 2-semester elementary accounting course. The new model emphasized, first, shifting from the traditional view of the preparer of accounting information to that of the user; second, forcing the student to adopt…

  16. Careers for Women in Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayburn, Letricia Gayle

    1976-01-01

    This survey showed that most accounting firms are either actively trying to solve the problem of discrimination or are at least interested in seeking solutions. Some companies indicated that they would hire more women college graduates if they were qualified accountants. (Author)

  17. Incentives for Accountability. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    Policymakers and educators are taking a new look at incentives as they work to improve accountability systems. This ERIC Digest examines the role of rewards and sanctions in school reform and identifies key issues in implementing incentive systems. The new accountability is based on five components: carefully designed standards, assessments…

  18. An Accounting International Experience Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Leigh Redd; Rudolph, Holly R.; Seay, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Accounting students need practical opportunities to personally experience other cultures and international business practices if they are to effectively compete in today's global marketplace. In order to address this need, the Department of Accounting at Murray State University offers an international experience course which includes a short-term…

  19. The Accountability Illusion: New Hampshire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  20. The Accountability Illusion: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  1. Machine Accounting. An Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, E. Noah, Ed.

    Designed to prepare students to operate the types of accounting machines used in many medium-sized businesses, this instructor's guide presents a full-year high school course in machine accounting covering 120 hours of instruction. An introduction for the instructor suggests how to adapt the guide to present a 60-hour module which would be…

  2. The Accountability Illusion: New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is to hold schools accountable for ensuring that all their students achieve mastery in reading and math, with a particular focus on groups that have traditionally been left behind. Under NCLB, states submit accountability plans to the U.S. Department of Education detailing the rules and…

  3. GASB's Basis of Accounting Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovlak, Daniel L.

    1986-01-01

    In July 1984, the Governmental Accounting Standards Board began its "Measurement Focus/Basis of Accounting" project, which addresses measurement issues and revenue and expenditure recognition problems involving governmental funds. This article explains the project's background, alternatives discussed by the board, and tentative…

  4. Revised Accounting for Business Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Arlette C.; Key, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has recently issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141 (Revised 2007) Business Combinations. The object of this Statement is to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of reported information about a business combination and its effects. This Statement…

  5. Canadian Accountants: Examining Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Elizabeth; Bagg, Robert; Doyle, Wendy; Young, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine workplace learning strategies, learning facilitators and learning barriers of public accountants in Canada across three professional levels--trainees, managers, and partners. Design/methodology/approach: Volunteer participants from public accounting firms in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick completed a demographic…

  6. Accounting Experiences in Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmond, Tracie; Tiggeman, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses incorporating collaborative learning into accounting classes as a response to the Accounting Education Change Commission's call to install a more active student learner in the classroom. Collaborative learning requires the students to interact with each other and with the material within the classroom setting. It is a…

  7. PLATO Instruction for Elementary Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, James C.

    A progress report of a study using computer assisted instruction (CAI) materials for an elementary course in accounting principles is presented. The study was based on the following objectives: (1) improvement of instruction in the elementary accounting sequence, and (2) help for transfer students from two-year institutions. The materials under…

  8. On the structure of gaseous confined laminar diffusion flames: Numerical investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawid, M. A.; Bulzan, D. L.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The structure and characteristics of gaseous confined laminar diffusion flames are investigated by numerically solving the time-dependent two-dimensional axisymmetric conservation equations. The numerical model accounts for the important chemical and physical processes involved, including axial diffusion, viscous effects, radial convection, and finite-rate chemistry. The numerical results clearly show that the flame has a finite thickness and leakage of fuel vapor into the flame zone is possible. The effect of heat release is found to induce some radial flow. Predicted flame shape and dimensions are compared to the classical Burke-Schumann flame. The numerically calculated flame is observed to be about 15 percent taller and 5 percent narrower than that of the Burke-Schumann solution under the same conditions.

  9. Numerical study of the thm effects on the near-field safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository - bmt1 of the decovalex iii project. part 1: conceptualization and characterization of the problems and summary of results

    SciTech Connect

    Chijimatsu, M.; Nguyen, T.S.; Jing, L.; De Jonge, J.; Kohlmeier, M.; Millard, A.; Rejeb, A.; Rutqvist, J.; Souley, M.; Sugita, Y.

    2004-06-30

    Geological disposal of the spent nuclear fuel uses often the concept of multiple barrier systems. In order to predict the performance of these barriers, mathematical models have been developed, verified and validated against analytical solutions, laboratory tests and field experiments within the international DECOVALEX III project. These models in general consider the full coupling of thermal (T), hydraulic (H) and mechanical (M) processes that would prevail in the geological media around the repository. For Bench Mark Test no. 1 (BMT1) of the DECOVALEX III project, seven multinational research teams studied the implications of coupled THM processes on the safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository at the near-field and are presented in three accompany papers in this issue. This paper is the first of the three companion papers, which provides the conceptualization and characterization of the BMT1 as well as some general conclusions based on the findings of the numerical studies. It also shows the process of building confidence in the mathematical models by calibration with a reference T-H-M experiment with realistic rock mass conditions and bentonite properties and measured outputs of thermal, hydraulic and mechanical variables.

  10. High-Resolution Numerical Simulation and Analysis of Mach Reflection Structures in Detonation Waves in Low-Pressure H 2 –O 2 –Ar Mixtures: A Summary of Results Obtained with the Adaptive Mesh Refinement Framework AMROC

    DOE PAGES

    Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation can be key to the understanding of the multidimensional nature of transient detonation waves. However, the accurate approximation of realistic detonations is demanding as a wide range of scales needs to be resolved. This paper describes a successful solution strategy that utilizes logically rectangular dynamically adaptive meshes. The hydrodynamic transport scheme and the treatment of the nonequilibrium reaction terms are sketched. A ghost fluid approach is integrated into the method to allow for embedded geometrically complex boundaries. Large-scale parallel simulations of unstable detonation structures of Chapman-Jouguet detonations in low-pressure hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures demonstrate the efficiency of the described techniquesmore » in practice. In particular, computations of regular cellular structures in two and three space dimensions and their development under transient conditions, that is, under diffraction and for propagation through bends are presented. Some of the observed patterns are classified by shock polar analysis, and a diagram of the transition boundaries between possible Mach reflection structures is constructed.« less

  11. Accountability in Education: Implications for Guidance Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lessinger, Leon

    An accountability policy is seen as having three basic elements: demonstrated student accomplishment, independent accomplishment audits, and public reports. It requires the regular independent review of results obtained for resources expended. Effects resulting from implementation of such a policy are: (1) the focus of schooling shifts from…

  12. Accountability Indicators from the Viewpoint of Statistical Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Larry

    Few people seriously regard students as "products" coming off an educational assembly line, but notions about accountability and quality improvement in higher education are pervaded by manufacturing ideas and metaphors. Because numerical indicators of quality are inevitably expressed by trend lines or statistical control chars of some kind, they…

  13. Revised numerical wrapper for PIES code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raburn, Daniel; Reiman, Allan; Monticello, Donald

    2015-11-01

    A revised external numerical wrapper has been developed for the Princeton Iterative Equilibrium Solver (PIES code), which is capable of calculating 3D MHD equilibria with islands. The numerical wrapper has been demonstrated to greatly improve the rate of convergence in numerous cases corresponding to equilibria in the TFTR device where magnetic islands are present. The numerical wrapper makes use of a Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov solver along with adaptive preconditioning and a sophisticated subspace-restricted Levenberg-Marquardt backtracking algorithm. The details of the numerical wrapper and several sample results are presented.

  14. Accounting for adsorption and desorption in lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Maximilien; Duvail, Magali; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Frenkel, Daan; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    We report a Lattice-Boltzmann scheme that accounts for adsorption and desorption in the calculation of mesoscale dynamical properties of tracers in media of arbitrary complexity. Lattice Boltzmann simulations made it possible to solve numerically the coupled Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics and Nernst-Planck equations of electrokinetics in complex, heterogeneous media. With the moment propagation scheme, it became possible to extract the effective diffusion and dispersion coefficients of tracers, or solutes, of any charge, e.g., in porous media. Nevertheless, the dynamical properties of tracers depend on the tracer-surface affinity, which is not purely electrostatic and also includes a species-specific contribution. In order to capture this important feature, we introduce specific adsorption and desorption processes in a lattice Boltzmann scheme through a modified moment propagation algorithm, in which tracers may adsorb and desorb from surfaces through kinetic reaction rates. The method is validated on exact results for pure diffusion and diffusion-advection in Poiseuille flows in a simple geometry. We finally illustrate the importance of taking such processes into account in the time-dependent diffusion coefficient in a more complex porous medium.

  15. Accountability,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    Lroubhle in Vietna 3 was Lia i: nur )rwere, js~el to I i( lit a war: ha t we cooli niev m:win. ś I was ai~ 3 ijried( to lJd ~rn Ro,-yal Thai i r 13a...Reich le, ’NCO IC of tuie Tk1£ * Iorce Chapil~ain School told me thit "I am accountalble for miy ac tionrs on and off duty. There’s a LQrice to pay . Thie

  16. The Source of the Symbolic Numerical Distance and Size Effects

    PubMed Central

    Krajcsi, Attila; Lengyel, Gábor; Kojouharova, Petia

    2016-01-01

    Human number understanding is thought to rely on the analog number system (ANS), working according to Weber’s law. We propose an alternative account, suggesting that symbolic mathematical knowledge is based on a discrete semantic system (DSS), a representation that stores values in a semantic network, similar to the mental lexicon or to a conceptual network. Here, focusing on the phenomena of numerical distance and size effects in comparison tasks, first we discuss how a DSS model could explain these numerical effects. Second, we demonstrate that the DSS model can give quantitatively as appropriate a description of the effects as the ANS model. Finally, we show that symbolic numerical size effect is mainly influenced by the frequency of the symbols, and not by the ratios of their values. This last result suggests that numerical distance and size effects cannot be caused by the ANS, while the DSS model might be the alternative approach that can explain the frequency-based size effect. PMID:27917139

  17. What Is Numerical Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, Vernell C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical control (a technique involving coded, numerical instructions for the automatic control and performance of a machine tool) does not replace fundamental machine tool training. It should be added to the training program to give the student an additional tool to accomplish production rates and accuracy that were not possible before. (HD)

  18. OPERATIONS RESEARCH AND THE ACCOUNTANT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    There has been a certain amount of scepticism and even apprehension on the part of accountants with respect to the sudden appearance of scientists in...sharpened form of common sense. As an illustration of the use of mathematics, a cost accounting problem is discussed and it is shown that a statistical...definition of ’overhead’ can lead to simplified pricing methods and management controls. Also, some of the confusing aspects of ’overhead’ accounting can be avoided by using mathematical techniques. (Author)

  19. The construction of mental accounts in benefits decision making.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, M E

    1999-01-01

    Mental accounting describes the psychological creation of separate accounts or budgets for categories of decisions. This process simplifies complex budget decisions in ways that significantly affect consumer behavior (Kahneman and Tversky 1981, 1984) and has been incorporated into economic theory (Shefrin and Thaler 1988). The impact of mental accounts on benefits decisions is likely to be significant. The creation of these accounts is context dependent, and prior work has demonstrated that the source and timing of payments affects the allocation of resources into mental accounts. Results from this work demonstrate that other normatively unimportant factors of the choice such as presentation order impact the construction of mental accounts. These results describe mental accounting biases within the context of health care benefits and demonstrate that the construction of mental accounts is highly unstable and easily manipulated within this domain.

  20. Numerical modeling of the spring thermal bar and pollutant transport in a large lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsydenov, Bair O.; Kay, Anthony; Starchenko, Alexander V.

    2016-08-01

    The spring riverine thermal bar phenomenon is investigated numerically on an example of Lake Baikal, and the spread of pollutants coming from the Selenga River is forecast using the 2.5 D non-hydrostatic model in the Boussinesq approximation. This hydrodynamic model takes into account the diurnal variability of the heat fluxes on the lake surface and the effects of wind and the Earth's rotation. The results of numerical modeling show that the variability of the total heat flux over 24 h plays a significant role in the variation of the thermal bar movement rate that contributes to the rapid mixing of impurities entering with river water.

  1. Direct numerical simulations of a reacting turbulent mixing layer by a pseudospectral-spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Givi, Peyman

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the implementation of the spectral-element technique for simulating a chemically reacting, spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. Attention is given to experimental and numerical studies that have investigated the development, evolution, and mixing characteristics of shear flows. A mathematical formulation is presented of the physical configuration of the spatially developing reacting mixing layer, in conjunction with a detailed representation of the spectral-element method's application to the numerical simulation of mixing layers. Results from 2D and 3D calculations of chemically reacting mixing layers are given.

  2. Numerical study of soap-film flow by nonuniform alternating electric fields.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, M; Shirsavar, R; Mollaei, S; Ramos, A

    2017-02-01

    Fluid flow of suspended liquid films induced by non-uniform alternating electric fields has been reported. The electric fields were generated by two rod-like electrodes perpendicular to the fluid surface. The observed fluid flow was explained qualitatively by considering a charge induction mechanism, where the electric field actuates on the charge induced on the film surface. In this paper we perform a numerical study of this fluid flow taking into account the charge induction mechanism. The numerical results are compared with experiments and good agreement is found. Finally, we propose the application of the device as a new kind of two dimensional fluid pump.

  3. Numerical study of soap-film flow by nonuniform alternating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, M.; Shirsavar, R.; Mollaei, S.; Ramos, A.

    2017-02-01

    Fluid flow of suspended liquid films induced by non-uniform alternating electric fields has been reported. The electric fields were generated by two rod-like electrodes perpendicular to the fluid surface. The observed fluid flow was explained qualitatively by considering a charge induction mechanism, where the electric field actuates on the charge induced on the film surface. In this paper we perform a numerical study of this fluid flow taking into account the charge induction mechanism. The numerical results are compared with experiments and good agreement is found. Finally, we propose the application of the device as a new kind of two dimensional fluid pump.

  4. Being Accountable: Why Friendship, Vulnerability, and Forgiveness Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pignatelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Regrettably, accountability has largely come to mean suffering externally imposed consequences if results on simplistic, reductive measures of success are not met. Just as worrisome, this notion of accountability is internalized, deemed inevitable, and trivializes our understanding of moral accountability. This essay is an attempt to posit an…

  5. Sound propagation in a duct of periodic wall structure. [numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurze, U.

    1978-01-01

    A boundary condition, which accounts for the coupling in the sections behind the duct boundary, is given for the sound-absorbing duct with a periodic structure of the wall lining and using regular partition walls. The soundfield in the duct is suitably described by the method of differences. For locally active walls this renders an explicit approximate solution for the propagation constant. Coupling may be accounted for by the method of differences in a clear manner. Numerical results agree with measurements and yield information which has technical applications.

  6. 77 FR 202 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Updated Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting References

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... 9000-AM00 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Updated Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting... accounting standards owing to the Financial Accounting Standards Board's Accounting Standards Codification of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. DATES: Effective Date: February 2, 2012. FOR FURTHER...

  7. Counting, accounting, and accountability: Helen Verran's relational empiricism.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Martha

    2015-10-01

    Helen Verran uses the term 'relational empiricism' to describe situated empirical inquiry that is attentive to the relations that constitute its objects of study, including the investigator's own practices. Relational empiricism draws on and reconfigures Science and Technology Studies' traditional concerns with reflexivity and relationality, casting empirical inquiry as an important and non-innocent world-making practice. Through a reading of Verran's postcolonial projects in Nigeria and Australia, this article develops a concept of empirical and political 'accountability' to complement her relational empiricism. In Science and an African Logic, Verran provides accounts of the relations that materialize her empirical objects. These accounts work to decompose her original objects, generating new objects that are more promising for the specific postcolonial contexts of her work. The process of decomposition is part of remaining accountable for her research methods and accountable to the worlds she is working in and writing about. This is a practice of narrating relations and learning to tell better technoscientific stories. What counts as better, however, is not given, but is always contextual and at stake. In this way, Verran acts not as participant-observer, but as participant-storyteller, telling stories to facilitate epistemic flourishing within and as part of a historically located community of practice. The understanding of accountability that emerges from this discussion is designed as a contribution, both practical and evocative, to the theoretical toolkit of Science and Technology Studies scholars who are interested in thinking concretely about how we can be more accountable to the worlds we study.

  8. Physical and Relativistic Numerical Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Anninos, Peter

    1998-01-01

    In order to account for the observable Universe, any comprehensive theory or model of cosmology must draw from many disciplines of physics, including gauge theories of strong and weak interactions, the hydrodynamics and microphysics of baryonic matter, electromagnetic fields, and spacetime curvature, for example. Although it is difficult to incorporate all these physical elements into a single complete model of our Universe, advances in computing methods and technologies have contributed significantly towards our understanding of cosmological models, the Universe, and astrophysical processes within them. A sample of numerical calculations addressing specific issues in cosmology are reviewed in this article: from the Big Bang singularity dynamics to the fundamental interactions of gravitational waves; from the quark-hadron phase transition to the large scale structure of the Universe. The emphasis, although not exclusively, is on those calculations designed to test different models of cosmology against the observed Universe.

  9. Accounting Internships: A Practical Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Linvol G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe a framework for administration and implementation of postsecondary internships in accounting. Topics covered include (1) qualifications, (2) duration, (3) timing, (4) granting credit and providing grades, and (5) evaluation criteria. Implementation guidelines are included. (CH)

  10. Speaking the Language of Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Leslie B.

    1997-01-01

    Round Robin is a game in which students must express accounting information in their own words. It is a means of familiarizing students with the language of vocabulary and of developing their verbal expressiveness. (SK)

  11. A numerical method of regenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaowei; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2004-02-01

    A numerical method for regenerators is introduced in this paper. It is not only suitable for the regenerators in cryocoolers and Stirling engines, but also suitable for the stacks in acoustic engines and the pulse tubes in pulse tube refrigerators. The numerical model is one dimensional periodic unsteady flow model. The numerical method is based on the control volume concept with the implicitly solve method. The iteration acceleration method, which considers the one-dimensional periodic unsteady problem as the steady two-dimensional problem, is used for decreasing the calculation time. By this method, the regenerator in an inertance tube pulse tube refrigerator was simulated. The result is useful for understanding how the inefficiency of the regenerator changes with the inertance effect.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teukolsky, Saul

    2003-04-01

    Einstein's equations of general relativity are prime candidates for numerical solution on supercomputers. There is some urgency in being able to carry out such simulations: Large-scale gravitational wave detectors are now coming on line, and the most important expected signals cannot be predicted except numerically. Problems involving black holes are perhaps the most interesting, yet also particularly challenging computationally. One difficulty is that inside a black hole there is a physical singularity that cannot be part of the computational domain. A second difficulty is the disparity in length scales between the size of the black hole and the wavelength of the gravitational radiation emitted. A third difficulty is that all existing methods of evolving black holes in three spatial dimensions are plagued by instabilities that prohibit long-term evolution. I will describe the ideas that are being introduced in numerical relativity to deal with these problems, and discuss the results of recent calculations of black hole collisions.

  13. Numerical solution of the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    This study presents three numerical algorithms to solve the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics. The algorithms have been developed taking into account delayed neutrons and they have been implemented into the novel MCART code, which solves the neutron transport equation for two-dimensional geometry and an arbitrary number of energy groups. The MCART code uses regular mesh for the representation of the spatial domain, it models up-scattering, and takes advantage of OPENMP and OPENGL algorithms for parallel computing and plotting, respectively. The code has been benchmarked with the multiplication factor results of a Boiling Water Reactor, with the analytical results for a prompt jump transient in an infinite medium, and with PARTISN and TDTORT results for cross section and source transients. The numerical simulations have shown that only two numerical algorithms are stable for small time steps.

  14. Insight into the physics of foam densification via numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenhagen, S. G.; Brydon, A. D.; Guilkey, J. E.

    2005-03-01

    Foamed materials are increasingly finding application in engineering systems on account of their unique properties. The basic mechanics which gives rise to these properties is well established, they are the result of collapsing the foam microstructure. Despite a basic understanding, the relationship between the details of foam microstructure and foam bulk response is generally unknown. With continued advances in computational power, many researchers have turned to numerical simulation to gain insight into the relationship between foam microstructure and bulk properties. However, numerical simulation of foam microscale deformation is a very challenging computational task and, to date, simulations over the full range of bulk deformations in which these materials operate have not been reported. Here a particle technique is demonstrated to be well-suited for this computational challenge, permitting simulation of the compression of foam microstructures to full densification. Computations on idealized foam microstructures are in agreement with engineering guidelines and various experimental results. Dependencies on degree of microstructure regularity and material properties are demonstrated. A surprising amount of porosity is found in fully-densified foams. The presence of residual porosity can strongly influence dynamic material response and hence needs to be accounted for in bulk (average) constitutive models of these materials.

  15. Some remarks on the numerical computation of integrals on an unbounded interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capobianco, M.; Criscuolo, G.

    2007-08-01

    An account of the error and the convergence theory is given for Gauss?Laguerre and Gauss?Radau?Laguerre quadrature formulae. We develop also truncated models of the original Gauss rules to compute integrals extended over the positive real axis. Numerical examples confirming the theoretical results are given comparing these rules among themselves and with different quadrature formulae proposed by other authors (Evans, Int. J. Comput. Math. 82:721?730, 2005; Gautschi, BIT 31:438?446, 1991).

  16. Accounting for false negatives in hotspot detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Wilson, John E.

    2007-08-28

    Hotspot sampling designs are used in environmental sampling to identify the location of one (or more) contiguous regions of elevated contamination. These regions are known as hotspots. The problem of how to calculate the probability of detecting an elliptical hotspot using a rectangular or triangular grid of sampling points was addressed by Singer and Wickman in 1969. This approach presumed that any sample which coincided with a hotspot would detect the hotspot without error. However, for many sampling methodologies, there is a chance that the hotspot will not be detected even though it has been sampled directly--a false negative. We present a mathematical solution and a numerical algorithm which account for false negatives when calculating the probability of detecting hotspots that are circular in shape.

  17. Rocket engine numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: a definition of the rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS); objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusions.

  18. Rocket engine numerical simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: a rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS) definition; objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusion.

  19. Accounting and accountability: observations on the AHERF settlements.

    PubMed

    Maco, P S; Weinstein, S J

    2000-10-01

    Recent enforcement proceedings involving health care and accounting--relating primarily to the Allegheny Health, Education and Research Foundation (AHERF)--have sparked renewed interest in the activities of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in the municipal securities market. Officials and accountants who are working for public-sector issuers in the healthcare industry have responsibilities under the Federal securities laws. Other issues of relevance include disclosure in the secondary market as well as upon initial issuance, and the significance of antifraud actions in other areas.

  20. Accounting and Accountability for Distributed and Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thigpen, William; McGinnis, Laura F.; Hacker, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    While the advent of distributed and grid computing systems will open new opportunities for scientific exploration, the reality of such implementations could prove to be a system administrator's nightmare. A lot of effort is being spent on identifying and resolving the obvious problems of security, scheduling, authentication and authorization. Lurking in the background, though, are the largely unaddressed issues of accountability and usage accounting: (1) mapping resource usage to resource users; (2) defining usage economies or methods for resource exchange; (3) describing implementation standards that minimize and compartmentalize the tasks required for a site to participate in a grid.