Science.gov

Sample records for accounts energy flows

  1. Transonic flow over airfoils at energy input and with account for the real properties of the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aul'Chenko, S. M.; Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2010-07-01

    We have investigated the influence of molecular (thermodynamic and transfer) properties of the air on the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the gas-dynamic effects of pulsed-periodic energy input in transonic flow over airfoils. The influence of the transfer properties (viscosity) has been taken into account approximately within the boundary layer. It has been shown that qualitative estimates of the above effects do not depend on the account of molecular properties of the air, but the existence of internal degrees of freedom leads to a marked lowering of the temperature level as compared to the ideal gas model. Account of the viscosity somewhat decreases the energy input estimates. The influence of the airfoil shape on the aerodynamic characteristics at energy input has been investigated.

  2. US energy flow, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, C.K.; Borg, I.Y.

    1982-10-01

    Flow diagrams to describe the US energy situation have been prepared since 1972 by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In 1981 the energy consumption was 73 quads (or 73 x 10/sup 15/ Btu) - down from 75 quads in 1980. Oil continues to dominate the picture as it comprises 45% of the total energy used. Net oil use (exclusive of oil purchased for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and exports) fell 8%; oil imports declined 14%. In contrast to oil, use of natural gas and coal remained at 1980 levels. Decreased use of residual oils, principally for electric power generation, account for much of the drop in oil use. Increased use of coal and nuclear energy for power generation almost compensated for the decrease in use of oil in that end-use. Transmitted power remained at 1980 levels. The remainder of the drop in energy usage is attributed to price-driven conservation, increased efficiencies in end-use and the recession that prevailed during most of the year. The share of the energy drop attributable to the recession is estimated by various analysts to be on the order of 40 to 50%. The fact that for a given dollar of US GNP, oil consumption has declined faster than overall energy consumption attests to the role factors other than the economic slow-down have had on decreased energy consumption. Gasoline consumption remained at 1980 levels and the total transportation end-use sector increased its energy consumption by a modest 3%.

  3. US energy flow, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1992-06-01

    Trends in energy consumption and assessment of energy sources are discussed. Specific topics discussed include: energy flow charts; comparison of energy use with 1990 and earlier years; supply and demand of fossil fuels (oils, natural gas, coal); electrical supply and demand; and nuclear power.

  4. Energy accounting and optimization for mobile systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Mian

    Energy accounting determines how much a software process contributes to the total system energy consumption. It is the foundation for evaluating software and has been widely used by operating system based energy management. While various energy accounting policies have been tried, there is no known way to evaluate them directly simply because it is hard to track every hardware use by software in a heterogeneous multi-core system like modern smartphones and tablets. In this thesis, we provide the ground truth for energy accounting based on multi-player game theory and offer the first evaluation of existing energy accounting policies, revealing their important flaws. The proposed ground truth is based on Shapley value, a single value solution to multi-player games of which four axiomatic properties are natural and self-evident to energy accounting. To obtain the Shapley value-based ground truth, one only needs to know if a process is active during the time under question and the system energy consumption during the same time. We further provide a utility optimization formulation of energy management and show, surprisingly, that energy accounting does not matter for existing energy management solutions that control the energy use of a process by giving it an energy budget, or budget based energy management (BEM). We show an optimal energy management (OEM) framework can always outperform BEM. While OEM does not require any form of energy accounting, it is related to Shapley value in that both require the system energy consumption for all possible combination of processes under question. We provide a novel system solution that meet this requirement by acquiring system energy consumption in situ for an OS scheduler period, i.e.,10 ms. We report a prototype implementation of both Shapley value-based energy accounting and OEM based scheduling. Using this prototype and smartphone workload, we experimentally demonstrate how erroneous existing energy accounting policies can

  5. Energy accounting for solar and alternative energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, W. D., Jr.

    Shortcomings in energy data collection, display and accounting practices are of minor consequence in an economy of today in which most end use services are provided via fossil fuels and electricity. However, the emergence of a variety of alternative technologies that might be used to provide these services suggests that present accounting practices be reexamined and a more appropriate system devised. The paper proposes an energy accounting framework based upon the actual services provided to end users. An energy service is a measure of the service actually provided to ultimate consumers by their own use of energy, quantified, for example, using units of work or of heat at various temperatures. Fifteen categories of energy service are described and some of their characteristics are identified. The proposed energy accounting framework consists of two matrices - an energy service matrix and an energy carrier matrix. The energy service matrix displays quantities of energy carriers used to provide energy services. The energy carrier matrix displays quantities of energy carriers used to produce and distribute energy carriers to ultimate consumers.

  6. Visualizing Accounting Transaction Flows into Financial Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Professors who teach the introductory accounting course should ask themselves: "What are the core concepts that I wish to have my non-majors remember if I meet them at their ten-year alumni class reunion?" There is a fundamental logic to financial accounting. This teaching note presents foundational accounting concepts in a manner that…

  7. The FASB explores accounting for future cash flows.

    PubMed

    Luecke, R W; Meeting, D T

    2001-03-01

    The FASB's Statement of Financial Accounting Concepts No. 7, Using Cash Flow Information and Present Value in Accounting Measurements (Statement No. 7), presents the board's views regarding how cash-flow information and present values should be used in accounting for future cash flows when information on fair values is not available. Statement No. 7 presents new concepts regarding how an asset's present value should be calculated and when the interest method of allocation should be used. The FASB proposes a present-value method that takes into account the degree of uncertainty associated with future cash flows among different assets and liabilities. The FASB also suggests that rather than use estimated cash flows (in which a single set of cash flows and a single interest rate is used to reflect the risk associated with an asset or liability), accountants should use expected cash flows (in which all expectations about possible cash flows are used) in calculating present values.

  8. Molecular vibrational energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruebele, M.; Bigwood, R.

    This article reviews some recent work in molecular vibrational energy flow (IVR), with emphasis on our own computational and experimental studies. We consider the problem in various representations, and use these to develop a family of simple models which combine specific molecular properties (e.g. size, vibrational frequencies) with statistical properties of the potential energy surface and wavefunctions. This marriage of molecular detail and statistical simplification captures trends of IVR mechanisms and survival probabilities beyond the abilities of purely statistical models or the computational limitations of full ab initio approaches. Of particular interest is IVR in the intermediate time regime, where heavy-atom skeletal modes take over the IVR process from hydrogenic motions even upon X H bond excitation. Experiments and calculations on prototype heavy-atom systems show that intermediate time IVR differs in many aspects from the early stages of hydrogenic mode IVR. As a result, IVR can be coherently frozen, with potential applications to selective chemistry.

  9. Energy fluxes in turbulent separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollicone, J.-P.; Battista, F.; Gualtieri, P.; Casciola, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent separation in channel flow containing a curved wall is studied using a generalised form of Kolmogorov equation. The equation successfully accounts for inhomogeneous effects in both the physical and separation spaces. We investigate the scale-by-scale energy dynamics in turbulent separated flow induced by a curved wall. The scale and spatial fluxes are highly dependent on the shear layer dynamics and the recirculation bubble forming behind the lower curved wall. The intense energy produced in the shear layer is transferred to the recirculation region, sustaining the turbulent velocity fluctuations. The energy dynamics radically changes depending on the physical position inside the domain, resembling planar turbulent channel dynamics downstream.

  10. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  11. Accounting For Compressibility In Viscous Flow In Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinle, Frank W.; Gee, Ken; Murthy, Sreedhara V.

    1991-01-01

    Method developed to account for effects of compressibility in viscous flows through long, circular pipes of uniform diameter. Based on approximation of variations in density and velocity across pipe cross section by profile equations developed for boundary-layer flow between flat plates.

  12. Accounting for environmental flow requirements in global water assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, A. V.; Ludwig, F.; Biemans, H.; Hoff, H.; Kabat, P.

    2014-12-01

    As the water requirement for food production and other human needs grows, quantification of environmental flow requirements (EFRs) is necessary to assess the amount of water needed to sustain freshwater ecosystems. EFRs are the result of the quantification of water necessary to sustain the riverine ecosystem, which is calculated from the mean of an environmental flow (EF) method. In this study, five EF methods for calculating EFRs were compared with 11 case studies of locally assessed EFRs. We used three existing methods (Smakhtin, Tennant, and Tessmann) and two newly developed methods (the variable monthly flow method (VMF) and the Q90_Q50 method). All methods were compared globally and validated at local scales while mimicking the natural flow regime. The VMF and the Tessmann methods use algorithms to classify the flow regime into high, intermediate, and low-flow months and they take into account intra-annual variability by allocating EFRs with a percentage of mean monthly flow (MMF). The Q90_Q50 method allocates annual flow quantiles (Q90 and Q50) depending on the flow season. The results showed that, on average, 37% of annual discharge was required to sustain environmental flow requirement. More water is needed for environmental flows during low-flow periods (46-71% of average low-flows) compared to high-flow periods (17-45% of average high-flows). Environmental flow requirements estimates from the Tennant, Q90_Q50, and Smakhtin methods were higher than the locally calculated EFRs for river systems with relatively stable flows and were lower than the locally calculated EFRs for rivers with variable flows. The VMF and Tessmann methods showed the highest correlation with the locally calculated EFRs (R2=0.91). The main difference between the Tessmann and VMF methods is that the Tessmann method allocates all water to EFRs in low-flow periods while the VMF method allocates 60% of the flow in low-flow periods. Thus, other water sectors such as irrigation can withdraw

  13. Energy accounting for eleven vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, C.E.; Daugherty, M.J.

    1982-09-01

    Energy inputs and outputs were comparatively analyzed for 11 vegetable oil fuels. Three-year average prices and production quantities were also compared. All nonirrigated oil crops had favorable energy ratios. Soybean, peanut and sunflower oils were the most promising as domestic fuel sources. Rapeseed oil would also be promising if significant domestic production can be established.

  14. Accounting for environmental flow requirements in global water assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, A. V.; Ludwig, F.; Biemans, H.; Hoff, H.; Kabat, P.

    2013-12-01

    With growing water needs for food production, it is necessary to improve the quantification of "Environmental Flow Requirements (EFRs)" to secure enough water for the freshwater ecosystems. In this study, five methods for calculating EFRs were compared to 11 case studies of locally-calculated EFRs. Three of the methods already existed (Smakhtin, Tennant and Tessmann) and two were developed in this study (the Variable Monthly Flow method and the Q90_Q50 method). The Variable Monthly Flow (VFM) method mimics for the first time the natural flow regimes while being "validated" at global and local scales. The VFM uses algorithms to classify flow regime into high, intermediate and low-flow months to take into account intra-annual variability by allocating EFRs with a percentage of mean monthly flow (MMF). The Q90_Q50 method allocates annual flow quantiles (Q50 and Q90) depending on the flow season. The results showed that, over all methods, 37% of annual discharge was allocated to "Nature" with a higher pressure on low flow requirements (LFR = 46% to 71% of average low flows) than on high flow requirements (HFR = 17% to 45% of average high flows). Environmental flow methods using fixed annual thresholds such as Tennant, Q90_Q50 and Smakhtin seemed to overestimate EFRs of stable flow regimes and underestimate EFRs of variable flow regimes. VFM and Tessmann methods showed the highest correlation with the locally-calculated EFRs (R2 = 0.91). The main difference between the Tessmann and VFM methods is that Tessmann method does not allow any water withdrawals during the low-flow season. Those five methods were tested within the global vegetation and hydrological model LPJml. The calculated global annual EFRs for "fair" ecological conditions represent between 25 to 46% of mean annual flow (MAF). Variable flow regimes such as the Nile have lower EFRs (ranging from 12 to 48% of MAF) than stable tropical regimes such as the Amazon (EFRs ranging from 30 to 67% of MAF).

  15. Fluid flow nozzle energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Winn, Tyler; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Power generation schemes that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce about 1 Watt average power with long-life (decades) are actively being developed. A variety of proposed energy harvesting schemes could be used to extract energy from this environment but each of these has their own limitations that limit their practical use. Since vibrating piezoelectric structures are solid state and can be driven below their fatigue limit, harvesters based on these structures are capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades); thereby, possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. An initial survey [1] identified that spline nozzle configurations can be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to convert the abundant flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. This paper presents current flow energy harvesting designs and experimental results of specific spline nozzle/ bimorph design configurations which have generated suitable power per nozzle at or above well production analogous flow rates. Theoretical models for non-dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical model are also presented in this paper to optimize the flow harvesting system.

  16. California energy flow in 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1994-04-01

    For the past 16 years energy flow diagrams for the State of California have been prepared from available data by members of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. They have proven to be useful tools in graphically expressing energy supply and use in the State as well as illustrating the difference between particular years and between the State and the US as a whole. As far as is possible, similar data sources have been used to prepare the diagrams from year to year and identical assumptions{sup la-le} concerning conversion efficiencies have been made in order to minimize inconsistencies in the data and analyses. Sources of data used in this report are given in Appendix B and C; unavoidably the sources used over the 1976--1993 period have varied as some data bases are no longer available. In addition, we continue to see differences in specific data reported by different agencies for a given year. In particular, reported data on supply and usage in industrial/commercial/residential end-use categories have shown variability amongst the data gathering agencies, which bars detailed comparisons from year to year. Nonetheless, taken overall, valid generalizations can be made concerning gross trends and changes.

  17. Regional material flow accounting and environmental pressures: the Spanish case.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Sergio; Carpintero, Óscar; Lomas, Pedro L

    2015-02-17

    This paper explores potential contributions of regional material flow accounting to the characterization of environmental pressures. With this aim, patterns of material extraction, trade, consumption, and productivity for the Spanish regions were studied within the 1996-2010 period. The main methodological variation as compared to whole-country based approaches is the inclusion of interregional trade, which can be separately assessed from the international exchanges. Each region was additionally profiled regarding its commercial exchanges with the rest of the regions and the rest of the world and the related environmental pressures. Given its magnitude, interregional trade is a significant source of environmental pressure. Most of the exchanges occur across regions and different extractive and trading patterns also arise at this scale. These differences are particularly great for construction minerals, which in Spain represent the largest share of extracted and consumed materials but do not cover long distances, so their impact is visible mainly at the regional level. During the housing bubble, economic growth did not improve material productivity.

  18. Improved accounting of emissions from utility energy storage system operation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Denholm; Tracey Holloway

    2005-12-01

    Several proposed utility-scale energy storage systems in the U.S. will use the spare output capacity of existing electric power systems to create the equivalent of new load-following plants that can rapidly respond to fluctuations in electricity demand and increase the flexibility of baseload generators. New energy storage systems using additional generation from existing plants can directly compete with new traditional sources of load-following and peaking electricity, yet this application of energy storage is not required to meet many of the Clean Air Act standards required of new electricity generators (e.g., coal- or gas-fired power plants). This study evaluates the total emissions that will likely result from the operation of a new energy storage facility when coupled with an average existing U.S. coal-fired power plant and estimates that the emission rates of SO{sub 2} and NOx will be considerably higher than the rate of a new plant meeting Clean Air Act standards, even accounting for the efficiency benefits of energy storage. This study suggests that improved emissions 'accounting' might be necessary to provide accurate environmental comparisons between energy storage and more traditional sources of electricity generation. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Improved accounting of emissions from utility energy storage system operation.

    PubMed

    Denholm, Paul; Holloway, Tracey

    2005-12-01

    Several proposed utility-scale energy storage systems in the U.S. will use the spare output capacity of existing electric power systems to create the equivalent of new load-following plants that can rapidly respond to fluctuations in electricity demand and increase the flexibility of baseload generators. New energy storage systems using additional generation from existing plants can directly compete with new traditional sources of load-following and peaking electricity, yet this application of energy storage is not required to meet many of the Clean Air Act standards required of new electricity generators (e.g., coal- or gas-fired power plants). This study evaluates the total emissions that will likely result from the operation of a new energy storage facility when coupled with an average existing U.S. coal-fired power plant and estimates that the emission rates of SO2 and NOx will be considerably higher than the rate of a new plant meeting Clean Air Act standards, even accounting for the efficiency benefits of energy storage. This study suggests that improved emissions "accounting" might be necessary to provide accurate environmental comparisons between energy storage and more traditional sources of electricity generation.

  20. Magnetic energy flow in the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modisette, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the effect of rotation (tangential flow) of the solar wind on the conclusions of Whang (1971) suggesting an increase in the solar wind velocity due to the conversion of magnetic energy to kinetic energy. It is shown that the effect of the rotation of the sun on the magnetic energy flow results in most of the magnetic energy being transported by magnetic shear stress near the sun.

  1. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Walkemeyer, Phillip E. (Inventor); Hall, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Lee, Hyeong Jae (Inventor); Colonius, Tim (Inventor); Tosi, Phillipe (Inventor); Kim, Namhyo (Inventor); Sun, Kai (Inventor); Corbett, Thomas Gary (Inventor); Arrazola, Alvaro Jose (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A flow energy harvesting device having a harvester pipe includes a flow inlet that receives flow from a primary pipe, a flow outlet that returns the flow into the primary pipe, and a flow diverter within the harvester pipe having an inlet section coupled to the flow inlet, a flow constriction section coupled to the inlet section and positioned at a midpoint of the harvester pipe and having a spline shape with a substantially reduced flow opening size at a constriction point along the spline shape, and an outlet section coupled to the constriction section. The harvester pipe may further include a piezoelectric structure extending from the inlet section through the constriction section and point such that the fluid flow past the constriction point results in oscillatory pressure amplitude inducing vibrations in the piezoelectric structure sufficient to cause a direct piezoelectric effect and to generate electrical power for harvesting.

  2. Energy and carbon accounting to compare bioenergy crops.

    PubMed

    Borak, Brian; Ort, Donald R; Burbaum, Jonathan J

    2013-06-01

    To compare the utility of current and future biofuels and biofuel feedstocks in an objective manner can be extremely challenging. This challenge exists because agricultural data are inherently variable, experimental techniques are crop-dependent, and the literatures usually report relative, rather than absolute, values. Here, we discuss the 'PETRO approach', a systematic approach to evaluate new crops. This approach accounts for not only the capture of solar energy but also the capture of atmospheric carbon (as CO2) to generate a final carbon-based liquid fuel product. The energy yield, per unit area, of biofuel crops grown in different climate zones can thus be benchmarked and quantitatively compared in terms of both carbon gain and solar energy conversion efficiency.

  3. How to Organize and Communicatre Your Energy Data. A Guide to Energy Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwall, Bonnie J.

    Stategies for organizing data on a district's energy use are presented in this guide, originally intended for use in California schools. Also presented are methods of communicating this information to those involved in planning, in recordkeeping, and in motivating staff and students to save energy. The energy accounting system offered in the first…

  4. Promoting Accountability and Enhancing Efficiency: Using National Education Accounts to Track Expenditure Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chawla, Deepika; Forbes, Phyllis

    2010-01-01

    Increasing accountability and efficiency in the use of public and out-of-pocket financing in education are critical to realizing the maximum impact of the meager allocations to education in most developing countries. While broad estimates and numbers are routinely collected by most national ministries and state departments of education, the lack…

  5. Energy density and energy flow of magnetoplasmonic waves on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2017-03-01

    By means the linearized magnetohydrodynamic theory, expressions for energy density and energy flow are derived for the p-polarized surface magnetoplasmon polaritons on graphene in the Voigt configuration, where a static magnetic field is normal to the graphene surface. Numerical results show that the external magnetic field has significant impact on the energy density and energy transport velocity of magnetoplasmon waves in the long-wavelength region, while total power flow vary only weakly with magnetostatic field. The velocity of energy propagation is proved to be identical with group velocity of the surface waves.

  6. Accounting for flow dependence of respiratory resistance during exercise.

    PubMed

    de Bisschop, Claire; Pichon, Aurélien; Guénard, Hervé; Denjean, André

    2003-06-12

    Studies of airway function during exercise have produced conflicting results both in healthy and diseased subjects. Respiratory resistance (Rrs) was measured using an impulse oscillation technique. A flow/resistance curve was established for each of 16 healthy males during voluntary hyperventilation (VHV) at rest. Then, Rrs and flow were measured immediately (t(0)) and 90 sec (t(90)) after exercise on a cycle ergometer at 60, 70, and 80% of maximal aerobic power. The flow/resistance relationship at rest during VHV was used to assess the flow dependence of Rrs. Rrs at t(0) was higher than at rest (P <0.01) but lower than Rrs obtained at matched flow during VHV (P <0.05). In healthy subjects, the linear increase in Rrs with VHV indicates airflow dependency of Rrs following Rohrer's equation. The relative decrease in Rrs with exercise suggests bronchodilation. The bronchodilating effect disappeared promptly when exercise was stopped suggesting that it may have been related to a reflex mechanism.

  7. Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashway, Larry

    1999-01-01

    This issue reviews publications that provide a starting point for principals looking for a way through the accountability maze. Each publication views accountability differently, but collectively these readings argue that even in an era of state-mandated assessment, principals can pursue proactive strategies that serve students' needs. James A.…

  8. Energy flows, metabolism and translation

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Robert; Boiteau, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Thermodynamics provides an essential approach to understanding how living organisms survive in an organized state despite the second law. Exchanges with the environment constantly produce large amounts of entropy compensating for their own organized state. In addition to this constraint on self-organization, the free energy delivered to the system, in terms of potential, is essential to understand how a complex chemistry based on carbon has emerged. Accordingly, the amount of free energy brought about through discrete events must reach the strength needed to induce chemical changes in which covalent bonds are reorganized. The consequence of this constraint was scrutinized in relation to both the development of a carbon metabolism and that of translation. Amino acyl adenylates involved as aminoacylation intermediates of the latter process reach one of the higher free energy levels found in biochemistry, which may be informative on the range in which energy was exchanged in essential early biochemical processes. The consistency of this range with the amount of energy needed to weaken covalent bonds involving carbon may not be accidental but the consequence of the abovementioned thermodynamic constraints. This could be useful in building scenarios for the emergence and early development of translation. PMID:21930587

  9. Energy flows, metabolism and translation.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Robert; Boiteau, Laurent

    2011-10-27

    Thermodynamics provides an essential approach to understanding how living organisms survive in an organized state despite the second law. Exchanges with the environment constantly produce large amounts of entropy compensating for their own organized state. In addition to this constraint on self-organization, the free energy delivered to the system, in terms of potential, is essential to understand how a complex chemistry based on carbon has emerged. Accordingly, the amount of free energy brought about through discrete events must reach the strength needed to induce chemical changes in which covalent bonds are reorganized. The consequence of this constraint was scrutinized in relation to both the development of a carbon metabolism and that of translation. Amino acyl adenylates involved as aminoacylation intermediates of the latter process reach one of the higher free energy levels found in biochemistry, which may be informative on the range in which energy was exchanged in essential early biochemical processes. The consistency of this range with the amount of energy needed to weaken covalent bonds involving carbon may not be accidental but the consequence of the above mentioned thermodynamic constraints. This could be useful in building scenarios for the emergence and early development of translation.

  10. Energy storage: Redox flow batteries go organic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vince

    2016-03-01

    The use of renewable resources as providers to the electrical grid is hampered by the intermittent and irregular nature in which they generate energy. Electrical energy storage technology could provide a solution and now, by using an iterative design process, a promising anolyte for use in redox flow batteries has been developed.

  11. Supersonic flow with feeding of energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaremba, W.

    1985-01-01

    The present work discusses the results of some experimental studies on the possibility of attenuating shock waves in a supersonic flow. The shock waves were formed by an external source of electrical energy. An electromechanical method is described that permits partial recovery of the expended energy.

  12. California energy flow in 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1995-04-01

    Energy consumption in the state of California decreased about 3% in 1993 reflecting continuation of the recession that was manifest in a moribund construction industry and a high state unemployment that ran counter to national recovery trends. Residential/commercial use decreased slightly reflecting a mild winter in the populous southern portion of the state, a decrease that was offset to some extent by an increase in the state population. Industrial consumption of purchased energy declined substantially as did production of self-generated electricity for in-house use. Consumption in the transportation sector decreased slightly. The amount of power transmitted by the utilities was at 1992 levels; however a smaller proportion was produced by the utilities themselves. Generation of electricity by nonutilities, primarily cogenerators and small power producers, was the largest of any state in the US. The growth in the number of private power producers combined with increased amounts of electricity sold to the public utilities set the stage for the sweeping proposals before the California Public Utility Commission to permit direct sales from the nonutilities to retail customers. California production of both oil and natural gas declined; however, to meet demand only the imports of natural gas increased. A break in the decade-long drought during the 1992--1993 season resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of hydroelectricity generated during the year. Geothermal energy`s contribution increased substantially because of the development of new resources by small power producers. Decline in steam production continued at The Geysers, the state`s largest field, principally owned and managed by a public utility. Increases in windpower constituted 1--1/2% of the total electric supply--up slightly from 1992. Several solar photo voltaic demonstration plants were in operation, but their contribution remained small.

  13. California energy flow in 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Mui, N.

    1996-09-01

    California energy consumption increased in 1994 in keeping with a recovery from the previous mild recession years. Although unemployment remained above the national average, other indicators pointed to improved economic health. Increased energy use was registered principally in the residential/commercial and transportation end-use sectors. A cooler-than-usual winter and spring was reflected in increased consumption of natural gas, the principal space-heating fuel in the state. Because of low water levels behind state dams, utilities turned to natural gas for electrical generation and to increased imports from out-of- state sources to meet demand. Other factors, such as smaller output from geothermal, biomass, and cogenerators, contributed to the need for the large increase in electrical supply from these two sources. Nonetheless, petroleum dominated the supply side of the energy equation of the state in which transportation requirements comprise more than one-third of total energy demand. About half of the oil consumed derived from California production. Onshore production has been in slow decline; however, in 1994 the decrease was compensated for by increases from federal offshore fields. Until 1994 production had been limited by regulatory restrictions relating to the movement of the crude oil to onshore refineries. State natural gas production remained at 1993 levels. The increased demand was met by larger imports from Canada through the recent expansion of Pacific Transmission Company`s 804 mile pipeline. Deregulation of the state`s utilities moved ahead in 1994 when the California Public Utilities Commission issued its proposal on how to restructure the industry. Public hearings were conducted in which the chief issues were recovery of the utilities` capital investments, conflicts with the Public Utilities Policies Act, management of power transactions between new suppliers and former utility customers, and preservation of energy conservation programs

  14. High energy density redox flow device

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  15. Snowmass 2001: Jet energy flow project

    SciTech Connect

    C. F. Berger et al.

    2002-12-05

    Conventional cone jet algorithms arose from heuristic considerations of LO hard scattering coupled to independent showering. These algorithms implicitly assume that the final states of individual events can be mapped onto a unique set of jets that are in turn associated with a unique set of underlying hard scattering partons. Thus each final state hadron is assigned to a unique underlying parton. The Jet Energy Flow (JEF) analysis described here does not make such assumptions. The final states of individual events are instead described in terms of flow distributions of hadronic energy. Quantities of physical interest are constructed from the energy flow distribution summed over all events. The resulting analysis is less sensitive to higher order perturbative corrections and the impact of showering and hadronization than the standard cone algorithms.

  16. Dark energy domination in the Virgocentric flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Nasonova, O. G.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Byrd, G. G.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The standard ΛCDM cosmological model implies that all celestial bodies are embedded in a perfectly uniform dark energy background, represented by Einstein's cosmological constant, and experience its repulsive antigravity action. Aims: Can dark energy have strong dynamical effects on small cosmic scales as well as globally? Continuing our efforts to clarify this question, we now focus on the Virgo Cluster and the flow of expansion around it. Methods: We interpret the Hubble diagram from a new database of velocities and distances of galaxies in the cluster and its environment, using a nonlinear analytical model, which incorporates the antigravity force in terms of Newtonian mechanics. The key parameter is the zero-gravity radius, the distance at which gravity and antigravity are in balance. Results: 1. The interplay between the gravity of the cluster and the antigravity of the dark energy background determines the kinematical structure of the system and controls its evolution. 2. The gravity dominates the quasi-stationary bound cluster, while the antigravity controls the Virgocentric flow, bringing order and regularity to the flow, which reaches linearity and the global Hubble rate at distances ⪆15 Mpc. 3. The cluster and the flow form a system similar to the Local Group and its outflow. In the velocity-distance diagram, the cluster-flow structure reproduces the group-flow structure with a scaling factor of about 10; the zero-gravity radius for the cluster system is also 10 times larger. Conclusions: The phase and dynamical similarity of the systems on the scales of 1-30 Mpc suggests that a two-component pattern may be universal for groups and clusters: a quasi-stationary bound central component and an expanding outflow around it, caused by the nonlinear gravity-antigravity interplay with the dark energy dominating in the flow component.

  17. Historical Account to the State of the Art in Debris Flow Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2013-04-01

    In this contribution, I present a historical account of debris flow modelling leading to the state of the art in simulations and applications. A generalized two-phase model is presented that unifies existing avalanche and debris flow theories. The new model (Pudasaini, 2012) covers both the single-phase and two-phase scenarios and includes many essential and observable physical phenomena. In this model, the solid-phase stress is closed by Mohr-Coulomb plasticity, while the fluid stress is modeled as a non-Newtonian viscous stress that is enhanced by the solid-volume-fraction gradient. A generalized interfacial momentum transfer includes viscous drag, buoyancy and virtual mass forces, and a new generalized drag force is introduced to cover both solid-like and fluid-like drags. Strong couplings between solid and fluid momentum transfer are observed. The two-phase model is further extended to describe the dynamics of rock-ice avalanches with new mechanical models. This model explains dynamic strength weakening and includes internal fluidization, basal lubrication, and exchanges of mass and momentum. The advantages of the two-phase model over classical (effectively single-phase) models are discussed. Advection and diffusion of the fluid through the solid are associated with non-linear fluxes. Several exact solutions are constructed, including the non-linear advection-diffusion of fluid, kinematic waves of debris flow front and deposition, phase-wave speeds, and velocity distribution through the flow depth and through the channel length. The new model is employed to study two-phase subaerial and submarine debris flows, the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes/oceans, and rock-ice avalanches. Simulation results show that buoyancy enhances flow mobility. The virtual mass force alters flow dynamics by increasing the kinetic energy of the fluid. Newtonian viscous stress substantially reduces flow deformation, whereas non-Newtonian viscous stress may change the

  18. System analysis of a bio-energy plantation: full greenhouse gas balance and energy accounting (POPFULL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceulemans, R.; Janssens, I.; Berhongaray, G.; Broeckx, L.; De Groote, T.; ElKasmioui, O.; Fichot, R.; Njakou Djomo, S.; Verlinden, M.; Zona, D.

    2011-12-01

    In recent year the environmental impact of fossil fuels and their reduced availability are leading to an increasing interest in renewable energy sources, among them bio-energy. However, the cost/benefit in establishing, managing, and using these plantations for energy production should be quantified together with their environmental impact. In this project we are performing a full life cycle analysis (LCA) balance of the most important greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, H2O and O3), together with full energy accounting of a short-rotation coppice (SRC) plantation with fast-growing trees. We established the plantation two years ago and we have been monitoring net fluxes of CO2, N2O, CH4, and O3, in combination with biomass pools (incl. soil) and fluxes, and volatile organic carbon (VOCs). This poplar plantation will be monitored for another two years then harvested and transformed into bio-energy. For the energy accounting we are performing a life cycle analysis and energy efficiency assessments over the entire cycle of the plantation until the production of electricity and heat. Here we present an overview of the results from the first two years from the plantation establishment, and some of the projections based on these first results.

  19. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting in Internal Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Colonius, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We consider piezoelectric flow energy harvesting in an internal flow environment with the ultimate goal powering systems such as sensors in deep oil well applications. Fluid motion is coupled to structural vibration via a cantilever beam placed in a converging-diverging flow channel. Two designs were considered for the electromechanical coupling: first; the cantilever itself is a piezoelectric bimorph; second; the cantilever is mounted on a pair of flextensional actuators. We experimentally investigated varying the geometry of the flow passage and the flow rate. Experimental results revealed that the power generated from both designs was similar; producing as much as 20 mW at a flow rate of 20 L/min. The bimorph designs were prone to failure at the extremes of flow rates tested. Finite element analysis (FEA) showed fatigue failure was imminent due to stress concentrations near the bimorph’s clamped region; and that robustness could be improved with a stepped-joint mounting design. A similar FEA model showed the flextensional-based harvester had a resonant frequency of around 375 Hz and an electromechanical coupling of 0.23 between the cantilever and flextensional actuators in a vacuum. These values; along with the power levels demonstrated; are significant steps toward building a system design that can eventually deliver power in the Watts range to devices down within a well. PMID:26473879

  20. Energy and material flows of megacities

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J.; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world’s 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001–2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth. PMID:25918371

  1. Energy and material flows of megacities.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Christopher A; Stewart, Iain; Facchini, Angelo; Cersosimo, Igor; Mele, Renata; Chen, Bin; Uda, Mariko; Kansal, Arun; Chiu, Anthony; Kim, Kwi-Gon; Dubeux, Carolina; Lebre La Rovere, Emilio; Cunha, Bruno; Pincetl, Stephanie; Keirstead, James; Barles, Sabine; Pusaka, Semerdanta; Gunawan, Juniati; Adegbile, Michael; Nazariha, Mehrdad; Hoque, Shamsul; Marcotullio, Peter J; González Otharán, Florencia; Genena, Tarek; Ibrahim, Nadine; Farooqui, Rizwan; Cervantes, Gemma; Sahin, Ahmet Duran

    2015-05-12

    Understanding the drivers of energy and material flows of cities is important for addressing global environmental challenges. Accessing, sharing, and managing energy and material resources is particularly critical for megacities, which face enormous social stresses because of their sheer size and complexity. Here we quantify the energy and material flows through the world's 27 megacities with populations greater than 10 million people as of 2010. Collectively the resource flows through megacities are largely consistent with scaling laws established in the emerging science of cities. Correlations are established for electricity consumption, heating and industrial fuel use, ground transportation energy use, water consumption, waste generation, and steel production in terms of heating-degree-days, urban form, economic activity, and population growth. The results help identify megacities exhibiting high and low levels of consumption and those making efficient use of resources. The correlation between per capita electricity use and urbanized area per capita is shown to be a consequence of gross building floor area per capita, which is found to increase for lower-density cities. Many of the megacities are growing rapidly in population but are growing even faster in terms of gross domestic product (GDP) and energy use. In the decade from 2001-2011, electricity use and ground transportation fuel use in megacities grew at approximately half the rate of GDP growth.

  2. Observing and modeling Earths energy flows

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens B.; Schwartz S.

    2012-05-11

    This article reviews, from the authors perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within {+-}2 W m{sup -2}. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds

  3. Observing and Modeling Earth's Energy Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews, from the authors' perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within ±2 W m-2. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute

  4. Energy flow and energy dissipation in a free surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldburg, Walter; Cressman, John

    2005-11-01

    Turbulent flows on a free surface are strongly compressible [1] and do not conserve energy in the absence of viscosity as bulk fluids do. Despite violation of assumptions essential to Kolmogorov's theory of 1941 (K41) [2, 3], surface flows show strong agreement with Kolmogorov scaling, though intermittency is larger there. Steady state turbulence is generated in a tank of water, and the spatially averaged energy flux is measured from the four-fifth's law at each instant of time. Likewise, the energy dissipation rate as measured from velocity gradients is also a random variable in this experiment. The energy flux - dissipation rate cross-correlation is measured to be correlated in incompressible bulk flows, but strongly anti-correlated on the surface. We argue that the reason for this discrepancy between surface and bulk flows is due to compressible effects present on the surface. [1] J. R. Cressman, J. Davoudi, W. I. Goldburg, and J. Schumacher, New Journal of Physics, 6, 53, 2004. [2] U. Frisch. Turbulence: The legacy of A. N. Kolmogorov, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1995. [3] A. N. Kolmogorov, Doklady Akad. Nauk SSSR, 32, 16, 1941.

  5. Mass and energy flow near sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nye, Alan; Bruning, David; Labonte, Barry J.

    1988-01-01

    Sunspots block the flow of energy to the solar surface. The blocked energy heats the volume beneath the spot, producing a pressure excess which drives an outflow of mass. Linear numerical models of the mass and energy flow around spots were constructed to estimate the predictions of this physical picture against the observed properties of sunspot bright rings and moat flows. The width of the bright ring and moat are predicted to be proportional to the depth of the spot penumbra, in conflict with the observed proportionality of the moat width to the spot diameter. Postulating that spot depths are proportional to spot diameters would bury the moat flow too deeply to be observed, because the radial velocity at the surface is found to be inversely proportional to the depth of the spot penumbra. The radial velocity at the surface is of order a few hundred meters per second after 1 day, in agreement with the observed excess of moat velocities over supergranule velocities.

  6. Nematomorph parasites drive energy flow through a riparian ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sato, Takuya; Wtanabe, Katsutoshi; Kanaiwa, Minoru; Niizuma, Yasuaki; Harada, Yasushi; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Parasites are ubiquitous in natural systems and ecosystem-level effects should be proportional to the amount of biomass or energy flow altered by the parasites. Here we quantified the extent to which a manipulative parasite altered the flow of energy through a forest-stream ecosystem. In a Japanese headwater stream, camel crickets and grasshoppers (Orthoptera) were 20 times more likely to enter a stream if infected by a nematomorph parasite (Gordionus spp.), corroborating evidence that nematomorphs manipulate their hosts to seek water where the parasites emerge as free-living adults. Endangered Japanese trout (Salvelinus leucomaenis japonicus) readily ate these infected orthopterans, which due to their abundance, accounted for 60% of the annual energy intake of the trout population. Trout grew fastest in the fall, when nematomorphs were driving energy-rich orthopterans into the stream. When infected orthopterans were available, trout did not eat benthic invertebrates in proportion to their abundance, leading to the potential for cascading, indirect effects through the forest-stream ecosystem. These results provide the first quantitative evidence that a manipulative parasite can dramatically alter the flow of energy through and across ecosystems.

  7. Energy dissipation in sheared granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Karion, A.; Hunt, M.L.

    1999-11-01

    Granular material flows describe flows of solid particles in which the interstitial fluid plays a negligible role in the flow mechanics. Examples include the transport of coal, food products, detergents, pharmaceutical tablets, and toner particles in high-speed printers. Using a two-dimensional discrete element computer simulation of a bounded, gravity-free Couette flow of particles, the heat dissipation rate per unit area is calculated as a function of position in the flow as well as overall solid fraction. The computation results compare favorably with the kinetic theory analysis for rough disks. The heat dissipation rate is also measured for binary mixtures of particles for different small to large solid fraction ratios, and for diameter ratios of ten, five, and two. The dissipation rates increase significantly with overall solid fraction as well as local strain rates and granular temperatures. The thermal energy equation is solved for a Couette flow with one adiabatic wall and one at constant temperature. Solutions use the simulation measurements of the heat dissipation rate, solid fraction, and granular temperature to show that the thermodynamic temperature increases with solid fraction and decreases with particle conductivity. In mixtures, both the dissipation rate and the thermodynamic temperature increase with size ratio and with decreasing ratio of small to large particles.

  8. Water flow energy harvesters for autonomous flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisseau, Sebastien; Duret, Alexandre-Benoit; Perez, Matthias; Jallas, Emmanuel; Jallas, Eric

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on a water flow energy harvester exploiting a horizontal axis turbine with distributed magnets of alternate polarities at the rotor periphery and air coils outside the pipe. The energy harvester operates down to 1.2L/min with an inlet section of 20mm of diameter and up to 25.2mW are provided at 20L/min in a 2.4V NiMH battery through a BQ25504 power management circuit. The pressure loss induced by the insertion of the energy harvester in the hydraulic circuit and by the extraction of energy has been limited to 0.05bars at 30L/min, corresponding to a minor loss coefficient of KEH=3.94.

  9. Graphene plasmonic lens for manipulating energy flow

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoxi; Liu, Xueming; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Manipulating the energy flow of light is at the heart of modern information and communication technologies. Because photons are uncharged, it is still difficult to effectively control them by electrical means. Here, we propose a graphene plasmonic (GP) lens to efficiently manipulate energy flow by elaborately designing the thickness of the dielectric spacer beneath the graphene sheet. Different from traditional metal-based lenses, the proposed graphene plasmonic lens possesses the advantages of tunability and excellent confinement of surface plasmons. It is found that the proposed lens can be utilized to focus and collimate the GP waves propagating along the graphene sheet. Particularly, the lens is dispersionless over a wide frequency range and the performance of lens can be flexibly tuned by adjusting the bias voltage. As an application of such a lens, the image transfer of two point sources with a separation of λ0/30 is demonstrated. PMID:24517981

  10. Energy Flow Analysis of Coupled Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, P. E.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1998-04-01

    Energy flow analysis (EFA) is an analytical tool for prediction of the frequency-averaged vibrational response of built-up structures at high audible frequencies. The procedure is based on two developments; first, the derivation of the partial differential equations that govern the propagation of energy-related quantities in simple structural elements such as rods, beams, plates, and acoustic cavities; and second, the derivation of coupling relationships in terms of energy-related quantities that describe the transfer of energy for various joints (e.g., beam-to-beam, rod-to-beam, plate-to-plate, structure-to-acoustic field coupling). In this investigation, the energy flow coupling relationships at these joints for rods and beams are derived. EFA is used to predict the frequency-averaged vibrational response of a frame structure with a three-dimensional joint, where four wave types propagate in the structure. The predicted results of EFA are shown to be a good approximation of the frequency-averaged “exact” energetics, which are computed from classical displacement solutions.

  11. Flow Energy Piezoelectric Bimorph Nozzle Harvester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Kim, Namhyo; Sun, Kai; Corbett, Gary; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Hasenoehrl, Jennifer; Hall, Jeffery L.; Colonius, Tim; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Arrazola, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for a long-life power generation scheme that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce 1 Watt average power. There are a variety of existing or proposed energy harvesting schemes that could be used in this environment but each of these has its own limitations. The vibrating piezoelectric structure is in principle capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades) thereby possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. In order to determine the feasibility of using piezoelectrics to produce suitable flow energy harvesting, we surveyed experimentally a variety of nozzle configurations that could be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to enable conversion of flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. These included reed structures, spring mass-structures, drag and lift bluff bodies and a variety of nozzles with varying flow profiles. Although not an exhaustive survey we identified a spline nozzle/piezoelectric bimorph system that experimentally produced up to 3.4 mW per bimorph. This paper will discuss these results and present our initial analyses of the device using dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical modeling. The analysis suggests that an order-of-magnitude improvement in power generation from the current design is possible.

  12. Flow energy piezoelectric bimorph nozzle harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Hasenoehrl, Jennifer; Hall, Jeffrey L.; Colonius, Tim; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Arrazola, Alvaro; Kim, Namhyo; Sun, Kai; Corbett, Gary

    2014-04-01

    There is a need for a long-life power generation scheme that could be used downhole in an oil well to produce 1 Watt average power. There are a variety of existing or proposed energy harvesting schemes that could be used in this environment but each of these has its own limitations. The vibrating piezoelectric structure is in principle capable of operating for very long lifetimes (decades) thereby possibly overcoming a principle limitation of existing technology based on rotating turbo-machinery. In order to determine the feasibility of using piezoelectrics to produce suitable flow energy harvesting, we surveyed experimentally a variety of nozzle configurations that could be used to excite a vibrating piezoelectric structure in such a way as to enable conversion of flow energy into useful amounts of electrical power. These included reed structures, spring mass-structures, drag and lift bluff bodies and a variety of nozzles with varying flow profiles. Although not an exhaustive survey we identified a spline nozzle/piezoelectric bimorph system that experimentally produced up to 3.4 mW per bimorph. This paper will discuss these results and present our initial analyses of the device using dimensional analysis and constitutive electromechanical modeling. The analysis suggests that an order-of-magnitude improvement in power generation from the current design is possible.

  13. Energy flow analysis of coupled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Phillip Eung-Ho

    1993-01-01

    Energy flow analysis (EFA) is an analytical tool for prediction of the frequency-averaged vibrational response of built-up structures at high audible frequencies. The procedure is based on two developments; firstly, the derivation of the partial differential equations that govern the propagation of energy-related quantities in simple structural elements such as rods, beams, plates, and acoustic cavities; secondly, the derivation of coupling relationships in terms of energy-related quantities that describe the transfer of energy for various joints (e.g., beam-to-beam, plate-to-plate, and structure-to acoustic field couplings). In this investigation, EFA is used to predict the vibrational response of various coupled structures. In the process of predicting the vibrational response of the coupled structures, the energy flow coupling relationships at the joints of these structures are derived. In addition, the finite element formulation of the governing energy equations are developed. Because the energy density is discontinuous at the joint, a special global assembly procedure is developed to assemble the finite element matrix equations into global matrix equations. The global matrix assembly procedure is predicated on the development of joint element matrix equations using energy flow coupling relationships for various structural joints. The results predicted by EFA for a frame structure with a three-dimensional joint, where four wave types propagate in the structure, are shown to be a reasonable approximation of the frequency-averaged 'exact' energetics, which are computed from classical displacement solutions. The accuracy of the results predicted by EFA increased with high mode count and modal overlap factor or high non-dimensional wavenumber band and non-dimensional damped wavenumber band in the frequency band of interest. An experimental investigation of vibrational response of a light truck frame structure was performed to verify the results of EFA when applied

  14. Aviation security cargo inspection queuing simulation model for material flow and accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Allgood, Glenn O; Rose, Terri A; Brumback, Daryl L

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in 2010, the U.S. will require that all cargo loaded in passenger aircraft be inspected. This will require more efficient processing of cargo and will have a significant impact on the inspection protocols and business practices of government agencies and the airlines. In this paper, we develop an aviation security cargo inspection queuing simulation model for material flow and accountability that will allow cargo managers to conduct impact studies of current and proposed business practices as they relate to inspection procedures, material flow, and accountability.

  15. Variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum flow transport model for compound channels accounting for distributed non-uniform lateral flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Ratnakar; Sahoo, Bhabagrahi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the fully volume conservative simplified hydrodynamic-based variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum (VPMM) flow transport model advocated by Perumal and Price in 2013 is extended to exclusively incorporate the distributed non-uniform lateral flow in the routing scheme accounting for compound river channel flows. The revised VPMM formulation is exclusively derived from the combined form of the de Saint-Venant's continuity and momentum equations with the spatiotemporally distributed lateral flow which is solved using the finite difference box scheme. This revised model could address the earlier model limitations of: (i) non-accounting non-uniformly distributed lateral flow, (ii) ignoring floodplain flow, and (iii) non-consideration of catchment dynamics of lateral flow generation restricting its real-time application. The efficacy of the revised formulation is tested to simulate 16 years (1980-1995) river runoff from real-time storm events under scarce morpho-hydrological data conditions in a tropical monsoon-type 48 km Bolani-Gomlai reach of the Brahmani River in eastern India. The spatiotemporally distributed lateral flows generated in real-time is computed by water balance approach accounting for catchment characteristics of normalized network area function, land use land cover classes, and soil textural classes; and hydro-meteorological variables of precipitation, soil moisture, minimum and maximum temperatures, wind speed, relative humidity, and solar radiation. The multiple error measures used in this study and the simulation results reveal that the revised VPMM model has a greater practical utility in estimating the event-based and long-term meso-scale river runoff (both discharge and its stage) at any ungauged site, enhancing its application for real-time flood estimation.

  16. Weatherization Enhancement, and Local Energy Efficiency Investment and Accountability Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Coons, Christopher A. [D-DE

    2013-06-20

    06/25/2013 Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy. Hearings held. With printed Hearing: S.Hrg. 113-70. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  17. Optimal energy growth in swept Hiemenz flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guegan, Alan; Huerre, Patrick; Schmid, Peter

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown in Gu'egan, Schmid & Huerre 2006 that the kinetic energy of optimal G"ortler-H"ammerlin (GH) perturbations in swept Hiemenz flow can be transiently amplified by two orders of magnitude at Reynolds numbers ranging from 400 to 1000 and spanwise wavenumbers from 0.1 to 0.5. In this configuration an array of counter-rotating chordwise vortices is compressed by the spanwise shear, as in the well-known Orr mechanism. We show that stronger transient growth can be achieved when the GH assumption is relaxed. In this case the optimal initial perturbation consists in vorticity sheets stacked in the chordwise direction, at a small angle from the symmetry plane of the base flow. Although the spatial structure of the GH perturbations is lost, wall-normal-spanwise plane cuts show that the amplification mechanism is mostly unchanged. The GH assumption thus provides a reasonably good estimate for transient energy amplification levels in swept Hiemenz flow. Extension of this analysis to the spatial growth problem is under way and preliminary results will be shown.

  18. Energy efficient continuous flow ash lockhopper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor); Suitor, Jerry W. (Inventor); Dubis, David (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to an energy efficient continuous flow ash lockhopper, or other lockhopper for reactor product or byproduct. The invention includes an ash hopper at the outlet of a high temperature, high pressure reactor vessel containing heated high pressure gas, a fluidics control chamber having an input port connected to the ash hopper's output port and an output port connected to the input port of a pressure letdown means, and a control fluid supply for regulating the pressure in the control chamber to be equal to or greater than the internal gas pressure of the reactor vessel, whereby the reactor gas is contained while ash is permitted to continuously flow from the ash hopper's output port, impelled by gravity. The main novelty resides in the use of a control chamber to so control pressure under the lockhopper that gases will not exit from the reactor vessel, and to also regulate the ash flow rate. There is also novelty in the design of the ash lockhopper shown in two figures. The novelty there is the use of annular passages of progressively greater diameter, and rotating the center parts on a shaft, with the center part of each slightly offset from adjacent ones to better assure ash flow through the opening.

  19. Harvesting energy from water flow over graphene?

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Zhang, Zhuhua; Li, Xuemei; Zhou, Jianxin; Guo, Wanlin

    2012-03-14

    It is reported excitingly in a previous letter (Nano Lett. 2011, 11, 3123) that a small piece of graphene sheet about 30 × 16 μm(2) immersed in flowing water with 0.6 M hydrochloric acid can produce voltage ~20 mV. Here we find that no measurable voltage can be induced by the flow over mono-, bi- and trilayered graphene samples of ~1 × 1.5 cm(2) in size in the same solution once the electrodes on graphene are isolated from interacting with the solution, mainly because the H(3)O(+) cations in the water adsorb onto graphene by strong covalent bonds as revealed by our first-principles calculations. When both the graphene and its metal electrodes are exposed to the solution as in the previous work, water flow over the graphene-electrode system can induce voltages from a few to over a hundred millivolts. In this situation, the graphene mainly behaves as a load connecting between the electrodes. Therefore, the harvested energy is not from the immersed carbon nanomaterials themselves in ionic water flow but dominated by the exposed electrodes.

  20. Energy flow for electric power system deregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hung

    Over the past few years, the electric power utility industry in North America and other countries has experienced a strong drive towards deregulation. People have considered the necessity of deregulation of electric utilities for higher energy efficiency and energy saving. The vertically integrated monopolistic industry is being transferred into a horizontally integrated competitive structure in some countries. Wheeling charges are a current high priority problem throughout the power industry, for independent power producers, as well as regulators. Nevertheless the present transmission pricing mechanism fails to be adjusted by a customer loading condition. Customer loading is dynamic, but the present wheeling charge method is fixed, not real-time. A real-time wheeling charge method is developed in this dissertation. This dissertation introduces a concept of a power flow network which can be used for the calculation of power contribution factors in a network. The contribution factor is defined as the ratio of the power contributed by a particular source to a line flow or bus load to the total output of the source. Generation, transmission, and distribution companies can employ contribution factors for the calculation of energy cost, wheeling charges, and loss compensation. Based on the concept of contribution factors, a proposed loss allocation method is developed in this dissertation. Besides, counterflow condition will be given a credit in the proposed loss allocation method. A simple 22-bus example was used for evaluating the contribution factors, proposed wheeling charge method, and loss allocation method.

  1. [Energy flow in arctic aquatic ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    This study is aimed at determining the major pathways of energy flow in freshwater ecosystems of the Alaskan arctic coastal plain. Selected sites for study of the processes supplying energy to streams and lakes to verify the generality of past findings will be surveyed for collection of organisms including the Colville River drainage and the lake region around Teshekpuk Lake. Specific objectives are to collect food web apex organisms (fish and birds) from a variety of sites in the coastal plain to verify descriptive models of ecosystem structure and food web pathways and to compare the utilization rates by insect larvae of fresh litter and in situ primary production relative to more refractory peaty materials through seasonal sampling for isotopic analysis.

  2. [Energy flow in arctic aquatic ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1985-12-31

    This study is aimed at determining the major pathways of energy flow in freshwater ecosystems of the Alaskan arctic coastal plain. Selected sites for study of the processes supplying energy to streams and lakes to verify the generality of past findings will be surveyed for collection of organisms including the Colville River drainage and the lake region around Teshekpuk Lake. Specific objectives are to collect food web apex organisms (fish and birds) from a variety of sites in the coastal plain to verify descriptive models of ecosystem structure and food web pathways and to compare the utilization rates by insect larvae of fresh litter and in situ primary production relative to more refractory peaty materials through seasonal sampling for isotopic analysis.

  3. Dark Energy Domination In The Virgocentric Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Gene; Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.

    2011-04-01

    Dark energy (DE) was first observationally detected at large Gpc distances. If it is a vacuum energy formulated as Einstein's cosmological constant, Λ, DE should also have dynamical effects at much smaller scales. Previously, we found its effects on much smaller Mpc scales in our Local Group (LG) as well as in other nearby groups. We used new HST observations of member 3D distances from the group centers and Doppler shifts. We find each group's gravity dominates a bound central system of galaxies but DE antigravity results in a radial recession increasing with distance from the group center of the outer members. Here we focus on the much larger (but still cosmologically local) Virgo Cluster and systems around it using new observations of velocities and distances. We propose an analytic model whose key parameter is the zero-gravity radius (ZGR) from the cluster center where gravity and DE antigravity balance. DE brings regularity to the Virgocentric flow. Beyond Virgo's 10 Mpc ZGR, the flow curves to approach a linear global Hubble law at larger distances. The Virgo cluster and its outer flow are similar to the Local Group and its local outflow with a scaling factor of about 10; the ZGR for Virgo is 10 times larger than that of the LG. The similarity of the two systems on the scales of 1 to 30 Mpc suggests that a quasi-stationary bound central component and an expanding outflow applies to a wide range of groups and clusters due to small scale action of DE as well as gravity. Chernin, et al 2009 Astronomy and Astrophysics 507, 1271 http://arxiv.org/abs/1006.0066 http://arxiv.org/abs/1006.0555

  4. Numerical prediction of a draft tube flow taking into account uncertain inlet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugiere, O.; Balarac, G.; Corre, C.; Metais, O.; Flores, E.; Pleroy

    2012-11-01

    The swirling turbulent flow in a hydroturbine draft tube is computed with a non-intrusive uncertainty quantification (UQ) method coupled to Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modelling in order to take into account in the numerical prediction the physical uncertainties existing on the inlet flow conditions. The proposed approach yields not only mean velocity fields to be compared with measured profiles, as is customary in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) practice, but also variance of these quantities from which error bars can be deduced on the computed profiles, thus making more significant the comparison between experiment and computation.

  5. Accounting Methodology for Source Energy of Non-Combustible Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Donohoo-Vallett, Paul

    2016-10-01

    As non-combustible sources of renewable power (wind, solar, hydro, and geothermal) do not consume fuel, the “source” (or “primary”) energy from these sources cannot be accounted for in the same manner as it is for fossil fuel sources. The methodology chosen for these technologies is important as it affects the perception of the relative size of renewable source energy to fossil energy, affects estimates of source-based building energy use, and overall source energy based metrics such as energy productivity. This memo reviews the methodological choices, outlines implications of each choice, summarizes responses to a request for information on this topic, and presents guiding principles for the U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) to use to determine where modifying the current renewable source energy accounting method used in EERE products and analyses would be appropriate to address the issues raised above.

  6. Numerical modeling of gravity-driven bubble flows with account of polydispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, A. S.; Schmidt, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The present study is focused on the investigation of motion of bubble-liquid medium inside the bubble columns or vertical pipes with account of polydisperse phenomena by the means of numerical simulation. The underlying mathematical model is based on the Euler- Euler approach with interphase interaction described by the momentum and mass transfer between phases, along with the k-w-SST turbulence model which includes turbulence generation by the bubble motion and bubble path dispersion. Polydispersion is taken into account by the multi-class model with piecewise-constant distribution of bubble sizes per cell. Simulation of downward flow inside the straight vertical pipe resulted in maximum of the bubble void fraction close to the pipe center which is in good correlation with the experimental data. Simulation of multiphase flow inside rectangular bubble column with off-center sparger resulted in vertical bubble-liquid jet which is biased towards nearby wall with the correct prediction of attachment point location.

  7. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    This project has been using natural isotope abundances to trace major pathways of energy flow to consumers in Imnavait Creek and the tundra ecosystem of the R4D watershed with comparative work in the coastal tundra. We are processing samples collected at the R4D intensive site over the past three years and are comparing these data with similar samples collected from the coastal plain. Our approach is to determine if carbon is accumulating in upland and coastal tundra; to determine the role of eroded peat carbon in the aquatic ecosystem; and to determine the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the tundra-pond ecosystem to establish the feasibility of using natural differences as tracers.

  8. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1993-05-01

    This project has been using natural isotope abundances to trace major pathways of energy flow to consumers in Imnavait Creek and the tundra ecosystem of the R4D watershed with comparative work in the coastal tundra. We are processing samples collected at the R4D intensive site over the past three years and are comparing these data with similar samples collected from the coastal plain. Our approach is to determine if carbon is accumulating in upland and coastal tundra; to determine the role of eroded peat carbon in the aquatic ecosystem; and to determine the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the tundra-pond ecosystem to establish the feasibility of using natural differences as tracers.

  9. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Natural isotope abundances to trace major pathways of energy flow to consumers in Imnavait Creek and the tundra ecosystem of the R4D watershed with comparative work in the coastal tundra. Our overall goals are to a determine if carbon is accumulating in upland and coastal tundra; determine the role of eroded peat carbon in the aquatic ecosystem; and to determine the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the tundra-pond ecosystem to establish the feasibility of using natural differences as tracers. Past work on fishes, birds, and the prey species of insects and aquatic crustaceans has shown that peat carbon is very important in the energy supply supporting the food webs over the course of the year. Obligate freshwater fishes from the coastal lakes and Colville River have been shown to contain up to 60 percent peat carbon at the end of the winter season. In contrast, migratory shorebirds and passerines contained much smaller radiocarbon abundances in summer, indicating a major shift to recent in situ primary production in pond and stream ecosystems in summer months. For the past two years, we have narrowed our focus to the processes supplying carbon to the beaded stream system at MS-117 and have concentrated on determining the transfer and accumulation rates of carbon in the watershed.

  10. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1988-12-31

    Natural isotope abundances to trace major pathways of energy flow to consumers in Imnavait Creek and the tundra ecosystem of the R4D watershed with comparative work in the coastal tundra. Our overall goals are to a determine if carbon is accumulating in upland and coastal tundra; determine the role of eroded peat carbon in the aquatic ecosystem; and to determine the distribution of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in the tundra-pond ecosystem to establish the feasibility of using natural differences as tracers. Past work on fishes, birds, and the prey species of insects and aquatic crustaceans has shown that peat carbon is very important in the energy supply supporting the food webs over the course of the year. Obligate freshwater fishes from the coastal lakes and Colville River have been shown to contain up to 60 percent peat carbon at the end of the winter season. In contrast, migratory shorebirds and passerines contained much smaller radiocarbon abundances in summer, indicating a major shift to recent in situ primary production in pond and stream ecosystems in summer months. For the past two years, we have narrowed our focus to the processes supplying carbon to the beaded stream system at MS-117 and have concentrated on determining the transfer and accumulation rates of carbon in the watershed.

  11. Energy Flow: Flow Charts Illustrating United States Energy Resources and Usage, from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    DOE Data Explorer

    Decision makers have long recognized the importance of visualizing energy and material flows in a way that distinguishes between resources, transformations and services. Research priorities can be defined in terms of changes to the flows, and the consequences of policy or technology shifts can be traced both upstream and downstream. The usefulness of this top-down view is limited by the level of detail that can be conveyed in a single image. We use two techniques to balance information content with readability. First we employe visualization techniques, such as those embodied in the energy Sankey diagram below (Figure 1), to display both qualitative (relative line weight) and quantitative (listed values) information in a reader-friendly package. The second method is to augment static images with dynamic, scalable digital content containing multiple layers (e.g. energy, carbon and economic data). This transitions the audience from that of a passive reader to an active user of the information. When used in conjunction these approaches enable relatively large, interconnected processes to be described and analyzed efficiently. [copied from the description at http://en.openei.org/wiki/LLNL_Energy_Flow_Charts#cite_note-1

  12. Flow based vs. demand based energy-water modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozos, Evangelos; Nikolopoulos, Dionysis; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koukouvinos, Antonios; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The water flow in hydro-power generation systems is often used downstream to cover other type of demands like irrigation and water supply. However, the typical case is that the energy demand (operation of hydro-power plant) and the water demand do not coincide. Furthermore, the water inflow into a reservoir is a stochastic process. Things become more complicated if renewable resources (wind-turbines or photovoltaic panels) are included into the system. For this reason, the assessment and optimization of the operation of hydro-power systems are challenging tasks that require computer modelling. This modelling should not only simulate the water budget of the reservoirs and the energy production/consumption (pumped-storage), but should also take into account the constraints imposed by the natural or artificial water network using a flow routing algorithm. HYDRONOMEAS, for example, uses an elegant mathematical approach (digraph) to calculate the flow in a water network based on: the demands (input timeseries), the water availability (simulated) and the capacity of the transmission components (properties of channels, rivers, pipes, etc.). The input timeseries of demand should be estimated by another model and linked to the corresponding network nodes. A model that could be used to estimate these timeseries is UWOT. UWOT is a bottom up urban water cycle model that simulates the generation, aggregation and routing of water demand signals. In this study, we explore the potentials of UWOT in simulating the operation of complex hydrosystems that include energy generation. The evident advantage of this approach is the use of a single model instead of one for estimation of demands and another for the system simulation. An application of UWOT in a large scale system is attempted in mainland Greece in an area extending over 130×170 km². The challenges, the peculiarities and the advantages of this approach are examined and critically discussed.

  13. Energy flows in rock mass under tidal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klishin, SV; Revuzhenko, AF

    2017-02-01

    Under analysis is the stress state of an elliptical domain under varying loading conditions. The energy flow lines are plotted. The paper demonstrates the effect of the boundary conditions on the shape of the flow lines.

  14. Asymmetric energy flow in liquid alkylbenzenes: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, David M.; Pandey, Hari Datt

    2015-10-14

    Ultrafast IR-Raman experiments on substituted benzenes [B. C. Pein et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 10898–10904 (2013)] reveal that energy can flow more efficiently in one direction along a molecule than in others. We carry out a computational study of energy flow in the three alkyl benzenes, toluene, isopropylbenzene, and t-butylbenzene, studied in these experiments, and find an asymmetry in the flow of vibrational energy between the two chemical groups of the molecule due to quantum mechanical vibrational relaxation bottlenecks, which give rise to a preferred direction of energy flow. We compare energy flow computed for all modes of the three alkylbenzenes over the relaxation time into the liquid with energy flow through the subset of modes monitored in the time-resolved Raman experiments and find qualitatively similar results when using the subset compared to all the modes.

  15. Redox flow cell energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    NASA-Redox systems are electrochemical storage devices that use two fully soluble Redox couples, anode and cathode fluids, as active electrode materials separated by a highly selective ion exchange membrane. The reactants are contained in large storage tanks and pumped through a stack of Redox flow cells where the electrochemical reactions (reduction and oxidation) take place at porous carbon felt electrodes. A string or stack of these power producing cells is connected in series in a bipolar manner. Redox energy storage systems promise to be inexpensive and possess many features that provide for flexible design, long life, high reliability and minimal operation and maintenance costs. These features include independent sizing of power and storage capacity requirements and inclusion within the cell stack of a cell that monitors the state of charge of the system as a whole, and a rebalance cell which permits continuous correction to be made for minor side reactions that would tend to result in the anode fluid and cathode fluids becoming electrochemically out of balance. These system features are described and discussed.

  16. Energy flow model for thin plate considering fluid loading with mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ju-Bum; Hong, Suk-Yoon; Song, Jee-Hun

    2012-11-01

    Energy Flow Analysis (EFA) has been developed to predict the vibration energy density of system structures in the high frequency range. This paper develops the energy flow model for the thin plate in contact with mean flow. The pressure generated by mean flow affects energy governing equation and power reflection-transmission coefficients between plates. The fluid pressure is evaluated by using velocity potential and Bernoulli's equation, and energy governing equations are derived by considering the flexural wavenumbers of a plate, which are different along the direction of flexural wave and mean flow. The derived energy governing equation is composed of two kinds of group velocities. To verify the developed energy flow model, various numerical analyses are performed for a simple plate and a coupled plate for several excitation frequencies. The EFA results are compared with the analytical solutions, and correlations between the EFA results and the analytical solutions are verified.

  17. Integrated and spectral energy flows of the GLAS GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennebaum, J.

    1981-01-01

    Methods to analyze the generation, transport, and dissipation of energy to study geophysical fluid flows are discussed. Energetics analyses are pursued in several directions: (1) the longitudinal and time dependence on the energy flow to the stratosphere was examined as a function of geographical sector; (2) strong and weak energy flows were correlated by medium range forecasts; (3) the one dimensional spectral results (Fourier services around latitude circles) were extended to spherical harmonics over a global domain; (4) the validity of vertical velocities derived from mass convergence was examined for their effect on the conversion of eddy available potential energy to eddy kinetic energy.

  18. Modelling overbank flow on farmed catchments taking into account spatial hydrological discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, R.; Tilma, M.; Chahinian, N.; Huttel, O.

    2003-04-01

    In agricultural catchments, hydrological processes are largely variable in space due to human impact causing hydrological discontinuities such as ditch network, field limits and terraces. The ditch network accelerates runoff by concentrating flows, drains the water table or replenishes it by reinfiltration of the runoff water. During extreme flood events, overbank flow occurs and surface pathflows are modified. The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of overbank flow on hydrograph shape during flood events. For that, MHYDAS, a physically based distributed hydrological model, was especially developed to take into account these hydrological discontinuities. The model considers the catchment as a series of interconnected hydrological unit. Runoff from each unit is estimated using a deterministic model based on the pounding-time algorithm and then routed through the ditch network using the diffusive wave equation. Overbank flow is modelled by modifying links between the hydrological units and the ditch network. The model was applied to simulate the main hydrological processes on a small headwater farmed Mediterranean catchment located in Southern France. The basic hydrometeorological equipment consists of a meteorological station, rain gauges, a tensio-neutronic and a piezometric measurement network, and eight water flow measurements. A multi-criteria and multi-scale approach was used. Three independent error criteria (Nash, error on volume and error on peak flow) were calculated and combined using the Pareto technique. Then, a multi-scale approach was used to calibrate and validate the model for the eight water flow measurements. The application of MHYDAS on the extreme ten flood events of the last decade enables to identify the ditches where overbank flows occur and to calculate discharge at various points of the ditch network. Results show that for the extreme flood event, more than 45% of surface runoff occur due to overbank flow. Discussion shows that

  19. Accountability Policy Implementation and the Case of Smaller School District Capacity: Three Contrasting Cases that Examine the Flow and Use of NCLB Accountability Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act increases pressure on schools and districts to use standardized state test data. Seeking to learn about the process of turning accountability data into actionable information, this paper presents findings from three case studies of small to medium sized school districts. The study examines the flow of state science…

  20. Energy conservation with automatic flow control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, D.

    1984-12-01

    Automatic flow control valves are offered in a wide range of sizes starting at 1/2 in. with flow rates of 0.5 gpm and up. They are also provided with materials and end connections to meet virtually any fan-coil system requirement. Among these are copper sweat type valves; ductile iron threaded valves; male/female threaded brass valves; and combination flow control/ball valves with union ends.

  1. Audit of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Office of Chief Accountant

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-07

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (Commission) mission is to oversee America`s natural gas and oil pipeline transportation, electric utility, and hydroelectric power industries to ensure that consumers receive adequate energy supplies at just and reasonable rates. To carry out this mission, the Commission issues regulations covering the accounting, reporting, and rate-making requirements of the regulated utility companies. The Commission`s Office of Chief Accountant performs financial related audits at companies to ensure compliance with these regulations. The purpose of this audit was to evaluate the office of Chief Accountant`s audit performance. Specifically, the objectives were to determine if the most appropriate audit approach was used and if a quality assurance process was in place to ensure reports were accurate and supported by the working papers.

  2. Character of energy flow in air shower core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, K.; Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Energy per charged particle near the core of air showers was measured by 9 energy flow detectors, which were the combination of Cerenkov counters and scintillators. Energy per particle of each detector was normalized to energy at 2m from the core. The following results were obtained as to the energy flow: (1) integral frequency distribution of mean energy per particle (averaged over 9 detectors) is composed of two groups separated distinctly; and (2) showers contained in one group show an anisotropy of arrival direction.

  3. Modeling Water Resource Systems Accounting for Water-Related Energy Use, GHG Emissions and Water-Dependent Energy Generation in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escriva-Bou, A.; Lund, J. R.; Pulido-Velazquez, M.; Medellin-Azuara, J.

    2015-12-01

    Most individual processes relating water and energy interdependence have been assessed in many different ways over the last decade. It is time to step up and include the results of these studies in management by proportionating a tool for integrating these processes in decision-making to effectively understand the tradeoffs between water and energy from management options and scenarios. A simple but powerful decision support system (DSS) for water management is described that includes water-related energy use and GHG emissions not solely from the water operations, but also from final water end uses, including demands from cities, agriculture, environment and the energy sector. Because one of the main drivers of energy use and GHG emissions is water pumping from aquifers, the DSS combines a surface water management model with a simple groundwater model, accounting for their interrelationships. The model also explicitly includes economic data to optimize water use across sectors during shortages and calculate return flows from different uses. Capabilities of the DSS are demonstrated on a case study over California's intertied water system. Results show that urban end uses account for most GHG emissions of the entire water cycle, but large water conveyance produces significant peaks over the summer season. Also the development of more efficient water application on the agricultural sector has increased the total energy consumption and the net water use in the basins.

  4. Simulations of cardiovascular blood flow accounting for time dependent deformational forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters Randles, Amanda; Melchionna, Simone; Latt, Jonas; Succi, Sauro; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is currently the leading cause of death in the United States, and early detection is critical. Despite advances in imaging technology, 50% of these deaths occur suddenly and with no prior symptoms. The development and progression of coronary diseases such as atherosclerosis has been linked to prolonged areas of low endothelial shear stress (ESS); however, there is currently no way to measure ESS in vivo. We will present a patient specific fluid simulation that applies the Lattice Boltzmann equation to model the blood flow in the coronary arteries whose geometries are derived from computed tomography angiography data. Using large-scale supercomputers up to 294,912 processors, we can model a full heartbeat at the resolution of the red blood cells. We are investigating the time dependent deformational forces exerted on the arterial flows from the movement of the heart. The change in arterial curvature that occurs over a heartbeat has been shown to have significant impact on flow velocity and macroscopic quantities like shear stress. We will discuss a method for accounting for these resulting forces by casting them into a kinetic formalism via a Gauss-Hermite projection and their impact on ESS while maintaining the static geomtry obtained from CTA data.

  5. Collective Flow in Heavy Ion Collisions at Low to Relativistic Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisa, M. A.

    1997-04-01

    collaboration has found sidewards flow at SPS energies (160 A GeV); preliminary comparisons to RQMD calculations indicate that the model reproduces the flow well. At all of these bombarding energies (over 3 orders of magnitude!), the particle spectra show a strong non-thermal component which has been identified as largely isotropic or "radial" flow. While the sidewards flow accounts for only ~5% of emitted particles' energy, roughly 30-50% of the energy of emitted particles is found in radial flow. Several groups are studying the implications of having such a large fraction of the energy in collective motion. Finally, spectral analyses accounting for the radial or outwards flow may suggest a leveling-off of the temperature and flow velocity around and above the highest AGS energies, which may be hint at a transition to QGP formation.

  6. Energy storage: Redox flow batteries go organic

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Sprenkle, Vince

    2016-02-19

    Access to sustainable and affordable energy is the foundation for the economic growth of our current society and its future prosperity. Energy harvested from renewable resources, such as solar and wind, although currently at a small fraction, is on a steady trajectory of increasing installation accompanied with falling cost. Driven also by the need to reduce the carbon footprint from electricity generation, they could provide a clean and sustainable energy future. The caveat, however, is the intermittent and fluctuating nature of the renewables, which threatens the stability of the grid when its share surpasses 20% of the overall energy capacity. 1 Besides the on-demand power generation, electrical energy storage is another potentially cost-effective way to provide massive energy storage for not only renewable energy integration, but to balance the mismatch between supply and demand, and the improvement of grid reliability and efficiency also.

  7. Teaching the Indirect Method of the Statement of Cash Flows in Introductory Financial Accounting: A Comprehensive, Problem-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickner, Daniel R.; McCombs, Gary B.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an instructional resource for presenting the indirect method of the statement of cash flows (SCF) in an introductory financial accounting course. The authors focus primarily on presenting a comprehensive example that illustrates the "why" of SCF preparation and show how journal entries and T-accounts can be…

  8. Magnetic and thermal energy flow during disruptions in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hyatt, A.W.; Lee, R.L.; Humphreys, D.A.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; Cuthbertson, J.W.; Lasnier, C.J.

    1996-07-01

    The authors present results from disruption experiments where they measure magnetic energy flow across a closed surface surrounding the plasma using a Poynting flux analysis to measure the electromagnetic power, bolometers to measure radiation power and IR scanners to measure radiation and particle heat conduction to the divertor. The initial and final stored energies within the volume are found using the full equilibrium reconstruction code EFIT. From this analysis they calculate an energy balance and find that they can account for all energy deposited on the first wall and the divertor to within about 10%.

  9. How to Read an LLNL Energy Flow Chart (Sankey Diagram)

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, A. J.

    2016-04-19

    Each year, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory releases energy flow charts that illustrate the nation's consumption and use of energy. A.J. Simon, group leader for LLNL’s energy program, breaks the 2015 chart down in this video, describing how to read the chart and what year-to-year trends he sees.

  10. How to Read an LLNL Energy Flow Chart (Sankey Diagram)

    ScienceCinema

    Simon, A. J.

    2016-07-12

    Each year, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory releases energy flow charts that illustrate the nation's consumption and use of energy. A.J. Simon, group leader for LLNL’s energy program, breaks the 2015 chart down in this video, describing how to read the chart and what year-to-year trends he sees.

  11. Students' Use of the Energy Model to Account for Changes in Physical Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadouris, Nico; Constantinou, Constantinos P.; Kyratsi, Theodora

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the ways in which students, aged 11-14 years, account for certain changes in physical systems and the extent to which they draw on an energy model as a common framework for explaining changes observed in diverse systems. Data were combined from two sources: interviews with 20 individuals and an open-ended…

  12. Accounting for delay of energy transfer between coupled rooms in statistical-acoustics models of reverberant-energy decay.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jason E

    2012-08-01

    A statistical-acoustics model for energy decay in systems of two or more coupled rooms is introduced, which accounts for the distribution of delay in the transfer of energy between subrooms that results from the finite speed of sound. The method extends previous models based on systems of coupled ordinary differential equations by using functional differential equations to explicitly model dependence on prior values of energy in adjacent subrooms. Predictions of the model are illustrated for a two-room coupled system and compared with the predictions of a benchmark computational geometrical-acoustics model.

  13. Scale-by-scale energy budgets which account for the coherent motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, Thiesset; L, Danaila; A, Antonia R.; T, Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are written for flows where coherent structures may be prominent. Both general and locally isotropic formulations are provided. In particular, the contribution to the production, diffusion and energy transfer terms associated with the coherent motion is highlighted. Preliminary results are presented in the intermediate wake of a circular cylinder for phase-averaged second-and third-order structure functions. The experimental data provide adequate support for the scale-by-scale budgets.

  14. Energy-Efficient, Continuous-Flow Ash Lockhopper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.; Suitor, Jerry W.; Dubis, David

    1989-01-01

    Pressure balance in control gas prevents loss of reactor gas. Energy efficiency of continuous-flow ash lockhopper increased by preventing hot gases from flowing out of reactor vessel through ash-hopper outlet and carrying away heat energy. Stopping loss of reactor gases also important for reasons other than energy efficiency; desired reaction product toxic or contained to prevent pollution. In improved continuous-flow ash lockhopper, pressure-driven loss of hot gas from reactor vessel through ash-hopper outlet prevented by using control gas in fluidic flow-control device to equalize pressure in reactor vessel. Also enables reactor to attain highest possible product yield with continuous processing while permitting controllable, continuous flow of ash.

  15. Polytropic dark matter flows illuminate dark energy and accelerated expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, K.; Spyrou, N. K.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, a large amount of data implies that the matter constituents of the cosmological dark sector might be collisional. An attractive feature of such a possibility is that, it can reconcile dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE) in terms of a single component, accommodated in the context of a polytropic-DM fluid. In fact, polytropic processes in a DM fluid have been most successfully used in modeling dark galactic haloes, thus significantly improving the velocity dispersion profiles of galaxies. Motivated by such results, we explore the time evolution and the dynamical characteristics of a spatially-flat cosmological model, in which, in principle, there is no DE at all. Instead, in this model, the DM itself possesses some sort of fluidlike properties, i.e., the fundamental units of the Universe matter-energy content are the volume elements of a DM fluid, performing polytropic flows. In this case, together with all the other physical characteristics, we also take the energy of this fluid's internal motions into account as a source of the universal gravitational field. This form of energy can compensate for the extra energy, needed to compromise spatial flatness, namely, to justify that, today, the total energy density parameter is exactly unity. The polytropic cosmological model, depends on only one free parameter, the corresponding (polytropic) exponent, Γ. We find this model particularly interesting, because for Γ ≤ 0.541, without the need for either any exotic DE or the cosmological constant, the conventional pressure becomes negative enough so that the Universe accelerates its expansion at cosmological redshifts below a transition value. In fact, several physical reasons, e.g., the cosmological requirement for cold DM (CDM) and a positive velocity-of-sound square, impose further constraints on the value of Γ, which is eventually settled down to the range -0.089 < Γ ≤ 0. This cosmological model does not suffer either from the age problem or from the

  16. Energy flow: image correspondence approximation for motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangliang; Li, Ruifeng; Fang, Yajun

    2016-04-01

    We propose a correspondence approximation approach between temporally adjacent frames for motion analysis. First, energy map is established to represent image spatial features on multiple scales using Gaussian convolution. On this basis, energy flow at each layer is estimated using Gauss-Seidel iteration according to the energy invariance constraint. More specifically, at the core of energy invariance constraint is "energy conservation law" assuming that the spatial energy distribution of an image does not change significantly with time. Finally, energy flow field at different layers is reconstructed by considering different smoothness degrees. Due to the multiresolution origin and energy-based implementation, our algorithm is able to quickly address correspondence searching issues in spite of background noise or illumination variation. We apply our correspondence approximation method to motion analysis, and experimental results demonstrate its applicability.

  17. The application of finance and accounting theory to the valuation of new energy and efficiency options

    SciTech Connect

    Awerbuch, S.

    1995-12-31

    New, renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies are often passive and capital intensive-attributes they share with computer-integrated-manufacturing (CIM), robotics, computer-aided-design (CAD) and similar manufacturing process technologies. The experience in manufacturing over the last two decades indicates that traditional accounting-based procedures for valuing such new technologies significantly understate their benefits. This paper highlights recent research which extends project valuation principles and illustrates how reliance on the engineering oriented levelized energy cost distorst benefit/cost streams.

  18. Equiparatition of energy for turbulent astrophysical fluids: Accounting for the unseen energy in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular clouds are observed to be partially supported by turbulent pressure. The kinetic energy of the turbulence is directly measurable, but the potential energy, which consists of magnetic, thermal, and gravitational potential energy, is largly unseen. We have extended previous results on equipartition between kinetic and potential energy to show that it is likely to be a very good approximation in molecular clouds. We have used two separate approaches to demonstrate this result: For small-amplitude perturbations of a static equilibrium, we have used the energy principle analysis of Bernstein et al. (1958); this derivation applies to perturbations of arbitary wavelength. To treat perturbations of a nonstatic equilibrium, we have used the Lagrangian analysis of Dewar (1970); this analysis applies only to short-wavelength perturbations. Both analysis assume conservation of energy. Wave damping has only a small effect on equipartition if the wave frequency is small compared to the neutral-ion collision frequency; for the particular case we considered, radiative losses have no effect on equipartition. These results are then incorporated in a simple way into analyses of cloud equilibrium and global stability. We discuss the effect of Alfvenic turbulence on the Jeans mass and show that it has little effect on the magnetic critical mass.

  19. Optical routing and switching of energy flow in nanostructure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.

    2011-09-01

    We study optical routing and switching of energy transfer between semiconductor quantum dots and metallic nanostructures. We demonstrate that in the presence of a metallic nanoshell, one can use quantum coherence to direct or switch energy transfer flow from a quantum dot to another quantum dot or to the nanoshell. Our results show that a quantum dot-metallic nanoshell system can act as a bistable energy switch formed via quantum mechanical control of energy transfer processes.

  20. Using Streamlines to Visualize Acoustic Energy Flow Across Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    radiate from a point source in a homogeneous fluid and propagate across a plane boundary into a dissimilar homogeneous fluid, the acoustic field may...associated with diffraction i.e., those components that vanish with increasing frequency. The energy flow from a continuous-wave monopole point source...vector, averaged over a wave cycle. It is seen that the acoustic energy flow is not always in line with the “Snell’s law” or stationary phase path. Also

  1. Radiant energy receiver having improved coolant flow control means

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, H.

    1980-10-29

    An improved coolant flow control for use in radiant energy receivers of the type having parallel flow paths is disclosed. A coolant performs as a temperature dependent valve means, increasing flow in the warmer flow paths of the receiver, and impeding flow in the cooler paths of the receiver. The coolant has a negative temperature coefficient of viscosity which is high enough such that only an insignificant flow through the receiver is experienced at the minimum operating temperature of the receiver, and such that a maximum flow is experienced at the maximum operating temperature of the receiver. The valving is accomplished by changes in viscosity of the coolant in response to the coolant being heated and cooled. No remotely operated valves, comparators or the like are needed.

  2. Bootstrapping the energy flow in the beginning of life.

    PubMed

    Hengeveld, R; Fedonkin, M A

    2007-01-01

    This paper suggests that the energy flow on which all living structures depend only started up slowly, the low-energy, initial phase starting up a second, slightly more energetic phase, and so on. In this way, the build up of the energy flow follows a bootstrapping process similar to that found in the development of computers, the first generation making possible the calculations necessary for constructing the second one, etc. In the biogenetic upstart of an energy flow, non-metals in the lower periods of the Periodic Table of Elements would have constituted the most primitive systems, their operation being enhanced and later supplanted by elements in the higher periods that demand more energy. This bootstrapping process would put the development of the metabolisms based on the second period elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen at the end of the evolutionary process rather than at, or even before, the biogenetic event.

  3. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  4. Energy Storage Sizing Taking Into Account Forecast Uncertainties and Receding Horizon Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Kyri; Hug, Gabriela; Li, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Energy storage systems (ESS) have the potential to be very beneficial for applications such as reducing the ramping of generators, peak shaving, and balancing not only the variability introduced by renewable energy sources, but also the uncertainty introduced by errors in their forecasts. Optimal usage of storage may result in reduced generation costs and an increased use of renewable energy. However, optimally sizing these devices is a challenging problem. This paper aims to provide the tools to optimally size an ESS under the assumption that it will be operated under a model predictive control scheme and that the forecast of the renewable energy resources include prediction errors. A two-stage stochastic model predictive control is formulated and solved, where the optimal usage of the storage is simultaneously determined along with the optimal generation outputs and size of the storage. Wind forecast errors are taken into account in the optimization problem via probabilistic constraints for which an analytical form is derived. This allows for the stochastic optimization problem to be solved directly, without using sampling-based approaches, and sizing the storage to account not only for a wide range of potential scenarios, but also for a wide range of potential forecast errors. In the proposed formulation, we account for the fact that errors in the forecast affect how the device is operated later in the horizon and that a receding horizon scheme is used in operation to optimally use the available storage.

  5. U.S. Energy Flow -- 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H; Mui, N; Pasternak, A

    1997-12-01

    Energy consumption in 1995 increased slightly for the fifth year in a row (from 89 to 91 quadrillion [1015Btu). U.S. economic activity slowed from the fast-paced recovery of 1994, even with the continued low unemployment rates and low inflation rates. The annual increase in U.S. real GDP dropped to 4.6% from 1994's increase of 5.8%. Energy consumption in all major end-use sectors surpassed the record-breaking highs achieved in 1994, with the largest gains (2.5%) occurring in the residential/commercial sector. Crude oil imports decreased for the first time this decade. There was also a decline in domestic oil production. Venezuela replaced Saudi Arabia as the principal supplier of imported oil. Imports of natural gas, mainly from Canada, continued to increase. The demand for natural gas reached a level not seen since the peak levels of the early 1970s and the demand was met by a slight increase in both natural gas production and imports. Electric utilities had the largest percentage increase of n.atural gas consumption, a climb of 7% above 1994 levels. Although coal production decreased, coal exports continued to make a comeback after 3 years of decline. Coal once again become the primary U.S. energy export. Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) consists of two phases. Phase I (in effect as of January 1, 1995) set emission restrictions on 110 mostly coal-burning plants in the eastern and midwestem United States. Phase II, planned to begin in the year 2000, places additional emission restrictions on about 1,000 electric plants. As of January 1, 1995, the reformulated gasoline program, also part of the CAAA90, was finally initiated. As a result, this cleaner-burning fuel was made available in areas of the United States that failed to meet the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) ozone standards. In 1995, reformulated gasoline represented around 28% of total gasoline sales in the United States. The last commercial nuclear power plant

  6. Vibrational energy flow models for the Rayleigh-Love and Rayleigh-Bishop rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ju-Bum; Hong, Suk-Yoon; Song, Jee-Hun; Kwon, Hyun-Wung

    2014-01-01

    Energy Flow Analysis (EFA) has been developed to predict the vibrational energy density of the system structures in the medium-to-high frequency range. The elementary longitudinal wave theory is often used to describe the longitudinal vibration of a slender rod. However, for relatively large diameter rods or high frequency ranges, the elementary longitudinal wave theory is inaccurate because the lateral motions are not taken into account. In this paper, vibrational energy flow models are developed to analyze the longitudinally vibrating Rayleigh-Love rod considering the effect of lateral inertia, and the Rayleigh-Bishop rod considering the effect not only of the lateral inertia but also of the shear stiffness. The derived energy governing equations are second-order differential equations which predict the time and space averaged energy density and active intensity distributions in a rod. To verify the accuracy of the developed energy flow models, various numerical analyses are performed for a rod and coupled rods. Also, the EFA results for the Rayleigh-Love and Rayleigh-Bishop rods are compared with the analytical solutions for these models, the traditional energy flow solutions, and the analytical solutions for the classical rod.

  7. Simulating energy flow in biomolecules: application to tuna cytochrome c.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Wong, C F; Rabitz, H

    1998-01-01

    By constructing a continuity equation of energy flow, one can utilize results from a molecular dynamics simulation to calculate the energy flux or flow in different parts of a biomolecule. Such calculations can yield useful insights into the pathways of energy flow in biomolecules. The method was first tested on a small system of a cluster of 13 argon atoms and then applied to the study of the pathways of energy flow after a tuna ferrocytochrome c molecule was oxidized. Initially, energy propagated faster along the direction perpendicular to the heme plane. This was due to an efficient through-bond mechanism, because the heme iron in cytochrome c was covalently bonded to a cysteine and a histidine. For the oxidation of cytochrome c, electrostatic interactions also facilitated a long-range through-space mechanism of energy flow. As a result, polar or charged groups that were further away from the oxidation site could receive energy earlier than nonpolar groups closer to the site. Another bridging mechanism facilitating efficient long-range responses to cytochrome c oxidation involved the coupling of far-off atoms with atoms that were nearer to, and interacted directly with, the oxidation site. The different characteristics of these energy transfer mechanisms defied a simple correlation between the time that the excess energy of the oxidation site first dissipated to an atom and the distance of the atom from the oxidation site. For tuna cytochrome c, all of the atoms of the protein had sensed the effects of the oxidation within approximately 40 fs. For the length scale of energy transfer considered in this study, the speed of the energy propagation in the protein was on the order of 10(5) m/s. PMID:9649368

  8. Sustained turbulence and magnetic energy in nonrotating shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauman, Farrukh; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-03-01

    From numerical simulations, we show that nonrotating magnetohydrodynamic shear flows are unstable to finite amplitude velocity perturbations and become turbulent, leading to the growth and sustenance of magnetic energy, including large scale fields. This supports the concept that sustained magnetic energy from turbulence is independent of the driving mechanism for large enough magnetic Reynolds numbers.

  9. Energy dissipation in flows through curved spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debus, J.-D.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-02-01

    Fluid dynamics in intrinsically curved geometries is encountered in many physical systems in nature, ranging from microscopic bio-membranes all the way up to general relativity at cosmological scales. Despite the diversity of applications, all of these systems share a common feature: the free motion of particles is affected by inertial forces originating from the curvature of the embedding space. Here we reveal a fundamental process underlying fluid dynamics in curved spaces: the free motion of fluids, in the complete absence of solid walls or obstacles, exhibits loss of energy due exclusively to the intrinsic curvature of space. We find that local sources of curvature generate viscous stresses as a result of the inertial forces. The curvature- induced viscous forces are shown to cause hitherto unnoticed and yet appreciable energy dissipation, which might play a significant role for a variety of physical systems involving fluid dynamics in curved spaces.

  10. Energy dissipation in flows through curved spaces

    PubMed Central

    Debus, J.-D.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Fluid dynamics in intrinsically curved geometries is encountered in many physical systems in nature, ranging from microscopic bio-membranes all the way up to general relativity at cosmological scales. Despite the diversity of applications, all of these systems share a common feature: the free motion of particles is affected by inertial forces originating from the curvature of the embedding space. Here we reveal a fundamental process underlying fluid dynamics in curved spaces: the free motion of fluids, in the complete absence of solid walls or obstacles, exhibits loss of energy due exclusively to the intrinsic curvature of space. We find that local sources of curvature generate viscous stresses as a result of the inertial forces. The curvature- induced viscous forces are shown to cause hitherto unnoticed and yet appreciable energy dissipation, which might play a significant role for a variety of physical systems involving fluid dynamics in curved spaces. PMID:28195148

  11. U.S. energy flow - 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1994-10-01

    With continued improvement in the economic health of the nation, energy consumption in 1993 increased by almost 2.5%. Use of energy in all major end-use sectors increased, with the largest gains registered in the residential/commercial sector. In this sector, substantial increase in the use of natural gas reflected a harsh 1993-1994 winter as well as broader availability of the fuel for space heating. Crude oil imports rose 8% but stood below the all-time high set in 1977. About half of the increase reflected declining domestic oil production. Imports of natural gas, principally from Canada, increased as they have every year since 1986. They comprise 11% of supply and supplement domestic production, which has similarly risen over the same time span. Increased demand for natural gas is evident in most sectors but especially in the industrial sector, where a growing number of cogenerators of electricity burn natural gas. Although coal consumption in the United States rose 3% in 1993, domestic coal production declined by a greater margin due to a coal strike. Because of increased international competition, exports fell 27%. Electricity transmitted by the utilities again increased, following a decade-long trend interrupted only in 1992 by the national economic recession. The provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 dealing with transport of nonutility-generated electricity by the public utilities began to be implemented in 1993. The provisions of the Energy Policy Act as well as those of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 are setting the stage for increased competition for customers and for what promises to be a restructuring of the historically monopolistic industry. Nuclear power from the United States`s 109 operable reactors constituted 21% of utility-generated electricity. With the continued retirement of outmoded and flawed reactors, nuclear capacity factors attained 71 in 1993, up from 56% a decade earlier.

  12. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    PubMed

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  13. High energy density redox flow device

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, William Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  14. High energy density redox flow device

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yet -Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2015-10-06

    Redox flow devices are described including a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector, and an ion-permeable membrane separating said positive and negative current collectors, positioned and arranged to define a positive electroactive zone and a negative electroactive zone; wherein at least one of said positive and negative electroactive zone comprises a flowable semi-solid composition comprising ion storage compound particles capable of taking up or releasing said ions during operation of the cell, and wherein the ion storage compound particles have a polydisperse size distribution in which the finest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume, is at least a factor of 5 smaller than the largest particles present in at least 5 vol % of the total volume.

  15. Stability of elastic and viscoelastic plates in a gas flow taking into account shear strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, V. D.

    2004-09-01

    It is well known that the internal friction in a material can have a considerable destabilizing effect on the stability of non-conservative systems. Apart from the Voigt model, the viscoelastic body model is sometimes utilized to describe material damping. This relates the stability problem for non-conservative elastic systems with that for viscoelastic system. The Bubnov-Galerkin method is usually applied for solving the problems. In this case, the displacement functions are represented by series in terms of natural vibration modes ϕ i( x) of the elastic system. To provide a high degree of accuracy for the solution, one should involve a fairly large number of modes. For a viscoelastic plate, the number of terms to be kept in the expansion of the deflection can be substantially more. One should bear in mind, however, that as the number of modes preserved in the expansion increases, the influence of shear strains and rotational inertia on the behavior of the solution becomes more pronounced. In view of this, it is important to study the stability of non-conservative viscoelastic systems with the shear strain and rotational inertia being taken into account. In the present paper this problem is solved for a viscoelastic plate in a supersonic gas flow.

  16. Pyrolysis and gasification of meat-and-bone-meal: Energy balance and GHG accounting

    SciTech Connect

    Cascarosa, Esther; Boldrin, Alessio; Astrup, Thomas

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • GHG savings are in the order of 600–1000 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. per Mg of MBM treated. • Energy recovery differed in terms of energy products and efficiencies. • The results were largely determined by use of the products for energy purposes. - Abstract: Meat-and-bone-meal (MBM) produced from animal waste has become an increasingly important residual fraction needing management. As biodegradable waste is routed away from landfills, thermo-chemical treatments of MBM are considered promising solution for the future. Pyrolysis and gasification of MBM were assessed based on data from three experimental lab and pilot-scale plants. Energy balances were established for the three technologies, providing different outcomes for energy recovery: bio-oil was the main product for the pyrolysis system, while syngas and a solid fraction of biochar were the main products in the gasification system. These products can be used – eventually after upgrading – for energy production, thereby offsetting energy production elsewhere in the system. Greenhouse gases (GHG) accounting of the technologies showed that all three options provided overall GHG savings in the order of 600–1000 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. per Mg of MBM treated, mainly as a consequence of avoided fossil fuel consumption in the energy sector. Local conditions influencing the environmental performance of the three systems were identified, together with critical factors to be considered during decision-making regarding MBM management.

  17. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1983-12-31

    This component of the terrestrial-aquatic interaction group seeks to use the natural stable carbon isotope ratios and radiocarbon abundances to trace the movement of photosynthate from the terrestrial environment to the stream system at MS-117. In addition to estimating the total flux, we will also attempt to describe the relative fractions derived from modern primary production and that derived from delayed inputs of eroded peat. We will also seek to determine the coupling efficiency of these energy sources to the invertebrate faunal populations in the tundra soils and streams.

  18. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    This component of the terrestrial-aquatic interaction group seeks to use the natural stable carbon isotope ratios and radiocarbon abundances to trace the movement of photosynthate from the terrestrial environment to the stream system at MS-117. In addition to estimating the total flux, we will also attempt to describe the relative fractions derived from modern primary production and that derived from delayed inputs of eroded peat. We will also seek to determine the coupling efficiency of these energy sources to the invertebrate faunal populations in the tundra soils and streams.

  19. Internal energy flows in composite optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer-Garcia, Manuel F.; Lopez-Mago, Dorilian; Hernandez-Aranda, Raul I.

    2016-09-01

    We study the energy ow pattern in the superposition of two off-axis optical vortices with orthogonal polarization states. This system presents a rich structure of polarization singularities, which allows us to study the transverse spin and orbital angular momentum of different polarization morphologies, which includes C points (stars, lemons and monstars) and L lines. We perform numerical simulations of the optical forces acting on submicron particles and show interesting configurations. We provide the set of control parameters to unambiguously distinguish between the spin and orbital ow contributions.

  20. Bounded energy states in homogeneous turbulent shear flow: An alternative view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, Peter S.; Speziale, Charles G.

    1990-01-01

    The equilibrium structure of homogeneous turbulent shear flow is investigated from a theoretical standpoint. Existing turbulence models, in apparent agreement with physical and numerical experiments, predict an unbounded exponential time growth of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate; only the anisotropy tensor and turbulent time scale reach a structural equilibrium. It is shown that if vortex stretching is accounted for in the dissipation rate transport equation, then there can exist equilibrium solutions, with bounded energy states, where the turbulence production is balanced by its dissipation. Illustrative calculations are present for a k-epsilon model modified to account for vortex stretching. The calculations indicate an initial exponential time growth of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate for elapsed times that are as large as those considered in any of the previously conducted physical or numerical experiments on homogeneous shear flow. However, vortex stretching eventually takes over and forces a production-equals-dissipation equilibrium with bounded energy states. The validity of this result is further supported by an independent theoretical argument. It is concluded that the generally accepted structural equilibrium for homogeneous shear flow with unbounded component energies is in need of re-examination.

  1. Natural Regulation of Energy Flow in a Green Quantum Photocell.

    PubMed

    Arp, Trevor B; Barlas, Yafis; Aji, Vivek; Gabor, Nathaniel M

    2016-12-14

    Manipulating the flow of energy in nanoscale and molecular photonic devices is of both fundamental interest and central importance for applications in light energy harvesting optoelectronics. Under erratic solar irradiance conditions, unregulated power fluctuations in a light-harvesting photocell lead to inefficient energy storage in conventional solar cells and potentially fatal oxidative damage in photosynthesis. Here, we compare the theoretical minimum energy fluctuations in nanoscale quantum heat engine photocells that incorporate one or two photon-absorbing channels and show that fluctuations are naturally suppressed in the two-channel photocell. This intrinsic suppression acts as a passive regulation mechanism that enables the efficient conversion of varying incident solar power into a steady output for absorption over a broad range of the solar spectrum on Earth. Remarkably, absorption in the green portion of the spectrum provides no inherent regulatory benefit, indicating that green light should be rejected in a photocell whose primary role is the regulation of energy flow.

  2. U.S. energy flow -- 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1995-12-01

    Energy consumption in 1994 increased for the fourth year in a row, reaching an all-time high. It was associated with a robust economy, low inflation, and low unemployment rates. Of the populous states, California lagged substantially behind the national recovery. Consumption in all major end-use sectors reached historic highs. Transmission of electrical power by the utilities increased almost 3%. However, this understates the increase of the total amount of electricity used in the nation because the amount of electricity used ``in-house`` by a growing number of self-generators is unrecorded. Imports of both fossil fuels and electricity increased. About half of the total oil consumed was imported, with Saudi Arabia being the principal supplier. Domestic oil production continued to decline; however, the sharp decline in Alaskan production was slowed. The increase in the demand for natural gas was met by both a modest increase in domestic production and imports from Canada, which comprised 10% of supply. The residential/commercial sector is the largest single consumer of natural gas; however, use by electric generators has increased annually for the past decade. The regulated utilities increased their consumption 11% in 1994. The year was noteworthy for the US nuclear power industry. Work was halted on the last nuclear power plant under construction in the country. Because of the retirement of aged and poorly performing nuclear plants and because of improved efficiencies, the capacity factor for the remaining 109 operable plants reached a record 74%.

  3. Use DCF to save energy. [Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) program

    SciTech Connect

    Doane, R.C.

    1982-07-01

    The Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) program is written for the TI-59 programmable calculator, and a profitability analysis can help the process engineer decide among various alternatives in an energy conservation project. The objective of the analysis is to determine the following parameters: discounted cash flow rate of return (also called earning power), present value profit (at any specified cost of capital), present value profit as a percent of the capital investment, and the payback period (undiscounted).

  4. The Student Accounting System. A Process for Tracking and Assessing the Flow of Students Through Vocational Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Peggy; Robinson, Gail

    This manual presents the Student Accounting System, a system designed to track and assess the flow of students through vocational training programs at both the community college and secondary levels. The two major data files/source documents are first described--an inventory of programs and their courses and an inventory of all courses completed…

  5. An integral turbulent kinetic energy analysis of free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Phares, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Mixing of coaxial streams is analyzed by application of integral techniques. An integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is solved simultaneously with the integral equations for the mean flow. Normalized TKE profile shapes are obtained from incompressible jet and shear layer experiments and are assumed to be applicable to all free turbulent flows. The shear stress at the midpoint of the mixing zone is assumed to be directly proportional to the local TKE, and dissipation is treated with a generalization of the model developed for isotropic turbulence. Although the analysis was developed for ducted flows, constant-pressure flows were approximated with the duct much larger than the jet. The axisymmetric flows under consideration were predicted with reasonable accuracy. Fairly good results were also obtained for the fully developed two-dimensional shear layers, which were computed as thin layers at the boundary of a large circular jet.

  6. Ambient wind energy harvesting using cross-flow fluttering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuguang; Yuan, Jianping; Lipson, Hod

    2011-01-01

    In this experimental study, we propose and test a bioinspired piezo-leaf architecture which converts wind energy into electrical energy by wind-induced fluttering motion. While conventional fluttering devices are arranged in parallel with the flow direction, here we explore a dangling cross-flow stalk arrangement. This architecture amplifies the vibration by an order of magnitude, making it appropriate for low-cost organic piezomaterials. We fabricated prototypes using flexible piezoelectric materials as stalks and polymer film as leaves. A series of experiments demonstrated a peak output power of approximately 600 μ W and maximum power density of approximately 2 mW/cm3 from a single leaf.

  7. Vibrational Energy Transfer of Diatomic Gases in Hypersonic Expanding Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Stephen Merrick

    In high temperature flows related to vehicles at hypersonic speeds significant excitation of the vibrational energy modes of the gas can occur. Accurate predictions of the vibrational state of the gas and the rates of vibrational energy transfer are essential to achieve optimum engine performance, for design of heat shields, and for studies of ground based hypersonic test facilities. The Landau -Teller relaxation model is widely used because it has been shown to give accurate predictions in vibrationally heating flows such as behind forebody shocks. However, a number of experiments in nozzles have indicated that it fails to accurately predict the rate of energy transfer in expanding, or cooling, flow regions and fails to predict the distribution of energy in the vibrational quantum levels. The present study examines the range of applicability of the Landau -Teller model in expanding flows and develops techniques which provide accurate predictions in expanding flows. In the present study, detailed calculations of the vibrational relaxation process of N_2 and CO in cooling flows are conducted. A coupled set of vibrational transition rate equations and quasi one-dimensional fluid dynamic equations is solved. Rapid anharmonic Vibration-Translation transition rates and Vibration -Vibration exchange collisions are found to be responsible for vibrational relaxation acceleration in situations of high vibrational temperature and low translational temperature. The predictions of the detailed master equation solver are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The exact degree of acceleration is cataloged in this study for N_2 and is found to be a function of both the translational temperature (T) and the ratio of vibrational to translational temperatures (T_{vib}/T). Non-Boltzmann population distributions are observed for values of T _{vib}/T as low as 2.0. The local energy transfer rate is shown to be an order of magnitude or more faster than the Landau-Teller model

  8. Distributed energy storage: Time-dependent tree flow design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Ziaei, S.; Lorente, S.

    2016-05-01

    This article proposes "distributed energy storage" as a basic design problem of distributing energy storage material on an area. The energy flows by fluid flow from a concentrated source to points (users) distributed equidistantly on the area. The flow is time-dependent. Several scenarios are analyzed: sensible-heat storage, latent-heat storage, exergy storage vs energy storage, and the distribution of a finite supply of heat transfer surface between the source fluid and the distributed storage material. The chief conclusion is that the finite amount of storage material should be distributed proportionally with the distribution of the flow rate of heating agent arriving on the area. The total time needed by the source stream to "invade" the area is cumulative (the sum of the storage times required at each storage site) and depends on the energy distribution paths and the sequence in which the users are served by the source stream. Directions for future designs of distributed storage and retrieval are outlined in the concluding section.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy fiscal year 1998 accountability report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This report, the Department of Energy`s first Accountability Report, is part of an effort to better measure how the Department of Energy is serving the American taxpayers; the results achieved; and the cost-effectiveness of the work. By integrating the Department`s FY 1998 performance results, financial status, and management controls, this report is a useful tool and provides a status report on the Department`s performance in FY 1998. It presents a clearer picture of the return on the investment of the resources entrusted to this agency. After thorough review by the Office of the Inspector General, with one exception, the financial statements have been found to present fairly the financial position of the Department in conformity with Federal accounting standards. Overall, the Department has reasonable assurance that DOE has management controls in place to ensure that operational activities are efficient and effective and comply with the law. Ten challenges where management controls can be strengthened have been identified.

  10. Energy flow along the medium-induced parton cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Blaizot, J.-P.

    2016-05-15

    We discuss the dynamics of parton cascades that develop in dense QCD matter, and contrast their properties with those of similar cascades of gluon radiation in vacuum. We argue that such cascades belong to two distinct classes that are characterized respectively by an increasing or a constant (or decreasing) branching rate along the cascade. In the former class, of which the BDMPS, medium-induced, cascade constitutes a typical example, it takes a finite time to transport a finite amount of energy to very soft quanta, while this time is essentially infinite in the latter case, to which the DGLAP cascade belongs. The medium induced cascade is accompanied by a constant flow of energy towards arbitrary soft modes, leading eventually to the accumulation of the initial energy of the leading particle at zero energy. It also exhibits scaling properties akin to wave turbulence. These properties do not show up in the cascade that develops in vacuum. There, the energy accumulates in the spectrum at smaller and smaller energy as the cascade develops, but the energy never flows all the way down to zero energy. Our analysis suggests that the way the energy is shared among the offsprings of a splitting gluon has little impact on the qualitative properties of the cascades, provided the kernel that governs the splittings is not too singular.

  11. Bounded energy states in homogeneous turbulent shear flow - An alternative view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, P. S.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    The equilibrium structure of homogeneous turbulent shear flow is investigated from a theoretical standpoint. Existing turbulence models, in apparent agreement with physical and numerical experiments, predict an unbounded exponential time growth of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate; only the anisotropy tensor and turbulent time scale reach a structural equilibrium. It is shown that if a residual vortex stretching term is maintained in the dissipation rate transport equation, then there can exist equilibrium solutions, with bounded energy states, where the turbulence production is balanced by its dissipation. Illustrative calculations are presented for a k-epsilon model modified to account for net vortex stretching.

  12. Flow dynamics and energy efficiency of flow in the left ventricle during myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Vivek; Low, Adriel Jia Jun; Annamalai, Sarayu Parimal; Sampath, Smita; Poh, Kian Keong; Totman, Teresa; Mazlan, Muhammad; Croft, Grace; Richards, A Mark; de Kleijn, Dominique P V; Chin, Chih-Liang; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2017-03-31

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, where myocardial infarction (MI) is a major category. After infarction, the heart has difficulty providing sufficient energy for circulation, and thus, understanding the heart's energy efficiency is important. We induced MI in a porcine animal model via circumflex ligation and acquired multiple-slice cine magnetic resonance (MR) images in a longitudinal manner-before infarction, and 1 week (acute) and 4 weeks (chronic) after infarction. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed based on MR images to obtain detailed fluid dynamics and energy dynamics of the left ventricles. Results showed that energy efficiency flow through the heart decreased at the acute time point. Since the heart was observed to experience changes in heart rate, stroke volume and chamber size over the two post-infarction time points, simulations were performed to test the effect of each of the three parameters. Increasing heart rate and stroke volume were found to significantly decrease flow energy efficiency, but the effect of chamber size was inconsistent. Strong complex interplay was observed between the three parameters, necessitating the use of non-dimensional parameterization to characterize flow energy efficiency. The ratio of Reynolds to Strouhal number, which is a form of Womersley number, was found to be the most effective non-dimensional parameter to represent energy efficiency of flow in the heart. We believe that this non-dimensional number can be computed for clinical cases via ultrasound and hypothesize that it can serve as a biomarker for clinical evaluations.

  13. Pyrolysis and gasification of meat-and-bone-meal: energy balance and GHG accounting.

    PubMed

    Cascarosa, Esther; Boldrin, Alessio; Astrup, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Meat-and-bone-meal (MBM) produced from animal waste has become an increasingly important residual fraction needing management. As biodegradable waste is routed away from landfills, thermo-chemical treatments of MBM are considered promising solution for the future. Pyrolysis and gasification of MBM were assessed based on data from three experimental lab and pilot-scale plants. Energy balances were established for the three technologies, providing different outcomes for energy recovery: bio-oil was the main product for the pyrolysis system, while syngas and a solid fraction of biochar were the main products in the gasification system. These products can be used - eventually after upgrading - for energy production, thereby offsetting energy production elsewhere in the system. Greenhouse gases (GHG) accounting of the technologies showed that all three options provided overall GHG savings in the order of 600-1000kg CO2-eq. per Mg of MBM treated, mainly as a consequence of avoided fossil fuel consumption in the energy sector. Local conditions influencing the environmental performance of the three systems were identified, together with critical factors to be considered during decision-making regarding MBM management.

  14. Dark energy and the quietness of the local Hubble flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axenides, M.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2002-06-01

    The linearity and quietness of the local (<10 Mpc) Hubble flow (LHF) in view of the very clumpy local universe is a long standing puzzle in standard and in open CDM (cold dark matter) cosmogony. The question addressed in this paper is whether the antigravity component of the recently discovered dark energy can cool the velocity flow enough to provide a solution to this puzzle. We calculate the growth of matter fluctuations in a flat universe containing a fraction ΩX(t0) of dark energy obeying the time independent equation of state pX=wρX. We find that dark energy can indeed cool the LHF. However the dark energy parameter values required to make the predicted velocity dispersion consistent with the observed value vrms~=40 km/s have been ruled out by other observational tests constraining the dark energy parameters w and ΩX. Therefore despite the claims of recent qualitative studies, dark energy with time independent equation of state cannot by itself explain the quietness and linearity of the local Hubble flow.

  15. Nuclear Material Accountability Applications of a Continuous Energy and Direction Gamma Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    David Gerts; Robert Bean; Marc Paff

    2010-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has recently developed a detector system based on the principle of a Wilson cloud chamber that gives the original energy and direction to a gamma ray source. This detector has the properties that the energy resolution is continuous and the direction to the source can be resolved to desired fidelity. Furthermore, the detector has low power requirements, is durable, operates in widely varying environments, and is relatively cheap to produce. This detector is expected, however, to require significant time to perform measurements. To mitigate the significant time for measurements, the detector is expected to scale to very large sizes with a linear increase in cost. For example, the proof of principle detector is approximately 30,000 cm3. This work describes the technical results that lead to these assertions. Finally, the applications of this detector are described in the context of nuclear material accountability.

  16. Accounting Issues: An Essay Series Part IX--Statement of Cash Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laux, Judy

    2009-01-01

    This essay series, beginning with Laux [2007a], defends the proposition that eliminating the theoretical chapter from the principles level accounting course has weakened the introduction for students new to this subject, perhaps resulting in some adverse selection for the accounting profession. As a remedy, it offers concise theoretical articles…

  17. Neutron radigoraphy of fluid flow for geothermal energy research

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R.; Polsky, Yarom; Anovitz, L.; Carmichael, Justin R.; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Jacobson, David; Hussey, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems seek to expand the potential for geothermal energy by engineering heat exchange systems within the earth. A neutron radiography imaging method has been developed for the study of fluid flow through rock under environmental conditions found in enhanced geothermal energy systems. For this method, a pressure vessel suitable for neutron radiography was designed and fabricated, modifications to imaging instrument setups were tested, multiple contrast agents were tested, and algorithms developed for tracking of flow. The method has shown success for tracking of single phase flow through a manufactured crack in a 3.81 cm (1.5 inch) diameter core within a pressure vessel capable of confinement up to 69 MPa (10,000 psi) using a particle tracking approach with bubbles of fluorocarbon-based fluid as the “particles” and imaging with 10 ms exposures.

  18. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  19. Distributed Power Flow Control: Distributed Power Flow Control using Smart Wires for Energy Routing

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-24

    GENI Project: Smart Wire Grid is developing a solution for controlling power flow within the electric grid to better manage unused and overall transmission capacity. The 300,000 miles of high-voltage transmission line in the U.S. today are congested and inefficient, with only around 50% of all transmission capacity utilized at any given time. Increased consumer demand should be met in part with more efficient and an economical power flow. Smart Wire Grid’s devices clamp onto existing transmission lines and control the flow of power within—much like how internet routers help allocate bandwidth throughout the web. Smart wires could support greater use of renewable energy by providing more consistent control over how that energy is routed within the grid on a real-time basis. This would lessen the concerns surrounding the grid’s inability to effectively store intermittent energy from renewables for later use.

  20. Material control and accounting in the Department of Energy's nuclear fuel complex

    SciTech Connect

    1989-01-01

    Material control and accounting takes place within an envelope of activities related to safeguards and security, as well as to safety, health, and environment, all of which need to be managed to assure that the entire nuclear fuel complex can operate in a societally accepted manner. Within this envelope the committee was directed to carry out the following scope of work: (1) Review the MCandA systems in use at selected DOE facilities that are processing special nuclear material (SNM) in various physical and chemical forms. (2) Design and convene a workshop for senior representatives from each of DOE's facilities on the flows and inventories of nuclear materials. (3) Plan and conduct a series of site visits to each of the facilities to observe first hand the processing operations and the related MCandA systems. (4) Review the potential improvement in overall safeguard systems effectiveness, as measured by expected reduction in inventory difference control limits and inventory differences for materials balance accounts and facilities, or other criteria as appropriate. Indicate how this affects the relative degree of uncertainty in the system. (5) Review the efficiency of operating the MCandA system with and without the upgrading options and assess whether upgrading will contribute further efficiencies in operation, which may reduce many of the current operations costs. Determine if the current system is cost-effective. (6) Recommend the most promising technical approaches for further development by DOE and further study as warranted.

  1. Advective velocity and energy dissipation rate in an oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ziaul; Hondzo, Miki; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2005-07-01

    Characterizing the transport processes at the sediment-water interface along sloping boundaries in lakes and reservoirs is of fundamental interest in lake and reservoir water quality management. The turbulent bottom boundary layer (TBBL) along a slope, induced by the breaking of internal waves in a linearly stratified fluid, was investigated through laboratory measurements. Fast response micro-scale conductivity and temperature probes in conjunction with laser-Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the time series of salinity, temperature, and velocity along a sloping boundary. Turbulent energy spectra were computed from the velocity data using a time-dependent advective velocity and Taylor's hypothesis. The energy spectra were used to estimate the energy dissipation rate at different positions in the TBBL. The advective velocity in this near-zero mean shear flow is based on an integral time scale (T(int)). The integral time scale is related to the average frequency of the spectral energy density of the flow velocity. The energy dissipation rate estimated from the variable advective velocity with an averaging time window equal to the integral time scale (T=T(int)) was 43% higher than the energy dissipation rate estimated from a constant advective velocity. The estimated dissipation rates with T=T(int) were comparable to values obtained by curve-fitting a theoretical Batchelor spectrum for the temperature gradient spectra. This study proposes the integral time scale to be used for the oscillatory flows as (a) a time-averaging window to estimate the advective velocity and associated energy dissipation level, and (b) a normalizing parameter in the energy spectrum.

  2. Evolution of energy in flow driven by rising bubbles.

    PubMed

    Mazzitelli, Irene M; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-06-01

    We investigate by direct numerical simulations the flow that rising bubbles cause in an originally quiescent fluid. We employ the Eulerian-Lagrangian method with two-way coupling and periodic boundary conditions. In order to be able to treat up to 288000 bubbles, the following approximations and simplifications had to be introduced, as done before, e.g., by Climent and Magnaudet, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4827 (1999). (i) The bubbles were treated as point particles, thus (ii) disregarding the near-field interactions among them, and (iii) effective force models for the lift and the drag forces were used. In particular, the lift coefficient was assumed to be 1/2, independent of the bubble Reynolds number and the local flow field. The results suggest that large-scale motions are generated, owing to an inverse energy cascade from the small to the large scales. However, as the Taylor-Reynolds number is only in the range of 1, the corresponding scaling of the energy spectrum with an exponent of -5/3 cannot develop over a pronounced range. In the long term, the property of local energy transfer, characteristic of real turbulence, is lost and the input of energy equals the viscous dissipation at all scales. Due to the lack of strong vortices, the bubbles spread rather uniformly in the flow. The mechanism for uniform spreading is as follows. Rising bubbles induce a velocity field behind them that acts on the following bubbles. Owing to the shear, those bubbles experience a lift force, which makes them spread to the left or right, thus preventing the formation of vertical bubble clusters and therefore of efficient forcing. Indeed, when the lift is artificially put to zero in the simulations, the flow is forced much more efficiently and a more pronounced energy that accumulation at large scales (due to the inverse energy cascade) is achieved.

  3. Soap film flow visualization investigations of oscillating wing energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschmeier, Benjamin; Bryant, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    With increasing population and proliferation of wireless electronics, significant research attention has turned to harvesting energy from ambient sources such as wind and water flows at scales ranging from micro-watt to mega-watt levels. One technique that has recently attracted attention is the application of bio-inspired flapping wings for energy harvesting. This type of system uses a heaving and pitching airfoil to extract flow energy and generate electricity. Such a device can be realized using passive devices excited by aeroelastic flutter phenomena, kinematic mechanisms driven by mechanical linkages, or semi-active devices that are actively controlled in one degree of freedom and passively driven in another. For these types of systems, numerical simulations have showed strong dependence on efficiency and vortex interaction. In this paper we propose a new apparatus for reproducing arbitrary pitch-heave waveforms to perform flow visualization experiments in a soap film tunnel. The vertically falling, gravity driven soap film tunnel is used to replicate flows with a chord Reynolds number on the order of 4x104. The soap film tunnel is used to investigate leading edge vortex (LEV) and trailing edge vortex (TEV) interactions for sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal waveforms. From a qualitative analysis of the fluid structure interaction, we have been able to demonstrate that the LEVs for non-sinusoidal motion convect faster over the airfoil compared with sinusoidal motion. Signifying that optimal flapping frequency is dependent on the motion profile.

  4. Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty in Detectors for High-Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin

    Systematic instrumental uncertainties in astronomical analyses have been generally ignored in data analysis due to the lack of robust principled methods, though the importance of incorporating instrumental calibration uncertainty is widely recognized by both users and instrument builders. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. Lee et al. (2011) introduced a so-called pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is "pragmatic" in that it introduces an ad hoc technique that simplifies computation by assuming that the current data is not useful in narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product, i.e., that the prior and posterior distributions for the calibration products are the same. In the thesis, we focus on incorporating calibration uncertainty into a principled Bayesian X-ray spectral analysis, specifically we account for uncertainty in the so-called effective area curve and the photon redistribution matrix. X-ray spectral analysis models the distribution of the energies of X-ray photons emitted from an astronomical source. The effective area curve of an X-ray detector describes its sensitive as a function of the energy of incoming photons, and the photon redistribution matrix describes the probability distribution of the recorded (discrete) energy of a photon as a function of the true (discretized) energy. Starting with the effective area curve, we follow Lee et al. (2011) and use a principle component analysis (PCA) to efficiently represent the uncertainty. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method to account for calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. For the photon redistribution matrix, we first model each conditional distribution as a normal distribution and then apply PCA to the parameters describing the normal models. This results in an

  5. Eight energy and material flow characteristics of urban ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuemei

    2016-11-01

    Recent decades have seen an expanding literature exploring urban energy and material flows, loosely branded as urban metabolism analysis. However, this has occurred largely in parallel to the mainstream studies of cities as ecosystems. This paper aims to conceptually bridge these two distinctive fields of research, by (a) identifying the common aspects between them; (b) identifying key characteristics of urban ecosystems that can be derived from energy and material flow analysis, namely energy and material budget and pathways; flow intensity; energy and material efficiency; rate of resource depletion, accumulation and transformation; self-sufficiency or external dependency; intra-system heterogeneity; intersystem and temporal variation; and regulating mechanism and governing capacity. I argue that significant ecological insight can be, or has the potential to be, drawn from the rich and rapidly growing empirical findings of urban metabolism studies to understand the behaviour of cities as human-dominated, complex systems. A closer intellectual linkage and cross pollination between urban metabolism and urban ecosystem studies will advance our scientific understanding and better inform urban policy and management practices.

  6. Macroscopic momentum and mechanical energy equations for incompressible single-phase flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Paéz-García, Catherine Teresa; Valdés-Parada, Francisco J; Lasseux, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Modeling flow in porous media is usually focused on the governing equations for mass and momentum transport, which yield the velocity and pressure at the pore or Darcy scales. However, in many applications, it is important to determine the work (or power) needed to induce flow in porous media, and this can be achieved when the mechanical energy equation is taken into account. At the macroscopic scale, this equation may be postulated to be the result of the inner product of Darcy's law and the seepage velocity. However, near the porous medium boundaries, this postulate seems questionable due to the spatial variations of the effective properties (velocity, permeability, porosity, etc.). In this work we derive the macroscopic mechanical energy equation using the method of volume averaging for the simple case of incompressible single-phase flow in porous media. Our analysis shows that the result of averaging the pore-scale version of the mechanical energy equation at the Darcy scale is not, in general, the expected product of Darcy's law and the seepage velocity. As a matter of fact, this result is only applicable in the bulk region of the porous medium and, in the derivation of this result, the properties of the permeability tensor are determinant. Furthermore, near the porous medium boundaries, a more novel version of the mechanical energy equation is obtained, which incorporates additional terms that take into account the rapid variations of structural properties taking place in this particular portion of the system. This analysis can be applied to multiphase and compressible flows in porous media and in many other multiscale systems.

  7. Macroscopic momentum and mechanical energy equations for incompressible single-phase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paéz-García, Catherine Teresa; Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; Lasseux, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Modeling flow in porous media is usually focused on the governing equations for mass and momentum transport, which yield the velocity and pressure at the pore or Darcy scales. However, in many applications, it is important to determine the work (or power) needed to induce flow in porous media, and this can be achieved when the mechanical energy equation is taken into account. At the macroscopic scale, this equation may be postulated to be the result of the inner product of Darcy's law and the seepage velocity. However, near the porous medium boundaries, this postulate seems questionable due to the spatial variations of the effective properties (velocity, permeability, porosity, etc.). In this work we derive the macroscopic mechanical energy equation using the method of volume averaging for the simple case of incompressible single-phase flow in porous media. Our analysis shows that the result of averaging the pore-scale version of the mechanical energy equation at the Darcy scale is not, in general, the expected product of Darcy's law and the seepage velocity. As a matter of fact, this result is only applicable in the bulk region of the porous medium and, in the derivation of this result, the properties of the permeability tensor are determinant. Furthermore, near the porous medium boundaries, a more novel version of the mechanical energy equation is obtained, which incorporates additional terms that take into account the rapid variations of structural properties taking place in this particular portion of the system. This analysis can be applied to multiphase and compressible flows in porous media and in many other multiscale systems.

  8. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  9. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  10. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  11. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-21

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  12. Accounting for intracell flow in models with emphasis on water table recharge and stream-aquifer interaction. 2. A procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgensen, D.G.; Signor, D.C.; Imes, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Intercepted intracell flow, especially if cell includes water table recharge and a stream (sink), can result in significant model error if not accounted for. A procedure utilizing net flow per cell (Fn) that accounts for intercepted intracell flow can be used for both steady state and transient simulations. Germane to the procedure is the determination of the ratio of area of influence of the interior sink to the area of the cell (Ai/Ac). Ai is the area in which water table recharge has the potential to be intercepted by the sink. Determining Ai/Ac requires either a detailed water table map or observation of stream conditions within the cell. A proportioning parameter M, which is equal to 1 or slightly less and is a function of cell geometry, is used to determine how much of the water that has potential for interception is intercepted by the sink within the cell. Also germane to the procedure is the determination of the flow across the streambed (Fs) which is not directly a function of cell size, due to difference in head between the water level in the stream and the potentiometric surface of the aquifer underlying the streambed. -from Authors

  13. Energy Flow for a Variable-Gap Capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Nathaniel R.

    2005-09-01

    When capacitor plates are separated, the capacitor's electrostatic energy either increases or decreases, depending upon whether the charge or the voltage is held constant. For the constant-voltage case, an interesting puzzle can be posed to students: How is it possible that an external agent does positive work on the capacitor while at the same time the capacitor's stored energy decreases? An energy flow diagram, as suggested by Art Hobson's TPT article, helps to visualize the movements of energy among different parts of the system. What Richard Feynman calls a "surprising factor of one-half" in the expression for the force between capacitor plates confronts students with an additional puzzle to decipher.2

  14. Redistribution of energy flow in a material due to damping.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Pierce, Donna M; Arnoldus, Henk F

    2011-02-01

    The field lines of energy flow of the radiation emitted by a linear dipole in free space are straight lines, running radially outward from the source. When the dipole is embedded in a medium, the field lines are curves when the imaginary part of the relative permittivity is finite. It is shown that due to the damping in the material all radiation is emitted in directions perpendicular to the dipole axis, whereas for a dipole in free space the radiation is emitted in all directions except along the dipole axis. It is also shown that some field lines in the near field form semiloops. Energy flowing along these semiloops is absorbed by the material and does not contribute to the radiative power in the far field.

  15. Lithium-Based High Energy Density Flow Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement a lithium-based high energy density flow battery. In one embodiment, a lithium-based high energy density flow battery includes a first anodic conductive solution that includes a lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex dissolved in a solvent, a second cathodic conductive solution that includes a cathodic complex dissolved in a solvent, a solid lithium ion conductor disposed so as to separate the first solution from the second solution, such that the first conductive solution, the second conductive solution, and the solid lithium ionic conductor define a circuit, where when the circuit is closed, lithium from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex in the first conductive solution dissociates from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex, migrates through the solid lithium ionic conductor, and associates with the cathodic complex of the second conductive solution, and a current is generated.

  16. Vanadium Flow Battery for Energy Storage: Prospects and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cong; Zhang, Huamin; Li, Xianfeng; Liu, Tao; Xing, Feng

    2013-04-18

    The vanadium flow battery (VFB) as one kind of energy storage technique that has enormous impact on the stabilization and smooth output of renewable energy. Key materials like membranes, electrode, and electrolytes will finally determine the performance of VFBs. In this Perspective, we report on the current understanding of VFBs from materials to stacks, describing the factors that affect materials' performance from microstructures to the mechanism and new materials development. Moreover, new models for VFB stacks as well as structural design will be summarized as well. Finally, the challenges, the overall cost evaluation, and future research directions will be briefly proposed.

  17. Executing the double win: protect your cash flow during a patient accounting system install.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jason L; Smith, J Cathy; Strand, Brett

    2009-09-01

    MultiCare Health System's plan for ensuring that its patient accounting system implementation would bring rapid financial benefits comprised eight basic steps: Set baselines and establish goals. Identify key leadership stakeholders across departmental lines. Identify team resources. Establish roles and responsibilities. Identify and prepare for potential risks. Develop guiding principles. Develop key reporting and monitoring tools. Conduct daily monitoring.

  18. Estimation of excitation energy of diatomic molecules in expanding nonequilibrium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul

    1992-01-01

    The energy contained in the highly excited vibrational and rotational states in a diatomic gas in a thermochemical nonequilibrium state during expansion is estimated. The estimation is made on the assumption that the populations of the vibrational and rotational states, when normalized by their respective equilibrium values, are describable by simple functions containing no more than four arbitrary parameters. A cubic polynomial, a logarithmic-cubic polynomial, and a bimodal step function are used for this purpose. The four parameters are determined by imposing conditions known at the ground state and the dissociation limit and the mass conservation law. The energy in excess of that accounted for by assuming a Boltzmann distribution of these states, defined here as excess excitation energy, is calculated for N2, O2, NO, CO, OH, and H2. A calculation made for a typical nozzle flow shows that the excess energy may reach 6 percent of the total enthalpy of the flow, and that the flow velocity may decrease by as much as 4 percent due to the nonequilibrium excitation phenomenon.

  19. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 2: Free-energy form of Hamilton's principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The first and second variations are calculated for the irreducible form of Hamilton's Principle that involves the minimum number of dependent variables necessary to describe the kinetmatics and thermodynamics of inviscid, compressible, baroclinic flow in a specified gravitational field. The form of the second variation shows that, in the neighborhood of a stationary point that corresponds to physically stable flow, the action integral is a complex saddle surface in parameter space. There exists a form of Hamilton's Principle for which a direct solution of a flow problem is possible. This second form is related to the first by a Friedrichs transformation of the thermodynamic variables. This introduces an extra dependent variable, but the first and second variations are shown to have direct physical significance, namely they are equal to the free energy of fluctuations about the equilibrium flow that satisfies the equations of motion. If this equilibrium flow is physically stable, and if a very weak second order integral constraint on the correlation between the fluctuations of otherwise independent variables is satisfied, then the second variation of the action integral for this free energy form of Hamilton's Principle is positive-definite, so the action integral is a minimum, and can serve as the basis for a direct trail and error solution. The second order integral constraint states that the unavailable energy must be maximum at equilibrium, i.e. the fluctuations must be so correlated as to produce a second order decrease in the total unavailable energy.

  20. Importance of Atomic Contacts in Vibrational Energy Flow in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Masato; Mizuno, Misao; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-06-02

    Vibrational energy flow in proteins was studied by monitoring the time-resolved anti-Stokes ultraviolet resonance Raman scattering of three myoglobin mutants in which a Trp residue substitutes a different amino acid residue near heme. The anti-Stokes Raman intensities of the Trp residue in the three mutants increased with similar rates after depositing excess vibrational energy at heme, despite the difference in distance between heme and each substituted Trp residue along the main chain of the protein. This indicates that vibrational energy is not transferred through the main chain of the protein but rather through atomic contacts between heme and the Trp residue. Distinct differences were observed in the amplitude of the band intensity change between the Trp residues at different positions, and the amplitude of the band intensity change exhibits a correlation with the extent of exposure of the Trp residue to solvent water. This correlation indicates that atomic contacts between an amino acid residue and solvent water play an important role in vibrational energy flow in a protein.

  1. Velocity fluctuations and energy amplification in laminar fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz de Zarate, Jose M.; Sengers, Jan V.

    2008-11-01

    We present a systematic procedure for evaluating the intrinsic velocity fluctuations and the resulting intrinsic energy amplification that are always present in laminar fluid flows. For this purpose we formulate a stochastic Orr-Sommerfeld equation and a stochastic Squire equation by applying a fluctuation-dissipation theorem for the random part of the dissipative stresses. From the solution of the stochastic Orr- Sommerfeld and Squire equations the intrinsic energy amplification can be deduced. As an illustration of the procedure we present an explicit solution for the case of planar Couette flow. We first solve the fluctuating hydrodynamics equations in the bulk, obtaining an exact representation of the spatial spectrum of the velocity fluctuations valid for large wave numbers. The resulting energy amplification is proportional to Re^3/2. Next, we show how to a good approximation confinement can be incorporated by a simple Galerkin projection technique. The effect of the boundary conditions is to reduce the energy amplification to a logarithmic dependence on Re. We shall also indicate how an exact solution for the case of confined geometries can be obtained by an expansion into a set of hydrodynamic modes, conveniently expressed in terms of Airy functions.

  2. An extended macro traffic flow model accounting for the driver's bounded rationality and numerical tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Huang, Hai-Jun; Shang, Hua-Yan

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a macro traffic flow model to explore the effects of the driver's bounded rationality on the evolutions of traffic waves (which include shock and rarefaction waves) and small perturbation, and on the fuel consumption and emissions (that include CO, HC and NOX) during the evolution process. The numerical results illustrate that considering the driver's bounded rationality can prominently smooth the wavefront of the traffic waves and improve the stability of traffic flow, which shows that the driver's bounded rationality has positive impacts on traffic flow; but considering the driver's bounded rationality reduces the fuel consumption and emissions only at the upstream of the rarefaction wave while enhances the fuel consumption and emissions under other situations, which shows that the driver's bounded rationality has positive impacts on the fuel consumption and emissions only at the upstream of the rarefaction wave, while negative effects on the fuel consumption and emissions under other situations. In addition, the numerical results show that the driver's bounded rationality has little prominent impact on the total fuel consumption, and emissions during the whole evolution of small perturbation.

  3. Embedded resource accounting for coupled natural-human systems: An application to water resource impacts of the western U.S. electrical energy trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Adams, Elizabeth A.; Rushforth, Richard; Tidwell, Vincent C.

    2014-10-01

    In complex coupled natural-human systems (CNH), multitype networks link social, environmental, and economic systems with flows of matter, energy, information, and value. Embedded Resource Accounting (ERA) is a systems analysis framework that includes the indirect connections of a multitype CNH network. ERA is conditioned on perceived system boundaries, which may vary according to the accountant's point of view. Both direct and indirect impacts are implicit whenever two subnetworks interact in such a system; the ratio of two subnetworks' impacts is the embedded intensity. For trade in the services of water, this is understood as the indirect component of a water footprint, and as "virtual water" trade. ERA is a generalization of input-output, footprint, and substance flow methods, and is a type of life cycle analysis. This paper presents results for the water and electrical energy system in the western U.S. This system is dominated by California, which outsources the majority of its water footprint of electrical energy. Electricity trade increases total water consumption for electricity production in the western U.S. by 15% and shifts water use to water-stressed Colorado River Basin States. A systemic underaccounting for water footprints occurs because state-level processes discount a portion of the water footprint occurring outside of the state boundary.

  4. Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow with bounded energy states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Abid, R.

    1992-01-01

    Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow are conducted with a second-order closure model modified to account for non-equilibrium vortex stretching in the dissipation rate transport equation, as recently proposed by Bernard and Speziale. As with the earlier reported k-epsilon model calculations incorporating this vortex stretching effect, a production-equals-dissipation equilibrium is obtained with bounded turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. However, this equilibrium is not achieved until the dimensionless time greater than 60, an elapsed time that is at least twice as large as any of those considered in previous numerical and physical experiments on homogeneous shear flow. Direct quantitative comparisons between the model predictions and the results of experiments are quite favorable. In particular, it is shown that the inclusion of this non-equilibrium vortex stretching effect has the capability of explaining the significant range of production to dissipation ratios observed in experiments.

  5. Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow with bounded energy states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Abid, R.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow are conducted with a second-order closure model modified to account for nonequilibrium vortex stretching in the dissipation rate transport equation as recently proposed by Bernard and Speziale (1992). As with the earlier reported K-epsilon model calculations incorporating this vortex stretching effect, a production-equals-dissipation equilibrium is obtained with bounded turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. However, this equilibrium is now not achieved until the dimensionless time St greater than 60 - an elapsed time that is at least twice as large as any of those considered in previous numerical and physical experiments on homogeneous shear flow. Direct quantitative comparisons between the model predictions and the results of experiments are quite favorable. In particular, it is shown that the inclusion of this nonequilibrium vortex stretching effect has the capability of explaining the significant range of production to dissipation ratios observed in experiments.

  6. Combining LCT tools for the optimization of an industrial process: material and energy flow analysis and best available techniques.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M T Torres; Andrade, L Cristóbal; Bugallo, P M Bello; Long, J J Casares

    2011-09-15

    Life cycle thinking (LCT) is one of the philosophies that has recently appeared in the context of the sustainable development. Some of the already existing tools and methods, as well as some of the recently emerged ones, which seek to understand, interpret and design the life of a product, can be included into the scope of the LCT philosophy. That is the case of the material and energy flow analysis (MEFA), a tool derived from the industrial metabolism definition. This paper proposes a methodology combining MEFA with another technique derived from sustainable development which also fits the LCT philosophy, the BAT (best available techniques) analysis. This methodology, applied to an industrial process, seeks to identify the so-called improvable flows by MEFA, so that the appropriate candidate BAT can be selected by BAT analysis. Material and energy inputs, outputs and internal flows are quantified, and sustainable solutions are provided on the basis of industrial metabolism. The methodology has been applied to an exemplary roof tile manufacture plant for validation. 14 Improvable flows have been identified and 7 candidate BAT have been proposed aiming to reduce these flows. The proposed methodology provides a way to detect improvable material or energy flows in a process and selects the most sustainable options to enhance them. Solutions are proposed for the detected improvable flows, taking into account their effectiveness on improving such flows.

  7. Optimal energy growth and optimal control in swept Hiemenz flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guégan, Alan; Schmid, Peter J.; Huerre, Patrick

    2006-11-01

    The objective of the study is first to examine the optimal transient growth of Görtler Hämmerlin perturbations in swept Hiemenz flow. This configuration constitutes a model of the flow in the attachment-line boundary layer at the leading-edge of swept wings. The optimal blowing and suction at the wall which minimizes the energy of the optimal perturbations is then determined. An adjoint-based optimization procedure applicable to both problems is devised, which relies on the maximization or minimization of a suitable objective functional. The variational analysis is carried out in the framework of the set of linear partial differential equations governing the chordwise and wall-normal velocity fluctuations. Energy amplifications of up to three orders of magnitude are achieved at low spanwise wavenumbers (k {˜} 0.1) and large sweep Reynolds number (textit{Re} {˜} 2000). Optimal perturbations consist of spanwise travelling chordwise vortices, with a vorticity distribution which is inclined against the sweep. Transient growth arises from the tilting of the vorticity distribution by the spanwise shear via a two-dimensional Orr mechanism acting in the basic flow dividing plane. Two distinct regimes have been identified: for k {≤sssim} 0.25, vortex dipoles are formed which induce large spanwise perturbation velocities; for k {gtrsim} 0.25, dipoles are not observed and only the Orr mechanism remains active. The optimal wall blowing control yields for instance an 80% decrease of the maximum perturbation kinetic energy reached by optimal disturbances at textit{Re} {=} 550 and k {=} 0.25. The optimal wall blowing pattern consists of spanwise travelling waves which follow the naturally occurring vortices and qualitatively act in the same manner as a more simple constant gain feedback control strategy.

  8. The Onset of Nonlinear Flow in Three-Dimensional Heterogeneous Flow Domains Based on Energy Dissipation Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meakin, P.; Basagaoglu, H.; Succi, S.; Welhan, J.

    2005-12-01

    The onset of nonlinear flow in three-dimensional random disordered porous flow domains was analyzed using participation numbers based on local kinetic energies, and energy dissipation rates computed via non-equilibrium kinetic tensors. A three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model was used to simulate gravity-driven single-phase flow over a range of Reynolds numbers that included the crossover from linear to nonlinear flow. The simulations results indicated that the kinetic energy participation number characterized the onset of nonlinear flow in terms of transition to a more dispersed (uniform) distribution of kinetic energy densities as the flow rate increased. However, the energy dissipation participation number characterized the onset of nonlinear flow in terms of a transition to a more locally concentrated distribution of energy dissipation densities at higher flows. The flow regime transition characterized by the energy dissipation participation number occurred over a nearly equal or a narrower range of Reynolds numbers compared to the transition characterized by the kinetic energy participation number. The results also revealed that the boundary conditions (periodic vs. no-slip) parallel to the main flow direction have an insignificant effect on the magnitude of the critical Reynolds number, that characterizes the onset of nonlinear effects, although they did influence the spatial correlations of the pore-scale kinetic energy and the energy dissipation densities in all Cartesian directions. Flow domains with periodic boundaries resulted in less-localized (more dispersed) steady-state flows than domains with no-slip boundaries. These results should be useful for designing future experiment like those of Zeria et al. 2005 (Transport in Porous Media, 60:159-181) that would have significant potential implications in diverse fields.

  9. Recent trends in energy flows through the Arctic climate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Michael; Haimberger, Leo

    2016-04-01

    While Arctic climate change can be diagnosed in many parameters, a comprehensive assessment of long-term changes and low frequency variability in the coupled Arctic energy budget still remains challenging due to the complex physical processes involved and the lack of observations. Here we draw on strongly improved observational capabilities of the past 15 years and employ observed radiative fluxes from CERES along with state-of-the-art atmospheric as well as coupled ocean-ice reanalyses to explore recent changes in energy flows through the Arctic climate system. Various estimates of ice volume and ocean heat content trends imply that the energy imbalance of the Arctic climate system was >1 Wm-2 during the 2000-2015 period, where most of the extra heat warmed the ocean and a comparatively small fraction was used to melt sea ice. The energy imbalance was partly fed by enhanced oceanic heat transports into the Arctic, especially in the mid 2000s. Seasonal trends of net radiation show a very clear signal of the ice-albedo feedback. Stronger radiative energy input during summer means increased seasonal oceanic heat uptake and accelerated sea ice melt. In return, lower minimum sea ice extent and higher SSTs lead to enhanced heat release from the ocean during fall season. These results are consistent with modeling studies finding an enhancement of the annual cycle of surface energy exchanges in a warming Arctic. Moreover, stronger heat fluxes from the ocean to the atmosphere in fall tend to warm the arctic boundary layer and reduce meridional temperature gradients, thereby reducing atmospheric energy transports into the polar cap. Although the observed results are a robust finding, extended high-quality datasets are needed to reliably separate trends from low frequency variability.

  10. The total flow concept for geothermal energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    A geothermal development project has been initiated at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) to emphasize development of methods for recovery and conversion of the energy in geothermal deposits of hot brines. Temperatures of these waters vary from 150 C to more than 300 C with dissolved solids content ranging from less than 0.1% to over 25% by weight. Of particular interest are the deposits of high-temperature/high-salinity brines, as well as less saline brines, known to occur in the Salton Trough of California. Development of this resource will depend on resolution of the technical problems of brine handling, scale and precipitation control, and corrosion/erosion resistant systems for efficient conversion of thermal to electrical energy. Research experience to date has shown these problems to be severe. Hence, the LLL program emphasizes development of an entirely different approach called the Total Flow concept.

  11. Advanced Redox Flow Batteries for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-03-19

    This report describes the status of the advanced redox flow battery research being performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 of FY2012 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails completion of evaluation and optimization of single cell components for the two advanced redox flow battery electrolyte chemistries recently developed at the lab, the all vanadium (V) mixed acid and V-Fe mixed acid solutions. All the single cell components to be used in future kW-scale stacks have been identified and optimized in this quarter, which include solution electrolyte, membrane or separator; carbon felt electrode and bi-polar plate. Varied electrochemical, chemical and physical evaluations were carried out to assist the component screening and optimization. The mechanisms of the battery capacity fading behavior for the all vanadium redox flow and the Fe/V battery were discovered, which allowed us to optimize the related cell operation parameters and continuously operate the system for more than three months without any capacity decay.

  12. Elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions at NICA energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B. Ivanov, Yu.; Soldatov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The transverse-momentum-integrated elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity, v2 (charged), and that of identified hadrons from Au+Au collisions are analyzed in the range of incident energies relevant to the Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility (NICA). Simulations are performed within a three-fluid model employing three different equations of state (EoSs): a purely hadronic EoS and two versions of the EoS involving the deconfinement transition-a first-order phase transition and a smooth crossover one. The present simulations demonstrate low sensitivity of v2 (charged) to the EoS. All considered scenarios equally well reproduce recent STAR data on v2 (charged) for mid-central Au+Au collisions and properly describe its change of sign at the incident energy decrease below √{s_{NN}} ≈ 3.5 GeV. The predicted integrated elliptic flow of various species exhibits a stronger dependence on the EoS. A noticeable sensitivity to the EoS is found for anti-protons and, to a lesser extent, for K- mesons. Presently there are no experimental data that could verify these predictions. Future experiments at NICA could corroborate these findings.

  13. Accounting for anthropogenic actions in modeling of stream flow at the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C. H.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The modeling of the horizontal movement of water from land to coasts at scales ranging from 10^5 km^2 to 10^6 km^2 has benefited from extensive research within the past two decades. In parallel, community technology for gathering/sharing surface water observations and datasets for describing the geography of terrestrial water bodies have recently had groundbreaking advancements. Yet, the fields of computational hydrology and hydroinformatics have barely started to work hand-in-hand, and much research remains to be performed before we can better understand the anthropogenic impact on surface water through combined observations and models. Here, we build on our existing river modeling approach that leverages community state-of-the-art tools such as atmospheric data from the second phase of the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS2), river networks from the enhanced National Hydrography Dataset (NHDPlus), and observations from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System (NWIS) obtained through CUAHSI webservices. Modifications are made to our integrated observational/modeling system to include treatment for anthropogenic actions such as dams, pumping and divergences in river networks. Initial results of a study focusing on the entire State of California suggest that availability of data describing human alterations on natural river networks associated with proper representation of such actions in our models could help advance hydrology further. Snapshot from an animation of flow in California river networks. The full animation is available at: http://www.ucchm.org/david/rapid.htm.

  14. SHOCK WAVE STRUCTURE IN ASTROPHYSICAL FLOWS WITH AN ACCOUNT OF PHOTON TRANSFER

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstov, Alexey; Blinnikov, Sergei; Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2015-09-20

    For an accurate treatment of the shock wave propagation in high-energy astrophysical phenomena, such as supernova shock breakouts, gamma-ray bursts and accretion disks, knowledge of radiative transfer plays a crucial role. In this paper we consider one-dimensional (1D) special relativistic radiation hydrodynamics by solving the Boltzmann equation for radiative transfer. The structure of a radiative shock is calculated for a number of shock tube problems, including strong shock waves, and relativistic- and radiation-dominated cases. Calculations are performed using an iterative technique that consistently solves the equations of relativistic hydrodynamics and relativistic comoving radiative transfer. A comparison of radiative transfer solutions with the Eddington approximation and the M1 closure is made. A qualitative analysis of moment equations for radiation is performed and the conditions for the existence of jump discontinuity for non-relativistic cases are investigated numerically.

  15. UV DRIVEN EVAPORATION OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS: ENERGY-LIMITED, RECOMBINATION-LIMITED, AND PHOTON-LIMITED FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the evaporation of close-in exoplanets irradiated by ionizing photons. We find that the properties of the flow are controlled by the ratio of the recombination time to the flow timescale. When the recombination timescale is short compared to the flow timescale, the flow is in approximate local ionization equilibrium with a thin ionization front where the photon mean free path is short compared to the flow scale. In this “recombination-limited” flow the mass-loss scales roughly with the square root of the incident flux. When the recombination time is long compared to the flow timescale the ionization front becomes thick and encompasses the entire flow with the mass-loss rate scaling linearly with flux. If the planet's potential is deep, then the flow is approximately “energy-limited”; however, if the planet's potential is shallow, then we identify a new limiting mass-loss regime, which we term “photon-limited.” In this scenario, the mass-loss rate is purely limited by the incoming flux of ionizing photons. We have developed a new numerical approach that takes into account the frequency dependence of the incoming ionizing spectrum and performed a large suite of 1D simulations to characterize UV driven mass-loss around low-mass planets. We find that the flow is “recombination-limited” at high fluxes but becomes “energy-limited” at low fluxes; however, the transition is broad occurring over several orders of magnitude in flux. Finally, we point out that the transitions between the different flow types do not occur at a single flux value but depend on the planet's properties, with higher-mass planets becoming “energy-limited” at lower fluxes.

  16. 75 FR 36381 - Office of Energy Policy and Innovation; Request for Comments Regarding Rates, Accounting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... contracted-for storage capacity to arbitrage differences in peak and off-peak energy prices. The Commission... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Office of Energy Policy and Innovation; Request for Comments Regarding...

  17. High-Energy-Density Shear Flow and Instability Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kline, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid-density, 20 μm thick Al plate, variations of the experiment to details of the initial conditions have been performed. These variations have included increasing the fluid densities (by modifying the plate material from Al to Ti and Cu), imposing sinusoidal seed perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. Radiography of the unseeded layer has revealed the presence of emergent Kelvin-Helmholtz structures which may be analyzed to infer fluid-mechanical properties including turbulent energy density. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  18. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafò, A.; Liu, Y.; Panesi, M.

    2015-12-01

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  19. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, A.; Liu, Y.; Panesi, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  20. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  1. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Puria, Sunil; Steele, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  2. Nonequilibrium velocity fluctuations and energy amplification in planar Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz de Zárate, José M.; Sengers, Jan V.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we investigate intrinsic thermally excited nonequilibrium velocity fluctuations in laminar planar Couette flow. For this purpose we have complemented the solution of the stochastic Orr-Sommerfeld equation for the intensity of the fluctuations of the wall-normal velocity, presented in a previous publication, with a solution of the stochastic Squire equation for the intensity of the fluctuations of the wall-normal vorticity. We have obtained exact solutions of these equations without boundary conditions and solutions in a Galerkin approximation when appropriate boundary conditions are included. These results enable us to make a quantitative assessment of the intensity of these nonequilibrium fluctuations, as well as of the related energy amplification, which are always present, even in the absence of any externally imposed noise.

  3. A quasi steady state method for solving transient Darcy flow in complex 3D fractured networks accounting for matrix to fracture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nœtinger, B.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling natural Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) receives more and more attention in applied geosciences, from oil and gas industry, to geothermal recovery and aquifer management. The fractures may be either natural, or artificial in case of well stimulation. Accounting for the flow inside the fracture network, and accounting for the transfers between the matrix and the fractures, with the same level of accuracy is an important issue for calibrating the well architecture and for setting up optimal resources recovery strategies. Recently, we proposed an original method allowing to model transient pressure diffusion in the fracture network only [1]. The matrix was assumed to be impervious. A systematic approximation scheme was built, allowing to model the initial DFN by a set of N unknowns located at each identified intersection between fractures. The higher N, the higher the accuracy of the model. The main assumption was using a quasi steady state hypothesis, that states that the characteristic diffusion time over one single fracture is negligible compared with the characteristic time of the macroscopic problem, e.g. change of boundary conditions. In that context, the lowest order approximation N = 1 has the form of solving a transient problem in a resistor/capacitor network, a so-called pipe network. Its topology is the same as the network of geometrical intersections between fractures. In this paper, we generalize this approach in order to account for fluxes from matrix to fractures. The quasi steady state hypothesis at the fracture level is still kept. Then, we show that in the case of well separated time scales between matrix and fractures, the preceding model needs only to be slightly modified in order to incorporate these fluxes. The additional knowledge of the so-called matrix to fracture transfer function allows to modify the mass matrix that becomes a time convolution operator. This is reminiscent of existing space averaged transient dual porosity models.

  4. TEMPO-based catholyte for high-energy density nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Liu, Tianbiao; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-03

    A TEMPO-based non-aqueous electrolyte with the TEMPO concentration as high as 2.0 m is demonstrated as a high-energy-density catholyte for redox flow battery applications. With a hybrid anode, Li|TEMPO flow cells using this electrolyte deliver an energy efficiency of ca. 70% and an impressively high energy density of 126 W h L(-1) .

  5. Seventeenth century organic agriculture in China: II. Energy flows through an agroecosystem in Jiaxing Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dazhong, W.; Pimentel, D.

    1986-03-01

    The energy flows in a seventeenth century agroecosystem in Jiaxing Region of eastern China were analyzed on the basis of historical data. The agroecosystem included cropping, mulberry-silkworm livestock, and fishing systems. In terms of energy, the agroecosystem was sustainable. Human labor provided all the power with inputs of about 3700 hr per hectare of farmland. Most or 70% of the labor was expended in the cropping system. Human and animal manure provided most of the nutrients for crop and mulberry production. About two-thirds of the total manure was used in crop production and one-third in the mulberry plantations. The only fossil energy input was a few hand tools. Approximately 55% of the grain was consumed directly by local residents, about one-third of the grain was used to make an alcohol drink and produce distillers' grains, which was fed to pigs, and only 2% of the grains were exported outside the agroecosystem. About two-thirds of the harvested crop residues were used as household fuel, while the remainder was returned to the field as an organic fertilizer. Pork accounted for 85% and silk cocoons 14% of the total animal products produced. Even though the agroecosystem was generally sustainable in terms of energy, the major environmental problem was that two-thirds of the harvested crop residues were used for household fuel. This reduced nutrient cycling in the system. Insufficient land was available to produce fuelwood; thus, crop residues were the primary source of fuel for the people.

  6. Kinetic model for the vibrational energy exchange in flowing molecular gas mixtures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offenhaeuser, F.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the development of a computational model for the description of the vibrational energy exchange in flowing gas mixtures, taking into account a given number of energy levels for each vibrational degree of freedom. It is possible to select an arbitrary number of energy levels. The presented model uses values in the range from 10 to approximately 40. The distribution of energy with respect to these levels can differ from the equilibrium distribution. The kinetic model developed can be employed for arbitrary gaseous mixtures with an arbitrary number of vibrational degrees of freedom for each type of gas. The application of the model to CO2-H2ON2-O2-He mixtures is discussed. The obtained relations can be utilized in a study of the suitability of radiation-related transitional processes, involving the CO2 molecule, for laser applications. It is found that the computational results provided by the model agree very well with experimental data obtained for a CO2 laser. Possibilities for the activation of a 16-micron and 14-micron laser are considered.

  7. Efficient Ionization Investigation for Flow Control and Energy Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Kamhawi, Hani; Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2009-01-01

    Nonequilibrium ionization of air by nonthermal means is explored for hypersonic vehicle applications. The method selected for evaluation generates a weakly ionized plasma using pulsed nanosecond, high-voltage discharges sustained by a lower dc voltage. These discharges promise to provide a means of energizing and sustaining electrons in the air while maintaining a nearly constant ion/neutral molecule temperature. This paper explores the use of short approx.5 nsec, high-voltage approx.12 to 22 kV, repetitive (40 to 100 kHz) discharges in generating a weakly ionized gas sustained by a 1 kV dc voltage in dry air at pressures from 10 to 80 torr. Demonstrated lifetimes of the sustainer discharge current approx.10 to 25 msec are over three orders of magnitude longer than the 5 nsec pulse that generates the electrons. This life is adequate for many high speed flows, enabling the possibility of exploiting weakly ionized plasma phenomena in flow-fields such as those in hypersonic inlets, combustors, and nozzles. Results to date are obtained in a volume of plasma between electrodes in a bell jar. The buildup and decay of the visible emission from the pulser excited air is photographed on an ICCD camera with nanosecond resolution and the time constants for visible emission decay are observed to be between 10 to 15 nsec decreasing as pressure increases. The application of the sustainer voltage does not change the visible emission decay time constant. Energy consumption as indicated by power output from the power supplies is 194 to 669 W depending on pulse repetition rate.

  8. A Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump Computer Model in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Raustad, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the variable refrigerant flow heat pump computer model included with the Department of Energy's EnergyPlusTM whole-building energy simulation software. The mathematical model for a variable refrigerant flow heat pump operating in cooling or heating mode, and a detailed model for the variable refrigerant flow direct-expansion (DX) cooling coil are described in detail.

  9. A Density Functional That Accounts for Medium-Range Correlation Energies in Organic Chemistry (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-03

    previous functionals. A related example, in particular a case of DFT failing to account for stereoelectronic effects, was provided by Schreiner et...8, 3631. (4) Schreiner , P. R.; Fokin, A. A.; Pascal Jr., R. A.; de Meijere, A. Org. Lett. 2006, 8, 3635. (5) Perdew, J. P.; Burke, K.; Ernzerhof...M. Phys. Rev. Lett 1996, 77, 3865. (6) Staroverov, V. N.; Scuseria, G. E.; Tao , J.; Perdew, J. P. J. Chem. Phys. 2003, 119, 12129. (7) Becke, A

  10. Energy use and recovery in waste management and implications for accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions.

    PubMed

    Fruergaard, Thilde; Astrup, Tomas; Ekvall, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    The energy system plays an essential role in accounting of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste management systems and waste technologies. This paper focuses on energy use and energy recovery in waste management and outlines how these aspects should be addressed consistently in a GHG perspective. Essential GHG emission data for the most common fuels, electricity and heat are provided. Average data on electricity provision show large variations from country to country due to different fuels being used and different efficiencies for electricity production in the individual countries (0.007-1.13 kg CO(2)-eq. kWh(-1)). Marginal data on electricity provision show even larger variations (0.004-3 kg CO(2)-eq. kWh( -1)). Somewhat less variation in GHG emissions is being found for heat production (0.01-0.69 kg CO(2)-eq. kWh( -1)). The paper further addresses allocation principles and the importance of applying either average or marginal energy data, and it discusses the consequences of introducing reduction targets on CO( 2) emissions. All discussed aspects were found to significantly affect the outcome of GHG accounts suggesting transparent reporting to be critical. Recommendations for use of average/marginal energy data are provided.

  11. Design Flexibility of Redox Flow Systems. [for energy storage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics inherent in Redox flow systems permit considerable latitude in designing systems for specific storage applications. The first of these characteristics is the absence of plating/deplating reactions with their attendant morphology changes at the electrodes. This permits a given Redox system to operate over a wide range of depths of discharge and charge/discharge rates. The second characteristic is the separation of power generating components (stacks) from the energy storage components (tanks). This results in cost effective system design, ease of system growth via modularization, and freedom from sizing restraints so that the whole spectrum of applications, from utilities down to single residence can be considered. The final characteristic is the commonality of the reactant fluids which assures that all cells at all times are receiving reactants at the same state of charge. Since no cell can be out of balance with respect to any other cell, it is possible for some cells to be charged while others are discharging, in effect creating a DC to DC transformer. It is also possible for various groups of cells to be connected to separate loads, thus supplying a range of output voltages. Also, trim cells can be used to maintain constant bus voltage as the load is changed or as the depth of discharge increases. The commonality of reactant fluids also permits any corrective measures such as rebalancing to occur at the system level instead of at the single cell level.

  12. Energy flow and the “grassification” of desert shrublands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Betancourt, Julio L.

    2015-01-01

    In our directionally and continuously changing world, history still matters, and it does so in increasingly novel and important ways. Human adaptation to global change will rely heavily on robust baselines of historic environmental variability and detailed understanding of how both past and modern ecosystems have responded to both individual and multiple stressors. The question of global change has motivated an upsurge in paleoecological studies that span the late Quaternary and the modern era, and has inspired a growing consideration of time as a fundamental axis in ecology (1). A major challenge in developing pertinent ecological baselines remains how to fuse, into continuous time series, observations and experiments from living systems with paleoecological reconstructions from the same sites (2, 3). Tracing and disentangling complex responses to environmental stress from paleological to present-day communities is especially daunting; for example, how climate change; accelerated land use; and biological invasions are influencing the flows of water, nutrients, and energy. The paper by Terry and Rowe in PNAS (4) is a shining example of how modern ecology and paleoecology can be spliced together to decipher how ecological processes unfold over time scales inaccessible to direct observation or experimentation, and how they can be disrupted by human impacts.

  13. Energy balance of a plasma with a wave, taking the wave nonpotentiality into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelberg, M. G.; Volosevich, A. V.

    It is shown that the potential electric field of low-frequency plasma waves in the ionosphere is phase-shifted by approximately -pi/2 with respect to current fluctuations, while the vortex field is nearly cophase with the current. Thus, the work of energy transfer between the plasma and the wave occurs primarily with the participation of the vortex field. The wave nonpotentiality is shown to have a substantial effect on the energy balance of the wave-plasma system.

  14. Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

    2008-07-17

    California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

  15. Accounting for the role of turbulent flow on particle dislodgement via a coupled quadrant analysis of velocity and pressure sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, WuRong; Diplas, Panayiotis; Celik, Ahmet Ozan; Dancey, Clinton

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of duration, in addition to magnitude, of energetic turbulent events on particle dislodgement under threshold of motion conditions. It is therefore proposed here that the use of turbulence sequences, instead of single instantaneous extreme events, is more appropriate for characterizing the role of fluctuating velocities and associated hydrodynamic forces on particle mobility. The validity of the proposed method is examined through the detailed analysis of directly measured velocity and pressure data sets. In an effort to relate the results of the conventional velocity quadrant analysis with the instantaneous pressure measurements, the concept of pressure quadrant analysis is introduced. The coupled sequences of the synchronous velocity and pressure quadrant events allow for a more complete description of the local turbulent flow characteristics, including the prevalent coherent structures, and more clear interpretation of their role on particle mobility. It is concluded here that large-scale sweep structures are capable of generating excessive and persistent force fluctuations which are predominantly responsible for the dynamic process of particle dislodgement. This result supports the impulse criterion as the proper way of accounting for the cumulative effect of coherent structures on particle movement.

  16. Temperature Field of Turbulent Flow in a Well with Account for the Dependence of Thermal Conductivity Coefficient on Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. I.; Shabarov, A. B.; Akhmetova, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    A method of solving the problem on nonstationary heat transfer of turbulent flow with variable coefficients and nonlinearity caused by the dependence of the thermal conductivity of oil on temperature is considered. The method consists of the joint application of the asymptotic methods of small and formal parameters. Based on the analysis of experimental data on the dependence of the thermal conductivity coefficient on temperature, it is shown that this dependence can be presented by a linear function in the form of the Taylor series containing the small parameter. The expansion of the problem in the small parameter leads to a linear problem in zero approximation that can be solved by using the asymptotic method of formal parameter. To determine the first coefficient of the expansion in the small parameter, a unique procedure of uncoupling has been developed. Analytical dependences of temperature in a well and in the surrounding rocks on time and spatial coordinates have been found that account for the orthotropy of the thermophysical properties of the media.

  17. Materials and energy flows in the earth science century : summary of a workshop held by the USGS [in Reston] in November 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown(compiler), William M.; Matos, Grecia; Sullivan, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    For the 21st century, the USGS and many others throughout government, academia, and the private sector carry a hopeful vision of better solutions to the problems of depleting natural resources and creating excessive wastes. For this effort, investigators are engaging in whole system views of the human condition using the tools of materials and energy flow accounting and industrial ecology.

  18. Controlling a transonic flow around airfoils by means of energy supply with allowance for real properties of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulchenko, S. M.; Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2010-05-01

    The influence of molecular (thermodynamic and transport) properties of air on gas-dynamic effects of pulsed-periodic energy supply in a transonic flow around airfoils is studied. Relations for air with allowance for excitation of vibrations and dissociation are taken as the thermal equation of state and the caloric equation. The influence of the transport properties (viscosity) is taken into account approximately, within the framework of the boundary layer model. It is demonstrated that the effects in qualitative considerations do not depend on taking into account the molecular properties, but the allowance for internal degrees of freedom yields a significantly lower temperature than the temperature predicted by the ideal gas model. Allowance for viscosity ensures certain attenuation of the energy supply effects.

  19. Solar energy: Account of a mission to the USA from 27 April to 3 May 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, J. P.; Genier, R.; Roche, M.

    1982-05-01

    The state of progress of the Solar One solar tower is described. The parabolic collectors program of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is outlined. The Los Alamos National Laboratory research program on the geothermal characteristics of dry rocks is summarized. The ASME solar energy conference is mentioned.

  20. Energy-Consistent Multiscale Algorithms for Granular Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-07

    the behavior of granular materials under extreme avalanche flow. In the area of algorithmic development at the grain scale, we have successfully...flow; iii) the development of experimental techniques and approaches to model the behavior of granular materials under extreme avalanche flow. In the... avalanches . Status/Progress In this grant, we have focused mainly in making progress within three (3) areas of mayor interest: (1) a new simulation

  1. Effects of accounting rules on utility choices of energy technologies in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrad, B. I.

    1980-07-01

    Comparisons of the costs of power systems, specifically the cost of nuclear versus other power systems, are discussed. The effects of inconsistent accounting are examined. Five systems that supply electrical power are cost analyzed: (1) light water reactors; (2) liquid metal fast breeder reactors; (3) coal plants, with scrubbers, burning low sulfur or processed high sulfur coal; (4) coal plants with fluidized bed combustion of high sulfur coal; and (5) solar power plants with sufficient storage for baseload use. Cost estimates for the system are made and justified. Cost comparison results show that, contrary to currently accepted conclusions, light water reactors have a decisive cost advantage over coal; if assumed target costs are met, after development, liquid metal fast breeder reactor would be the cheapest system; and if postdevelopment target costs are met, solar power plants are almost competitive with the nuclear systems and are much cheaper than coal.

  2. Application of energy gradient theory in flow instability in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, H. S.; Jiang, W.

    2013-12-01

    The flow instability in a centrifugal pump is studied using the energy gradient theory. Since the Re is high, the base flow is assumed to be turbulent. The distribution of the energy gradient function K at various flow rates is obtained from numerical simulations. According to the energy gradient method, the area with larger value of K is the place to cause instability and to be of high turbulence intensity. The results show that instability is easier to be excited in the area of impeller outlet and volute tongue. In order to improve the stability of centrifugal pumps working under low flow rate condition, carefulness must be taken in these two key areas.

  3. Parking infrastructure: energy, emissions, and automobile life-cycle environmental accounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad; Madanat, Samer

    2010-07-01

    The US parking infrastructure is vast and little is known about its scale and environmental impacts. The few parking space inventories that exist are typically regionalized and no known environmental assessment has been performed to determine the energy and emissions from providing this infrastructure. A better understanding of the scale of US parking is necessary to properly value the total costs of automobile travel. Energy and emissions from constructing and maintaining the parking infrastructure should be considered when assessing the total human health and environmental impacts of vehicle travel. We develop five parking space inventory scenarios and from these estimate the range of infrastructure provided in the US to be between 105 million and 2 billion spaces. Using these estimates, a life-cycle environmental inventory is performed to capture the energy consumption and emissions of greenhouse gases, CO, SO2, NOX, VOC (volatile organic compounds), and PM10 (PM: particulate matter) from raw material extraction, transport, asphalt and concrete production, and placement (including direct, indirect, and supply chain processes) of space construction and maintenance. The environmental assessment is then evaluated within the life-cycle performance of sedans, SUVs (sports utility vehicles), and pickups. Depending on the scenario and vehicle type, the inclusion of parking within the overall life-cycle inventory increases energy consumption from 3.1 to 4.8 MJ by 0.1-0.3 MJ and greenhouse gas emissions from 230 to 380 g CO2e by 6-23 g CO2e per passenger kilometer traveled. Life-cycle automobile SO2 and PM10 emissions show some of the largest increases, by as much as 24% and 89% from the baseline inventory. The environmental consequences of providing the parking spaces are discussed as well as the uncertainty in allocating paved area between parking and roadways.

  4. TOWARD A COMPLETE ACCOUNTING OF ENERGY AND MOMENTUM FROM STELLAR FEEDBACK IN GALAXY FORMATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Leitner, Samuel N.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-06-10

    We investigate the momentum and energy budget of stellar feedback during different stages of stellar evolution, and study its impact on the interstellar medium (ISM) using simulations of local star-forming regions and galactic disks at the resolution affordable in modern cosmological zoom-in simulations. In particular, we present a novel subgrid model for the momentum injection due to radiation pressure and stellar winds from massive stars during early, pre-supernova (pre-SN) evolutionary stages of young star clusters. Early injection of momentum acts to clear out dense gas in star-forming regions, hence limiting star formation. The reduced gas density mitigates radiative losses of thermal feedback energy from subsequent SN explosions. The detailed impact of stellar feedback depends sensitively on the implementation and choice of parameters. Somewhat encouragingly, we find that implementations in which feedback is efficient lead to approximate self-regulation of the global star formation efficiency. We compare simulation results using our feedback implementation to other phenomenological feedback methods, where thermal feedback energy is allowed to dissipate over timescales longer than the formal gas cooling time. We find that simulations with maximal momentum injection suppress star formation to a similar degree as is found in simulations adopting adiabatic thermal feedback. However, different feedback schemes are found to produce significant differences in the density and thermodynamic structure of the ISM, and are hence expected to have a qualitatively different impact on galaxy evolution.

  5. High–energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage. PMID:26702440

  6. High-energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage.

  7. Nonstationary flow in a channel with variable cross section under conditions of periodic pulsed energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2007-04-01

    The effect of a periodic pulsed supply of energy, equal to that of hydrogen combustion in air, on the structure of a supersonic flow in a channel of variable cross section modeling a ramjet tract has been studied. The flow has been numerically simulated based on two-dimensional gasdynamic equations. Various flow regimes are obtained depending on the configuration of energy supply zones and the excess air ratio in the channel.

  8. Formulation of total complex power and energy flows into a discrete system.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Akira; Tanabe, Yosuke

    2015-12-01

    By considering total inputs into a discrete system, this letter analytically formulates and summarizes the relationships in the complex-form power and energy flows and the dissipated power and Lagrangian energy of the system. The matrix inverse method to obtain the force/moment necessary for the power/energy flow is shown as an indirect yet analytically exact method. A 2 degree-of-freedom system is employed to analytically validate the derived formulas, followed by a computational confirmation. A finite element plate-beam model is further utilized to computationally confirm the relationships in the complex power and energy flows.

  9. Comparison of Methods to Account for Implausible Reporting of Energy Intake in Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jinnie J.; Sampson, Laura; Cho, Eunyoung; Hughes, Michael D.; Hu, Frank B.; Willett, Walter C.

    2015-01-01

    In a recent article in the American Journal of Epidemiology by Mendez et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2011;173(4):448–458), the use of alternative approaches to the exclusion of implausible energy intakes led to significantly different cross-sectional associations between diet and body mass index (BMI), whereas the use of a simpler recommended criteria (<500 and >3,500 kcal/day) yielded no meaningful change. However, these findings might have been due to exclusions made based on weight, a primary determinant of BMI. Using data from 52,110 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1990), we reproduced the cross-sectional findings of Mendez et al. and compared the results from the recommended method with those from 2 weight-dependent alternative methods (the Goldberg method and predicted total energy expenditure method). The same 3 exclusion criteria were then used to examine dietary variables prospectively in relation to change in BMI, which is not a direct function of attained weight. We found similar associations using the 3 methods. In a separate cross-sectional analysis using biomarkers of dietary factors, we found similar correlations for intakes of fatty acids (n = 439) and carotenoids and retinol (n = 1,293) using the 3 methods for exclusions. These results do not support the general conclusion that use of exclusion criteria based on the alternative methods might confer an advantage over the recommended exclusion method. PMID:25656533

  10. Comparison of methods to account for implausible reporting of energy intake in epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jinnie J; Sampson, Laura; Cho, Eunyoung; Hughes, Michael D; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter C

    2015-02-15

    In a recent article in the American Journal of Epidemiology by Mendez et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2011;173(4):448-458), the use of alternative approaches to the exclusion of implausible energy intakes led to significantly different cross-sectional associations between diet and body mass index (BMI), whereas the use of a simpler recommended criteria (<500 and >3,500 kcal/day) yielded no meaningful change. However, these findings might have been due to exclusions made based on weight, a primary determinant of BMI. Using data from 52,110 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1990), we reproduced the cross-sectional findings of Mendez et al. and compared the results from the recommended method with those from 2 weight-dependent alternative methods (the Goldberg method and predicted total energy expenditure method). The same 3 exclusion criteria were then used to examine dietary variables prospectively in relation to change in BMI, which is not a direct function of attained weight. We found similar associations using the 3 methods. In a separate cross-sectional analysis using biomarkers of dietary factors, we found similar correlations for intakes of fatty acids (n = 439) and carotenoids and retinol (n = 1,293) using the 3 methods for exclusions. These results do not support the general conclusion that use of exclusion criteria based on the alternative methods might confer an advantage over the recommended exclusion method.

  11. An Individual-Based Model of Zebrafish Population Dynamics Accounting for Energy Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudouin, Rémy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin; Augustine, Starrlight; Devillers, James; Brion, François; Péry, Alexandre R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model) was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model). Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level. PMID:25938409

  12. Energy flow in high speed perforation and cutting

    SciTech Connect

    van Thiel, M.

    1980-10-07

    It is demonstrated that effects of long rod penetrators on targets can be modeled by introducing a high pressure (energy) column on the penetration path in place of the projectile. This energy can be obtained from the kinetic energy of the penetrator; the equations of state of the materials used and a Bernoulli penetration condition. The model is supported by detailed hydro calculations.

  13. Water flows, energy demand, and market analysis of the informal water sector in Kisumu, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Laura C.; Kelner-Levine, Evan; Eckelman, Matthew J.; McCarty, Kathleen M.; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-01-01

    In rapidly growing urban areas of developing countries, infrastructure has not been able to cope with population growth. Informal water businesses fulfill unmet water supply needs, yet little is understood about this sector. This paper presents data gathered from quantitative interviews with informal water business operators (n=260) in Kisumu, Kenya, collected during the dry season. Sales volume, location, resource use, and cost were analyzed by using material flow accounting and spatial analysis tools. Estimates show that over 76% of the city's water is consumed by less than 10% of the population who have water piped into their dwellings. The remainder of the population relies on a combination of water sources, including water purchased directly from kiosks (1.5 million m3 per day) and delivered by hand-drawn water-carts (0.75 million m3 per day). Energy audits were performed to compare energy use among various water sources in the city. Water delivery by truck is the highest per cubic meter energy demand (35 MJ/m3), while the city's tap water has the highest energy use overall (21,000 MJ/day). We group kiosks by neighborhood and compare sales volume and cost with neighborhood-level population data. Contrary to popular belief, we do not find evidence of price gouging; the lowest prices are charged in the highest-demand low-income area. We also see that the informal sector is sensitive to demand, as the number of private boreholes that serve as community water collection points are much larger where demand is greatest. PMID:23543887

  14. Bidirectional control system for energy flow in solar powered flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, Frank J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An energy storage system for a spacecraft is provided which employs a solar powered flywheel arrangement including a motor/generator which, in different operating modes, drives the flywheel and is driven thereby. A control circuit, including a threshold comparator, senses the output of a solar energy converter, and when a threshold voltage is exceeded thereby indicating the availability of solar power for the spacecraft loads, activates a speed control loop including the motor/generator so as to accelerate the flywheel to a constant speed and thereby store mechanical energy, while also supplying energy from the solar converter to the loads. Under circumstances where solar energy is not available and thus the threshold voltage is not exceeded, the control circuit deactivates the speed control loop and activates a voltage control loop that provides for operation of the motor as a generator so that mechanical energy from the flywheel is converted into electrical energy for supply to the spacecraft loads.

  15. Modeling energy expenditure and oxygen consumption in human exposure models: accounting for fatigue and EPOC.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Kristin; Glen, Graham; Mccurdy, Thomas; Smith, Luther

    2008-05-01

    Human exposure and dose models often require a quantification of oxygen consumption for a simulated individual. Oxygen consumption is dependent on the modeled individual's physical activity level as described in an activity diary. Activity level is quantified via standardized values of metabolic equivalents of work (METS) for the activity being performed and converted into activity-specific oxygen consumption estimates. However, oxygen consumption remains elevated after a moderate- or high-intensity activity is completed. This effect, which is termed excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), requires upward adjustment of the METS estimates that follow high-energy expenditure events, to model subsequent increased ventilation and intake dose rates. In addition, since an individual's capacity for work decreases during extended activity, methods are also required to adjust downward those METS estimates that exceed physiologically realistic limits over time. A unified method for simultaneously performing these adjustments is developed. The method simulates a cumulative oxygen deficit for each individual and uses it to impose appropriate time-dependent reductions in the METS time series and additions for EPOC. The relationships between the oxygen deficit and METS limits are nonlinear and are derived from published data on work capacity and oxygen consumption. These modifications result in improved modeling of ventilation patterns, and should improve intake dose estimates associated with exposure to airborne environmental contaminants.

  16. Pulsed-flow air classification for waste to energy production. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peirce, J.J.; Vesilind, P.A.

    1983-09-30

    The development and testing of pulsed-flow air classification for waste-to-energy production are discussed. Standard designs generally permit large amounts of combustible material to escape as reject while producing a fuel that is high in metal and glass contaminants. Pulsed-flow classification is presented as a concept which can avoid both pitfalls. Each aspect of theory and laboratory testing is summarized: particle characteristics, theory of pulsed-flow classification, laboratory testing, and pulsed-flow air classification for waste-to-energy production. Conclusions from the research are summarized.

  17. Computational flow field in energy efficient engine (EEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Kenji; Moder, Jeff; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, preliminary results for the recently-updated Open National Combustor Code (Open NCC) as applied to the EEE are presented. The comparison between two different numerical schemes, the standard Jameson-Schmidt-Turkel (JST) scheme and the advection upstream splitting method (AUSM), is performed for the cold flow and the reacting flow calculations using the RANS. In the cold flow calculation, the AUSM scheme predicts a much stronger reverse flow in the central recirculation zone. In the reacting flow calculation, we test two cases: gaseous fuel injection and liquid spray injection. In the gaseous fuel injection case, the overall flame structures of the two schemes are similar to one another, in the sense that the flame is attached to the main nozzle, but is detached from the pilot nozzle. However, in the exit temperature profile, the AUSM scheme shows a more uniform profile than that of the JST scheme, which is close to the experimental data. In the liquid spray injection case, we expect different flame structures in this scenario. We will give a brief discussion on how two numerical schemes predict the flame structures inside the Eusing different ways to introduce the fuel injection. Supported by NASA's Transformational Tools and Technologies project.

  18. Network-based representation of energy transfer in unsteady separated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Aditya; Taira, Kunihiko

    2015-11-01

    We construct a network-based representation of energy pathways in unsteady separated flows using a POD-Galerkin projection model. In this formulation, we regard the POD modes as the network nodes and the energy transfer between the modes as the network edges. Based on the energy transfer analysis performed by Noack et al. (2008), edge weights are characterized on the interaction graph. As an example, we examine the energy transfer within the two-dimensional incompressible flow over a circular cylinder. In particular, we analyze the energy pathways involved in flow transition from the unstable symmetric steady state to periodic shedding cycle. The growth of perturbation energy over the network is examined to highlight key features of flow physics and to determine how the energy transfer can be influenced. Furthermore, we implement closed-loop flow control on the POD-Galerkin model to alter the energy interaction path and modify the global behavior of the wake dynamics. The insights gained will be used to perform further network analysis on fluid flows with added complexity. Work supported by US Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0386) and US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (YIP: FA9550-13-1-0183).

  19. System Size, Energy, Pseudorapidity, and Centrality Dependence of Elliptic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M. P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.

    2007-06-15

    This Letter presents measurements of the elliptic flow of charged particles as a function of pseudorapidity and centrality from Cu-Cu collisions at 62.4 and 200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow in Cu-Cu collisions is found to be significant even for the most central events. For comparison with the Au-Au results, it is found that the detailed way in which the collision geometry (eccentricity) is estimated is of critical importance when scaling out system-size effects. A new form of eccentricity, called the participant eccentricity, is introduced which yields a scaled elliptic flow in the Cu-Cu system that has the same relative magnitude and qualitative features as that in the Au-Au system.

  20. Nonstationary flow in the model channel of a ramjet engine in pulse-periodic energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2008-05-01

    A study has been made of the influence of the pulse-periodic supply of energy that is equal to the energy released in the combustion of hydrogen in air on the structure of supersonic flow in a channel of variable cross section, modeling the duct of a ramjet engine. The flow has been modeled on the basis of two-dimensional nonstationary gas-dynamic equations. Different flow regimes have been obtained depending on the configuration of the zones of energy supply and the excess-air coefficients.

  1. Energy and materials flows in the iron and steel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Sparrow, F.T.

    1983-06-01

    Past energy-consumption trends and future energy-conservation opportunities are investigated for the nation's iron and steel industry. It is estimated that, in 1980, the industry directly consumed approximately 2.46 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy (roughly 3% of total US energy consumption) to produce 111 million tons of raw steel and to ship 84 million tons of steel products. Direct plus indirect consumption is estimated to be about 3.1 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. Of the set of conservation technologies identified, most are judged to be ready for commercialization if and when the industry's capital formation and profitability problems are solved and the gradual predicted increase in energy prices reduces the payback periods to acceptable levels.

  2. Flow instability of a centrifugal pump determined using the energy gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Dong, Wenlong; He, Zhaohui; Huang, Yuanmin; Jiang, Xiaojun

    2015-02-01

    The stability of the centrifugal pump has not been well revealed because of the complexity of internal flow. To analyze the flow characteristics of a centrifugal pump operating at low capacity, methods of numerical simulation and experimental research were adopted in this paper. Characteristics of the inner flow were obtained. Standard k-ɛ turbulence models were used to calculate the inner flow of the pump under off-design conditions. The distribution of the energy gradient function K was obtained by three-dimensional numerical simulation at different flow rates. The relative velocity component was acquired from the absolute velocity obtained in particle image velocimetry. By comparing with experimental results, it was found that flow instability occurs at the position of maximum K. The flow stability reduces with an increasing flow rate. The research results provide a theoretical basis for the optimization design of a centrifugal pump.

  3. Flow depth and energy coefficient relatiohnships for stepped spillways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-year, large-scale physical model study of stepped chutes was conducted over a broad range of design parameters (i.e. step heights, slopes, and unit discharges). Air entrainment developed naturally as the flow descended the chute. Air entrainment began to develop downstream of the surface i...

  4. Integrating Reverse-Electrodialysis Stacks with Flow Batteries for Improved Energy Recovery from Salinity Gradients and Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Kim, Taeyoung; Rahimi, Mohammad; Gorski, Christopher A; Logan, Bruce E

    2017-02-22

    Salinity gradient energy can be directly converted into electrical power by using reverse electrodialysis (RED) and other technologies, but reported power densities have been too low for practical applications. Herein, the RED stack performance was improved by using 2,6-dihydroxyanthraquinone and ferrocyanide as redox couples. These electrolytes were then used in a flow battery to produce an integrated RED stack and flow battery (RED-FB) system capable of capturing, storing, and discharging salinity gradient energy. Energy captured from the RED stack was discharged in the flow battery at a maximum power density of 3.0 kW m(-2) -anode, which was similar to the flow batteries charged by electrical power and could be used for practical applications. Salinity gradient energy captured from the RED stack was recovered from the electrolytes as electricity with 30 % efficiency, and the maximum energy density of the system was 2.4 kWh m(-3) -anolyte. The combined RED-FB system overcomes many limitations of previous approaches to capture, store, and use salinity gradient energy from natural or engineered sources.

  5. UNDERSTANDING FLOW OF ENERGY IN BUILDINGS USING MODAL ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    John Gardner; Kevin Heglund; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-07-01

    It is widely understood that energy storage is the key to integrating variable generators into the grid. It has been proposed that the thermal mass of buildings could be used as a distributed energy storage solution and several researchers are making headway in this problem. However, the inability to easily determine the magnitude of the building’s effective thermal mass, and how the heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system exchanges thermal energy with it, is a significant challenge to designing systems which utilize this storage mechanism. In this paper we adapt modal analysis methods used in mechanical structures to identify the primary modes of energy transfer among thermal masses in a building. The paper describes the technique using data from an idealized building model. The approach is successfully applied to actual temperature data from a commercial building in downtown Boise, Idaho.

  6. Food Utilization (Energy-Flow) Investigations with Pieris Brassicae (Large White) Caterpillars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Derek H. T.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for experiments in which caterpillars are used to investigate energy-flow relationships. Areas in which the experiments could be used include ecology, applied biology, and animal feeding. (DH)

  7. Critical behavior in the inverse to forward energy transition in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic flow.

    PubMed

    Seshasayanan, Kannabiran; Alexakis, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the critical transition from an inverse cascade of energy to a forward energy cascade in a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic flow as the ratio of magnetic to mechanical forcing amplitude is varied. It is found that the critical transition is the result of two competing processes. The first process is due to hydrodynamic interactions and cascades the energy to the large scales. The second process couples small-scale magnetic fields to large-scale flows, transferring the energy back to the small scales via a nonlocal mechanism. At marginality the two cascades are both present and cancel each other. The phase space diagram of the transition is sketched.

  8. Quantifying the Energy Efficiency of Object Recognition and Optical Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-28

    Bruce D Lucas, Takeo Kanade, et al. An Iterative Image Registration Technique with an Application to Stereo Vision. In IJCAI, volume 81, pages 674–679...board unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) vision processing. Specifically, we focus on object recognition, object tracking, and optical flow. Given that on...6] with >1M labeled images ) for training and evaluating object recognition systems. It turns out that large datasets are a lynchpin of high-accuracy

  9. Kinetics and Energy Transfer in Nonequilibrium Fluid Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-03

    Crosley, Molecular Physics Laboratory, SRI International, Menlo Park, California 94025 Abstract Laser-induced fluorescence has reached maturity as an...FLUORESCENCE IN COMBUSTION The technique of laser-induced fluorescence has attained maturity in the field of combustion science. At the Twenty-fourth...HCO by the photolysis of slowly flowing acetaldehyde in a room temperature cell [12]. An excitation spectrum showing several bands of this electronic

  10. Effect of flow oscillations on axial energy transport in a porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of flow oscillations on axial energy diffusion in a porous medium, in which the flow is continuously disrupted by the irregularities of the porous structure, are analyzed. The formulation employs an internal heat transfer coefficient that couples the fluid and solid temperatures. The final relationship shows that the axial energy transport per unit cross-sectional area and time is directly proportional to the axial temperature gradient and the square of the maximum fluid displacement.

  11. Investigations on sound energy decays and flows in a monumental mosque.

    PubMed

    Sü Gül, Zühre; Xiang, Ning; Çalışkan, Mehmet

    2016-07-01

    This work investigates the sound energy decays and flows in the Süleymaniye Mosque in İstanbul. This is a single-space superstructure having multiple domes. The study searches for the non-exponential sound energy decay characteristics. The effect of different material surfaces and volumetric contributions are investigated using acoustic simulations and in situ acoustical measurements. Sound energy decay rates are estimated by Bayesian decay analysis. The measured data reveal double- or triple-slope energy decay profiles within the superstructure. To shed light on the mechanism of energy exchanges resulting in multi-slope decay, spatial sound energy distributions and energy flow vectors are studied by diffusion equation model (DEM) simulations. The resulting sound energy flow vector maps highlight the contribution of a sound-reflective central dome contrasted with an absorptive carpeted floor in providing delayed energy feedback. In contrast, no multi-slope energy decay pattern is observed in DEM simulations with a bare marble floor, which generates a much more diffuse sound field than in the real situation with a carpeted floor. The results demonstrate that energy fragmentation, in support of the non-exponential energy decay profile, is due to both the sound absorption characteristics of materials and to their distributions, as well as to relations between the subvolumes of the mosque's interior.

  12. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  13. Valuing uncertain cash flows from investments that enhance energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Abadie, Luis M; Chamorro, José M; González-Eguino, Mikel

    2013-02-15

    There is a broad consensus that investments to enhance energy efficiency quickly pay for themselves in lower energy bills and spared emission allowances. However, investments that at first glance seem worthwhile usually are not undertaken. One of the plausible, non-excluding explanations is the numerous uncertainties that these investments face. This paper deals with the optimal time to invest in an energy efficiency enhancement at a facility already in place that consumes huge amounts of a fossil fuel (coal) and operates under carbon constraints. We follow the Real Options approach. Our model comprises three sources of uncertainty following different stochastic processes which allows for application in a broad range of settings. We assess the investment option by means of a three-dimensional binomial lattice. We compute the trigger investment cost, i.e., the threshold level below which immediate investment would be optimal. We analyze the major drivers of this decision thus aiming at the most promising policies in this regard.

  14. Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields and energy flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hacyan, Shahen

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Algebraic structure of general electromagnetic fields in stationary spacetime. > Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the electomagnetic field tensor. > Energy-momentum in terms of eigenvectors and Killing vector. > Explicit form of reference frame with vanishing Poynting vector. > Application of formalism to Bessel beams. - Abstract: The algebraic structures of a general electromagnetic field and its energy-momentum tensor in a stationary space-time are analyzed. The explicit form of the reference frame in which the energy of the field appears at rest is obtained in terms of the eigenvectors of the electromagnetic tensor and the existing Killing vector. The case of a stationary electromagnetic field is also studied and a comparison is made with the standard short-wave approximation. The results can be applied to the general case of a structured light beams, in flat or curved spaces. Bessel beams are worked out as example.

  15. Variational energy principle for compressible, baroclinic flow. 1: First and second variations of total kinetic action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    The case of a cold gas in the absence of external force fields is considered. Since the only energy involved is kinetic energy, the total kinetic action (i.e., the space-time integral of the kinetic energy density) should serve as the total free-energy functional in this case, and as such should be a local minimum for all possible fluctuations about stable flow. This conjecture is tested by calculating explicit, manifestly covariant expressions for the first and second variations of the total kinetic action in the context of Lagrangian kinematics. The general question of the correlation between physical stability and the convexity of any action integral that can be interpreted as the total free-energy functional of the flow is discussed and illustrated for the cases of rectillinear and rotating shearing flows.

  16. Generalization and extension of the law of acoustic energy conservation in a nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    An exact conservation equation is derived which generalizes the familiar acoustic energy equations. The new relation is valid for arbitrary disturbances to a viscous, compressible flow. It is suggested by a development of the acoustic energy equation by means of a regular perturbation expansion of the general energy equation of fluid mechanics. A perturbation energy density and flux are defined and identified as the exact physical quantities whose leading order perturbation representations are the usual acoustic energy density and flux. The conservation equation governing the perturbation energy quantities is shown to yield previously known results for several special cases.

  17. A mathematical method for verifying the validity of measured information about the flows of energy resources based on the state estimation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazderin, A. V.; Sof'in, V. V.; Samoylenko, V. O.

    2015-11-01

    Efforts aimed at improving energy efficiency in all branches of the fuel and energy complex shall be commenced with setting up a high-tech automated system for monitoring and accounting energy resources. Malfunctions and failures in the measurement and information parts of this system may distort commercial measurements of energy resources and lead to financial risks for power supplying organizations. In addition, measurement errors may be connected with intentional distortion of measurements for reducing payment for using energy resources on the consumer's side, which leads to commercial loss of energy resource. The article presents a universal mathematical method for verifying the validity of measurement information in networks for transporting energy resources, such as electricity and heat, petroleum, gas, etc., based on the state estimation theory. The energy resource transportation network is represented by a graph the nodes of which correspond to producers and consumers, and its branches stand for transportation mains (power lines, pipelines, and heat network elements). The main idea of state estimation is connected with obtaining the calculated analogs of energy resources for all available measurements. Unlike "raw" measurements, which contain inaccuracies, the calculated flows of energy resources, called estimates, will fully satisfy the suitability condition for all state equations describing the energy resource transportation network. The state equations written in terms of calculated estimates will be already free from residuals. The difference between a measurement and its calculated analog (estimate) is called in the estimation theory an estimation remainder. The obtained large values of estimation remainders are an indicator of high errors of particular energy resource measurements. By using the presented method it is possible to improve the validity of energy resource measurements, to estimate the transportation network observability, to eliminate

  18. Transient radiative energy transfer in incompressible laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Singh, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the transient radiative interactions of nongray absorbing-emitting species in laminar fully-developed flows between two parallel plates. The particular species considered are OH, CO, CO2, and H2O and different mixtures of these. Transient and steady-state results are obtained for the temperaure distribution and bulk temperature for different plate spacings, wall temperatures, and pressures. Results, in general, indicate that the rate of radiative heating can be quite high during earlier times. This information is useful in designing thermal protection systems for transient operations.

  19. Aircraft energy efficiency laminar flow control wing design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, T. F., Jr.; Pride, J. D., Jr.; Fernald, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    An engineering design study was performed in which laminar flow control (LFC) was integrated into the wing of a commercial passenger transport aircraft. A baseline aircraft configuration was selected and the wing geometry was defined. The LFC system, with suction slots, ducting, and suction pumps was integrated with the wing structure. The use of standard aluminum technology and advanced superplastic formed diffusion bonded titanium technology was evaluated. The results of the design study show that the LFC system can be integrated with the wing structure to provide a structurally and aerodynamically efficient wing for a commercial transport aircraft.

  20. Energy Extraction from Fluid Flow Via Vortex Induced Angular Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Sorathiya, Shahajhan H.

    2015-11-01

    Using Lattice-Boltzmann simulations, we study angular oscillations of an elliptical cylinder attached to a torsional spring, with the axis placed perpendicular to a uniform flow, at low Reynolds numbers (Re=100 and Re=200). The equilibrium angle and stiffness of the torsional spring is chosen such that the ellipse reaches stable equilibrium at an angle of roughly 45° with respect to the incoming flow. This configuration leads to large unsteady torque due to vortex shedding, which in turn can lead to large oscillations of the ellipse, with several frequency modes. Along with measuring the angular oscillations of the ellipse, we also measure the potential for power-extraction from this setup, by attaching an external angular damper to the axis of the ellipse. For low density ratios, the ellipse tends to oscillate within the first quadrant, while, for higher density ratios, the ellipse, due to its tendency to auto-rotate, undergoes very large oscillations. The ellipse locks on to primary and secondary vortex shedding modes over the range of density ratios studied here. The power output of this setup increases with increasing Reynolds number and density ratio, with peak efficiency of 1.7%.

  1. The default-mode, ego-functions and free-energy: a neurobiological account of Freudian ideas

    PubMed Central

    Friston, K. J.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the notion that Freudian constructs may have neurobiological substrates. Specifically, we propose that Freud’s descriptions of the primary and secondary processes are consistent with self-organized activity in hierarchical cortical systems and that his descriptions of the ego are consistent with the functions of the default-mode and its reciprocal exchanges with subordinate brain systems. This neurobiological account rests on a view of the brain as a hierarchical inference or Helmholtz machine. In this view, large-scale intrinsic networks occupy supraordinate levels of hierarchical brain systems that try to optimize their representation of the sensorium. This optimization has been formulated as minimizing a free-energy; a process that is formally similar to the treatment of energy in Freudian formulations. We substantiate this synthesis by showing that Freud’s descriptions of the primary process are consistent with the phenomenology and neurophysiology of rapid eye movement sleep, the early and acute psychotic state, the aura of temporal lobe epilepsy and hallucinogenic drug states. PMID:20194141

  2. Low Energy Atomic Models Suggesting a Pilus Structure that could Account for Electrical Conductivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens Pili.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Shu, Chuanjun; Martz, Eric; Lovley, Derek R; Sun, Xiao

    2016-03-22

    The metallic-like electrical conductivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens pili has been documented with multiple lines of experimental evidence, but there is only a rudimentary understanding of the structural features which contribute to this novel mode of biological electron transport. In order to determine if it was feasible for the pilin monomers of G. sulfurreducens to assemble into a conductive filament, theoretical energy-minimized models of Geobacter pili were constructed with a previously described approach, in which pilin monomers are assembled using randomized structural parameters and distance constraints. The lowest energy models from a specific group of predicted structures lacked a central channel, in contrast to previously existing pili models. In half of the no-channel models the three N-terminal aromatic residues of the pilin monomer are arranged in a potentially electrically conductive geometry, sufficiently close to account for the experimentally observed metallic like conductivity of the pili that has been attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. These atomic resolution models capable of explaining the observed conductive properties of Geobacter pili are a valuable tool to guide further investigation of the metallic-like conductivity of the pili, their role in biogeochemical cycling, and applications in bioenergy and bioelectronics.

  3. Low Energy Atomic Models Suggesting a Pilus Structure that could Account for Electrical Conductivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens Pili

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ke; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Shu, Chuanjun; Martz, Eric; Lovley, Derek R.; Sun, Xiao

    2016-03-01

    The metallic-like electrical conductivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens pili has been documented with multiple lines of experimental evidence, but there is only a rudimentary understanding of the structural features which contribute to this novel mode of biological electron transport. In order to determine if it was feasible for the pilin monomers of G. sulfurreducens to assemble into a conductive filament, theoretical energy-minimized models of Geobacter pili were constructed with a previously described approach, in which pilin monomers are assembled using randomized structural parameters and distance constraints. The lowest energy models from a specific group of predicted structures lacked a central channel, in contrast to previously existing pili models. In half of the no-channel models the three N-terminal aromatic residues of the pilin monomer are arranged in a potentially electrically conductive geometry, sufficiently close to account for the experimentally observed metallic like conductivity of the pili that has been attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. These atomic resolution models capable of explaining the observed conductive properties of Geobacter pili are a valuable tool to guide further investigation of the metallic-like conductivity of the pili, their role in biogeochemical cycling, and applications in bioenergy and bioelectronics.

  4. Accounting for vegetation height and wind direction to correct eddy covariance measurements of energy fluxes over hilly crop fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouna-Chebbi, Rim; Prévot, Laurent; Jacob, Frédéric; Voltz, Marc

    2015-05-01

    As agricultural hilly watersheds are widespread throughout the world, there is a strong need for reliable estimates of land surface fluxes, especially evapotranspiration, over crop fields on hilly slopes. In order to obtain reliable estimates from eddy covariance (EC) measurements in such conditions, the current study aimed at proposing adequate planar fit tilt corrections that account for the combined effects of topography, wind direction, and vegetation height on airflow inclinations. EC measurements were collected within an agricultural hilly watershed in northeastern Tunisia, throughout the growth cycles of cereals, legumes, and pasture. The wind had two dominant directions that induced upslope and downslope winds. For upslope winds, the airflows were parallel to the slopes and slightly came closer to the horizontal plane when vegetation grew. For downslope winds, over fields located in the lee of the rim top, the airflows were almost horizontal over bare soil and came closer to the topographical slope when vegetation grew. We therefore adjusted the planar fit tilt correction on EC measurements according to vegetation height and by discriminating between upslope and downslope winds. This adjusted tilt correction improved the energy balance closure in most cases, and the obtained energy balance closures were similar to that reported in the literature for flat conditions. We conclude that EC data collected within crop fields on hilly slopes can be used for monitoring land surface fluxes, provided planar fit tilt corrections are applied in an appropriate manner.

  5. Low Energy Atomic Models Suggesting a Pilus Structure that could Account for Electrical Conductivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens Pili

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ke; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Shu, Chuanjun; Martz, Eric; Lovley, Derek R.; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The metallic-like electrical conductivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens pili has been documented with multiple lines of experimental evidence, but there is only a rudimentary understanding of the structural features which contribute to this novel mode of biological electron transport. In order to determine if it was feasible for the pilin monomers of G. sulfurreducens to assemble into a conductive filament, theoretical energy-minimized models of Geobacter pili were constructed with a previously described approach, in which pilin monomers are assembled using randomized structural parameters and distance constraints. The lowest energy models from a specific group of predicted structures lacked a central channel, in contrast to previously existing pili models. In half of the no-channel models the three N-terminal aromatic residues of the pilin monomer are arranged in a potentially electrically conductive geometry, sufficiently close to account for the experimentally observed metallic like conductivity of the pili that has been attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. These atomic resolution models capable of explaining the observed conductive properties of Geobacter pili are a valuable tool to guide further investigation of the metallic-like conductivity of the pili, their role in biogeochemical cycling, and applications in bioenergy and bioelectronics. PMID:27001169

  6. Fluctuation-induced shear flow and energy transfer in plasma interchange turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Sun, C. K.; Wang, X. Y.; Zhou, A.; Wang, X. G.; Ernst, D. R.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation-induced E × B shear flow and energy transfer for plasma interchange turbulence are examined in a flux-driven system with both closed and open magnetic field lines. The nonlinear evolution of interchange turbulence shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high E × B flow shear. In the first regime, the large-scale turbulent convection is dominant and the mean E × B shear flow is at a relatively low level. By increasing the heat flux above a certain threshold, the increased turbulent intensity gives rise to the transfer of energy from fluctuations to mean E × B flows. As a result, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which a strong mean E × B shear flow is generated.

  7. Mass, momentum and energy flow from an MPD accelerator. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cory, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    The mass, momentum, and energy flows are measured over a current range of 8 to 50 kA and inlet mass flows of 2 to 36q/sec of argon. The momentum flux profile indicates that the accelerator produces a uniform, 2-inch diameter axial jet at the anode which expands into a Gaussian profile at an axial station 11 inches from the anode. The electromagnetic component of the thrust is found to follow the familiar quadratic dependence on arc current, while a more complex empirical relation is needed to correlate the gasdynamic contribution with the current and mass flow rate. Using available time-of-flight velocity profiles at a current of 16 kA and a mass flow of 5.9 g/sec, calculated flux profiles of mass and kinetic energy exhibit a tendency for some fraction of the inlet mass flow to leak out at a low velocity around the central high velocity core.

  8. Relationships Among the Energy, Emergy, and Money Flows of the United States From 1900 to 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper, we examine the relationships among the energy, emergy, and money flows of the United States from 1900 to 2011. To establish a theoretical basis for understanding these relationships, Energy Systems Language models of the resource base for the World System and of e...

  9. Determination of the Arrhenius Activation Energy Using a Temperature-Programmed Flow Reactor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kit-ha C.; Tse, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a novel method for the determination of the Arrhenius activation energy, without prejudging the validity of the Arrhenius equation or the concept of activation energy. The method involves use of a temperature-programed flow reactor connected to a concentration detector. (JN)

  10. Relationships among the energy, emergy, and money flows of the United States from 1900 to 2011.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy Systems Language models of the resource base for the U.S. economy and of economic exchange were used, respectively, (1) to show how energy consumption and emergy use contribute to real and nominal gross domestic product (GDP) and (2) to propose a model of coupled flows tha...

  11. Chiral nihility effects on energy flow in chiral materials.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Burokur, Nawaz; Zouhd, Saïd; Li, Le-Wei

    2008-01-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic plane waves in an isotropic chiral medium is characterized, and a special interest is shown in chiral nihility and the effects of chirality on energy transmission. In particular, the wave impedance is matched to that of free space. Moreover, the refractive index n is also matched in impedance to that of free space when an appropriate value of the chirality is chosen. A "chiral nihility" medium is explored in which both the permittivity and the permeability tend to zero. Some specific case studies of chiral nihility are presented, and Brewster angles are found to cover an extremely wide range. The E-field distributions in these different cases where the chiral slab is placed in free space are analyzed by using the appropriate constitutive relations. It is shown from numerical calculations that one can obtain some critical characteristics of the effects of chirality on energy transmission and reflection, such as transparency and power tunneling.

  12. High-energy ions produced by two approaching flow fronts in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, H.; Ieda, A.; Machida, S.; Imada, S.

    2015-12-01

    During a substorm event in 2009, THEMIS probes observed high-energy (≲ 1MeV) ions and characteristic time evolution of the differential flux. The high-energy ions seem to be produced in the magnetotail, but existing acceleration theories cannot explain the production of such high-energy ions due to the limitation of dawn-dusk (DD) flow scale. We propose that if two approaching flow fronts exist simultaneously in the magnetotail, the production of high-energy ions can be achieved. Namely, some ideal ions are repeatedly reflected by the two fronts and accelerated to high energies, exceeding the energy-limit given by the product of the duskward electric field and DD scale length of the flows. In addition, this acceleration model similar to "first-order Fermi acceleration" can produce the observed differential flux change. We have analytically calculated the energy-gain of each ion between two approaching flow fronts, and roughly estimated the efficiency of the acceleration and the spectrum change. In order to include the DD flow scale, we have further performed a spatially 1-D (2-D in velocity) test particle simulation where a couple of flow fronts approach each other. Using the simulation, we have confirmed the production of high-energy ions as well as the change of the energy spectrum of ions associated with the acceleration. The simulation result shows that high-energy ions can be produced with shorter DD scale length compared to that of the simple acceleration for trapped particles in the flow front. If we assume that the DD scale length of the flow is 10Re, the simulated ion maximum energy near 1MeV and differential flux change are similar to those of the observation. This scale length is less than half of the length needed for the product with the duskward electric field to produce 1MeV ions. This estimated 10Re flow scale in that event does not contradict previous studies.

  13. Classical simulation of quantum energy flow in biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Stock, Gerhard

    2009-03-20

    Based on a comparison of classical and quantum-mechanical perturbation theory, the validity of classical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to describe vibrational energy redistribution in biomolecules is studied. Adopting a small model peptide in aqueous solution as an example, the theory correctly predicts quantum correction factors that need to be applied to the results of classical simulations in order to match the correct quantum results.

  14. Free energy and entropy flows in magnetised plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schekochihin, A.; Cowley, S.; Dorland, W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.; Plunk, G.; TenBarge, J.; Mallet, A.; Kanekar, A.

    2011-12-01

    Just as fluid turbulence can be conceptualised as a cascade of kinetic energy from large to small scales, kinetic plasma turbulence is a cascade of free energy in the 6D phase space (position and velocity). I will discuss this as a general principle and then specialise to the case of magnetised plasma turbulence at kinetic (sub-ion-Larmor) scales. At these scales, the free energy flux arriving from the inertial range splits into two channels: the kinetic Alfven wave cascade destined to be dissipated into electron heat and the ion entropy cascade, resulting in ion heating. The phase-space nature of the cascade is particularly manifest in this case as the ion entropy cascade involves simultaneous generation of small spatial scales and small scales in velocity space, the latter via a nonlinear phase-mixing process due to ion gyromotion. I will also discuss how the electron Landau damping and the associated process of parallel phase mixing fit into this cascade picture and whether they represent an effective dissipation mechanism in a strongly turbulent nonlinear system.

  15. Beam-Energy and Centrality Dependence of Directed Flow of Identified Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmuganathan, Prashanth

    2016-12-01

    These proceedings present directed flow (v1) measurements in Au+Au collisions from STAR's Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, for p, p ‾, Λ, Λ ‾, K±, KS0 and π±. At intermediate centrality, protons show a minimum in directed flow slope, dv1 / dy|y≤0.8, as a function of beam energy. Proton dv1 / dy changes sign near 10 GeV, and the directed flow for Λ is consistent with the proton result. The directed flow slope for net protons shows a clear minimum at 14.5 GeV and becomes positive at beam energies below 10 GeV and above 30 GeV. New results for net-kaon directed flow slope resemble net protons from high energy down to 14.5 GeV, but remain negative at lower energies. The slope dv1 / dy shows a strong centrality dependence, especially for p and Λ at the lower beam energies. Available model calculations are in poor agreement.

  16. A Leaf-Inspired Luminescent Solar Concentrator for Energy-Efficient Continuous-Flow Photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Cambié, Dario; Zhao, Fang; Hessel, Volker; Debije, Michael G; Noël, Timothy

    2017-01-19

    The use of solar light to promote chemical reactions holds significant potential with regard to sustainable energy solutions. While the number of visible light-induced transformations has increased significantly, the use of abundant solar light has been extremely limited. We report a leaf-inspired photomicroreactor that constitutes a merger between luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) and flow photochemistry to enable green and efficient reactions powered by solar irradiation. This device based on fluorescent dye-doped polydimethylsiloxane collects sunlight, focuses the energy to a narrow wavelength region, and then transports that energy to embedded microchannels where the flowing reactants are converted.

  17. Angular distributions of the quenched energy flow from dijets with different radius parameters in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinn, Christopher F.

    2016-12-01

    The flow of the quenched energy in imbalanced dijet events has been previously studied by transverse vector sum of charged particles with the CMS detector, namely the missing pT measurement. The results have led to new theoretical insights to order to explain the wide angle radiation. The missing pT technique has been improved so that it allows the study of angular distribution of the energy flow with respect to the dijet axis. The measurements are performed using different distance parameters R with the anti-kT clustering algorithm, which provide information about how the angular distribution of the quenched energy depends on the jet width.

  18. Kinematic, Dynamic, and Energy Characteristics of Diastolic Flow in the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Khalafvand, Seyed Saeid; Hung, Tin-Kan; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Blood flow characteristics in the normal left ventricle are studied by using the magnetic resonance imaging, the Navier-Stokes equations, and the work-energy equation. Vortices produced during the mitral valve opening and closing are modeled in a two-dimensional analysis and correlated with temporal variations of the Reynolds number and pressure drop. Low shear stress and net pressures on the mitral valve are obtained for flow acceleration and deceleration. Bernoulli energy flux delivered to blood from ventricular dilation is practically balanced by the energy influx and the rate change of kinetic energy in the ventricle. The rates of work done by shear and energy dissipation are small. The dynamic and energy characteristics of the 2D results are comparable to those of a 3D model. PMID:26417381

  19. Non-invasive energy meter for fixed and variable flow systems

    DOEpatents

    Menicucci, David F.; Black, Billy D.

    2005-11-01

    An energy metering method and apparatus for liquid flow systems comprising first and second segments of one or more conduits through which a liquid flows, comprising: attaching a first temperature sensor for connection to an outside of the first conduit segment; attaching a second temperature sensor for connection to an outside of the second conduit segment; via a programmable control unit, receiving data from the sensors and calculating energy data therefrom; and communicating energy data from the meter; whereby the method and apparatus operate without need to temporarily disconnect or alter the first or second conduit segments. The invention operates with both variable and fixed flow systems, and is especially useful for both active and passive solar energy systems.

  20. Anticipation Driving Behavior and Related Reduction of Energy Consumption in Traffic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Wei, Yan-Fang; Song, Tao; Dai, Shi-Qiang; Dong, Li-Yun

    In view that drivers would pay attention to the variation of headway on roads, an extended optimal velocity model is proposed by considering anticipation driving behavior. A stability criterion is given through linear stability analysis of traffic flows. The mKdV equation is derived with the reductive perturbation method for headway evolution which could be used to describe the stop-and-go traffic phenomenon. The results show a good effect of anticipation driving behavior on the stabilization of car flows and the anticipation driving behavior can improve the numerical stability of the model as well. In addition, the fluctuation of kinetic energy and the consumption of average energy in congested traffic flows are systematically analyzed. The results show that the reasonable level of anticipation driving behavior can save energy consumption in deceleration process effectively and lead to an associated relation like a "bow-tie" between the energy-saving and the value of anticipation factor.

  1. Vibrational energy flow in the villin headpiece subdomain: Master equation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, David M. E-mail: stock@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Buchenberg, Sebastian; Brettel, Paul; Stock, Gerhard E-mail: stock@physik.uni-freiburg.de

    2015-02-21

    We examine vibrational energy flow in dehydrated and hydrated villin headpiece subdomain HP36 by master equation simulations. Transition rates used in the simulations are obtained from communication maps calculated for HP36. In addition to energy flow along the main chain, we identify pathways for energy transport in HP36 via hydrogen bonding between residues quite far in sequence space. The results of the master equation simulations compare well with all-atom non-equilibrium simulations to about 1 ps following initial excitation of the protein, and quite well at long times, though for some residues we observe deviations between the master equation and all-atom simulations at intermediate times from about 1–10 ps. Those deviations are less noticeable for hydrated than dehydrated HP36 due to energy flow into the water.

  2. Energy dissipation in inelastic flow of cohesionless granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Naoyuki

    In a granular mass which supports the externally applied loads through contact friction, the external work is partly stored and partly dissipated by friction or other mechanisms. In many applications involving relatively small pressures and hard granules, the dissipation by frictional sliding constitutes the major energy absorbing mechanism. Based on micromechanics, it is shown that the external work supplied to a water-saturated sand mass is mainly dissipated through friction between contacting granules. The frictional energy is formulated as a linear function of effective pressure. The model results are compared with the cyclic shearing experiments. A large hollow cylindrical torsional apparatus is used for the experiments, with sand as the test material. This thesis consists of three related parts. First, the results of a study of the cyclic shear deformation behavior under undrained conditions are presented. Experiments are conducted under strain-controlled conditions with various strain amplitudes. The relation between the excess pore water pressure and the corresponding external work in cyclic shearing is studied experimentally. Then, the results of a micromechanical model are compared with the experimental measurements. It is shown that the internal energy dissipation can be expressed as the history of the effective pressure and a single parameter. Second, the cyclic shear deformation behavior under drained conditions is studied. It is shown experimentally that the total volume decreases after each cycle, while the corresponding shear modulus increases. It is found that the energy dissipation coefficient is not constant in drained tests, but that these coefficients for undrained and drained tests approach each other as the number of cycles is increased. Third, the effect of the residual strain on the undrained cyclic shear deformation characteristics is experimentally studied. Experiments are conducted under both stress- and strain-controlled conditions, and

  3. Local expansion flows of galaxies: quantifying acceleration effect of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.

    2013-08-01

    The nearest expansion flow of galaxies observed around the Local group is studied as an archetypical example of the newly discovered local expansion flows around groups and clusters of galaxies in the nearby Universe. The flow is accelerating due to the antigravity produced by the universal dark energy background. We introduce a new acceleration measure of the flow which is the dimensionless ``acceleration parameter" Q (x) = x - x-2 depending on the normalized distance x only. The parameter is zero at the zero-gravity distance x = 1, and Q(x) ∝ x, when x ≫ 1. At the distance x = 3, the parameter Q = 2.9. Since the expansion flows have a self-similar structure in normalized variables, we expect that the result is valid as well for all the other expansion flows around groups and clusters of galaxies on the spatial scales from ˜ 1 to ˜ 10 Mpc everywhere in the Universe.

  4. Energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during laser and electron beam irradiation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.W.; Aziz, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The fundamentals of energy deposition, heat flow, and rapid solidification during energy deposition from lasers and electron beams is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the deposition of energy from pulsed sources (10 to 100 ns pulse duration time) in order to achieve high heating and cooling rates (10/sup 8/ to 10/sup 10/ /sup 0/C/s) in the near surface region. The response of both metals and semiconductors to pulsed energy deposition is considered. Guidelines are presented for the choice of energy source, wavelength, and pulse duration time.

  5. Collision energy dependence of viscous hydrodynamic flow in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chun; Heinz, Ulrich

    2012-05-01

    Using a (2+1)-dimensional viscous hydrodynamical model, we study the dependence of flow observables on the collision energy ranging from s=7.7A GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to s=2760A GeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). With a realistic equation of state, Glauber model initial conditions, and a small specific shear viscosity η/s=0.08, the differential charged hadron elliptic flow v2ch(pT,s) is found to exhibit a very broad maximum as a function of s around top RHIC energy, rendering it almost independent of collision energy for 39⩽s⩽2760A GeV. Compared to ideal fluid dynamical simulations, this “saturation” of elliptic flow is shifted to higher collision energies by shear viscous effects. For color-glass-motivated Monte Carlo-Kharzeev-Levin-Nardi initial conditions, which require a larger shear viscosity η/s=0.2 to reproduce the measured elliptic flow, a similar saturation is not observed up to LHC energies, except for very low pT. We emphasize that this saturation of the elliptic flow is not associated with the QCD phase transition, but arises from the interplay between radial and elliptic flow, which shifts with s depending on the fluid's viscosity and leads to a subtle cancellation between increasing contributions from light particles and decreasing contributions from heavy particles to v2 in the s range, where v2ch(pT,s) at fixed pT is maximal. By generalizing the definition of spatial eccentricity ɛx to isothermal hypersurfaces, we calculate ɛx on the kinetic freeze-out surface at different collision energies. Up to top RHIC energy, s=200A GeV, the fireball is still out-of-plane deformed at freeze-out, while at LHC energy the final spatial eccentricity is predicted to approach zero.

  6. Impact behavior of a high viscosity magnetorheological fluid-based energy absorber with a radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Benyuan; Liao, Changrong; Li, Zhuqiang; Xie, Lei; Zhang, Peng; Jian, Xiaochun

    2017-02-01

    High viscosity linear polysiloxane magnetorheological fluid (HVLP MRF) was demonstrated with excellent suspension stability. Such material is suitable for application in the magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) under axial impact loading conditions. On this basis, a new energy absorber incorporating a radial valve with high magnetic field utilization and a corrugated tube is proposed. In energy absorption applications where the MREA is rarely if ever used, our MREA takes the ultra-stable HVLP MRF as controlled medium in order for a long-term stability. For MREA performing at very high shear rates where the minor losses are important contributing factors to damping, a nonlinear analytical model, based on the Herschel-Bulkley flow model (HB model), is developed taking into account the effects of minor losses (called HBM model). The HB model parameters are determined by rheological experiments with a commercial shear rheometer. Then, continuity equation and governing differential equation of the HVLP MRF in radial flow are established. Based on the HB model, the expressions of radial velocity distribution are deduced. The influences of minor losses on pressure drop are analyzed with mean fluid velocities. Further, mechanical behavior of the corrugated tube is investigated via drop test. In order to verify the theoretical methodology, a MREA is fabricated and tested using a high-speed drop tower facility with a 600 kg mass at different drop heights and in various magnetic fields. The experiment results show that the HBM model is capable of well predicting the impact behavior of the proposed MREA.

  7. Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Lynn, Sean R.; Heidegger, Nathan J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). The analyses were performed using three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off-design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component aero/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

  8. Energy harvesting by means of flow-induced vibrations on aerospace vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daochun; Wu, Yining; Da Ronch, Andrea; Xiang, Jinwu

    2016-10-01

    This paper reviews the design, implementation, and demonstration of energy harvesting devices that exploit flow-induced vibrations as the main source of energy. Starting with a presentation of various concepts of energy harvesters that are designed to benefit from a general class of flow-induced vibrations, specific attention is then given at those technologies that may offer, today or in the near future, a potential benefit to extend the operational capabilities and to monitor critical parameters of unmanned aerial vehicles. Various phenomena characterized by flow-induced vibrations are discussed, including limit cycle oscillations of plates and wing sections, vortex-induced and galloping oscillations of bluff bodies, vortex-induced vibrations of downstream structures, and atmospheric turbulence and gusts. It was found that linear or linearized modeling approaches are commonly employed to support the design phase of energy harvesters. As a result, highly nonlinear and coupled phenomena that characterize flow-induced vibrations are neglected in the design process. The Authors encourage a shift in the current design paradigm: considering coupled nonlinear phenomena, and adequate modeling tools to support their analysis, from a design limitation to a design opportunity. Special emphasis is placed on identifying designs and implementations applicable to aircraft configurations. Application fields of flow-induced vibrations-based energy harvesters are discussed including power supply for wireless sensor networks and simultaneous energy harvest and control. A large body of work on energy harvesters is included in this review journal. Whereas most of the references claim direct applications to unmanned aerial vehicles, it is apparent that, in most of the cases presented, the working principles and characteristics of the energy harvesters are incompatible with any aerospace applications. Finally, the challenges that hold back the integration of energy harvesting

  9. Energy flow and functional compensation in Great Basin small mammals under natural and anthropogenic environmental change

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Rebecca C.; Rowe, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Research on the ecological impacts of environmental change has primarily focused at the species level, leaving the responses of ecosystem-level properties like energy flow poorly understood. This is especially so over millennial timescales inaccessible to direct observation. Here we examine how energy flow within a Great Basin small mammal community responded to climate-driven environmental change during the past 12,800 y, and use this baseline to evaluate responses observed during the past century. Our analyses reveal marked stability in energy flow during rapid climatic warming at the terminal Pleistocene despite dramatic turnover in the distribution of mammalian body sizes and habitat-associated functional groups. Functional group turnover was strongly correlated with climate-driven changes in regional vegetation, with climate and vegetation change preceding energetic shifts in the small mammal community. In contrast, the past century has witnessed a substantial reduction in energy flow caused by an increase in energetic dominance of small-bodied species with an affinity for closed grass habitats. This suggests that modern changes in land cover caused by anthropogenic activities—particularly the spread of nonnative annual grasslands—has led to a breakdown in the compensatory dynamics of energy flow. Human activities are thus modifying the small mammal community in ways that differ from climate-driven expectations, resulting in an energetically novel ecosystem. Our study illustrates the need to integrate across ecological and temporal scales to provide robust insights for long-term conservation and management. PMID:26170294

  10. Keeping Accountability Systems Accountable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Martha

    2007-01-01

    The standards and accountability movement in education has undeniably transformed schooling throughout the United States. Even before President Bush signed the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act into law in January 2002, mandating annual public school testing in English and math for grades 3-8 and once in high school, most states had already…

  11. Comparison of energy efficiency between variable refrigerant flow systems and ground source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tainzhen; Liu, Xaiobing

    2009-11-01

    With the current movement toward net zero energy buildings, many technologies are promoted with emphasis on their superior energy efficiency. The variable refrigerant flow (VRF) and ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems are probably the most competitive technologies among these. However, there are few studies reporting the energy efficiency of VRF systems compared with GSHP systems. In this article, a preliminary comparison of energy efficiency between the air-source VRF and GSHP systems is presented. The computer simulation results show that GSHP system is more energy efficient than the air-source VRF system for conditioning a small office building in two selected US climates. In general, GSHP system is more energy efficient than the air-source VRV system, especially when the building has significant heating loads. For buildings with less heating loads, the GSHP system could still perform better than the air-source VRF system in terms of energy efficiency, but the resulting energy savings may be marginal.

  12. Two-way FSI modelling of blood flow through CCA accounting on-line medical diagnostics in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowicz, K.; Badur, J.; Narkiewicz, K.

    2014-08-01

    Flow parameters can induce pathological changes in the arteries. We propose a method to asses those parameters using a 3D computer model of the flow in the Common Carotid Artery. Input data was acquired using an automatic 2D ultrasound wall tracking system. This data has been used to generate a 3D geometry of the artery. The diameter and wall thickness have been assessed individually for every patient, but the artery has been taken as a 75mm straight tube. The Young's modulus for the arterial walls was calculated using the pulse pressure, diastolic (minimal) diameter and wall thickness (IMT). Blood flow was derived from the pressure waveform using a 2-parameter Windkessel model. The blood is assumed to be non-Newtonian. The computational models were generated and calculated using commercial code. The coupling method required the use of Arbitrary Lagrangian-Euler formulation to solve Navier-Stokes and Navier-Lame equations in a moving domain. The calculations showed that the distention of the walls in the model is not significantly different from the measurements. Results from the model have been used to locate additional risk factors, such as wall shear stress or circumferential stress, that may predict adverse hypertension complications.

  13. On the rapidity distribution of nucleons participating in elliptical flow at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kamaldeep; Kumar, Suneel

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of nucleons participating in elliptical flow is studied for the reactions of 79197Au + 79197Au, 60150Nd + 60150Nd, 50124Sn + 50124Sn, 4496Ru + 4496Ru, 3678Kr + 3678Kr, 2048Ca + 2048Ca and 2040Ca + 2040Ca using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model for various centrality ranges and over the wide range of intermediate energy. Our findings reveal that the sigma (width) of rapidity distribution obtained varies with mass of colliding system at a given energy. The peak of rapidity distribution decreases with decrease in the mass of colliding nuclei. Transition energy as well as width of rapidity distribution depends on the mass of fragment for a given centrality. Influence of isospin dependent symmetry energy and nucleon-nucleon cross-section can be studied using rapidity distribution. Second transition energy depends on the mass of the fragment. Rotational phenomenon of nucleons can be observed for nucleons participating in elliptical flow.

  14. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l−1). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l−1 is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from −20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications. PMID:25709083

  15. PCB Food Web Dynamics Quantify Nutrient and Energy Flow in Aquatic Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Anne M; Paterson, Gordon; Drouillard, Ken G; Haffner, G Douglas

    2015-11-03

    Measuring in situ nutrient and energy flows in spatially and temporally complex aquatic ecosystems represents a major ecological challenge. Food web structure, energy and nutrient budgets are difficult to measure, and it is becoming more important to quantify both energy and nutrient flow to determine how food web processes and structure are being modified by multiple stressors. We propose that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners represent an ideal tracer to quantify in situ energy and nutrient flow between trophic levels. Here, we demonstrate how an understanding of PCB congener bioaccumulation dynamics provides multiple direct measurements of energy and nutrient flow in aquatic food webs. To demonstrate this novel approach, we quantified nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and caloric turnover rates for Lake Huron lake trout, and reveal how these processes are regulated by both growth rate and fish life history. Although minimal nutrient recycling was observed in young growing fish, slow growing, older lake trout (>5 yr) recycled an average of 482 Tonnes·yr(-1) of N, 45 Tonnes·yr(-1) of P and assimilated 22 TJ yr(-1) of energy. Compared to total P loading rates of 590 Tonnes·yr(-1), the recycling of primarily bioavailable nutrients by fish plays an important role regulating the nutrient states of oligotrophic lakes.

  16. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Redox flow batteries are receiving wide attention for electrochemical energy storage due to their unique architecture and advantages, but progress has so far been limited by their low energy density (~25 Wh l(-1)). Here we report a high-energy density aqueous zinc-polyiodide flow battery. Using the highly soluble iodide/triiodide redox couple, a discharge energy density of 167 Wh l(-1) is demonstrated with a near-neutral 5.0 M ZnI2 electrolyte. Nuclear magnetic resonance study and density functional theory-based simulation along with flow test data indicate that the addition of an alcohol (ethanol) induces ligand formation between oxygen on the hydroxyl group and the zinc ions, which expands the stable electrolyte temperature window to from -20 to 50 °C, while ameliorating the zinc dendrite. With the high-energy density and its benign nature free from strong acids and corrosive components, zinc-polyiodide flow battery is a promising candidate for various energy storage applications.

  17. Triboelectric-based harvesting of gas flow energy and powerless sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi, Majid; Sadeghi, Ali; Mazzolai, Barbara; Beccai, Lucia; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we propose an approach that can convert gas flow energy to electric energy by using the triboelectric effect, in a structure integrating at least two conductive parts (i.e. electrodes) and one non-conductive sheet. The gas flow induces vibration of the cited parts. Therefore, the frequent attaching and releasing between a non-conductive layer with at least one electrode generates electrostatic charges on the surfaces, and then an electron flow between the two electrodes. The effect of blown gas on the output signals is studied to evaluate the gas flow sensing. We also illustrate that the introduced system has an ability to detect micro particles driven by air into the system. Finally we show how we can use this approach for a self sustainable system demonstrating smoke detection and LED lightening.

  18. Multichannel readout ASIC design flow for high energy physics and cosmic rays experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A.; Malankin, E.

    2016-02-01

    In the large-scale high energy physics and astrophysics experiments multi-channel readout application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) are widely used. The ASICs for such experiments are complicated systems, which usually include both analog and digital building blocks. The complexity and large number of channels in such ASICs require the proper methodological approach to their design. The paper represents the mixed-signal design flow of the ASICs for high energy physics and cosmic rays experiments. This flow was successfully embedded to the development of the read-out ASIC prototype for the muon chambers of the CBM experiment. The approach was approved in UMC CMOS MMRF 180 nm process. The design flow enable to analyse the mixed-signal system operation on the different levels: functional, behavioural, schematic and post layout including parasitic elements. The proposed design flow allows reducing the simulation period and eliminating the functionality mismatches on the very early stage of the design.

  19. Reformulation and energy flow of the Cowling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Amm, O.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ieda, A.; Vanhamäki, H.

    2011-02-01

    The question to which extent the divergence of the Hall current can be connected to the Pedersen current or to the closure current in the magnetosphere through field-aligned currents (FACs), that is, the Cowling channel process in the polar region, has long been debated but not fully understood. The present study reformulates the Cowling channel by introducing a two-layer model consisting of Hall and Pedersen conductivity layers with channel boundaries not only in the direction perpendicular to the channel but also in the direction along it. This new model enables us to better and more physically understand the connection between the Hall current, Pedersen current, and FAC. In particular, the finiteness of the channel along its direction enables us to understand that the primary nonzero electric field along the channel and FACs at the channel boundaries that faced each other in the channel direction carries the necessary energy for the Hall current to set up the secondary electric field from the magnetosphere. A case for a possible connection between the Pedersen and Hall currents is shown based on a polar current system derived from the Kamide-Richmond-Matsushita method. A more comprehensive analysis based on data is presented in the companion paper.

  20. An energy-based model accounting for snow accumulation and snowmelt in a coniferous forest and in an open area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matějka, Ondřej; Jeníček, Michal

    2016-04-01

    An energy balance approach was used to simulate snow water equivalent (SWE) evolution in an open area, forest clearing and coniferous forest during winter seasons 2011/12 and 2012/13 in the Bystřice River basin (Krušné Mountains, Czech Republic). The aim was to describe the impact of vegetation on snow accumulation and snowmelt under different forest canopy structure and trees density. Hemispherical photographs were used to describe the forest canopy structure. Energy balance model of snow accumulation and melt was set up. The snow model was adjusted to account the effects of forest canopy on driving meteorological variables. Leaf area index derived from 32 hemispherical photographs of vegetation and sky was used to implement the forest influence in the snow model. The model was evaluated using snow depth and SWE data measured at 16 localities in winter seasons from 2011 to 2013. The model was able to reproduce the SWE evolution in both winter seasons beneath the forest canopy, forest clearing and open area. The SWE maximum in forest sites was by 18% lower than in open areas and forest clearings. The portion of shortwave radiation on snowmelt rate was by 50% lower in forest areas than in open areas due to shading effect. The importance of turbulent fluxes was by 30% lower in forest sites compared to openings because of wind speed reduction up to 10% of values at corresponding open areas. Indirect estimation of interception rates was derived. Between 14 and 60% of snowfall was intercept and sublimated in the forest canopy in both winter seasons. Based on model results, the underestimation of solid precipitation (heated precipitation gauge used for measurement) at the weather station Hřebečná was revealed. The snowfall was underestimated by 40% in winter season 2011/12 and by 13% in winter season 2012/13. Although, the model formulation appeared sufficient for both analysed winter seasons, canopy effects on the longwave radiation and ground heat flux were not

  1. Influence of the Internal Energy Model on DSMC Flow Results for Rarefied Spacecraft Plumes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    DSMC Flow Results for Rarefied Spacecraft Plumes 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jason Cline (Spectral Sciences, Inc...Symposium on Rarefied Gas Dynamics, Monterey, CA, 10-15 July 2010. 14. ABSTRACT In low Earth orbit, energetic collisions between molecules from...Energy Model on DSMC Flow Results for Rarefied Spacecraft Plumes Jason A. Cline Spectral Sciences Inc., 4 Fourth Ave., Burlington, MA, 01803

  2. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Jun; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-24

    Large-scale energy storage systems are crucial for substantial deployment of renewable energy sources. Energy storage systems with high energy density, high safety, and low cost and environmental friendliness are desired. To overcome the major limitations of the current aqueous redox flow battery systems, namely lower energy density (~25 Wh L-1) and presence of strong acids and/or other hazardous, a high energy density aqueous zinc/polyiodide flow battery (ZIB) is designed with near neutral ZnI2 solutions as catholytes. The energy density of ZIB could reach 322 Wh L-1 at the solubility limit of ZnI2 in water (~7 M). We demonstrate charge and discharge energy densities of 245.9 Wh/L and 166.7 Wh L-1 with ZnI2 electrolyte at 5.0 M, respectively. The addition of ethanol (EtOH) in ZnI2 electrolyte can effectively mitigate the growth of zinc dendrite at the anode and improve the stability of catholytes with wider temperature window (-20 to 50°C), which enable ZIB system to be a promising alternative as a high-energy and high- safety stationary energy storage system.

  3. Ambipolar zinc-polyiodide electrolyte for a high-energy density aqueous redox flow battery

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Bin; Nie, Zimin; Vijayakumar, M.; ...

    2015-02-24

    Large-scale energy storage systems are crucial for substantial deployment of renewable energy sources. Energy storage systems with high energy density, high safety, and low cost and environmental friendliness are desired. To overcome the major limitations of the current aqueous redox flow battery systems, namely lower energy density (~25 Wh L-1) and presence of strong acids and/or other hazardous, a high energy density aqueous zinc/polyiodide flow battery (ZIB) is designed with near neutral ZnI2 solutions as catholytes. The energy density of ZIB could reach 322 Wh L-1 at the solubility limit of ZnI2 in water (~7 M). We demonstrate charge andmore » discharge energy densities of 245.9 Wh/L and 166.7 Wh L-1 with ZnI2 electrolyte at 5.0 M, respectively. The addition of ethanol (EtOH) in ZnI2 electrolyte can effectively mitigate the growth of zinc dendrite at the anode and improve the stability of catholytes with wider temperature window (-20 to 50°C), which enable ZIB system to be a promising alternative as a high-energy and high- safety stationary energy storage system.« less

  4. Improved Soft Abrasive Flow Finishing Method Based on Turbulent Kinetic Energy Enhancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Jun; JI, Shiming; TAN, Dapeng

    2017-03-01

    Soft abrasive flow(SAF) finishing can process the irregular geometric surfaces, but with the matter of low processing efficiency. To address the issue, an improved SAF finishing method based on turbulent kinetic energy enhancing is proposed. A constrained flow passage with serration cross-section is constructed to increase the turbulence intensity. Taking the constrained flow passage as the objective, a two-phase fluid dynamic model is set up by using particle trajectory model and standard k-ɛ turbulence model, and the flow field characteristics of the flow passage are acquired. The numerical results show that the serration flow passage can enhance the turbulence intensity, uniform the particles distribution, and increase the particle concentration near the bottom wall. The observation results by particle image velocimetry(PIV) show that the internal vortex structures are formed in flow passage, and the abrasive flow takes on turbulence concentrating phenomenon in near-wall region. The finishing experiments prove that the proposed method can obtain better surface uniformity, and the processing efficiency can be improved more 35%. This research provides an abrasive flow modeling method to reveal the particle motion regulars, and can offer references to the technical optimization of fluid-based precision processing.

  5. Vortex shedding induced energy harvesting from piezoelectric materials in heating, ventilation and air conditioning flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, L. A.; Cacan, M. R.; So, P. M.; Wright, P. K.

    2012-04-01

    A cantilevered piezoelectric beam is excited in a heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) flow. This excitation is amplified by the interactions between (a) an aerodynamic fin attached at the end of the piezoelectric cantilever and (b) the vortex shedding downstream from a bluff body placed in the air flow ahead of the fin/cantilever assembly. The positioning of small weights along the fin enables tuning of the energy harvester to operate at resonance for flow velocities from 2 to 5 m s-1, which are characteristic of HVAC ducts. In a 15 cm diameter air duct, power generation of 200 μW for a flow speed of 2.5 m s-1 and power generation of 3 mW for a flow speed of 5 m s-1 was achieved. These power outputs are sufficient to power a wireless sensor node for HVAC monitoring systems or other sensors for smart building technology.

  6. Measurement and analysis of energy flow in Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ki, Taekyung; Jeong, Sangkwon; Seo, Mansu; Park, Inmyong

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of energy flow is a useful method for understanding a system. This paper focuses on the instantaneous measurement of physical conditions and analysis of energy flow in the Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator. For measuring physical conditions of the working fluid such as the mass flow rate, the temperature, and the pressure, several cryogenic sensors are installed in the Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator optimally designed in the operating condition of 60 Hz and 2.5 MPa. The physical conditions of the working fluid in the Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator are carefully measured as varying the operating frequency and the charging pressure. From the measured results, the enthalpy, the PV work, and the loss are quantified in each location of the PTR and the conversion of energy flows is experimentally confirmed. The results of this paper can be used for understanding the optimal operating condition and modifying correlations of various losses in the Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerator. KEYWORDS: Energy flow, Loss, Pulse tube refrigerator

  7. Rossby wave energy dispersion from tropical cyclone in zonal basic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenli; Fei, Jianfang; Huang, Xiaogang; Liu, Yudi; Ma, Zhanhong; Yang, Lu

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates tropical cyclone energy dispersion under horizontally sheared flows using a nonlinear barotropic model. In addition to common patterns, unusual features of Rossby wave trains are also found in flows with constant vorticity and vorticity gradients. In terms of the direction of the energy dispersion, the wave train can rotate clockwise and elongate southwestward under anticyclonic circulation (ASH), which contributes to the reenhancement of the tropical cyclone (TC). The wave train even splits into two obvious wavelike trains in flows with a southward vorticity gradient (WSH). Energy dispersed from TCs varies over time, and variations in the intensity of the wave train components typically occur in two stages. Wave-activity flux diagnosis and ray tracing calculations are extended to the frame that moves along with the TC to reveal the concrete progress of wave propagation. The direction of the wave-activity flux is primarily determined by the combination of the basic flow and the TC velocity. Along the flux, the distribution of pseudomomentum effectively illustrates the development of wave trains, particularly the rotation and split of wave propagation. Ray tracing involves the quantitative tracing of wave features along rays, which effectively coincide with the wave train regimes. Flows of a constant shear (parabolic meridional variation) produce linear (nonlinear) wave number variations. For the split wave trains, the real and complex wave number waves move along divergent trajectories and are responsible for different energy dispersion ducts.

  8. ENERGY EFFICIENT THERMAL MANAGEMENT FOR NATURAL GAS ENGINE AFTERTREATMENT VIA ACTIVE FLOW CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen

    2004-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  9. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2006-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  10. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2005-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  11. Molecular effects on turbulent diffusion and energy in a low speed closed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpovo, Charlemagne C.; Johnson, Joseph A.; Chabi Orou, Jean B.

    2008-05-01

    The coefficient of turbulent diffusion and the total turbulent energy are determined during the compression phase of a motored internal combustion engine with varying flow conditions and using intake gases with varying molecular weights. These turbulent parameters change with time and with intake gas molecular weight. However, under all flow conditions, both parameters first increase and then decrease with increasing molecular weight. In addition, a direct correlation is observed between the average values of the coefficient of turbulent diffusion and the average values of the total turbulent energy, irrespective of the molecular weight.

  12. Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model for internal energy excitation and dissociation in hypersonic flows.

    PubMed

    Munafò, A; Panesi, M; Magin, T E

    2014-02-01

    A Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model is proposed to reduce a detailed kinetic mechanism database developed at NASA Ames Research Center for internal energy transfer and dissociation in N(2)-N interactions. The coarse-grained model is constructed by lumping the rovibrational energy levels of the N(2) molecule into energy bins. The population of the levels within each bin is assumed to follow a Boltzmann distribution at the local translational temperature. Excitation and dissociation rate coefficients for the energy bins are obtained by averaging the elementary rate coefficients. The energy bins are treated as separate species, thus allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. The proposed coarse-grained model is applied to the study of nonequilibrium flows behind normal shock waves and within converging-diverging nozzles. In both cases, the flow is assumed inviscid and steady. Computational results are compared with those obtained by direct solution of the master equation for the rovibrational collisional model and a more conventional multitemperature model. It is found that the proposed coarse-grained model is able to accurately resolve the nonequilibrium dynamics of internal energy excitation and dissociation-recombination processes with only 20 energy bins. Furthermore, the proposed coarse-grained model provides a superior description of the nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in shock heated and nozzle flows when compared with the conventional multitemperature models.

  13. Pathways to low-cost electrochemical energy storage: a comparison of aqueous and nonaqueous flow batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Darling, Robert M.; Gallagher, Kevin G.; Kowalski, Jeffrey A.; ...

    2014-11-01

    Energy storage is increasingly seen as a valuable asset for electricity grids composed of high fractions of intermittent sources, such as wind power or, in developing economies, unreliable generation and transmission services. However, the potential of batteries to meet the stringent cost and durability requirements for grid applications is largely unquantified. We investigate electrochemical systems capable of economically storing energy for hours and present an analysis of the relationships among technological performance characteristics, component cost factors, and system price for established and conceptual aqueous and nonaqueous batteries. We identified potential advantages of nonaqueous flow batteries over those based on aqueousmore » electrolytes; however, new challenging constraints burden the nonaqueous approach, including the solubility of the active material in the electrolyte. Requirements in harmony with economically effective energy storage are derived for aqueous and nonaqueous systems. The attributes of flow batteries are compared to those of aqueous and nonaqueous enclosed and hybrid (semi-flow) batteries. Flow batteries are a promising technology for reaching these challenging energy storage targets owing to their independent power and energy scaling, reliance on facile and reversible reactants, and potentially simpler manufacture as compared to established enclosed batteries such as lead–acid or lithium-ion.« less

  14. Pathways to low-cost electrochemical energy storage: a comparison of aqueous and nonaqueous flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Robert M.; Gallagher, Kevin G.; Kowalski, Jeffrey A.; Ha, Seungbum; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2014-11-01

    Energy storage is increasingly seen as a valuable asset for electricity grids composed of high fractions of intermittent sources, such as wind power or, in developing economies, unreliable generation and transmission services. However, the potential of batteries to meet the stringent cost and durability requirements for grid applications is largely unquantified. We investigate electrochemical systems capable of economically storing energy for hours and present an analysis of the relationships among technological performance characteristics, component cost factors, and system price for established and conceptual aqueous and nonaqueous batteries. We identified potential advantages of nonaqueous flow batteries over those based on aqueous electrolytes; however, new challenging constraints burden the nonaqueous approach, including the solubility of the active material in the electrolyte. Requirements in harmony with economically effective energy storage are derived for aqueous and nonaqueous systems. The attributes of flow batteries are compared to those of aqueous and nonaqueous enclosed and hybrid (semi-flow) batteries. Flow batteries are a promising technology for reaching these challenging energy storage targets owing to their independent power and energy scaling, reliance on facile and reversible reactants, and potentially simpler manufacture as compared to established enclosed batteries such as lead–acid or lithium-ion.

  15. Design and optimization of a large flow rate booster pump in SWRO energy recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Z. N.; Wu, P.; Wu, D. Z.; Wang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) is a high energy-consumption industry, so energy efficiency is an important issue. Energy recovery systems, which contain a pressure exchanger and a booster pump, are widely used in SWRO plants. As a key part of energy recovery system, the difficulty of designing booster pumps lies in high inlet pressure, high medium causticity and large flow rate. High inlet pressure adds difficulties to seal design, and large flow rate and high efficiency requirement bring high demand for hydraulic design. In this paper, a 625 m3/h booster pump is designed and optimized according to the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation results. The impeller and volute is well designed, a new type of high pressure mechanical seal is applied and axial force is well balanced. After optimization based on blade redesign, the efficiency of the pump was improved. The best efficiency reaches more than 85% at design point according to the CFD simulation result.

  16. Research and design of underwater flow-induced vibration energy harvester based on Karman vortex street

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Gang; Wang, Hai; Yang, Chunlai; Wen, Li

    2017-03-01

    With the increasing development of wireless sensor network (WSN), power supply for WSN nodes had attracted increasing attention, and the energy harvesting system based on Karman vortex street has been widely used in underwater WSN. But the research of the influences of affecting factors towards the energy harvesting system is yet to be completed. So, in this paper, an underwater flow-induced vibration energy harvesting system based on Karman vortex street was proposed and tested. The influence of bluff body geometry and flow velocity towards the performance of the energy harvesting has been researched. The results showed that the output voltage increased as the diameter of bluff body and the water velocity increase. The power generation efficiency was the best when the shape of bluff body was circular.

  17. A novel iron-lead redox flow battery for large-scale energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhou, X. L.; Wei, L.; Ren, Y. X.

    2017-04-01

    The redox flow battery (RFB) is one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies for the massive utilization of intermittent renewables especially wind and solar energy. This work presents a novel redox flow battery that utilizes inexpensive and abundant Fe(II)/Fe(III) and Pb/Pb(II) redox couples as redox materials. Experimental results show that both the Fe(II)/Fe(III) and Pb/Pb(II) redox couples have fast electrochemical kinetics in methanesulfonic acid, and that the coulombic efficiency and energy efficiency of the battery are, respectively, as high as 96.2% and 86.2% at 40 mA cm-2. Furthermore, the battery exhibits stable performance in terms of efficiencies and discharge capacities during the cycle test. The inexpensive redox materials, fast electrochemical kinetics and stable cycle performance make the present battery a promising candidate for large-scale energy storage applications.

  18. Transient unidirectional energy flow and diode-like phenomenon induced by non-Markovian environments

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Jun; Segal, Dvira; Li, Baowen; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2015-01-01

    Relying on an exact time evolution scheme, we identify a novel transient energy transfer phenomenon in an exactly-solvable quantum microscopic model consisting of a three-level system coupled to two non-Markovian zero-temperature bosonic baths through two separable quantum channels. The dynamics of this model can be solved exactly using the quantum-state-diffusion equation formalism, demonstrating finite intervals of unidirectional energy flow across the system, typically, from the non-Markovian environment towards the more Markovian bath. Furthermore, when introducing a spatial asymmetry into the system, an analogue of the rectification effect is realized. In the long time limit, the dynamics arrives at a stationary state and the effects recede. Understanding temporal characteristics of directional energy flow will aid in designing microscopic energy transfer devices. PMID:26478230

  19. Impact of Groundwater Flow and Energy Load on Multiple Borehole Heat Exchangers.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, S Emad; Schincariol, Robert A; Olofsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of array configuration, that is, number, layout, and spacing, on the performance of multiple borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is generally known under the assumption of fully conductive transport. The effect of groundwater flow on BHE performance is also well established, but most commonly for single BHEs. In multiple-BHE systems the effect of groundwater advection can be more complicated due to the induced thermal interference between the boreholes. To ascertain the influence of groundwater flow and borehole arrangement, this study investigates single- and multi-BHE systems of various configurations. Moreover, the influence of energy load balance is also examined. The results from corresponding cases with and without groundwater flow as well as balanced and unbalanced energy loads are cross-compared. The groundwater flux value, 10(-7) m/s, is chosen based on the findings of previous studies on groundwater flow interaction with BHEs and thermal response tests. It is observed that multi-BHE systems with balanced loads are less sensitive to array configuration attributes and groundwater flow, in the long-term. Conversely, multi-BHE systems with unbalanced loads are influenced by borehole array configuration as well as groundwater flow; these effects become more pronounced with time, unlike when the load is balanced. Groundwater flow has more influence on stabilizing loop temperatures, compared to array characteristics. Although borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems have a balanced energy load function, preliminary investigation on their efficiency shows a negative impact by groundwater which is due to their dependency on high temperature gradients between the boreholes and surroundings.

  20. Material and Energy Flows Associated with Select Metals in GREET 2. Molybdenum, Platinum, Zinc, Nickel, Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Benavides, Pahola T.; Dai, Qiang; Sullivan, John L.; Kelly, Jarod C.; Dunn, Jennifer B.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we analyzed the material and energy consumption from mining to production of molybdenum, platinum, zinc, and nickel. We also analyzed the production of solar- and semiconductor-grade silicon. We described new additions to and expansions of the data in GREET 2. In some cases, we used operating permits and sustainability reports to estimate the material and energy flows for molybdenum, platinum, and nickel, while for zinc and silicon we relied on information provided in the literature.

  1. Characterization of Iodine Quenching and Energy Transfer Rate Constants for Supersonic Flow Visualization Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-28

    SUBTITLE Sm. CONTRACTNUBER Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate FA9550-41-- o3G Sb. GRANT NUMBER constants for supersonic flow...in the nozzle from a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL). PLIF images are recorded using laser excitation of the I= B-X transition. Data for the...Preacolbed byANSI Sad Z30.16 20071015188 Final report for the project, "Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate constants for

  2. Aqueous Lithium-Iodine Solar Flow Battery for the Simultaneous Conversion and Storage of Solar Energy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mingzhe; McCulloch, William D; Beauchamp, Damian R; Huang, Zhongjie; Ren, Xiaodi; Wu, Yiying

    2015-07-08

    Integrating both photoelectric-conversion and energy-storage functions into one device allows for the more efficient solar energy usage. Here we demonstrate the concept of an aqueous lithium-iodine (Li-I) solar flow battery (SFB) by incorporation of a built-in dye-sensitized TiO2 photoelectrode in a Li-I redox flow battery via linkage of an I3(-)/I(-) based catholyte, for the simultaneous conversion and storage of solar energy. During the photoassisted charging process, I(-) ions are photoelectrochemically oxidized to I3(-), harvesting solar energy and storing it as chemical energy. The Li-I SFB can be charged at a voltage of 2.90 V under 1 sun AM 1.5 illumination, which is lower than its discharging voltage of 3.30 V. The charging voltage reduction translates to energy savings of close to 20% compared to conventional Li-I batteries. This concept also serves as a guiding design that can be extended to other metal-redox flow battery systems.

  3. Energy and materials flows in the production of olefins and their derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.; Shen, S.Y.

    1980-08-01

    Production of olefins and their derivatives uses almost 3.5% of the oil and gas consumed annually in the United States. It is estimated that their production requires an input energy of 2 Q, which is 50% of the energy used in the production of all petrochemicals. Substantial amounts of this energy could be recovered through recycling. For example, recycling of a single plastic product, polyester soft drink bottles, could have recovered about 0.014 Q in 1979. (About 1.4 Q is used to produce plastic derivatives of olefins). Petrochemical processes use fuels as feedstocks, as well as for process energy, and a portion of this energy is not foregone and can be recovered through combustion of the products. The energy foregone in the production of ethylene is estimated to be 7800 Btu/lb. The energy foregone in plastics production ranges from 12,100 Btu/lb for the new linear low-density polyethylene to 77,200 Btu/lb for nylon 66, which is about 60% of the total energy input for that product. Further investigation of the following areas could yield both material and energy savings in the olefins industry: (1) recycling of petrochemical products to recover energy in addition to that recoverable through combustion, (2) impact of feedstock substitution on utilization of available national resources, and (3) effective use of the heat embodied in process steam. This steam accounts for a major fraction of the industry's energy input.

  4. A method for improving predictive modeling by taking into account lag time: Example of selenium bioaccumulation in a flowing system.

    PubMed

    Beckon, William N

    2016-07-01

    For bioaccumulative substances, efforts to predict concentrations in organisms at upper trophic levels, based on measurements of environmental exposure, have been confounded by the appreciable but hitherto unknown amount of time it may take for bioaccumulation to occur through various pathways and across several trophic transfers. The study summarized here demonstrates an objective method of estimating this lag time by testing a large array of potential lag times for selenium bioaccumulation, selecting the lag that provides the best regression between environmental exposure (concentration in ambient water) and concentration in the tissue of the target organism. Bioaccumulation lag is generally greater for organisms at higher trophic levels, reaching times of more than a year in piscivorous fish. Predictive modeling of bioaccumulation is improved appreciably by taking into account this lag. More generally, the method demonstrated here may improve the accuracy of predictive modeling in a wide variety of other cause-effect relationships in which lag time is substantial but inadequately known, in disciplines as diverse as climatology (e.g., the effect of greenhouse gases on sea levels) and economics (e.g., the effects of fiscal stimulus on employment).

  5. CHAPTER 17: VIVANTARY RESPONSIBLITY AND EMERGY ACCOUNTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystem processes represented by manifold material cycles and energy flows are a necessary condition of life on Earth. Though our species is embedded in a matrix of ecosystem processes mediated by networks involving millions of other species, human activities per se account fo...

  6. Resource Evaluation and Energy Production Estimate for a Tidal Energy Conversion Installation using Acoustic Flow Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Ian; Baldwin, Ken; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The ``Living Bridge'' project plans to install a tidal turbine at Memorial Bridge in the Piscataqua River at Portsmouth, NH. A spatio-temporal tidal energy resource assessment was performed using long term bottom-deployed Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers ADCP. Two locations were evaluated: at the planned deployment location and mid-channel. The goal was to determine the amount of available kinetic energy that can be converted into usable electrical energy on the bridge. Changes in available kinetic energy with ebb/flood and spring/neap tidal cycles and electrical energy demand were analyzed. A system model is used to calculate the net energy savings using various tidal generator and battery bank configurations. Differences in the tidal characteristics between the two measurement locations are highlighted. Different resource evaluation methodologies were also analyzed, e.g., using a representative ADCP ``bin'' vs. a more refined, turbine-geometry-specific methodology, and using static bin height vs. bin height that move w.r.t. the free surface throughout a tidal cycle (representative of a bottom-fixed or floating turbine deployment, respectively). ADCP operating frequencies and bin sizes affect the standard deviation of measurements, and measurement uncertainties are evaluated. Supported by NSF-IIP grant 1430260.

  7. Chemical Energy Release in Several Recently Discovered Detonation and Deflagration Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.

    2010-10-01

    Several recent experiments on complex detonation and deflagration flows are analyzed in terms of the chemical energy release required to sustain these flows. The observed double cellular structures in detonating gaseous nitromethane-oxygen and NO2-fuel (H2, CH4, and C2H6) mixtures are explained by the amplification of two distinct pressure wave frequencies by two exothermic reactions, the faster reaction forming vibrationally excited NO* and the slower reaction forming highly vibrationally excited N2**. The establishment of a Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) deflagration behind a weak shock wave, the C-J detonation established after a head-on collision with a shock front, and the C-J detonation conditions established in reactive supersonic flows are quantitatively calculated using the chemical energy release of a H2 + Cl2 mixture. For these three reactive flows, these calculations illustrate that different fractions of the exothermic chemical energy are used to sustain steady-state propagation. C-J detonation calculations on the various initial states using the CHEETAH chemical equilibrium code are shown to be in good agreement with experimental detonation velocity measurements for the head-on collision and supersonic flow detonations.

  8. Energy and materials flows in the production of liquid and gaseous oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.; Wolsky, A.M.

    1980-08-01

    Liquid and gaseous oxygen is produced in an energy-intensive air separation processo that also generates nitrogen. More than 65% of the cost of oxygen is attributable to energy costs. Energy use and materials flows are analyzed for various air separation methods. Effective approaches to energy and material conservation in air separation plants include efficient removal of contaminants (carbon dioxide and water), centralization of air products user-industries so that large air separation plants are cost-effective and the energy use in transportation is minimized, and increased production of nitrogen. Air separation plants can produce more than three times more nitrogen than oxygen, but present markets demand, at most, only 1.5 times more. Full utlization of liquid and gaseous nitrogen should be encouraged, so that the wasted separation energy is minimized. There are potential markets for nitrogen in, for example, cryogenic separation of metallic and plastic wastes, cryogenic particle size reduction, and production of ammonia for fertilizer.

  9. Neuroimaging and Neuroenergetics: Brain Activations as Information-Driven Reorganization of Energy Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strelnikov, Kuzma

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing focus on the neurophysiological underpinnings of brain activations, giving birth to an emerging branch of neuroscience--neuroenergetics. However, no common definition of "brain activation" exists thus far. In this article, we define brain activation as the information-driven reorganization of energy flows in a population of…

  10. An analytical study of a lead-acid flow battery as an energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Alex; Mukerjee, Santanu; Lee, Sang C.; Lee, Dong-Ha; Park, Sam

    2014-03-01

    The most important issue with our current clean energy technology is the dependence on environmental conditions to produce power. To solve this problem a wide range of energy storage devices are being explored for grid-scale energy storage including soluble lead-acid flow batteries. Flow batteries offer a unique solution to grid-scale energy storage because of their electrolyte tanks which allow easy scaling of storage capacity. This study seeks to further understand the mechanisms of a soluble lead acid flow battery using simulations. The effects of varies changes to operating conditions and the system configuration can be explored through simulations. The simulations preformed are 2D and include the positive electrode, negative electrode, and the flow space between them. Simulations presented in this study show Pb(II) surface concentration, external electric potential, and PbO/PbO2 surface concentration on the positive electrode. Simulations have shown increasing cell temperature can increase external electric potential by as much as 0.2 V during charge. Simulations have also shown electrolyte velocity is an important aspect when investigating lead deposition onto the electrodes. Experimental work was performed to validate simulation results of current density and voltage. Good correlation was found between experimental work and simulation results.

  11. The energy transfer mechanism of a perturbed solid-body rotation flow in a rotating pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chunjuan; Liu, Feng; Rusak, Zvi; Wang, Shixiao

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of a solid-body rotation superposed on a uniform axial flow entering a rotating constant-area pipe of finite length are presented. Steady in time profiles of the radial, axial, and circumferential velocities are imposed at the pipe inlet. Convective boundary conditions are imposed at the pipe outlet. The Wang and Rusak (Phys. Fluids 8:1007-1016, 1996. doi: 10.1063/1.86882) axisymmetric instability mechanism is retrieved at certain operational conditions in terms of incoming flow swirl levels and the Reynolds number. However, at other operational conditions there exists a dominant, three-dimensional spiral type of instability mode that is consistent with the linear stability theory of Wang et al. (J. Fluid Mech. 797: 284-321, 2016). The growth of this mode leads to a spiral type of flow roll-up that subsequently nonlinearly saturates on a large amplitude rotating spiral wave. The energy transfer mechanism between the bulk of the flow and the perturbations is studied by the Reynolds-Orr equation. The production or loss of the perturbation kinetic energy is combined of three components: the viscous loss, the convective loss at the pipe outlet, and the gain of energy at the outlet through the work done by the pressure perturbation. The energy transfer in the nonlinear stage is shown to be a natural extension of the linear stage with a nonlinear saturated process.

  12. Mechanical energy and power flow analysis of wheelchair use with different camber settings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueh-Chu; Guo, Lan-Yuen; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Su, Fong-Chin

    2013-04-01

    It has been suggested that minimisation of energy cost is one of the primary determinants of wheelchair designs. Wheel camber is one important parameter related to wheelchair design and its angle may affect usability during manual propulsion. However, there is little available literature addressing the effect of wheel camber on the mechanical energy or power flow involved in manual wheelchair propulsion. Twelve normal subjects (mean age, 22.3 years; SD, 1.6 years) participated in this study. A video-tracking system and an instrumented wheel were used to collect 3D kinematic and kinetic data. Wheel camber of 0° and 15° was chosen to examine the difference between mechanical power and power flow of the upper extremity during manual wheelchair propulsion. The work calculated from power flow and the discrepancy between the mechanical work and power flow work of upper extremity had significantly greater values with increased camber. The upper arm had a larger active muscle power compared with that in the forearm and hand segments. While propelling the increased camber, the magnitude of both the proximal and distal joint power and proximal muscle power was increased in all three segments. While the propelling wheel with camber not only needs a greater energy cost but also there is greater energy loss.

  13. Deterministic and stochastic algorithms for resolving the flow fields in ducts and networks using energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochi, Taha

    2016-09-01

    Several deterministic and stochastic multi-variable global optimization algorithms (Conjugate Gradient, Nelder-Mead, Quasi-Newton and global) are investigated in conjunction with energy minimization principle to resolve the pressure and volumetric flow rate fields in single ducts and networks of interconnected ducts. The algorithms are tested with seven types of fluid: Newtonian, power law, Bingham, Herschel-Bulkley, Ellis, Ree-Eyring and Casson. The results obtained from all those algorithms for all these types of fluid agree very well with the analytically derived solutions as obtained from the traditional methods which are based on the conservation principles and fluid constitutive relations. The results confirm and generalize the findings of our previous investigations that the energy minimization principle is at the heart of the flow dynamics systems. The investigation also enriches the methods of computational fluid dynamics for solving the flow fields in tubes and networks for various types of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.

  14. Collisional Scaling of the Energy Transfer in Drift-Wave Zonal Flow Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, B.; Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.

    2017-02-01

    The collisionality scaling of density and potential coupling together with zonal flow energy transfer and spectral power is investigated at the stellarator experiment TJ-K. With a poloidal probe array, consisting of 128 Langmuir probes, density and potential fluctuations are measured on four neighboring flux surfaces simultaneously over the complete poloidal circumference. By analyzing Reynolds stress and pseudo-Reynolds stress, it is found that, for increasing collisionality, the coupling between density and potential decreases which hinders the zonal flow drive. Also, as a consequence, the nonlinear energy transfer, as well as the zonal flow contribution to the complete turbulent spectrum, decreases the same way. This is in line with theoretical expectations and is a first experimental verification of the importance of collisionality for large-scale structure formation in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas.

  15. Collisional Scaling of the Energy Transfer in Drift-Wave Zonal Flow Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Schmid, B; Manz, P; Ramisch, M; Stroth, U

    2017-02-03

    The collisionality scaling of density and potential coupling together with zonal flow energy transfer and spectral power is investigated at the stellarator experiment TJ-K. With a poloidal probe array, consisting of 128 Langmuir probes, density and potential fluctuations are measured on four neighboring flux surfaces simultaneously over the complete poloidal circumference. By analyzing Reynolds stress and pseudo-Reynolds stress, it is found that, for increasing collisionality, the coupling between density and potential decreases which hinders the zonal flow drive. Also, as a consequence, the nonlinear energy transfer, as well as the zonal flow contribution to the complete turbulent spectrum, decreases the same way. This is in line with theoretical expectations and is a first experimental verification of the importance of collisionality for large-scale structure formation in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas.

  16. Catchment organisation, free energy dynamics and network control on critical zone water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, E.; Ehret, U.; Kleidon, A.; Jackisch, C.; Scherer, U.; Blume, T.

    2012-04-01

    as that these flow structures organize and dominate flows of water, dissolved matter and sediments during rainfall driven conditions at various scales: - Surface connected vertical flow structures of anecic worm burrows or soil cracks organize and dominated vertical flows at the plot scale - this is usually referred to as preferential flow; - Rill networks at the soil surface organise and dominate hillslope scale overland flow response and sediment yields; - Subsurface pipe networks at the bedrock interface organize and dominate hillslope scale lateral subsurface water and tracer flows; - The river net organizes and dominates flows of water, dissolved matter and sediments to the catchment outlet and finally across continental gradients to the sea. Fundamental progress with respect to the parameterization of hydrological models, subscale flow networks and to understand the adaptation of hydro-geo ecosystems to change could be achieved by discovering principles that govern the organization of catchments flow networks in particular at least during steady state conditions. This insight has inspired various scientists to suggest principles for organization of ecosystems, landscapes and flow networks; as Bejans constructural law, Minimum Energy Expenditure , Maximum Entropy Production. In line with these studies we suggest that a thermodynamic/energetic treatment of the catchment is might be a key for understanding the underlying principles that govern organisation of flow and transport. Our approach is to employ a) physically based hydrological model that address at least all the relevant hydrological processes in the critical zone in a coupled way, behavioural representations of the observed organisation of flow structures and textural elements, that are consistent with observations in two well investigated research catchments and have been tested against distributed observations of soil moisture and catchment scale discharge; to simulate the full concert of hydrological

  17. Materials Flows Through Industry Tool to Track Supply Chain Energy Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Alberta; Mann, Margaret; Gelman, Rachel; Lewis, John; Benson, David; Cresko, Joe; Ma, Seungwook

    2014-10-01

    In evaluating next-generation materials and processes, the supply chain can have a large impact on the life cycle energy impacts. The Materials Flow through Industry (MFI) tool was developed for the Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office to be able to evaluate the energy impacts of the U.S. supply chain. The tool allows users to perform process comparisons, material substitutions, and grid modifications, and to see the effects of implementing sector efficiency potentials (Masanet, et al. 2009). This paper reviews the methodology of the tool and provides results around specific scenarios.

  18. Explicit Runge-Kutta schemes for incompressible flow with improved energy-conservation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, F.; Coppola, G.; Rández, L.; de Luca, L.

    2017-01-01

    The application of pseudo-symplectic Runge-Kutta methods to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is discussed in this work. In contrast to fully energy-conserving, implicit methods, these are explicit schemes of order p that preserve kinetic energy to order q, with q > p. Use of explicit methods with improved energy-conservation properties is appealing for convection-dominated problems, especially in case of direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulent flows. A number of pseudo-symplectic methods are constructed for application to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and compared in terms of accuracy and efficiency by means of numerical simulations.

  19. 18 CFR 367.1840 - Account 184, Clearing accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Deferred Debits § 367.1840 Account 184, Clearing accounts. This account must include undistributed balances in clearing accounts at the date of the balance sheet... accounts. 367.1840 Section 367.1840 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...

  20. A Thermally-Regenerative Ammonia-Based Flow Battery for Electrical Energy Recovery from Waste Heat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Rahimi, Mohammad; Gorski, Christopher A; Logan, Bruce

    2016-04-21

    Large amounts of low-grade waste heat (temperatures <130 °C) are released during many industrial, geothermal, and solar-based processes. Using thermally-regenerative ammonia solutions, low-grade thermal energy can be converted to electricity in battery systems. To improve reactor efficiency, a compact, ammonia-based flow battery (AFB) was developed and tested at different solution concentrations, flow rates, cell pairs, and circuit connections. The AFB achieved a maximum power density of 45 W m(-2) (15 kW m(-3) ) and an energy density of 1260 Wh manolyte (-3) , with a thermal energy efficiency of 0.7 % (5 % relative to the Carnot efficiency). The power and energy densities of the AFB were greater than those previously reported for thermoelectrochemical and salinity-gradient technologies, and the voltage or current could be increased using stacked cells. These results demonstrated that an ammonia-based flow battery is a promising technology to convert low-grade thermal energy to electricity.

  1. Scale-to-scale energy transfer in mixing flow induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) mixing flow induced by a planar shock wave of Mach 1.6 is investigated using direct numerical simulation method. Interfacial perturbations of different scales between air and sulfur hexafluoride are introduced to study the effect of the initial conditions. Focus is placed on the analysis of the scale-to-scale transfer of kinetic energy in both Fourier and physical spaces. The kinetic energy injected from the perturbation scales is transferred to both larger and smaller scales in an average sense within the inner mixing zone (IMZ) at early times and is mainly passed down into smaller scales at the late stage. The physical-space energy flux due to the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress is studied using a filtering approach in order to shed light on the physical origin of the scale-to-scale kinetic energy transfer. It is found that the pointwise SGS energy flux is highly correlated with the local spike and bubble structures in the IMZ. Moreover, it turns out that the mean SGS energy flux is mainly ascribed to the component in the direction of shock wave propagation. An analysis using the method of conditional averaging manifests that the generation of local SGS energy flux is associated with the property of the surrounding flow induced by quadrupolar or dipolar vortex structures.

  2. International energy trade impacts on water resource crises: an embodied water flows perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. C.; Zhong, R.; Zhao, P.; Zhang, H. W.; Wang, Y.; Mao, G. Z.

    2016-07-01

    Water and energy are coupled in intimate ways (Siddiqi and Anadon 2011 Energy Policy 39 4529-40), which is amplified by international energy trade. The study shows that the total volume of energy related international embodied water flows averaged 6298 Mm3 yr-1 from 1992-2010, which represents 10% of the water used for energy production including oil, coal, gas and electricity production. This study calculates embodied water import and export status of 219 countries from 1992 to 2010 and embodied water flow changes of seven regions over time (1992/2000/2010). In addition, the embodied water net export risk-crisis index and net embodied water import benefit index are established. According to the index system, 33 countries export vast amounts of water who have a water shortage, which causes water risk and crisis related to energy trade. While 29 countries abate this risk due to their rich water resource, 45 countries import embodied water linked to energy imports. Based on the different status of countries studied, the countries were classified into six groups with different policy recommendations.

  3. Effect of Mach number on the efficiency of microwave energy deposition in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, V. A.; Karpenko, A. G.; Khoronzhuk, R. S.; Mashek, I. Ch.

    2016-05-01

    The article is devoted to experimental and numerical studies of the efficiency of microwave energy deposition into a supersonic flow around the blunt cylinder at different Mach numbers. Identical conditions for energy deposition have been kept in the experiments, thus allowing to evaluate the pure effect of varying Mach number on the pressure drop. Euler equations are solved numerically to model the corresponding unsteady flow compressed gas. The results of numerical simulations are compared to the data obtained from the physical experiments. It is shown that the momentum, which the body receives during interaction of the gas domain modified by microwave discharge with a shock layer before the body, increases almost linearly with rising of Mach number and the efficiency of energy deposition also rises.

  4. A method for analyzing the vibrational energy flow in biomolecules in solution.

    PubMed

    Soler, Miguel Angel; Bastida, Adolfo; Farag, Marwa H; Zúñiga, José; Requena, Alberto

    2011-11-28

    A method is proposed to analyze the intra- and intermolecular vibrational energy flow occurring in biomolecules in solution during relaxation processes. It is based on the assumption that the total energy exchanged between the vibrational modes is minimal and the global process is essentially statistical. This statistical minimum flow method is shown to provide very useful information about the amount and the rate at which energy is transferred between the individual vibrations of the molecule. To demonstrate the performance of the method, an application is made to the relaxation of the amide I mode of N-methylacetamide-d in aqueous D(2)O solution which yields a detailed quantitative description of the process.

  5. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  6. Coupled nonequilibrium flow, energy and radiation transport for hypersonic planetary entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, Donald Jerome

    An ever increasing demand for energy coupled with a need to mitigate climate change necessitates technology (and lifestyle) changes globally. An aspect of the needed change is a decrease in the amount of anthropogenically generated CO2 emitted to the atmosphere. The decrease needed cannot be expected to be achieved through only one source of change or technology, but rather a portfolio of solutions are needed. One possible technology is Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS), which is likely to play some role due to its combination of mature and promising emerging technologies, such as the burning of hydrogen in gas turbines created by pre-combustion CCS separation processes. Thus research on effective methods of burning turbulent hydrogen jet flames (mimicking gas turbine environments) are needed, both in terms of experimental investigation and model development. The challenge in burning (and modeling the burning of) hydrogen lies in its wide range of flammable conditions, its high diffusivity (often requiring a diluent such as nitrogen to produce a lifted turbulent jet flame), and its behavior under a wide range of pressures. In this work, numerical models are used to simulate the environment of a gas turbine combustion chamber. Concurrent experimental investigations are separately conducted using a vitiated coflow burner (which mimics the gas turbine environment) to guide the numerical work in this dissertation. A variety of models are used to simulate, and occasionally guide, the experiment. On the fundamental side, mixing and chemistry interactions motivated by a H2/N2 jet flame in a vitiated coflow are investigated using a 1-D numerical model for laminar flows and the Linear Eddy Model for turbulent flows. A radial profile of the jet in coflow can be modeled as fuel and oxidizer separated by an initial mixing width. The effects of species diffusion model, pressure, coflow composition, and turbulent mixing on the predicted autoignition delay times and mixture

  7. Integrated Photoelectrochemical Solar Energy Conversion and Organic Redox Flow Battery Devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjie; Fu, Hui-Chun; Li, Linsen; Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel; He, Jr-Hau; Jin, Song

    2016-10-10

    Building on regenerative photoelectrochemical solar cells and emerging electrochemical redox flow batteries (RFBs), more efficient, scalable, compact, and cost-effective hybrid energy conversion and storage devices could be realized. An integrated photoelectrochemical solar energy conversion and electrochemical storage device is developed by integrating regenerative silicon solar cells and 9,10-anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonic acid (AQDS)/1,2-benzoquinone-3,5-disulfonic acid (BQDS) RFBs. The device can be directly charged by solar light without external bias, and discharged like normal RFBs with an energy storage density of 1.15 Wh L(-1) and a solar-to-output electricity efficiency (SOEE) of 1.7 % over many cycles. The concept exploits a previously undeveloped design connecting two major energy technologies and promises a general approach for storing solar energy electrochemically with high theoretical storage capacity and efficiency.

  8. Regulating the Energy Flow in a Cyanobacterial Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Ido; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Harris, Dvir; Yochelis, Shira; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B; Adir, Noam; Keren, Nir; Paltiel, Yossi

    2017-02-16

    Photosynthetic organisms harvest light energy, utilizing the absorption and energy-transfer properties of protein-bound chromophores. Controlling the harvesting efficiency is critical for the optimal function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we show that the cyanobacterial light-harvesting antenna complex may be able to regulate the flow of energy to switch reversibly from efficient energy conversion to photoprotective quenching via a structural change. We isolated cyanobacterial light-harvesting proteins, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin, and measured their optical properties in solution and in an aggregated-desiccated state. The results indicate that energy band structures are changed, generating a switch between the two modes of operation, exciton transfer and quenching, achieved without dedicated carotenoid quenchers. This flexibility can contribute greatly to the large dynamic range of cyanobacterial light-harvesting systems.

  9. Accounting Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickett, Charlotte

    This curriculum guide describes the accounting curriculum in the following three areas: accounting clerk, bookkeeper, and nondegreed accountant. The competencies and tasks complement the Arizona validated listing in these areas. The guide lists 24 competencies for nondegreed accountants, 10 competencies for accounting clerks, and 11 competencies…

  10. Preliminary study of high energy density Zn/Ni flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Wang, Yan

    2015-10-01

    The escalation of power system promotes the development of energy storage technologies (ESTs). Among all of ESTs, battery technologies develop quickly and diversely because of its huge application market. Aqueous redox flow batteries (RFBs) are very attractive to customers in the energy grid system, and their noticeable technological innovations in past decades are driving them to gradually replace the conventional ESTs under certain circumstance. Here, the first fully-flow-able zinc-nickel flow battery (ZNFB) is preliminary reported in this paper, and its superior performance is supposed to be suitable for both large-scale storage need and carry-on powertrain in cars. Through using semi-solid fuel cell (SSFC) technology, we incorporates the beneficial features of Zn/Ni chemistry (essentially sustainable, eco-friendly and deposit-abundant) into RFB structure to make a "hybrid" flow battery system, which can take the advantage of both. The relationship between carbon loading and suspension conductivity is determined. Electrochemical properties of ZNFB as static test, cycling test, and fully flowing test are studied to demonstrate our design.

  11. Feedback control of transient energy growth in subcritical plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, Fulvio; Quadrio, Maurizio; McKernan, John; Whidborne, James F.

    Subcritical flows may experience large transient perturbation energy amplifications, that could trigger nonlinear mechanisms and eventually lead to transition to turbulence. In plane Poiseuille flow, controlled via wall blowing/suction with zero net mass flux, optimal and robust control theory has been recently applied to a state-space representation of the Orr-Sommerfeld-Squire equations, leading to reduced transient growth as well as increased transition thresholds. However, to date no feedback control law has been found that is capable of ensuring the closed-loop Poiseuille flow to be monotonically stable. The present paper addresses first the possibility of complete feedback suppression of the transient growth mechanism in subcritical plane Poiseuille flow when wall actuation is available, and demonstrates that closed-loop monotonic stability cannot be achieved in such a case. Secondly, a Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI) technique is employed to design controllers that directly target the energy growth mechanism. The performance of such control laws is quantified by using Direct Numerical Simulations of transitional plane Poiseuille flow, and the increase in transition thresholds due to the control action is assessed.

  12. Shared Freight Transportation and Energy Commodities Phase One: Coal, Crude Petroleum, & Natural Gas Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Davidson, Diane

    2016-07-01

    The Freight Analysis Framework (FAF) integrates data from a variety of sources to create a comprehensive picture of nationwide freight movements among states and major metropolitan areas for all modes of transportation. It provides a national picture of current freight flows to, from, and within the United States, assigns selected flows to the transportation network, and projects freight flow patterns into the future. The latest release of FAF is known as FAF4 with a base year of 2012. The FAF4 origin-destination-commodity-mode (ODCM) matrix is provided at national, state, major metropolitan areas, and major gateways with significant freight activities (e.g., El Paso, Texas). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in using FAF4 database for its strategic planning and policy analysis, particularly in association with the transportation of energy commodities. However, the geographic specification that DOE requires is a county-level ODCM matrix. Unfortunately, the geographic regions in the FAF4 database were not available at the DOE desired detail. Due to this limitation, DOE tasked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assist in generating estimates of county-level flows for selected energy commodities by mode of transportation.

  13. Exploiting stiffness nonlinearities to improve flow energy capture from the wake of a bluff body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhadidi, Ali H.; Abderrahmane, Hamid; Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2016-12-01

    Fluid-structure coupling mechanisms such as wake galloping have been recently utilized to develop scalable flow energy harvesters. Unlike traditional rotary-type generators which are known to suffer serious scalability issues because their efficiency drops significantly as their size decreases; wake-galloping flow energy harvesters (FEHs) operate using a very simple motion mechanism, and, hence can be scaled down to fit the desired application. Nevertheless, wake-galloping FEHs have their own shortcomings. Typically, a wake-galloping FEH has a linear restoring force which results in a very narrow lock-in region. As a result, it does not perform well under the broad range of shedding frequencies normally associated with a variable flow speed. To overcome this critical problem, this article demonstrates theoretically and experimentally that, a bi-stable restoring force can be used to broaden the steady-state bandwidth of wake galloping FEHs and, thereby to decrease their sensitivity to variations in the flow speed. An experimental case study is carried out in a wind tunnel to compare the performance of a bi-stable and a linear FEH under single- and multi-frequency vortex street. An experimentally-validated lumped-parameters model of the bi-stable harvester is also introduced, and solved using the method of multiple scales to study the influence of the shape of the potential energy function on the output voltage.

  14. Effects of high-energy particles on accretion flows onto a supermassive black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Takahara, Fumio; Toma, Kenji

    2014-08-20

    We study the effects of high-energy particles (HEPs) on the accretion flows onto a supermassive black hole and luminosities of escaping particles such as protons, neutrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos. We formulate a one-dimensional model of the two-component accretion flow consisting of thermal particles and HEPs, supposing that some fraction of the released energy is converted to the acceleration of HEPs. The thermal component is governed by fluid dynamics while the HEPs obey the moment equations of the diffusion-convection equation. By solving the time evolution of these equations, we obtain advection-dominated flows as the steady state solutions. The effects of the HEPs on the flow structures turn out to be small even if the pressure of the HEPs dominates over the thermal pressure. For a model in which the escaping protons take away almost all the energy released, the HEPs have a large enough influence to make the flow have a Keplerian angular velocity at the inner region. We calculate the luminosities of the escaping particles for these steady solutions. The escaping particles can extract the energy from about 10{sup −4} M-dot c{sup 2} to 10{sup −2} M-dot c{sup 2}, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate. The luminosities of the escaping particles depend on parameters such as the injection Lorentz factors, the mass accretion rates, and the diffusion coefficients. We also discuss some implications on the relativistic jet production by the escaping particles.

  15. Transient river flow into a fjord and its control of plume energy partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Callaghan, J. M.; Stevens, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    The influence of variable inflows on near-field plume dynamics and energy partitioning was examined using observations of a controlled flow into Doubtful Sound, New Zealand. The high temporal changes in flows passing through the Manapouri hydroelectric power station mimic the magnitude and variability seen in small mountainous river systems (SMRS) globally. The variable flow coupled with strong vertical density gradients akin to ambient conditions in coastal systems enabled plume behavior to be characterized for differing flow, wind, and tidal inputs in a quasi-idealized "laboratory" system. Comparisons of the frequency distributions of energy for different forcing conditions showed that baroclinic and barotropic processes were closely intertwined for transient forcing. The periodicity of density due to tidal oscillations was initially absent; headwaters of the fjord absorbed the momentum when inflows were substantially increased from the mean of ˜420 m3 s-1. From the buoyancy frequency squared N2, six events were identified when N2 was greater than 0.07 s-2. Seven occurrences of supercritical flow (Froude number, Fri > 1) and associated transitions to subcritical flow were observed over the duration of mooring deployment. Transient inflows induced internal hydraulic jumps in the near-field region which lead to a rapid breakdown of vertical stratification. The horizontal length scale of an internal hydraulic jump is O (1 km). Not all transitions from Fri > 1 to <1 are explained by transient forcing and the role of strong, up-fjord wind stress is likely to initiate supercritical flows via setup at the head of the fjord.

  16. Harvesting energy from a water flow through ionic polymer metal composites' buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellini, Filippo; Cha, Youngsu; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-03-01

    This study seeks to investigate the feasibility of energy harvesting from mechanical buckling of ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) induced by a steady fluid flow. In particular, we propose a harvesting device composed of a paddle wheel, a slider-crank mechanism, and two IPMCs clamped at both their ends. We test the system in a water tunnel to estimate the effects of the flow speed and the shunting resistance on power harvesting. The classical post-buckling theory of inextensible rods is utilized, in conjunction with a black-box model for IPMC sensing, to interpret experimental results.

  17. Energy efficiency of a concentration gradient flow battery at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Egmond, W. J.; Starke, U. K.; Saakes, M.; Buisman, C. J. N.; Hamelers, H. V. M.

    2017-02-01

    Fast growth of intermittent renewable energy generation introduces a need for large scale electricity storage. The Concentration Gradient Flow Battery (CGFB) is an emerging technology which combines Electrodialysis with Reverse Electrodialysis into a flow battery which is able to safely store very large amounts of energy in environmental friendly NaCl solutions. In this work, (dis)charge efficiency, energy density and power density are both theoretically and experimentally investigated. Fifteen constant current experiments (-47.5 to +37.5 A m-2) are performed at 40 °C and two experiments (-32.5 and 15 A m-2) at 10 and 25 °C. The magnitudes of the three main energy dissipation sources (internal resistance, water transport and co-ion transport) are measured and mitigation strategies are proposed. The effect of current density, state of charge and temperature on the dissipation sources is analysed. Water transport is shown to cause hysteresis, lower (dis)charge efficiencies and lower energy capacity. At constant current and with increasing temperature, internal resistance is reduced but unwanted water transport is increased. This study reports charge efficiencies up to 58% and discharge efficiencies up to 72%. Full charge or discharge of the battery is shown inefficient. The optimal operating range is therefore introduced and identified (concentration difference Δm > 0.5 and energy efficiency η > 0.4).

  18. Power flow as a complement to statistical energy analysis and finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Present methods of analysis of the structural response and the structure-borne transmission of vibrational energy use either finite element (FE) techniques or statistical energy analysis (SEA) methods. The FE methods are a very useful tool at low frequencies where the number of resonances involved in the analysis is rather small. On the other hand SEA methods can predict with acceptable accuracy the response and energy transmission between coupled structures at relatively high frequencies where the structural modal density is high and a statistical approach is the appropriate solution. In the mid-frequency range, a relatively large number of resonances exist which make finite element method too costly. On the other hand SEA methods can only predict an average level form. In this mid-frequency range a possible alternative is to use power flow techniques, where the input and flow of vibrational energy to excited and coupled structural components can be expressed in terms of input and transfer mobilities. This power flow technique can be extended from low to high frequencies and this can be integrated with established FE models at low frequencies and SEA models at high frequencies to form a verification of the method. This method of structural analysis using power flo and mobility methods, and its integration with SEA and FE analysis is applied to the case of two thin beams joined together at right angles.

  19. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  20. Vibrational Energy Flow Analysis Using a Substructure Approach: the Application of Receptance Theory to Fea and Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, K.; Keane, A. J.

    1997-04-01

    A method for studying the vibrational energy flows through structures based on receptance theory is presented. The structures are considered to be made up of subsystems, which may, in turn, be substructures modelled by using finite element analysis (FEA), each having been separately analyzed for its eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The method may be classified as a form of substructuring using free{puen}free interface conditions. It differs significantly from traditional substructuring in its use of matrices composed of the substructure Green functions, evaluated as summations over their uncoupled modes, to obtain the displacement contributions of the external and boundary coupling forces; also, the method can readily take into account variations in substructure damping. The proposed method can readily take into account variations in substructure damping. The proposed method additionally calculates the time averaged substructure vibrational energy levels by evaluating the balance between input and dissipated energies and the energy transfers through coupling nodes. It is therefore of particular interest when using FEA substructures to carry out statistical energy analysis (SEA) studies, since the resulting energy data can be readily applied to evaluate SEA parameters such as coupling loss factors.The formulation developed has been implemented as a computer program which uses substructure modal information from a commercial FEA package and then combines this to predict the response of the global model. Two simple examples involving two- and three-dimensional FEA models built from beam elements are presented, which show that there is good agreement between the substructure based predictions and the equivalent global models. Moreover, the method presented is computationally more efficient than using global FEA models, even when all the substructure modes are used. The method is then applied to study the SEA coupling loss factors of two further example structures: first

  1. Inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.; Parmar, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper addresses important fundamental issues of inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows through scaling analysis. In typical point-particle or two-fluid approaches, the fluid motion and convective heat transfer at the particle scale are not resolved and the momentum and energy coupling between fluid and particles are provided by proper closure models. By examining the kinetic energy transfer due to the coupling forces from the macroscale to microscale fluid motion, closure models are obtained for the contributions of the coupling forces to the energy coupling. Due to the inviscid origin of the added-mass force, its contribution to the microscale kinetic energy does not contribute to dissipative transfer to fluid internal energy as was done by the quasi-steady force. Time scale analysis shows that when the particle is larger than a critical diameter, the diffusive-unsteady kernel decays at a time scale that is smaller than the Kolmogorov time scale. As a result, the computationally costly Basset-like integral form of diffusive-unsteady heat transfer can be simplified to a non-integral form. Conventionally, the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is used to evaluate the relative importance of the unsteady heat transfer to the energy balance of the particles. Therefore, for gas-particle flows, where the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is small, unsteady heat transfer is usually ignored. However, the present scaling analysis shows that for small fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio, the importance of the unsteady heat transfer actually depends on the ratio between the particle size and the Kolmogorov scale. Furthermore, the particle mass loading multiplied by the heat capacity ratio is usually used to estimate the importance of the thermal two-way coupling effect. Through scaling argument, improved estimates are established for the energy coupling parameters of each

  2. Closed cycle MHD generator with nonuniform gas-plasma flow driving recombinated plasma clots formed by high-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, V.V.; Laptev, S.S.; Slavin, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    A new concept of a closed cycle MHD generator without alkali seed has been suggested. The essence of it is the use of the high-energy electron beams technology for a nonuniform gas-plasma flow in MHD channel creation. At the inlet of MHD channel in supersonic flow of noble gas (He) the plasma clots with a density about 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} are formed by pulsed intense electron beams with energy about 100 keV. Gas flow drives these clots in a cross magnetic field along the MHD channel which has electrodes connected with a load by Faraday`s scheme. Because the nonuniform gas-plasma flow has not the conductivity in the Hall`s EMF direction a Faraday`s current can flow only through the narrow plasma layers. The energy dissipation and Joule`s heating in MHD channel support the nonequilibrium conductivity in these plasma layers. a gas flow pushes current layers and produces electric power at the expense of enthalpy extraction. The key element is a question of plasma layers stability in MHD channel. The most dangerous instability is the overheating instability. it is shown that taking into account the phenomenon of frozen conductivity for recombinated plasma which appears for noble gas at T{sub e} > 4,000 K the regime with {partial_derivative}{sigma}/{partial_derivative}T{sub e} < 0 can be realized. Due to the fulfillment of this condition the overheating instability is effectively suppressed. The numerical simulation has shown that a supersonic gas flow, containing about 4 current layers in MHD channel simultaneously, is braked without shock waves creation. Current layers provide no less than 30% enthalpy extraction and about 80% isentropic efficiency.

  3. A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT AND FEASIBILITY EVALUATION OF NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW MEASUREMENT ALTERNATIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Kendricks A. Behring II; Eric Kelner; Ali Minachi; Cecil R. Sparks; Thomas B. Morrow; Steven J. Svedeman

    1999-01-01

    Deregulation and open access in the natural gas pipeline industry has changed the gas business environment towards greater reliance on local energy flow rate measurement. What was once a large, stable, and well-defined source of natural gas is now a composite from many small suppliers with greatly varying gas compositions. Unfortunately, the traditional approach to energy flow measurement [using a gas chromatograph (GC) for composition assay in conjunction with a flow meter] is only cost effective for large capacity supplies (typically greater than 1 to 30 million scfd). A less costly approach will encourage more widespread use of energy measurement technology. In turn, the US will benefit from tighter gas inventory control, more efficient pipeline and industrial plant operations, and ultimately lower costs to the consumer. An assessment of the state and direction of technology for natural gas energy flow rate measurement is presented. The alternative technologies were ranked according to their potential to dramatically reduce capital and operating and maintenance (O and M) costs, while improving reliability and accuracy. The top-ranked technologies take an unconventional inference approach to the energy measurement problem. Because of that approach, they will not satisfy the fundamental need for composition assay, but have great potential to reduce industry reliance on the GC. Technological feasibility of the inference approach was demonstrated through the successful development of data correlations that relate energy measurement properties (molecular weight, mass-based heating value, standard density, molar ideal gross heating value, standard volumetric heating value, density, and volume-based heating value) to three inferential properties: standard sound speed, carbon dioxide concentration, and nitrogen concentration (temperature and pressure are also required for the last two). The key advantage of this approach is that inexpensive on-line sensors may be used

  4. A chemistry and material perspective on lithium redox flow batteries towards high-density electrical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yu; Li, Yutao; Peng, Lele; Byon, Hye Ryung; Goodenough, John B; Yu, Guihua

    2015-11-21

    Electrical energy storage system such as secondary batteries is the principle power source for portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage. As an emerging battery technology, Li-redox flow batteries inherit the advantageous features of modular design of conventional redox flow batteries and high voltage and energy efficiency of Li-ion batteries, showing great promise as efficient electrical energy storage system in transportation, commercial, and residential applications. The chemistry of lithium redox flow batteries with aqueous or non-aqueous electrolyte enables widened electrochemical potential window thus may provide much greater energy density and efficiency than conventional redox flow batteries based on proton chemistry. This Review summarizes the design rationale, fundamentals and characterization of Li-redox flow batteries from a chemistry and material perspective, with particular emphasis on the new chemistries and materials. The latest advances and associated challenges/opportunities are comprehensively discussed.

  5. Flow of chemical energy in Alwar jheel of Yamuna basin near Allahabad.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Watal, Geeta

    2006-07-01

    The water quality, rate of energy transformation, chemical composition of producers and flow of chemical energy were studied in both feeding river Yamuna and Alwar jheel near Allahabad. As the river Yamuna had high value of alkalinity (210.0 mgl(-1)), conductance (518.0 micromhos), dissolved solids (260.0 mgl(-1)), hardness (162.0 mgl(-1)) and chloride (54.6 mgl(-1)) jheel also showed high values of these parameters. The rate of energy transformation from kinetic radiant energy to chemical energy was very high in the jheel 32,315 Cal m(-2) day(-1) of which 25,620 Cal m(-2) day(-1) was contributed by aquatic plants. Out of 11,764 x 10(4) Kcal ha(-1) yr(-1) total energy fixed in the system, producers stored 7,154 x 10(4) Kcal ha(-1) yr(-1) and the rest was lost as heat of respiration. The pattern of storage of energy was different in two groups of producers and thus most of the energy fixed by phytoplankton was stored as protein (56.2%) and less as carbohydrate (11.7%) while aquatic plants stored more energy as carbohydrate (40.8%) than protein (23.2%). The chemical energy obtained from the system was 1,85,000 Kcal ha(-1) yr(-1) and thus only 0.260% of the chemical energy stored by producers was harvested. The potential chemical energy resource in the jheel was 81.4 x 10(4) Kcal ha(-1) yr(-1) of which only 22.6% was harvested in the jheel and there is enough scope for further enhancement.

  6. Hydroelastic response and energy harvesting potential of flexible piezoelectric beams in viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Young, Yin Lu

    2012-05-01

    Electroactive polymers such as piezoelectric elements are able to generate electric potential differences from induced mechanical deformations. They can be used to build devices to harvest ambient energy from natural flow-induced deformations, e.g., as flapping flags subject to flowing wind or artificial seaweed subject to waves or underwater currents. The objectives of this study are to (1) investigate the transient hydroelastic response and energy harvesting potential of flexible piezoelectric beams fluttering in incompressible, viscous flow, and (2) identify critical non-dimensional parameters that govern the response of piezoelectric beams fluttering in viscous flow. The fluid-structure interaction response is simulated using an immersed boundary approach coupled with a finite volume solver for incompressible, viscous flow. The effects of large beam deformation, membrane tension, and coupled electromechanical responses are all considered. Validation studies are shown for the motion of a flexible filament in uniform flow, and for a piezoelectric beam subject to base vibration. The predicted flutter velocities and frequencies also compared well with published experimental and numerical data over a range of Reynolds numbers for varying fluid and solid combinations. The results showed that for a heavy beam in a light fluid (i.e., high βρ regime), flutter incepts at a lower critical speed with a lower reduced frequency than for a light beam in a heavy fluid (i.e., low βρ regime). In the high βρ regime, flutter develops at the second mode and is only realized when the fluid inertial forces are in balance with the solid elastic restoring forces, which leads to large amplitude oscillations and complex wake patterns; the flutter speed is practically independent of the Reynolds number (Re) and solid to fluid mass ratio (βρ), because the response is dominated by the solid inertial forces. In the low βρ regime, fluid inertial forces dominate, flutter develops at

  7. Energy harvesting through charged nanochannels using external flows of different salt concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, Sourayon; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2016-11-01

    Renewable electricity may be generated by mixing of two solutions of different salt concentrations through charged nanochannels or pores, by leveraging ion-selective effect of the nano-confinements. We numerically investigate such a continuous power generation system using reverse electrodialysis (RED) with external flows. In the simulation model, two reservoirs are connected using a nanochannel of constant surface charge density. Solutions of high and low concentrations flow through the two reservoirs at a constant velocity. We examine the effects of (salt) concentration gradients and nanochannel dimensions on the power generation. Moreover, the effect of external flow velocity on the process is analyzed. Our results show that the maximum surface charge density, open circuit voltage, channel resistance, and energy conversion efficiency of the process are significantly affected by the difference of the high and low concentrations and the nanochannel dimension ratio.

  8. Measurement of velocity and kinetic energy of turbulence in swirling flows and their numerical prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, S.; Ganesan, V.

    1986-04-01

    A method is offered for measuring turbulence levels in three directions in gas turbine combustion systems and high intensity industrial furnaces, using a hot wire anemometer. A detailed analysis of the turbulence in the flow is necessary to achieve optimum combustion conditions, and until now there has been no established method available for measuring turbulence in swirling and recirculating flows. The merit of the new method is the use of a single-wire probe rather than the X-probe. The method has been used to measure turbulence levels in swirling recirculating flows generated by vane swirlers. From the measured turbulence levels, the kinetic energy of turbulence has been calculated and the results are compared with a well-established numerical prediction method. Mean velocity measurements have also been made using a 3-hole Pitot probe. The agreement between the measured and predicted values is quite satisfactory.

  9. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 Theory Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2005-11-01

    This document presents the mathematical theory implemented in the CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator. The simulator is a three-dimensional finite element model that can be used for evaluating flow and solute mass transport. Although the theory for thermal transport is presented in this guide, it has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. The flow module is capable of simulating both confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentration of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. Mesh construction employs “collapsible”, hexahedral finite elements in a three-dimensional coordinate system. CFEST uses the Galerkin finite element method to convert the partial differential equations to algebraic form. To solve the coupled equations for momentum, solute and heat transport, either Picard or Newton-Raphson iterative schemes are used to treat nonlinearities. An upstream weighted residual finite-element method is used to solve the advective-dispersive transport and energy transfer equations, which circumvents problems of numerical oscillation problems. Matrix solutions of the flow and transport problems are performed using efficient iterative solvers available in ITPACK and PETSc, solvers that are available in the public domain. These solvers are based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient and ORTHOMIN methods for symmetric and a nonsymmetric matrices, respectively.

  10. Vertical dipole above a dielectric or metallic half space: Energy-flow considerations.

    PubMed

    Berman, P R; Zandbergen, S R; Khitrova, G

    2015-07-01

    The emission pattern from a classical dipole located above and oriented perpendicular to a metallic or dielectric half space is calculated for a dipole driven at constant amplitude. Emphasis is placed on the fields in the metal or dielectric. It is shown that the radial Poynting vector in the metal points inwards when the frequency of the dipole is below the surface plasmon resonance frequency. In this case, energy actually flows out of the interface at small radii and the power entering the metal can actually oscillate as a function of radius. The Joule heating in the metal is also calculated for a cylindrical volume in the metal. When the metal is replaced by a dielectric having permittivity less than that of the medium in which the dipole is immersed, it is found that energy flows out of the interface for sufficiently large radii, a result reminiscent of the Goos-Hänchen effect.

  11. A theoretical analysis of fluid flow and energy transport in hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faust, Charles R.; Mercer, James W.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical derivation for fluid flow and energy transport in hydrothermal systems is presented. Specifically, the mathematical model describes the three-dimensional flow of both single- and two-phase, single-component water and the transport of heat in porous media. The derivation begins with the point balance equations for mass, momentum, and energy. These equations are then averaged over a finite volume to obtain the macroscopic balance equations for a porous medium. The macroscopic equations are combined by appropriate constitutive relationships to form two similified partial differential equations posed in terms of fluid pressure and enthalpy. A two-dimensional formulation of the simplified equations is also derived by partial integration in the vertical dimension. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. Two-stage acceleration of interstellar ions driven by high-energy lepton plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, YunQian; Sheng, ZhengMing; Lu, QuanMing; Li, YuTong; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of the interaction of a high-energy lepton plasma flow with background electron-proton plasma and focus on the acceleration processes of the protons. It is found that the acceleration follows a two-stage process. In the first stage, protons are significantly accelerated transversely (perpendicular to the lepton flow) by the turbulent magnetic field "islands" generated via the strong Weibel-type instabilities. The accelerated protons shows a perfect inverse-power energy spectrum. As the interaction continues, a shockwave structure forms and the protons in front of the shockwave are reflected at twice of the shock speed, resulting in a quasi-monoenergetic peak located near 200 MeV under the simulation parameters. The presented scenario of ion acceleration may be relevant to cosmic-ray generation in some astrophysical environments.

  13. Experimental energy harvesting from fluid flow by using two vibrating masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yoshiki; Fukuda, Kengo; Shinohara, Wataru

    2017-04-01

    In this study, an experiment was performed to determine how the addition of a second degree of freedom to a vibratory system affects its energy extraction from a surrounding fluid flow. A circular cylinder was submerged underwater and subjected to flow, and another cylinder mounted on springs was inserted between the submerged cylinder and a generator. The experiment results demonstrated that vortex-induced vibration occurred at frequencies that were locked-in to the first and second natural modes for reduced velocity ranges of 5.0-9.0 and greater than 12.0, respectively. The output voltages were particularly high when the vibration frequency was locked-in to that of the second natural mode. It was found that application of energy extraction using a system with two degrees of freedom can widen the range of reduced velocity within which power extraction is effective.

  14. A high-energy-density redox flow battery based on zinc/polyhalide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Lai, Qinzhi; Zhang, Jianlu; Zhang, Huamin

    2012-05-01

    Zn and the Art of Battery Development: A zinc/polyhalide redox flow battery employs Br(-) /ClBr(2-) and Zn/Zn(2+) redox couples in its positive and negative half-cells, respectively. The performance of the battery is evaluated by charge-discharge cycling tests and reveals a high energy efficiency of 81%, based on a Coulombic efficiency of 96% and voltage efficiency of 84%. The new battery technology can provide high performance and energy density at an acceptable cost.

  15. Energy loss as the origin of a universal scaling law of the elliptic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, Carlota; Braun, Mikhail; Pajares, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    It is shown that the excellent scaling of the elliptic flow found for all centralities, species and energies from RHIC to the LHC for pT less than the saturation momentum is a consequence of the energy lost by a parton interacting with the color field produced in a nucleus-nucleus collision. In particular, the deduced shape of the scaling curve describes correctly all the data. We discuss the possible extensions to higher pT, proton-nucleus and proton-proton collisions as well as higher harmonics.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW-COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kelner; T.E. Owen; D.L. George; A. Minachi; M.G. Nored; C.J. Schwartz

    2004-03-01

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} began a multi-year project co-funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy. The project goal is to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype retrofit natural gas energy flow meter in 2000-2001 included: (1) evaluation of the inferential gas energy analysis algorithm using supplemental gas databases and anticipated worst-case gas mixtures; (2) identification and feasibility review of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen diluent content; (3) experimental performance evaluation of infrared absorption sensors for carbon dioxide diluent content; and (4) procurement of a custom ultrasonic transducer and redesign of the ultrasonic pulse reflection correlation sensor for precision speed-of-sound measurements. A prototype energy meter module containing improved carbon dioxide and speed-of-sound sensors was constructed and tested in the GRI Metering Research Facility at SwRI. Performance of this module using transmission-quality natural gas and gas containing supplemental carbon dioxide up to 9 mol% resulted in gas energy determinations well within the inferential algorithm worst-case tolerance of {+-}2.4 Btu/scf (nitrogen diluent gas measured by gas chromatograph). A two-week field test was performed at a gas-fired power plant to evaluate the inferential algorithm and the data acquisition requirements needed to adapt the prototype energy meter module to practical field site conditions.

  17. Test of Zero-point Energy Emission from Gases Flowing Through Casimir Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga; Moddel, Garret

    A recently issued patent [1] describes a method by which vacuum energy is extracted from gas flowing through a Casimir cavity. According to stochastic electrodynamics, the electronic orbitals in atoms are supported by the ambient zero-point (ZP) field. When the gas atoms are pumped into a Casimir cavity, where long-wavelength ZP field modes are excluded, the electrons spin down into lower energy orbitals and release energy in the process. This energy is collected in a local absorber. When the electrons exit the Casimir cavity they are re-energized to their original orbitals by the ambient ZP fields. The process is repeated to produce continuous power. In this way, the device functions like a heat pump for ZP energy, extracting it globally from the electromagnetic quantum vacuum and collecting it in a local absorber. This energy can be used for heating, or converted to electric power. We carried out a series of experiments to test whether energy is, in fact, radiated from Casimir cavities when the appropriate gas flows through them. The Casimir cavity devices we tested were nanopore polycarbonate membranes with submicron pores having a density of 3x108pores/cm2. Gas was pumped through the membranes in a stainless steel vacuum system, and emitted energy was measured using a broadband pyroelectric detector and lock-in amplifier. Emission in the infrared was clearly observed. We analyzed the emission from different gases and cavities to determine its origin. None of the conventional thermodynamic models we applied to our data fully explain it, leaving open the possibility that it is due to Casimir-cavity-induced emission from ZP fields.

  18. Thermomagnetic convective flows in a vertical layer of ferrocolloid: perturbation energy analysis and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Suslov, Sergey A; Bozhko, Alexandra A; Sidorov, Alexander S; Putin, Gennady F

    2012-07-01

    Flow patterns arising in a vertical differentially heated layer of nonconducting ferromagnetic fluid placed in an external uniform transverse magnetic field are studied experimentally and discussed from the point of view of the perturbation energy balance. A quantitative criterion for detecting the parametric point where the dominant role in generating a flow instability is transferred between the thermogravitational and thermomagnetic mechanisms is suggested, based on the disturbance energy balance analysis. A comprehensive experimental study of various flow patterns is undertaken, and the existence is demonstrated of oblique thermomagnetic waves theoretically predicted by Suslov [Phys. Fluids 20, 084101 (2008)] and superposed onto the stationary magnetoconvective pattern known previously. It is found that the wave number of the detected convection patterns depends sensitively on the temperature difference across the layer and on the applied magnetic field. In unsteady regimes its value varies periodically by a factor of almost 2, indicating the appearance of two different competing wave modes. The wave numbers and spatial orientation of the observed dominant flow patterns are found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  19. Measurement of the forward energy flow in pp collisions at [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    The energy flow created in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] is studied within the pseudorapidity range 1.9<η<4.9 with data collected by the LHCb experiment. The measurements are performed for inclusive minimum-bias interactions, hard scattering processes and events with an enhanced or suppressed diffractive contribution. The results are compared to predictions given by Pythia-based and cosmic-ray event generators, which provide different models of soft hadronic interactions.

  20. Rotational transformations and transverse energy flow in paraxial light beams: linear azimuthons.

    PubMed

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr; Soskin, Marat

    2006-07-15

    Paraxial beams whose transverse structure rotates upon free propagation (spiral beams) can be treated as analogs of azimuthons recently found in nonlinear media [Phys. Rev. Lett.95, 203904 (2005)]. These linear azimuthons have essentially a nonlocalized character and can possess an almost arbitrary rotation rate independent of the angular momentum of the beam. Such beams can be assimilated into fluent mechanical bodies with intrinsic mass flows determined by transverse energy redistribution over the beam cross section.

  1. B-spline image model for energy minimization-based optical flow estimation.

    PubMed

    Le Besnerais, Guy; Champagnat, Frédéric

    2006-10-01

    Robust estimation of the optical flow is addressed through a multiresolution energy minimization. It involves repeated evaluation of spatial and temporal gradients of image intensity which rely usually on bilinear interpolation and image filtering. We propose to base both computations on a single pyramidal cubic B-spline model of image intensity. We show empirically improvements in convergence speed and estimation error and validate the resulting algorithm on real test sequences.

  2. Nanofluid heat transfer under mixed convection flow in a tube for solar thermal energy applications.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Y Raja; Sharma, K V; Kamal, Subhash

    2016-05-01

    The solar flat plate collector operating under different convective modes has low efficiency for energy conversion. The energy absorbed by the working fluid in the collector system and its heat transfer characteristics vary with solar insolation and mass flow rate. The performance of the system is improved by reducing the losses from the collector. Various passive methods have been devised to aid energy absorption by the working fluid. Also, working fluids are modified using nanoparticles to improve the thermal properties of the fluid. In the present work, simulation and experimental studies are undertaken for pipe flow at constant heat flux boundary condition in the mixed convection mode. The working fluid at low Reynolds number in the mixed laminar flow range is undertaken with water in thermosyphon mode for different inclination angles of the tube. Local and average coefficients are determined experimentally and compared with theoretical values for water-based Al2O3 nanofluids. The results show an enhancement in heat transfer in the experimental range with Rayleigh number at higher inclinations of the collector tube for water and nanofluids.

  3. Harvesting Energy from Salinity Differences Using Battery Electrodes in a Concentration Flow Cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Rahimi, Mohammad; Logan, Bruce E; Gorski, Christopher A

    2016-09-06

    Salinity-gradient energy (SGE) technologies produce carbon-neutral and renewable electricity from salinity differences between seawater and freshwater. Capacitive mixing (CapMix) is a promising class of SGE technologies that captures energy using capacitive or battery electrodes, but CapMix devices have produced relatively low power densities and often require expensive materials. Here, we combined existing CapMix approaches to develop a concentration flow cell that can overcome these limitations. In this system, two identical battery (i.e., faradaic) electrodes composed of copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF) were simultaneously exposed to either high (0.513 M) or low (0.017 M) concentration NaCl solutions in channels separated by a filtration membrane. The average power density produced was 411 ± 14 mW m(-2) (normalized to membrane area), which was twice as high as previously reported values for CapMix devices. Power production was continuous (i.e., it did not require a charging period and did not vary during each step of a cycle) and was stable for 20 cycles of switching the solutions in each channel. The concentration flow cell only used inexpensive materials and did not require ion-selective membranes or precious metals. The results demonstrate that the concentration flow cell is a promising approach for efficiently harvesting energy from salinity differences.

  4. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-17

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  5. A PCM/forced convection conjugate transient analysis of energy storage systems with annular and countercurrent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Y.; Faghri, A.; Juhasz, A.

    1991-01-01

    Latent heat energy storage systems with both annular and countercurrent flows are modeled numerically. The change of phase of the phase-change material (PCM) and the transient forced convective heat transfer for the transfer fluid are solved simultaneously as a conjugate problem. A parametric study and a system optimization are conducted. It is found that the energy storage system with the countercurrent flow is an efficient way to absorb heat energy in a short period for pulsed power load space applications.

  6. The formation of reverse shocks in magnetized high energy density supersonic plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: l.suttle10@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Swadling, G. F.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Grouchy, P. de; Hall, G. N.; Hare, J. D.; Kalmoni, N.; Niasse, N.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Burgess, D.; Clemens, A.; Ciardi, A.; Sheng, L.; Yuan, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    A new experimental platform was developed, based on the use of supersonic plasma flow from the ablation stage of an inverse wire array z-pinch, for studies of shocks in magnetized high energy density physics plasmas in a well-defined and diagnosable 1-D interaction geometry. The mechanism of flow generation ensures that the plasma flow (Re{sub M} ∼ 50, M{sub S} ∼ 5, M{sub A} ∼ 8, V{sub flow} ≈ 100 km/s) has a frozen-in magnetic field at a level sufficient to affect shocks formed by its interaction with obstacles. It is found that in addition to the expected accumulation of stagnated plasma in a thin layer at the surface of a planar obstacle, the presence of the magnetic field leads to the formation of an additional detached density jump in the upstream plasma, at a distance of ∼c/ω{sub pi} from the obstacle. Analysis of the data obtained with Thomson scattering, interferometry, and local magnetic probes suggests that the sub-shock develops due to the pile-up of the magnetic flux advected by the plasma flow.

  7. Shrub morpho-types as indicator for the water flow energy - Tivoli travertine case (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erthal, Marcelle Marques; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Mancini, Alessandro; Claes, Hannes; Soete, Jeroen; Swennen, Rudy

    2017-01-01

    Travertines from Tivoli area (Central Italy) possess abundant shrub-like fabrics that are laterally continuous over hundreds of square meters. They occur dominantly in horizontal layers with aggradational and progradational stacking patterns. Their fabrics and morphologies are remarkably similar to the shrubs lithotypes reported in literature for the Pre-Salt reservoirs, offshore Brazil and Angola, with huge oil accumulations. Petrographic and micro-computer tomography analyses allowed the identification of six shrub morpho-types (i.e., narrow dendriform, wide dendriform, fili dendriform, arborescent, arbustiform and pustular). Dendriform shrubs are the most common lithotype in Tivoli area, and three different subtypes could be distinguished according to the arrangement of their branches. The shrubs consist largely of peloidal micritic aggregates engulfed in spar calcite, ranging in average from 1 to 3 cm in height. The shrubs are interpreted to have developed in very shallow extensive waterlogged slightly inclined flat areas, changing laterally into a slope system with crusts as the main lithotype. Changes in the hydrodynamic conditions with episodes of stagnancy influenced the shrub morpho-types making them very variegated. Shrub morphologies likely reflect specific (micro-) environments that are controlled by water flow rates, evaporation and microbial activity. The latter processes influenced shrub fabric and morphology. Under high flow conditions, CO2 degassing is the main process leading to carbonate precipitation. Consequently, denser and tightly packed morphologies will precipitate, composing mainly the crust lithotype. In this scenario microbes are less dominant. Dendriform shrubs, with narrow, wide and fili morphologies are interpreted to occur in moderate to low energy water flows. Narrow dendriform shrubs reflect faster flowing conditions, with decreasing impact of flow on the morphological aspects from wide dendriform shrubs to fili dendriform shrubs

  8. Observations of subsonic and supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.

    2009-11-01

    Shear layers containing strong velocity gradients appear in many high-energy-density (HED) systems and play important roles in mixing and the transition to turbulence. Yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their detailed evolution in this extreme environment where plasmas are compressible, actively ionizing, often involve strong shock waves and have complex material properties. Many shear flows produce the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability, which initiates the mixing at a fluid interface. We present results from two dedicated shear flow experiments that produced overall subsonic and supersonic flows using novel target designs. In the subsonic case, the Omega laser was used to drive a blast wave along a rippled interface between plastic and foam, shocking both the materials to produce two fluids separated by a sharp shear layer. The interface subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices that were accompanied by bubble-like structures of unknown origin. This was the first time the evolution of a well-resolved KH instability was observed in a HED plasma in the laboratory. We have analyzed the properties and dynamics of the plasma based on the data and fundamental models, without resorting to simulated values. In the second, supersonic experiment the Nike laser was used to drive a supersonic flow of Al plasma along a rippled, low-density foam surface. Here again the flowing plasma drove a shock into the second material, so that two fluids were separated by a shear layer. In contrast to the subsonic case, the flow developed shocks around the ripples in response to the supersonic flow of Al. Collaborators: R.P. Drake, O.A. Hurricane, J.F. Hansen, Y. Aglitskiy, T. Plewa, B.A. Remington, H.F. Robey, J.L. Weaver, A.L. Velikovich, R.S. Gillespie, M.J. Bono, M.J. Grosskopf, C.C. Kuranz, A. Visco.

  9. A generation-attraction model for renewable energy flows in Italy: A complex network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valori, Luca; Giannuzzi, Giovanni Luca; Facchini, Angelo; Squartini, Tiziano; Garlaschelli, Diego; Basosi, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, in Italy, the trend of the electricity demand and the need to connect a large number of renewable energy power generators to the power-grid, developed a novel type of energy transmission/distribution infrastructure. The Italian Transmission System Operator (TSO) and the Distribution System Operator (DSO), worked on a new infrastructural model, based on electronic meters and information technology. In pursuing this objective it is crucial importance to understand how even more larger shares of renewable energy can be fully integrated, providing a constant and reliable energy background over space and time. This is particularly true for intermittent sources as photovoltaic installations due to the fine-grained distribution of them across the Country. In this work we use an over-simplified model to characterize the Italian power grid as a graph whose nodes are Italian municipalities and the edges cross the administrative boundaries between a selected municipality and its first neighbours, following a Delaunay triangulation. Our aim is to describe the power flow as a diffusion process over a network, and using open data on the solar irradiation at the ground level, we estimate the production of photovoltaic energy in each node. An attraction index was also defined using demographic data, in accordance with average per capita energy consumption data. The available energy on each node was calculated by finding the stationary state of a generation-attraction model.

  10. Quality evaluation of energy consumed in flow regulation method by speed variation in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, S.; Culman, M.; Acevedo, C.; Rey, C.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, energy efficiency and the Electric Power Quality are two inseparable issues in the evaluation of three-phase induction motors, framed within the program of Rational and Efficient Use of Energy (RUE).The use of efficient energy saving devices has been increasing significantly in RUE programs, for example the use of variable frequency drives (VFD) in pumping systems.The overall objective of the project was to evaluate the impact on power quality and energy efficiency in a centrifugal pump driven by an induction three-phase motor, using the flow control method of speed variation by VFD. The fundamental purpose was to test the opinions continuously heard about the use of flow control methods in centrifugal pumps, analyzing the advantages and disadvantages that have been formulated deliberately in order to offer support to the industry in taking correct decisions. The VFD changes the speed of the motor-pump system increasing efficiency compared to the classical methods of regulation. However, the VFD originates conditions that degrade the quality of the electric power supplied to the system and therefore its efficiency, due to the nonlinearity and presence of harmonic currents. It was possible to analyze the power quality, ensuring that the information that comes to the industry is generally biased.

  11. Reaction mechanism and reaction coordinates from the viewpoint of energy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao

    2016-03-01

    Reaction coordinates are of central importance for correct understanding of reaction dynamics in complex systems, but their counter-intuitive nature made it a daunting challenge to identify them. Starting from an energetic view of a reaction process as stochastic energy flows biased towards preferred channels, which we deemed the reaction coordinates, we developed a rigorous scheme for decomposing energy changes of a system, both potential and kinetic, into pairwise components. The pairwise energy flows between different coordinates provide a concrete statistical mechanical language for depicting reaction mechanisms. Application of this scheme to the C7eq → C7ax transition of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum revealed novel and intriguing mechanisms that eluded previous investigations of this well studied prototype system for biomolecular conformational dynamics. Using a cost function developed from the energy decomposition components by proper averaging over the transition path ensemble, we were able to identify signatures of the reaction coordinates of this system without requiring any input from human intuition.

  12. State-to-State Mode Specificity: Energy Sequestration and Flow Gated by Transition State.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2015-12-23

    Energy flow and sequestration at the state-to-state level are investigated for a prototypical four-atom reaction, H2 + OH → H + H2O, using a transition-state wave packet (TSWP) method. The product state distribution is found to depend strongly on the reactant vibrational excitation, indicating mode specificity at the state-to-state level. From a local-mode perspective, it is shown that the vibrational excitation of the H2O product derives from two different sources, one attributable to the energy flow along the reaction coordinate into the newly formed OH bond and the other due to the sequestration of the vibrational energy in the OH spectator moiety during the reaction. The analysis provided a unified interpretation of some seemingly contradicting experimental observations. It is further shown that the transfer of vibrational energy from the OH reactant to H2O product is gated by the transition state, accomplished coherently by multiple TSWPs with the corresponding OH vibrational excitation.

  13. Management of old landfills by utilizing forest and energy industry waste flows.

    PubMed

    Niutanen, Ville; Korhonen, Jouni

    2002-05-01

    The lack of landfill capacity, forthcoming EU waste disposal and landfill management legislation and the use of non-renewable and energy intensive natural resources for the end-treatment of old landfills increase pressures to develop new landfill management methods. This paper considers a method for the end-management of old landfills in Finland, which is based on the utilization of forest and paper industry waste flows, wastes from paper recycling (de-inking) and wastes from forest industry energy production. Fibre clay wastes from paper mills, de-inking sludges from de-inking of recovered waste paper and incineration ash from forest industry power plants serve to substitute the use of natural clay for the building of landfill structures for closed landfills. Arguably, this method is preferable to existing practices of natural clay use for landfill building, because it (1) substitutes non-renewable natural clay, (2) consumes less energy and generates less CO2 emissions than the use of natural clay, and (3) eliminates considerable amounts of wastes from paper production, paper consumption and from forest industry energy production. Some difficulties in the application of the method are considered and the waste flow utilization is incorporated into a local forest industry recycling network.

  14. Reaction mechanism and reaction coordinates from the viewpoint of energy flow

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reaction coordinates are of central importance for correct understanding of reaction dynamics in complex systems, but their counter-intuitive nature made it a daunting challenge to identify them. Starting from an energetic view of a reaction process as stochastic energy flows biased towards preferred channels, which we deemed the reaction coordinates, we developed a rigorous scheme for decomposing energy changes of a system, both potential and kinetic, into pairwise components. The pairwise energy flows between different coordinates provide a concrete statistical mechanical language for depicting reaction mechanisms. Application of this scheme to the C7eq → C7ax transition of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum revealed novel and intriguing mechanisms that eluded previous investigations of this well studied prototype system for biomolecular conformational dynamics. Using a cost function developed from the energy decomposition components by proper averaging over the transition path ensemble, we were able to identify signatures of the reaction coordinates of this system without requiring any input from human intuition. PMID:27004858

  15. A low-cost iron-cadmium redox flow battery for large-scale energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhou, X. L.; Wei, L.; Jiang, H. R.

    2016-10-01

    The redox flow battery (RFB) is one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies that offer a potential solution to the intermittency of renewable sources such as wind and solar. The prerequisite for widespread utilization of RFBs is low capital cost. In this work, an iron-cadmium redox flow battery (Fe/Cd RFB) with a premixed iron and cadmium solution is developed and tested. It is demonstrated that the coulombic efficiency and energy efficiency of the Fe/Cd RFB reach 98.7% and 80.2% at 120 mA cm-2, respectively. The Fe/Cd RFB exhibits stable efficiencies with capacity retention of 99.87% per cycle during the cycle test. Moreover, the Fe/Cd RFB is estimated to have a low capital cost of 108 kWh-1 for 8-h energy storage. Intrinsically low-cost active materials, high cell performance and excellent capacity retention equip the Fe/Cd RFB to be a promising solution for large-scale energy storage systems.

  16. Optimal mixing and optimal stirring for fixed energy, fixed power, or fixed palenstrophy flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunasin, Evelyn; Lin, Zhi; Novikov, Alexei; Mazzucato, Anna; Doering, Charles R.

    2012-11-01

    We consider passive scalar mixing by a prescribed divergence-free velocity vector field in a periodic box and address the following question: Starting from a given initial inhomogeneous distribution of passive tracers, and given a certain energy budget, power budget, or finite palenstrophy budget, what incompressible flow field best mixes the scalar quantity? We focus on the optimal stirring strategy recently proposed by Lin et al. ["Optimal stirring strategies for passive scalar mixing," J. Fluid Mech. 675, 465 (2011)], 10.1017/S0022112011000292 that determines the flow field that instantaneously maximizes the depletion of the H-1 mix-norm. In this work, we bridge some of the gap between the best available a priori analysis and simulation results. After recalling some previous analysis, we present an explicit example demonstrating finite-time perfect mixing with a finite energy constraint on the stirring flow. On the other hand, using a recent result by Wirosoetisno et al. ["Long time stability of a classical efficient scheme for two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations," SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 50(1), 126-150 (2012)], 10.1137/110834901 we establish that the H-1 mix-norm decays at most exponentially in time if the two-dimensional incompressible flow is constrained to have constant palenstrophy. Finite-time perfect mixing is thus ruled out when too much cost is incurred by small scale structures in the stirring. Direct numerical simulations in two dimensions suggest the impossibility of finite-time perfect mixing for flows with fixed power constraint and we conjecture an exponential lower bound on the H-1 mix-norm in this case. We also discuss some related problems from other areas of analysis that are similarly suggestive of an exponential lower bound for the H-1 mix-norm.

  17. A novel method for analyzing seismic energy loss associated with wave-induced fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solazzi, Santiago G.; Germán Rubino, J.; Müller, Tobias M.; Milani, Marco; Guarracino, Luis; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Whenever a seismic wave propagates through a fluid saturated porous rock that contains heterogeneities in the mesoscopic scale, that is, heterogeneities larger than the typical pore size but smaller than the predominant wavelengths, local gradients in the pore-fluid pressure arise. These pressure gradients, which are due to the uneven response of the heterogeneities to the stress applied by the passing seismic wavefield, induce viscous fluid flow and energy dissipation. Consequently, seismic waves tend to be strongly attenuated and dispersed in this kind of media. This attenuation mechanism scales with the compressibility contrast between heterogeneities and the background. Correspondingly, environments characterized by patchy saturation as well as fractured media represent two prominent scenarios where seismic attenuation due to wave-induced fluid flow is expected to be the predominant energy dissipation mechanism. Numerical oscillatory compressibility and shear tests based on the quasistatic poroelasticity equations provide an effective means to compute equivalent viscoelastic moduli for representative rock samples of the heterogeneous media under study. Approaches of this type rely on the existence of a dynamic-equivalent medium, that is, the heterogeneous porous rock is represented by an equivalent homogeneous viscoelastic solid that exhibits an overall response similar to that of the original heterogeneous porous sample. This methodology allows for extracting the equivalent seismic attenuation and phase velocity of the sample, but fails to provide any information with regard to the underlying physical processes. In this work, we present a novel approach based on the quantification of the energy loss taking place in the interior of the considered heterogeneous rock sample. To this end, we first determine the spatial distribution of the energy dissipation in response to the applied oscillatory stresses. Next, we quantify the total dissipated energy as well as

  18. Zonal flow energy ratio evolution during L-H and H-L transitions in EAST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailin, ZHAO; Tao, LAN; Adi, LIU; Defeng, KONG; Huagang, SHEN; Jie, WU; Wandong, LIU; Changxuan, YU; Wei, ZHANG; Guosheng, XU; Baonian, WAN

    2017-03-01

    The essential role of zonal flow in the L-H transition and the suppression of turbulence have been studied with a long range correlation technique using Langmuir probe arrays in EAST tokamak. Two toroidally localized probe arrays are used to measure the zonal flow during L-H transition and H-L back transition. The energy ratio of the low frequency zonal flow to the total drift wave turbulence is calculated. During ELM-free H mode, the energy ratio is higher than that in L mode, which reveals the important role of zonal flows in regulating turbulence amplitude in L-H transition.

  19. Measurement of forward energy flow at 13 TeV with the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerci, Salim

    2017-02-01

    The measurement of the energy flow is performed with the forward (HF: 3.15 < |η| < 5.2) and very-forward (CASTOR: -6.6 < η < -5.2) calorimeters of CMS at the centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data were taken during the several periods of low luminosity operation in 2015. The results are compared to Monte Carlo (MC) model predictions as well as the earlier proton-proton data taken at √{s }=0.9 TeV and 7 TeV. Furthermore, the beam fragmentation which provides valuable input for tuning of MC models used to describe high energy hadronic interactions is also studied at the regions close to the beam rapidities.

  20. Flow at Brookhaven AGS Energy (11.6 GeV/nucleon): A barometer for high density effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, D.E.; Shuryak, E.; Pang, Y.; Pang, Y.

    1997-07-01

    Preliminary data on transverse energy {open_quotes}flow{close_quotes} and event asymmetries reported by the E877(814) Collaborations are compared to ARC (a relativistic cascade) model calculations for Au+Au at full AGS Brookhaven (Alternating Gradient Synchroton) beam energy. ARC triple differential cross sections for protons and pions are presented. Proton flow is produced in ARC, with the maximum {l_angle}P{sub x}{r_angle}{approximately}120 MeV/c. For central events {l_angle}P{sub x}{r_angle} for the pions is near zero, consistent with experiment. The comparison with data provides a constraint on the size of flow at the highest energy available, to be put beside that at Bevalac energy. This sets the stage for examining flow at intermediate energies, now being measured by E895, for signs of baryon rich plasma. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Dynamo dominated accretion and energy flow: The mechanism of active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Li, H.

    1998-12-31

    An explanation of the magnetic fields of the universe, the central mass concentration of galaxies, the massive black hole of every galaxy, and the AGN phenomena has been an elusive goal. The authors suggest here the outlines of such a theoretical understanding and point out where the physical understanding is missing. They believe there is an imperative to the sequence of mass flow and hence energy flow in the collapse of a galactic mass starting from the first non-linearity appearing in structure formation following decoupling. This first non-linearity of a two to one density fluctuation, the Lyman-{alpha} clouds, ultimately leads to the emission spectra of the phenomenon of AGN, quasars, blazars, etc. The over-arching physical principle is the various mechanisms for the transport of angular momentum. They believe they have now understood the new physics of two of these mechanisms that have previously been illusive and as a consequence they impose strong constraints on the initial conditions of the mechanisms for the subsequent emission of the gravitational binding energy. The new phenomena described are: (1) the Rossby vortex mechanism of the accretion disk {alpha}-viscosity, and (2) the mechanism of the {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo in the accretion disk. The Rossby vortex mechanism leads to a prediction of the black hole mass and rate of energy release and the {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo leads to the generation of the magnetic flux of the galaxy (and the far greater magnetic flux of clusters) and separately explains the primary flux of energy emission as force-free magnetic energy density. This magnetic flux and magnetic energy density separately are the necessary consequence of the saturation of a dynamo created by the accretion disk with a gain greater than unity.

  2. Analysis of the flow field into a two stages and double entry storage pump taking into account two geometries of stator blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunca, G.; Muntean, S.; Isbasoiu, E. C.

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents the 3D numerical analysis of the flow into a hydraulic passage of the two stages and double entry storage pump. One of the reasons for choosing this machinery was that, even from the beginning of its operation, high levels of noise and vibration were recorded. According to the literature, these can be considered as effects of the impeller-stator phenomenon. After only 100 hours of operation, the pump' first stator blades was bend and the second stator blades was broken. As a rehabilitation solution, 100 mm of the chord were cut from the stator blades, near the leading edge. After the rehabilitation, a decrease of the noise and vibration levels during pump operation was observed. In order to analyse the pump behaviour, three measurements campaigns were conducted, after the rehabilitation. Yet, the experimental results were not very conclusive. A more detailed experimental analysis on a real turbo machine is very difficult and expensive. Thus, in order to obtain more detailed information regarding the impeller-stator phenomenon inside the analysed pump, a numerical analysis was realized. The impeller-stator (between the first impeller and first stator as well as between second impeller and second stator) and stator-impeller (between the first stator and second impeller) interactions are taken into account with mixing interface method. The hydrodynamic field from the inlet to the outlet is obtained. As a result, the pressure rise and hydraulic efficiency are computed at best efficiency point. These values are validated against experimental data measured into the storage pump. Comparing the numerical results obtained for the two geometries of the stators, it can be seen that they have different behaviour during the pump's operation. It can be considered that, although the same geometry modification was realized for both the stators, the effects on the flow parameters are different, only for the second stator being possible to observe a net

  3. Thermal conduction tensor imaging and energy flow analysis of brain: a feasibility study using MRI.

    PubMed

    Khundrakpam, Budhachandra S; Shukla, Vinay K; Roy, Prasun K

    2010-10-01

    The imaging of the distribution of thermal conductivity tensor at various points in a tissue is an essential need when accurate knowledge of heat energy flow in tissue is required for diagnostic and therapeutic management in oncology, neurology, and interventional radiology. Conventionally, tissue thermal conductivity is assumed as scalar, which induces errors in obtaining proper heat flow distribution. Using statistical thermodynamics principles, we present a method for constructing thermal conductivity tensor image of a tissue or an organ, using an MRI scanner. We elucidate the necessary tensorial cross-property relationship between different transport processes and confirm the same by experimental data. Using the proposed method, we perform a preliminary study of the procedure of thermal conductivity tensor imaging of the human brain as a case study. The methodology is quantitatively elucidated by measurement of tissue anisotropy distribution, tensor eigenvalues, and path tracking, along with three illustrative examples showing that transport properties estimated by the proposed thermal conductivity approach closely corroborates, with over 90% accuracy, to the experimentally measured values of the transport parameters which have been independently experimentally measured directly. By combining diffusion and perfusion tensor imaging approaches using mobility-encoding and spin-labelling methodologies respectively, we delineate the possible applications of this novel imaging modality to clinical problems of energy flow mapping involving biological heat transfer equations, such as planning of hyperthermic treatment to brain tumors, and electrode localization for deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

  4. Nonlinear stochastic controllers for power-flow-constrained vibratory energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Ian L.; Scruggs, Jeffrey T.

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses the formulation of nonlinear feedback controllers for stochastically excited vibratory energy harvesters. Maximizing the average power generated from such systems requires the transducer current to be regulated using a bi-directional power electronic converter. There are many applications where the implementation of these types of converters is infeasible, due to the higher parasitic losses they must sustain. If instead the transducer current is regulated using a converter capable of single-directional power-flow, then these parasitic losses can be reduced significantly. However, the constraint on the power-flow directionality restricts the domain of feasible feedback laws. The only feasible linear feedback law imposes a static relationship between current and voltage, i.e., a static admittance. In stochastic response, the power generation performance can be enhanced significantly beyond that of the optimal static admittance, using nonlinear feedback. In this paper, a general approach to nonlinear control synthesis for power-flow-constrained energy harvesters is presented, which is analytically guaranteed to outperform the optimal static admittance in stationary stochastic response. Simulation results are presented for a single-degree-of-freedom resonant oscillator with an electromagnetic transducer, as well as for a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam.

  5. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor.

  6. Common patterns of energy flow and biomass distribution on weighted food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiang; Feng, Yuanjing

    2014-07-01

    Weights of edges and nodes on food webs which are available from the empirical data hide much information about energy flows and biomass distributions in ecosystem. We define a set of variables related to weights for each species i, including the throughflow Ti, the total biomass Xi, and the dissipated flow Di (output to the environment) to uncover the following common patterns in 19 empirical weighted food webs: (1) DGBD distributions (Discrete version of a Generalized Beta Distribution), a kind of deformed Zipf's law, of energy flow and storage biomass; (2) The allometric scaling law Ti∝Xiα, which can be viewed as the counterpart of the Kleiber's 3/4 law at the population level; (3) The dissipation law Di∝Tiβ; and (4) The gravity law, including univariate version f∝( and bivariate approvement f∝Tiγ1Tjγ2. These patterns are very common and significant in all collected webs, as a result, some remarkable regularities are hidden in weights.

  7. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging air-flow energy to sustainably power temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Shuhua; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator with dimensions of 6.7 cm × 4.5 cm × 2 cm and a weight of 42.3 g that consists of two triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and two electromagnetic generators (EMGs) for scavenging air-flow energy. Under an air-flow speed of about 18 m/s, the hybridized nanogenerator can deliver largest output powers of 3.5 mW for one TENG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 8.8 mW/g and 14.6 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 3 MΩ and 1.8 mW for one EMG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 0.3 mW/g and 0.4 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 2 kΩ, respectively. The hybridized nanogenerator can be utilized to charge a capacitor of 3300 μF to sustainably power four temperature sensors for realizing self-powered temperature sensor networks. Moreover, a wireless temperature sensor driven by a hybridized nanogenerator charged Li-ion battery can work well to send the temperature data to a receiver/computer at a distance of 1.5 m. This work takes a significant step toward air-flow energy harvesting and its potential applications in self-powered wireless sensor networks.

  8. Randomly Accountable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Thomas J.; Staiger, Douglas O.; Geppert, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    The accountability debate tends to devolve into a battle between the pro-testing and anti-testing crowds. When it comes to the design of a school accountability system, the devil is truly in the details. A well-designed accountability plan may go a long way toward giving school personnel the kinds of signals they need to improve performance.…

  9. Dark energy in six nearby galaxy flows: Synthetic phase diagrams and self-similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Kanter, A. A.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Valtonen, M. J.; Byrd, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    Outward flows of galaxies are observed around groups of galaxies on spatial scales of about 1 Mpc, and around galaxy clusters on scales of 10 Mpc. Using recent data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have constructed two synthetic velocity-distance phase diagrams: one for four flows on galaxy-group scales and the other for two flows on cluster scales. It has been shown that, in both cases, the antigravity produced by the cosmic dark-energy background is stronger than the gravity produced by the matter in the outflow volume. The antigravity accelerates the flows and introduces a phase attractor that is common to all scales, corresponding to a linear velocity-distance relation (the local Hubble law). As a result, the bundle of outflow trajectories mostly follow the trajectory of the attractor. A comparison of the two diagrams reveals the universal self-similar nature of the outflows: their gross phase structure in dimensionless variables is essentially independent of their physical spatial scales, which differ by approximately a factor of 10 in the two diagrams.

  10. An experimental comparison of min-cut/max-flow algorithms for energy minimization in vision.

    PubMed

    Boykov, Yuri; Kolmogorov, Vladimir

    2004-09-01

    After [15], [31], [19], [8], [25], [5], minimum cut/maximum flow algorithms on graphs emerged as an increasingly useful tool for exact or approximate energy minimization in low-level vision. The combinatorial optimization literature provides many min-cut/max-flow algorithms with different polynomial time complexity. Their practical efficiency, however, has to date been studied mainly outside the scope of computer vision. The goal of this paper is to provide an experimental comparison of the efficiency of min-cut/max flow algorithms for applications in vision. We compare the running times of several standard algorithms, as well as a new algorithm that we have recently developed. The algorithms we study include both Goldberg-Tarjan style "push-relabel" methods and algorithms based on Ford-Fulkerson style "augmenting paths." We benchmark these algorithms on a number of typical graphs in the contexts of image restoration, stereo, and segmentation. In many cases, our new algorithm works several times faster than any of the other methods, making near real-time performance possible. An implementation of our max-flow/min-cut algorithm is available upon request for research purposes.

  11. High Performance Hydrogen/Bromine Redox Flow Battery for Grid-Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, KT; Ridgway, P; Weber, AZ; Haussener, S; Battaglia, V; Srinivasan, V

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of a promising hydrogen/bromine redox flow battery is investigated for grid-scale energy-storage application with some of the best redox-flow-battery performance results to date, including a peak power of 1.4 W/cm(2) and a 91% voltaic efficiency at 0.4 W/cm(2) constant-power operation. The kinetics of bromine on various materials is discussed, with both rotating-disk-electrode and cell studies demonstrating that a carbon porous electrode for the bromine reaction can conduct platinum-comparable performance as long as sufficient surface area is realized. The effect of flow-cell designs and operating temperature is examined, and ohmic and mass-transfer losses are decreased by utilizing a flow-through electrode design and increasing cell temperature. Charge/discharge and discharge-rate tests also reveal that this system has highly reversible behavior and good rate capability. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.018211jes] All rights reserved.

  12. Water flow and energy balance for a tropical dry semideciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, J. L.; Garruña-Hernandez, R.; Leon-Palomo, M.; Us-Santamaria, R.; Sima, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    Tropical forests cool down locally because increase water evaporation from the soil to the atmosphere, reduce albedo and help forming clouds that reflect solar radiation back to the atmosphere; this, aligned to the carbon catchment, increase forests value. We will present an estimation of the sap flow and energy balance for the tropical dry semideciduous forest at Kiuic, Yucatan, Mexico during a year. We use a meteorological tower equipped with a rain gauge, temperature and relative humidity, heat flow plates, thermocouples and volumetric soil water content. We recorded net radiation and soil heat flux and estimated sensible heat and latent heat. Besides, we estimated latent heat by measuring sap flow directly in tres using disispation constant heat probes during the rainy season. Results show the influence of the seasonality on net radiation, air temperatura and vapor pressure deficit, because during the dry season his variables were higher and with more duation than during the rainy and early dry season. Sap flow was different for trees belonging to the family Fabaceae compared to trees from other families.

  13. Energy flow in the cryptophyte PE545 antenna is directed by bilin pigment conformation.

    PubMed

    Curutchet, Carles; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Kongsted, Jacob; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; van Grondelle, Rienk; Scholes, Gregory D; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2013-04-25

    Structure-based calculations are combined with quantitative modeling of spectra and energy transfer dynamics to detemine the energy transfer scheme of the PE545 principal light-harvesting antenna of the cryptomonad Rhodomonas CS24. We use a recently developed quantum-mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method that allows us to account for pigment-protein interactions at atomic detail in site energies, transition dipole moments, and electronic couplings. In addition, conformational flexibility of the pigment-protein complex is accounted for through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that conformational disorder largely smoothes the large energetic differences predicted from the crystal structure between the pseudosymmetric pairs PEB50/61C-PEB50/61D and PEB82C-PEB82D. Moreover, we find that, in contrast to chlorophyll-based photosynthetic complexes, pigment composition and conformation play a major role in defining the energy ladder in the PE545 complex, rather than specific pigment-protein interactions. This is explained by the remarkable conformational flexibility of the eight bilin pigments in PE545, characterized by a quasi-linear arrangement of four pyrrole units. The MD-QM/MM site energies allow us to reproduce the main features of the spectra, and minor adjustments of the energies of the three red-most pigments DBV19A, DBV19B, and PEB82D allow us to model the spectra of PE545 with a similar quality compared to our original model (model E from Novoderezhkin et al. Biophys. J.2010, 99, 344), which was extracted from the spectral and kinetic fit. Moreover, the fit of the transient absorption kinetics is even better in the new structure-based model. The largest difference between our previous and present results is that the MD-QM/MM calculations predict a much smaller gap between the PEB50/61C and PEB50/61D sites, in better accord with chemical intuition. We conclude that the current adjusted MD-QM/MM energies are more reliable in order to explore the

  14. Tracking the Energy Flow on Nanoscale via Sample-Transmitted Excitation Photoluminescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Pavel; Razgoniaeva, Natalia; He, Yufan; Jensen, Gregory; Eckard, Holly; Lu, H Peter; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2017-03-23

    Tracking the energy flow in nanoscale materials is an important yet challenging goal. Experimental methods for probing the intermolecular energy transfer (ET) are often burdened by the spectral crosstalk between donor and acceptor species, which complicates unraveling their individual contributions. This issue is particularly prominent in inorganic nanoparticles and biological macromolecules featuring broad absorbing profiles. Here, we demonstrate a general spectroscopic strategy for measuring the ET efficiency between nanostructured or molecular dyes exhibiting a significant donor-acceptor spectral overlap. The reported approach is enabled through spectral shaping of the broadband excitation light with solutions of donor molecules, which inhibits the excitation of respective donor species in the sample. The resulting changes in the acceptor emission induced by the spectral modulation of the excitation beam are then used to determine the quantum efficiency and the rate of ET processes between arbitrary fluorophores (molecules, nanoparticles, polymers) with high accuracy. The feasibility of the reported method was demonstrated using a control donor-acceptor system utilizing a protein-bridged Cy3-Cy5 dye pair and subsequently applied for studying the energy flow in a CdSe560-CdSe600 binary nanocrystal film.

  15. User's guide for RIV2; a package for routing and accounting of river discharge for a modular, three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground- water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Roger S.

    1988-01-01

    RIV2 is a package for the U.S. Geological Survey 's modular, three-dimensional, finite-difference, groundwater flow model developed by M. G. McDonald and A. W. Harbaugh that simulates river-discharge routing. RIV2 replaces RIVI, the original river package used in the model. RIV2 preserves the basic logic of RIV1, but better represents river-discharge routing. The main features of RIV2 are (1) The river system is divided into reaches and simulated river discharge is routed from one node to the next. (2) Inflow (river discharge) entering the upstream end of a reach can be specified. (3) More than one river can be represented at one node and rivers can cross, as when representing a siphon. (4) The quantity of leakage to or from the aquifer at a given node is proportional to the hydraulic-head difference between that specified for the river and that calculated for the aquifer. Also, the quantity of leakage to the aquifer at any node can be limited by the user and, within this limit, the maximum leakage to the aquifer is the discharge available in the river. This feature allows for the simulation of intermittent rivers and drains that have no discharge routed to their upstream reaches. (5) An accounting of river discharge is maintained. Neither stage-discharge relations nor storage in the river or river banks is simulated. (USGS)

  16. Control of flow around a circular cylinder for minimizing energy dissipation.

    PubMed

    Naito, Hiroshi; Fukagata, Koji

    2014-11-01

    Control of flow around a circular cylinder is studied numerically aiming at minimization of the energy dissipation. First, we derive a mathematical relationship (i.e., identity) between the energy dissipation in an infinitely large volume and the surface quantities, so that the cost function can be expressed by the surface quantities only. Subsequently a control law to minimize the energy dissipation is derived by using the suboptimal control procedure [J. Fluid Mech. 401, 123 (1999)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S002211209900659X]. The performance of the present suboptimal control law is evaluated by a parametric study by varying the value of the arbitrary parameter contained. Two Reynolds numbers, Re=100 and 1000, are investigated by two-dimensional simulations. Although no improvement is obtained at Re=100, the present suboptimal control shows better results at Re=1000 than the suboptimal controls previously proposed. With the present suboptimal control, the dissipation and the drag are reduced by 58% and 44% as compared to the uncontrolled case, respectively. The suction around the front stagnation point and the blowing in the rear half are found to be weakened as compared to those in the previous suboptimal control targeting at pressure drag reduction. A predetermined control based on the control input profile obtained by the suboptimal control is also performed. The energy dissipation and the drag are found to be reduced as much as those in the present suboptimal control. It is also found that the present suboptimal and predetermined controls have better energy efficiencies than the suboptimal control previously proposed. Investigation at different control amplitudes reveals an advantage of the present control at higher amplitude. Toward its practical implementation, a localized version of the predetermined control is also examined, and it is found to work as effectively as the continuous case. Finally, the present predetermined control is confirmed to work well in a

  17. Linear Chain Formation by Unicellular Bacteria During Mat Growth Under Low-Energy Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, M. M.; Newman, D. K.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Biofilm morphologies and material properties are known to be functions of overlying fluid flow strength. It has been hypothesized that microbial mats and stromatolites also respond morphologically to fluid flow. We show that microscopic textures of experimentally grown mats of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 respond sensitively to overlying flow. Cultures were grown in two chemostats in which growth medium was replaced at a rate much faster than the bacteria's instantaneous growth rate, thus selecting for individuals attached to surfaces. Small petri dishes at the bottoms of each chemostat received innocula at the beginning of the experiment. One chemostat was stirred at a low rate such that there was no measurable flow across the tops of the dishes, while the other was stirred at a rate maintaining a flow of approximately 0.7 cm/s at 1 cm over the dishes. Cultures were grown for 10 days during which thick biofilms/mats developed in the dishes. In addition to biofilms developed on the petri dish surfaces, cultures in the rapidly stirred chemostat developed thick "streamers" which projected up into and were deflected by the overlying flow. Samples were collected from films and, in the rapidly stirred chemostat, from streamers by pipetting and by pinching between two thin bamboo sticks. Samples were examined by fluorescence microscopy with a 40x objective. Without fluid flow, cells were only loosely associated and showed little or no spatial organization. Under the modest flow set up in the rapidly stirred chemostat, cells in both biofilms and streamers formed long linear chains arranged in sheets or tight bundles. These results suggest that hydraulic factors may be significant in shaping mat textures at the scale of 10-100 μm by modifying the spatial associations of groups of cells. If preserved in microcrystalline quartz or carbonate, the chains formed in these experiments could be mistaken for filamentous bacteria. Care must be taken

  18. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, A.; Faginas-Lago, N.; Pacifici, L.; Grossi, G.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  19. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO{sub 2} molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, A. Faginas-Lago, N.; Pacifici, L.; Grossi, G.

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO{sub 2} characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO{sub 2} + CO{sub 2} collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO{sub 2} structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  20. Energy transfer upon collision of selectively excited CO2 molecules: State-to-state cross sections and probabilities for modeling of atmospheres and gaseous flows.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, A; Faginas-Lago, N; Pacifici, L; Grossi, G

    2015-07-21

    Carbon dioxide molecules can store and release tens of kcal/mol upon collisions, and such an energy transfer strongly influences the energy disposal and the chemical processes in gases under the extreme conditions typical of plasmas and hypersonic flows. Moreover, the energy transfer involving CO2 characterizes the global dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system and the energy balance of other planetary atmospheres. Contemporary developments in kinetic modeling of gaseous mixtures are connected to progress in the description of the energy transfer, and, in particular, the attempts to include non-equilibrium effects require to consider state-specific energy exchanges. A systematic study of the state-to-state vibrational energy transfer in CO2 + CO2 collisions is the focus of the present work, aided by a theoretical and computational tool based on quasiclassical trajectory simulations and an accurate full-dimension model of the intermolecular interactions. In this model, the accuracy of the description of the intermolecular forces (that determine the probability of energy transfer in molecular collisions) is enhanced by explicit account of the specific effects of the distortion of the CO2 structure due to vibrations. Results show that these effects are important for the energy transfer probabilities. Moreover, the role of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom is found to be dominant in the energy exchange, while the average contribution of translations, under the temperature and energy conditions considered, is negligible. Remarkable is the fact that the intramolecular energy transfer only involves stretching and bending, unless one of the colliding molecules has an initial symmetric stretching quantum number greater than a threshold value estimated to be equal to 7.

  1. Regional blood flow and skeletal muscle energy status in endotoxemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jepson, M.M.; Cox, M.; Bates, P.C.; Rothwell, N.J.; Stock, M.J.; Cady, E.B.; Millward, D.J.

    1987-05-01

    Endotoxins induce muscle wasting in part as a result of depressed protein synthesis. To investigate whether these changes reflect impaired energy transduction, blood flow, O/sub 2/ extraction, and high-energy phosphates in muscle and whole-body O/sub 2/ consumption (Vo/sub 2/) have been measured. Vo/sub 2/ was measured for 6 h after an initial sublethal dose of endotoxin (Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide 0.3 mg/100 g body wt sc) or saline and during 6 h after a second dose 24 h later. In fed or fasted rats, Vo/sub 2/ was either increased or better maintained after endotoxin. In anesthetized fed rats 3-4 h after the second dose of endotoxin Vo/sub 2/ was increased, and this was accompanied by increased blood flow measured by /sup 57/Co-labelled microspheres to liver (hepatic arterial supply), kidney, and perirenal brown adipose tissue and a 57 and 64% decrease in flow to back and hindlimb muscle, respectively, with no change in any other organ. Hindlimb arteriovenous O/sub 2/ was unchanged, indicating markedly decreased aerobic metabolism in muscle, and the contribution of the hindlimb to whole-body Vo/sub 2/ decreased by 46%. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate levels in muscle were unchanged in endotoxin-treated rats, and this was confirmed by topical nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which also showed muscle pH to be unchanged. These results show that, although there is decreased blood flow and aerobic oxidation in muscle, adenosine 5'-triphosphate availability does not appear to be compromised so that the endotoxin-induced muscle catabolism and decreased protein synthesis must reflex some other mechanism.

  2. Accounting for minor storage terms in an attempt to close the measured surface energy balance over a winter wheat field in Southwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshonkulov, Ravshan; Poyda, Arne; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Studies of energy and water exchange between the land surface and the atmospheric boundary layer are important to understand weather dynamics and climate change. Energy and water fluxes were measured on a winter wheat field in Kraichgau, Southern Germany, using the eddy covariance (EC) method. It is well known that EC measurements suffer from incomplete closure of the energy budget. In addition to the common ground heat flux measurements we measured heat storage in soil and the wheat canopy using high-precision temperature loggers within the EC footprint. Ground heat flux was re-calculated by calorimetric and harmonic analysis. First results obtained by the two methods will be compared. Based on measured data we calculated the contribution of photosynthesis, the air heat storage inside the canopy as well as the atmospheric moisture change to the energy budget. Our results show that accounting for minor storage terms improves the closure of the energy budget, but only to a limited extent. Further investigations will be necessary to identify additional sources of the energy gap typical for EC measurements.

  3. A convective-like energy-stable open boundary condition for simulations of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new energy-stable open boundary condition, and an associated numerical algorithm, for simulating incompressible flows with outflow/open boundaries. This open boundary condition ensures the energy stability of the system, even when strong vortices or backflows occur at the outflow boundary. Under certain situations it can be reduced to a form that can be analogized to the usual convective boundary condition. One prominent feature of this boundary condition is that it provides a control over the velocity on the outflow/open boundary. This is not available with the other energy-stable open boundary conditions from previous works. Our numerical algorithm treats the proposed open boundary condition based on a rotational velocity-correction type strategy. It gives rise to a Robin-type condition for the discrete pressure and a Robin-type condition for the discrete velocity on the outflow/open boundary, respectively at the pressure and the velocity sub-steps. We present extensive numerical experiments on a canonical wake flow and a jet flow in open domain to test the effectiveness and performance of the method developed herein. Simulation results are compared with the experimental data as well as with other previous simulations to demonstrate the accuracy of the current method. Long-time simulations are performed for a range of Reynolds numbers, at which strong vortices and backflows occur at the outflow/open boundaries. The results show that our method is effective in overcoming the backflow instability, and that it allows for the vortices to discharge from the domain in a fairly natural fashion even at high Reynolds numbers.

  4. Heat and Mass Transfer in Unsteady Rotating Fluid Flow with Binary Chemical Reaction and Activation Energy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faiz G.; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  5. Energy Theater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daane, Abigail R.; Wells, Lindsay; Scherr, Rachel E.

    2014-05-01

    Energy Theater is a dynamic, full-body activity that engages all students in representing the flow of energy in various phenomena, such as a light bulb burning steadily or a refrigerator cooling food. In Energy Theater, each participant acts as a unit of energy that has one form at a time. Regions on the floor correspond to objects in a physical scenario, and participants move from one region to another to demonstrate the flow of energy among objects. (See Figs. 1, 3, and 4.) The goal of Energy Theater is for students to track energy transfers and transformations in real-world energy scenarios while employing the principle of energy conservation and disambiguating matter and energy. Unlike most representations of energy, which are static before-and-after accounting schemes for energy changes, Energy Theater is a dynamic representation that provides a natural stepping stone toward the more advanced ideas of energy density, energy current, and a continuity equation relating them. The fact that conservation of energy is embedded in the representation encourages students to "find the energy" in situations where it may be imperceptible. The rules of Energy Theater are listed in Fig. 2.

  6. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY VIA OPTIMIZED CHARGE MOTION AND SLURRY FLOW IN PLANT SCALE SAG MILLS

    SciTech Connect

    Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Sravan K. Prathy; Trilokyanath Patra

    2005-12-01

    The U.S. mining industry operates approximately 80 semi-autogenesis grinding mills (SAG) throughout the United States. Depending on the mill size the SAG mills draws between 2 MW and 17 MW. The product from the SAG mill is further reduced in size using pebble crushers and ball mills. Hence, typical gold or copper ore requires between 2.0 and 7.5 kWh per ton of energy to reduce the particle size. Considering a typical mining operation processes 10,000 to 100,000 tons per day the energy expenditure in grinding is 50 percent of the cost of production of the metal. A research team from the University of Utah is working to make inroads into saving energy in these SAG mills. In 2003, Industries of the Future Program of the Department of Energy tasked the University of Utah team to build a partnership between the University and the mining industry for the specific purpose of reducing energy consumption in SAG mills. A partnership was formed with Cortez Gold Mines, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation, Process Engineering Resources Inc. and others. In the current project, Cortez Gold Mines played a key role in facilitating the 26-ft SAG mill at Cortez as a test mill for this study. According to plant personnel, there were a number of unscheduled shut downs to repair broken liners and the mill throughput fluctuated depending on ore type. The University team had two softwares, Millsoft and FlowMod to tackle the problem. Millsoft is capable of simulating the motion of charge in the mill. FlowMod calculates the slurry flow through the grate and pulp lifters. Based on this data the two models were fine-tuned to fit the Cortez SAG will. In the summer of 2004 a new design of shell lifters were presented to Cortez and in September 2004 these lifters were installed in the SAG mill. By December 2004 Cortez Mines realized that the SAG mill is drawing approximately 236-kW less power than before while maintaining the same level of production. In the first month there was extreme cycling

  7. Reynolds stress and the energy balance of a localized two-dimensional vortex in a uniform shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Patrick F.

    2015-04-01

    Consideration is given to the kinetic energy balance of a localized two-dimensional vortex in unbounded space, subject to a uniform background shear flow. For this problem, a quadratic invariant based on the total flow can be constructed that consists of the sum of the vortex self-energy and the energy of interaction with the background flow. It is shown that an energy equation also may be written for the rate of change of vortex self-energy, relating this to the rate of working by the Reynolds stress. The stress integral is demonstrated to converge for a localized vortex of finite circulation, in contrast to the total kinetic energy. The two approaches to the energy balance are shown to be complementary, and the relation between the Reynolds stress and interaction energy is discussed. As an example, the integrated Reynolds stress is evaluated for a uniformly sheared elliptical (Kirchhoff) vortex. The stress integral includes far field contributions, indicating that appreciable exchange of energy with the external flow occurs well beyond the boundary of the vortex.

  8. Effects of the pulsatile flow settings on pulsatile waveforms and hemodynamic energy in a PediVAS centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Rider, Alan R; Kunselman, Allen R; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test different pulsatile flow settings of the PediVAS centrifugal pump to seek an optimum setting for pulsatile flow to achieve better pulsatile energy and minimal backflow. The PediVAS centrifugal pump and the conventional pediatric clinical circuit, including a pediatric membrane oxygenator, arterial filter, arterial cannula, and 1/4 in circuit tubing were used. The circuit was primed with 40% glycerin water mixture. Postcannula pressure was maintained at 40 mm Hg by a Hoffman clamp. The experiment was conducted at 800 ml/min of pump flow with a modified pulsatile flow setting at room temperature. Pump flow and pressure readings at preoxygenator and precannula sites were simultaneously recorded by a data acquisition system. The results showed that backflows appeared at flow rates of 200-800 ml/min (200 ml/min increments) with the default pulsatile flow setting and only at 200 ml/min with the modified pulsatile flow setting. With an increased rotational speed difference ratio and a decreased pulsatile width, the pulsatility increased in terms of surplus hemodynamic energy and total hemodynamic energy at preoxygenator and precannula sites. Backflows seemed at preoxygenator and precannula sites at a 70% of rotational speed difference ratio. The modified pulsatile flow setting was better than the default pulsatile flow setting in respect to pulsatile energy and backflow. The pulsatile width and the rotational speed difference ratio significantly affected pulsatility. The parameter of the rotational speed difference ratio can automatically increase pulsatility with increased rotational speeds. Further studies will be conducted to optimize the pulsatile flow setting of the centrifugal pump.

  9. Mineral carbonation: energy costs of pretreatment options and insights gained from flow loop reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, Larry R.; O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Rush, Gilbert E.

    2004-01-01

    Sequestration of carbon as a stable mineral carbonate has been proposed to mitigate environmental concerns that carbon dioxide may with time escape from its sequestered matrix using alternative sequestration technologies. A method has been developed to prepare stable carbonate products by reacting CO2 with magnesium silicate minerals in aqueous bicarbonate/chloride media at high temperature and pressure. Because this approach is inherently expensive due to slow reaction rates and high capital costs, studies were conducted to improve the reaction rates through mineral pretreatment steps and to cut expenses through improved reactor technology. An overview is given for the estimated cost of the process including sensitivity to grinding and heating as pretreatment options for several mineral feedstocks. The energy costs are evaluated for each pretreatment in terms of net carbon avoided. New studies with a high-temperature, high-pressure flow-loop reactor have yielded information on overcoming kinetic barriers experienced with processing in stirred autoclave reactors. Repeated tests with the flow-loop reactor have yielded insights on wear and failure of system components, on challenges to maintain and measure flow, and for better understanding of the reaction mechanism.

  10. Cerebral energy metabolism, glucose transport and blood flow: changes with maturation and adaptation to hypoglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Nehlig, A

    1997-02-01

    Brain maturation is characterized by a peak of cerebral energy metabolism and blood flow occurring between 3 and 8 years of age in humans and around 14-17 days of postnatal life in rats. This high activity coincides with the period of active brain growth. The human brain is dependent on glucose alone during that period, whereas rat brain uses both glucose and ketone bodies to cover its energetic and biosynthetic needs. The maturation of the density of glucose transporter sites-GLUT1 located at the blood-brain barrier and GLUT3 at the neuronal membrane-parallels the development of cerebral glucose utilization. During moderate acute hypoglycaemia, there are no changes in cerebral functional activity; cerebral glucose utilization decreases and blood flow increases only when hypoglycaemia is severe (lower than 2 mumol/ml). During chronic hypoglycaemia, the brain adapts to the low circulating levels of glucose: the number of glucose transporter sites is increased, and cerebral glucose utilization and function are maintained at normal levels while cerebral blood flow is more moderately increased than during acute hypoglycaemia. Neuronal damage consecutive to severe and prolonged hypoglycaemia occurs mainly in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and caudate-putamen as a result of active release of excitatory amino acids.

  11. 18 CFR 367.1430 - Account 143, Other accounts receivable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GAS ACT Balance Sheet Chart of Accounts Current and Accrued Assets § 367.1430 Account 143, Other... accounts receivable. 367.1430 Section 367.1430 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF...

  12. Multimode stretched spiral vortex and nonequilibrium energy spectrum in homogeneous shear flow turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuti, Kiyosi; Ozawa, Tetsuya

    2011-03-01

    The stretched spiral vortex [T. S. Lundgren, "Strained spiral vortex model for turbulent structures," Phys. Fluids 25, 2193 (1982)] is identified in turbulence in homogeneous shear flow and the spectral properties of this flow are studied using direct-numerical simulation data. The effects of mean shear on the genesis, growth, and annihilation processes of the spiral vortex are elucidated, and the role of the spiral vortex in the generation of turbulence is shown. As in homogeneous isotropic turbulence [K. Horiuti and T. Fujisawa, "The multi mode stretched spiral vortex in homogeneous isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 595, 341 (2008)], multimodes of the spiral vortex are extracted. Two symmetric modes of configurations with regard to the vorticity alignment along the vortex tube in the core region and dual vortex sheets spiraling around the tube are often educed. One of the two symmetric modes is created by a conventional rolling-up of a single spanwise shear layer. Another one is created by the convergence of the recirculating flow or streamwise roll [F. Waleffe, "Homotopy of exact coherent structures in plane shear flows," Phys. Fluids 15, 1517 (2003)] caused by the upward and downward motions associated with the streaks. The vortex tube is formed by axial straining and lowering of pressure in the recirculating region. The spanwise shear layers are entrained by the tube and they form spiral turns. The latter symmetric mode tends to be transformed into the former mode with lapse of time due to the action of the pressure Hessian term. The power law in the inertial subrange energy spectrum is studied. The base steady spectrum fits the equilibrium Kolmogorov -5/3 spectrum, to which a nonequilibrium component induced by the fluctuation of the dissipation rate ɛ is added. This component is extracted using the conditional sampling on ɛ, and it is shown that it fits the -7/3 power in accordance with the statistical theory. The correlation between these spectra and

  13. An energy-efficient self-regulating heater for flow-through applications.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Loree, Ellis L; Li, Jianzhong; Genfa, Zhang

    2003-08-01

    In many experiments, a flow-through heating arrangement is needed to reduce reaction time. Often the reaction conditions require inertness of the wetted material. Heated reactors based on polymeric tubing, notably PTFE, are the most common, and such reactors are typically used in a manner in which they are put in a heated bath or an otherwise thermally conductive potting in which a heater and a temperature sensor are embedded for heating and temperature control. Polymeric tubes are poor conductors of heat; as such, most reactors of this type have very poor energy utilization. We describe here heated flow-through reactors where a wire runs through the entire length of the tubular reactor and where the wire is directly electrically heated. The wire may or may not be electrically insulated. If the exterior of the tube is well insulated, the energy efficiency of such a reactor in heating the fluid of interest is nearly unity. This makes it most suitable for battery-powered applications. If an appropriate wire with a significant temperature coefficient of resistance is chosen, monitoring the current through the device at constant applied voltage indicates the effective mean temperature of the device and thus allows effective temperature control without an additional sensor/controller with essentially instantaneous response. Temperature control within +/- 0.4 degrees C at a mean temperature of 65 degrees C and within +/- 0.9 degrees C at 87 degrees C have been achieved.

  14. Parametric CFD study of micro-energy harvesting in a flow channel exploiting vortex shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koubogiannis, Dimitrios G.

    2016-05-01

    Miniature energy harvesting devices are increasingly used in various fields. For example, Wireless Sensor Networks have recently made great progress in many applications. However, their main drawback, i.e. the limited duration of operation, poses the requirement for an effective way to recharge their batteries. In this context, the presentwork focuses on the study of micro-energy harvesting from flow by exploiting vortex shedding behind bluff bodies, in order to cause oscillations to a piezoelectric film and generate the required electrical power. To this end, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool is validated on a particular miniature device configuration proposed in the literature and implemented for the numerical simulations of flow around bluff micro-bodies in a very small channel. Aiming to enhance vortex shedding, parametric studies corresponding to different bluff body shapes and arrangements for a fixed Reynolds number are performed, the main parameters involved in the phenomenon are highlighted and the potential for vortex shedding exploitation is qualitatively assessed.

  15. Schlieren Visualization of the Energy Addition by Multi Laser Pulse in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    The experimental results of the energy addition by multi laser pulse in Mach 7 hypersonic flow are presented. Two high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA lasers (TEA1 5.5 J, TEA2 3.9 J) were assembled sharing the same optical cavity to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The lasers can be triggered with a selectable time delay and in the present report the results obtained with delay between 30 {mu}s and 80 {mu}s are shown. The schlieren technique associated with a high speed camera was used to accomplish the influence of the energy addition in the mitigation of the shock wave formed on the model surface by the hypersonic flow. A piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to obtain the time history of the impact pressure at stagnation point of the model and the pressure reduction could be measured. The total recovery of the shock wave between pulses as well as the prolonged effect of the mitigation without recovery was observed by changing the delay.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kelner; D. George; T. Morrow; T. Owen; M. Nored; R. Burkey; A. Minachi

    2005-05-01

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute began a multi-year project to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype energy meter in 2002-2003 included: (1) refinement of the algorithm used to infer properties of the natural gas stream, such as heating value; (2) evaluation of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen content, improvements in carbon dioxide measurements, and improvements in ultrasonic measurement technology and signal processing for improved speed of sound measurements; (3) design, fabrication and testing of a new prototype energy meter module incorporating these algorithm and sensor refinements; and (4) laboratory and field performance tests of the original and modified energy meter modules. Field tests of the original energy meter module have provided results in close agreement with an onsite gas chromatograph. The original algorithm has also been tested at a field site as a stand-alone application using measurements from in situ instruments, and has demonstrated its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. The algorithm has been revised to use measurement technologies existing in the module to measure the gas stream at multiple states and infer nitrogen content. The instrumentation module has also been modified to incorporate recent improvements in CO{sub 2} and sound speed sensing technology. Laboratory testing of the upgraded module has identified additional testing needed to attain the target accuracy in sound speed measurements and heating value.

  17. Effect of intraprostatic blood flow on laser energy penetration in the canine prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Robert S., III; Hubbard, Bradley S.; Rawlings, Clarence A.

    1995-05-01

    Visual Laser Ablation of the Prostate has been shown to be an effective treatment for the relief of bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Dosimetry studies using the potato and live canine model are commonly used to advocate application of the Nd:YAG energy into the prostatic tissue. Questions have been raised as to the accuracy of tissue heat penetration in such models based on the scatter and diffusion caused by variations in blood flow and tissue differences from one prostate to another. Thus a study was done to evaluate differences, it any, in heat energy penetration caused by blood flow in the prostate. Mature canine prostates were lased in the (1) live dog, (2) euthanized dog, and (3) en bloc resected canine prostates immersed in a water bath of 101 degree(s)F. Prostates were lased using 60 watts for 60 seconds in the 2, 4, 8, and 10 o'clock positions. One prostate model was lased in the 8 and 10 o'clock positions while alive and then removed in bloc, immersed in a water bath at 101 degree(s)F and lased at the 2 and 4 o'clock positions. A third prostate, having been completely removed two days prior to lasing and frozen, was immersed in a water bath at 101 degree(s)F and lased. The findings indicate in the resected prostate loss of the ring of thermal damage, however, a zone of coagulative necrosis which is consistent with that seen in the live model. Thus blood flow does not appear to have a significant effect on Nd:YAG depth of penetration.

  18. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gilca, Alex; Cole, Charles R.; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2006-07-20

    The CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator described in this User’s Guide is a three-dimensional finite-element model used to evaluate groundwater flow and solute mass transport. Confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows can be represented with CFEST. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentra¬tion of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Although several thermal parameters described in this User’s Guide are required inputs, thermal transport has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. The CFEST simulator is written in the FORTRAN 77 language, following American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. Execution of the CFEST simulator is controlled through three required text input files. These input file use a structured format of associated groups of input data. Example input data lines are presented for each file type, as well as a description of the structured FORTRAN data format. Detailed descriptions of all input requirements, output options, and program structure and execution are provided in this User’s Guide. Required inputs for auxillary CFEST utilities that aide in post-processing data are also described. Global variables are defined for those with access to the source code. Although CFEST is a proprietary code (CFEST, Inc., Irvine, CA), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory retains permission to maintain its own source, and to distribute executables to Hanford subcontractors.

  19. Dynamo Dominated Accretion and Energy Flow: The Mechanism of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S. A.; Li, H.

    An explanation of the magnetic fields of the universe, the central mass concentration of galaxies, the massive black hole of every galaxy, and the AGN phenomena has been an elusive goal. We suggest here the outlines of such a theoretical understanding and point out where the physical understanding is missing. We believe there is an imperative to the sequence of mass flow and hence energy flow in the collapse of a galactic mass starting from the first non-linearity appearing in structure formation following decoupling. This first non-linearity of a two to one density fluctuation, the Lyman-α clouds, ultimately leads to the emission spectra of the phenomenon of AGN, quasars, blazars etc. The over-arching physical principle is the various mechanisms for the transport of angular momentum. We believe we have now understood the new physics of two of these mechanisms that have previously been illusive and as a consequence they impose strong constraints on the initial conditions of the mechanisms for the subsequent emission of the gravitational binding energy. The new phenomena described here are: 1) the Rossby vortex mechanism of the accretion disk viscosity, and 2) the mechanism of the α - Ω dynamo in the accretion disk. The Rossby vortex mechanism leads to a prediction of the black hole mass and rate of energy release and the α - Ω dynamo leads to the generation of the magnetic flux of the galaxy (and the far greater magnetic flux of clusters) and separately explains the primary flux of energy emission as force-free magnetic energy density. This magnetic flux and magnetic energy density separately are the necessary consequence of the saturation of a dynamo created by the accretion disk with a gain greater than unity. The predicted form of the emission of both the flux and the magnetic energy density is a force-free magnetic helix extending axially from the disk a distance depending upon its winding number and radius of its flux surfaces, a distance of Mpc's. This

  20. Study of dust particle charging in weakly ionized inert gases taking into account the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Dyatko, N. A.; Kostenko, A. S.

    2014-11-15

    The charging of dust particles in weakly ionized inert gases at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The conditions under which the gas is ionized by an external source, a beam of fast electrons, are considered. The electron energy distribution function in argon, krypton, and xenon has been calculated for three rates of gas ionization by fast electrons: 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14}, and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −1}. A model of dust particle charging with allowance for the nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function in the region of strong plasma quasi-neutrality violation around the dust particle is described. The nonlocality is taken into account in an approximation where the distribution function is a function of only the total electron energy. Comparative calculations of the dust particle charge with and without allowance for the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function have been performed. Allowance for the nonlocality is shown to lead to a noticeable increase in the dust particle charge due to the influence of the group of hot electrons from the tail of the distribution function. It has been established that the screening constant virtually coincides with the smallest screening constant determined according to the asymptotic theory of screening with the electron transport and recombination coefficients in an unperturbed plasma.

  1. Compare Energy Use in Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pumps Field Demonstration and Computer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Chandan; Raustad, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are often regarded as energy efficient air-conditioning systems which offer electricity savings as well as reduction in peak electric demand while providing improved individual zone setpoint control. One of the key advantages of VRF systems is minimal duct losses which provide significant reduction in energy use and duct space. However, there is limited data available to show their actual performance in the field. Since VRF systems are increasingly gaining market share in the US, it is highly desirable to have more actual field performance data of these systems. An effort was made in this direction to monitor VRF system performance over an extended period of time in a US national lab test facility. Due to increasing demand by the energy modeling community, an empirical model to simulate VRF systems was implemented in the building simulation program EnergyPlus. This paper presents the comparison of energy consumption as measured in the national lab and as predicted by the program. For increased accuracy in the comparison, a customized weather file was created by using measured outdoor temperature and relative humidity at the test facility. Other inputs to the model included building construction, VRF system model based on lab measured performance, occupancy of the building, lighting/plug loads, and thermostat set-points etc. Infiltration model inputs were adjusted in the beginning to tune the computer model and then subsequent field measurements were compared to the simulation results. Differences between the computer model results and actual field measurements are discussed. The computer generated VRF performance closely resembled the field measurements.

  2. Hypersolidus geothermal energy from the moving freeze-fracture-flow boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, Charles; Eichelberger, John; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Papale, Paolo; Sun, Yunwei

    2014-05-01

    Rhyolitic magmas at low pressure undergo much of their crystallization over a small temperature interval just above the solidus. This hypersolidus material has a high energy density and effective heat capacity because of stored heat of crystallization, yet may sustain fractures and therefore admit heat exchange with fluids because of its interlocking crystal framework. Rhyolitic magmas emplaced near the liquidus should at first cool rapidly, owing to internal convection, modest crystallization with declining temperature, and extreme temperature gradients at their boundaries. However, once the solidus is approached the rapid rise in effective heat capacity should result in low temperature gradients and rates of heat flow within the bodies. They are suspended for a time in the hypersolidus state. Prodigious quantities of heat can be released from these thermal masses by hydrothermal systems, natural or perhaps stimulated, fracturing their way inward from the margins. The fracture front drives the solidus isotherm ahead of it. Heat of crystallization in front of the advancing solidus is transferred across the thin, moving boundary zone to the external fluid, which advects it away. Once the material is below (outboard of) the solidus, it behaves as normal rock and cools rapidly, having a heat capacity only about 20% that of water. Variations on this theme were published by Lister (1974) for mid-ocean ridges, Hardee (1980) for lava lakes, and Bjornsson et al (1982) for Grimsvotn and Heimaey, who cited possible geothermal energy exploitiation. This scenario is consistent with a number of observations: 1. The geophysical rarity of imaging mostly liquid magma in the shallow crust, despite common petrologic evidence that silicic magma has undergone shallow storage. 2. More common imaging of "partial melt" volumes, whose inferred properties suggest some, but not dominant proportion of melt. 3. Evidence that pure-melt rhyolitic eruptions may have drained relatively shallow

  3. Information flow and its significance in coherently integrated policymaking for promoting energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kua, Harn Wei

    2007-05-01

    Why do negative, unexpected outcomes occur in sustainable development policies? What can we learn from them? Studies have shown clearly that, to be effective, sustainable development policies must be as coherent and integrated as possible; however, policy integration should not evolve into a tool that restricts creativity and undermines the relevance of local policy initiatives. The Coherently Integrated Policymaking frameworks, based on the precept that information flow is pivotal to the success of policymaking, are proposed and then applied to design an integrated energy efficiency policy that coaddresses a set of indicators. These indicators are energy and greenhouse gas reduction, improvement of public's health, increase in material efficiency, enhancementof energy equity, provision of employment and education opportunities, improvement of workers' health, improvement of local economy, and reduction in derived costs for the business community. Our framework also provides guidance for the magnitude of change a policy should introduce at one time, guided by five distinct types of feedback loops that link the different stakeholders involved in the design, implementation, and monitoring of integrated policies.

  4. The thermal effects on high-frequency vibration of beams using energy flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Chen, Hualing; Zhu, Danhui; Kong, Xiangjie

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the energy flow analysis (EFA) method is developed to predict the high-frequency response of beams in a thermal environment, which is a topic of concern in aerospace and automotive industries. The temperature load applied on the structures can generate thermal stresses and change material properties. The wavenumber and group velocity associated with the in-plane axial force arising from thermal stresses are included in the derivation of the governing energy equation, and the input power is obtained from the derived effective bending stiffness. In addition, effect of temperature-dependent material properties is considered in the EFA model. To verify the proposed formulation, numerical simulations are performed for a pinned-pinned beam in a uniform thermal environment. The EFA results are compared with the modal solutions for various frequencies and damping loss factors, and good correlations are observed. The results show that the spatial distributions and levels of energy density can be affected by the thermal effects, and the vibration response of beams increases with temperature.

  5. Basic study on an energy conversion system using gas-liquid two-phase flows of magnetic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, Masaaki; Ishimoto, Jun; Kamiyama, Schinichi.

    1994-12-31

    The mechanism of the pressure rise in a gas-liquid two-phase pipe flow of magnetic fluid under a nonuniform magnetic field is investigated in detail both theoretically and experimentally. First, governing equations of one-dimensional gas-liquid two-phase magnetic fluid flow are presented and numerically solved. Next, the pressure distribution in a nonuniform magnetic wild region is measured in the cases of two-phase flow, single-phase flow and the stationary state using a new experimental apparatus for the flow system. From the numerical measurement results, the magnitude of the pressure components which contribute to the total driving force is accurately estimated. These results on the pressure distribution will contribute to the development of the new energy conversion system using a gas-liquid two-phase magnetic fluid flow.

  6. Study of the Beam Energy Dependence of Azimuthal Anisotropy Coefficients and Non-Flow Effects in Small System d +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Pengqi

    2016-09-01

    Recent measurements of azimuthal anisotropy, v_n, in collision systems such as p,d,3He +Au suggest that a quark gluon plasma (QGP) may be formed in these small systems, which would be an unexpected discovery. However, this QGP lives for a shorter time than in larger A +A systems and it is not clear how the azimuthal anisotropy signals develop. Varying the collision energy in d +Au collisions can help to answer this question. However, non-flow effects are more dominant in small systems and must be accounted for in order to draw conclusions. We will show theoretical calculations of v_2 and v_3 in d +Au using different models at several collision energies, and we will present a method based on reference fitting to estimate the non-flow component in actual measurements so that they might be better compared to the theory. (Based on work published in) Division of Nuclear Physics of the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER41152.

  7. Application of the methods of gas dynamics to water flows with free surface I : flows with no energy dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preiswerk, Ernst

    1940-01-01

    The application is treated in sufficient detail to facilitate as much as possible its application by the engineer who is less familiar with the subject. The present work was undertaken with two objects in view. In the first place, it is considered as a contribution to the water analogy of gas flows, and secondly, a large portion is devoted to the general theory of the two-dimensional supersonic flows.

  8. New Class of Flow Batteries for Terrestrial and Aerospace Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; West, William C.; Kindler, Andrew; Smart, Marshall C.

    2013-01-01

    Future sustainable energy generation technologies such as photovoltaic and wind farms require advanced energy storage systems on a massive scale to make the alternate (green) energy options practical. The daunting requirements of such large-scale energy systems such as long operating and cycle life, safety, and low cost are not adequately met by state-of-the-art energy storage technologies such as vanadium flow cells, lead-acid, and zinc-bromine batteries. Much attention is being paid to redox batteries specifically to the vanadium redox battery (VRB) due to their simplicity, low cost, and good life characteristics compared to other related battery technologies. NASA is currently seeking high-specific- energy and long-cycle-life rechargeable batteries in the 10-to-100-kW range to support future human exploration missions, such as planetary habitats, human rovers, etc. The flow batteries described above are excellent candidates for these applications, as well as other applications that propose to use regenerative fuel cells. A new flow cell technology is proposed based on coupling two novel electrodes in the form of solvated electron systems (SES) between an alkali (or alkaline earth) metal and poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), separated by an ionically conducting separator. The cell reaction involves the formation of such SES with a PAH of high voltage in the cathode, while the alkali (or alkaline earth metal) is reduced from such an MPAH complex in the anode half-cell. During recharge, the reactions are reversed in both electrodes. In other words, the alkali (alkaline earth) metal ion simply shuttles from one M-PAH complex (SES) to another, which are separated by a metal-ion conducting solid or polymer electrolyte separator. As an example, the concept was demonstrated with Li-naphthalene//Li DDQ (DDQ is 2,3-Dichloro-5,6-dicyano- 1,4-benzoquinone) separated by lithium super ion conductor, either ceramic or polymer (solid polymer or gel polymer) electrolytes. The

  9. Damage Evaluation Based on a Wave Energy Flow Map Using Multiple PZT Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaolu; Hu, Ning; Xu, Hong; Yuan, Weifeng; Yan, Cheng; Li, Yuan; Goda, Riu; Alamusi; Qiu, Jinhao; Ning, Huiming; Wu, Liangke

    2014-01-01

    A new wave energy flow (WEF) map concept was proposed in this work. Based on it, an improved technique incorporating the laser scanning method and Betti's reciprocal theorem was developed to evaluate the shape and size of damage as well as to realize visualization of wave propagation. In this technique, a simple signal processing algorithm was proposed to construct the WEF map when waves propagate through an inspection region, and multiple lead zirconate titanate (PZT) sensors were employed to improve inspection reliability. Various damages in aluminum and carbon fiber reinforced plastic laminated plates were experimentally and numerically evaluated to validate this technique. The results show that it can effectively evaluate the shape and size of damage from wave field variations around the damage in the WEF map. PMID:24463430

  10. Measurement of Electromagnetic Energy Flow Through a Sparse Particulate Medium: A Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    First-principle analysis of the functional design of a well-collimated radiometer (WCR) reveals that in general, this instrument does not record the instantaneous directional flow of electromagnetic energy. Only in special cases can a sequence of measurements with a WCR yield the magnitude and direction of the local time-averaged Poynting vector. Our analysis demonstrates that it is imperative to clearly formulate the physical nature of the actual measurement afforded by a directional radiometer rather than presume desirable measurement capabilities. Only then can the directional radiometer be considered a legitimate part of physically based remote sensing and radiation-budget applications. We also emphasize the need for a better understanding of the nature of measurements with panoramic radiometers.

  11. Stopped-flow fluorescence resonance energy transfer for analysis of nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tims, Hannah S; Widom, Jonathan

    2007-03-01

    Macromolecular assemblies and machines undergo large-scale conformational changes as essential features of their normal function. Modern stopped-flow instrumentation and biotechnology combine to provide a powerful tool for characterizing the rates and natures of these conformational changes. Standard commercially available instruments provide extraordinary sensitivity and speed, allowing analysis of millisecond or longer timescale processes, with concentrations as low as a few nanomolar and volumes of just a few hundred microliters. One can now place specific dyes anywhere desired on a nucleic acid, and often on a protein as well. This ability allows the use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments for detailed conformational analyses, even as the system is evolving rapidly over time following the initiation of a reaction. This approach is ideally suited for analysis of intrinsic properties of chromatin and of the machines that control chromatin assembly, disassembly, and function.

  12. Buoyant Turbulent Kinetic Energy Production in Steep-Slope Katabatic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldroyd, Holly J.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Higgins, Chad W.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2016-12-01

    We develop several critical concepts that should be considered when interpreting, modelling and designing future experiments for flows over sloping terrain. Vertical buoyancy fluxes in katabatic flows can be positive and a source of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) despite the statically stable, thermal stratification that drives these flows. This phenomenon occurs when the ratio of along-slope to slope-normal kinematic heat fluxes is greater than the cotangent of the slope angle, suggesting a critical value of slope-angle steepness found in earlier studies. We provide field-data-based evidence that the along-slope heat flux may dominate the variables in this inequality, and therefore in generating buoyant TKE production or suppression over a steep slope. These data show the along-slope heat flux can be more variable and significantly larger in magnitude than the slope-normal component. The gradient Richardson number does not include the effects of the along-slope buoyancy; furthermore, none of the canonical stability parameters can properly reflect the TKE redistribution from turbulent transport divergence and the sink of TKE in cases of counter-gradient momentum fluxes, which we frequently observe near the peak of the katabatic jet. In such cases, canonical stability parameters inadequately represent the physical mechanisms associated with stability. These results have broad implications related to accurately modelling turbulence and surface exchanges over sloping terrain and illustrate the need to more thoroughly investigate the along-slope heat flux and its drivers, the meaning and definitions of stability, and the effects of non-local turbulent transport.

  13. Levelized cost of energy and sensitivity analysis for the hydrogen-bromine flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nirala; McFarland, Eric W.

    2015-08-01

    The technoeconomics of the hydrogen-bromine flow battery are investigated. Using existing performance data the operating conditions were optimized to minimize the levelized cost of electricity using individual component costs for the flow battery stack and other system units. Several different configurations were evaluated including use of a bromine complexing agent to reduce membrane requirements. Sensitivity analysis of cost is used to identify the system elements most strongly influencing the economics. The stack lifetime and round-trip efficiency of the cell are identified as major factors on the levelized cost of electricity, along with capital components related to hydrogen storage, the bipolar plate, and the membrane. Assuming that an electrocatalyst and membrane with a lifetime of 2000 cycles can be identified, the lowest cost market entry system capital is 220 kWh-1 for a 4 h discharge system and for a charging energy cost of 0.04 kWh-1 the levelized cost of the electricity delivered is 0.40 kWh-1. With systems manufactured at large scales these costs are expected to be lower.

  14. Parameter scaling toward high-energy density in a quasi-steady flow Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. C.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Sheared axial flows are utilized by the ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Experiment to stabilize MHD instabilities. The pinches formed are 50 cm long with radii ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 cm. The plasma is generated in a coaxial acceleration region, similar to a Marshall gun, which provides a steady supply of plasma for approximately 100 us. The power to the plasma is partially decoupled between the acceleration and pinch assembly regions through the use of separate power supplies. Adiabatic scaling of the Bennett relation gives targets for future devices to reach high-energy density conditions or fusion reactors. The applicability of an adiabatic assumption is explored and work is done experimentally to clarify the plasma compression process, which may be more generally polytropic. The device is capable of a much larger parameter space than previous machine iterations, allowing flexibility in the initial conditions of the compression process to preserve stability. This work is supported by DoE FES and NNSA.

  15. Parametric analysis of three dimensional flow models applied to tidal energy sites in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Anas; Venugopal, Vengatesan

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a detailed parametric analysis on various input parameters of two different numerical models, namely Telemac3D and Delft3D, used for the simulation of tidal current flow at potential tidal energy sites in the Pentland Firth in Scotland. The motivation behind this work is to investigate the influence of the input parameters on the above 3D models, as the majority of past research has mainly focused on using the 2D depth-averaged flow models for this region. An extended description of the models setup, along with the utilised parameters is provided. The International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO) tidal gauges and Acoustic Doppler and Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements are used in calibrating model output to ensure the robustness of the models. Extensive parametric study on the impact of varying drag coefficients, roughness formulae and turbulence models has been investigated and reported. The results indicate that both Telemac3D and Delft3D models are able to produce excellent comparison against measured data; however, with Delft3D, the model parameters which provided higher correlation with the measured data, are found to be different from those reported in the previous literature, which could be attributed to the choice of boundary conditions and the mesh size.

  16. Improving Energy Efficiency Via Optimized Charge Motion and Slurry Flow in Plant Scale Sag Mills

    SciTech Connect

    Raj K. Rajamani; Jose Angel Delgadillo

    2006-07-21

    A research team from the University of Utah is working to make inroads into saving energy in these SAG mills. In 2003, Industries of the Future Program of the Department of Energy tasked the University of Utah team to build a partnership between the University and the mining industry for the specific purpose of reducing energy consumption in SAG mills. A partnership was formed with Cortez Gold Mines, Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation, Process Engineering Resources Inc. and Outokumpu Technology. In the current project, Cortez Gold Mines played a key role in facilitating the 26-ft SAG mill at Cortez as a test mill for this study. According to plant personnel, there were a number of unscheduled shut downs to repair broken liners and the mill throughput fluctuated depending on ore type. The University team had two softwares, Millsoft and FlowMod to tackle the problem. Millsoft is capable of simulating the motion of charge in the mill. FlowMod calculates the slurry flow through the grate and pulp lifters. Based on this data the two models were fine-tuned to fit the Cortez SAG will. In the summer of 2004 a new design of shell lifters were presented to Cortez and in September 2004 these lifters were installed in the SAG mill. By December 2004 Cortez Mines realized that the SAG mill is drawing approximately 236-kW less power than before while maintaining the same level of production. In the first month there was extreme cycling and operators had to learn more. Now the power consumption is 0.3-1.3 kWh/ton lower than before. The actual SAG mill power draw is 230-370 kW lower. Mill runs 1 rpm lesser in speed on the average. The recirculation to the cone crusher is reduced by 1-10%, which means more efficient grinding of critical size material is taking place in the mill. All of the savings have resulted in reduction of operating cost be about $0.023-$0.048/ ton. After completing the shell lifter design, the pulp lifter design was taken up. Through a series of mill surveys and

  17. Consumption of energy beverage is associated with attenuation of arterial endothelial flow-mediated dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, John P; Yang, Benjamin; Herrin, Nikki E; Yarlagadda, Santi; Le, George T; Ortiz, Brandon L; Ali, Asif; Infanger, Stephen C

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate whether consumption of an energy drink will acutely impair endothelial function in young healthy adults. METHODS Energy drinks are being consumed more and more worldwide, and have been associated with some deaths in adolescents and young adults, especially when consumed while exercising. After fasting and not smoking for at least 8 h prior, eleven medical students (9 males) received an electrocardiogram, blood pressure and pulse check, and underwent baseline testing (BL) of endothelial function using the technique of endothelium-dependent flow mediated dilatation (FMD) with high-resolution ultrasound (according to recommended guidelines of the University of Wisconsin Atherosclerosis Imaging Research Program Core Laboratory). The subjects then drank an energy beverage (EB), a 24-oz can of Monster Energy, and the above was repeated at 90 min after consumption. The relative FMD (%) was calculated as the ratio between the average post-cuff release and the baseline diameter. Each image was checked for quality control, and each artery diameter was measured from the media to media points by two experts, 3 measurements at the QRS complex, repeated on 3 separate beats, and then all were averaged. RESULTS Subjects characteristics averages (given with standard deviations) include: Age 24.5 ± 1.5 years, sex 9 male and 2 female, weight 71.0 ± 9.1 kg, height 176.4 ± 6.0 cm, BMI 22.8 ± 2.7 kg/m2. The hemodynamics were as follows, BL vs EB group respectively (mean ± SD): Heart rate 65.2 ± 11.3 vs 68.2 ± 11.8 beats per minute, systolic blood pressure 114.0 ± 10.4 mmHg vs 114.1 ± 10.4 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure 68.8 ± 9.3 mmHg vs 70.6 ± 7.1 mmHg; all were not significantly different. However after drinking the EB, a significantly attenuated peak FMD response was measured (mean ± SD): BL group 5.9% ± 4.6% vs EB group 1.9% ± 2.1%; P = 0.03). Given the increased consumption of energy beverages associated with exercise in young adults, more research

  18. The principle of ‘maximum energy dissipation’: a novel thermodynamic perspective on rapid water flow in connected soil structures

    PubMed Central

    Zehe, Erwin; Blume, Theresa; Blöschl, Günter

    2010-01-01

    Preferential flow in biological soil structures is of key importance for infiltration and soil water flow at a range of scales. In the present study, we treat soil water flow as a dissipative process in an open non-equilibrium thermodynamic system, to better understand this key process. We define the chemical potential and Helmholtz free energy based on soil physical quantities, parametrize a physically based hydrological model based on field data and simulate the evolution of Helmholtz free energy in a cohesive soil with different populations of worm burrows for a range of rainfall scenarios. The simulations suggest that flow in connected worm burrows allows a more efficient redistribution of water within the soil, which implies a more efficient dissipation of free energy/higher production of entropy. There is additional evidence that the spatial pattern of worm burrow density at the hillslope scale is a major control of energy dissipation. The pattern typically found in the study is more efficient in dissipating energy/producing entropy than other patterns. This is because upslope run-off accumulates and infiltrates via the worm burrows into the dry soil in the lower part of the hillslope, which results in an overall more efficient dissipation of free energy. PMID:20368256

  19. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Allgood, Glenn O; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Lake, Joe E

    2012-01-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  20. [Study of laser energy in multi-element detection of pulverized coal flow with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian-Ping; Lu, Ji-Dong; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Shi-He; Yao, Shun-Chun; Pan, Feng-Ping; Dong, Xuan; Zhang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    The logical range of laser power density and optimum laser power density were explored for multi-element analysis of pulverized coal flow with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the present paper. The range of laser energy was chosen from 20 to 160 mJ in the experiment. Pulverized coal less than 200 microm in diameter of particles fell freely through feeder outlet and the rate of flow was controlled by screw feeder. Emissions were collected with pulse laser at 1 064 nm focusing on pulverized coal flow and plasma was generated. The intensity and cause of fluctuation of emission spectra at various laser energy levels were studied. A suitable range of laser power density is from 14.4 to 34.4 GW x cm(-2), and the optimum laser power density is 19.5 GW x cm(-2) for the determination of pulverized coal flow with LIBS.

  1. Predicting Adult Weight Change in the Real World: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Accounting for Compensatory Changes in Energy Intake or Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Dhurandhar, Emily J.; Kaiser, Kathryn A.; Dawson, John A.; Alcorn, Amy S.; Keating, Karen D.; Allison, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Public health and clinical interventions for obesity in free-living adults may be diminished by individual compensation for the intervention. Approaches to predict weight outcomes do not account for all mechanisms of compensation, so they are not well suited to predict outcomes in free-living adults. Our objective was to quantify the range of compensation in energy intake or expenditure observed in human randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods We searched multiple databases (PubMed, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Cochrane, ProQuest, PsycInfo) up to August 1, 2012 for RCTs evaluating the effect dietary and/or physical activity interventions on body weight/composition. Inclusion Criteria: subjects per treatment arm ≥ 5; ≥1 week intervention; a reported outcome of body weight /body composition; the intervention was either a prescribed amount of over- or underfeeding and/or supervised or monitored physical activity was prescribed; ≥ 80% compliance; an objective method was used to verify compliance with the intervention (e.g., observation, electronic monitoring). Data were independently extracted and analyzed by multiple reviewers with consensus reached by discussion. We compared observed weight change to predicted weight change using two models that predict weight change accounting only for metabolic compensation. Findings Twenty-eight studies met inclusion criteria. Overfeeding studies indicate 96% less weight gain than expected if no compensation occurred. Dietary restriction and exercise studies may result in up to 12–44% and 55–64% less weight loss than expected, respectively, under an assumption of no behavioral compensation. Interpretation Compensation is substantial even in high-compliance conditions, resulting in far less weight change than would be expected. The simple algorithm we report allows for more realistic predictions of intervention effects in free-living populations by accounting for the significant compensation that occurs. PMID:25323965

  2. Impact of the postpump resistance on pressure-flow waveform and hemodynamic energy level in a neonatal pulsatile centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Haines, Nikkole; Richardson, J Scott; Dasse, Kurt A; Undar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different postpump resistances on pulsatile pressure-flow waveforms and hemodynamic energy output in a mock extracorporeal system. The circuit was primed with a 40% glycerin-water mixture, and a PediVAS centrifugal pump was used. The pre- and postpump pressures and flow rates were monitored via a data acquisition system. The postpump resistance was adjusted using a Hoffman clamp at the outlet of the pump. Five different postpump resistances and rotational speeds were tested with nonpulsatile (NP: 5000 RPM) and pulsatile (P: 4000 RPM) modes. No backflow was found when using pulsatile flow. With isoresistance, increased arterial resistances decreased pump flow rates (NP: from 1,912 ml/min to 373 ml/min; P: from 1,485 ml/min to 288 ml/min), increased postpump pressures (NP: from 333 mm Hg to 402 mm Hg; P: from 223 mm Hg to 274 mm Hg), and increased hemodynamic energy output with pulsatile mode. Pump flow rate correlated linearly with rotational speed (RPMs) of the pump, whereas postpump pressures and hemodynamic energy outputs showed curvilinear relationships with RPMs. The maximal pump flow rate also increased from 618 ml/min to 4,293 ml/min with pulsatile mode and from 581 ml/min to 5,665 ml/min with nonpulsatile mode. Results showed that higher postpump resistance reduced the pump flow range, and increased postpump pressure and surplus hemodynamic energy output with pulsatile mode. Higher rotational speeds also generated higher pump flow rates, postpump pressures, and increased pulsatility.

  3. Study of turbulent energy dissipation rate of fluid flow in the vicinity of dispersed phase boundary using spatiotemporal tree model.

    PubMed

    Sikiö, Päivi; Jalali, Payman

    2014-12-01

    The hierarchical shell models of turbulence including a spatial dimension, namely, spatiotemporal tree models, reproduce the intermittent behavior of Navier-Stokes equations in both space and time dimensions corresponding to high Reynolds number turbulent flows. This model is used, for the first time in this paper, in a one-dimensional flow zone containing a dispersed-phase particle that can be used in the study of dispersed-phase flows. In this paper, a straightforward method has been used to introduce discrete phase into the spatiotemporal tree model that leads to an increased amount of turbulent energy dissipation rate in the vicinity of the discrete phase. The effects of particle insertion and particle size on the turbulent energy dissipation rate are demonstrated. Moreover, the space-scale behavior of the time-averaged turbulent energy dissipation rate in the presence of dispersed phase is demonstrated by means of continuous wavelet transform.

  4. Merging elemental and macronutrient approaches for a comprehensive study of energy and nutrient flows.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Shawn M; Jeyasingh, Punidan D

    2016-11-01

    Global warming and predation risk can have important impacts on animal physiology and life histories that can have consequences for ecosystem function. Zhang et al. () recently tested the separate and interactive effects of warming and predation risk on the body composition of Daphnia magna. By measuring both the elemental and biochemical composition of individuals, they showed that D. magna body elemental composition responded opposite to theoretical predictions and previous studies but that these changes were explained by adaptive life-history shifts in allocation to protein in eggs versus body lipid reserves. Photograph by Joachim Mergeay. Zhang, C., Jansen, M., De Meester, L. & Stoks, R. (2016) Energy storage and fecundity explain deviations from ecological stoichiometry predictions under global warming and size-selective predation. Journal of Animal Ecology 85, 1431-1441. Understanding the mechanisms through which energy and nutrients flow through ecosystems is critical to predicting and mitigating the consequences of climate change and other ecological disturbances. Ecological stoichiometry and nutritional geometry, using data on elements and macromolecules, respectively, have independently made major contributions towards this goal. Zhang et al. () provide data demonstrating that these two major frameworks can provide complementary insight into the consequences of global warming and predation risk for the physiology and life-history traits of a key aquatic herbivore, Daphnia magna. This study should catalyse further work to unite these two parallel and complementary frameworks.

  5. Cyclic Performance Analysis of Hydrogen/Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid-Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, KT; Tucker, MC; Ding, M; Ridgway, P; Battaglia, VS; Srinivasan, V; Weber, AZ

    2014-06-03

    This paper explores the critical factors dominating the cycle performance of the hydrogen/bromine redox flow battery (RFB). Carbon electrode oxidation to CO2 was seen as the dominant side reaction, which can be prevented by operating the cell below 1.4 V. Crossover of bromide species from the positive to the negative electrode, especially during charge, dominates the coulombic efficiency, and can result in dissolution of the Pt catalyst if an adequate hydrogen supply is not maintained. This paper also describes the tradeoffs in voltaic, energy, and coulombic efficiencies during cycling, including the determination of the peak energy efficiency with respect to the HBr concentration and current density. Long-term cycling demonstrates negligible cell-component degradation over 600 cycles (approximate to 3 months), with capacity loss caused by the bromine from the system, which can be mitigated by proper system design. The data and methodologies provided in this paper can be used to understand better the operation of this and other RFBs.

  6. Nitric oxide, interorganelle communication, and energy flow: a novel route to slow aging

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Alessandra; Nisoli, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial lifecycle (mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and removal by mitophagy) is carefully orchestrated to ensure the efficient generation of cellular energy and to maintain reactive oxygen species (ROS) production within an optimal range for cellular health. Based on latest research, these processes largely depend on mitochondrial interactions with other cell organelles, so that the ER- and peroxisome-mitochondrial connections might intervene in the control of cellular energy flow. Damaged organelles are cleared by autophagic mechanisms to assure the quality and proper function of the intracellular organelle pool. Nitric oxide (NO) generated through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) acts a gas signaling mediator to promote mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics, with a favorable impact in diverse chronic diseases of the elderly. Obesity, diabetes and aging share common pathophysiological mechanisms, including mitochondrial impairment and dysfunctional eNOS. Here we review the evidences that eNOS-dependent mitochondrial biogenesis and quality control, and possibly the complex interplay among cellular organelles, may be affected by metabolic diseases and the aging processes, contributing to reduce healthspan and lifespan. Drugs or nutrients able to sustain the eNOS-NO generating system might contribute to maintain organelle homeostasis and represent novel preventive and/or therapeutic approaches to chronic age-related diseases. PMID:25705617

  7. Special Report on the "Department of Energy's Efforts to Meet Accountability and Performance Reporting Objectives of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was to jumpstart the U.S. economy, create or save millions of jobs, spur technological advances in health and science, and invest in the Nation's energy future. The Department of Energy will receive an unprecedented $38 billion in Recovery Act funding to support a variety of science, energy, and environmental initiatives. The Recovery Act requires transparency and accountability over these funds. To this end, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued guidance requiring the Department to compile and report a wide variety of funding, accounting, and performance information. The Department plans to leverage existing information systems to develop accounting and performance information that will be used by program managers and ultimately reported to Recovery.gov, the government-wide source of Recovery Act information, and to OMB. The Department's iManage iPortal, a system that aggregates information from a number of corporate systems, will serve as the main reporting gateway for accounting information. In addition, the Department plans to implement a methodology or system that will permit it to monitor information reported directly to OMB by prime funding recipients. Furthermore, performance measures or metrics that outline expected outcomes are being developed, with results ultimately to be reported in a recently developed Department-wide system. Because of the significance of funds provided and their importance to strengthening the Nation's economy, we initiated this review to determine whether the Department had taken the steps necessary to ensure that Recovery Act funds can be appropriately tracked and are transparent to the public, and whether the benefits of the expenditures can be properly measured and reported clearly, accurately, and in a timely manner. Although not yet fully mature, we found that the Department's efforts to develop, refine, and apply the control structure

  8. Multiscale gyrokinetics for rotating tokamak plasmas: fluctuations, transport and energy flows.

    PubMed

    Abel, I G; Plunk, G G; Wang, E; Barnes, M; Cowley, S C; Dorland, W; Schekochihin, A A

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a complete theoretical framework for studying turbulence and transport in rapidly rotating tokamak plasmas. The fundamental scale separations present in plasma turbulence are codified as an asymptotic expansion in the ratio ε = ρi/α of the gyroradius to the equilibrium scale length. Proceeding order by order in this expansion, a set of coupled multiscale equations is developed. They describe an instantaneous equilibrium, the fluctuations driven by gradients in the equilibrium quantities, and the transport-timescale evolution of mean profiles of these quantities driven by the interplay between the equilibrium and the fluctuations. The equilibrium distribution functions are local Maxwellians with each flux surface rotating toroidally as a rigid body. The magnetic equilibrium is obtained from the generalized Grad-Shafranov equation for a rotating plasma, determining the magnetic flux function from the mean pressure and velocity profiles of the plasma. The slow (resistive-timescale) evolution of the magnetic field is given by an evolution equation for the safety factor q. Large-scale deviations of the distribution function from a Maxwellian are given by neoclassical theory. The fluctuations are determined by the 'high-flow' gyrokinetic equation, from which we derive the governing principle for gyrokinetic turbulence in tokamaks: the conservation and local (in space) cascade of the free energy of the fluctuations (i.e. there is no turbulence spreading). Transport equations for the evolution of the mean density, temperature and flow velocity profiles are derived. These transport equations show how the neoclassical and fluctuating corrections to the equilibrium Maxwellian act back upon the mean profiles through fluxes and heating. The energy and entropy conservation laws for the mean profiles are derived from the transport equations. Total energy, thermal, kinetic and magnetic, is conserved and there is no net turbulent heating. Entropy is produced

  9. Long-Cycling Aqueous Organic Redox Flow Battery (AORFB) toward Sustainable and Safe Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; DeBruler, Camden; Rhodes, Zayn; Liu, T Leo

    2017-01-25

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are a viable technology to store renewable energy in the form of electricity that can be supplied to electricity grids. However, widespread implementation of traditional RFBs, such as vanadium and Zn-Br2 RFBs, is limited due to a number of challenges related to materials, including low abundance and high costs of redox-active metals, expensive separators, active material crossover, and corrosive and hazardous electrolytes. To address these challenges, we demonstrate a neutral aqueous organic redox flow battery (AORFB) technology utilizing a newly designed cathode electrolyte containing a highly water-soluble ferrocene molecule. Specifically, water-soluble (ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium chloride (FcNCl, 4.0 M in H2O, 107.2 Ah/L, and 3.0 M in 2.0 NaCl, 80.4 Ah/L) and N(1)-ferrocenylmethyl-N(1),N(1),N(2),N(2),N(2)-pentamethylpropane-1,2-diaminium dibromide, (FcN2Br2, 3.1 M in H2O, 83.1 Ah/L, and 2.0 M in 2.0 M NaCl, 53.5 Ah/L) were synthesized through structural decoration of hydrophobic ferrocene with synergetic hydrophilic functionalities including an ammonium cation group and a halide anion. When paired with methyl viologen (MV) as an anolyte, resulting FcNCl/MV and FcN2Br2/MV AORFBs were operated in noncorrosive neutral NaCl supporting electrolytes using a low-cost anion-exchange membrane. These ferrocene/MV AORFBs are characterized as having high theoretical energy density (45.5 Wh/L) and excellent cycling performance from 40 to 100 mA/cm(2). Notably, the FcNCl/MV AORFBs (demonstrated at 7.0 and 9.9 Wh/L) exhibited unprecedented long cycling performance, 700 cycles at 60 mA/cm(2) with 99.99% capacity retention per cycle, and delivered power density up to 125 mW/cm(2). These AORFBs are built from earth-abundant elements and are environmentally benign, thus representing a promising choice for sustainable and safe energy storage.

  10. Fourth and eighth grade students' conceptions of energy flow through ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkwright, Ashlie Beals

    This mixed methods status study examined 32 fourth grade students' conceptual understandings of energy flow through ecosystems prior to instruction and 40 eighth grade students' conceptual understandings of the same topic after five years of daily standards-based instruction in science. Specific ecological concepts assessed related to: 1) roles of organisms; 2) the sun as the original energy source for most ecosystems; and 3) interdependency of organisms. Fourth and eighth grade students were assessed using the same three-tiered forced-choice instrument, with accompanying tasks for students to defend their forced-choice selections and rate their level of confidence in making the selections. The instrument was developed for the study by a team of researchers and was based on similar tasks presented in the research literature. Distractor options were embedded in each assessment task using common non-scientific ideas also reported in the research literature. Cronbach's alpha values at or greater than .992 for each task indicated interrater consistency of task answers, and Rasch analysis was employed to establish the reliability of the instrument. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were employed to assess the data. Constant comparative methods were employed to analyze students' written responses, which were coded and grouped into emerging themes. These themes were further developed to characterize students' conceptual understandings. Student open responses also were scored and coded by a team of researchers using a rubric to identify level of scientific understanding. Quantitative analyses included Rasch analysis used to normalize survey data. Independent samples t-tests were then employed to compare students' forced-choice responses to their written responses and to the confidence ratings, as well as to compare fourth and eighth grade students' responses. Findings indicated that eighth grade students generally outperformed the fourth grade on both the forced

  11. Analysis of free-surface flows through energy considerations: Single-phase versus two-phase modeling.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Salvatore; Colagrossi, Andrea; Di Mascio, Andrea; Le Touzé, David

    2016-05-01

    The study of energetic free-surface flows is challenging because of the large range of interface scales involved due to multiple fragmentations and reconnections of the air-water interface with the formation of drops and bubbles. Because of their complexity the investigation of such phenomena through numerical simulation largely increased during recent years. Actually, in the last decades different numerical models have been developed to study these flows, especially in the context of particle methods. In the latter a single-phase approximation is usually adopted to reduce the computational costs and the model complexity. While it is well known that the role of air largely affects the local flow evolution, it is still not clear whether this single-phase approximation is able to predict global flow features like the evolution of the global mechanical energy dissipation. The present work is dedicated to this topic through the study of a selected problem simulated with both single-phase and two-phase models. It is shown that, interestingly, even though flow evolutions are different, energy evolutions can be similar when including or not the presence of air. This is remarkable since, in the problem considered, with the two-phase model about half of the energy is lost in the air phase while in the one-phase model the energy is mainly dissipated by cavity collapses.

  12. Material and Energy Flows in the Production of Cathode and Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Jennifer B.; James, Christine; Gaines, Linda; Gallagher, Kevin; Dai, Qiang; Kelly, Jarod C.

    2015-09-01

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model has been expanded to include four new cathode materials that can be used in the analysis of battery-powered vehicles: lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide (LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2 [NMC]), lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4 [LFP]), lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2 [LCO]), and an advanced lithium cathode (0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.44Co0.25Mn0.31O2 [LMR-NMC]). In GREET, these cathode materials are incorporated into batteries with graphite anodes. In the case of the LMR-NMC cathode, the anode is either graphite or a graphite-silicon blend. Lithium metal is also an emerging anode material. This report documents the material and energy flows of producing each of these cathode and anode materials from raw material extraction through the preparation stage. For some cathode materials, we considered solid state and hydrothermal preparation methods. Further, we used Argonne National Laboratory’s Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model to determine battery composition (e.g., masses of cathode, anode, electrolyte, housing materials) when different cathode materials were used in the battery. Our analysis concluded that cobalt- and nickel-containing compounds are the most energy intensive to produce.

  13. Material and Energy Flows in the Production of Cathode and Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Jennifer B.; James, Christine; Gaines, Linda G.; Gallagher, Kevin

    2014-09-30

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model has been expanded to include four new cathode materials that can be used in the analysis of battery-powered vehicles: lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide (LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2 [NMC]), lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4 [LFP]), lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2 [LCO]), and an advanced lithium cathode (0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.44Co0.25Mn0.31O2 [LMR-NMC]). In GREET, these cathode materials are incorporated into batteries with graphite anodes. In the case of the LMR-NMC cathode, the anode is either graphite or a graphite-silicon blend. This report documents the material and energy flows of producing each of these cathode and anode materials from raw material extraction through the preparation stage. For some cathode materials, we considered solid state and hydrothermal preparation methods. Further, we used Argonne National Laboratory’s Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model to determine battery composition (e.g., masses of cathode, anode, electrolyte, housing materials) when different cathode materials were used in the battery. Our analysis concluded that cobalt- and nickel-containing compounds are the most energy intensive to produce.

  14. Effect of georesource–consumer process flows on coal loss in energy supply of the Polar regions in Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkach, SM; Gavrilov, VL

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that the process flows of mining, haulage and utilization of coal in the Polar regions in Yakutia feature high quantitative and qualitative loss. In case the process flows are considered as integrated systems aimed at the overall performance efficiency, it is possible to reduce the loss per each individual chain loop. The authors formulate approaches intended to lower total loss of coal in process flows. The geotechnical and organizational solutions are put forward to improve and stabilize quality of fuel used by local fuel and energy industry.

  15. Accounting Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication identifies 20 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of accounting specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 20 units are as follows:…

  16. Painless Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, R. W.; And Others

    The computerized Painless Accountability System is a performance objective system from which instructional programs are developed. Three main simplified behavioral response levels characterize this system: (1) cognitive, (2) psychomotor, and (3) affective domains. Each of these objectives are classified by one of 16 descriptors. The second major…

  17. Accountability Overboard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chieppo, Charles D.; Gass, James T.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports that special interest groups opposed to charter schools and high-stakes testing have hijacked Massachusetts's once-independent board of education and stand poised to water down the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) tests and the accountability system they support. President Barack Obama and Massachusetts…

  18. Observing Vibrational Energy Flow in a Protein with the Spatial Resolution of a Single Amino Acid Residue.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoki; Mizuno, Misao; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2014-09-18

    One of the challenges in physical chemistry has been understanding how energy flows in a condensed phase from the microscopic viewpoint. To address this, space-resolved information at the molecular scale is required but has been lacking due to experimental difficulties. We succeeded in the real-time mapping of the vibrational energy flow in a protein with the spatial resolution of a single amino acid residue by combining time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy and site-directed single-Trp mutagenesis. Anti-Stokes Raman intensities of the Trp residues at different sites exhibited different temporal evolutions, reflecting propagation of the energy released by the heme group. A classical heat transport model was not able to reproduce the entire experimental data set, showing that we need a molecular-level description to explain the energy flow in a protein. The systematic application of our general methodology to proteins with different structural motifs may provide a greatly increased understanding of the energy flow in proteins.

  19. Recombination processes in a flowing magnetized plasma: Application to ionization energy recovery in the variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (VASIMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavers, Donald Gregory

    Electric propulsion involves the acceleration of charged particles (ions and electrons) through electric and magnetic body forces. The collection of these charged particles, or plasma, cannot be stored but must be created in-situ. Therefore, energy must be supplied to a neutral gas to create the plasma that is accelerated by the body forces. The energy that is used to create the plasma, i.e., ionization energy, is typically lost, "frozen" in the exhaust of the thruster. When the kinetic energy in the plasma flow is much larger than the energy used to create the plasma, this frozen-flow loss is negligible. Conversely, if the frozen-flow loss is a major fraction of the total plasma energy, its recovery, even in a partial way, may improve the energy efficiency of the thruster while also providing a potential means for thrust augmentation. This dissertation investigates the underlying physics, which could enable the practical recovery of frozen-flow losses by processes such as surface and volume recombination. For surface recombination, the ions approach the surface of the metal and are neutralized by electrons from the metal via the Auger neutralization process. For volume recombination, the ions and electrons recombine, with energy released via line radiation or by transferring energy to a third body such as another electron. Since the total energy of the neutralized ion, an atom, is less than the total energy of the ion and electron pair before recombination, conservation of energy requires the release of energy as the ion and electron recombine. The measurements described in this dissertation were performed on the VX-10 experiment, a plasma device supporting the development of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept and located at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory of the Johnson Space Center. Results suggest that the recombination energy can be recovered. The available energy and power recovered depends on the local plasma

  20. Energy conserving numerical methods for the computation of complex vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaneau, Yves

    One of the original goals of this thesis was to develop numerical tools to help with the design of micro air vehicles. Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) are small flying devices of only a few inches in wing span. Some people consider that as their size becomes smaller and smaller, it would be increasingly more difficult to keep all the classical control surfaces such as the rudders, the ailerons and the usual propellers. Over the years, scientists took inspiration from nature. Birds, by flapping and deforming their wings, are capable of accurate attitude control and are able to generate propulsion. However, the biomimicry design has its own limitations and it is difficult to place a hummingbird in a wind tunnel to study precisely the motion of its wings. Our approach was to use numerical methods to tackle this challenging problem. In order to precisely evaluate the lift and drag generated by the wings, one needs to be able to capture with high fidelity the extremely complex vortical flow produced in the wake. This requires a numerical method that is stable yet not too dissipative, so that the vortices do not get diffused in an unphysical way. We solved this problem by developing a new Discontinuous Galerkin scheme that, in addition to conserving mass, momentum and total energy locally, also preserves kinetic energy globally. This property greatly improves the stability of the simulations, especially in the special case p=0 when the approximation polynomials are taken to be piecewise constant (we recover a finite volume scheme). In addition to needing an adequate numerical scheme, a high fidelity solution requires many degrees of freedom in the computations to represent the flow field. The size of the smallest eddies in the flow is given by the Kolmogoroff scale. Capturing these eddies requires a mesh counting in the order of Re³ cells, where Re is the Reynolds number of the flow. We show that under-resolving the system, to a certain extent, is acceptable. However our

  1. Semi-Solid Flowable Battery Electrodes: Semi-Solid Flow Cells for Automotive and Grid-Level Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEEST Project: Scientists at 24M are crossing a Li-Ion battery with a fuel cell to develop a semi-solid flow battery. This system relies on some of the same basic chemistry as a standard Li-Ion battery, but in a flow battery the energy storage material is held in external tanks, so storage capacity is not limited by the size of the battery itself. The design makes it easier to add storage capacity by simply increasing the size of the tanks and adding more paste. In addition, 24M's design also is able to extract more energy from the semi-solid paste than conventional Li-Ion batteries. This creates a cost-effective, energy-dense battery that can improve the driving range of EVs or be used to store energy on the electric grid.

  2. Finescale parameterizations of energy dissipation in a region of strong internal tides and sheared flow, the Lucky-Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, Simon; Bouruet-Aubertot, Pascale; Reverdin, Gilles; Turnherr, Andreas; Laurent, Lou St.

    2016-06-01

    The relevance of finescale parameterizations of dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy is addressed using finescale and microstructure measurements collected in the Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). There, high amplitude internal tides and a strongly sheared mean flow sustain a high level of dissipation rate and turbulent mixing. Two sets of parameterizations are considered: the first ones (Gregg, 1989; Kunze et al., 2006) were derived to estimate dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy induced by internal wave breaking, while the second one aimed to estimate dissipation induced by shear instability of a strongly sheared mean flow and is a function of the Richardson number (Kunze et al., 1990; Polzin, 1996). The latter parameterization has low skill in reproducing the observed dissipation rate when shear unstable events are resolved presumably because there is no scale separation between the duration of unstable events and the inverse growth rate of unstable billows. Instead GM based parameterizations were found to be relevant although slight biases were observed. Part of these biases result from the small value of the upper vertical wavenumber integration limit in the computation of shear variance in Kunze et al. (2006) parameterization that does not take into account internal wave signal of high vertical wavenumbers. We showed that significant improvement is obtained when the upper integration limit is set using a signal to noise ratio criterion and that the spatial structure of dissipation rates is reproduced with this parameterization.

  3. Altered Right Ventricular Kinetic Energy Work Density and Viscous Energy Dissipation in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Pilot Study Using 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Han, Q. Joyce; Witschey, Walter R. T.; Fang-Yen, Christopher M.; Arkles, Jeffrey S.; Barker, Alex J.; Forfia, Paul R.; Han, Yuchi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Right ventricular (RV) function has increasingly being recognized as an important predictor for morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The increased RV after-load increase RV work in PAH. We used time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI (4D flow MRI) to derive RV kinetic energy (KE) work density and energy loss in the pulmonary artery (PA) to better characterize RV work in PAH patients. Methods 4D flow and standard cardiac cine images were obtained in ten functional class I/II patients with PAH and nine healthy subjects. For each individual, we calculated the RV KE work density and the amount of viscous dissipation in the PA. Results PAH patients had alterations in flow patterns in both the RV and the PA compared to healthy subjects. PAH subjects had significantly higher RV KE work density than healthy subjects (94.7±33.7 mJ/mL vs. 61.7±14.8 mJ/mL, p = 0.007) as well as a much greater percent PA energy loss (21.1±6.4% vs. 2.2±1.3%, p = 0.0001) throughout the cardiac cycle. RV KE work density and percent PA energy loss had mild and moderate correlations with RV ejection fraction. Conclusion This study has quantified two kinetic energy metrics to assess RV function using 4D flow. RV KE work density and PA viscous energy loss not only distinguished healthy subjects from patients, but also provided distinction amongst PAH patients. These metrics hold promise as imaging markers for RV function. PMID:26418553

  4. 18 CFR 367.2320 - Account 232, Accounts payable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... payable. This account must include all amounts payable by the service company within one year that are not... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Account 232, Accounts payable. 367.2320 Section 367.2320 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY...

  5. Study on steric transition in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and application to characterization of high-energy material.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Lee, Yong-Ju; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Seungho

    2013-08-23

    In field-flow fractionation (FFF), there is the 'steric transition' phenomenon where the sample elution mode changes from the normal to steric/hyperlayer mode. Accurate analysis by FFF requires understanding of the steric transition phenomenon, particularly when the sample has a broad size distribution, for which the effect by combination of different modes may become complicated to interpret. In this study, the steric transition phenomenon in asymmetrical flow FFF (AF4) was studied using polystyrene (PS) latex beads. The retention ratio (R) gradually decreases as the particle size increases (normal mode) and reaches a minimum (Ri) at diameter around 0.5μm, after which R increases with increasing diameter (steric/hyperlayer mode). It was found that the size-based selectivity (Sd) tends to increase as the channel thickness (w) increases. The retention behavior of cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (commonly called 'research department explosive' (RDX)) particles in AF4 was investigated by varying experimental parameters including w and flow rates. AF4 showed a good reproducibility in size determination of RDX particles with the relative standard deviation of 4.1%. The reliability of separation obtained by AF4 was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  6. Accounting for sap flow from different parts of the root system improves the prediction of xylem ABA concentration in plants grown with heterogeneous soil moisture

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Ian C.; Egea, Gregorio; Davies, William J.

    2008-01-01

    When soil moisture is heterogeneous, sap flow from, and ABA status of, different parts of the root system impact on leaf xylem ABA concentration ([X-ABA]leaf). The robustness of a model for predicting [X-ABA]leaf was assessed. ‘Two root-one shoot’ grafted sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants received either deficit irrigation (DI, each root system received the same irrigation volumes) or partial rootzone drying (PRD, only one root system was watered and the other dried the soil). Irrespective of whether relative sap flow was assessed using sap flow sensors in vivo or by pressurization of de-topped roots, each root system contributed similarly to total sap flow during DI, while sap flow from roots in drying soil declined linearly with soil water potential (Ψsoil) during PRD. Although Ψsoil of the irrigated pot determined the threshold Ψsoil at which sap flow from roots in drying soil decreased, the slope of this decrease was independent of the wet pot Ψsoil. Irrespective of whether sap was collected from the wet or dry root system of PRD plants, or a DI plant, root xylem ABA concentration increased as Ψsoil declined. The model, which weighted ABA contributions of each root system according to the sap flow from each, almost perfectly explained [X-ABA] immediately above the graft union. That the model overestimated measured [X-ABA]leaf may result from changes in [X-ABA] along the transport pathway or an artefact of collecting xylem sap from detached leaves. The implications of declining sap flow through partially dry roots during PRD for the control of stomatal behaviour and irrigation scheduling are discussed. PMID:18940933

  7. Accounting for sap flow from different parts of the root system improves the prediction of xylem ABA concentration in plants grown with heterogeneous soil moisture.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Ian C; Egea, Gregorio; Davies, William J

    2008-01-01

    When soil moisture is heterogeneous, sap flow from, and ABA status of, different parts of the root system impact on leaf xylem ABA concentration ([X-ABA]leaf). The robustness of a model for predicting [X-ABA]leaf was assessed. 'Two root-one shoot' grafted sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants received either deficit irrigation (DI, each root system received the same irrigation volumes) or partial rootzone drying (PRD, only one root system was watered and the other dried the soil). Irrespective of whether relative sap flow was assessed using sap flow sensors in vivo or by pressurization of de-topped roots, each root system contributed similarly to total sap flow during DI, while sap flow from roots in drying soil declined linearly with soil water potential (Psisoil) during PRD. Although Psisoil of the irrigated pot determined the threshold Psisoil at which sap flow from roots in drying soil decreased, the slope of this decrease was independent of the wet pot Psisoil. Irrespective of whether sap was collected from the wet or dry root system of PRD plants, or a DI plant, root xylem ABA concentration increased as Psisoil declined. The model, which weighted ABA contributions of each root system according to the sap flow from each, almost perfectly explained [X-ABA] immediately above the graft union. That the model overestimated measured [X-ABA]leaf may result from changes in [X-ABA] along the transport pathway or an artefact of collecting xylem sap from detached leaves. The implications of declining sap flow through partially dry roots during PRD for the control of stomatal behaviour and irrigation scheduling are discussed.

  8. Pit membrane structure is highly variable and accounts for a major resistance to water flow through tracheid pits in stems and roots of two boreal conifer species.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Paul J; Hacke, Uwe G; Schoonmaker, Amanda L

    2015-10-01

    The flow of xylem sap in conifers is strongly dependent on the presence of a low resistance path through bordered pits, particularly through the pores present in the margo of the pit membrane. A computational fluid dynamics approach was taken, solving the Navier-Stokes equation for models based on the geometry of pits observed in tracheids from stems and roots of Picea mariana (black spruce) and Picea glauca (white spruce). Model solutions demonstrate a close, inverse relationship between the total resistance of bordered pits and the total area of margo pores. Flow through the margo was dominated by a small number of the widest pores. Particularly for pits where the margo component of flow resistance was low relative to that of the torus, pore location near the inner edge of the margo allowed for greater flow than that occurring through similar-sized pores near the outer edge of the margo. Results indicate a surprisingly large variation in pit structure and flow characteristics. Nonetheless, pits in roots have lower resistance to flow than those in stems because the pits were wider and consisted of a margo with a larger area in pores.

  9. Impact of oxygenator selection on hemodynamic energy indicators under pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow in a neonatal extracorporeal life support model.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, Rahul; Khan, Sameer; Qiu, Feng; Kunselman, Allen; Undar, Akif

    2011-06-01

    This study compared the quality of perfusion delivered by two oxygenators--the hollow-fiber membrane Capiox Baby RX05 and silicone membrane Medtronic 0800--using hemodynamic energy indicators. The oxygenators were tested across varying flow rates and perfusion modes in a neonatal extracorporeal life support (ECLS) model. The experimental ECLS circuit included a Jostra HL-20 heart/lung machine with Jostra Roller pump, oxygenators with associated tubing and components, and a neonatal pseudo-patient. We used a 40/60 glycerin/water solution in the circuit as a blood analog. Testing occurred at flow rates of 250, 500, and 750 mL/min at 37°C under both pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow conditions. Hemodynamic data points consisted of recording 20-s intervals of data, and a total of 96 experimental repetitions were conducted. The pressure drop across the Capiox Baby RX05 oxygenator was significantly lower than the pressure drop across the Medtronic 0800 at all flow rates and perfusion modes. Furthermore, the Medtronic 0800 oxygenator showed significantly lower post-oxygenator energy equivalent pressures, total hemodynamic energy values, and surplus hemodynamic energy retention values compared to those of the Capiox Baby RX05. These results indicate the Medtronic 0800 oxygenator significantly dampens the hemodynamic energy compared to the Capiox Baby RX05. Consequently, clinical use of the Medtronic 0800 in a pulsatile ECLS setting is likely to mitigate the benefits provided by pulsatile flow. In contrast, the Capiox Baby RX05 better transmits hemodynamic energy to the patient with much lower pressure drop.

  10. A stock-flow consistent input-output model with applications to energy price shocks, interest rates, and heat emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Matthew; Hartley, Brian; Richters, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    By synthesizing stock-flow consistent models, input-output models, and aspects of ecological macroeconomics, a method is developed to simultaneously model monetary flows through the financial system, flows of produced goods and services through the real economy, and flows of physical materials through the natural environment. This paper highlights the linkages between the physical environment and the economic system by emphasizing the role of the energy industry. A conceptual model is developed in general form with an arbitrary number of sectors, while emphasizing connections with the agent-based, econophysics, and complexity economics literature. First, we use the model to challenge claims that 0% interest rates are a necessary condition for a stationary economy and conduct a stability analysis within the parameter space of interest rates and consumption parameters of an economy in stock-flow equilibrium. Second, we analyze the role of energy price shocks in contributing to recessions, incorporating several propagation and amplification mechanisms. Third, implied heat emissions from energy conversion and the effect of anthropogenic heat flux on climate change are considered in light of a minimal single-layer atmosphere climate model, although the model is only implicitly, not explicitly, linked to the economic model.

  11. An All-vanadium Continuous-flow Photoelectrochemical Cell for Extending State-of-charge in Solar Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zi; Shen, Yi; Liu, Dong; Liu, Fuqiang

    2017-04-04

    Greater levels of solar energy storage provide an effective solution to the inherent nature of intermittency, and can substantially improve reliability, availability, and quality of the renewable energy source. Here we demonstrated an all-vanadium (all-V) continuous-flow photoelectrochemical storage cell (PESC) to achieve efficient and high-capacity storage of solar energy, through improving both photocurrent and photocharging depth. It was discovered that forced convective flow of electrolytes greatly enhanced the photocurrent by 5 times comparing to that with stagnant electrolytes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) study revealed a great reduction of charge transfer resistance with forced convective flow of electrolytes as a result of better mass transport at U-turns of the tortuous serpentine flow channel of the cell. Taking advantage of the improved photocurrent and diminished charge transfer resistance, the all-V continuous-flow PESC was capable of producing ~20% gain in state of charge (SOC) under AM1.5 illumination for ca. 1.7 hours without any external bias. This gain of SOC was surprisingly three times more than that with stagnant electrolytes during a 25-hour period of photocharge.

  12. Effects of free surface on flow energy harvesting system based on flapping foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Lubao; Deng, Jian; Shao, Xueming

    2016-11-01

    Here, we consider a flapping foil based energy harvester, which is modelled by a 2D NACA0015 foil performing coupled motions of pitching and heaving. Volume of fraction(VOF) method is employed to capture the free surface. We fix the Reynolds number at Re = 900 , and the Froude number at Fr = 0 . 32 . We fix the non-dimensional flapping frequency at f = 0 . 16 , the pitching amplitude at θ0 =75° , and the heaving amplitude at h0 = 1 c , where c is the chord length. With these parameters, the harvester has been proved to reach its highest efficiency of η = 0 . 34 in a single phase flow. By varying the submergence d, which is defined as the distance between the calm free surface and the highest position of the pitching pivot of the flapping foil, we find that the free surface affects pronouncedly the energy harvesting efficiency η. As d decreases from 24 c to 0 . 5 c , η increases from 0 . 34 to 0 . 41 , getting a 20% promotion of the efficiency. To reveal the underlying physical mechanism of the effects of free surface, we examine the time histories of hydrodynamic forces on the foil. We find that due to the existence of the the free surface, the lift force and pitching moment experience asymmetric time histories during the upstroke and downstroke of the foil. This research is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No: 11272283) and the Public Projects of Zhejiang Province (Grant No: 2015C31126) to conduct this research.

  13. On the Way Toward Understanding Solution Chemistry of Lithium Polysulfides for High Energy Li-S Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Huilin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Henderson, Wesley A.; Shao, Yuyan; Chen, Junzheng; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

    2015-04-27

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) redox flow battery (RFB) is a promising candidate for high energy large-scale energy storage application due to good solubility of long-chain polysulfide species and low cost of sulfur. In this report, recent progress and new concepts for Li-S redox flow batteries are discussed with an emphasis on the fundamental understanding and control of lithium polysulfide chemistry to enable the development of liquid phase Li-S redox flow prototype cells. These differ significantly from conventional static Li-S batteries targeting for vehicle electrification. A high solubility of the different lithium polysulfides generated at different depths of discharge and states of charge is required for a flow battery in order to take full advantage of the multiple electron transitions between elemental sulfur and Li2S. A new DMSO-based electrolyte is proposed for Li-S redox flow batteries, which not only enables the high solubility of lithium polysulfide species, especially for the short-chain species, but also results in excellent cycling with a high Coulombic efficiency. The challenges and opportunities for the Li-S redox flow concept have also been discussed in depth.

  14. 10 CFR 490.505 - Credit accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credit accounts. 490.505 Section 490.505 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fueled Vehicle Credit Program § 490.505 Credit accounts. (a) DOE shall establish a credit account for each fleet...

  15. Modal Energy Flow Analysis the Highly Modulated Wake of a Wall-mounted Square-based Pyramid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinuzzi, Robert; Hosseini, Zahra; Noack, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    We present the first modal energy flow analysis of a time-resolved 3D velocity field from experimental PIV data for a highly modulated wake of a square-based pyramid protruding a boundary layer. The underlying low-order representation is optimized for resolving the base flow variation as well as the first and second harmonics associated with vortex shedding, thus generalizing the triple decomposition of Reynolds & Hussain (1972). The analysis comprises not only a detailed modal balance of turbulent kinetic energy as pioneered by Rempfer & Fasel (1994) for POD models, but also the companion mean-flow energy balance. The experimental results strikingly demonstrate how constitutive elements of mean-field theory (Stuart, 1958) near laminar Hopf bifurcations are still strongly expressed in a turbulent wake characterized by highly modulated, quasi-periodic shedding. The results emphasize, for instance, the stabilizing role of the mean-field manifolds, as explored in the POD model of Aubry et al. (1988). The proposed low-order representation of the flow and modal energy analyses may provide a novel framework for characterizing highly anisotropic wakes and vortex interactions; yielding important insights and reference data for computational turbulence modeling, e.g. URANS. The authors wish to recognize the support of the Canadian Natural Sciences and Enginering Research Council (Discovery Grant and Scholarship programs) and the ANR Chair of Excellence TUCOROM.

  16. Modeling energy flow and nutrient cycling in natural semiarid grassland ecosystems with the aid of thematic mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Energy flow and nutrient cycling were modeled as affected by herbivory on selected intensive sites along gradients of precipitation and soils, validating the model output by monitoring selected parameters with data derived from the Thematic Mapper (TM). Herbivore production was modeled along the gradient of soils and herbivory, and validated with data derived from TM in a spatial data base.

  17. Cafeteria diet induce changes in blood flow that are more related with heat dissipation than energy accretion

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, David; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Romero, María del Mar; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2016-01-01

    Background. A “cafeteria” diet is a self-selected high-fat diet, providing an excess of energy, which can induce obesity. Excess of lipids in the diet hampers glucose utilization eliciting insulin resistance, which, further limits amino acid oxidation for energy. Methods. Male Wistar rats were exposed for a month to “cafeteria” diet. Rats were cannulated and fluorescent microspheres were used to determine blood flow. Results. Exposure to the cafeteria diet did not change cardiac output, but there was a marked shift in organ irrigation. Skin blood flow decreased to compensate increases in lungs and heart. Blood flow through adipose tissue tended to increase in relation to controls, but was considerably increased in brown adipose tissue (on a weight basis). Discussion. The results suggest that the cafeteria diet-induced changes were related to heat transfer and disposal. PMID:27547590

  18. Denaturation of RNA secondary and tertiary structure by urea: simple unfolded state models and free energy parameters account for measured m-values

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Dominic; Draper, David E.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism by which urea destabilizes RNA structure, urea-induced unfolding of four different RNA secondary and tertiary structures was quantified in terms of an m-value, the rate at which the free energy of unfolding changes with urea molality. From literature data and our osmometric study of a backbone analog, we derived average interaction potentials (per Å2 of solvent accessible surface) between urea and three kinds of RNA surfaces: phosphate, ribose, and base. Estimates of the increases in solvent accessible surface areas upon RNA denaturation were based on a simple model of unfolded RNA as a combination of helical and single strand segments. These estimates, combined with the three interaction potentials and a term to account for urea interactions with released ions, yield calculated m-values in good agreement with experimental values (200 mm monovalent salt). Agreement was obtained only if single-stranded RNAs were modeled in a highly stacked, A form conformation. The primary driving force for urea induced denaturation is the strong interaction of urea with the large surface areas of bases that become exposed upon denaturation of either RNA secondary or tertiary structure, though urea interactions with backbone and released ions may account for up to a third of the m-value. Urea m-values for all four RNA are salt-dependent, which we attribute to an increased extension (or decreased charge density) of unfolded RNAs with increased urea concentration. The sensitivity of the urea m-value to base surface exposure makes it a potentially useful probe of the conformations of RNA unfolded states. PMID:23088364

  19. Methane source strength and energy flow shape methanotrophic communities in oxygen-methane counter-gradients.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sascha; Lüke, Claudia; Frenzel, Peter

    2012-04-01

    The role of microbial diversity for ecosystem functioning has become an important subject in microbial ecology. Recent work indicates that microbial communities and microbial processes can be very sensitive to anthropogenic disturbances. However, to what extent microbial communities may change upon, resist to, or overcome disturbances might differ depending on substrate availability. We used soil from an Italian rice field in gradient microcosms, and analysed the response of methanotrophic communities to an NH4 (+) pulse as a potential disturbance under two different CH4 source strengths. We found a significant influence of source strength, i.e. the energy flow through the methanotrophic community, while NH4 (+) had no effect. Our data suggest that historical contingencies, i.e. nitrogen fertilization, led to an ammonium-tolerant MOB community. Methanotrophs were able to oxidize virtually all CH4 diffusing into the oxic-anoxic boundary layer regardless of NH4 (+) addition. Total and active methanotrophic communities were assessed by a pmoA-specific microarray. From the reservoir of dormant methanotrophs, different species became active with Methylobacter and an environmental cluster affiliated with paddy soils being indicative for high CH4 source strength. Thus, a microbial seed bank is an important prerequisite to maintain functioning in a fluctuating environment.

  20. Nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon for energy storage in vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Xiqing; Engelhard, Mark H; Wang, Congmin; Liu, Jun; YANG, ZHENGUO; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an excellent performance of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon (N-MPC) for energy storage in vanadium redox flow batteries. Mesoporous carbon (MPC) is prepared using a soft-template method and doped with nitrogen by heat-treating MPC in NH{sub 3}. N-MPC is characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The redox reaction of [VO]{sup 2+}/[VO{sub 2}]{sup +} is characterized with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The electrocatalytic kinetics of the redox couple [VO]{sup 2+}/[VO{sub 2}]{sup +} is significantly enhanced on N-MPC electrode compared with MPC and graphite electrodes. The reversibility of the redox couple [VO]{sup 2+}/[VO{sub 2}]{sup +} is greatly improved on N-MPC (0.61 for N-MPC vs. 0.34 for graphite), which is expected to increase the energystorage efficiency of redoxflowbatteries. Nitrogen doping facilitates the electron transfer on electrode/electrolyte interface for both oxidation and reduction processes. N-MPC is a promising material for redoxflowbatteries. This also opens up new and wider applications of nitrogen-doped carbon.

  1. Large-activation-energy analysis of gaseous reactive flow in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Boza, Daniel; Iglesias, Immaculada; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    Frank-Kamenetskii's analysis of thermal explosions is applied, using also a single-reaction model with an Arrhenius rate having a large activation energy, to describe the evolution of an initially cold gaseous mixture flowing along a circular pipe with constant wall temperature for moderately large values of the relevant Reynolds number. The analysis shows two modes of combustion. There is a flameless slowly reacting mode for low wall temperatures or small pipe radii, when the temperature rise resulting from the heat released by the reaction is kept small by the heat-conduction losses to the wall, so as not to change significantly the order of magnitude of the reaction rate. In the other mode, the slow reaction rates occur only in an initial ignition stage, which ends abruptly when very large reaction rates cause a temperature runaway, or thermal explosion, at a well-defined ignition distance. The analysis determines the slow streamwise evolution for the flameless mode of combustion as well as the ignition distance for the explosive mode.

  2. Interaction of light with a metal wedge: the role of diffraction in shaping energy flow.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yonggang; Jung, Yun Suk; Kim, Hong Koo

    2010-02-01

    When a light wave hits a metal wedge structure, the metal surfaces respond to the incident light by generating both free-space and surface-bound waves. Here we present a physical model that elucidates electromagnetic interactions of an incoming planar wave with a simple semi-infinite 90 degrees metal wedge. We show that a metal wedge structure possesses an intrinsic capability of directing the incident power around the corner into the forward direction. Interplay of the boundary diffraction wave and the incident and reflection waves in the near field region of a metal corner is found to form a basis of the funneling phenomena that are commonly observed in metal nanoslit structures. Theory and experiment reveal that the incident wave propagating parallel to the sidewall destructively interferes with the boundary diffraction wave forming a depleted-energy-flow region along the glancing angle direction. A physical understanding of various electromagnetic phenomena associated with a metal wedge structure confirms rich potential of the simple structure as an elemental building block of complex metal nanostructures.

  3. High shear rate flow in a linear stroke magnetorheological energy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Wereley, N. M.; Hiemenz, G. J.; Ngatu, G. T.

    2014-05-01

    To provide adaptive stroking load in the crew seats of ground vehicles to protect crew from blast or impact loads, a magnetorheological energy absorber (MREA) or shock absorber was developed. The MREA provides appropriate levels of controllable stroking load for different occupant weights and peak acceleration because the viscous stroking load generated by the MREA force increases with velocity squared, thereby reducing its controllable range at high piston velocity. Therefore, MREA behavior at high piston velocity is analyzed and validated experimentally in order to investigate the effects of velocity and magnetic field on MREA performance. The analysis used to predict the MREA force as a function of piston velocity squared and applied field is presented. A conical fairing is mounted to the piston head of the MREA in order reduce predicted inlet flow loss by 9% at nominal velocity of 8 m/s, which resulted in a viscous force reduction of nominally 4%. The MREA behavior is experimentally measured using a high speed servo-hydraulic testing system for speeds up to 8 m/s. The measured MREA force is used to validate the analysis, which captures the transient force quite accurately, although the peak force is under-predicted at the peak speed of 8 m/s.

  4. Carbon Emission Flow in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chongqing; Zhou, Tianrui; Chen, Qixin; Xu, Qianyao; Xia, Qing; Ji, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    As the human population increases and production expands, energy demand and anthropogenic carbon emission rates have been growing rapidly, and the need to decrease carbon emission levels has drawn increasing attention. The link between energy production and consumption has required the large-scale transport of energy within energy transmission networks. Within this energy flow, there is a virtual circulation of carbon emissions. To understand this circulation and account for the relationship between energy consumption and carbon emissions, this paper introduces the concept of “carbon emission flow in networks” and establishes a method to calculate carbon emission flow in networks. Using an actual analysis of China's energy pattern, the authors discuss the significance of this new concept, not only as a feasible approach but also as an innovative theoretical perspective. PMID:22761988

  5. Insight from elliptic flow of open charm mesons using quark coalescence model at RHIC and LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esha, Roli; Nasim, Md.; Huang, Huan Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A study of elliptic flow of open charm mesons, D 0 and using quark coalescence as the mechanism of hadronization of heavy quarks will be presented. The coalescing partons are taken from a multi-phase transport model. The transverse momentum dependence of the elliptic flow parameter at mid-rapidity (|y| < 1.0) for minimum bias Au+Au collisions at > = 200 GeV (RHIC) and Pb+Pb collisions = 2.76 TeV (LHC) for different values of partonic interaction cross-section and QCD coupling constant will be discussed. We have compared our calculations with the experimentally measured data at the LHC energy. We will also present the effect of specific viscosity on elliptic flow of open charm mesons within the transport model approach. Our study indicates that the elliptic flow of open charmed mesons is more sensitive to viscous properties of QGP medium compared to light hadrons.

  6. Role of Frequency Chirp and Energy Flow Directionality in the Strong Coupling Regime of Brillouin-Based Plasma Amplification.

    PubMed

    Chiaramello, M; Amiranoff, F; Riconda, C; Weber, S

    2016-12-02

    A detailed analysis is presented of the various stages of strong coupling Brillouin plasma amplification, emphasizing the importance of the chirp which can be of threefold origin: the intrinsic one driven by the amplification process, the one originating from the chirped-pulse-generated laser pulses, and the one associated with the plasma profile. Control of the overall chirp can optimize or quench the energy transfer. The time-dependent phase relation explains the energy flow direction during amplification and is characteristic for this strong coupling process. The study is also of potential importance to understand and maybe control cross-beam-energy transfer in inertial confinement fusion.

  7. Role of Frequency Chirp and Energy Flow Directionality in the Strong Coupling Regime of Brillouin-Based Plasma Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaramello, M.; Amiranoff, F.; Riconda, C.; Weber, S.

    2016-12-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the various stages of strong coupling Brillouin plasma amplification, emphasizing the importance of the chirp which can be of threefold origin: the intrinsic one driven by the amplification process, the one originating from the chirped-pulse-generated laser pulses, and the one associated with the plasma profile. Control of the overall chirp can optimize or quench the energy transfer. The time-dependent phase relation explains the energy flow direction during amplification and is characteristic for this strong coupling process. The study is also of potential importance to understand and maybe control cross-beam-energy transfer in inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Mechanism of kinetic energy transfer in homogeneous bidisperse gas-solid flow and its implications for segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabadi, Mohammad; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2017-02-01

    Most gas-solid flows encountered in nature and industrial applications are polydisperse, and the segregation or mixing of particle classes in polydisperse gas-solid flows is a phenomenon of great practical importance. A statistically homogeneous gas-solid flow with a bidisperse distribution (in size or density) of particles is a canonical representation of polydisperse flows. A key feature that distinguishes the bidisperse flow from its monodisperse counterpart is the exchange of momentum and kinetic energy between the particle classes due to collisions, which are important for applications outside the very dilute regime. The average exchange of linear momentum between particle classes due to collisions occurs through the particle-particle drag term. The conservation equations for average momentum corresponding to each particle class can be used to deduce the average slip velocity between the particle size and density classes, which is the signature of particle segregation. In this canonical problem, the steady value of particle mean slip velocity results from a balance between three terms, each in turn involving the body force or the mean fluid pressure gradient, the gas-particle drag, and the particle-particle drag. The particle-particle drag depends on the particle velocity fluctuations in each class [Louge, M. Y. et al., "The role of particle collisions in pneumatic transport," J. Fluid Mech. 231, 345-359 (1991)], thereby coupling the mean and second-moment equations. For monodisperse gas-solid flows the transfer of kinetic energy from the mean to second-moment equations was explained by Subramaniam and co-workers who proposed the conservation of interphase turbulent kinetic energy transfer principle [Xu, Y. and Subramaniam, S., "Consistent modeling of interphase turbulent kinetic energy transfer in particle-laden turbulent flows," Phys. Fluids 19(8), 085101 (2007)], and this was subsequently verified by particle-resolved direct numerical simulation [Mehrabadi

  9. Impact of Pulsatility and Flow Rates on Hemodynamic Energy Transmission in an Adult Extracorporeal Life Support System.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Rachel; Strother, Ashton; Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the total hemodynamic energy (THE) and surplus hemodynamic energy transmission (SHE) of a novel adult extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system with nonpulsatile and pulsatile settings and varying pulsatility to define the most effective setting for this circuit. The circuit consisted of an i-cor diagonal pump (Xenios AG, Heilbronn, Germany), an XLung membrane oxygenator (Xenios AG), an 18 Fr Medos femoral arterial cannula (Xenios AG), a 23/25 Fr Estech RAP femoral venous cannula (San Ramon, CA, USA), 3/8 in ID × 140 cm arterial tubing, and 3/8 in ID × 160 cm venous tubing. Priming was done with lactated Ringer's solution and packed red blood cells (HCT 36%). The trials were conducted at flow rates 1-4 L/min (1 L/min increments) under nonpulsatile and pulsatile mode, with differential speed values 1000-4000 rpm (1000 rpm increments) at 36°. The pseudo patient's mean arterial pressure was kept at 100 mm Hg using a Hoffman clamp during all trials. Real-time flow and pressure data were collected using a custom-based data acquisition system. Mean pressures across the circuit increased with increasing flow rates, but increased insignificantly with increasing differential speed values. Mean pressure did not change significantly between pulsatile and nonpulsatile modes. Pulsatile flow created more THE than nonpulsatile flow at the preoxygenator site (P < 0.01). Of the different components of the circuit, the arterial cannula created the greatest THE loss. THE loss across the circuit ranged from 24.8 to 71.3%. Still, under pulsatile mode, more THE was delivered to the pseudo patient at low flow rates. No SHE was created with nonpulsatile flow, but SHE was created with pulsatile flow, and increased with increasing differential speed values. At lower flow rates (1-2 L/min), the arterial cannula contributed the most to SHE loss, but at higher flow rates the arterial tubing created the most SHE loss. The circuit

  10. Charge and energy flow in π+ p, K + p and pp interactions at 250 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajinenko, I. V.; Baladyan, S. G.; Belokopytov, Yu. A.; Böttcher, H.; Botterweck, F.; Chliapnikov, P. V.; Crijns, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Dreher, C.; Dziunikowska, K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Garutchava, Z. C.; Gerdyukov, L. N.; Gevorkyan, G. V.; Grässler, H.; van Hal, P.; Haupt, T.; Kittel, W.; Meijers, F.; Michałowska, A. B.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Oliveira, L. C.; Olkiewicz, K.; Pöllänen, R.; Ronjin, V. M.; Rybin, A. M.; Saarikko, H. M. T.; Schmitz, W.; Scholten, L.; Shabalina, E. K.; Stepaniak, J.; Tchikilev, O. G.; Tomaradze, A. G.; Uvarov, V. A.; Verbeure, F.; Wischnewski, R.; Yarba, Yu. V.; Zielinski, W.

    1989-03-01

    We present data on the flow of energy and charge in π+ p, K + p and pp interactions at 250 GeV/c. The energy and charge flow in the beam c.m. hemisphere is analysed in terms of the cluster-invariant Bialas-Ochs-Stodolsky variable λ=cot θ/ E jet. The profile functions dQ/dλ and dE/dλ indicate a widening in p T of jets between 32 and 250 GeV/c incident laboratory momentum, whereas the ratio dQ/dE is energy independent. The data are compared to μ p deep-inelastic scattering resutls and to expectations from the single string LUND model, the Dual Parton Model and the two-string LUND model (FRITIOF).

  11. The effectiveness of power-generating complexes constructed on the basis of nuclear power plants combined with additional sources of energy determined taking risk factors into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Portyankin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of combining nuclear power plants equipped with water-cooled water-moderated power-generating reactors (VVER) with other sources of energy within unified power-generating complexes is analyzed. The use of such power-generating complexes makes it possible to achieve the necessary load pickup capability and flexibility in performing the mandatory selective primary and emergency control of load, as well as participation in passing the night minimums of electric load curves while retaining high values of the capacity utilization factor of the entire power-generating complex at higher levels of the steam-turbine part efficiency. Versions involving combined use of nuclear power plants with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units for generating electricity are considered. In view of the fact that hydrogen is an unsafe energy carrier, the use of which introduces additional elements of risk, a procedure for evaluating these risks under different conditions of implementing the fuel-and-hydrogen cycle at nuclear power plants is proposed. Risk accounting technique with the use of statistical data is considered, including the characteristics of hydrogen and gas pipelines, and the process pipelines equipment tightness loss occurrence rate. The expected intensities of fires and explosions at nuclear power plants fitted with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units are calculated. In estimating the damage inflicted by events (fires and explosions) occurred in nuclear power plant turbine buildings, the US statistical data were used. Conservative scenarios of fires and explosions of hydrogen-air mixtures in nuclear power plant turbine buildings are presented. Results from calculations of the introduced annual risk to the attained net annual profit ratio in commensurable versions are given. This ratio can be used in selecting projects characterized by the most technically attainable and socially acceptable safety.

  12. Amide-I lifetime-limited vibrational energy flow in a one-dimensional lattice of hydrogen-bonded peptide units.

    PubMed

    Pouthier, Vincent

    2008-12-01

    A time-convolutionless master equation is established for describing the amide-I vibrational energy flow in a lattice of H-bonded peptide units. The dynamics is addressed within the small polaron formalism to account for the strong coupling between the amide-I vibron and the phonons describing the H-bond vibrations. Therefore, special attention is paid to characterize the influence of the amide-I relaxation on the polaron transport properties. This relaxation is modeled by assuming that each amide-I mode interacts with a bath of intramolecular normal modes whose displacements are strongly localized on the C=O groups. It has been shown that the energy relaxation occurs over a very short time scale which prevents any significant delocalization of the polaron. At biological temperature, the polaron explores a finite region around the excited site whose size is about one or two lattice parameters. However, two regimes occur depending on whether the vibron-phonon coupling is weak or strong. For a weak coupling, the energy propagates coherently along the lattice until the polaron disappears. By contrast, for a strong coupling, a diffusive regime occurs so that the polaron explores a finite size region incoherently. In both cases, the finite polaron lifetime favors the localization of the vibron density whose amplitude decreases exponentially.

  13. Blood flow in guinea fowl Numida meleagris as an indicator of energy expenditure by individual muscles during walking and running

    PubMed Central

    Ellerby, David J; Henry, Havalee T; Carr, Jennifer A; Buchanan, Cindy I; Marsh, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    Running and walking are mechanically complex activities. Leg muscles must exert forces to support weight and provide stability, do work to accelerate the limbs and body centre of mass, and absorb work to act as brakes. Current understanding of energy use during legged locomotion has been limited by the lack of measurements of energy use by individual muscles. Our study is based on the correlation between blood flow and aerobic energy expenditure in active skeletal muscle during locomotion. This correlation is strongly supported by the available evidence concerning control of blood flow to active muscle, and the relationship between blood flow and the rate of muscle oxygen consumption. We used injectable microspheres to measure the blood flow to the hind-limb muscles, and other body tissues, in guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) at rest, and across a range of walking and running speeds. Combined with data concerning the various mechanical functions of the leg muscles, this approach has enabled the first direct estimates of the energetic costs of some of these functions. Cardiac output increased from 350 ml min−1 at rest, to 1700 ml min−1 at a running speed (∼ 2.6 m s−1) eliciting a of 90% of . The increase in cardiac output was achieved via approximately equal factorial increases in heart rate and stroke volume. Approximately 90% of the increased cardiac output was directed to the active muscles of the hind limbs, without redistribution of blood flow from the viscera. Values of mass-specific blood flow to the ventricles, ∼ 15 ml min−1 g−1, and one of the hind-limb muscles, ∼ 9 ml min−1 g−1, were the highest yet recorded for blood flow to active muscle. The patterns of increasing blood flow with increasing speed varied greatly among different muscles. The increases in flow correlated with the likely fibre type distribution of the muscles. Muscles expected to have many high-oxidative fibres preferentially increased flow at low exercise intensities. We

  14. Variations in the Fe/O value resulting from changes in the ion energy in flows of accelerated solar particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasyants, G. S.; Minasyants, T. M.; Tomozov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    Qualitative estimates of the relative iron and oxygen ions (Fe/O) in flows of solar cosmic rays from impulsive and long-duration solar flares are obtained for different ion energy ranges. The Fe/O value serves as a measuring unit for the known FIP effect in the solar atmosphere. It is shown that the FIP effect is most evident (maximum Fe/O values) in impulsive events for ions at energies <2 MeV/n. In long-duration events, the Fe/O value gradually decreases in parallel with ion energy and its maximum values are observable in the area of relatively low energies. The comparison of some flare models provided grounds for a qualitative explanation of the Fe/O behavior in response to changes in ion energies for both classes of solar cosmic ray (SCR) events.

  15. Vehicle Infrastructure Cash-Flow Estimation--VICE 2.0; Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.

    2015-04-02

    This presentation discusses the differences between the original Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) Model and the revamped version, VICE 2.0. The enhanced tool can now help assess projects to acquire vehicles and infrastructure, or to acquire vehicles only.

  16. Flow rate and duty cycle effects in lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using high-energy pulsed focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Riesberg, Grant; Bigelow, Timothy A; Stessman, Dan J; Spalding, Martin H; Yao, Linxing; Wang, Tong; Xu, Jin

    2014-06-01

    To consider microalgae lipid biofuel as a viable energy source, it is a necessity to maximize algal cell lysis, lipid harvest, and thus biofuel production versus the energy used to lyse the cells. Previous techniques have been to use energy consumptive ultrasound waves in the 10-40 kHz range in a stationary exposure environment. This study evaluated the potential of using 1.1 MHz ultrasound pulses in a new flow through type chamber on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism for cell breakage. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34 cm and an active diameter of 6.36 cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at varied pulse repetition frequencies. First, variations in flow rate were examined at a constant duty cycle of 3.6%. After assessing flow rates, the duty cycle was varied to further explore the dependence on the tone burst parameters. Cell lysis was assessed by quantifying protein and chlorophyll release into the supernatant as well as by lipid extractability. Appropriate flow rates with higher duty cycles led to statistically significant increases in cell lysis relative to controls and other exposure conditions.

  17. Influence of Rotor-Stator Interaction on Flow Stability in Centrifugal Pump Based on Energy Gradient Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lu-Lu; Dou, Hua-Shu; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Zuchao; Cui, Baoling

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulation is performed for the three-dimensional turbulent flow field in a centrifugal pump by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the RNG k-epsilon turbulent model. The finite volume method and the SIMPLE algorithm are employed for the solution of the system. All the parameters in the centrifugal pump at different blade angular positions are obtained by simulation. The flow structure is analyzed and the distributions of the energy gradient function K are calculated at different blade angular positions based on the energy gradient method. According to the energy gradient method, the location which has larger value of K is easier to cause instability and to be of high turbulence intensity. The result shows that the flow instability is easier to be excited nearing the tongue where the value of K is large. The unstable flow area nearing the tongue is also in agreement with the zone where the velocity decreases rapidly. The sudden variation of velocity contributes to the large value of K. The research result also indicates that the tongue has large impact only on the impeller passages passing the tongue.

  18. Energy generation by fermentation of glucose in a batch flow microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu; Enache, Stanica; Tamaian, Radu; Buga, Mihaela-Ramona; Pirvu, Cristian; Varlam, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    In the last years, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have emerged like a novel research technologies for production of sustainable and clean electricity energy through bioxidation of organic materials, representing a promising alternative to combustion energy sources. In this study, production of bioelectricity in MFC in batch system (dual chambered MFC) was investigated. A dual chambered MFC from glass was built for this purpose. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an active biocatalyst was explored for power generation. Graphite plates were used as electrodes and glucose as substrate. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was initially grown on a period of 72h at 30 degree Celsius, on medium of modified Sabouraud liquid medium containing 30 g glucose/L. A volume of inoculated medium (80 mL) was transferred in the anode compartment of MFC together with 20 mL glucose 1M, while neutral red was used as mediator (electron shuttle) in concentration of 200 μM in anaerobic anode chamber. Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) was used as oxidizing agent in the cathode in wide concentration range (400 μM-40 000 μM). Cathodic compartment was loaded initially with 40 mM potassium permanganate, and afterwards was supplied two times more with KMnO4 of the same concentration, in order to maintain MFC functionality. The MFC was operated on a water bath heated by a combined hot-plate magnetic-stirrer device at 30 degree Celsius and mixed at 180 rpm. The maximum open circuit potential (OCV) recorded of about 0.6 V was reached after the 3rd loading with 40 milimolles of potassium permanganate. Using a potentiostat, the polarization curve was recorded by varying the potential between 0.5 V and 0.0 V, while the intensity of current increased from 0.0 to about 1.5 mA respectively, corresponding to an anodic current density of about 0.81 A/m2. In order to optimize the design and performance of the MFC, the goal of the further research is to use variously concentrations of potassium permanganate. Furthermore, a dual

  19. Apparatus and method for using radar to evaluate wind flow fields for wind energy applications

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, John; Hirth, Brian; Guynes, Jerry

    2017-02-21

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for obtaining data to determine one or more characteristics of a wind flow field using one or more radars. Data is collected from the one or more radars, and analyzed to determine the one or more characteristics of the wind flow field. The one or more radars are positioned to have a portion of the wind flow field within a scanning sector of the one or more radars.

  20. Bi-Annual Report 2010-2011: Shaping pulse flows to meet environmental and energy objectives

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta

    2010-10-01

    This report describes a bioenergetic model developed to allocate seasonal pulse flows to benefit salmon growth. The model links flow with floodplain inundation and production of invertebrate prey eaten by juvenile Chinook salmon. A unique quantile modeling approach is used to describe temporal variation among juvenile salmon spawned at different times. Preliminary model outputs are presented and future plans to optimize flows both to maximize salmon growth and hydropower production are outlined.