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Sample records for accredited residency programs

  1. A new model for accreditation of residency programs in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Goroll, Allan H; Sirio, Carl; Duffy, F Daniel; LeBlond, Richard F; Alguire, Patrick; Blackwell, Thomas A; Rodak, William E; Nasca, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    A renewed emphasis on clinical competence and its assessment has grown out of public concerns about the safety, efficacy, and accountability of health care in the United States. Medical schools and residency training programs are paying increased attention to teaching and evaluating basic clinical skills, stimulated in part by these concerns and the responding initiatives of accrediting, certifying, and licensing bodies. This paper, from the Residency Review Committee for Internal Medicine of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, proposes a new outcomes-based accreditation strategy for residency training programs in internal medicine. It shifts residency program accreditation from external audit of educational process to continuous assessment and improvement of trainee clinical competence.

  2. Management of open fractures in pediatric patients: current teaching in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited residency programs.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, William F; Uhl, Richard; Krieves, Michael; Drvaric, David M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the method of treatment for open fractures in pediatric patients that is used and taught at academic orthopedic residency programs. A web-based survey was constructed and emailed to program directors of orthopedic residencies. Seventy programs out of a total of 140 surveyed programs responded. Data were tabulated and charts created in an Excel spreadsheet. Type I fractures were treated by most with a cephalosporin alone (97%) for less than 48 h (87%). Type II were treated by most programs with a cephalosporin alone with no aminoglycoside (84%) for less than 48 h (80%). Type IIIa were treated by most programs with a cephalosporin and an aminoglycoside (50%) for less than 48 h (60%). Type IIIb were treated by most programs with a cephalosporin and aminoglycoside (54%) for less than 48 h (53%). Type IIIc were also treated by most with a cephalosporin and an aminoglycoside (53%) for less than 48 h (51%). Wounds were closed by most responders for type I (90%), type II (86%) and type IIIa (50%) but not type IIIb (10%), and type IIIc (16%). For the programs responding to the pediatric section of the survey over half (53%) reported using a trauma room and 58% reported allowing residents to irrigate and debride wounds in the emergency room. In conclusion, for pediatric patients most orthopedic residencies use a cephalosporin alone for type I and type II open fractures with an aminoglycoside added for type III fractures. Treatment is typically for 48 h or less. Delay of 6 h seems to be accepted for type I and type II fractures but not type III fractures. PMID:18043369

  3. Accredited Internship and Postdoctoral Programs for Training in Psychology: 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This is the official listing of accredited internship and postdoctoral residency programs in psychology. It reflects all Commission on Accreditation decisions through July 22, 2012. (Contains 15 footnotes.)

  4. The Optometric Residency Accreditation Process--Planning for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suchoff, Irwin B.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The American Optometric Association's current review of procedures for accrediting optometric residencies is discussed. Reasons for the review (projected growth of programs and revised standards) are discussed, procedures currently in place for accrediting programs in osteopathy, dentistry, pharmacy, podiatry, and optometry are summarized; and…

  5. Standards for Day and Resident Camps: The Accreditation Programs of the American Camping Association. 1990 Edition, Revised 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    This book outlines standards that provide a basis for camp accreditation and site approval by the American Camping Association (ACA), Inc. The purpose of the ACA accreditation programs is to educate camp owners and directors in the administration of key aspects of camp operation, particularly those related to program quality and the health and…

  6. Standards for Day and Resident Camps: The Accreditation Programs of the American Camping Association. 1990 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The purpose of this manual is to educate camp directors and camp personnel regarding government-recognized standard practices and procedures followed within the camp industry. These standards also provide a basis for voluntary accreditation of camps by the American Camping Association (ACA) beyond the minimum requirements of licensing. The manual…

  7. Initial assessment of patient handoff in accredited general surgery residency programs in the United States and Canada: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Abdulaziz M.; Paulus, Jessica K.; Vassiliou, Melina C.; Parsons, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Communication errors are considered one of the major causes of sentinel events. Our aim was to assess the process of patient handoff among junior surgical residents and to determine ways in which to improve the handoff process. Methods We conducted nationwide surveys that included all accredited general surgery residency programs in the United States and Canada. Results Of the 244 American and 17 Canadian accredited surgical residency programs contacted, 65 (27%) and 12 (71%), respectively, participated in the survey. Of the American and Canadian respondents, 66% and 69%, respectively, were from postgraduate year (PGY) 1, and 32% and 29%, respectively, were from PGY 2; 85 (77%) and 50 (96%), respectively, had not received any training about patient handoff before their surgical residency, and 27% and 64%, respectively, reported that the existing handoff system at their institutions did not adequately protect patient safety. Moreover, 29% of American respondents and 37% of Canadian respondents thought that the existing handoffs did not support continuity of patient care. Of the American residents, 67% and 6% reported receiving an incomplete handoff that resulted in minor and major patient harm, respectively. These results mirrored those from Canadian residents (63% minor and 7% major harm). The most frequent factor reported to improve the patient handoff process was standardization of the verbal handoff. Conclusion Our survey results indicate that the current patient handoff system contributes to patient harm. More efforts are needed to establish standardized forms of verbal and written handoff to ensure patient safety and continuity of care. PMID:26204366

  8. Mammography accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, P.

    1993-12-31

    In the mid-1980`s, the movement toward the use of dedicated mammography equipment provided significant improvement in breast cancer detection. However, several studies demonstrated that this change was not sufficient to ensure optimal image quality at a low radiation dose. In particular, the 1985 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends identified the wide variations in image quality and radiation dose, even from dedicated units. During this time period, the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched its Breast Cancer Awareness Screening Campaign. However, there were concerns about the ability of radiology to respond to the increased demand for optimal screening examinations that would result from the ACS program. To respond to these concerns, the ACS and the American College of Radiology (ACR) established a joint committee on mammography screening in 1986. After much discussion, it was decided to use the ACR Diagnostic Practice Accreditation Program as a model for the development of a mammography accreditation program. However, some constraints were required in order to make the program meet the needs of the ACS. This voluntary, peer review program had to be timely and cost effective. It was determined that the best way to address these needs would be to conduct the program by mail. Finally, by placing emphasis on the educational nature of the program, it would provide an even greater opportunity for improving mammographic quality. The result of this effort was that, almost six years ago, in May 1987, the pilot study for the ACR Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) began, and in August of that year, the first applications were received. In November 1987, the first 3-year accreditation certificates were awarded.

  9. Distinctions among Accreditation Agencies for Business Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Charles P.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, business accreditation has become a growth industry. In 1988, some eleven percent of business programs were accredited by an accrediting body devoted solely to business program accreditation. Today, over forty-two percent boast of such external validation of their programs. Although the three principal accrediting…

  10. Accrediting industrial safety training programs

    SciTech Connect

    Beitel, L.

    1992-01-01

    There are job-specific training requirements established by regulations that Impose stringent training requirements on a contractor, for example, the Occupational Safety Health Act (OSHA). Failure to comply with OSHA training requirements can result in severe penalties being levied against a company. Although an accredited training program is expensive, it is a possible solution for minimizing risks associated with job-specific training requirements for employees. Operating DOE contractors direct approximately 10 percent of the operating funds toward training activities. Training needs for contractors span a broad range, from requirements awareness training for managers, to general training required on a one-time basis for all employees, to highly specialized training programs for employees involved In clean-up operations at hazardous waste sites. With this kind of an investment in training, it is logical to maximize the most return on an investment of training funds and to limit exposure to liability suits whenever possible. This presentation will provide an overview of accredited industrial safety programs. The criteria for accredited industrial safety programs will be defined. The question of whether accredited training programs are necessary will be examined. Finally, advantages and disadvantages will be identified for accrediting industrial safety training programs.

  11. Accrediting industrial safety training programs

    SciTech Connect

    Beitel, L.

    1992-12-31

    There are job-specific training requirements established by regulations that Impose stringent training requirements on a contractor, for example, the Occupational Safety & Health Act (OSHA). Failure to comply with OSHA training requirements can result in severe penalties being levied against a company. Although an accredited training program is expensive, it is a possible solution for minimizing risks associated with job-specific training requirements for employees. Operating DOE contractors direct approximately 10 percent of the operating funds toward training activities. Training needs for contractors span a broad range, from requirements awareness training for managers, to general training required on a one-time basis for all employees, to highly specialized training programs for employees involved In clean-up operations at hazardous waste sites. With this kind of an investment in training, it is logical to maximize the most return on an investment of training funds and to limit exposure to liability suits whenever possible. This presentation will provide an overview of accredited industrial safety programs. The criteria for accredited industrial safety programs will be defined. The question of whether accredited training programs are necessary will be examined. Finally, advantages and disadvantages will be identified for accrediting industrial safety training programs.

  12. Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Richard M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Three articles on accreditation by Richard M. Millard, Robert A. Scott, and David E. Sumler cover ensuring the quality of programs and institutions, the accreditation process and what accreditation is needed by higher education institutions, and the cooperation between the Maryland state agency and a regional accreditation body. (MLW)

  13. Accreditation of Industrial Engineering Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, George H.

    The guidelines used in the accreditation of industrial engineering programs are discussed. Changes that have taken place in engineering curriculum are described, along with the philosophy of educators in formulating industrial engineering program requirements in the areas of faculty, facilities, curriculum, administration, and scholastic work.…

  14. Assessment of Competence: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/Residency Review Committee Perspective.

    PubMed

    Potts, John R

    2016-02-01

    Competency is an individual trait. As an agency that accredits programs and institutions, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) does not define or access competency. However, in the past 15 years the ACGME has promulgated several initiatives to aid programs in the assessment of the competence of their residents and fellows. Those initiatives include the Outcomes Project (which codified the competencies), the Milestones, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review Program. In the near future, the ACGME will implement an initiative by which programs can develop and study the results of competency-based residency curricula.

  15. Accreditation of Developmental Disabilities Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Richard; Braddock, David

    1988-01-01

    Data gathered from 296 agency accreditation surveys, conducted by the Accreditation Council on Services for People with Developmental Disabilities, were analyzed, focusing on ownership, services provided, size of residential units, critical standards, characteristics of individuals served, and accreditation outcome. Redundancies between private…

  16. Administrative Practices of Accredited Adventure Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Michael, Ed.

    In response to the growth and diversification of adventure programming, the Association for Experiential Education developed an accreditation process that addresses both the fluid nature of adventure programming and the need for specificity in standards. This book describes exemplary administrative practices and policies of accredited adventure…

  17. Accreditation standards for undergraduate forensic science programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Marilyn Tebbs

    Undergraduate forensic science programs are experiencing unprecedented growth in numbers of programs offered and, as a result, student enrollments are increasing. Currently, however, these programs are not subject to professional specialized accreditation. This study sought to identify desirable student outcome measures for undergraduate forensic science programs that should be incorporated into such an accreditation process. To determine desirable student outcomes, three types of data were collected and analyzed. All the existing undergraduate forensic science programs in the United States were examined with regard to the input measures of degree requirements and curriculum content, and for the output measures of mission statements and student competencies. Accreditation procedures and guidelines for three other science-based disciplines, computer science, dietetics, and nursing, were examined to provide guidance on accreditation processes for forensic science education programs. Expert opinion on outcomes for program graduates was solicited from the major stakeholders of undergraduate forensic science programs-forensic science educators, crime laboratory directors, and recent graduates. Opinions were gathered by using a structured Internet-based survey; the total response rate was 48%. Examination of the existing undergraduate forensic science programs revealed that these programs do not use outcome measures. Of the accreditation processes for other science-based programs, nursing education provided the best model for forensic science education, due primarily to the balance between the generality and the specificity of the outcome measures. From the analysis of the questionnaire data, preliminary student outcomes, both general and discipline-specific, suitable for use in the accreditation of undergraduate forensic science programs were determined. The preliminary results were reviewed by a panel of experts and, based on their recommendations, the outcomes

  18. Integrating Accreditation Criteria into Educational Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Gail L.; Sauter, Marcia

    1998-01-01

    Describes theory-driven evaluation and illustrates the application of a conceptual framework for nursing program evaluation. For each evaluation type, lists recommended actions and corresponding National League for Nursing accreditation criteria. (SK)

  19. Supplement to listing of accredited doctoral, internship, and postdoctoral training programs in professional psychology.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The Commission on Accreditation has provided a list announcing the following status changes for Accredited doctoral (clinical, counseling, school, or a combination thereof and developed practice area), doctoral internship, and postdoctoral residency programs in professional psychology as of April 1, 2016. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Supplement to Listing of Accredited Doctoral, Internship, and Postdoctoral Training Programs in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Committee on Accreditation announces changes in the listing of accredited doctoral (clinical, counseling, school, and combined professional-scientific), internship, and postdoctoral residency programs in professional psychology. These changes update the listing in the December 2006 issue of the American Psychologist [see EJ751413].

  1. Supplement to listing of accredited doctoral, internship, and postdoctoral training programs in professional psychology.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The Commission on Accreditation has provided a list announcing the following status changes for Accredited doctoral (clinical, counseling, school, or a combination thereof and developed practice area), doctoral internship, and postdoctoral residency programs in professional psychology as of April 1, 2016. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504578

  2. 75 FR 59605 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Currently Accredited Veterinarians Performing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... United States and internationally. On December 9, 2009 (74 FR 64998-65013, Docket No. APHIS-2006- 0093... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 161 RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary Accreditation Program... National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) may continue to perform accredited duties and to elect...

  3. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Masse, F.X; Eisenhower, E.H.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory.

  4. Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) or APA Doctoral Accreditation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Thomas J.

    The Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), as a corporate affiliate of the American Association for Counseling and Development, is the accrediting agency for the world's largest association for counseling. CACREP has been in consultation with the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA) staff…

  5. Characteristics of Combined Family Practice-Psychiatry Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Whelchel, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate how family practice-psychiatry residency programs meet the challenges of rigorous accreditation demands, clinical supervision, and boundaries of practice. Method: A 54-question survey of program directors of family practice-psychiatry residency programs outlining program demographic data, curricula, coordination, resident…

  6. 76 FR 78814 - National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program; Operating Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology 15 CFR Part 285 RIN 0693-AB61 National Voluntary Laboratory... Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive... Chief, National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program, National Institute of Standards...

  7. 77 FR 31362 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From the Community Health Accreditation Program for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... the Community Health Accreditation Program for Continued Approval of Its Hospice Accreditation Program... conditions. A national accrediting organization applying for approval of its accreditation program under part... for continued approval of its accreditation program every 6 years or as we determine. Community...

  8. Accreditation of Allied Medical Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Medical Education.

    Prepared by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association with the cooperation of collaborating organizations, this document is a collection of guidelines for accredited programs for medical assistants, nuclear medicine technology, orthopedic assistants, radiation therapy technology, and radiologic technologists. The…

  9. A survey of state financing of psychiatry residency programs.

    PubMed

    Magen, J G; Banazak, D A; Dahn, J

    1998-09-01

    With upcoming cuts in graduate medical education funding, it is likely that many psychiatry residencies will be searching for new sources of revenue. State funding of residency programs is one possible avenue. The authors surveyed all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited psychiatry residency programs to assess the present dimensions of state funding. Some programs in both publicly funded and private settings receive large proportions of their budgets from the state. Service commitments are common. State support of psychiatry residency education is currently an important source of funding and could become even more important in the near future. PMID:24442943

  10. Accreditation in the Professions: Implications for Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlakis, Alexandra; Kelley, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Program accreditation is a process based on a set of professional expectations and standards meant to signal competency and credibility. Although accreditation has played an important role in shaping educational leadership preparation programs, recent revisions to accreditation processes and standards have highlighted attention to the purposes,…

  11. Improving Outcome Assessment in Information Technology Program Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goda, Bryan S.; Reynolds, Charles

    2010-01-01

    As of March 2010, there were fourteen Information Technology programs accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, known as ABET, Inc (ABET Inc. 2009). ABET Inc. is the only recognized institution for the accreditation of engineering, computing, and technology programs in the U.S. There are currently over 128 U.S. schools…

  12. DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program administration

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP), organizational responsibilities, and the accreditation process. DOELAP evaluates and accredits personnel dosimetry and radiobioassay programs used for worker monitoring and protection at DOE and DOE contractor sites and facilities as required in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. The purpose of this technical standard is to establish procedures for administering DOELAP and acquiring accreditation.

  13. Strategic issues for the successful merger of residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Tasman, A; Riba, M

    1993-10-01

    Retrenchment in federal financing, more stringent residency accreditation standards, fewer psychiatric residents, and other factors are putting increased pressure on psychiatric residency training programs to collaborate with or even merge with other residency programs. To improve the likelihood that a collaboration or merger of psychiatric residencies will work, administrators must address such issues as educational philosophy, goals of education and training, governance of the combined program, the impact on faculty and trainees, and the separate institutional cultures. Experiences from the merger of the residency programs at the Institute of Living and the University of Connecticut illustrate some of the factors.

  14. Characteristics of anesthesiology residency program directors.

    PubMed

    Long, Timothy R; Brown, Michael J; Elliott, Beth A; Rose, Steven H

    2010-12-01

    The roles and responsibilities of anesthesiology core program directors have evolved, in part because the Anesthesiology Residency Review Committee of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education no longer requires that the department chair also serve in this role. We reviewed several core anesthesiology program director academic and demographic characteristics including age, academic rank, gender, duration of service, board certification and re-certification status, and whether the program director also serves as department chair. Anesthesiology core residency program directors range in age from 33 to 74 years, with a median of 52 years. Thirty-seven (28%) program directors are women. The majority (67%) have senior academic rank (professor or associate professor). The median appointment duration is 3.7 years. The core residency program director currently also serves as department chair in 24 of the 131 (18.3%) programs.

  15. Basis of Accreditation for Educational Programs in Allied Medical Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed as a guide to accreditation for educational programs in the allied medical disciplines in Canada, this report provides educators with guidelines, general requirements and requirements for specific programs. Following information on the organization, structure, goals and terminology of accreditation of allied medical programs in Canada,…

  16. Reputation Cycles: The Value of Accreditation for Undergraduate Journalism Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blom, Robin; Davenport, Lucinda D.; Bowe, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Accreditation is among various outside influences when developing an ideal journalism curriculum. The value of journalism accreditation standards for undergraduate programs has been studied and is still debated. This study discovers views of opinion leaders in U.S. journalism programs, as surveyed program directors give reasons for being…

  17. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program proficiency testing for Thermal Insulation Materials Laboratory Accreditation Program Round 9 - August 1983. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Horlick, J.

    1984-06-01

    The National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) is a federal program which accredits testing laboratories satisfying published criteria. One Laboratory Accreditation Program (LAP) accredits laboratories for thermal insulation materials test methods. Participation in proficiency testing is required for certain test methods including: settled density, smoldering combustion, surface flammability, and thermal conductivity. Analyses and summaries of the test data returned by 30 laboratories for these methods for Insulation LAP Proficiency Testing Round 9 are reported. A description of NVLAP proficiency testing and how it fits into the laboratory evaluation process is given.

  18. Accreditation of Health Educational Programs. Part 1: Staff Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Study of Accreditation of Selected Health Educational Programs, Washington, DC.

    This publication contains the first set of working papers concerned with structure, financing, research, and expansion as they relate to the accreditation of health education programs conducted by professional agencies. Texts of these papers are included: (1) "Historical Introduction to Accreditation of Health Educational Programs" by W.K. Selden,…

  19. Research Training in Doctoral Programs Accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, L. DiAnne; Wester, Kelly L.; Fickling, Melissa J.; Adamson, Nicole A.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty in 38 doctoral counselor education programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs identified the quantitative and qualitative designs and other research topics that were covered in required and elective course work, discipline of course instructors, and opportunities for doctoral…

  20. Position Paper: General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry Programs: Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    The currently used internal and external program evaluation processes for general practice residency and advanced education in general dentistry programs are discussed, noting accrediting and evaluation groups, criteria, and designs. A generalized evaluation plan is proposed. (MSE)

  1. Standards for Accreditation of Master's Programs in Library & Information Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association, Chicago, IL. Office for Accreditation.

    These standards for the accreditation of graduate programs of library and information studies leading to a master's degree are a result of review and revision of the "Standards for Accreditation 1972." Six areas are addressed: (1) Mission, Goals and Objectives; (2) Curriculum; (3) Faculty; (4) Students; (5) Administration and Financial Support;…

  2. Inclusion of Substance Abuse Training in CACREP-Accredited Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salyers, Kathleen M.; Ritchie, Martin H.; Luellen, Wendy S.; Roseman, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    Professional counselors and counselors-in-training continue to serve clients who have substance abuse issues, yet systematic training in substance abuse counseling is not available to many counselors. The authors investigated the extent to which students in programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational…

  3. Inclusion of Substance Abuse Training in CACREP-Accredited Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salyers, Kathleen M.; Ritchie, Martin H.; Cochrane, Wendy S.; Roseman, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    Professional counselors and counselors-in-training continue to serve clients who have substance abuse issues, yet systematic training in substance abuse counseling is not available to many counselors. The authors investigated the extent to which students in programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational…

  4. Accredited Postsecondary Institutions and Programs. Including Institutions Holding Preaccredited Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Leslie, W.; Green, Yvonne W.

    This is the fifth edition of a list of postsecondary educational institutions and programs that are accredited by, or that have preaccredited status awarded by, the regional and national accrediting agencies formally recognized by the Secretary of Education. In addition to the lists of postsecondary specialized and vocational institutions and…

  5. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents: A flexible informatics curriculum linked to Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education milestones

    PubMed Central

    Henricks, Walter H; Karcher, Donald S; Harrison, James H; Sinard, John H; Riben, Michael W; Boyer, Philip J; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics have been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: The objective of the study is to develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:27563486

  6. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested; Macario, Alex

    2016-04-15

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the resident with the most patients, and in 2014, this equaled 48%. There were residents who had 75% more than the class average number of cases for several of the 12 case types and 3 procedure types required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Also, there were residents with fewer than half as many for some of the required cases or procedure types. Some of the variability may have been because of the hazards of self-reporting.

  7. National voluntary laboratory accreditation program: Energy efficient lighting products. Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Galowin, L.S.; Hall, W.; Rossiter, W.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to set out procedures and technical requirements for the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) accreditation of laboratories which perform test methods covered by the Energy Efficient Lighting (EEL) Products program. It complements and supplements the NVLAP programmatic procedures and general requirements found in NIST Handbook 150 (PB94-178225). The interpretive comments and additional requirements contained in this handbook make the general NVLAP criteria specifically applicable to the EEL program.

  8. Religion and Spirituality in Variously Accredited Counselor Training Programs: A Comment on Pate and High (1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Eugene W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Extends Pate and High's study of Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and other Related Education Program (CACREP) accredited programs. Focusing on the attention given to religion and spirituality in programs accredited by several different counselor and therapist-training accrediting bodies, found that many programs do not address client…

  9. 77 FR 37678 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Continued Approval of Its Ambulatory Surgery Facilities Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, HHS... application from the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF)...

  10. 76 FR 17367 - National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program; Operating Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology 15 CFR Part 285 RIN 0693-AB61 National Voluntary Laboratory..., Chief, National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program, National Institute of Standards and..., Conformity assessment, Laboratories, Measurement standards, Testing. For the reasons set forth in...

  11. ADN Programs Accredited by the National League for Nursing, 1974

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nursing Outlook, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The complete list of programs leading to an associate degree in nursing that are accredited by the National League for Nursing is presented, without annotation. The institutions are listed alphabetically by State. (Author/AJ)

  12. Residency and Fellowship Programs for RNs and Advanced Practice RNs.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Sheryl

    2015-09-01

    In this month's column, the Senior Accreditation Operations Manager of the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) discusses the value of nursing residency programs and current discussion in the profession, along with criteria offered by the ANCC to support this imperative for both RNs and advanced practice RNs including new graduates and those transitioning between clinical settings.

  13. SU-B-213-04: Evaluation of Residency Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Reft, C.

    2015-06-15

    The North American medical physics community validates the education received by medical physicists and the clinical qualifications for medical physicists through accreditation of educational programs and certification of medical physicists. Medical physics educational programs (graduate education and residency education) are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP), whereas medical physicists are certified by several organizations, the most familiar of which is the American Board of Radiology (ABR). In order for an educational program to become accredited or a medical physicist to become certified, the applicant must meet certain specified standards set by the appropriate organization. In this Symposium, representatives from both CAMPEP and the ABR will describe the process by which standards are established as well as the process by which qualifications of candidates for accreditation or certification are shown to be compliant with these standards. The Symposium will conclude with a panel discussion. Learning Objectives: Recognize the difference between accreditation of an educational program and certification of an individual Identify the two organizations primarily responsible for these tasks Describe the development of educational standards Describe the process by which examination questions are developed GS is Executive Secretary of CAMPEP.

  14. The next accreditation system in radiology: a report from the APDR residency structure committee.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Brandi T; Paladin, Angelisa M; Oldham, Sandra A; Hudson, Kathleen T; Weissman, Barbara N; Wissman, Robert D; Davis, Lawrence P; Reddy, Gautham P; Heitkamp, Darel E

    2014-04-01

    In a move to emphasize the educational outcomes of training programs, the ACGME has created the Next Accreditation System (NAS). The stated goals of NAS include aiding the ACGME in the accreditation of programs based on educational outcome measures, decreasing program burdens associated with the conventional process-based approach to ACGME accreditation, allowing good programs to innovate while enabling struggling programs to steadily improve, and providing public accountability for outcomes. Diagnostic radiology is among the first group of specialties to undergo NAS implementation and began operating under the NAS in July 2013. This article describes the various components of the NAS and explains the new elements, including the clinical learning environment review program, the milestones, the clinical competency committee, and the self-study visits.

  15. Enhancing Teamwork Between Chief Residents and Residency Program Directors: Description and Outcomes of an Experiential Workshop

    PubMed Central

    McPhillips, Heather A.; Frohna, John G.; Murad, M. Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A.; Brigham, Timothy P.; Doughty, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Background An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. Methods The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Results Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Conclusion Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief

  16. A Case Study of the Impact of a Sytematic Evaluation Process in a Graduate Medical Education Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kromrei, Heidi T.

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has charged institutions that sponsor accredited Graduate Medical Education programs (residency and fellowship specialty programs) with overseeing implementation of mandatory annual program evaluation efforts to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. Physicians receive scant, if…

  17. Manual of Accreditation Standards for Adventure Programs 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, John E., Comp.; Gass, Michael, Comp.

    This manual presents standards for adventure education programs seeking accreditation from the Association for Experiential Education. The manual is set up sequentially, focusing both on objective standards such as technical risk management aspects, and on subjective standards such as teaching approaches used in programs. Chapter titles provide…

  18. Delegation and Empowerment in CAATE Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, Johanna; White, Kristi; Starkey, Chad; Krause, B. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Context: The use of delegation can potentially alleviate some of the stress with administering an athletic training education program (ATEP) and allow program directors (PDs) to focus on other aspects of their academic role. Objectives: To determine the reasons PDs delegate and do not delegate tasks to other faculty of ATEPs accredited by the…

  19. Accreditation Standards for Camp Programs and Services. Revised 1998 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    The American Camping Association (ACA) accreditation program aims to educate camp owners and directors in the administration of key aspects of camp operation, particularly those related to program quality and the health and safety of campers and staff, and to assist the public in selecting camps that meet industry-accepted and…

  20. NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory Awarded Accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, James C.; Cooper, Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) provides a comprehensive array of acoustical testing services, including sound pressure level, sound intensity level, and sound-power-level testing per International Standards Organization (ISO)1 3744. Since its establishment in September 2000, the ATL has provided acoustic emission testing and noise control services for a variety of customers, particularly microgravity space flight hardware that must meet International Space Station acoustic emission requirements. The ATL consists of a 23- by 27- by 20-ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic test chamber and a separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. The ATL employs a personal-computer-based data acquisition system that provides up to 26 channels of simultaneous data acquisition with real-time analysis (ref. 4). Specialized diagnostic tools, including a scanning sound-intensity system, allow the ATL's technical staff to support its clients' aggressive low-noise design efforts to meet the space station's acoustic emission requirement. From its inception, the ATL has pursued the goal of developing a comprehensive ISO 17025-compliant quality program that would incorporate Glenn's existing ISO 9000 quality system policies as well as ATL-specific technical policies and procedures. In March 2003, the ATL quality program was awarded accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for sound-power-level testing in accordance with ISO 3744. The NVLAP program is administered by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the U.S. Department of Commerce and provides third-party accreditation for testing and calibration laboratories. There are currently 24 NVLAP-accredited acoustical testing laboratories in the United States. NVLAP accreditation covering one or more specific testing procedures conducted in accordance with established test standards is awarded upon successful completion of an intensive

  1. Reflections in a time of transition: orthopaedic faculty and resident understanding of accreditation schemes and opinions on surgical skills feedback

    PubMed Central

    Gundle, Kenneth R.; Mickelson, Dayne T.; Hanel, Doug P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Orthopaedic surgery is one of the first seven specialties that began collecting Milestone data as part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System (NAS) rollout. This transition from process-based advancement to outcome-based education is an opportunity to assess resident and faculty understanding of changing paradigms, and opinions about technical skill evaluation. Methods In a large academic orthopaedic surgery residency program, residents and faculty were anonymously surveyed. A total of 31/32 (97%) residents and 29/53 (55%) faculty responded to Likert scale assessments and provided open-ended responses. An internal end-of-rotation audit was conducted to assess timeliness of evaluations. A mixed-method analysis was utilized, with nonparametric statistical testing and a constant-comparative qualitative method. Results There was greater familiarity with the six core competencies than with Milestones or the NAS (p<0.05). A majority of faculty and residents felt that end-of-rotation evaluations were not adequate for surgical skills feedback. Fifty-eight per cent of residents reported that end-of-rotation evaluations were rarely or never filled out in a timely fashion. An internal audit demonstrated that more than 30% of evaluations were completed over a month after rotation end. Qualitative analysis included themes of resident desire for more face-to-face feedback on technical skills after operative cases, and several barriers to more frequent feedback. Discussion The NAS and outcome-based education have arrived. Residents and faculty need to be educated on this changing paradigm. This transition period is also a window of opportunity to address methods of evaluation and feedback. In our orthopaedic residency, trainees were significantly less satisfied than faculty with the amount of technical and surgical skills feedback being provided to trainees. The quantitative and qualitative analyses converge on one

  2. US dermatology residency program rankings.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wen, Ge; Wu, Jashin J

    2014-10-01

    Unlike many other adult specialties, US News & World Report does not rank dermatology residency programs annually. We conducted a study to rank individual US dermatology residency programs based on set criteria. For each residency program, data from 2008 related to a number of factors were collected, including annual amount of National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Dermatology Foundation (DF) funding received; number of publications from full-time faculty members; number of faculty lectures given at 5 annual society meetings; and number of full-time faculty members who were on the editorial boards of 6 dermatology journals with the highest impact factors. Most of the data were obtained through extensive Internet searches, and missing data were obtained by contacting individual residency programs. The programs were ranked based on the prior factors according to a weighted ranking algorithm. A list of overall rankings also was created.

  3. Study of Accreditation of Selected Health Educational Programs. Commission Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Accrediting, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings and recommendations resulting from a study of the accreditation of 15 selected health education programs by a 13-member study commission. Section I of the report presents a summation of the basic issues and problems considered by the commission, including such issues as: (1) accountability, structure, financing,…

  4. 10 CFR 430.25 - Laboratory Accreditation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Procedures § 430.25 Laboratory Accreditation Program. Testing for fluorescent lamp ballasts performed in... service fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector lamps shall be... that test for compliance with standards for fluorescent lamp ballast luminous efficiency (BLE),...

  5. 10 CFR 430.25 - Laboratory Accreditation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Procedures § 430.25 Laboratory Accreditation Program. Testing for fluorescent lamp ballasts performed in... fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector lamps shall be performed in accordance with Appendix R to this subpart. The testing for medium base compact fluorescent lamps shall...

  6. 10 CFR 430.25 - Laboratory Accreditation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Procedures § 430.25 Laboratory Accreditation Program. Testing for fluorescent lamp ballasts performed in... fluorescent lamps, general service incandescent lamps, and incandescent reflector lamps shall be performed in accordance with Appendix R to this subpart. The testing for medium base compact fluorescent lamps shall...

  7. 10 CFR 430.25 - Laboratory Accreditation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Procedures § 430.25 Laboratory Accreditation Program. The testing for general service fluorescent lamps... Appendix R to this subpart. The testing for medium base compact fluorescent lamps shall be performed in... standards for lamp efficacy and CRI are set forth in 15 CFR part 285. A manufacturer's or importer's...

  8. 10 CFR 430.25 - Laboratory Accreditation Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures § 430.25 Laboratory Accreditation Program. The testing for general service fluorescent lamps... Appendix R to this subpart. The testing for medium base compact fluorescent lamps shall be performed in... standards for lamp efficacy and CRI are set forth in 15 CFR part 285. A manufacturer's or importer's...

  9. 75 FR 57658 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    .... List of Subjects 9 CFR Part 91 Animal diseases, Animal welfare, Exports, Livestock, Reporting and... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 91 and 162 RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA....

  10. The Next Accreditation System.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Lynne M

    2016-02-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has implemented a new accreditation system for graduate medical education in the United States. This system, called the Next Accreditation System, focuses on more continuous monitoring of the outcomes of residency training, and for high-quality programs, less on the detailed processes of that training. This allows programs to innovate to best meet the needs of their trainees and communities. This new system also reviews the clinical learning environment at each institution sponsoring graduate medical education, focusing on professionalism, trainee supervision, duty hour and fatigue management, care transitions, and integration of residents into patient safety and health care quality. This Next Accreditation System is too new to fully assess its outcomes in better preparing residents for medical practice. Assessments of its early implementation, however, suggest we can expect such outcomes in the near future. PMID:26859375

  11. A theory-informed, process-oriented Resident Scholarship Program

    PubMed Central

    Thammasitboon, Satid; Darby, John B.; Hair, Amy B.; Rose, Karen M.; Ward, Mark A.; Turner, Teri L.; Balmer, Dorene F.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to provide curricula for residents to engage in scholarly activities but does not specify particular guidelines for instruction. We propose a Resident Scholarship Program that is framed by the self-determination theory (SDT) and emphasize the process of scholarly activity versus a scholarly product. Methods The authors report on their longitudinal Resident Scholarship Program, which aimed to support psychological needs central to SDT: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. By addressing those needs in program aims and program components, the program may foster residents’ intrinsic motivation to learn and to engage in scholarly activity. To this end, residents’ engagement in scholarly processes, and changes in perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness were assessed. Results Residents engaged in a range of scholarly projects and expressed positive regard for the program. Compared to before residency, residents felt more confident in the process of scholarly activity, as determined by changes in increased perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Scholarly products were accomplished in return for a focus on scholarly process. Conclusions Based on our experience, and in line with the SDT, supporting residents’ autonomy, competence, and relatedness through a process-oriented scholarship program may foster the curiosity, inquisitiveness, and internal motivation to learn that drives scholarly activity and ultimately the production of scholarly products. PMID:27306995

  12. High-dose secondary calibration laboratory accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    There is a need for high-dose secondary calibration laboratories to serve the multi-billion dollar radiation processing industry. This need is driven by the desires of industry for less costly calibrations and faster calibration-cycle response time. Services needed include calibration irradiations of routine processing dosimeters and the supply of reference standard transfer dosimeters for irradiation in the production processing facility. In order to provide measurement quality assurance and to demonstrate consistency with national standards, the high-dose secondary laboratories would be accredited by means of an expansion of an existing National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program. A laboratory performance criteria document is under development to implement the new program.

  13. Enhancing Professionalism in Academic Agricultural Communications Programs: The Role of Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Mark; Whaley, Sherrie R.; Whiting, Larry; Agunga, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of the accreditation process as it relates to academic agricultural communications programs. Reports results of an electronic mail survey regarding the perceptions of 16 agricultural communications faculty as to the need for accreditation. Discusses the merits of national accreditation standards. (Contains 20 references.) (JOW)

  14. Designing and implementing a resiliency program for family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Julie; McGrady, Angele

    2015-01-01

    Family medicine residents are at risk for burnout due to extended work hours, lack of control over their work schedule, and challenging work situations and environments. Building resiliency can prevent burnout and may improve a resident's quality of life and health behavior. This report describes a program designed to build resiliency, the ability to bounce back from stress, in family medicine residents in a medium sized U.S. residency training program. Interactive sessions emphasized building self-awareness, coping skills, strengths and meaning in work, time management, self-care, and connections in and outside of medicine to support resident well-being. System changes which fostered wellness were also implemented. These changes included increasing the availability of fresh fruits in the conference and call room, purchasing an elliptical exercise machine for the on call room, and offering a few minutes of mindfulness meditation daily to the inpatient residents. Results to date show excellent acceptance of the program by trainees, increased consumption of nutritious foods, more personal exercise, and self-reported decreased overreactions to stress. Resiliency programs can effectively serve to meet accreditation requirements while fostering residents' abilities to balance personal and professional demands. PMID:26130769

  15. REQUIREMENTS FOR AN ACCREDITED PROGRAM IN DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Dental Association, Chicago, IL.

    THE COUNCIL WORKS WITHIN THE AUTHORITY OF THE "BYLAWS" OF THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION AND THE NATIONAL COMMISSION ON ACCREDITING. IT PREFERS THAT AN ACCREDITED CURRICULUM IN DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY BE CONDUCTED IN 2- OR 4-YEAR COLLEGE OR POST-HIGH SCHOOL INSTITUTIONS WHICH ARE ACCREDITED OR ELIGIBLE FOR ACCREDITATION. AT AN EARLY STAGE OF…

  16. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  17. IS 2010 and ABET Accreditation: An Analysis of ABET-Accredited Information Systems Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saulnier, Bruce; White, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Many strong forces are converging on information systems academic departments. Among these forces are quality considerations, accreditation, curriculum models, declining/steady student enrollments, and keeping current with respect to emerging technologies and trends. ABET, formerly the Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology, is at…

  18. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health care...

  19. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health care...

  20. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health care...

  1. 42 CFR 488.6 - Other national accreditation programs for hospitals and other providers and suppliers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... national accreditation program for hospitals; psychiatric hospitals; transplant centers, except for kidney transplant centers; SNFs; HHAs; ASCs; RHCs; CORFs; hospices; religious nonmedical health care...

  2. Strategic Faults in Implementation of Hospital Accreditation Programs in Developing Countries: Reflections on the Iranian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Aryankhesal, Aidin

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of hospital accreditation programs is increasingly growing across numerous developing nations. Such initiatives aim to improve quality of care. However, such establishments, mainly incentivized by successful and famous accreditation plans in developed countries, usually suffer from lack of necessary arrangements which, in turn, result in undesired consequences. Indeed, the first priority for such nations, including Iran, is not establishment of accreditation programs, yet strict licensing plans.

  3. Accredited Institutions of Postsecondary Education, Programs, Candidates, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Alt, Kenneth A., Ed.

    A comprehensive guide to institutions of higher learning that are accredited by national and regional accrediting agencies, this annual volume has been published since 1964. Data in each entry have been provided by the accrediting bodies. Admissions officers, counselors, and employers rely upon the accurate and up-to-date information in this…

  4. Ethics and Accreditation in Addictions Counselor Training: Possible Field Placement Issues for CACREP-Accredited Addictions Counseling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    Professional counselors have long been practicing in alcohol and drug treatment settings. However, only recently has the counseling field offered formal recognition of addictions counseling as a specialization through the implementation of accreditation standards for addiction counseling training programs. With the passage of the 2009 standards,…

  5. Allied health deans' and program directors' perspectives of specialized accreditation effectiveness and reform.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sarah S; Morrone, Anastasia S; Gable, Karen E

    2004-01-01

    Criticisms, calls for change, and recommendations for specialized accreditation improvement have been made by individuals or groups external to the daily operations of allied health educational programs, frequently as opinion pieces or articles lacking a research foundation. While there is a great deal of concern related to specialized accreditation, little input has been provided from those within, and integral to, allied health educational programs affected by specialized accreditation standards. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of selected allied health deans and program directors regarding specialized accreditation effectiveness and reform. Survey research was used to study perspectives of allied health deans and program directors located in four-year colleges and universities and in academic health centers and medical schools. Surveys were mailed to program directors offering-programs in clinical laboratory sciences and medical technology, nuclear medicine technology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiation therapy, and radiography. Simultaneously, allied health deans located within these institutions were surveyed. A total of 773 surveys were mailed and 424 valid responses were received, yielding a response rate of 55%. The results affirmed the role of accreditation as an effective system for assuring quality in higher education. The role of specialized accreditation in improving the quality of allied health programs was clearly articulated by the respondents. Respondents voiced strong opposition to governmental or state-level requirements for accountability and emphasized the vital role of peer evaluators. Significant differences in deans' and program directors' perspectives related to specialized accreditation were evident. Whereas deans and program directors agreed with the purposes of specialized accreditation, they expressed less support for the process and effectiveness, and critique and reform, of specialized

  6. Assessor Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gair, Nicholas

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the development of a national accreditation scheme for volunteer assessors in the expeditions section of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award program for young people. Stages of accreditation include wild country experience, introductory learning and preparation, accreditation weekend, and induction assessments. Performance criteria are…

  7. Developing an Accreditation Process for a Computing Faculty with Focus on the IS Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghazzawi, Daniyal; Fardoun, Habib

    2014-01-01

    The 3-year migration of the computing faculty for three undergraduate programs from ad hoc teaching to three accredited programs is the focus of this paper. This journey started after numerous international accreditation organizations were surveyed, and ABET was chosen as the faculty's target. In this paper, the timelines and processes for…

  8. Basis of Accreditation for Educational Programs in Designated Health Science Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed as a guide to accreditation for educational programs in designated health science professions in Canada, this report provides educators with guidelines, general requirements, and requirements for specific programs. Following information on the organization, structure, goals, mission, values, philosophy, and terminology of accreditation of…

  9. A Relationship with a Purpose: Accreditation Facilitation Projects and Early Childhood Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flis, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Describes use of accreditation facilitation projects (AFP) begun in the 1990s to provide varying levels and types of support to early childhood programs engaged in the self-study process for accreditation with the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Presents insights about the early childhood program/AFP relationship related…

  10. Accreditation of University Undergraduate Programs in Nigeria from 2001-2012: Implications for Graduates Employability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dada, M. S.; Imam, Hauwa

    2015-01-01

    This study analysed accreditation exercises of universities undergraduate programs in Nigeria from 2001-2013. Accreditation is a quality assurance mechanism to ensure that undergraduate programs offered in Nigeria satisfies benchmark minimum academic standards for producing graduates with requisite skills for employability. The study adopted the…

  11. [The new residency program in neurological surgery in Spain].

    PubMed

    Lobato, R D; Fernandez Alen, J; Alday, R; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2003-09-01

    A new Residency Program in Neurological Surgery has been recently elaborated by the "Comisión Nacional de Neurocirugía" following the requirement of the National Council of Specialities. This new Program, which will replace the one proposed in 1992, has been designed in a similar way as those applied in countries providing the best neurosurgical training. Changes included deal with the definition of the speciality, and the introduction of new rotations,a resident Log Book, a Tutor with a well defined profil and commitments, a structured planning of academic and clinical objectives, a rotation or training in research, and a planning for continuous evaluation of the progress of the resident. It is likely that an appropriate application of the new Program in Spanish neurosurgical units with accreditation for training will result in formation of highly competent neurosurgeons. However, there are new challenges for improving neurosurgical training and the development of our speciality in Spain, as those related with new legislation regulating resident working hours, or some political decisions changing the mechanisms for controlling the number of resident positions per year. PMID:14506551

  12. Interorganizational networks: fundamental to the Accreditation Canada program.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan I; Nicklin, Wendy; MacDonald, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    Within the Canadian healthcare system, the term population-accountable health network defines the use of collective resources to optimize the health of a population through integrated interventions. The leadership of these networks has also been identified as a critical factor, highlighting the need for creative management of resources in determining effective, balanced sets of interventions. In this article, using specific principles embedded in the Accreditation Canada program, the benefits of a network approach are highlighted, including knowledge sharing, improving the consistency of practice through standards, and a broader systems-and-population view of healthcare delivery across the continuum of care. The implications for Canadian health leaders to leverage the benefits of interorganizational networks are discussed.

  13. Pharmacists teaching in family medicine residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Derek; Muller, Andries; Whelan, Anne Marie; Buxton, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the percentage of family medicine residency programs that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents, the types and extent of teaching provided by pharmacists in family medicine residency programs, and the primary source of funding for the pharmacists. Design Web-based survey. Setting One hundred fifty-eight resident training sites within the 17 family medicine residency programs in Canada. Participants One hundred residency program directors who were responsible for overseeing the training sites within the residency programs were contacted to determine the percentage of training sites in which pharmacists were directly involved in teaching. Pharmacists who were identified by the residency directors were invited to participate in the Web-based survey. Main outcome measures The percentage of training sites for family medicine residency that have pharmacists directly involved in teaching residents. The types and the extent of teaching performed by the pharmacists who teach in the residency programs. The primary source of funding that supports the pharmacists’ salaries. Results More than a quarter (25.3%) of family medicine residency training sites include direct involvement of pharmacist teachers. Pharmacist teachers reported that they spend a substantial amount of their time teaching residents using a range of teaching modalities and topics, but have no formal pharmacotherapy curriculums. Nearly a quarter (22.6%) of the pharmacists reported that their salaries were primarily funded by the residency programs. Conclusion Pharmacists have a role in training family medicine residents. This is a good opportunity for family medicine residents to learn about issues related to pharmacotherapy; however, the role of pharmacists as educators might be optimized if standardized teaching methods, curriculums, and evaluation plans were in place. PMID:21918131

  14. Proficiency testing for thermal insulation materials in the national voluntary laboratory accreditation program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, D.; Horlick, J.

    1983-01-01

    The National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) is administered by the Department of Commerce to accredit testing laboratories upon request. Accreditation is currently available for laboratories that test carpet, thermal insulation materials, and freshly mixed field concrete. Decisions to accredit laboratories are based on evaluation conducted by the National Bureau of Standards which include questionnaires, on-site examination and proficiency testing. This paper discusses the design and operation of the first two years of the proficiency testing portion of the evaluation of laboratories that test thermal insulation materials.

  15. Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accreditation ( CHEA ). CAAHEP is also member of the Association of Specialized & Professional Accreditors ( ASPA ). Powered by: Indigo Interactive Privacy Policy | End-User Agreement | SITE MAP | COPYRIGHTS & PERMISSIONS

  16. 76 FR 52548 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Currently Accredited Veterinarians Performing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... spread of animal diseases throughout the United States and internationally. On December 9, 2009 (74 FR... accredited duties. In a notice published in the Federal Register and effective on September 28, 2010 (75 FR... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 161 RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary...

  17. Preparing School Psychologists for Working with Diverse Students: Does Program Accreditation Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styck, Kara M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which differences exist between accredited and non-accredited school psychology training programs on specific characteristics of training theorized to prepare graduates for working with racially, ethnically, and/or linguistically diverse students. Training directors from each of the 237…

  18. NAEYC Early Childhood Program Standards and Accreditation Criteria: The Mark of Quality in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redleaf Press, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) administers the nation's largest and most widely recognized accreditation system for child care centers, preschools, kindergartens, and other early childhood education programs. The standards and accreditation criteria included in this book were approved by the NAEYC Governing…

  19. Accreditation of Professional Preparation Programs for School Health Educators: The Changing Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Alyson; Goekler, Susan; Auld, M. Elaine; Birch, David A.; Muller, Susan; Wengert, Deitra; Allegrante, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The health education profession is committed to maintaining the highest standards of quality assurance, including accreditation of professional preparation programs in both school and community/public health education. Since 2001, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has increased attention to strengthening accreditation processes for…

  20. Accreditation of Engineering Programs: An Evaluation of Current Practices in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Said, Suhana Mohd; Chow, Chee-Onn; Mokhtar, N.; Ramli, Rahizar; Ya, Tuan Mohd Yusoff Shah Tuan; Sabri, Mohd Faizul Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The curriculum for undergraduate engineering courses in Malaysia is becoming increasingly structured, following the global trend for quality assurance in engineering education, through accreditation schemes. Generally, the accreditation criteria call for the graduates from engineering programs to demonstrate a range of skills, from technical…

  1. Impact of the Nova Scotia School Accreditation Program on Teaching and Student Learning: An Initial Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Christine; Meyer, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    School accreditation is one process currently mandated in Nova Scotia schools to facilitate school improvement efforts. This mixed methods study sought to discover and describe the impact of the Nova Scotia School Accreditation Program (NSSAP) specifically on teaching and student learning in three secondary schools in one school board. Surveys,…

  2. 34 CFR 602.19 - Monitoring and reevaluation of accredited institutions and programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring and reevaluation of accredited institutions and programs. 602.19 Section 602.19 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE SECRETARY'S RECOGNITION OF ACCREDITING AGENCIES The Criteria...

  3. 34 CFR 602.19 - Monitoring and reevaluation of accredited institutions and programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... institution it has accredited that offers distance education or correspondence education. If any such... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring and reevaluation of accredited institutions and programs. 602.19 Section 602.19 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  4. 34 CFR 602.19 - Monitoring and reevaluation of accredited institutions and programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... institution it has accredited that offers distance education or correspondence education. If any such... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring and reevaluation of accredited institutions and programs. 602.19 Section 602.19 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  5. 34 CFR 602.19 - Monitoring and reevaluation of accredited institutions and programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... institution it has accredited that offers distance education or correspondence education. If any such... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Monitoring and reevaluation of accredited institutions and programs. 602.19 Section 602.19 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  6. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors.

    PubMed

    Barajaz, Michelle; Turner, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions. PMID:27507541

  7. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors

    PubMed Central

    Barajaz, Michelle; Turner, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions. PMID:27507541

  8. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors.

    PubMed

    Barajaz, Michelle; Turner, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions.

  9. Accreditation of Gerontology Programs: A Look from Inside

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dussen, Daniel J.; Applebaum, Robert; Sterns, Harvey

    2012-01-01

    For over three decades, there has been considerable discussion about the development of gerontology education in the United States. A debate about accreditation is a logical outgrowth in this evolution. The dialogue about accreditation raises some important questions and gives gerontology an opportunity to further define itself. Accreditation…

  10. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  11. Internship Attainment and Program Policies: Trends in APA-Accredited School Psychology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Thompson, Miriam E.; Mahoney, Emery

    2015-01-01

    Completion of an internship that is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) is considered to be to the "gold standard" for health service psychology training programs. The Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) facilitates a Match process between participating applicants and internship…

  12. US Department of Energy Laboratory Accredition Program (DOELAP) for personnel dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Carlson, R.D.; Loesch, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Accreditation of personnel dosimetry systems is required for laboratories that conduct personnel dosimetry for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Accreditation is a two-step process which requires the participant to pass a proficiency test and an onsite assessment. The DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is a measurement quality assurance program for DOE laboratories. Currently, the DOELAP addresses only dosimetry systems used to assess the whole body dose to personnel. A pilot extremity DOELAP has been completed and routine testing is expected to begin in January 1994. It is expected that participation in the extremity program will be a regulatory requirement by January 1996.

  13. A program to accredit laboratories for reliable testing of pork and horse meat for Trichinella.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Lorry B; Scandrett, W Brad; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2005-09-01

    The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has developed a program to accredit external laboratories to conduct Trichinella digestion assays for export purposes. Accredited laboratories are responsible for staffing, equipment and operating test facilities under the auspices and guidance of the CFIA. The CFIA's Centre for Animal Parasitology provides training, proficiency samples, audits and other support for the accreditation process. The program has also been adapted for use in laboratories conducting Trichinella digestion tests for surveillance and food safety purposes and provides a useful template for others wishing to develop similar systems.

  14. 75 FR 53277 - Notice of Intent To Terminate Selected National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Notice of Intent To Terminate Selected National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) Services AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology... INFORMATION: The National Institute of Standards and Technology administers the National Voluntary...

  15. [MENTORING PROGRAM - ANOTHER FACET OF RESIDENT EDUCATION].

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ami; Kenet, Ron; Biron-Shental, Tal

    2015-08-01

    Medical residents are exposed to physical and emotional pressure and are required to cope with numerous demands during long working hours. Often, the intense workload leads to neglect of possible difficulties and professional and personal growth and empowerment. The Mentoring Program provides each resident with an attending physician mentor to help him or her adjust to the residency and to cope with its demands. The mentor guides the resident in career development and provides support in the event of difficulties. Attending physicians received professional guidance in the objectives and meaning of mentorship and were teamed with residents. The residents completed questionnaires regarding satisfaction and self-confidence before and a year after the mentoring program was established. The program significantly increased their feelings of support, confidence and satisfaction. As the program continued, the mentors' role in guiding the residents was expanded. The Mentoring Program has become an integral part of departmental teaching and team communication. It seems that the mentors, the residents and the department, all benefit from the program. PMID:26480614

  16. Out of the wilderness: flipping the classroom to advance scholarship in an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Dale S

    2014-11-01

    Residents in an internal medicine residency program "flipped the classroom" in a series of learner-centered activities which included the creation of a medical student interest group, a continuing medical education symposium, and a journal supplement focused on wilderness medicine topics in Hawai'i and Asia Pacific. The project encompassed both scholarly activities (discovery, integration, application, and teaching) as well as scholarship (writing for publication). The project advanced the professional formation of residents by developing competencies and producing outcomes that are key features of the ACGME Next Accreditation System.

  17. Out of the wilderness: flipping the classroom to advance scholarship in an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Dale S

    2014-11-01

    Residents in an internal medicine residency program "flipped the classroom" in a series of learner-centered activities which included the creation of a medical student interest group, a continuing medical education symposium, and a journal supplement focused on wilderness medicine topics in Hawai'i and Asia Pacific. The project encompassed both scholarly activities (discovery, integration, application, and teaching) as well as scholarship (writing for publication). The project advanced the professional formation of residents by developing competencies and producing outcomes that are key features of the ACGME Next Accreditation System. PMID:25478292

  18. Program Strengths and Opportunities for Improvement Identified by Residents During ACGME Site Visits in 5 Surgical Specialties.

    PubMed

    Caniano, Donna A; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2016-05-01

    Background There is limited information about how residents in surgical specialties view program strengths and opportunities for improvement (OFIs). Objective This study aggregated surgical residents' perspectives on program strengths and OFIs to determine whether there was agreement in perspectives among residents in 5 surgical specialties. Methods Resident consensus lists of program strengths and areas for improvement were aggregated from site visits reports during 2012 and 2013 for obstetrics and gynecology, orthopaedic surgery, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, and surgery programs. Four trained individuals coded each strength or OFI in 1 of 3 categories: (1) factors common to all specialties; (2) program or institutional resources; and (3) factors unique to surgical specialties. Themes were classified as most frequent when listed by residents in more than 20% of the programs and less frequent when listed by residents in less than 20% of the programs. Results This study included a total of 359 programs, representing 27% to 49% of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited programs in the 5 specialties. The most frequent strengths were progressive autonomy, collegiality, program leadership, and operative volume. Improving research and didactics, increasing faculty teaching and attendance at educational sessions, and increasing the number of nurse practitioners and physician assistants were common OFIs. Conclusions Factors identified as important by surgical residents related to their learning environment, their educational program, and program and institutional support. Across programs in the study, similar attributes were listed as both program strengths and OFIs. PMID:27168889

  19. Putting "Rural" into Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, William A.; Pomerantz, Andrew; Schwartz, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evidence indicates disparities in the number of psychiatrists practicing in rural America compared to urban areas suggesting the need for a greater emphasis on rural psychiatry in residency training programs. The authors offer suggestions for integrating a rural focus in psychiatry residency training to foster greater competency and…

  20. The Apollo Accreditation Program: A web-based Joint Commission International standards compliance management tool.

    PubMed

    Dewan, Shaveta; Sibal, Anupam; Uberoi, R S; Kaur, Ishneet; Nayak, Yogamaya; Kar, Sujoy; Loria, Gaurav; Yatheesh, G; Balaji, V

    2014-01-01

    Creating and implementing processes to deliver quality care in compliance with accreditation standards is a challenging task but even more daunting is sustaining these processes and systems. There is need for frequent monitoring of the gap between the expected level of care and the level of care actually delivered so as to achieve consistent level of care. The Apollo Accreditation Program (AAP) was implemented as a web-based single measurable dashboard to display, measure and compare compliance levels for established standards of care in JCI accredited hospitals every quarter and resulted in an overall 15.5% improvement in compliance levels over one year. PMID:25985559

  1. [The accreditation program of hospital institutions in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Marracino, C J

    1993-01-01

    This document explains and evaluates the strategy adopted and the experience gathered by the Joint Commission for the Development of Quality Assurance for Medical Care, for accreditation and categorization of health care establishments. This Commission is a non governmental and non profit making institution formed by representatives of 12 Scientific Entities, Social Welfare (Social Security) and Union of Private Health Care Establishments, which is giving strength to a volunteer Accreditation Programme in establishments. The promotion of the programme has allowed to evaluate different aspects of the mentioned problematic. Among them: a) Primary Evaluation of Establishments, observing a high influence of small establishments that do not fulfill the basic requirements, b) the need to differentiate between establishments concerning their risks and complexity and c) development of the accreditation manual which has the application methodology and the standards agreed.

  2. Development of a residency program in radiation oncology physics: an inverse planning approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rao F H; Dunscombe, Peter B

    2016-03-08

    Over the last two decades, there has been a concerted effort in North America to organize medical physicists' clinical training programs along more structured and formal lines. This effort has been prompted by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP) which has now accredited about 90 residency programs. Initially the accreditation focused on standardized and higher quality clinical physics training; the development of rounded professionals who can function at a high level in a multidisciplinary environment was recognized as a priority of a radiation oncology physics residency only lately. In this report, we identify and discuss the implementation of, and the essential components of, a radiation oncology physics residency designed to produce knowledgeable and effective clinical physicists for today's safety-conscious and collaborative work environment. Our approach is that of inverse planning, by now familiar to all radiation oncology physicists, in which objectives and constraints are identified prior to the design of the program. Our inverse planning objectives not only include those associated with traditional residencies (i.e., clinical physics knowledge and critical clinical skills), but also encompass those other attributes essential for success in a modern radiation therapy clinic. These attributes include formal training in management skills and leadership, teaching and communication skills, and knowledge of error management techniques and patient safety. The constraints in our optimization exercise are associated with the limited duration of a residency and the training resources available. Without compromising the knowledge and skills needed for clinical tasks, we have successfully applied the model to the University of Calgary's two-year residency program. The program requires 3840 hours of overall commitment from the trainee, of which 7%-10% is spent in obtaining formal training in nontechnical "soft skills".

  3. Development of a residency program in radiation oncology physics: an inverse planning approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rao F H; Dunscombe, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there has been a concerted effort in North America to organize medical physicists' clinical training programs along more structured and formal lines. This effort has been prompted by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP) which has now accredited about 90 residency programs. Initially the accreditation focused on standardized and higher quality clinical physics training; the development of rounded professionals who can function at a high level in a multidisciplinary environment was recognized as a priority of a radiation oncology physics residency only lately. In this report, we identify and discuss the implementation of, and the essential components of, a radiation oncology physics residency designed to produce knowledgeable and effective clinical physicists for today's safety-conscious and collaborative work environment. Our approach is that of inverse planning, by now familiar to all radiation oncology physicists, in which objectives and constraints are identified prior to the design of the program. Our inverse planning objectives not only include those associated with traditional residencies (i.e., clinical physics knowledge and critical clinical skills), but also encompass those other attributes essential for success in a modern radiation therapy clinic. These attributes include formal training in management skills and leadership, teaching and communication skills, and knowledge of error management techniques and patient safety. The constraints in our optimization exercise are associated with the limited duration of a residency and the training resources available. Without compromising the knowledge and skills needed for clinical tasks, we have successfully applied the model to the University of Calgary's two-year residency program. The program requires 3840 hours of overall commitment from the trainee, of which 7%-10% is spent in obtaining formal training in nontechnical "soft skills". PMID

  4. The Teaching of Ethics in Advertising Curricula: An Analysis of ACEJMC Accredited and Non-Accredited Programs and Programs in Business Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardoin, Birthney

    A survey was taken to find answers to questions being asked by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (ACEJMC) about the teaching of ethics. A questionnaire was mailed to the 90 advertising programs listed in the 1983 edition of "Where Shall I Go to College to Study Advertising?" to determine where ethics was…

  5. 42 CFR 413.79 - Direct GME payments: Determination of the weighted number of FTE residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... approved preventive medicine residency or fellowship program also may be counted as a full FTE resident for... in geriatric medicine, accredited by the appropriate approving body listed in § 415.152 of this... a new program was accredited by the appropriate allopathic or osteopathic accrediting body...

  6. DOE standard: The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for radiobioassay

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This technical standard describes the US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) for Radiobioassay, for use by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE Contractor radiobioassay programs. This standard is intended to be used in conjunction with the general administrative technical standard that describes the overall DOELAP accreditation process--DOE-STD-1111-98, Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program Administration. This technical standard pertains to radiobioassay service laboratories that provide either direct or indirect (in vivo or in vitro) radiobioassay measurements in support of internal dosimetry programs at DOE facilities or for DOE and DOE contractors. Similar technical standards have been developed for other DOELAP dosimetry programs. This program consists of providing an accreditation to DOE radiobioassay programs based on successful completion of a performance-testing process and an on-site evaluation by technical experts. This standard describes the technical requirements and processes specific to the DOELAP Radiobioassay Accreditation Program as required by 10 CFR 835 and as specified generically in DOE-STD-1111-98.

  7. A cost benefit analysis of professional accreditation by ABET for baccalaureate engineering degree programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Faye Sui Yee

    Tightening fiscal budgets and the growing emphasis on accountability has created a need to assess the value that programmatic accreditation provides. For degrees in engineering, ABET is the only organization recognized in the U.S. responsible for the programmatic accreditation. This research examines the costs and benefits of ABET accreditation to baccalaureate engineering programs in 4-year degree granting institutions. Engineering department heads, or a designee, completed an online survey containing Likert items, open-ended questions, and multiple-choice questions that addressed the costs and benefits of ABET accreditation. The greatest benefits in pursuing accreditation are the recognition and prestige programs receive and the increased career opportunities for graduates. The greatest costs are time, resources (human capital), and effort due to an over cumbersome process and ambiguous expectations. These factors likely cause programs to perceive the cost of ABET accreditation to slightly exceed the benefits. This research will further discuss the implications of the findings and propose areas for future research.

  8. The Status of Evaluation in ACA Accredited Camping Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.; Bialeschki, M. Deborah

    Questionnaires covering evaluation strategies and practices were sent to directors of 200 camps accredited by the American Camping Association. Half received questionnaires designed to collect quantitative data in the form of yes/no responses and Likert scales; the other half received qualitative questionnaires covering the same information in an…

  9. Impact of a Reaffirmation Accreditation Program on Institutional Assessment Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Karen Michelle

    2012-01-01

    In the period between 2004 and 2006, several publications were released questioning the quality of higher education: One such report was from the 2006 Spellings Commission of the U.S. Secretary of Education, which prompted accrediting agencies to review institutional assessment practices. This research was designed to measure the impact Academy…

  10. Surveyor Management of Hospital Accreditation Program: A Thematic Analysis Conducted in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Ramezani, Mozhdeh; Arab, Mohammad; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Akbari Sari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background The surveyors in hospital accreditation program are considered as the core of accreditation programs. So, the reliability and validity of the accreditation program heavily depend on their performance. Objectives This study aimed to identify the dimensions and factors affecting surveyor management of hospital accreditation programs in Iran. Materials and Methods This qualitative study used a thematic analysis method, and was performed in Iran in 2014. The study participants included experts in the field of hospital accreditation, and were derived from three groups: 1. Policy-makers, administrators, and surveyors of the accreditation bureau, the ministry of health and medical education, Iranian universities of medical science; 2. Healthcare service providers, and 3. University professors and faculty members. The data were collected using semi-structured in-depth interviews. Following text transcription and control of compliance with the original text, MAXQDA10 software was used to code, classify, and organize the interviews in six stages. Results The findings from the analysis of 21 interviews were first classified in the form of 1347 semantic units, 11 themes, 17 sub-themes, and 248 codes. These were further discussed by an expert panel, which then resulted in the emergence of seven main themes - selection and recruitment of the surveyor team, organization of the surveyor team, planning to perform surveys, surveyor motivation and retention, surveyor training, surveyor assessment, and recommendations - as well as 27 sub-themes, and 112 codes. Conclusions The dimensions and variables affecting the surveyors’ management were identified and classified on the basis of existing scientific methods in the form of a conceptual framework. Using the results of this study, it would certainly be possible to take a great step toward enhancing the reliability of surveys and the quality and safety of services, while effectively managing accreditation program surveyors

  11. Transition within a graduate nurse residency program.

    PubMed

    Varner, Kendra D; Leeds, Ruth A

    2012-11-01

    As evidence of the effectiveness of these programs grows, nurse leaders feel the pressure to establish high-quality, yet cost-effective graduate nurse transition programs. In 2009, the authors developed an innovative program by incorporating transition theory, research results, stakeholder involvement, and the recommendations of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing. The graduate nurse residency program yielded positive outcomes, including stakeholder satisfaction and high retention rates. PMID:23061408

  12. The Teacher in Residence Partnership Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttery, Thomas J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This article briefly reviews a program, entitled "Teacher in Residence Partnership Program," involving the Tuscaloosa City School System, the Tuscaloosa County School System, and The University of Alabama's School of Education. Outstanding teachers from the school systems are appointed as fellows and serve as faculty members at the University. (MT)

  13. The practice of clinical research in accredited marriage and family therapy programs.

    PubMed

    McWey, Lenore M; West, Stacy Hernandez; Ruble, Nikki M; Handy, Amy K; Handy, David G; Koshy, Mathen; Mills, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    This study aims to explore the prevalence of clinic-based research among accredited marriage and family therapy (MFT) programs and reveal rationales explaining why academic settings may or may not be conducting clinical research. Findings of this project are the result of electronic-mail surveys completed by 26 accredited MFT programs. Approximately one-half of the respondents reported currently conducting clinic-based research. Open-ended responses reveal factors that lead to research success and failure, as well as reasons research was not being conducted at training programs.

  14. A Survey of Simulation Utilization in Anesthesiology Residency Programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rochlen, Lauryn R; Housey, Michelle; Gannon, Ian; Tait, Alan R; Naughton, Norah; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2016-06-01

    Given the evolution of competency-based education and evidence supporting the benefits of incorporating simulation into anesthesiology residency training, simulation will likely play an important role in the training and assessment of anesthesiology residents. Currently, there are little data available regarding the current status of simulation-based curricula across US residency programs. In this study, we assessed simulation-based training and assessment in US anesthesiology programs using a survey designed to elicit information regarding the type, frequency, and content of the simulation courses offered at the 132 Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-certified anesthesiology training programs. The response rate for the survey was 66%. Although most of the responding programs offered simulation-based courses for interns and residents and during CA-1 orientation, the curriculum varied greatly among programs. Approximately 40% of responding programs use simulation for resident assessment and remediation. The majority of responding programs favored standard simulation-based training as part of residency training (89%), and the most common perceived obstacles to doing so were time, money, and human resources. The results from this survey highlight that there are currently large variations in simulation-based training and assessment among training programs. It also confirms that many program directors feel that standardizing some components of simulation-based education and assessment would be beneficial. Given the positive impact simulation has on skill retention and operating room preparedness, it may be worthwhile to consider developing a standard curriculum.

  15. Teaching Statistics in APA-Accredited Doctoral Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology: A Syllabi Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ord, Anna S.; Ripley, Jennifer S.; Hook, Joshua; Erspamer, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Although statistical methods and research design are crucial areas of competency for psychologists, few studies explore how statistics are taught across doctoral programs in psychology in the United States. The present study examined 153 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology and aimed…

  16. The Model Does Matter II: Admissions and Training in APA-Accredited Counseling Psychology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norcross, John C.; Evans, Krystle L.; Ellis, Jeannette L.

    2010-01-01

    This study collected information on the acceptance rates, admission standards, financial assistance, student characteristics, theoretical orientations, and select outcomes of American Psychological Association-accredited counseling psychology programs (99% response rate). Results are presented collectively for all 66 counseling programs as well as…

  17. Gender and Diversity Topics Taught in Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Ebony Joy; Piercy, Fred P.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how the topics of gender and diversity are being taught and defined in accredited marriage and family therapy programs through syllabi content analysis and interviews with selected faculty. We examined findings by program (master's and doctoral) and type of training (those that taught specific gender and culture courses and…

  18. Technology-Supported Assessment Systems: A Comparison of Accredited and Unaccredited Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haughton, Noela; Keil, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The debate surrounding teacher quality often fails to differentiate effectively between teacher-preparation providers. This failure also extends to distinguishing between teachers prepared in traditional campus-based accredited programs from those prepared in unaccredited campus-based programs. This paper compares assessment infrastructure and…

  19. 75 FR 62693 - National Organic Program: Notice of Draft Guidance for Accredited Certifying Agents and Certified...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Budget (OMB) Bulletin on Agency Good Guidance Practices (GGPs) (January 25, 2007, 72 FR 3432-3440). The... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 205 National Organic Program: Notice of Draft Guidance for Accredited... availability with request for comments. SUMMARY: The National Organic Program (NOP) is announcing...

  20. Research Productivity and Scholarly Impact of APA-Accredited School Psychology Programs: 2005-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranzler, John H.; Grapin, Sally L.; Daley, Matt L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the research productivity and scholarly impact of faculty in APA-accredited school psychology programs using data in the PsycINFO database from 2005 to 2009. We ranked doctoral programs on the basis of authorship credit, number of publications, and number of citations. In addition, we examined the primary publication outlets of…

  1. 34 CFR 602.19 - Monitoring and reevaluation of accredited institutions and programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... measures of student achievement, consistent with the provisions of § 602.16(f). This provision does not... annually, collect headcount enrollment data from those institutions or programs. (d) Institutional accrediting agencies must monitor the growth of programs at institutions experiencing significant...

  2. Of Swans and Ugly Ducklings...Business and Education Program Accreditation Compared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnur, James O.

    1982-01-01

    This article compares the way schools, colleges, or departments of business (SCDBs) and schools, colleges or departments of education (SCDEs) are accredited on such key factors as faculty-to-student ratios, faculty qualifications, program admission, and institutional program support. (CT)

  3. Undergraduate Medical Education Accreditation as a Driver of Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Frank A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the accreditation of medical education programs that lead to the Doctor of Medicine degree in the United States and Canada. We identify select accreditation standards that relate directly to the preparation of medical school graduates, as required for the supervised practice of medicine in residency training and for developing the…

  4. The Teacher-in-Residence Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poda, Janice H.

    1993-01-01

    South Carolina Center for Teacher Recruitment created the Teacher-in-Residence fellowship in 1986, when a classroom teacher and counselor became the first representative to the South Carolina Teacher Cadet Program--a project encouraging bright high school students to consider education careers. The representative helped plan curriculum training…

  5. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; LaMarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills.

  6. Comparison of Accreditation Criteria: CBHDP, NLN, and COA Accreditation Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frels, Lois; Horton, Betty

    1991-01-01

    Presents a detailed comparison of similarities and differences in the accreditation criteria of two nursing accrediting agencies--the National League for Nursing and the Council on Accreditation--as they relate to nurse anesthesiology programs. (JOW)

  7. Wave of the Future?: Integrating IR, Outcomes Assessment, Planning, Program Review, and Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leimer, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Integrating institutional research, outcomes assessment, program review, strategic planning, and accreditation can be a powerful means of creating a culture of evidence-based decision making and continuous improvement. This study examined how this "integrated" model is organized in practice, how such offices began, why this approach was chosen,…

  8. Studying Online: Student Motivations and Experiences in ALA-Accredited LIS Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguz, Fatih; Chu, Clara M.; Chow, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a large scale study of online MLIS students (n = 910), who completed at least one online course and were enrolled in 36 of the 58 ALA-accredited MLIS programs in Canada and the United States. The results indicate that the typical student is female, White, lives in an urban setting, and is in her mid-30s. Online students were…

  9. The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs: Promoting Quality in Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urofsky, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    Much has changed for the counseling profession in the 30 years since the founding of the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). CACREP, the primary specialized accreditor for the counseling profession, has been an influential participant in the growing recognition and professionalization of counseling.…

  10. Of Course: Prerequisite Courses for Admission into APA-Accredited Clinical and Counseling Psychology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.; Stratigis, Katerina Y.; Zimmerman, Barrett E.

    2014-01-01

    Students often inquire about which psychology courses to complete in preparation for graduate school. This study provides data that enable students and their advisors to make research-informed decisions. We surveyed the directors of the 304 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology (97%…

  11. Professional Interaction, Relevant Practical Experience, and Intellectual Contributions at Nondoctoral AACSB-Accredited Accounting Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlinghaus, Barry P.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a survey of faculty members at nondoctoral AACSB-accredited accounting programs in the United States. The purpose of the survey was to determine the environment for professional interaction and relevant experience in light of institutional demands for intellectual contributions. The findings show that the…

  12. Discussion of the Effectiveness of the National Accreditation Process of Secondary Science Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazler, Judith A.; Van Sickle, Meta; Simonis, Doris; Graybill, Letty; Sorenson, Nancy; Brounstein, Erica

    2014-01-01

    This paper reflects upon the development, design, and results of a questionnaire distributed to professors of science education concerning the processes involved in a national accreditation of teacher education programs in science. After a pilot study, five professors/administrators from public and private institutions designed a questionnaire and…

  13. 76 FR 26177 - National Organic Program: Notice of Final Guidance for Accredited Certifying Agents and Certified...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... on five draft guidance documents (75 FR 62693). The topics covered in the draft documents addressed... Guidance Practices (GGPs) (January 25, 2007, 72 FR 3432-3440). The purpose of GGPs is to ensure that... Service 7 CFR Part 205 National Organic Program: Notice of Final Guidance for Accredited Certifying...

  14. Ratings, Quality, and Accreditation: Policy Implications for Educational Communications and Technology Programs in a Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Ellen S.

    2013-01-01

    At a time when higher education is being pushed not only to increase efficiencies to provide greater value and to innovate to meet new global challenges, processes of accountability and accreditation to demonstrate quality may be leading to conformance and a one-size-fits-all model of what institutions and programs should be. Further, in the…

  15. Preservice Legal Education for Academic Librarians within ALA-Accredited Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, William M.; Edwards, Phillip M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to explore the current state of legal education for graduates of LIS programs, we present the results of an examination of the curricula and faculty composition at all 57 institutions that offer ALA-accredited graduate degrees. Concluding that, even under the best circumstances, many students graduate with a limited understanding of legal…

  16. Scholarly Productivity and Impact of School Psychology Faculty in APA-Accredited Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grapin, Sally L.; Kranzler, John H.; Daley, Matt L.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to conduct a normative assessment of the research productivity and scholarly impact of tenured and tenure-track faculty in school psychology programs accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA). Using the PsycINFO database, productivity and impact were examined for the field as a whole and by…

  17. Relationship of Institutional Characteristics to CACREP Accreditation of Doctoral Counselor Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Ronnie Louis, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of accredited doctoral-level counselor education and supervision (CES) programs available to meet the documented and growing need for more qualified and competent professional counselors. The problem addressed via this study is the shortage of trained doctoral-level counselors and counselor faculty to train other counselors due to…

  18. An Evaluative Review of School Accreditation Implementation Program in Indonesian Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haryati, Sri

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically reviews and evaluates the implementation of School Accreditation Program for the period of 2013 with a particular reference to Central Java Schools, consisting of Kindergarten (TK) Elementary School (SD), Junior High School (SMP) and Senior High School (SMA) (Note 1). The aim of the review is to see to what extent they can…

  19. A Successful Experience of ABET Accreditation of an Electrical Engineering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Yahya, S. A.; Abdel-Halim, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The procedures followed and the various factors that led to the ABET accreditation of the College of Engineering, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia, are illustrated and evaluated for the benefit of other similar colleges. Taking the Electrical Engineering (EE) program as an example, this paper describes the procedures followed to implement…

  20. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA) accredits institutions and programs that prepare nurses to become practicing nurse anesthetists. Currently the agency accredits 105 programs located in 35 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, including three single purpose freestanding institutions. The…

  1. First nationwide survey of US integrated 6-year cardiothoracic surgical residency program directors

    PubMed Central

    Lebastchi, Amir H.; Tackett, John J.; Argenziano, Michael; Calhoon, John H.; Gasparri, Mario G.; Halkos, Michael E.; Hicks, George L.; Iannettoni, Mark D.; Ikonomidis, John S.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Starnes, Sandra L.; Tong, Betty C.; Yuh, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The recently implemented integrated 6-year (I-6) format represents a significant change in cardiothoracic surgical residency training. We report the results of the first nationwide survey assessing I-6 program directors' impressions of this new format. Methods A 28-question web-based survey was distributed to program directors of all 24 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited I-6 training programs in November 2013. The response rate was a robust 67%. Results Compared with graduates of traditional residencies, most I-6 program directors with enrolled residents believed that their graduates will be better trained (67%), be better prepared for new technological advances (67%), and have superior comprehension of cardiothoracic disease processes (83%). Just as with traditional program graduates, most respondents believed their I-6 graduates would be able to independently perform routine adult cardiac and general thoracic operations (75%) and were equivocal on whether additional specialty training (eg, minimally invasive, heart failure, aortic) was necessary. Most respondents did not believe that less general surgical training disadvantaged I-6 residents in terms of their career (83%); 67% of respondents would have chosen the I-6 format for themselves if given the choice. The greater challenges in training less mature and experienced trainees and vulnerability to attrition were noted as disadvantages of the I-6 format. Most respondents believed that I-6 programs represent a natural evolution toward improved residency training rather than a response to declining interest among medical school graduates. Conclusions High satisfaction rates with the I-6 format were prevalent among I-6 program directors. However, concerns with respect to training relatively less experienced, mature trainees were evident. PMID:24820188

  2. Attending to Diversity Representation among Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) Master's Programs: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Richard Quentin; Smith, Lance Christian; Goodrich, Kristopher Michael; LaRosa, Nina Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Extant research has neglected to explore the diversity representation of counselor education programs. This pilot study sought to examine the extent to which CACREP-accredited master's-level programs attend to the representation of people of color, individuals with dis/abilities, lesbian, gay, bisexual (LGB), and transgender persons within…

  3. An Australian Consideration of Program Accreditation as a Way of Filling the Gap from Minimum to High Quality Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrea, Nadine L.

    The efforts of Queensland's parents, government officials, and early childhood professionals to raise the quality of child care by developing a voluntary process for accreditation of early childhood programs are described. The envisioned accreditation process would begin with collaborative self-study by child caregivers of the extent to which…

  4. National Skills Standards Development Project. Study of the State of the Art of Certification and Accreditation Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Electronic Industries Foundation, Washington, DC.

    A study of 10 organizations explored how their various certification or accreditation programs were developed, structured, and managed and made observations to guide the development of certification or accreditation for the electronics industry. From November 1994 through January 1995, a phone and fax survey was conducted of these organizations:…

  5. Student Perceptions of Educational Quality in Radiologic Technology Programs: A Comparative Analysis of Specialized and Institutional Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Hoek, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if students' perceptions of quality differed between Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) accredited and non JRCERT-accredited radiography programs using the quality dimensions of curriculum, faculty, facilities and equipment, integrity, student outcomes, and overall…

  6. Family medicine's search for manpower: the American Osteopathic Association accreditation option.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Mark; Kunkle, Judith L; Doane, Cheryl

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, family medicine has encountered problems recruiting and filling its Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited residencies. In addressing these reverses, one increasingly popular strategy has been to acquire American Osteopathic Association (AOA) accreditation as a way to tap into the growing number of osteopathic graduates. This stratagem is founded on assumptions that parallel-accredited postdoctoral programs are attractive to doctor of osteopathy (DO) graduates, that collaboration with sponsoring colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs) provides direct access to osteopathic students, and that DOs can play an important role in replacing the increasing scarcity of United States medical graduates who are selecting specialty residencies. Within the past 5 years, nearly 10% of all ACGME family medicine residency programs have voluntarily obtained a second level of accreditation to also qualify as AOA-accredited family medicine residency programs. This strategy has produced mixed outcomes, as noted from the results of the osteopathic matching program. The flood of osteopathic graduates into these parallel-accredited programs has not occurred. In addition, recent AOA policy changes now require ACGME-accredited programs to make a deeper educational commitment to osteopathic postdoctoral education. The most successful ACGME/AOA-accredited programs have been those that are closely affiliated with and in near proximity of a COM and also train osteopathic students in required clerkship rotations. PMID:16518739

  7. Medical students’ perceptions of international accreditation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Razig, Sawsan; Nair, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to explore the perceptions of medical students in a developing medical education system towards international accreditation. Methods Applicants to an Internal Medicine residency program in an academic medical center in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-International (ACGME-I) were surveyed between May and June 2014. The authors analysed responses using inductive qualitative thematic analysis to identify emergent themes. Results Seventy-eight of 96 applicants (81%) completed the survey. The vast majority of respondents 74 (95%) reported that ACGME-I accreditation was an important factor in selecting a residency program. Five major themes were identified, namely improving the quality of education, increasing opportunities, meeting high international standards, improving program structure, and improving patient care. Seven (10%) of respondents felt they would be in a position to pursue fellowship training or future employment in the United States upon graduation from an ACGME-I program. Conclusions UAE trainees have an overwhelmingly positive perception of international accreditation, with an emphasis on improving the quality of training provided. Misperceptions, however, exist about potential opportunities available to graduates of ACGME-I programs. As more countries adopt the standards of the ACGME-I or other international accrediting bodies, it is important to recognize and foster trainee “buy-in” of educational reform initiatives. PMID:26454402

  8. Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor Abdel-Wahab, May; Spangler, Ann E.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

  9. An Internal Review of a Residency Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Carole J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    At the University of Minnesota Affiliated Hospitals Residency Training Program in Family Practice and Community Health, internal investigators examined the entire affiliated program (the largest family practice residency program in the U.S.) from such aspects as a description of the residents to the administration of affiliated units. Methods and…

  10. ISO/IEC 17025 laboratory accreditation of NRC Acoustical Standards Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, George S. K.; Wu, Lixue; Hanes, Peter; Ohm, Won-Suk

    2001-05-01

    Experience gained during the external accreditation of the Acoustical Standards Program at the Institute for National Measurement Standards of the National Research Council is discussed. Some highlights include the preparation of documents for calibration procedures, control documents with attention to reducing future paper work and the need to maintain documentation or paper trails to satisfy the external assessors. General recommendations will be given for laboratories that are contemplating an external audit in accordance to the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025.

  11. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  12. Professionalizing Gerontology: Why AGHE Must Accredit Gerontology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelham, Anabel; Schafer, Donna; Abbott, Pauline; Estes, Carroll

    2012-01-01

    The aging of society requires more trained aging specialists. Are higher education institutions prepared? Results of a comparison of gerontology programs in 2000 and 2010 indicate that the number of programs has declined and that higher education is not prepared. To address this challenge, the authors propose that gerontology be professionalized.…

  13. Evaluating Scholarship Productivity in COAMFTE-Accredited Phd Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jared DuPree, W.; White, Mark B.; Meredith, William H.; Ruddick, Lindsay; Anderson, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Due to an increasing trend among states to cut higher education funds, many universities are relying more on private donations and federal funding to keep programs afloat. Scholarship productivity in general has become an integral factor in terms of universities granting tenure to faculty, allocating resources, and supporting program goals due to…

  14. Spirituality in the Curricula of Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udermann, Brian E.; Schutte, Greta E.; Reineke, David M.; Pitney, William A.; Gibson, Mark H.; Murray, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to examine if topics related to spirituality were being addressed in the curricula of athletic training education programs (ATEPs) and to investigate whether program directors (PDs) believed this to be a topic worthy of inclusion in ATEP experiences. Design and Setting: A descriptive mixed method study…

  15. Financial Implications of Residency Programs for Sponsoring Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiberger, Michael H.

    1997-01-01

    Explores cost implications of residency programs within the Veterans Administration health care system, particularly the costs and benefits of residencies in family medicine, osteopathic medicine, and general dentistry, because they resemble optometric residencies most closely. Costs of an existing vision therapy residency are examined, and…

  16. 75 FR 73088 - Medicare Program; Application by the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities, Inc. (AAAASF) for Deeming Authority for... Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for recognition as a national accrediting organization for providers...

  17. Effectiveness of iterative interventions to increase research productivity in one residency program

    PubMed Central

    Alweis, Richard; Wenderoth, Suzanne; Donato, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to expose residents to research opportunities. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a series of iterative interventions to increase scholarly activity in one internal medicine residency. Methods Retrospective analysis of the effectiveness of a series of interventions to increase resident and faculty scholarly productivity over a 14-year period was performed using quality improvement methodology. Outcomes measured were accepted regional and national abstracts and PubMed indexed manuscripts of residents and faculty. Results Initially, regional meeting abstracts increased and then were supplanted by national meeting abstracts. Sustained gains in manuscript productivity occurred in the eighth year of interventions, increasing from a baseline of 0.01 publications/FTE/year to 1.57 publications/FTE/year in the final year measured. Run chart analysis indicated special cause variation associated with the interventions performed. Conclusions Programs attempting to stimulate research production among faculty and residents can choose among many interventions cited in the literature. Since success of any group of interventions is likely additive and may take years to show benefit, measuring outcomes using quality improvement methodology may be an effective way to determine success. PMID:26653689

  18. Required Postdoctoral Education Programs in General Dentistry: Accreditation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santangelo, Mario V.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the history and current status of both the predoctoral dental curriculum and general dentistry programs gives insight into the nature and scope of the movement to make postdoctoral dental education a requirement. (MSE)

  19. Chaplain Documentation and the Electronic Medical Record: A Survey of ACPE Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Alexander; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Ford, Timothy; Demm, Charles; Hassell, Alma

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which chaplaincy departments at ACPE-accredited residency programs make use of the electronic medical record (EMR) for documentation and training. Survey data solicited from 219 programs with a 45% response rate and interview findings from 11 centers demonstrate a high level of usage of the EMR as well as an expectation that CPE residents document each patient/family encounter. Centers provided considerable initial training, but less ongoing monitoring of chaplain documentation. Centers used multiple sources to develop documentation tools for the EMR. One center was verified as having created the spiritual assessment component of the documentation tool from a peer reviewed published model. Interviews found intermittent use of the student chart notes for educational purposes. One center verified a structured manner of monitoring chart notes as a performance improvement activity. Findings suggested potential for the development of a standard documentation tool for chaplain charting and training.

  20. Chaplain Documentation and the Electronic Medical Record: A Survey of ACPE Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Alexander; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Ford, Timothy; Demm, Charles; Hassell, Alma

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which chaplaincy departments at ACPE-accredited residency programs make use of the electronic medical record (EMR) for documentation and training. Survey data solicited from 219 programs with a 45% response rate and interview findings from 11 centers demonstrate a high level of usage of the EMR as well as an expectation that CPE residents document each patient/family encounter. Centers provided considerable initial training, but less ongoing monitoring of chaplain documentation. Centers used multiple sources to develop documentation tools for the EMR. One center was verified as having created the spiritual assessment component of the documentation tool from a peer reviewed published model. Interviews found intermittent use of the student chart notes for educational purposes. One center verified a structured manner of monitoring chart notes as a performance improvement activity. Findings suggested potential for the development of a standard documentation tool for chaplain charting and training. PMID:26168408

  1. Research productivity and scholarly impact of APA-accredited school psychology programs: 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Kranzler, John H; Grapin, Sally L; Daley, Matt L

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the research productivity and scholarly impact of faculty in APA-accredited school psychology programs using data in the PsycINFO database from 2005 to 2009. We ranked doctoral programs on the basis of authorship credit, number of publications, and number of citations. In addition, we examined the primary publication outlets of school psychology program faculties and the major themes of research during this time period. We compared our results with those of a similar study that examined data from a decade earlier. Limitations and implications of this study are also discussed.

  2. The role of the EPA radiation quality assurance program in the measurement quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    As the nature and extent of radiological contamination becomes better documented and more public, radioanalytical laboratories are faced with a constantly expanding variety of new and difficult analytical requirements. Concurrent with those requirements is the responsibility to provide customers, regulatory officials, or the public with defensible data produced in an environment of verifiable, controlled quality. To meet that need, a quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories has been proposed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The standard will provide the organizational framework and functional requirements needed to assure the quality of laboratory outputs. Under the proposed program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Laboratory Intercomparison Program plays a key role as a reference laboratory. The current and proposed roles of the EPA Intercomparison Program are discussed, as are the functional relationships between EPA, the accreditating organization, and the service and monitoring laboratories.

  3. Morning Report in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuncharapu, Indumathi; Cass, Alvah R.; Carlson, Carol A.; Scott, Jack R.

    Morning Report (MR) is a frequently held case conference in most Family Medicine (FM) residency programs among medical learners who discuss recent inpatient admissions before the day's care of patients. This study conducted a national survey of FM residency program directors to describe the roles of faculty and residents in facilitating MR.…

  4. 13 CFR 120.840 - Accredited Lenders Program (ALP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (ALP). (a) General. Under the ALP program, SBA designates qualified CDCs as ALP CDCs, gives them... approval and servicing actions. (b) Application. A CDC must apply for ALP status to the Lead SBA Office.... (c) Eligibility. In order for a CDC to be eligible to receive ALP status, its application must...

  5. 13 CFR 120.840 - Accredited Lenders Program (ALP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (ALP). (a) General. Under the ALP program, SBA designates qualified CDCs as ALP CDCs, gives them... approval and servicing actions. (b) Application. A CDC must apply for ALP status to the Lead SBA Office.... (c) Eligibility. In order for a CDC to be eligible to receive ALP status, its application must...

  6. 13 CFR 120.840 - Accredited Lenders Program (ALP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (ALP). (a) General. Under the ALP program, SBA designates qualified CDCs as ALP CDCs, gives them... approval and servicing actions. (b) Application. A CDC must apply for ALP status to the Lead SBA Office.... (c) Eligibility. In order for a CDC to be eligible to receive ALP status, its application must...

  7. 13 CFR 120.840 - Accredited Lenders Program (ALP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (ALP). (a) General. Under the ALP program, SBA designates qualified CDCs as ALP CDCs, gives them... approval and servicing actions. (b) Application. A CDC must apply for ALP status to the Lead SBA Office.... (c) Eligibility. In order for a CDC to be eligible to receive ALP status, its application must...

  8. 13 CFR 120.840 - Accredited Lenders Program (ALP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (ALP). (a) General. Under the ALP program, SBA designates qualified CDCs as ALP CDCs, gives them... approval and servicing actions. (b) Application. A CDC must apply for ALP status to the Lead SBA Office.... (c) Eligibility. In order for a CDC to be eligible to receive ALP status, its application must...

  9. Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs adopts standards for the Practice Doctorate and Post-graduate CRNA Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Gombkoto, Rebecca L Madsen; Walker, James R; Horton, Betty J; Martin-Sheridan, Denise; Yablonky, Mary Jean; Gerbasi, Francis R

    2014-06-01

    The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs appointed a Standards Revision Task Force to develop new accreditation standards. After 3 years of research and development (2011-2013) by the task force, the Council approved the first entry-level Practice Doctorate Standards and the first voluntary Post-graduate CRNA Fellowship Standards in January 2014. This defining moment in accreditation history marks a transition in the educational preparation of entry-level nurse anesthetists and provides opportunities for learning in a variety of post-graduate fellowships for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists.

  10. 78 FR 66364 - Medicare & Medicaid Programs: Application From the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... notice in the Federal Register (78 FR 26036) announcing Accreditation Commission for Health Care's... the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for Continued CMS-Approval of Its Hospice Accreditation... final notice announces our decision to approve the Accreditation Commission for Health Care (ACHC)...

  11. HIV/AIDS Course Content in CSWE-Accredited Social Work Programs: A Survey of Current Curricular Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, Diana; Shears, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The authors surveyed program directors at all bachelor of social work and master of social work programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education using an online tool that assessed whether and how their respective social work programs are covering content related to HIV/AIDS. Of the 650 program directors, 153 (24%) participated in the…

  12. Emergency preparedness for residency/fellowship programs: lessons learned during Hurricane Katrina and applied during Hurricane Ike.

    PubMed

    Donini-Lenhoff, Fred G; Rockey, Paul H; Surdyk, Patricia M; Heard, Jeanne K; Blackwell, Thomas A

    2010-09-01

    When it struck the US Gulf Coast in 2005, Hurricane Katrina severely disrupted many graduate medical education residency/fellowship programs in the region and the training of hundreds of residents/fellows. Despite the work of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in responding to this natural disaster and facilitating communication and transfer of residents/fellows to other unaffected training programs, the storm exposed the gaps in the existing system. Subsequently, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, with the aid of its member organizations, including the American Medical Association, developed a new disaster recovery plan to allow for a more rapid, effective response to future catastrophic events. These policies were instrumental in the rapid relocation of 597 residents/fellows from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston after the landfall of Hurricane Ike in September 2008. As a further accommodation to affected trainees, medical certification boards should be as flexible as possible in waiving continuity requirements in the event of a disaster that affects residency/fellowship programs.

  13. Emergency preparedness for residency/fellowship programs: lessons learned during Hurricane Katrina and applied during Hurricane Ike.

    PubMed

    Donini-Lenhoff, Fred G; Rockey, Paul H; Surdyk, Patricia M; Heard, Jeanne K; Blackwell, Thomas A

    2010-09-01

    When it struck the US Gulf Coast in 2005, Hurricane Katrina severely disrupted many graduate medical education residency/fellowship programs in the region and the training of hundreds of residents/fellows. Despite the work of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in responding to this natural disaster and facilitating communication and transfer of residents/fellows to other unaffected training programs, the storm exposed the gaps in the existing system. Subsequently, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, with the aid of its member organizations, including the American Medical Association, developed a new disaster recovery plan to allow for a more rapid, effective response to future catastrophic events. These policies were instrumental in the rapid relocation of 597 residents/fellows from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston after the landfall of Hurricane Ike in September 2008. As a further accommodation to affected trainees, medical certification boards should be as flexible as possible in waiving continuity requirements in the event of a disaster that affects residency/fellowship programs. PMID:23105039

  14. Handbook for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for personnel dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The program contained in this Handbook provides a significant advance in the field of radiation protection through a structured means for assuring the quality of personnel dosimetry performance. Since personnel dosimetry performance is directly related to the assurance of worker safety, it has been of key interest to the Department of Energy. Studies conducted over the past three decades have clearly demonstrated a need for personnel dosimetry performance criteria, related testing programs, and improvements in dosimetry technology. In responding to these needs, the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (EH) has developed and initiated a DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) which is intended to improve the quality of personnel dosimetry through (1) performance testing, (2) dosimetry and calibration intercomparisons, and (3) applied research. In the interest of improving dosimetry technology, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is also designed to encourage cooperation and technical interchange between DOE laboratories. Dosimetry intercomparison programs have been scheduled which include the use of transport standard instruments, transport standard radioactive sources and special dosimeters. The dosimeters used in the intercomparison program are designed to obtain optimum data on the comparison of dosimetry calibration methodologies and capabilities. This data is used in part to develop enhanced calibration protocols. In the interest of overall calibration update, assistance and guidance for the calibration of personnel dosimeters is available through the DOELAP support laboratories. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Ready for Discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition-of-Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Gallahue, Fiona E.; Betz, Amy E.; Druck, Jeffrey; Jones, Jonathan S.; Burns, Boyd; Hern, Gene

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM) residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9%) of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency. PMID:26594283

  16. Ready for Discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition-of-Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Gallahue, Fiona E; Betz, Amy E; Druck, Jeffrey; Jones, Jonathan S; Burns, Boyd; Hern, Gene

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM) residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9%) of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency.

  17. Accredited, Non-Accredited News Curricula Are Similar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Bob A.

    1977-01-01

    Found that in news-editorial programs, the greatest differences between accredited and non-accredited programs occur in the social and behavioral sciences and the journalism theory and history subdivisions. (KS)

  18. Perceptions of Internal Medicine Residency Program Candidates on the Use of Simulation in the Selection Process

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Keith; Hartsell, Zachary; Ivanov, Ilko; Charles, Joseph; Joshi, Harshad; Blair, Janis; Geyer, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Background The recruitment of skilled candidates into internal medicine residency programs has relied on traditional interviewing techniques with varying degrees of success. The development of simulated medical technology has provided a new arena in which to assess candidates' clinical skills, knowledge base, situational awareness, and problem-solving dexterities within a standardized environment for educational and assessment purposes. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the interest of program candidates in incorporating simulation medicine into the internal medicine residency interview process. Methods As a prospective, survey-based analysis, potential candidates who completed an interview between October 2012 and January 2013 with an accredited internal medicine residency program were sent a postmatch survey that incorporated 3 additional questions relating to their prior experience with medical simulation and their views on incorporating the technology into the interview format. Results Of the 88 candidates who completed an interview, 92% (n  =  81) were scheduled to graduate medical school in 2013 and were graduates of a US medical school. All survey responders described previous experience with medical simulation. Fifty-eight percent (n  =  51) of responders described being “less likely” to interview with or join a residency program if they were required to participate in a 10-minute medical simulation during the interview process. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that despite the increasing role of technology in medical education, its role in high-stakes evaluations (such as residency interviews) requires further maturation before general acceptance by residency candidates can be expected. PMID:24949144

  19. [Medical residency program: perceptions of medical residents in hospitals of Lima and Callao].

    PubMed

    Miní, Elsy; Medina, Julio; Peralta, Verónica; Rojas, Luis; Butron, Joece; Gutiérrez, Ericson L

    2015-01-01

    In order to rate the medical residency training program from the perceptions of residents, a structured survey, based on international literature, was applied to 228 participants. 48.2% of residents rated their training as “good,” 36.4% as “fair” and 15.4% as “poor”. Most of the residents had low supervision while on call, were overworked and did not have rest after being on call. Having a good annual curriculum (OR: 8.5; 95% CI: 4.1 to 7.4) and university promotion of research (OR 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1 to 5.2) were independent factors associated with higher ratings of training. In conclusion, the rating of residents about their training is mostly good, but this percentage does not exceed 50%. Training authorities could use these results to propose improvements in training programs for medical residents in Peru.

  20. 76 FR 66929 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Approval of Deeming Authority for Rural... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for recognition as a... of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF's) request for deeming authority for RHCs. This notice...

  1. 77 FR 70446 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... a proposed notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 37678) announcing AAAASF's request for continued... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for Continuing CMS... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for continued recognition as...

  2. 15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. 280.103... QUALITY Petitions, Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation § 280.103 Laboratory accreditation. A laboratory may be accredited by any laboratory accreditation program that may be established by any entity...

  3. 15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. 280.103... QUALITY Petitions, Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation § 280.103 Laboratory accreditation. A laboratory may be accredited by any laboratory accreditation program that may be established by any entity...

  4. 15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. 280.103... QUALITY Petitions, Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation § 280.103 Laboratory accreditation. A laboratory may be accredited by any laboratory accreditation program that may be established by any entity...

  5. 15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. 280.103... QUALITY Petitions, Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation § 280.103 Laboratory accreditation. A laboratory may be accredited by any laboratory accreditation program that may be established by any entity...

  6. 15 CFR 280.103 - Laboratory accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Laboratory accreditation. 280.103... QUALITY Petitions, Affirmations, and Laboratory Accreditation § 280.103 Laboratory accreditation. A laboratory may be accredited by any laboratory accreditation program that may be established by any entity...

  7. 7 CFR 205.506 - Granting accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.506 Granting accreditation....

  8. 77 FR 17072 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Community Health Accreditation Program for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... 1861(m) and (o) and 1891 and 1895 of the Social Security Act (the Act) establish distinct criteria for... participation. If an accreditation organization is recognized by the Secretary as having standards for.... Proposed Notice In the September 23, 2011, Federal Register (76 FR 59136), we published a proposed...

  9. Wellness: A Developmental Programming Model for Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Mark J.

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrates how a Wellness model can be an effective vehicle for promoting developmental programs in residence halls. The Wellness model is examined in terms of marketing, student development theory, and balanced programming. (BL)

  10. 78 FR 26036 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Application From the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for Continued CMS-Approval of Its Hospice Accreditation... years or as determined by CMS. The Accreditation Commission for Health Care's (ACHC's) current term of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  11. 77 FR 37680 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care for Continued Approval of Its Ambulatory... Association for Ambulatory Health Care for continued recognition as a national accrediting organization for... 6 years or as determined by CMS. The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care...

  12. NCI Central Review Board Receives Accreditation

    Cancer.gov

    The Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs has awarded the NCI Central Institutional Review Board full accreditation. AAHRPP awards accreditation to organizations demonstrating the highest ethical standards in clinical res

  13. Chemical Dependency Content in CSWE Accredited BSW Programs: A Survey of Course Content and Implications for Further Curricula Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Herbert H.; Howard, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    Reports on responses from 61 accredited baccalaureate programs of social work surveyed concerning inclusion of courses and instructional materials on alcoholism/chemical dependency in curricula, use made of 12-step programs and recovering people, and whether spirituality aspects were addressed. Concludes that content on alcoholism and chemical…

  14. 78 FR 11204 - Accreditation and Reaccreditation Process for Firms Under the Third Party Review Program: Part I...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... the Third Party Review Program: Part I; Draft Guidance for Industry, Food and Drug Administration Staff, and Third Party Reviewers; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... entitled ``Accreditation and Reaccreditation Process for Firms Under the Third Party Review Program: Part...

  15. Professional School Counseling in the Rocky Mountain Region: Graduation Rates of CACREP vs. Non-CACREP Accredited Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Mary D.; Boes, Susan R.; Snow, Brent M.; Chibbaro, Julia S.

    2010-01-01

    School Counseling in the Rocky Mountain region of the United States was explored with a focus on the production of professional school counselors in the Rocky Mountain region of the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (RMACES). Comparisons of program graduates are made by state and program as well as by accreditation status. State…

  16. Postgraduate nurse practitioner residency programs: supporting transition to practice.

    PubMed

    Wiltse Nicely, Kelly L; Fairman, Julie

    2015-06-01

    The 2010 Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing recommended residency programs for nurses. The number of such postgraduate residencies for nurse practitioners (NPs) is increasing in community settings; still, the Institute of Medicine's recommendation departs from the tradition of direct entry into practice after the completion of a formal nursing program. Research shows that residencies support NPs' transition to practice, but very few data support their impact on patient care. Postgraduate residencies are controversial, and the authors of this Commentary discuss the naming, funding mechanisms, and possible mandating of these programs.The authors believe that residencies should not be mandated but encouraged for new NPs and for those moving to new clinical settings. Team-based residencies provide both an opportunity to improve collaboration and a model of patient-centered care.

  17. Building a resident research program in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Romy; Ramoska, Edward Anthony; Hamilton, Richard Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Residency training programs requirements state, "Residents should participate in scholarly activity." However, there is little consensus regarding how best to achieve these requirements. The objective of this study is to implement a resident research program that emphasizes resident participation in quantitative or qualitative empirical work. A three-step program "Think, Do, Write" roughly follows the 3 years of the residency. During the first phase, the resident chooses a topic, formulates a hypothesis, and completes standard research certifications. Phase 2 involves obtaining Institutional Review Board approval, and conducting the study. The final phase entails analyzing and interpreting the data, and writing an abstract to present during an annual research day. Residents are encouraged to submit their projects for presentation at scientific conferences and for publication. Multiple departmental resources are available, including a Resident Research Fund, and full support of the faculty. Prior to the new program, most scholarly activity consisted of case reports, book chapters, review articles, or other miscellaneous projects; only 27 % represented empirical studies. Starting in 2012, the new program was fully implemented, resulting in notable growth in original empirical works among residents. Currently there is almost 100 % participation in studies, and numerous residents have presented at national conferences, and have peer-reviewed publications. With a comprehensive and supported program in place, emergency medicine residents proved capable of conducting high-quality empirical research within their relatively limited time. Overall, residents developed valuable skills in research design and statistical analysis, and greatly increased their productivity as academic and clinical researchers. PMID:26597875

  18. Decision support using anesthesia information management system records and accreditation council for graduate medical education case logs for resident operating room assignments.

    PubMed

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Charnin, Jonathan; Driscoll, William D; Bailin, Michael T; Baker, Keith

    2013-08-01

    Our goal in this study was to develop decision support systems for resident operating room (OR) assignments using anesthesia information management system (AIMS) records and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs and evaluate the implementations. We developed 2 Web-based systems: an ACGME case-log visualization tool, and Residents Helping in Navigating OR Scheduling (Rhinos), an interactive system that solicits OR assignment requests from residents and creates resident profiles. Resident profiles are snapshots of the cases and procedures each resident has done and were derived from AIMS records and ACGME case logs. A Rhinos pilot was performed for 6 weeks on 2 clinical services. One hundred sixty-five requests were entered and used in OR assignment decisions by a single attending anesthesiologist. Each request consisted of a rank ordered list of up to 3 ORs. Residents had access to detailed information about these cases including surgeon and patient name, age, procedure type, and admission status. Success rates at matching resident requests were determined by comparing requests with AIMS records. Of the 165 requests, 87 first-choice matches (52.7%), 27 second-choice matches (16.4%), and 8 third-choice matches (4.8%) were made. Forty-three requests were unmatched (26.1%). Thirty-nine first-choice requests overlapped (23.6%). Full implementation followed on 8 clinical services for 8 weeks. Seven hundred fifty-four requests were reviewed by 15 attending anesthesiologists, with 339 first-choice matches (45.0%), 122 second-choice matches (16.2%), 55 third-choice matches (7.3%), and 238 unmatched (31.5%). There were 279 overlapping first-choice requests (37.0%). The overall combined match success rate was 69.4%. Separately, we developed an ACGME case-log visualization tool that allows individual resident experiences to be compared against case minimums as well as resident peer groups. We conclude that it is feasible to use ACGME case

  19. Decision support using anesthesia information management system records and accreditation council for graduate medical education case logs for resident operating room assignments.

    PubMed

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Charnin, Jonathan; Driscoll, William D; Bailin, Michael T; Baker, Keith

    2013-08-01

    Our goal in this study was to develop decision support systems for resident operating room (OR) assignments using anesthesia information management system (AIMS) records and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs and evaluate the implementations. We developed 2 Web-based systems: an ACGME case-log visualization tool, and Residents Helping in Navigating OR Scheduling (Rhinos), an interactive system that solicits OR assignment requests from residents and creates resident profiles. Resident profiles are snapshots of the cases and procedures each resident has done and were derived from AIMS records and ACGME case logs. A Rhinos pilot was performed for 6 weeks on 2 clinical services. One hundred sixty-five requests were entered and used in OR assignment decisions by a single attending anesthesiologist. Each request consisted of a rank ordered list of up to 3 ORs. Residents had access to detailed information about these cases including surgeon and patient name, age, procedure type, and admission status. Success rates at matching resident requests were determined by comparing requests with AIMS records. Of the 165 requests, 87 first-choice matches (52.7%), 27 second-choice matches (16.4%), and 8 third-choice matches (4.8%) were made. Forty-three requests were unmatched (26.1%). Thirty-nine first-choice requests overlapped (23.6%). Full implementation followed on 8 clinical services for 8 weeks. Seven hundred fifty-four requests were reviewed by 15 attending anesthesiologists, with 339 first-choice matches (45.0%), 122 second-choice matches (16.2%), 55 third-choice matches (7.3%), and 238 unmatched (31.5%). There were 279 overlapping first-choice requests (37.0%). The overall combined match success rate was 69.4%. Separately, we developed an ACGME case-log visualization tool that allows individual resident experiences to be compared against case minimums as well as resident peer groups. We conclude that it is feasible to use ACGME case

  20. Implementing a successful journal club in an anesthesiology residency program.

    PubMed

    Pitner, Nathaniel D; Fox, Chris A; Riess, Matthias L

    2013-01-01

    Journal clubs are an integral element of residency training. We report the successful implementation of a monthly structured journal club in our anesthesia residency program. Based on resident surveys before and one year after its start, the journal club led to a significantly higher confidence in how to critically appraise literature and present a manuscript. The journal club also improved the residents' ability to search the literature and their statistical knowledge, skills that are essential in the practice of evidence-based medicine. We describe key features that may aid other training programs in organizing a stimulating an educational and sustainable journal club. PMID:24358844

  1. The Benefits and Costs of Accreditation of Undergraduate Medical Education Programs Leading to the MD Degree in the United States and Its Territories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhtadi, Dalal J.

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the value of accreditation of all 126 fully-accredited four-year undergraduate medical education programs leading to the MD degree in the US through two lenses, "perceived benefits and costs" from the perspective of the leadership of internal stakeholders of the aforementioned programs. The online survey was sent to a…

  2. An Academic Multihealth System PGY2 Pediatric Pharmacy Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Theresa; Meyers, Rachel; Siu, Anita; Shah, Pooja; Kimler, Katelin; Sturgill, Marc; Robinson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel multihealth system pediatric pharmacy residency program through the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University. Pediatric clinical pharmacy is a growing field that has seen an increase in demand for practitioners. Practice sites include freestanding children's hospitals, children's hospitals within adult hospitals, and pediatric units within adult hospitals. To accommodate a residency program in a region with no freestanding children's hospital, the pediatric faculty members at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University developed a multihealth system postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pediatric pharmacy residency program with 6 pediatric faculty members functioning as preceptors at their 5 respective practice sites. The multihealth system setup of the program provides the resident exposure to a multitude of patient populations, pediatric specialties, and pediatric pharmacy practices. In addition, the affiliation with Rutgers University allows an emphasis on academia with opportunities for the resident to lecture in small and large classrooms, facilitate discussion periods, assist with clinical laboratory classes, and precept pharmacy students. The resident has the unique opportunity to develop a research project with a large and diverse patient population owing to the multihealth system rotation sites. A multihealth system PGY2 residency in pediatric pharmacy provides the resident a well-rounded experience in pediatric clinical practice, research, and academia that will enhance the resident's ability to build his or her own pediatric pharmacy practice. PMID:26766936

  3. Sources of stress for residents and recommendations for programs to assist them.

    PubMed

    Levey, R E

    2001-02-01

    Bridging the gap between graduation from medical school and being board eligible in a medical specialty is a lengthy and arduous process. The fact that stress is typical during the residency training period is well-documented in the literature, as are its many situational, professional, and personal sources, which the author reviews: heavy work-load, sleep deprivation, difficult patients, poor learning environments, relocation issues, isolation and social problems, financial concerns, cultural and minority issues, information overload, and career planning issues. Stress can also stem from and exacerbate gender-related issues and problems for significant others, spouses, and family members. The author also describes less commonly documented sources of stress-often overlooked or postponed so long that stresses are inevitable for all concerned. These are associated with residents who perform marginally and in some cases should not have been passed on from medical school, or who are studying specialties not compatible with their skills and personalities, or who foster severe interpersonal problems on the job. Common effects of stress include anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive trends, hostility, and alcohol and substance abuse. To respond to the problems that these many stressors present to residents, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that all post-medical-school medical training programs make assistance services available for all residents. The author outlines essential elements of an assistance program, states how important such problems can be in saving both residents and their institutions needless difficulties and costs, and presents important issues for the consideration of all involved in residents' training.

  4. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future. PMID:21838073

  5. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  6. Discussion of the Effectiveness of the National Accreditation Process of Secondary Science Education Programs, A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazler, Judith Ann; Van Sickle, Meta; Graybill, Letitia; Simonis, Doris; Sorenson, Nancy; Bronstein, Erica

    2014-01-01

    This paper reflects upon a discussion via wiki, face-to-face, and telephone concerning the processes involved in the national accreditation of teacher education programs in science. Specifically, five professors and administrators from public and private institutions, across the nation were involved in the discussion. Our collective reflections…

  7. Identifying Potential Biasing Variables in Student Evaluation of Teaching in a Newly Accredited Business Program in the UAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badri, Masood A.; Abdulla, Mohamed; Kamali, Mohammed A.; Dodeen, Hamzeh

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of many factors on student evaluation of teaching. Design/methodology/approach: The study analyzed 3,185 student evaluations of faculty from a newly accredited business program at the United Arab Emirates University using univariate and multi-analysis of variance (ANOVA and MANOVA).…

  8. Teaching and Understanding the Concept of Critical Thinking Skills within Michigan Accredited Associate Degree Dental Hygiene Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beistle, Kimberly S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores dental hygiene faculty's perceptions regarding the issues surrounding the concept of critical thinking skills integration within Michigan accredited associate degree dental hygiene programs. The primary research goals are to determine faculty understanding of the concept of critical thinking, identify personal and…

  9. The Capacity of Teacher Education Institutions in North Carolina to Meet Program Approval and Accreditation Demands for Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Renee; Carpenter, C. Dale; Nickles, Lee

    2013-01-01

    A statewide survey of the infrastructure of teacher education program assessment systems in North Carolina, which include electronic portfolios as a component in the assessment system, measured their ability to meet current and anticipated future data demands for state approval and national accreditation. Almost two-thirds of the 46 teacher…

  10. Promoting Social Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion through Accreditation: Comparing National and International Standards for Public Affairs Programs in Latin America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubaii, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which accreditation of public affairs programs can be a tool to advance social equity, diversity, and inclusion. The paper is presented in the context of the widespread acceptance of the importance of addressing social inequalities in Latin America and the critical role that public…

  11. The Impact of Size on Characteristics and Behaviors that Support General Education Programs in Accredited Public Community and Technical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    This research study examined the impact of the size of accredited public associate degree-granting community and technical colleges on institutional characteristics and behaviors that support general education programs. Further, it sought opinions of the chief academic officers (CAOs) of these institutions regarding key elements of their general…

  12. Accomplishing PETE Learning Standards and Program Accreditation through Teacher Candidates' Technology-Based Service Learning Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbone, Anne; Mercier, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Teacher candidates' use of technology is a component of physical education teacher education (PETE) program learning goals and accreditation standards. The methods presented in this article can help teacher candidates to learn about and apply technology as an instructional tool prior to and during field or clinical experiences. The goal in…

  13. 42 CFR Appendix D to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Nuclear Medicine Technologists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for Nuclear Medicine Technologists D Appendix D to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Nuclear Medicine Technologists A. Sponsorship 1... of patient care; (b) Radiation safety and protection; (c) Nuclear medicine physics; (d)...

  14. 42 CFR Appendix D to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Nuclear Medicine Technologists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for Nuclear Medicine Technologists D Appendix D to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Nuclear Medicine Technologists A. Sponsorship 1... of patient care; (b) Radiation safety and protection; (c) Nuclear medicine physics; (d)...

  15. 42 CFR Appendix D to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Nuclear Medicine Technologists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for Nuclear Medicine Technologists D Appendix D to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Nuclear Medicine Technologists A. Sponsorship 1... of patient care; (b) Radiation safety and protection; (c) Nuclear medicine physics; (d)...

  16. Position Paper: Dental General Practice Residency Programs: Financing and Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Paul W.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion of changeable economic issues that can affect dental general practice residency program planning includes costs and resource allocation, maximizing efficiency and productivity, ambulatory and inpatient revenue sources, management functions, faculty as practitioners, faculty appointments, and marketing. (MSE)

  17. Residents' experiences of abuse, discrimination and sexual harassment during residency training. McMaster University Residency Training Programs.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, D J; Liutkus, J F; Risdon, C L; Griffith, L E; Guyatt, G H; Walter, S D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault, and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation, and to examine the prevalence and impact of sexual harassment in residency training programs. DESIGN: Self-administered questionnaire. SETTING: McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. PARTICIPANTS: Residents in seven residency training programs during the academic year from July 1993 to June 1994. Of 225 residents 186 (82.7%) returned a completed questionnaire, and 50% of the respondents were women. OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of psychological abuse, physical assault and discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation experienced by residents during medical training, prevalence and residents' perceived frequency of sexual harassment. RESULTS: Psychological abuse was reported by 50% of the residents. Some of the respondents reported physical assault, mostly by patients and their family members (14.7% reported assaults by male patients and family members, 9.8% reported assaults by female patients and family members), 5.4% of the female respondents reported assault by male supervising physicians. Discrimination on the basis of gender was reported to be common and was experienced significantly more often by female residents than by male residents (p < 0.01). Ten respondents, all female, reported having experienced discrimination on the basis of their sexual orientation. Most of the respondents experienced sexual harassment, especially in the form of sexist jokes, flirtation and unwanted compliments on their dress or figure. On average, 40% of the respondents, especially women (p < 0.01), reported experiencing offensive body language and receiving sexist teaching material and unwanted compliments on their dress. Significantly more female respondents than male respondents stated that they had reported events of sexual harassment to someone (p < 0.001). The most frequent emotional reactions to sexual harassment were

  18. Accreditation in Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Accrediting, Washington, DC.

    The Council on Dental Education cooperates with the American Dental Hygienists' Association in developing educational requirements for schools of dental hygiene. To be eligible for accreditation, schools must operate on a non-profit basis. A school applying for accreditation completes a previsitation questionnaire concerning its program. The…

  19. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area. PMID:26522630

  20. A quality assurance program for clinical pathology residents.

    PubMed

    Greenson, J K; Lee, S; Geller, S A

    1987-12-01

    A quality assurance study was undertaken to examine the clinical pathology residency program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. During a three-month period, clinical pathology residents kept a log of all the problems encountered while "on-call." A staff pathologist rated the performance of the resident in terms of how well he or she solved each problem. Of the 109 calls evaluated, one was judged to have been handled incorrectly, and 7 others were considered to have been answered in a conditional manner. The Blood Bank generated the largest number of calls (66), and requests for blood products were the single most common call (29). The review of all on-call problems with staff pathologists proved to be a valuable educational tool, both for the residents and staff. In addition, the study served as an impetus for development of a useful program for evaluating and, if necessary, correcting decisions made by pathology residents.

  1. National Accreditation and Its Role in Early Education: An Analysis of Florida's Gold Seal Quality Child-Care Program and Licensing Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterbottom, Christian; Jones, Ithel

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the first Florida statewide assessment of the Gold Seal Quality Care program, accreditation, and the relationship with licensing violations. This study analyzed the differences between the Department of Children and Families Gold Seal-Accredited facilities and nonaccredited facilities by comparing the facilities and the…

  2. Applicants' Self-Reported Priorities in Selecting a Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Macklin, E. A.; Goldsmith, J.; Weinstein, Debra F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency recruitment is a high-stakes activity for all participants, yet there is limited information about how applicants choose among programs. Objective This study evaluated the importance applicants place on various residency program attributes; whether applicant priorities vary by sex, race/ethnicity, or specialty choice; and whether the importance of these factors changes over time. Methods Highly ranked applicants to residency programs at 2 academic medical centers were surveyed annually from 2004 to 2012 regarding the importance of 26 characteristics in selecting a program. Mean ratings of importance for each factor were analyzed to assess priority for the overall applicant group, and whether priorities differed for subgroups (by sex, race/ethnicity, and specialty). Results Of 9669 applicants surveyed, 6285 (65%) responded. The 5 factors with highest rating of importance (overall and across all subgroups) were the program's ability to prepare residents for future training or position, resident esprit de corps, faculty availability and involvement in teaching, depth and breadth of faculty, and variety of patients and clinical resources. Small but significant differences in the ratings of some factors by sex and/or specialty group were identified. Institution-level characteristics, such as call rooms, salary, and benefits, were relatively unimportant. Applicant priorities were stable over the 9-year study period. Conclusions Highly ranked applicants to competitive residency programs value educational aspects of the program most highly, along with resident morale. Top factors were consistent across subgroups and over the 9 years of the study. These findings have implications for resident recruitment strategies. PMID:26217417

  3. Is Gerontology Ready for Accreditation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, William E.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.; Montgomery, Rhonda J. V.

    2012-01-01

    The authors review widely accepted criteria for program accreditation and compare gerontology with well-established accredited fields including clinical psychology and social work. At present gerontology lacks many necessary elements for credible professional accreditation, including defined scope of practice, applied curriculum, faculty with…

  4. Evaluation of the orthopedic residency training program in Saudi Arabia and comparison with a selected Canadian residency program

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ahaideb, Abdulaziz; Alrabai, Hamza M; Alrehaili, Osama A; Aljurayyan, Abdulaziz N; Alsaif, Ranyah M; Algarni, Nizar; Al-Khawashki, Hazem M; Algarni, Abdulrahman D

    2014-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of the present study was to assess the quality of the Saudi Orthopedic Residency Program. Methodology As a comparator, a cross-sectional survey involving 76 Saudi residents from different training centers in Saudi Arabia namely; Riyadh, Jeddah, Medina, Abha, and Dammam and 15 Canadian. Results The results showed that Canadian residents read more peer-reviewed, scholarly articles compared with Saudi residents (P=0.002). The primary surgical role for residents was to hold retractors during surgery. The survey respondents strongly supported the ability to recommend removal of incompetent trainers. Saudi trainees were more apprehensive of examinations than Canadian trainees (P<0.0001). Most residents preferred studying multiple-choice questions before examinations. Saudi and Canadian participants considered their programs to be overcrowded. Unlike Canadian participants, Saudi trainees reported an inadequate level of training (P<0.0001). Conclusion Educational resources should be readily accessible and a mentorship system monitoring residents’ progress should be developed. The role of the resident must be clearly defined and resident feedback should not be ignored. Given the importance of mastering basic orthopedic operative skills for residents, meaningful remedial action should be taken with incompetent trainers. PMID:25278788

  5. Patient Suicides in Psychiatric Residencies and Post-Vention Responses: A National Survey of Psychiatry Chief Residents and Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Al; Moran, Scott; Shoemaker, Richard; Bradley, John

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This report focuses on post-vention measures taken by U.S. psychiatry residencies when a resident-in-training experiences a patient suicide. Methods: A survey distributed to program directors and chief residents obtained an estimate of the frequency of psychiatric residents' experiencing a patient suicide and the frequency of numerous…

  6. Development and Implementation of Cgcre Accreditation Program for Greenhouse Gas Verification Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropf Santos Fermam, Ricardo; Barroso Melo Monteiro de Queiroz, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    An organizational innovation is defined as the implementation of a new organizational method in the firm's business practices, organization of your workplace or in its external relations. This work illustrates a Cgcre innovation, by presentation of the development process of greenhouse gases verification body in Brazil according to the Brazilian accreditation body, the General Coordination for Accreditation (Cgcre).

  7. 77 FR 51540 - Medicare Program; Approved Renewal of Deeming Authority of the Accreditation Association for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Authority of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. for Medicare Advantage Health... Medicare Advantage ``deeming authority'' of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc... apply for MA deeming authority are generally recognized by the health care industry as entities...

  8. 77 FR 19290 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Renewal of Deeming Authority of the Accreditation Association for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Deeming Authority of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. for Medicare Advantage... Care, Inc. (AAAHC) for Health Maintenance Organizations and Preferred Provider Organizations for a term... generally recognized by the health care industry as entities that accredit HMOs and PPOs. As we specify...

  9. Aviation Program Administrators' Perceptions of Specialized Aviation Accreditation under Public Law 111-216

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Cody

    2013-01-01

    Sherman (2006) and Prather (2007) studied why so few of the schools offering aviation-related curriculum leading to an associate's or bachelor's degree do not seek specialized accreditation. The goal of this study was to update the field of specialized aviation accreditation in the new environment of the Airline Safety and Federal Aviation…

  10. 76 FR 22709 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... to Comments On November 29, 2010, we published a proposed notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 73088... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities, Inc. for Deeming Authority for... decision to approve the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities...

  11. Learning through Accreditation: Faculty Reflections on the Experience of Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Sarah; Herring, Angel; Hinton, W. Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study was conducted to explore the personal and professional experiences of family and consumer sciences educators (n = 3) who recently participated in the AAFCS accreditation process utilizing the 2010 Accreditation standards. Analysis of the transcribed semi-structured interview data yielded four overarching categories: (a)…

  12. Is gerontology ready for accreditation?

    PubMed

    Haley, William E; Ferraro, Kenneth F; Montgomery, Rhonda J V

    2012-01-01

    The authors review widely accepted criteria for program accreditation and compare gerontology with well-established accredited fields including clinical psychology and social work. At present gerontology lacks many necessary elements for credible professional accreditation, including defined scope of practice, applied curriculum, faculty with applied professional credentials, and resources necessary to support professional credentialing review. Accreditation with weak requirements will be dismissed as "vanity" accreditation, and strict requirements will be impossible for many resource-poor programs to achieve, putting unaccredited programs at increased risk for elimination. Accreditation may be appropriate in the future, but it should be limited to professional or applied gerontology, perhaps for programs conferring bachelor's or master's degrees. Options other than accreditation to enhance professional skills and employability of gerontology graduates are discussed.

  13. Resident Program Guide: Hillside Outdoor Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Bonnie

    Founded in 1972 as part of the private, non-profit Edwin Gould Outdoor Education Centers, the Hillside Outdoor Education Center offers services to various educational groups by providing residential experiences for students and faculty, day-visit programs, school-site outdoor education programs, teacher workshops, college courses in outdoor…

  14. Teaching Forensic Psychiatry to General Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that general psychiatry residency training programs provide trainees with exposure to forensic psychiatry. Limited information is available on how to develop a core curriculum in forensic psychiatry for general psychiatry residents and few articles have been…

  15. [THE FUNCTIONAL CONSTITUENT OF A BIOLOGICAL COMPONENT IN PROGRAMS FOR TRAINING SPECIALISTS IN THE AREA OF PARASITOLOGY FOR ACCREDITATION].

    PubMed

    Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Yu; Andreeva, N D

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the functional aspects of a biological component in programs for training specialists in the area of Parasitology for accreditation within the current enactments, including those on modernization of public health and additional professional education. The working program of the module "Fundamental Disciplines" has been used as an example to outline approaches to molding a medical parasitologist's capacity and readiness to solve professional tasks on the basis of knowledge of fundamental disciplines: biology, immunology, and medical geography. Education fundamentalization is shown to suggest more unsupervised work of a learner in the teaching process. The fundamental constituent of a biological component of the 'programs for training learners in the specialty of Parasitology for accreditation is shown in the interaction of all sections of this area with special and allied subjects.

  16. An Education Program to Reduce Unnecessary Laboratory Tests by Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Patrick T.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A program at an inner-city community health center involving 20 family practice residents provided an educational intervention concerning the use of laboratory tests based on quality of care, not cost containment. During the program, the use of thyroid stimulating hormone test declined, while complete blood counts ordered did not. (MSE)

  17. Outdoor Education: A Guide for Planning Resident Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Irwin, Comp.; Donaldson, George W., Comp.

    The purpose of this guide is to provide school district administrators and teachers with guidance and direction in the planning and conduct of resident programs of outdoor education. Methods for planning and financing the program, selecting the site and personnel, determining the role of the classroom teacher, and identifying resources are…

  18. Methods used by accredited dental specialty programs to advertise faculty positions: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Armbruster, Paul C; Gallo, John R

    2011-01-01

    The various reasons for the current and projected shortages of dental faculty members in the United States have received much attention. Dental school deans have reported that the top three factors impacting their ability to fill faculty positions are meeting the requirements of the position, lack of response to position announcement, and salary/budget limitations. An electronic survey sent to program directors of specialty programs at all accredited U.S. dental schools inquired about the number of vacant positions, advertised vacant positions, reasons for not advertising, selection of advertising medium, results of advertising, and assistance from professional dental organizations. A total of seventy-three permanently funded full-time faculty positions were reported vacant, with 89.0 percent of these positions having been advertised in nationally recognized professional journals and newsletters. Networking or word-of-mouth was reported as the most successful method for advertising. The majority of those responding reported that professional dental organizations did not help with filling vacant faculty positions, but that they would utilize the American Dental Association's website or their specialty organization's website to post faculty positions if they were easy to use and update. PMID:21205727

  19. Training in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Psychiatry Residency: An Overview for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudak, Donna M.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2001, Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education accredited general psychiatry training programs were charged with the requirement to train residents in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to a level of competence. Programs were given the responsibility to delineate standards for trainees, to determine measures of competence,…

  20. Does Accreditation Matter? School Readiness Rates for Accredited versus Nonaccredited Child Care Facilities in Florida's Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterbottom, Christian; Piasta, Shayne B.

    2015-01-01

    Accreditation is a widely accepted indicator of quality in early education and includes many of the components cited in broad conceptualizations of quality. The purpose of this study was to examine whether kindergarten readiness rates differed between Florida child care facilities that were and were not accredited by any relevant national…

  1. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and Methods Exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. PMID:25741056

  2. Telephone Management Training in Internal Medicine Residencies: A National Survey of Program Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Michael T.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 250 accredited internal medicine training sites in the United States revealed that only 6% offered formal training in telephone medicine to their residents, usually consisting of single lectures or reading materials. A majority of respondents felt telephone management training was very important and should be part of every internal…

  3. 15 CFR 285.9 - Granting accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Granting accreditation. 285.9 Section... VOLUNTARY LABORATORY ACCREDITATION PROGRAM § 285.9 Granting accreditation. (a) The Chief of NVLAP is responsible for all NVLAP accreditation actions, including granting, denying, renewing, suspending,...

  4. 15 CFR 285.9 - Granting accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Granting accreditation. 285.9 Section... VOLUNTARY LABORATORY ACCREDITATION PROGRAM § 285.9 Granting accreditation. (a) The Chief of NVLAP is responsible for all NVLAP accreditation actions, including granting, denying, renewing, suspending,...

  5. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University.

    PubMed

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Phelps, Mitch A; Neidecker, Marjorie V; Apseloff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program - one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology - that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions.

  6. Program director and resident perspectives of a competency-based medical education anesthesia residency program in Canada: a needs assessment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In July 2015, the University of Ottawa introduced a competency-based medical education (CBME) postgraduate program for anesthesia. Prior to program implementation, this study aimed to identify Canadian anesthesiology program directors perceptions of CBME and residents’ opinion on how the program should be designed and perceived consequences of CBME. Methods: This two-phase, qualitative study included semi-structured interviews with Canadian anesthesia program directors (Phase I) and a focus group interview with residents enrolled in the University of Ottawa time-based anesthesia program (Phase II). Both phases sought to gauge participant’s perceptions of CBME. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Results: Data was combined to protect anonymity of the six participants (three program directors and three residents). Participants spoke about the perceived advantages of CBME, the need to establish definitions, and challenges to a CBME program highlighting logistical factors, implications for trainees and the role assessment plays in CBME. Conclusion: These findings will inform CBME implementation strategies in anesthesia programs across the country, and may assist other residency programs in the design of their programs. Furthermore, our findings may help identify potential challenges and issues that other postgraduate specialties may face as they transition to a CBME model. PMID:26913772

  7. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Nori L; Bazzerelli, Amy; Lim, Jenny; Wu Chao Ying, Valerie; Steigerwald, Sarah; Strickland, Matt

    2015-06-01

    Currently, general surgeons provide about 50% of endoscopy services across Canada and an even greater proportion outside large urban centres. It is essential that endoscopy remain a core component of general surgery practice and a core competency of general surgery residency training. The Canadian Association of General Surgeons Residents Committee supports the position that quality endoscopy training for all Canadian general surgery residents is in the best interest of the Canadian public. However, the means by which quality endoscopy training is achieved has not been defined at a national level. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs requires standardization across the country and improved measurement to ensure that competency and basic credentialing requirements are met.

  8. Informatics integration in a medical residency program: early experiences.

    PubMed

    Moidu, K; Leehy, M A; Steinberg, I; Einreinhofer, S; Falsone, J J; Cleary, J; Nair, S; Mazur, E

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, Informatics training was integrated into the medical residency program at Norwalk Hospital. The program objective was to familiarize the residents with clinical applications of information technology that could enhance their productivity in clinical practice. In its first year, the curriculum was theory oriented. Evaluation of the program at the end of the first year led to a significant restructuring of the program format and curriculum. The trainees did not find theory to be of immediate clinical value, in the second year the program emphasis was redirected toward the development of practical skills. Next year, in 1993, 'Informatics Clinics' were initiated to develop practical Informatics skills that would be useful in a clinical setting. This approach was more successful but did not offer a complete solution. The degree to which the concepts and methods learned are clinically utilized by residents will depend upon the degree of reinforcement provided in the clinical residency years. In addition, there is a need for the development of assessment standards for the evaluation of Informatics literacy levels. In the absence of assessment standards the level of Informatics literacy in medical graduates remains undetermined Consequently, it is difficult to determine whether the training received has transformed expectations into reality.

  9. 24 CFR 248.173 - Resident homeownership program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... describe the resident council's current abilities and proposed capacity-building activities to successfully... 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794... alternative that is consistent with establishing a viable homeownership program, the Commissioner...

  10. 24 CFR 248.173 - Resident homeownership program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... describe the resident council's current abilities and proposed capacity-building activities to successfully... 11063 (3 CFR 1959-1963 comp., p. 652); section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794... alternative that is consistent with establishing a viable homeownership program, the Commissioner...

  11. Spatial Abilities of Medical Graduates and Choice of Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langlois, Jean; Wells, George A.; Lecourtois, Marc; Bergeron, Germain; Yetisir, Elizabeth; Martin, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Spatial abilities have been related in previous studies to three-dimensional (3D) anatomy knowledge and the performance in technical skills. The objective of this study was to relate spatial abilities to residency programs with different levels of content of 3D anatomy knowledge and technical skills. The hypothesis was that the choice of residency…

  12. Firearm Anticipatory Guidance Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy J.; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Mrdjenovich, Adam J.; Price, Joy A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Most suicides (60%) are committed with firearms, and most (80%) of individuals attempting suicide meet diagnostic criteria for mental illness. This study assessed the prevalence of firearm injury prevention training in psychiatric residency programs. Methods: A three-wave mail survey was sent to the directors of 179 psychiatric…

  13. Evaluation of a Pharmacy Resident Inpatient On-Call Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatoum, Hind T.

    1993-01-01

    The 440 interventions completed by pharmacy residents in an inpatient on-call program were analyzed for their source (self-initiated, solicited by physician or staff pharmacist), type (selection of dosage, schedule, drug level monitoring, route of administration), impact on quality of care, cost of care, and clinical significance. (Author/MSE)

  14. Implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy in a Psychiatry Residency Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtmacher, Jonathan; Eisendrath, Stuart J.; Haller, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for depression is a brief, well researched treatment for acute major depression. This article describes the implementation of IPT as an evidence-based treatment for depression in a psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors tracked the implementation process over 5 years as interpersonal…

  15. 24 CFR 248.173 - Resident homeownership program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the proceeds, if any, from the initial sale for costs of the homeownership program, including... to be received from HUD and of all other funds, including proceeds from the sale of units to initial..., including, but not limited to, the resident council's acquisition cost, estimated rehabilitation...

  16. A Consortium-based Research Education Program for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Anne Victoria; Pieper, David; Hammel, Ernest

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a consortium-based research education seminar program developed by the OHEP Center for Medical Education that presents a yearly research forum in which the best research projects from consortium members are presented by the resident-researchers, who compete for recognition and prize money. Of the 128 presentations to date 25 percent…

  17. An Ambulatory Program for Surgical Residents and Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    A pilot program based in a freestanding ambulatory surgery center at the Chicago Medical School Department of Surgery is described, its curriculum outlined, and the daily activities of the residents and medical students are detailed. A brief history of ambulatory surgery is given. (Author/MLW)

  18. Transforming Equity-Oriented Leaders: Principal Residency Network Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Donna; Billups, Felice D.; Gable, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    After 12 years focused on developing school leaders who act as change agents for educational equity, the Principal Residency Network (PRN) partnered with Johnson and Wales University's Center for Research and Evaluation to conduct a utilization-focused (Patton, 2002) program evaluation funded by a grant from the Rhode Island Foundation. The…

  19. Testing the Engagement Theory of Program Quality in CACREP-Accredited Counselor Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warden, Shannon P.; Benshoff, James M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the engagement theory of program quality (Haworth & Conrad, 1997), which highlights positive student learning outcomes that result from stakeholder involvement in program evaluation within master's-level graduate programs. A total of 481 master's-level counseling students and 63 faculty members, representing 68 Council for…

  20. Effective Research Strategies for Trainees in Internal Medicine Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wiederman, Michael W.; Sawyer, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    For most training programs, the development of research endeavors among trainees is an ongoing challenge. In this article, we review various considerations when attempting to undertake research activities within an internal medicine residency training program, including availability of institutional resources (eg, dedicated research time for trainees and faculty, available faculty mentors, accessible adjunctive personnel), engagement of residents into research, classic project quagmires in training programs, the institutional review board, publication options (eg, letters to the editor, case reports, literature reviews, original research reports), and journal submission strategies. Given that research entails multiple components and distinct skills, the overall program goal should be to make research an educationally understandable process for trainees. Research can be a rewarding activity when nurtured in a facilitating educational environment. PMID:26137359

  1. Outcomes assessment of a residency program in laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Morse, E E; Pisciotto, P T; Hopfer, S M; Makowski, G; Ryan, R W; Aslanzadeh, J

    1997-01-01

    During a down-sizing of residency programs at a State University Medical School, hospital based residents' positions were eliminated. It was determined to find out the characteristics of the residents who graduated from the Laboratory Medicine Program, to compare women graduates with men graduates, and to compare IMGs with United States Graduates. An assessment of a 25 year program in laboratory medicine which had graduated 100 residents showed that there was no statistically significant difference by chi 2 analysis in positions (laboratory directors or staff), in certification (American Board of Pathology [and subspecialties], American Board of Medical Microbiology, American Board of Clinical Chemistry) nor in academic appointments (assistant professor to full professor) when the male graduates were compared with the female graduates or when graduates of American medical schools were compared with graduates of foreign medical schools. There were statistically significant associations by chi 2 analysis between directorship positions and board certification and between academic appointments and board certification. Of 100 graduates, there were 57 directors, 52 certified, and 41 with academic appointments. Twenty-two graduates (11 women and 11 men) attained all three.

  2. The Accreditation Process for Engineering Curricula with Cooperative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostwick, Williard D.

    1980-01-01

    Details the structure, accreditation procedures, and criteria of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, with particular attention to the assessment of cooperative engineering education programs. (SK)

  3. 7 CFR 205.507 - Denial of accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.507 Denial of accreditation....

  4. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants.

  5. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants. PMID:25988694

  6. Survey of osteopathic and allopathic residents' attitudes toward osteopathic manipulative treatment.

    PubMed

    Allee, Brian A; Pollak, Michael H; Malnar, Karen F

    2005-12-01

    More than 50% of new osteopathic physicians receive their residency training in programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) rather than in programs approved by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). To examine the implications of this training pattern for trends in the practice of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT), the authors surveyed attitudes toward OMT with questionnaires targeted to osteopathic and allopathic residents in family medicine residency programs. Osteopathic residents in specialties other than family medicine were also surveyed. Differences in views between osteopathic residents in AOA-approved and ACGME-accredited programs--as well as the views of the allopathic residents--were analyzed using chi(2) tests. Fewer osteopathic residents in ACGME-accredited family medicine programs (39.5%) reported frequent use of OMT than did osteopathic residents in AOA-approved family medicine programs (67.9%). This difference appears to result more from experiences during residency training than from expectations formed before residency training. Ninety percent of the allopathic residents who responded to the survey said they believed that OMT is effective for treating somatic dysfunction. Moreover, 70.9% of allopathic physicians indicated they had at least some interest in learning OMT. To the authors' knowledge, this study was the first to quantify a change in attitude of allopathic residents toward a more positive view of osteopathic medicine.

  7. Accreditation and the Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timpe, Eugene

    1977-01-01

    A report to the Association on a study of the accreditation question. The topics covered are: a definition of accreditation; a listing of major accredited; a description of the process of accreditation; and procedures for becoming an accrediting agency. (AMH)

  8. 77 FR 70783 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) for continued recognition as a national accrediting... Notice On June 22, 2012, we published a proposed notice in the Federal Register (77 FR 37678) entitled...), AAAHC revised its standards to ensure patients have the right to ``voice grievances regarding...

  9. 78 FR 59621 - Extension of the Current Fees for the Accredited Laboratory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... / Friday, September 27, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food Safety and...: Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim final rule. SUMMARY: The Accredited... perform analyses on official regulatory samples of raw or processed meat and poultry products, and...

  10. 75 FR 51464 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the American Association for Accreditation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ..., 2009 (74 FR 30587) and a final notice on November 27, 2009 (74 FR 62330). This final notice provides... to AAAASF on November 27, 2009 (74 FR 62330) and this final notice, although not required by our... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Continued Deeming Authority...

  11. Networking Course Syllabus in Accredited Library and Information Science Programs: A Comparative Analysis Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated networking courses offered in accredited Library and Information Science schools in the United States in 2009. The study analyzed and compared network syllabi according to Course Syllabus Evaluation Rubric to obtain in-depth understanding of basic features and characteristics of networking courses taught. The study embraced…

  12. Current Status and Future Plans for Undergraduate Public/Community Health Education Program Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, M. Elizabeth; Birch, David A.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Quality assurance in health education professional preparation has long been a goal of the profession. A comprehensive coordinated accreditation process for graduate and undergraduate health education has been recommended. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the current status of, and future plans for,…

  13. Career Decisions of Senior Athletic Training Students and Recent Graduates of Accredited Athletic Training Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neibert, Peter; Huot, Christopher; Sexton, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students and graduates are faced with many factors that direct them into or away from the athletic training profession as a final career choice. Objective: The purpose of the study was to determine the career decisions made by athletic training students following graduation from an accredited professional athletic…

  14. Results of the 2001 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, P A; McPherson, D S; Schmittling, G T; Kahn, N B

    2001-09-01

    The results of the 2001 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistent decline of student interest in family practice residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2000 Match, 240 fewer positions (317 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2001, as well as 76 fewer (47 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 5 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (7 fewer US seniors), and 7 fewer (1 fewer US senior) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In contrast, 40 more positions (64 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and 11 more (10 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past 3 years. Ninety-one fewer positions (2 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 49 more positions (67 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer a market for family physicians, family practice experienced a fourth year of decline though the 2001 NRMP. Current forces, including student perspectives of specialty prestige, the turbulence of the health care environment, media hype, market factors, lifestyle choices, and student debt, all appear to be influencing many students to choose subspecialty rather than primary care careers. PMID:11573716

  15. Aligning Assessments for COSMA Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Curt; Johnson, Dennis A.; Alderman, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Many higher education sport management programs are currently in the process of seeking accreditation from the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation (COSMA). This article provides a best-practice method for aligning student learning outcomes with a sport management program's mission and goals. Formative and summative assessment procedures…

  16. Results of the 2002 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; McPherson, Deborah S; Schmittling, Gordon T; Kahn, Norman B

    2002-09-01

    The results of the 2002 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistent decline of student interest in family practice residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2001 Match, six fewer positions (103 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2002, as well as 48 fewer (30 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 1 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (8 more US seniors), and 45 fewer (45 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In comparison, 43 more positions (70 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology, but 11 fewer (16 fewer US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past 3 years. Eight fewer positions (60 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine while 99 fewer positions (142 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer opportunities for family physicians, family practice experienced a fifth year of decline through the 2002 NRMP. Many different forces, however, are impacting medical student career choices, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment, liability protection issues, and the impact of faculty and resident role models. The 2002 NRMP results may herald the leveling of recent trends away from family practice careers. PMID:12269534

  17. Results of the 2004 national resident matching program: family medicine.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; McPherson, Deborah S; Schmittling, Gordon T; Fetter, Gerald T; Kahn, Norman B

    2004-09-01

    The results of the 2004 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a leveling in the recent trend of declining student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2003 Match, 34 more positions (36 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2004, at the same time as 14 fewer (four fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 10 more in pediatrics-primary care (one more US senior), and 35 more (38 more US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In comparison, one less position (one more US senior) was filled in anesthesiology and seven fewer (five more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past several years. Many different forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment; liability protection issues; and the impact of faculty and resident role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. A total of 165 more positions (12 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine while 164 more positions (15 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. With the needs of the nation, especially for rural and underserved populations, continuing to offer opportunities for family physicians, family medicine experienced a slight increase through the 2004 NRMP. The 2004 NRMP suggests that the trend away from family medicine and primary care careers may be leveling off. PMID:15343417

  18. Results of the 2005 national resident matching program: family medicine.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; Schmittling, Gordon T; Fetter, Gerald T; Kahn, Norman B

    2005-09-01

    The results of the 2005 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a currently stable level of student interest in family medicine residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2004 Match, 19 more positions (66 fewer US seniors) were filled in family medicine residency programs through the NRMP in 2005, at the same time as four fewer (18 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, seven more in pediatrics-primary care (three fewer US seniors), and 12 fewer (21 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatrics programs. In comparison, 25 more positions (four more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology but two fewer (14 fewer US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past several years. Many different forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment, lifestyle issues, and the impact of faculty and resident role models, continue to influence medical student career choices. Seven more positions (57 more US seniors) were filled in categorical internal medicine while 48 more positions (68 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. With the needs of the nation, especially for rural and underserved populations, continuing to offer opportunities for family physicians, family medicine experienced another slight increase through the 2005 NRMP. The 2005 NRMP results suggest that interest in family medicine and primary care careers continues to be stable. PMID:16145633

  19. Results of the 2003 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; McPherson, Deborah S; Schmittling, Gordon T; Kahn, Norman B

    2003-09-01

    The results of the 2003 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistent decline of student interest in family practice residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2002 Match, 118 fewer positions (179 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2003, as well as 23 fewer (12 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 20 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (11 fewer US seniors), and 23 fewer (34 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In comparison, 40 more positions (14 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and 8 more (8 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past 3 years. Sixty-seven more positions (but 148 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 107 more positions (33 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer opportunities for family physicians, family practice experienced continued decline though the 2003 NRMP. Many different forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment; liability protection issues; and the impact of faculty and resident role models, are impacting medical student career choices. The 2003 NRMP again confirms the trend away from family practice and primary care careers. PMID:12947519

  20. Nurse manager residency program: an innovative leadership succession plan.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Amy; Wagner, Jennifer; Martin, Christina; Grant, Brandy; Maule, Katrina; Resh, Kimberly; King, Lisa; Eaton, Holly; Fetter, Katrina; King, Stacey L; Thompson, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    To ensure succession planning within the ranks of nurse managers meet current and projected nursing management needs and organizational goals, we developed and implemented a nurse manager residency program at our hospital. By identifying, supporting, and mentoring clinical experts who express a desire and display an aptitude for nursing leadership, we are graduating individuals who can transition to a nurse manager position with greater ease and competence.

  1. Nurse manager residency program: an innovative leadership succession plan.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Amy; Wagner, Jennifer; Martin, Christina; Grant, Brandy; Maule, Katrina; Resh, Kimberly; King, Lisa; Eaton, Holly; Fetter, Katrina; King, Stacey L; Thompson, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    To ensure succession planning within the ranks of nurse managers meet current and projected nursing management needs and organizational goals, we developed and implemented a nurse manager residency program at our hospital. By identifying, supporting, and mentoring clinical experts who express a desire and display an aptitude for nursing leadership, we are graduating individuals who can transition to a nurse manager position with greater ease and competence. PMID:24704735

  2. The economic impacts of Oklahoma's Family Medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Lapolla, Michael; Brandt, Edward N; Barker, Andréa; Ryan, Lori

    2004-06-01

    The enactment of Medicare and Medicaid created a new demand for medical services in Oklahoma, particularly in rural areas. The state of Oklahoma responded by creating The Oklahoma Physician Manpower Training Commission in 1975. The overall purpose of the Commission was to increase the number of primary care physicians and influence distribution into non-metro areas. This analysis concerns the public policy value of this ongoing program. The PMTC has provided resident stipend funding to each of Oklahoma's publicly funded Family Medicine residency programs. Since 1975, the PMTC has provided over 139 million dollars in resident stipend funding and support; and there have been 749 program graduates with 431 practicing in Oklahoma. This model calculates that the Oklahoma-based physicians have created a cumulative 3.7 billion dollars of economic impact on the state; and conservatively estimates that only 10% of the practice decisions/locations were influenced by the PMTC. This creates an estimated return of 370 million dollars on an "investment" of 139 million dollars. Additionally the model demonstrates that the current cohort of physicians is annually responsible for 15,530 jobs and an associated payroll of 428 million dollars. PMID:15346805

  3. 7 CFR 205.506 - Granting accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.506 Granting accreditation....

  4. Laboratory accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.

    1998-08-01

    Accreditation can offer many benefits to a testing or calibration laboratory, including increased marketability of services, reduced number of outside assessments, and improved quality of services. Compared to ISO 9000 registration, the accreditation process includes a review of the entire quality system, but in addition a review of testing or calibration procedures by a technical expert and participation in proficiency testing in the areas of accreditation. Within the DOE, several facilities have recently become accredited in the area of calibration, including Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge, AlliedSignal FM and T; Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., and Pacific Northwest National Lab. At the national level, a new non-profit organization was recently formed called the National Cooperation for Laboratory Accreditation (NACLA). The goal of NACLA is to develop procedures, following national and international requirements, for the recognition of competent accreditation bodies in the US. NACLA is a voluntary partnership between the public and private sectors with the goal of a test or calibration performed once and accepted world wide. The NACLA accreditation body recognition process is based on the requirements of ISO Guide 25 and Guide 58. A membership drive will begin some time this fall to solicit organizational members and an election of a permanent NACLA Board of Directors will follow later this year or early 1999.

  5. Spatial abilities of medical graduates and choice of residency programs.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Jean; Wells, George A; Lecourtois, Marc; Bergeron, Germain; Yetisir, Elizabeth; Martin, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Spatial abilities have been related in previous studies to three-dimensional (3D) anatomy knowledge and the performance in technical skills. The objective of this study was to relate spatial abilities to residency programs with different levels of content of 3D anatomy knowledge and technical skills. The hypothesis was that the choice of residency program is related to spatial abilities. A cohort of 210 medical graduates was enrolled in a prospective study in a 5-year experiment. Spatial abilities were measured with a redrawn Vandenberg and Kuse Mental Rotations Test (MRT) in two (MRTA) and three (MRTC) dimensions. Medical graduates were enrolled in Family Medicine (n = 76, 36.2%), Internal Medicine (64, 30.5%), Surgery (52, 24.8%), and Anesthesia (18, 8.6%). The assumption was that the level of 3D anatomy knowledge and technical skills content was higher in Surgery and Anesthesia compared to Family Medicine and Internal Medicine. Mean MRTA score of 12.4 (±SD 4.6), 12.0 (±4.3), 14.1 (±4.3), and 14.6 (±4.0) was obtained in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Surgery, and Anesthesia, respectively (P = 0.0176). Similarly, mean MRTC score of 8.0 (±4.4), 7.5 (±3.6), 8.5 (±3.9), and 7.9 (±4.1) was obtained (P = 0.5647). Although there was a tendency for lower MRTA score in Family Medicine and Internal Medicine compared to Surgery and Anesthesia, no statistically significant main effect of residency, year, sex, or the interactions were observed for the MRTA and MRTC. Studied sample of medical graduates was not found to choose their residency programs based on their innate spatial abilities.

  6. 42 CFR 413.79 - Direct GME payments: Determination of the weighted number of FTE residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... approved preventive medicine residency or fellowship program also may be counted as a full FTE resident for... in geriatric medicine, accredited by the appropriate approving body listed in § 415.152 of this... paragraph (c)(3)(ii)(A)(1) of this section, to include the number of FTE residents for which a new...

  7. 42 CFR 413.79 - Direct GME payments: Determination of the weighted number of FTE residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... approved preventive medicine residency or fellowship program also may be counted as a full FTE resident for... in geriatric medicine, accredited by the appropriate approving body listed in § 415.152 of this... refers to the number of unweighted allopathic and osteopathic FTE residents who are training in...

  8. 42 CFR 413.79 - Direct GME payments: Determination of the weighted number of FTE residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... approved preventive medicine residency or fellowship program also may be counted as a full FTE resident for... in geriatric medicine, accredited by the appropriate approving body listed in § 415.152 of this... refers to the number of unweighted allopathic and osteopathic FTE residents who are training in...

  9. A suitability study of the fission product phantom and the bottle manikin absorption phantom for calibration of in vivo bioassay equipment for the DOELAP accreditation testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, P.C.; Lynch, T.P.

    1991-08-01

    Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) conducted an intercomparison study of the Fission Product phantom and the bottle manikin absorption (BOMAB) phantom for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the consistency of calibration response of the two phantoms and their suitability for certification and use under a planned bioassay laboratory accreditation program. The study was initiated to determine calibration factors for both types of phantoms and to evaluate the suitability of their use in DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) round-robin testing. The BOMAB was found to be more appropriate for the DOELAP testing program. 9 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Current state of professional and core competency in pediatric residency program at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: A local survey

    PubMed Central

    EBRAHIMI, SEDIGHEH; REZAEE, RITA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Accreditation assesses performance, or capacity to perform, against predetermined standards. It typically combines external quality assurance, through a process of peers review, with elements of self-regulation through internal and self-directed assessment. This study is an attempt to identify the quality of pediatrics residency educational programs regarding predetermined standards. Methods This descriptive-analytical evaluation study of applied type was conducted during 2010 and 2011 in the pediatrics department of Shiraz Medical School, Iran. The assessment process occurred in several phases; at first an assessment model for a residency educational development and a series of educational criteria and indices were created based on WFME Standards. Multiple methods including a self-assessment questionnaire and several checklists were used to collect data, whereas systematic site visit, peer review and document reviewing were conducted with survey team. Due to limitation of the statistical society, all faculty members (n=34) and residents (n=41) of the pediatric department were asked to complete the survey. At last, descriptive and deductive statistics data analysis was performed using SPSS version 14.  Results According to the records available in assessing program quality, it seems that the input criteria were desirable for the program based on the residents’ viewpoints (86.6 %).There were proper physical facilities for them to meet the residency program goals.  The study indicated that the learning environment needed to be revised for the educational needs (Likert scale: 2.96±1.05). The peer evaluation team demonstrated achievement of mission fulfillment in the context of the objectives and indicators by meeting the desired themes.  In spite of some weaknesses in the process criteria, the criteria for output indicators were good according to the report (more than desired level of 75-80%). Conclusion Accreditation is an important step towards

  11. Specialized Accreditation in Allied Health Education: (CAHEA) [Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauser, John J.

    Specialized accreditation is a process whereby an organization or agency, following professional peer evaluation, recognizes a program of study as having met certain predetermined standards. It complements institutional accreditation and provides assurance to the public, the institution, the program, and the student that the accredited program has…

  12. Results of the 1999 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Kahn, N B; Schmittling, G T; Graham, R

    1999-09-01

    The 1999 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) results reflect continued volatility in the perceptions and career choices of physicians entering graduate medical education in the United States. A total of 117 fewer positions (155 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs in 1999, as well as 23 fewer (29 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine and 38 fewer (27 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In contrast, nine more positions (19 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and one more (10 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have recently been market sensitive. Seventy-three more positions (but 67 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 30 more positions (40 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees are "pluripotential" with perceived options for practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the demands of managed care and the needs of rural and underserved populations continue to offer a market for family physicians, family practice experienced a second year of "primary care backlash" through the 1999 NRMP. In addition, current forces appear to be influencing some students to choose subspecialty rather than primary care careers. PMID:10489637

  13. Results of the 2000 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, P A; McPherson, D S; Schmittling, G T; Kahn, N B

    2000-09-01

    The results of the 2000 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect substantial volatility in the perceptions and career choices of physicians entering graduate medical education in the United States. Ninety-four fewer positions (191 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2000, compared with 1999, as well as 60 fewer (66 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 12 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (6 fewer US seniors), and 10 fewer (9 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In contrast, 37 more positions (36 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and 4 more (13 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have recently been market sensitive. Twelve fewer positions (63 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 35 fewer positions (104 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer a market for family physicians, family practice experienced a third year of decline through the 2000 NRMP. Current forces, including media hype, market factors, lifestyle choices, debt, and the turbulence of the health care environment, appear to be influencing many students to choose subspecialty rather than primary care careers. PMID:11002864

  14. Law-Based Degree Programs in Business and Their Departments: What's in a Name? (A Comprehensive Study of Undergraduate Law-Based Degrees in AACSB-Accredited Universities)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carol J.; Crain, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines undergraduate law-based degree programs in the 404 U.S. universities with undergraduate degrees in business that had Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation in 2005. University Web sites were used to identify and compare law-based undergraduate programs inside business to law-related programs…

  15. Dermatology Residency Selection Criteria with an Emphasis on Program Characteristics: A National Program Director Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gorouhi, Farzam; Alikhan, Ali; Rezaei, Arash; Fazel, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dermatology residency programs are relatively diverse in their resident selection process. The authors investigated the importance of 25 dermatology residency selection criteria focusing on differences in program directors' (PDs') perception based on specific program demographics. Methods. This cross-sectional nationwide observational survey utilized a 41-item questionnaire that was developed by literature search, brainstorming sessions, and online expert reviews. The data were analyzed utilizing the reliability test, two-step clustering, and K-means methods as well as other methods. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in PDs' perception regarding the importance of the selection criteria based on program demographics. Results. Ninety-five out of 114 PDs (83.3%) responded to the survey. The top five criteria for dermatology residency selection were interview, letters of recommendation, United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I scores, medical school transcripts, and clinical rotations. The following criteria were preferentially ranked based on different program characteristics: “advanced degrees,” “interest in academics,” “reputation of undergraduate and medical school,” “prior unsuccessful attempts to match,” and “number of publications.” Conclusions. Our survey provides up-to-date factual data on dermatology PDs' perception in this regard. Dermatology residency programs may find the reported data useful in further optimizing their residency selection process. PMID:24772165

  16. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Competency and Curriculum Development for Preventive Medicine and Other Specialty Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Jani, Asim A; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2015-11-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS's Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine's dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site's competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees' work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine training.

  17. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Competency and Curriculum Development for Preventive Medicine and Other Specialty Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Jani, Asim A; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2015-11-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS's Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine's dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site's competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees' work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine training

  18. AQIP and Accreditation: Improving Quality and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangehl, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    For the past 12 years, the Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) has offered an innovative means for colleges and universities to maintain regional accreditation with the Higher Learning Commission (HLC), the only regional U.S. accrediting commission currently providing alternative pathways for maintaining accreditation. Although all HLC…

  19. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth Center Accredited 624 Smith Avenue St. Paul, MN 55107 651-689-3988 Accredited since April 2015 ... Birth Center Accredited 1901 44th Avenue North Minneapolis, MN 55343 612-338-2784 Accredited since November 2015 ...

  20. The organizational transformative power of nurse residency programs.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Maguire, Pat; Halfer, Diana; Budin, Wendy C; Hall, Debra S; Goodloe, Lauren; Klaristenfeld, Jessica; Teasley, Susan; Forsey, Lynn; Lemke, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Residency programs for newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) have been strongly advocated by the Institute of Medicine, American Organization of Nurse Executives, and other professional organizations. Their cost-effectiveness as well as their impact on NLRN retention, job and practice satisfaction, improved performance, and reduction in environmental reality shock has been demonstrated. This qualitative study sought answers to the question: what people, components, processes and activities of Nurse Residency Programs (NRPs), and the work environment are instrumental in the transition and integration of NLRNs into the professional practice role and into professional communities? In the course of interviewing 907 nurses-NLRNs, experienced nurses, managers, and educators-practicing on clinical units with confirmed "very healthy work environments" in 20 Magnet hospitals, it became evident that not only did NRPs positively impact the professional socialization of NLRNs, they led to transformative changes in the organization and in the practice of other health care professionals. The organizational transformative changes described by the interviewees are presented for each of the 7 major challenges identified by NLRNs-delegation, prioritization, managing patient care delivery, autonomous decision-making, collaboration with other disciplines, constructive conflict resolution, and utilizing feedback to restore self-confidence. If it can be demonstrated that these transformative changes stimulated by NRPs also lead to improved patient outcomes, NRPs may be the most significant organization transformation instituted by nurse leaders in recent years.

  1. The organizational transformative power of nurse residency programs.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Maguire, Pat; Halfer, Diana; Budin, Wendy C; Hall, Debra S; Goodloe, Lauren; Klaristenfeld, Jessica; Teasley, Susan; Forsey, Lynn; Lemke, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Residency programs for newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) have been strongly advocated by the Institute of Medicine, American Organization of Nurse Executives, and other professional organizations. Their cost-effectiveness as well as their impact on NLRN retention, job and practice satisfaction, improved performance, and reduction in environmental reality shock has been demonstrated. This qualitative study sought answers to the question: what people, components, processes and activities of Nurse Residency Programs (NRPs), and the work environment are instrumental in the transition and integration of NLRNs into the professional practice role and into professional communities? In the course of interviewing 907 nurses-NLRNs, experienced nurses, managers, and educators-practicing on clinical units with confirmed "very healthy work environments" in 20 Magnet hospitals, it became evident that not only did NRPs positively impact the professional socialization of NLRNs, they led to transformative changes in the organization and in the practice of other health care professionals. The organizational transformative changes described by the interviewees are presented for each of the 7 major challenges identified by NLRNs-delegation, prioritization, managing patient care delivery, autonomous decision-making, collaboration with other disciplines, constructive conflict resolution, and utilizing feedback to restore self-confidence. If it can be demonstrated that these transformative changes stimulated by NRPs also lead to improved patient outcomes, NRPs may be the most significant organization transformation instituted by nurse leaders in recent years. PMID:22407208

  2. Is the orthopedic fellowship interview process broken? A survey of program directors and residents.

    PubMed

    Oladeji, Lasun O; Pehler, Stephen F; Raley, James A; Khoury, Joseph G; Ponce, Brent A

    2015-11-01

    Most orthopedic surgery residents pursue fellowship training. The fellowship interview process requires considerable time and financial investment from residents and residency programs. We conducted a study of the time, financial, and program disruption impact the fellowship interview process has on residents and residency programs. Two mixed-response questionnaires were sent to orthopedic surgery residency directors and postgraduate year 4 and 5 residents. Responses were received from 45 program directors and 129 residents. Sixty-two percent of the directors thought the interview process was extremely disruptive to their program. On average, the residents applied to 19 programs, received 14 interview offers, attended 11 interviews, were away from residency training 11 days, and spent $5875 on travel. About 70% of directors and residents wanted changes made to the orthopedic fellowship interview process. Sixty percent of the directors wanted interviews conducted in a central location. Our results highlight that time away from residency training, financial costs associated with the fellowship interview process, and disruption of the residency program are substantial.

  3. 42 CFR 413.79 - Direct GME payments: Determination of the weighted number of FTE residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... NURSING FACILITIES Specific Categories of Costs § 413.79 Direct GME payments: Determination of the... training in a different specialty program, the resident's initial residency period will be determined based... the minimum accredited length for each type of program. The adjustment to the cap may not exceed...

  4. Factors Influencing the Choice of a Psychiatric Residency Program: A Survey of Applicants to the Johns Hopkins Residency Program in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davydow, Dimitry; Bienvenu, Joseph; Lipsey, John; Swartz, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors set out to determine what general factors are important in the selection of a psychiatric residency program, the views applicants have of several aspects of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Psychiatric Residency Program, and what relationships exist among these elements. Methods: A survey mailed to Johns Hopkins Hospital…

  5. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Katherine A.; Pound, Catherine M.; Peddle, Beth; Tokarewicz, Jaclyn; Eady, Kaylee

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians’ research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. Purpose To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. Methods We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Results Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1) critically evaluating research literature, 2) writing a research proposal, 3) submitting an application for research funding, and 4) writing a manuscript. Discussion This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents’ scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway. PMID:25526717

  6. A Study of the Incorporation of Information Technologies into the Curricula of Some ALA-Accredited Library and Information Science Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefelhocz, Charlotte P.

    Ten randomly-chosen U.S. American Library Association (ALA) accredited programs which grant the first professional degree in library and information science (LIS) were studied to determine to what degree, and in what manner, 15 information technologies (ITs) based on computers have been incorporated into the curricula. The method of study included…

  7. An Examination of U.S. AACSB International Accounting-Accredited Schools to Determine Global Travel Experience Requirements in Accounting Masters Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Susan Lee; Finley, Jane B.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on the extent to which U.S. graduate accounting programs accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business have included some type of global travel experience in their graduate accounting curriculum. The authors contacted 137 member schools offering accounting masters degrees. Only one school required an…

  8. Development of residency program guidelines for interaction with the pharmaceutical industry. Education Council, Residency Training Programme in Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Medical residency programs are likely to face increasing pressure to address their relations with the pharmaceutical industry. Our internal medicine residency program has developed guidelines that were adopted after extensive debate by residents and faculty members. The guidelines are based on the principles that residents and faculty should set the educational agenda and that the residency program should not allow gifts of any sort from industry to residents. Specific policies include obtaining and screening educational materials from the industry before residents are exposed to them, proscribing "drug lunches" and accepting industry sponsorship only when the residency program maintains complete control of the educational event being sponsored. The industry response to the guidelines was split; about half reacted negatively, and half found the guidelines acceptable. Our experience suggests that productive debate about guidelines for the interaction of residency programs with the pharmaceutical industry is possible and desirable and that explicit policies can clarify areas of ambiguity. PMID:8348422

  9. The RRC Mandate for Residency Programs to Demonstrate Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Competency among Residents: A Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Joel; Mellman, Lisa; Rubin, Eugene; Tasman, Allan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Residency Review Committee (RRC) requirement that residents must achieve competency in psychodynamic psychotherapy has generated considerable deliberation. Methods: The authors debated this subject at the 2004 American Psychiatric Association (APA) meetings. Results: Arguments favoring current requirements emphasize the importance…

  10. Engineering Accreditation in China: The Progress and Development of China's Engineering Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiaju, Bi

    2009-01-01

    Among engineering degree programs at the bachelor's level in China, civil engineering was the first one accredited in accordance with a professional programmatic accreditation system comparable to that of international practice. Launched in 1994, the accreditation of civil engineering aimed high and toward international standards and featured the…

  11. Quality Implementation in Health Physics Unit, Cosenza Hospital. Accreditation Program as Quality Improvement instrument.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, M; Siciliano, R

    2016-01-01

    Achieving high levels of quality in healthcare, which could be measurable, is increasingly important at present and is dictated by the radical changes of the welfare system imposed today by the well known economic constraints. However, even in the ongoing legislation, the practices concerning the verification and review of the quality of health care has had a major impact in the galaxy of Health. On the one hand, the citizen is developing an awareness of the possibilities of choice (Empowerment) between a plurality of providers of healthcare services, on the other hand providers themselves are obliged, within the logic of a global market, to retrain their offers to respond satisfactorily to the needs of citizens. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how the adoption of Operational Procedures, following the granting of a certificate of accreditation to the Unit of Medical Physics, has changed the approach to the work on the part of health workers, in the direction of a dynamic quality improvement. PMID:27479767

  12. Diversity in Libraries: Academic Residency Programs. Contributions in Librarianship and Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogell, Raquel V., Ed.; Gruwell, Cindy A., Ed.

    This book contains 15 essays written by 19 librarians who participated in minority residency programs in academic libraries and 5 essays written by 6 professionals who served as residency program administrators. The following essays are included: (1) "The University of California, Santa Barbara Fellowship--A Program in Transition" (Detrice…

  13. Child Welfare Training in Child Psychiatry Residency: A Program Director Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Terry G.; Cox, Julia R.; Walker, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study surveys child psychiatry residency program directors in order to 1) characterize child welfare training experiences for child psychiatry residents; 2) evaluate factors associated with the likelihood of program directors' endorsing the adequacy of their child welfare training; and 3) assess program directors'…

  14. Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training: Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating an Evidenced-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, Janice L.; Melczak, Michael; Johnjulio, William; Campopiano, Melinda; Gordon, Adam J.; Costlow, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Medical residents do not receive adequate training in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for alcohol and other drug use disorders. The federally funded Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training program (SMaRT) is an evidence-based curriculum with goals of training residents in SBIRT knowledge and skills and…

  15. A Survey of the Interactions between Psychiatry Residency Programs and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varley, Christopher K.; Jibson, Michael D.; McCarthy, Mary; Benjamin, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a survey of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT) on interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry residency programs. METHODS: American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training membership was anonymously surveyed by e-mail and by paper…

  16. Star: A Dementia-Specific Training Program for Staff in Assisted Living Residences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teri, Linda; Huda, Piruz; Gibbons, Laura; Young, Heather; van Leynseele, June

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes, and provides data on, an innovative, comprehensive, dementia-specific training program designed to teach direct care staff in assisted living residences to improve care and reduce problems in residents with dementia. Design and Methods: STAR--which stands for Staff Training in Assisted living Residences- provides…

  17. Perceptions of pediatric chief residents on minority house staff recruitment and retention in large pediatric residency programs.

    PubMed

    Giardino, A P; Cooper, M C

    1999-08-01

    This study examined methods of recruiting and retaining minority house staff at US residency training programs. A 28-item questionnaire was mailed to pediatric chief residents at 78 US training programs with more than 35 residents. The response rate was 74%. Programs were characterized by patient populations served, number of ethnic/racial minority house staff and faculty, and the presence of minority house staff support systems within the institution. In this largely urban sample, minority recruitment and retention was reported as an explicit priority by 40% of pediatric chief residents. The majority (71%) reported that their house staff recruitment committees had no explicitly defined recruitment goals regarding minority house staff. Seventy-seven percent reported that within their departments, recruitment efforts toward minorities were no different than for nonminorities. Overall, few minority house staff and minority faculty were identified in the responding institutions. The most frequently reported intra-institutional support systems for minority house staff included individual pairing with faculty advisors from the same minority group (29%), an affirmative-action office located at the institution (8%), and the existence of a minority faculty support group (4%). These results indicate that pediatric chief residents may not be fully aware of the specific challenges related to the recruitment and retention of minority physicians, and most house staff recruitment committees do not have explicit goals in this regard. PMID:12656435

  18. 28 CFR 115.342 - Placement of residents in housing, bed, program, education, and work assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... legally required educational programming or special education services. Residents in isolation shall... review to determine whether there is a continuing need for separation from the general population....

  19. Addressing the mandate for hand-off education: a focused review and recommendations for anesthesia resident curriculum development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lane-Fall, Meghan B; Brooks, Amber K; Wilkins, Sara A; Davis, Joshua J; Riesenberg, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that residency programs teach residents about handoffs and ensure their competence in this communication skill. Development of hand-off curricula for anesthesia residency programs is hindered by the paucity of evidence regarding how to conduct, teach, and evaluate handoffs in the various settings where anesthesia practitioners work. This narrative review draws from literature in anesthesia and other disciplines to provide recommendations for anesthesia resident hand-off curriculum development and evaluation.

  20. Teaching professionalism to residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eileen J; Jackson, J Craig; Kratz, Lyn; Marcuse, Edgar K; McPhillips, Heather A; Shugerman, Richard P; Watkins, Sandra; Stapleton, F Bruder

    2003-01-01

    The need to teach professionalism during residency has been affirmed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which will require documentation of education and evaluation of professionalism by 2007. Recently the American Academy of Pediatrics has proposed the following components of professionalism be taught and measured: honesty/integrity, reliability/responsibility, respect for others, compassion/empathy, self-improvement, self-awareness/knowledge of limits, communication/collaboration, and altruism/advocacy. The authors describe a curriculum for introducing the above principles of professionalism into a pediatrics residency that could serve as a model for other programs. The curriculum is taught at an annual five-day retreat for interns, with 11 mandatory sessions devoted to addressing key professionalism issues. The authors also explain how the retreat is evaluated and how the retreat's topics are revisited during the residency, and discuss general issues of teaching and evaluating professionalism.

  1. A Comparison between Emergency Medicine Residency Training Programs in the United States and Saudi Arabia from the Residents' Perception

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to compare the trainees' perception of emergency medicine (EM) training in the United States (US) and Saudi Arabia (SA) and to identify residents' levels of confidence and points of satisfaction in education, procedural skills, and work environment. Method. An IRB-exempt anonymous web-based survey was distributed to five EM residency training programs in the USA and three residency regions in SA. Results. 342 residents were polled with a 20% response rate (16.8% USA and 25.8% SA). The Saudi residents responded less positively to the questions about preparation for their boards' examinations, access to multiple educational resources, and weekly academic activities. The Saudi trainees felt less competent in less common procedures than US trainees. American trainees also more strongly agree that they have more faculty interest in their education compared to the Saudi trainees. The Saudi residents see more patients per hour compared to their US peers. Conclusion. These findings may be due to the differences in training techniques including less formal didactics and simulation experience in SA and more duty hour regulations in the USA. PMID:24563784

  2. A program of professional accreditation of hospital wards by the Italian Society of Internal Medicine (SIMI): self- versus peer-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Massimo; Traisci, Giancarlo; Franchini, Alberto; Benetti, Gianpiero; Serra, Pietro; Monti, Maria Alice

    2012-02-01

    The Italian Society of Internal Medicine has developed a voluntary program of professional accreditation of the medical units run by its constituency. Participation in the program, which is meant to foster staff involvement in clinical governance, includes all the medical personnel and nurses. Accreditation is awarded provided the candidate unit is able to adhere to a pre-established set of quality standards, meet a number of clinical and organizational requirements and monitor specific indicators. Self-evaluation is the first step in the program, followed by a site visit by a team of peer internists experienced in quality auditing. The program, which has involved so far 19 units, has considered a number of clinical requirements related to the three most frequent diseases in Italian internal medicine wards: chronic heart failure (CHF), exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hepatic cirrhosis with ascites (HCA). The comparison between self- and peer-evaluation witnessed less discrepancies for disease-related than for organizational requirements, the latter being met to a smaller degree by most units. In particular, concordance was higher for requirements and indicators pertaining to CHF and HCA than to COPD. This program of professional accreditation developed by the Italian Society of Internal Medicine has the potential to describe, monitor and improve clinical and organizational performances in internal medicine. It should also be seen as a contribution to implement the strategy of professional governance in hospitals.

  3. Preparing for a Successful Psychiatry Residency Review Committee Site Visit: A Guide for New Training Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Shashi K.; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: New residency training directors are often faced with multiple competing tasks such as meeting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Psychiatry Program Requirements and achieving successful completion of residency review committee (RRC) site visits. For many years, the authors have presented workshops on this…

  4. Integrative Medicine in a Preventive Medicine Residency: A Program for the Urban Underserved.

    PubMed

    Berz, Jonathan P B; Gergen Barnett, Katherine A; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    The Preventive Medicine Residency Program collaborated with the Department of Family Medicine's Program for Integrative Medicine and Health Disparities at Boston Medical Center to create a new rotation for preventive medicine residents starting in autumn 2012. Residents participated in integrative medicine group visits and consults, completed an online curriculum in dietary supplements, and participated in seminars all in the context of an urban safety net hospital. This collaboration was made possible by a federal Health Resources and Services Administration grant for integrative medicine in preventive medicine residencies and helped meet a need of the program to increase residents' exposure to clinical preventive medicine and integrative health clinical skills and principles. The collaboration has resulted in a required rotation for all residents that continues after the grant period and has fostered additional collaborations related to integrative medicine across the programs.

  5. Preparing Secondary Stem Teachers for High-Need Schools: Challenges of an Urban Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Rubén; Duchaine, Ellen L.; Reynosa, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Teaching residency programs that blend coursework with clinical experiences have emerged nationwide to prepare aspiring teachers for the demanding reality of teaching in high-need urban schools. The Teaching Residency Program for Critical Shortage Areas was created to help urban school districts with the challenge of recruiting and retaining…

  6. Developing an Instrument to Examine Student-Faculty Interaction in Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriram, Rishi; McLevain, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Faculty-in-residence programs are a distinct feature of residential colleges (Ryan, 2001), but more recently, institutions of higher education have created more opportunities for faculty to reside in various types of living-learning programs, including theme housing and first-year experience communities. Within the context of this study,…

  7. A National Survey of Procedural Skill Requirements in Family Practice Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenore, Josie L.; Sharp, Lisa K.; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed the use and composition of required procedure lists in U.S. family practice residency programs. Although a majority of respondents reported use of a required procedure list, programs differed greatly in terms of required procedures, and few defined how to evaluate the technical competency of their residents. (EV)

  8. Baylor SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program: Model Description and Initial Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, James H.; Kowalchuk, Alicia; Waters, Vicki; Laufman, Larry; Shilling, Elizabeth H.

    2012-01-01

    The Baylor College of Medicine SBIRT Medical Residency Training Program is a multilevel project that trains residents and faculty in evidenced-based screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) methods for alcohol and substance use problems. This paper describes the training program and provides initial evaluation after the…

  9. Health Literacy Teaching in U.S. Family Medicine Residency Programs: A National Survey.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Clifford A; Nguyen, Nancy T; Garvin, Roger; Sou, Channbunmorl; Carney, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Health care providers, including medical residents, often lack adequate knowledge and skills to work effectively with patients who have limited health literacy. Little is known about the degree to which medical residents are trained to communicate effectively with people who have limited health literacy. This study aimed to assess the status of health literacy training for physicians in U.S. family medicine residency programs. We conducted an online survey of residency directors at 444 U.S. family medicine residencies. Among 138 respondents (31% response rate), 58 programs (42%) reported teaching residents about health literacy as part of the required curriculum. Most instruction occurred during the 1st year of training. Hours of instruction ranged from 2 to 5 during Years 1 through 3. Skills-based training (e.g., plain language techniques) was taught by most programs. Not having access to a faculty authority on health literacy was strongly associated with lack of a required health literacy curriculum. Respondents overwhelmingly agreed that increasing health literacy training for medical students and residents would help improve residents' clinical skills. This study provides a baseline snapshot of health literacy curricula in U.S. family medicine residencies and likely overestimates the prevalence of such curricula. Additional studies are needed to determine the quality of health literacy instruction in U.S. family medicine residencies and the most effective methods for teaching residents about health literacy. PMID:27043758

  10. Residency Programs and Clinical Leadership Skills Among New Saudi Graduate Nurses.

    PubMed

    Al-Dossary, Reem Nassar; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2016-01-01

    Nurse residency programs have been adopted by health care organizations to assist new graduate nurses with daily challenges such as intense working environments, increasing patient acuity, and complex technologies. Overall, nurse residency programs are proven beneficial in helping nurses transition from the student role to independent practitioners and bedside leaders. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of residency programs on leadership skills of new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program compared to new Saudi graduate nurses who did not participate in residency programs. The study design was cross-sectional involving a convenience sample (n = 98) of new graduate nurses from three hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The Clinical Leadership Survey was used to measure the new graduate nurses' clinical leadership skills based on whether they completed a residency program or not. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine leadership skills in this sample of new Saudi graduate nurses. A significant difference was found between residents and nonresidents in their leadership skills (t = 10.48, P = .000). Specifically, residents were significantly more likely to show higher levels of leadership skills compared to their counterparts. Attending a residency program was associated with a significant increase in clinical leadership skills. The findings of this study indicate that there is a need to implement more residency programs in hospitals of Saudi Arabia. It is imperative that nurse managers and policy makers in Saudi Arabia consider these findings to improve nurses' leadership skills, which will in turn improve patient care. Further research should examine how residency programs influence new graduate nurses' transition from student to practitioner with regard to clinical leadership skills in Saudi Arabia.

  11. A Survey of Internship Programs for Management Undergraduates in AACSB-Accredited Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eyong B.; Kim, Kijoo; Bzullak, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to survey the current status of internship programs for Management undergraduate students and to introduce a well-established internship program. Design/methodology/approach: A web page analysis was conducted on 473 institutions that have AACSB (the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business)…

  12. Technology Competency Requirements of ALA-Accredited Library Science Programs: An Updated Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scripps-Hoekstra, Lindy; Carroll, Megan; Fotis, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    This study set out to provide an understanding of how LIS programs ensure that students are prepared for the demands of graduate study in the twenty-first century, how these expectations may have evolved since Kules's and McDaniel's previous 2008 study, and how various types of programs compare in their approaches. Content analysis was used to…

  13. The accreditation of nursing education in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Nicholas; Birks, Melanie; Chapman, Ysanne

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to explore and discuss the role that ANMAC and the accreditation standards play in pre-registration nursing education nationally. The context of the discussion is situated in the continuum of events that mark the accreditation of nursing education in Australia. The National Registration and Accreditation Scheme has given rise to significant challenges related to the accreditation of nursing programs of education in Australia. Given the importance of accreditation to the quality of nursing education, ANMAC in its appointed role as accrediting authority, must fill the position rather than occupy it. Enhancing transparency and effectiveness is central to ensuring accreditation facilitates quality in nursing education. Given ANMAC's key position, further work is needed in developing a broad base of expertise by fostering scholarly output in the substantive area of nursing accreditation. There is a concerning lack of research centred on the accreditation of programs of nursing education along with the processes associated with it. This problem is not restricted to the Australian context but also extends internationally. In this context, the expertise of accreditors ought to be questioned along with the processes ANMAC use to identify individual capability. As such, the selection of experts needs to be articulated clearly by ANMAC along with the ownership of introducing a research culture into accreditation. PMID:26285403

  14. A laboratory medicine residency training program that includes clinical consultation and research.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, E D; Pierce, G F; McDonald, J M

    1990-04-01

    We describe a laboratory medicine residency training program that includes ongoing interaction with both clinical laboratories and clinical services as well as significant research experience. Laboratory medicine residents serve as on-call consultants in the interpretation of test results, design of testing strategies, and assurance of test quality. The consultative on-call beeper system was evaluated and is presented as an effective method of clinical pathology training that is well accepted by the clinical staff. The research component of the residency program is also described. Together, these components provide training in real-time clinical problem solving and prepare residents for the changing technological environment of the clinical laboratory. At the completion of the residency, the majority of the residents are qualified laboratory subspecialists and are also capable of running an independent research program.

  15. Evaluation of a Transition to Practice Program for Neurosurgery Residents: Creating a Safe Transition From Resident to Independent Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Lister, J. Richard; Friedman, William A.; Murad, Gregory J.; Dow, Jamie; Lombard, Gwen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In 2004, the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Florida implemented a major curriculum innovation called the Transition to Practice program. This program was established to prepare residents to more safely transition to the role of independent practitioner. Methods A qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the program was conducted after its fifth year using online surveys and interviews. Study participants included Transition to Practice graduates, faculty, and current residents. Results Of the 26 respondents, 89% of faculty and all graduates were very satisfied with the program. Strengths identified included an independent yet mentored broad operative experience, the development of self-confidence, and a real sense of responsibility for patients. Medical billing and coding instruction and career mentoring were areas of the program that required additional attention. Conclusion Overall, this program is meeting the stated objectives and is well received by the graduates and faculty. Based on the results of this evaluation, curricular changes such as instructions in practice management and implementation of a career-mentoring program have occurred. The Transition to Practice program is a unique curricular response to change that other surgical specialties may find useful in addressing the current-day stresses on graduate medical education. PMID:21976085

  16. Ethics education for dermatology residents.

    PubMed

    Bercovitch, Lionel; Long, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada both require the teaching and demonstration of general competencies, which include professionalism and ethics as a condition of training program accreditation and specialty certification, respectively. Residents in dermatology and other specialties perceive their training in ethics is inadequate in numerous areas. Residents and specialists in dermatology encounter numerous ethical and professional issues throughout their workday. A dermatoethics curriculum was developed at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in 2001 to address the need for training in bioethics and professionalism. The subject matter of the curriculum and didactic methods are reviewed. Guidelines for effective teaching of ethics and professionalism to dermatology residents are presented. It is important to make the teaching sessions relevant to the residents' day-to-day work experiences and personal needs. Honesty and openness on the part of faculty and trainees is important. Although informality fosters such exchanges, the sessions should be a learning experience. Resources outside the residency program should be used as necessary. Evaluation of ethics and professionalism in trainees is addressed. PMID:19539170

  17. The effects of a prelicensure extern program and nurse residency program on new graduate outcomes and retention.

    PubMed

    Friday, Laura; Zoller, James S; Hollerbach, Ann D; Jones, Katherine; Knofczynski, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Organizations are looking to new graduate nurses to fill expected staffing shortages over the next decade. Creative and effective onboarding programs will determine the success or failure of these graduates as they transition from student to professional nurse. This longitudinal quantitative study with repeated measures used the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey to investigate the effects of offering a prelicensure extern program and postlicensure residency program on new graduate nurses and organizational outcomes versus a residency program alone. Compared with the nurse residency program alone, the combination of extern program and nurse residency program improved neither the transition factors most important to new nurse graduates during their first year of practice nor a measure important to organizations, retention rates. The additional cost of providing an extern program should be closely evaluated when making financially responsible decisions. PMID:25993454

  18. Family Medicine Residency Program Directors Attitudes and Knowledge of Family Medicine CAM Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C.; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Context Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. Objective The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate with an online survey tool, whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. Design A survey was distributed by the CAFM (Council of Academic Family Medicine) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via email. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded for a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into residency curriculum. Results Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In term of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included: time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%), and financial resources (29%). Conclusions While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers preventing residencies to implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. PMID:24021471

  19. The new residency curriculum: professionalism, patient safety, and more.

    PubMed

    Deitte, Lori

    2013-08-01

    Graduate medical education programs are facing unprecedented challenges. Public expectations for professionalism and patient safety are at an all-time high. A new graduate medical education accreditation system is under way. The author discusses ways to modify the current residency curriculum and assessment tools to include greater emphasis on professionalism and patient safety in the learning environment.

  20. A program to improve communication and collaboration between nurses and medical residents.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Ruth G; Hayes, Rosemarie; Stuart, Wendy; Cassell, Asenath; Farrell, Cheryl; Miller-Reyes, Charmin; Donaldson, Audeanne

    2010-04-01

    A program was implemented for nurses and medical residents to improve communication and collaboration. It has been noted that communication and collaboration between members of the health care team improve patient outcomes and job satisfaction among nurses. Nurses on the unit where medical residents trained attended a 2-hour educational program that reviewed effective communication styles and positive aspects of collaboration, including role-playing examples. Medical residents received a self-learning packet with a posttest that was returned to researchers when completed. Focus groups, including both nurses and medical residents, were held twice a month for 6 months after the educational program. Overall improvements in communication, collaboration, patient outcomes, and job satisfaction were noted from the focus group data. The educational program proved to be successful in improving collaboration and communication between nurses and medical residents, which in turn improved patient care.

  1. Practical Nursing Education: Criteria and Procedures for Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Practical Nurse Education and Service, Inc., New York, NY.

    The third in a series of pamphlets on practical nursing education, this document contains information on accreditation standards governing nursing programs. Included are announcements of: (1) available accreditation and consultation services, (2) policies regulating accreditation eligibility, (3) standards of ethics by which nursing programs are…

  2. Text4Peds: Feasibility of an Educational Text-Messaging Program for Pediatrics Residents

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Gregory T.; Draper, Lauren R.; Broom, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing effort to maximize educational material provided to residents who are in a time-constrained work environment. Mobile technology, principally smartphone applications and online modules, has shown educational promise. Intervention We developed a text-messaging program, Text4Peds, to assist residents with preparation for their pediatric board examinations. Goals were to assess (1) the feasibility of texting educational messages to residents, and (2) resident satisfaction and perceived usefulness of a texting program. Methods We conducted a prospective study of pediatrics and combined internal medicine-pediatrics residents. Messages derived from the most missed pediatric in-training examination questions were sent daily to residents. After 3 months, residents completed surveys that gauged their perception on the educational value of the text messages and the effect on their pediatric board preparation. Feasibility of the system was assessed as a total percentage of messages successfully received by residents. Results Of 55 residents, 35 (64%) participated in the program. Of 2534 messages sent out to participants, 2437 (96.2%) were delivered successfully. Positive comments cited the texting of board facts as a quick, helpful, daily study tool. Residents liked that messages were sent at 2:00 pm, and most felt that 1 to 5 messages per week was appropriate. Drawbacks included character restrictions of messages, content limitations, and the lack of a question-answer format. Conclusions An educational text message–based program was successfully implemented in our residency program. Messages were delivered with a high success rate, and residents found educational value in the messages. PMID:26140130

  3. 7 CFR 205.507 - Denial of accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.507 Denial of accreditation....

  4. Institutional Profiles of CAATE Accredited Entry-Level Athletic Training Education Programs in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Valerie J.; Kedrowski, Jonathan J.; Richter, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Context: Educational reform has recently become common thread in athletic training education. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) Education Task force suggests that Athletic Training Education Programs (ATEPs) align within colleges of health-related professions and offer academic majors. Objective: To provide a current profile of…

  5. The Formal Instruction of Psychopharmacology in CACREP-Accredited Counselor Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sepulveda, Victoria I.

    2011-01-01

    Counseling professionals and researchers have advocated for counselor training in psychopharmacology in order to heighten counselors' awareness of client needs and treatment standards (Ingersoll, 2000; King & Anderson, 2004; Smith & Garcia, 2003). There has been a lack of this training within counselor education graduate programs (Buelow, Hebert,…

  6. 75 FR 67992 - Voluntary Private Sector Accreditation and Certification Preparedness Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... a notice in the Federal Register at 75 FR 60773 announcing an initial plan to address small business...-Prep Program). That notice did not contain a closing date for the comment period. This notice provides...) invited public comment on the plan. However, the notice that published on October 1, 2010 did not...

  7. 75 FR 60773 - Voluntary Private Sector Accreditation and Certification Preparedness Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... June 16, 2010 (PS-Prep standards). 1. ASIS International, ``Organizational Resilience: Security... recommendations for standards that DHS should consider. See 73 FR 79140. After reviewing the responses to the... the adoption of three standards for use in the PS-Prep Program and sought public comment. See 74...

  8. 75 FR 34148 - Voluntary Private Sector Accreditation and Certification Preparedness Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... business continuity management). 3. ASIS International SPC. 1-2009--Organizational Resilience: Security... requesting recommendations for standards that DHS should consider. See 73 FR 79140. After reviewing the... the adoption of three standards for use in the PS-Prep Program and sought public comment. See 74...

  9. 77 FR 5415 - National Organic Program: Notice of Draft Guidance for Accredited Certifying Agents, Certified...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Budget (OMB) Bulletin on Agency Good Guidance Practices (GGPs) (January 25, 2007, 72 FR 3432-3440). The...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 205 National Organic Program: Notice of... Certified Organic Products AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of availability...

  10. Learning Goals of AACSB-Accredited Undergraduate Business Programs: Predictors of Conformity versus Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brink, Kyle E.; Palmer, Timothy B.; Costigan, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Learning goals are central to assurance of learning. Yet little is known about what goals are used by business programs or how they are established. On the one hand, business schools are encouraged to develop their own unique learning goals. However, business schools also face pressures that would encourage conformity by adopting goals used by…

  11. Assessment, Accreditation, and Accountability: Using the A-List to Promote Kinesiology Programs in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeve, T. Gilmour

    2010-01-01

    Higher education institutions and their departments are facing increased demands to document the effectiveness and efficiency of their academic programs, research, and engagement. These demands arise from the various constituents who have vested but not always "compatible" interest in the quality of the work and outcomes of these institutions. The…

  12. Outcome-based residency education: teaching and evaluating the core competencies in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Gregory N; Basu, C Bob; Leong, Mimi; Mateo, Carol; Hollier, Larry H; Stal, Samuel

    2008-06-01

    Through its oversight of residency education in the United States, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has mandated new structural changes in resident education with its newly created core competencies and an emphasis on outcomes-based education. These core competencies represent the central areas in which the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education believes a plastic surgery resident should receive adequate and appropriate education and training. In addition, as part of this outcomes-based education, residents are to be evaluated on their level of mastery in these core competencies. Increasingly, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education will assess the ability of residency programs to integrate the teaching and evaluating of the core competencies in their accreditation process of plastic surgery residency programs. This shift in residency evaluation initiated by the Outcomes Project by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education will have a significant impact in how plastic surgery residents are taught and, as importantly, evaluated in the coming years. The objectives of this work were as follows: (1) to outline the different methods available to foster a core competency-based plastic surgery training curriculum and (2) to serve as a primer to help both full-time academic and clinical faculty to further develop their curriculum to successfully teach and constructively evaluate their residents in the core competencies in accordance with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education guidelines. At the conclusion of this review, the reader should have a better understanding of what is necessary to formulate and help foster a plastic surgery core competency curriculum, particularly with an emphasis on the contemporary methods used for outcomes evaluations.

  13. Standards for Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Academic Senate.

    The standards for accreditation presented in this paper were developed by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges to measure basic characteristics of quality required of all accredited institutions. The accreditation standards are divided into eight areas. Standard one discusses institutional integrity: purposes; planning; and…

  14. Eleven-year outcomes from an integrated residency program to train research psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alexander C; Ordóñez, Anna E; Reus, Victor I; Mathews, Carol A

    2013-07-01

    In 2000, to address the critical shortage of research psychiatrists, faculty in the Residency Training Program in General Adult Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine developed and implemented a research resident training program (RRTP). In this article, the authors describe the program's development process, including its organizational structure, eligibility criteria for residents, and core program elements, and they report 11 years of outcomes data. Notable RRTP components include research and career mentorship, individualized training plans, the integration of clinical and research experiences, protected research time, and research funding. From 2000 to 2011, the RRTP enrolled 48 residents. The authors' primary outcome of interest in determining the success of the program was whether or not each RRTP resident entered a postdoctoral research fellowship after graduation. The authors found that more than 80% of graduates had matriculated to postdoctoral research fellowships, irrespective of their previous doctoral-level training in the basic or social sciences. The authors conclude that this flexible, individualized, and innovative training program for psychiatry residents was successful in facilitating the entry of participants into primary research careers, reasoning that it may serve as a model for other residency programs with similar goals. More widespread adoption of similar educational models may help to address the critical shortage of research psychiatrists. PMID:23702520

  15. Minerva: using a software program to improve resident performance during independent call

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itri, Jason N.; Redfern, Regina O.; Cook, Tessa; Scanlon, Mary H.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed an application called Minerva that allows tracking of resident discrepancy rates and missed cases. Minerva mines the radiology information system (RIS) for preliminary interpretations provided by residents during independent call and copies both the preliminary and final interpretations to a database. Both versions are displayed for direct comparison by Minerva and classified as 'in agreement', 'minor discrepancy' or 'major discrepancy' by the resident program director. Minerva compiles statistics comparing minor, major and total discrepancy rates for individual residents relative to the overall group. Discrepant cases are categorized according to date, modality and body part and reviewed for trends in missed cases. The rate of minor, major and total discrepancies for residents on-call at our institution was similar to rates previously published, including a 2.4% major discrepancy rate for second year radiology residents in the DePICTORS study and a 2.6% major discrepancy rate for resident at a community hospital. Trend analysis of missed cases was used to generate a topic-specific resident missed case conference on acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation injuries, which resulted in a 75% decrease in the number of missed cases related to AC separation subsequent to the conference. Using a software program to track of minor and major discrepancy rates for residents taking independent call using modified RadPeer scoring guidelines provides a competency-based metric to determine resident performance. Topic-specific conferences using the cases identified by Minerva can result in a decrease in missed cases.

  16. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    PubMed Central

    Langenau, Erik E.; Pugliano, Gina; Roberts, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA), residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP) program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE), also assess competency in several clinical domains. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009. Methods The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component) were merged and analyzed for relationships. Results Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings. Discussion A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA

  17. Clinician-Educator Tracks for Residents: Three Pilot Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jibson, Michael D.; Hilty, Donald M.; Arlinghaus, Kimberly; Ball, Valdesha L.; McCarthy, Tracy; Seritan, Andreea L.; Servis, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Over the past 30 years, clinician-educators have become a prominent component of medical school faculties, yet few of these individuals received formal training for this role and their professional development lags behind other faculty. This article reviews three residency tracks designed to build skills in teaching, curriculum…

  18. Is the hospital decision to seek accreditation an effective one?

    PubMed

    Grepperud, Sverre

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion in the number of accredited hospitals justifies inquiry into the motives of hospitals in seeking accreditation and its social effectiveness. This paper presents a simple decision-theoretic framework where cost reductions and improved quality of care represent the endpoint benefits from accreditation. We argue that hospital accreditation, although acting as a market-signaling device, might be a socially inefficient institution. First, there is at present no convincing evidence for accreditation causing output quality improvements. Second, hospitals could seek accreditation, even though doing so is socially inefficient, because of moral hazard, consumer misperceptions, and nonprofit motivations. Finally, hospitals that seek accreditation need not themselves believe in output quality improvements from accreditation. Consequently, while awaiting additional evidence on accreditation, policy makers and third-party payers should exercise caution in encouraging such programs. PMID:25470449

  19. Level of oxidative stress markers among physicians in a medical residency program.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Ali; Boojar, Masoud Mashhadi Akbar; Adibi, Peyman; Changiz, Tahereh

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of engaging in a medical residency program, as a stressful situation, on blood and urine levels of oxidative stress markers. Newly admitted medical residents participated in the study, along with a control group of (nonmedical) students. The authors assessed superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, malondialdehyde, micronuclei test, sister chromatid exchange, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine level. All the biomarkers declined after entrance to the residency program, and the parameters were strongly higher in residents than in the control group. There was no significant relationship between demographic factors and levels of stress biomarkers. The greater extent of oxidative stress may be due to higher tension before entrance to a supposedly critical new position, and the declined levels of biomarkers seen after several months in the program could be attributed to an appropriate adjustment of the residents to the new situation. PMID:18980879

  20. Level of oxidative stress markers among physicians in a medical residency program.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Ali; Boojar, Masoud Mashhadi Akbar; Adibi, Peyman; Changiz, Tahereh

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of engaging in a medical residency program, as a stressful situation, on blood and urine levels of oxidative stress markers. Newly admitted medical residents participated in the study, along with a control group of (nonmedical) students. The authors assessed superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, malondialdehyde, micronuclei test, sister chromatid exchange, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine level. All the biomarkers declined after entrance to the residency program, and the parameters were strongly higher in residents than in the control group. There was no significant relationship between demographic factors and levels of stress biomarkers. The greater extent of oxidative stress may be due to higher tension before entrance to a supposedly critical new position, and the declined levels of biomarkers seen after several months in the program could be attributed to an appropriate adjustment of the residents to the new situation.

  1. Medical students' views on thoracic surgery residency programs in a Japanese medical school.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Kiyofumi; Naraoka, Shu-ichi; Miyajima, Masahiro; Uzuka, Takeshi; Saito, Tatsuya; Abe, Tomio

    2003-09-01

    There has been a decline in the number of medical students applying for thoracic surgery training programs. We obtained knowledge of medical students' views on thoracic surgery residency programs. After completion of thoracic surgery clerkship, 17 students were asked to fill out questionnaires on first-year thoracic surgery residency programs. The majority of students considered thoracic surgery to be held in high regard by the general public, and felt that the salary was sufficient. However, only one student chose a thoracic surgery training program. The main reason for not applying for thoracic surgery residency was lifestyle issues. The factors in determining career choice included quality of education and work hours. Medical students are likely to select specialties other than thoracic surgery. Since the main factor influencing medical students' career is the quality of education in a residency program, efforts should be made to improve the quality of education.

  2. Resident dashboards: helping your clinical competency committee visualize trainees’ key performance indicators

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Karen A.; Raimo, John; Spielmann, Kelly; Chaudhry, Saima

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Under the Next Accreditation System, programs need to find ways to collect and assess meaningful reportable information on its residents to assist the program director regarding resident milestone progression. This paper discusses the process that one large Internal Medicine Residency Program used to provide both quantitative and qualitative data to its clinical competency committee (CCC) through the creation of a resident dashboard. Methods Program leadership at a large university-based program developed four new end of rotation evaluations based on the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) and Accreditation Council of Graduated Medical Education's (ACGME) 22 reportable milestones. A resident dashboard was then created to pull together both milestone- and non-milestone-based quantitative data and qualitative data compiled from faculty, nurses, peers, staff, and patients. Results Dashboards were distributed to the members of the CCC in preparation for the semiannual CCC meeting. CCC members adjudicated quantitative and qualitative data to present their cohort of residents at the CCC meeting. Based on the committee's response, evaluation scores remained the same or were adjusted. Final milestone scores were then entered into the accreditation data system (ADS) on the ACGME website. Conclusions The process of resident assessment is complex and should comprise both quantitative and qualitative data. The dashboard is a valuable tool for program leadership to use both when evaluating house staff on a semiannual basis at the CCC and to the resident in person. PMID:27037226

  3. A Self-Assessment Guide for Resident Teaching Experiences.

    PubMed

    Engle, Janet P; Franks, Amy M; Ashjian, Emily; Bingham, Angela L; Burke, John M; Erstad, Brian L; Haines, Seena L; Hilaire, Michelle L; Rager, Michelle L; Wienbar, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Educational Affairs Committee was charged with developing a self-assessment guide for residency programs to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the outcomes of resident teaching curricula. After extensively reviewing the literature, the committee developed assessment rubrics modeled after the 2013 ACCP white paper titled "Guidelines for Resident Teaching Experiences" and the revised American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) 2014 accreditation standards for PGY1 residencies, which place greater emphasis on the teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) than the previous accreditation standards. The self-assessment guide developed by the present committee can serve as an assessment tool for both basic and expanded TLCs. It provides the criteria for program goals, mentoring, directed readings with topic discussions, teaching experiences, and assessment methodology. For an expanded TLC, the committee has provided additional guidance on developing a teaching philosophy, becoming involved in interactive seminars, expanding teaching experiences, developing courses, and serving on academic committees. All the guidelines listed in the present paper use the measures "not present," "developing," and "well developed" so that residency program directors can self-assess along the continuum and identify areas of excellence and areas for improvement. Residency program directors should consider using this new assessment tool to measure program quality and outcomes of residency teaching experiences. Results of the assessment will help residency programs focus on areas within the TLC that will potentially benefit from additional attention and possible modification.

  4. 24 CFR 248.175 - Resident homeownership program-limited equity cooperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-limited equity cooperative. 248.175 Section 248.175 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... Resident homeownership program—limited equity cooperative. (a) Tenants may carry out a resident homeownership program through the purchase of eligible low income housing by a limited equity cooperative...

  5. 24 CFR 248.175 - Resident homeownership program-limited equity cooperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-limited equity cooperative. 248.175 Section 248.175 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to... Resident homeownership program—limited equity cooperative. (a) Tenants may carry out a resident homeownership program through the purchase of eligible low income housing by a limited equity cooperative...

  6. Reintegrating Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs: Making the Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Given the marginalization of couples and family therapy in psychiatric residency programs over the past two decades, the authors propose a rationale for the reintegration of these important psychosocial treatments into the mainstream of general psychiatric residency education. Methods: After reviewing recent trends in the field that…

  7. Collaborative Counselor and Medical Training at a Family Practice Residency Program: A Sharing of the Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, LeBron; Pilkington, Lloyd; Murray, Paige Johnson; Whitfield, Donna

    2000-01-01

    The reactions of a Ph.D.-level, counselor-in-training, a medical student, and a family practice resident to collaborative systems clinical training at a family practice residency program are given in this article. Addresses the initial impressions of the content and process of the teaching model and how the experience changed their views of…

  8. The Counselor-in-Residence Program: Reconfiguring Support Services for a New Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, D. Terry; Johnson, Deanna; Bartels, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    A decrease in resources and an increase in the severity of student concerns are critical challenges faced by counseling centers. By placing professional counselors in residence hails and directing their efforts toward staff rather than students, a Counselor-in-Residence (CIR) program can focus on prevention, identification of at-risk…

  9. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  10. An ACGME Duty Hour Compliant 3-Person Night Float System for Neurological Surgery Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ragel, Brian T.; Piedra, Mark; Klimo, Paul; Burchiel, Kim J.; Waldo, Heidi; McCartney, Shirley; Selden, Nathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) instituted the 24+6-hour work schedule and 80-hour workweek, and in 2011, it enhanced work hour and supervision standards. Innovation In response, Oregon Health & Science University's (OHSU) neurological surgery residency instituted a 3-person night float system. Methods We analyzed work hour records and operative experience for 1 year before and after night float implementation in a model that shortened a combined introductory research and basic clinical neurosciences rotation from 12 to 6 months. We analyzed residents' perception of the system using a confidential survey. The ACGME 2011 work hour standards were applied to both time periods. Results After night float implementation, the number of duty hour violations was reduced: 28-hour shift (11 versus 235), 8 hours off between shifts (2 versus 20), 80 hours per week (0 versus 17), and total violations (23 versus 275). Violations increased only for the less than 4 days off per 4-week interval rule (10 versus 3). No meaningful difference was seen in the number of operative cases performed per year at any postgraduate year (PGY) training level: PGY-2 (336 versus 351), PGY-3 (394 versus 354), PGY-4 (803 versus 802), PGY-5 (1075 versus 1040), PGY-7 (947 versus 913), and total (3555 versus 3460). Residents rated the new system favorably. Conclusions To meet 2011 ACGME duty hour standards, the OHSU neurological surgery residency instituted a 3-person night float system. A nearly complete elimination of work hour violations did not affect overall resident operative experience. PMID:24949139

  11. 15 CFR 285.9 - Granting accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Granting accreditation. 285.9 Section 285.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ACCREDITATION AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS...

  12. A Four-Year Program to Train Residents in Emergency Medical Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Edward J.; Zink, Brian J.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Cincinnati's comprehensive emergency medicine residency curriculum provides significant practical training in ground and aeromedical transport, disaster work, telemetry communications, and administrative matters. Initial program feedback has been very positive. (MSE)

  13. AOA Approval of ACGME Internship and Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Thomas; Martinez, Bulmaro

    2011-04-01

    Since the 1970s, the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) has provided a means for osteopathic physicians to apply for approval of their postdoctoral training in programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Osteopathic physicians who trained in ACGME programs need this approval to meet AOA licensure and board certification requirements. The AOA approves ACGME residency training with several different approval processes. Approval of the first year of postdoctoral training occurs through Resolution 42, specialty approval (for specialties in which the first year of training is part of the residency), or federal or military training approval. For residency training, the AOA verifies successful completion of an ACGME training program before approving the training. The AOA is using customer surveys and online applications to improve the review process for applicants.

  14. 42 CFR Appendix E to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Educational Programs for Radiation Therapy Technologists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... clinical education center is used, each must meet the standards of a major cancer management center. 3. When didactic preparation and supervised clinical education are not provided in the same institution... accredited institution and each clinical education center, clearly defining the responsibilities...

  15. Impact of a weekly reading program on orthopedic surgery residents' in-training examination.

    PubMed

    Weglein, Daniel G; Gugala, Zbigniew; Simpson, Suzanne; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-05-01

    In response to a decline in individual residents' performance and overall program performance on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE), the authors' department initiated a daily literature reading program coupled with weekly tests on the assigned material. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of the reading program on individual residents' scores and the training program's OITE scores. The reading program consisted of daily review articles from the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, followed by a weekly written examination consisting of multiple-choice or fill-in-the-blank questions. All articles were selected and all questions were written by the departmental chair. A questionnaire was given to assess residents' perceptions of the weekly tests. As a result of implementing the reading program for a 10-month period, residents' subsequent performance on the OITE significantly improved (mean score increase, 4, P<.0001; percentile score increase, 11, P=.0007). The difference in mean score was significant for residents in postgraduate years 3, 4, and 5. A statistically significant correlation was found between weekly test scores and performance on the OITE, with a significant correlation between weekly test scores and OITE percentile ranking. The study results also showed a positive correlation between reading test attendance and weekly test scores. Residents' anonymous questionnaire responses also demonstrated the reading program to be a valuable addition to the residency training curriculum. In conclusion, the study strongly supports the benefits of a weekly reading and examination program in enhancing the core knowledge of orthopedic surgery residents.

  16. Geriatrics Education in Psychiatric Residencies: A National Survey of Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warshaw, Gregg A.; Bragg, Elizabeth J.; Layde, Joseph B.; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Brewer, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the current characteristics of geriatrics training within general psychiatry training programs. Methods: In the fall of 2006, a survey was mailed and made available online to all U.S. psychiatric residency program directors (N=181). Results: The response rate was 54% (n=97). Of the responding psychiatry programs,…

  17. Listening to Students: How I Came to Love My Low-Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Finding an academic program that caters to children's literature is hard. Many people consider children's literature no more sophisticated than its audience--an arena for those who cannot hack it either as writers or as teachers of adult literature. This author, however, found a new program--a "low residency program"--at Hamline University in St.…

  18. Methods and resources for physics education in radiology residency programs: survey results.

    PubMed

    Bresolin, Linda; Bisset, George S; Hendee, William R; Kwakwa, Francis A

    2008-11-01

    Over the past 2 years, ongoing efforts have been made to reevaluate and restructure the way physics education is provided to radiology residents. Program directors and faculty from North American radiology residency programs were surveyed about how physics is being taught and what resources are currently being used for their residents. Substantial needs were identified for additional educational resources in physics, better integration of physics into clinical training, and a standardized physics curriculum closely linked to the initial certification examination of the American Board of Radiology.

  19. The Flipped Classroom: A Modality for Mixed Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning in a Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Young, Timothy P.; Bailey, Caleb J.; Guptill, Mindi; Thorp, Andrea W.; Thomas, Tamara L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A “flipped classroom” educational model exchanges the traditional format of a classroom lecture and homework problem set. We piloted two flipped classroom sessions in our emergency medicine (EM) residency didactic schedule. We aimed to learn about resident and faculty impressions of the sessions, in order to develop them as a regular component of our residency curriculum. Methods We evaluated residents’ impression of the asynchronous video component and synchronous classroom component using four Likert items. We used open-ended questions to inquire about resident and faculty impressions of the advantages and disadvantages of the format. Results For the Likert items evaluating the video lectures, 33/35 residents (94%, 95% CI 80%–99%) responded that the video lecture added to their knowledge about the topic, and 33/35 residents felt that watching the video was a valuable use of their time. For items evaluating the flipped classroom format, 36/38 residents (95%, 95% CI 82%–99%) preferred the format to a traditional lecture on the topic, and 38/38 residents (100%, 95% CI 89%–100%) felt that the small group session was effective in helping them learn about the topic. Most residents preferred to see the format monthly in our curriculum and chose an ideal group size of 5.5 (first session) and 7 (second session). Residents cited the interactivity of the sessions and access to experts as advantages of the format. Faculty felt the ability to assess residents’ understanding of concepts and provide feedback were advantages. Conclusion Our flipped classroom model was positively received by EM residents. Residents preferred a small group size and favored frequent use of the format in our curriculum. The flipped classroom represents one modality that programs may use to incorporate a mixture of asynchronous and interactive synchronous learning and provide additional opportunities to evaluate residents. PMID:25493157

  20. Specialized Accreditation: An Idea Whose Time Has Come? Or Gone?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, William R.

    1998-01-01

    Accreditation of specialized college programs would be improved by increasing communication and specific reform agendas; longer intervals between comprehensive self-studies; improved site-visit and accreditation-decision teams; greater consistency; opportunities to form new accrediting agencies; easing documentation burdens; measuring quality by…

  1. 34 CFR 602.26 - Notification of accrediting decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agency, and the appropriate accrediting agencies at the same time it notifies the institution or program... preaccreditation; or (2) Lets its accreditation or preaccreditation lapse, within 30 days of the date on which accreditation or preaccreditation lapses. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control...

  2. 34 CFR 602.26 - Notification of accrediting decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agency, and the appropriate accrediting agencies at the same time it notifies the institution or program... preaccreditation; or (2) Lets its accreditation or preaccreditation lapse, within 30 days of the date on which accreditation or preaccreditation lapses. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control...

  3. The Road to Accreditation. Readings on Early Education and Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Jean

    This document provides a collection of articles, speeches, and newsletter excerpts covering the accreditation of child care programs in Australia and the United States. The collection contains the following speeches and articles: (1) "The Road to Accreditation," on the history of accreditation in the two countries; (2) "The Case for Child Care…

  4. NAEYC Accreditation: A Decade of Learning and the Years Ahead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredekamp, Sue, Ed.; Willer, Barbara A., Ed.

    The year 1995-96 marks the 10th anniversary of NAEYC accreditation. This collection brings together essays that examine what educators have learned from the past decade along with future directions for accreditation. The chapters focus on three broad themes: (1) effects of NAEYC accreditation on program quality and outcomes for children; (2)…

  5. What Should Gerontology Learn from Health Education Accreditation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Dana Burr; Fitzgerald, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance and accreditation are closely tied together. This article documents the work toward a unified and comprehensive national accreditation program in health education. By exploring the accreditation journey of another discipline, the field of gerontology should learn valuable lessons. These include an attention to inclusivity, a…

  6. The Effects of AACSB Accreditation on Faculty Salaries and Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedrick, David W.; Henson, Steven E.; Krieg, John M.; Wassell, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored differences between salaries and productivity of business faculty in Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB)-accredited business programs and those without AACSB accreditation. Empirical evidence is scarce regarding these differences, yet understanding the impact of AACSB accreditation on salaries and…

  7. What should gerontology learn from health education accreditation?

    PubMed

    Bradley, Dana Burr; Fitzgerald, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance and accreditation are closely tied together. This article documents the work toward a unified and comprehensive national accreditation program in health education. By exploring the accreditation journey of another discipline, the field of gerontology should learn valuable lessons. These include an attention to inclusivity, a generous timeline, ample communication, and abundant resources.

  8. Geriatric medicine training for family practice residents in the 21st century: a report from the Residency Assistance Program/Harfford Geriatrics Initiative.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Gregg; Murphy, John; Buehler, James; Singleton, Stacy

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the quality and quantity of geriatric medicine training for family practice residents is a particular challenge for community-based programs. With support from the John A. Hartford Foundation of New York City, the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) implemented in 1995 a multi-part project to improve the amount and quality of geriatric medicine education received by family practice residents. This report summarizes the initial results of the regional geriatric medicine curriculum retreats for residency directors. The goals of the retreats were to build recognition among the residency directors of the skills that future family physicians will require to be successful providers of primary care to older adults and to allow the residency directors to identify and develop solutions to barriers to improving geriatric medicine training for residents. Forty-six program directors participated in the three retreats between February 2000 and February 2001. The participants represented 52 programs and rural tracks in all geographic regions, small and large programs, and urban and rural settings. The program directors developed a consensus on the geriatric medicine knowledge, skills, and attitudes that should be expected of all family practice residency graduates; developed a list of basic, required educational resources for each family practice residency program; and proposed solutions to common obstacles to successful curriculum development.

  9. A pathway to academic accreditation

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    The pathways to successfully accrediting programs through a partnership with a local college can be convoluted and offer many dead ends. Those pathways can be made straighter and have fewer false starts by following a plan that has worked. Accreditation of courses and programs can add credibility and prestige to a program. The process can be facilitated by following a basic plan such as the one outlined. The discussion will track the preliminary activities that form the ground work for the beginning of the accreditation process through final approval by a college`s State Board of trustees or regents. On the road to approval, the packaging of courses for presentation, the formulation and composition of an advisory committee, the subsequent use of the advisors, presentation to the faculty committees, the presentation to the college`s governing board of trustees or regents, and final approval by the State Board are covered. An important benefit of accreditation is the formation of a partnership with the local college. Teaming with a local college to provide an accredited certificate in a field of employee training is an excellent opportunity to establish an educational partnership within the local community that will be of benefit to the participating entities. It also represents a training/retraining opportunity in direct support of the US Department of Energy`s current missions of partnership and localization. The accredited modules can be taught where appropriate by college personnel or loaned instructors from the work site. By using the company employees who are working with the topics covered in the modules, the courses are kept up-to-date.

  10. Local and national trends in general surgery residents' operative experience: do work hour limitations negatively affect case volume in small community-based programs?

    PubMed

    Markelov, Alexey; Sakharpe, Aniket; Kohli, Harjeet; Livert, David

    2011-12-01

    The goals of this study were to analyze the impact of work hour restrictions on the operative case volume at a small community-based general surgery residency training program and compare changes with the national level. Annual national resident case log data from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) website and case logs of graduating Easton Hospital residents (years 2002-2009) were used for analysis. Weighted average change in total number of cases in our institution was -1.20 (P = 0.52) vs 1.78 (P = 0.07) for the national program average with statistically significant difference on comparison (P = 0.027). We also found significant difference in case volume changes at the national level compared with our institution for the following ACGME defined subcategories: alimentary tract [8.19 (P < 0.01) vs -1.08 (P = 0.54)], abdomen [8.48 (P < 0.01) vs -6.29 (P < 0.01)], breast [1.91 (P = 0.89) vs -3.6 (P = 0.02)], and vascular [4.03 (P = 0.02) vs -3.98 (P = 0.01)]. Comparing the national trend to the community hospital we see that there is total increase in cases at the national level whereas there is a decrease in case volume at the community hospital. These trends can also be followed in ACGME defined subcategories which form the major case load for a general surgical training such as alimentary tract, abdominal, breast, and vascular procedures. We hypothesize that work hour restrictions have been favorable for the larger programs, as these programs were able to better integrate the night float system, restructure their call schedule, and implement institutional modifications which are too resource demanding for smaller training programs.

  11. Growing practice specialists in mental health: addressing stigma and recruitment with a nursing residency program.

    PubMed

    Ng, San; Kessler, Linda; Srivastava, Rani; Dusek, Janice; Duncan, Deborah; Tansey, Margaret; Jeffs, Lianne

    2010-05-01

    Despite the growing prevalence and healthcare needs of people living with mental illness, the stigma associated with mental health nursing continues to present challenges to recruiting new nurses to this sector. As a key recruitment strategy, five mental health hospitals and three educational institutions collaborated to develop and pilot an innovative nursing residency program. The purpose of the Mental Health Nursing Residency Program was to dispel myths associated with practising in the sector by promoting mental health as a vibrant specialty and offering a unique opportunity to gain specialized competencies. The program curriculum combines protected clinical time, collaborative learning and mentored clinical practice. Evaluation results show significant benefits to clinical practice and an improved ability to recruit and retain nurses. Nursing leadership was crucial at multiple levels for success. In this paper, we describe our journey in designing and implementing a nursing residency program for other nurse leaders interested in providing a similar program to build on our experience.

  12. An Evaluation of Two Visiting Programs for Elderly Community Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogat, G. Anne; Jason, Leonard A.

    1983-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of two visiting programs designed to increase social participation and psychological well-being in a group of 35 older adults. Results showed the network-building program, which encouraged community involvement, showed higher means on most variables, but few significant differences were found. (JAC)

  13. After the strike: using facilitation in a residency training program.

    PubMed

    Andres, D; Hamoline, D; Sanders, M; Anderson, J

    1998-03-10

    Methods of alternative dispute resolution, including facilitation, can be used to identify and resolve areas of conflict. Facilitation was used by the University of Saskatchewan's Department of Family Medicine (Saskatoon division) after the strike by residents in July and August 1995 so as to allow optimal use of the remaining educational time. Through facilitation, experiences of the strike and areas of potential conflict were explored. Participants had a broad range of responses to the strike. Specific coping strategies were developed to deal with identified concerns. Although outcomes were not measured formally, levels of trust improved and collegial relationships were restored. Because so many changes occur in health care and medical education, conflict inevitably arises. Facilitation offers one way of dealing with change constructively, thereby making possible the optimal use of educational time. PMID:9526479

  14. Connecting resident education to patient outcomes: the evolution of a quality improvement curriculum in an internal medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad A; Diers, Tiffiny; Schauer, Daniel P; Warm, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    As part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System, residency programs must connect resident-physician education to improved patient care outcomes. Residency training programs, however, face multiple obstacles in doing so. Results from residency quality improvement (QI) curricula tend to show improvement in simple process-based measures but not in more complex outcomes of care such as diabetes or blood pressure control. In this article, the authors describe the evolution of their QI educational program for internal medicine residents at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center within the structure of a novel training model called the Ambulatory Long Block. They discuss a resident-run project that led to reduced rates of patients with uncontrolled diabetes as an example of improvement in outcome measures. Despite favorable results from that particular resident group, the successful intervention did not spread practice-wide. Using this example, they detail the phases of evolution and lessons learned from their curriculum from 2006 to 2014 within a framework of previously published general principles for successful QI education, including those of exemplary care and learning sites. Successful programs require leadership, faculty expertise and mentorship, data management, learner buy-in, and patient engagement. Their experience will hopefully be of help to others as they attempt to simultaneously improve care and education. Further research and innovation are needed in this area, including optimizing strategies for strengthening resident-driven projects through partnership with nursing, allied health, and longitudinally engaged faculty members.

  15. Accreditation for Indoor Climbing Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Peter

    To ensure that the rapidly growing climbing gym industry maintains the excellent safety record established so far, the Climbing Gym Association (CGA) has developed the Peer Review and Accreditation Program, a process of review between qualified and experienced CGA reviewers and a climbing facility operator to assess the facility's risk management…

  16. The Accreditation-Eligibility Link.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Nora Jean

    1981-01-01

    Public policy rests on the unreliable assumption that postsecondary education institutions and programs approved by nationally recognized private accrediting agencies are bona fide providers of educational services, worthy of students' time, effort, and money and of federal funds. Rather, federal fund eligibility should focus on measures of…

  17. 78 FR 14315 - Notice of Chargeable Rates Under the National Flood Insurance Program for Non-Primary Residences

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Program for Non-Primary Residences AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice... National Flood Insurance Program for non-primary residences. DATES: The rates announced in this notice are... notice chargeable premium rates for any residential property which is not the primary residence of...

  18. Interactive distance learning in orthodontic residency programs: problems and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katherine P; Hannum, Wallace H; Fields, Henry W; Proffit, William R

    2012-03-01

    Sharing resources through distance education has been proposed as one way to deal with a lack of full-time faculty members and maintain high-quality content in orthodontic residency programs. To keep distance education for orthodontic residents cost-effective while retaining interaction, a blended approach was developed that combines observation of web-based seminars with live post-seminar discussions. To evaluate this approach, a grant from the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) opened free access during the 2009-10 academic year to twenty-five recorded seminars in four instructional sequences to all sixty-three orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada. The only requirement was to also participate in the evaluation. Just over half (52 percent) of the U.S. programs chose to participate; the primary reason for participating was because faculty members wanted their residents to have exposure to other faculty members and ideas. The non-participating programs cited technical and logistical problems and their own ability to teach these subjects satisfactorily as reasons. Although participating distant faculty members and residents were generally pleased with the experience, problems in both educational and technical aspects were observed. Educationally, the biggest problem was lack of distant resident preparation and expectation of a lecture rather than a seminar. Technically, the logistics of scheduling distant seminars and uneven quality of the audio and video recordings were the major concerns of both residents and faculty members. Proposed solutions to these educational and technical problems are discussed.

  19. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training.

    PubMed

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education.

  20. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    PubMed Central

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people’s choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. PMID:25995656

  1. SU-B-213-00: Education Council Symposium: Accreditation and Certification: Establishing Educational Standards and Evaluating Candidates Based on these Standards

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    The North American medical physics community validates the education received by medical physicists and the clinical qualifications for medical physicists through accreditation of educational programs and certification of medical physicists. Medical physics educational programs (graduate education and residency education) are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP), whereas medical physicists are certified by several organizations, the most familiar of which is the American Board of Radiology (ABR). In order for an educational program to become accredited or a medical physicist to become certified, the applicant must meet certain specified standards set by the appropriate organization. In this Symposium, representatives from both CAMPEP and the ABR will describe the process by which standards are established as well as the process by which qualifications of candidates for accreditation or certification are shown to be compliant with these standards. The Symposium will conclude with a panel discussion. Learning Objectives: Recognize the difference between accreditation of an educational program and certification of an individual Identify the two organizations primarily responsible for these tasks Describe the development of educational standards Describe the process by which examination questions are developed GS is Executive Secretary of CAMPEP.

  2. Conducting a successful residency research project.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Jeffrey F

    2008-08-15

    The residency research project can be a challenging endeavor for pharmacy residents since they typically have limited experience in this area. Furthermore, as the number of accredited residency programs has increased, so has the demand for preceptors with research experience. This review is intended to assist the resident and preceptor by providing steps and guidance with conducting a successful residency research project. Items such as idea generation, proposing the right type of project, departmental review, and project management skills are discussed and guidance with writing the research protocol is provided. Items that must be addressed in every research protocol are described and a generalized protocol template is presented. In addition, the institutional review board review process is described and tips and pointers for obtaining approval are included. Finally, useful tools and resources are provided that can be used up front or throughout each phase of the research project.

  3. The Future of Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Judith S.

    2012-01-01

    Accreditation, the primary means of assuring and improving academic quality in U.S. higher education, has endured for more than 100 years. While accommodating many changes in higher education and society, accreditation's fundamental values and practices have remained essentially intact, affirming their sturdiness. Accreditation is a form of…

  4. A Handbook of Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, Chicago, IL.

    The accreditation process of the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools is discussed. After describing the meaning and purposes of accreditation and the evolution of the Commission's evaluative principles, information is provided on the Criteria for Accreditation and Candidacy,…

  5. Accreditation's Legal Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graca, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Like most issues in higher education, the accreditation paradigm in the United States is defined in large measure by the legal and political climate in which the academy finds itself. In the case of accreditation in particular, the legal substrate is of particular importance given the central role of accreditation in a college's ability to receive…

  6. Impact of an Enduring War on Two Military Psychiatry Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Groom, Rhianon M; Carr, Russell B; Leong, Stephanie L; Hornbaker-Park, Michelle B

    2015-08-01

    Four active duty military psychiatrists at different points in their careers were asked to reflect on the impact that the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan had on their respective training in military psychiatry residency programs. The result is an inside look from four unique perspectives on how military psychiatry residency training adapted over time to prepare their graduates to practice psychiatry in a wartime setting as many graduates went to the front lines of war shortly after graduation. This article will provide an understanding of the challenges faced by these residency programs striving to meet the behavioral health needs created by war while balancing this with ongoing ACGME requirements, how those challenges were met, and the impact it had on residents.

  7. Hobit and Blimp1 instruct a universal transcriptional program of tissue residency in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Laura K; Minnich, Martina; Kragten, Natasja A M; Liao, Yang; Nota, Benjamin; Seillet, Cyril; Zaid, Ali; Man, Kevin; Preston, Simon; Freestone, David; Braun, Asolina; Wynne-Jones, Erica; Behr, Felix M; Stark, Regina; Pellicci, Daniel G; Godfrey, Dale I; Belz, Gabrielle T; Pellegrini, Marc; Gebhardt, Thomas; Busslinger, Meinrad; Shi, Wei; Carbone, Francis R; van Lier, René A W; Kallies, Axel; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M

    2016-04-22

    Tissue-resident memory T (Trm) cells permanently localize to portals of pathogen entry, where they provide immediate protection against reinfection. To enforce tissue retention, Trm cells up-regulate CD69 and down-regulate molecules associated with tissue egress; however, a Trm-specific transcriptional regulator has not been identified. Here, we show that the transcription factor Hobit is specifically up-regulated in Trm cells and, together with related Blimp1, mediates the development of Trm cells in skin, gut, liver, and kidney in mice. The Hobit-Blimp1 transcriptional module is also required for other populations of tissue-resident lymphocytes, including natural killer T (NKT) cells and liver-resident NK cells, all of which share a common transcriptional program. Our results identify Hobit and Blimp1 as central regulators of this universal program that instructs tissue retention in diverse tissue-resident lymphocyte populations. PMID:27102484

  8. Impact of an Enduring War on Two Military Psychiatry Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Groom, Rhianon M; Carr, Russell B; Leong, Stephanie L; Hornbaker-Park, Michelle B

    2015-08-01

    Four active duty military psychiatrists at different points in their careers were asked to reflect on the impact that the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan had on their respective training in military psychiatry residency programs. The result is an inside look from four unique perspectives on how military psychiatry residency training adapted over time to prepare their graduates to practice psychiatry in a wartime setting as many graduates went to the front lines of war shortly after graduation. This article will provide an understanding of the challenges faced by these residency programs striving to meet the behavioral health needs created by war while balancing this with ongoing ACGME requirements, how those challenges were met, and the impact it had on residents. PMID:25739934

  9. Appraisal of the communication skills of residents in the Family Medicine Program in Central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alsaad, Saad M.; Alshammari, Sulaiman A.; Almogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess patients’ perceptions of the communication skills of family medicine residents. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Data were collected from patients, seeing 23 residents from 4 family medicine residency programs in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia namely, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh Military Hospital, Security Forces Hospital, and King Abdul-Aziz Medical City. The translated version of the Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) was used. Data were collected during January and February 2013. Results: A total of 350 patients completed the CAT, with an 87.5% response rate. Patients rated each resident differently, but the mean percentage of items, which residents rated as excellent was 71%. In general, male residents were rated higher 72.8 ± 27.2 than female residents 67.8 ± 32.2 with a significant difference; (p<0.005). Also, significant differences were found based on the gender of the residents, when each item of the CAT was compared. Comparing training centers, there were no significant differences found in the overall percentage of items rated as excellent or among items of the CAT. Conclusion: The study identified areas of strength and weaknesses that need to be addressed to improve communication skills of physicians. PMID:27381544

  10. The Design and Implementation of a Counselor-in-Residence Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchowski, Lindsay M.; Castelino, Paul; Ng, H. Mei; Cosio, David; Heaton, Jeanne A.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive--yet cost-effective--provision of psychological care is a timely concern for most college counseling centers. The current review summarizes the components of a program designed to meet such seemingly discordant demands. The Counselor-in-Residence program places live-in, doctoral students in clinical psychology/counselor education, in…

  11. Outdoor Education: A Guide for Planning Resident Programs. (Revision September 1977.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Irwin; Donaldson, George W.

    The culmination of educational experiences in the outdoors is the resident outdoor education program. Involving teachers and pupils living and learning in the natural environment, the program emphasizes the development of human values and provides students with learning opportunities that focus on direct, real, and relevant experiences. Intended…

  12. Medicaid: Recoveries from Nursing Home Residents' Estates Could Offset Program Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Through asset recovery programs, states can recover from the estates of nursing home residents or their survivors a portion of the expenses the state incurs in providing nursing home care. Estate recovery programs require Medicaid recipients whose primary assets are their homes to contribute toward the cost of their nursing home care in the same…

  13. A Nexus of Education and Practice: The Residency Program at the University of Michigan Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Richard M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes underlying rationale of program designed to offer recent library school graduates special training opportunities that focus on current issues, trends, and developments in academic librarianship. Recruitment, educational component of program, roles of supervisors and project director, and comments from three residents (expectations,…

  14. A Grounded Theory of Connectivity and Persistence in a Limited Residency Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Steven R.; Snyder, Martha M.; Dringus, Laurie P.; Maddrey, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Limited-residency and online doctoral programs have an attrition rate significantly higher than traditional programs. This grounded-theory study focused on issues pertaining to communication between students, their peers and faculty and how interpersonal communication may affect persistence. Data were collected from 17 students actively working on…

  15. A Model for Reintegrating Couples and Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors propose a family-systems training model for general residency training programs in psychiatry based on the couples and family therapy training program in Stanford's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Methods: The authors review key elements in couples and family therapy training. Examples are drawn from the…

  16. Graduate Medical Education Viewed from the National Intern and Resident Matching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graettinger, John S.

    1976-01-01

    The total number of applicants for first-year programs in graduate medical education through the National Intern and Resident Matching Program in 1976 exceeded the number of positions offered for the second consecutive year. There were deficits in the number of openings offered in the primary care specialties and surfeits in medical and surgical…

  17. Finding an Analytic Frame for Faculty-Student Interaction within Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mara, Miriam; Mara, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a case study analyzing how a Faculty-in-Residence program fosters student engagement. Using Cox & Orehovec's typology to add granularity to the National Study on Student Engagement's criteria for student engagement, we suggest best practices for the implementation of these in-situ faculty engagement programs.

  18. From "Outsider" to "Bridge": The Changing Role of University Supervision in an Urban Teacher Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Wendy; Lorch, Janet

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative research study investigated a faculty liaison (FL) model, an alternative to traditional field supervision implemented in an urban teacher residency (UTR) program. In the FL model, professors teaching in the UTR program were assigned to school sites rather than individual teacher candidates to observe and provide feedback, evaluate…

  19. The Council on Aviation Accreditation. Part 2; Contemporary Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, C. Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The Council on Aviation Accreditation (CAA) was established in 1988 in response to the need for formal, specialized accreditation of aviation academic programs, as expressed by institutional members of the University Aviation Association (UAA). The first aviation programs were accredited by the CAA in 1992, and today, the CAA lists 60 accredited programs at 21 institutions nationwide. Although the number of accredited programs has steadily grown, there are currently only 20 percent of UAA member institutions with CAA accredited programs. In an effort to further understand this issue, a case study of the CAA was performed, which resulted in a two-part case study report. Part one addressed the historical foundation of the organization and the current environment in which the CAA functions. Part two focuses on the following questions: (a) what are some of the costs to a program seeking CAA accreditation (b) what are some fo the benefits of being CAA accredited; (c) why do programs seek CAA accreditation; (d) why do programs choose no to seek CAA accreditation; (e) what role is the CAA playing in the international aviation academic community; and (f) what are some possible strategies the CAA may adopt to enhance the benefits of CAA accreditation and increase the number of CAA accredited programs. This second part allows for a more thorough understanding of the contemporary issued faced by the organization, as well as alternative strategies for the CAA to consider in an effort to increase the number of CAA accredited programs and more fully fulfill the role of the CAA in the collegiate aviation community.

  20. Combining clinical microsystems and an experiential quality improvement curriculum to improve residency education in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Tess, Anjala V; Yang, Julius J; Smith, C Christopher; Fawcett, Caitlin M; Bates, Carol K; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2009-03-01

    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's internal medicine residency program was admitted to the new Education Innovation Project accreditation pathway of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education to begin in July 2006. The authors restructured the inpatient medical service to create clinical microsystems in which residents practice throughout residency. Program leadership then mandated an active curriculum in quality improvement based in those microsystems. To provide the experience to every graduating resident, a core faculty in patient safety was trained in the basics of quality improvement. The authors hypothesized that such changes would increase the number of residents participating in quality improvement projects, improve house officer engagement in quality improvement work, enhance the culture of safety the residents perceive in their training environment, improve work flow on the general medicine ward rotations, and improve the overall educational experience for the residents on ward rotations.The authors describe the first 18 months of the intervention (July 2006 to January 2008). The authors assessed attitudes and the educational experience with surveys and evaluation forms. After the intervention, the authors documented residents' participation in projects that overlapped with hospital priorities. More residents reported roles in designing and implementing quality improvement changes. Residents also noted greater satisfaction with the quality of care they deliver. Fewer residents agreed or strongly agreed that the new admitting system interfered with communication. Ongoing residency program assessment showed an improved perception of workload, and educational ratings of rotations improved. The changes required few resources and can be transported to other settings. PMID:19240439

  1. 42 CFR 493.571 - Disclosure of accreditation, State and CMS validation inspection results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disclosure of accreditation, State and CMS... Program § 493.571 Disclosure of accreditation, State and CMS validation inspection results. (a) Accreditation organization inspection results. CMS may disclose accreditation organization inspection results...

  2. 42 CFR 493.571 - Disclosure of accreditation, State and CMS validation inspection results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disclosure of accreditation, State and CMS... Program § 493.571 Disclosure of accreditation, State and CMS validation inspection results. (a) Accreditation organization inspection results. CMS may disclose accreditation organization inspection results...

  3. Institutional Assessment in Colleges with Multiple Programmatic Accreditations: A Multiple Case Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Penni A.

    2012-01-01

    Many colleges maintain multiple programmatic accreditations in addition to regional accreditation. Both programmatic and regional accrediting organizations require assessment of student learning and program/institutional effectiveness. This suggests that as the number of accreditations maintained by a college or university increases, the emphasis…

  4. Who's Accredited? What and How the States Are Doing on Best Practices in Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surr, John

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the trends over time in NAEYC accreditation, which is the largest and oldest of the national child care accreditation systems. In this article, the author discusses types of accreditation, such as: (1) National Early Childhood Program Accreditation (NECPA); (2) The National School Age Care Alliance (NSACA); (3) The National…

  5. Evaluation of a Nutrition Education Program for Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A nutrition education program at the University of South Alabama Medical Center that was based on the "co-counseling model" as described by Moore and Larsen is described. Patients with one of three problem areas were selected for evaluation: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and pregnancy. (MLW)

  6. Strengthening Concurrent Enrollment through NACEP Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheffel, Kent; McLemore, Yvette; Lowe, Adam

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how implementing the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships' 17 accreditation standards strengthens a concurrent enrollment program, enhances secondary-postsecondary relations, and benefits students, their families, and secondary and postsecondary institutions.

  7. American College of Radiology Accredited Facility Search

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testing and QC Forms Toolkit for Site Visits Mammography Program Requirements FAQ Apply for Accreditation Testing and ... screening performance. Modalities Breast MRI Breast Ultrasound CT Mammography MRI Nuclear Medicine & PET Radiation Oncology Practice Stereotactic ...

  8. Residency training programs in veterinary clinical pathology: a comparison of experiences at two institutions.

    PubMed

    Raskin, Rose E

    2007-01-01

    Two institutions with different residency training formats in clinical pathology are compared with respect to application procedures, learning and teaching opportunities, learning resources, research training, publication requirements, and assessment methods of the program and trainees. The University of Florida and Purdue University programs are both based on an emphasis in morphologic recognition and interpretation of disease processes as well as training in basic science and applied research principles. The progress of trainees through each program is carefully monitored to meet individual needs as well as to meet the training requirements to allow candidates to sit for the certifying examination in clinical pathology. Periodic mock board exams are a critical tool to assess trainee progress and learning. The differences in format focus on coursework and publication requirements as well as on program assessment tools. While one program provides training in the form of 75% clinical diagnostic service, the other uses a mixture of 50% coursework and 50% clinical diagnostic training. Despite the contrast between a pure residency training program and one combining residency training with an MS degree, both institutions provide a solid program structure, ample learning resources, and adequate faculty mentorship to produce a high pass rate of board-certified specialists, the major focus for both programs. Numbers of post-training employment positions for both institutions are similar for those selecting faculty positions at veterinary schools. During the period studied, however, the combined residency and MS graduate program at Purdue University produced more graduates employed in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, while the residency program at the University of Florida produced more graduates employed by diagnostic laboratories.

  9. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    PubMed Central

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; DeChamplain, Andre F.; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC) were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) (91.1%), basic life support (BLS) (90.0%), interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4%) and blood gas (88.7%). Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later) and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%), sterile technique (67.2%), BLS (68.9%), ACLS (65.9%) and phlebotomy (63.5%). Discussion Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the first

  10. Program for energy analysis of residences (PEAR) (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Corin, N.

    1989-01-01

    PEAR is an interactive program for residential building energy analysis utilizing a comprehensive DOE-2.1 data base for residential buildings. The extensive data base is used by PEAR to estimate the annual energy use of houses with typical conservation measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation, different window types and glazing layers, infiltration levels, and equipment efficiency. It also allows the user to include the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heat absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night setback. Software Description: The software is written in the Turbo Pascal programming language for implementation on an IBM PC microcomputer using MS-DOS operating system. Software requires 128K of memory and a hard disk or two floppy disk drives with either a monochrome or color monitor. A graphics adapter is needed to implement the Bar Chart option.

  11. Directory of Residency and Fellowship Programs in Women's Health, 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Mission Statement The mission of the Association of Academic Women's Health Programs (AAWHP) is to improve the health of women through leadership in research, education clinical models, and community partnerships. This mission is carried out through networking, leadership and mentoring collaborative projects, lobbying and advocacy, political and social commentary, education of policy-makers, partnership with national organizations, and creation of interdisciplinary innovative models. May 2016. PMID:27168389

  12. Duck Valley Resident Fish Stocking Program, 2000 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, Guy; Pero, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes fish-stocking program was begun in 1988 and is intended to provide a subsistence fishery for the tribal members. The program stocks catchable and fingerling size trout in Mt. View and Sheep Creek Reservoirs. Rainbow trout are purchased from only certified disease-free facilities to be stocked in our reservoirs. This project will help restore a fishery for tribal members that historically depended on wild salmon and steelhead in the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers and their tributaries for their culture as well as for subsistence. This project is partial substitution for loss of anadromous fish production due to construction and operation of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. Until anadromous fish can be returned to the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers this project will continue indefinitely. As part of this project the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes will also receive income in the form of fees from non-tribal members who come to fish these reservoirs. Regular monitoring and evaluation of the fishery will include sampling for length/weight/condition and for signs of disease. A detailed Monitoring and evaluation plan has been put in place for this project. However due to budget limitations on this project only the fishery surveys and limited water quality work can be completed. A creel survey was initiated in 1998 and we are following the monitoring and evaluation schedule for this program (as budget allows) as well as managing the budget and personnel. This program has been very successful in the past decade and has provided enjoyment and sustenance for both tribal and non-tribal members. All biological data and stocking rates will be including in the Annual reports to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  13. Perceptions of professional practice and work environment of new graduates in a nurse residency program.

    PubMed

    Bratt, Marilyn Meyer; Felzer, Holly M

    2011-12-01

    New nurses continue to face challenging work environments and high expectations for professional competence as they enter practice. Nurse residency programs are gaining prominence as a mechanism to ease new graduates' transition to practice. This study examined new graduates' perceptions of their professional practice competence and work environment throughout a yearlong nurse residency program. Employing a repeated measures design, data were collected at baseline, at 6 months, and at 12 months. Results showed that job satisfaction was significantly lowest at 6 months and highest at 12 months. Job stress was found to be lowest at 12 months and organizational commitment was highest at baseline. Of the variables related to professional practice, clinical decision-making was highest at 12 months and quality of nursing performance significantly increased at each measurement point. These data add to the growing evidence supporting the efficacy of nurse residency programs.

  14. Integrating psychosocial concepts into psychopharmacology training: a survey study of program directors and chief residents.

    PubMed

    Mallo, C Jason; Mintz, David L; Lewis, Katie C

    2014-06-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that psychiatric medication outcomes are shaped significantly by psychological and social factors surrounding the prescribing process. Little, however, is known about the extent to which psychiatry programs integrate this evidence base into residency training or the methods by which this is accomplished. Psychiatry residency program directors and chief residents participated in an exploratory online survey to establish how psychosocial factors known to impact medication outcomes are integrated into psychopharmacology education. While participants highly valued the importance of psychosocial factors in the prescribing process, there was limited emphasis of these factors in psychopharmacology training. Additionally, some teaching methods that could advance understanding of complex interactions in the psychopharmacology relationship were found to be underutilized. Given that medication outcomes are significantly influenced by psychosocial factors, psychiatric educators have a responsibility to teach residents about the evidence base available. Residents exposed to this evidence base will be better equipped to manage the complexities of the psychopharmacology role. The results of this study offer clues as to how psychosocial factors may be more fully integrated into residency psychopharmacology training.

  15. Factors influencing the number of applications submitted per applicant to orthopedic residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Finkler, Elissa S.; Fogel, Harold A.; Kroin, Ellen; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Wu, Karen; Nystrom, Lukas M.; Schiff, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2002 to 2014, the orthopedic surgery residency applicant pool increased by 25% while the number of applications submitted per applicant rose by 69%, resulting in an increase of 109% in the number of applications received per program. Objective This study aimed to identify applicant factors associated with an increased number of applications to orthopedic surgery residency programs. Design An anonymous survey was sent to all applicants applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Questions were designed to define the number of applications submitted per respondent as well as the strength of their application. Of 733 surveys sent, 140 (19.1%) responses were received. Setting An academic institution in Maywood, IL. Participants Fourth-year medical students applying to the orthopedic surgery residency program at Loyola University. Results An applicant's perception of how competitive he or she was (applicants who rated themselves as ‘average’ submitted more applications than those who rated themselves as either ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’, p=0.001) and the number of away rotations (those who completed >2 away rotations submitted more applications, p=0.03) were significantly associated with an increased number of applications submitted. No other responses were found to be associated with an increased number of applications submitted. Conclusion Less qualified candidates are not applying to significantly more programs than their more qualified counterparts. The increasing number of applications represents a financial strain on the applicant, given the costs required to apply to more programs, and a time burden on individual programs to screen increasing numbers of applicants. In order to stabilize or reverse this alarming trend, orthopedic surgery residency programs should openly disclose admission criteria to prospective candidates, and medical schools should provide additional guidance for candidates in this process

  16. 7 CFR 205.502 - Applying for accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM Accreditation of Certifying Agents § 205.502 Applying for...

  17. Describing a residency program developed for newly graduated nurse practitioners employed in retail health settings.

    PubMed

    Thabault, Paulette; Mylott, Laura; Patterson, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Retail health clinics are an expanding health care delivery model and an emerging new practice site for nurse practitioners (NPs). Critical thinking skills, clinical competence, interprofessional collaboration, and business savvy are necessary for successful practice in this highly independent and autonomous setting. This article describes a pilot residency partnership program aimed at supporting new graduate NP transition to practice, reducing NP turnover, and promoting academic progression. Eight new graduate NPs were recruited to the pilot and paired with experienced clinical NP preceptors for a 12-month program that focused on increasing clinical and business competence in the retail health setting. The residency program utilized technology to facilitate case conferences and targeted Webinars to enhance learning and peer-to-peer sharing and support. An on-line doctoral-level academic course that focused on interprofessional collaboration in health care, population health, and business concepts was offered. Both NPs and preceptors were highly satisfied with the academic-service residency program between MinuteClinic and Northeastern University School of Nursing in Boston, MA. New NPs particularly valued the preceptor model, the clinical case conferences, and business Webinars. Because their priority was in gaining clinical experience and learning the business acumen relevant to managing the processes of care, they did not feel ready for the doctoral course and would have preferred to take later in their practice. The preceptors valued the academic course and felt that it enhanced their precepting and leadership skills. At the time of this article, 6 months post completion of the residency program, there has been no turnover. Our experience supports the benefits for residency programs for newly graduated NPs in retail settings. The model of partnering with academia by offering a course within a service organization's educational programs can enable academic

  18. Neurology Didactic Curricula for Psychiatry Residents: A Review of the Literature and a Survey of Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Claudia L.; Walaszek, Art

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Minimal literature exists on neurology didactic instruction offered to psychiatry residents, and there is no model neurology didactic curriculum offered for psychiatry residency programs. The authors sought to describe the current state of neurology didactic training in psychiatry residencies. Methods: The authors electronically…

  19. Impact of residency programs on professional socialization of newly licensed registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marlene; Maguire, Patrica; Halfer, Diana; Brewer, Barbara; Schmalenberg, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    Do Nurse Residency Programs (NRPs) reflect the professional socialization process? Residency facilitators in 34 Magnet hospitals completed Residency Program Questionnaires constructed to reflect the goals, themes, components, and strategies of the professional socialization process described in the literature. NRPs in 4 hospitals exemplified the complete two-stage (role transition and role/community integration) process. In 14 hospitals, NRPs were of sufficient length and contained components that reflected the professional socialization process. In 16 hospitals, NRPs exemplified the "becoming" role transition stage. What components are most effective in the professional socialization of new graduate nurses? A total of 907 new and experienced nurses, nurse managers, and educators working on clinical units with confirmed healthy work environments in 20 Magnet hospitals with additional "excellence designations" were interviewed. Components identified as most instrumental were precepted experience, reflective seminars, skill acquisition, reflective practice sessions, evidence-based management projects, and clinical coaching-mentoring sessions. Suggestions for improvement of NRPs are offered.

  20. COAMFTE accreditation and California MFT licensing exam success.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Benjamin E; Kunker, Shelly A; Brown, Stephen W; Saiki, Dustin Y

    2011-10-01

    Professional accreditation of graduate programs in marital and family therapy (MFT) is intended to ensure the strength of the education students receive. However, there is great difficulty in assessing the real-world impact of accreditation on students. Only one measure is applied consistently to graduates of all MFT programs, regardless of accreditation status: licensure examinations. Within California, COAMFTE-accredited, regionally (WASC) accredited, and state-approved programs all may offer degrees qualifying for licensure. Exam data from 2004, 2005, and 2006 (n = 5,646 examinees on the Written Clinical Vignette exam and n = 3,408 first-time examinees on the Standard Written Exam) were reviewed to determine the differences in exam success among graduates of programs at varying levels of accreditation. Students from COAMFTE-accredited programs were more successful on both California exams than were students from other WASC-accredited or state-approved universities. There were no significant differences between (non-COAMFTE) WASC-accredited universities and state-approved programs. Differences could be related to selection effects, if COAMFTE programs initially accept students of higher quality. Implications for therapist education and training are discussed.

  1. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (Ramp): Training Persons with Dementia to Serve as Group Activity Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Cameron J.; Skrajner, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Design and Methods: Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders'…

  2. Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Tobacco Treatment Curriculum for Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Leek, Desiree; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Louie, Alan K.; Jacobs, Marc H.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Smokers with mental illness and addictive disorders account for nearly one in two cigarettes sold in the United States and are at high risk for smoking-related deaths and disability. Psychiatry residency programs provide a unique arena for disseminating tobacco treatment guidelines, influencing professional norms, and increasing access…

  3. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  4. Preparing Mathematics and Science Teachers through a Residency Program: Perceptions and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Rubén; Werner, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The critical challenge of recruiting, preparing, and retaining high-quality mathematics and science teachers for high-need urban schools is complex. Therefore, identifying factors that support and impede a teaching residency program's implementation may have the potential to build an effective initiative that will benefit all stakeholders.…

  5. An Exploration of Current Practices in Curricular Design of Resident Assistant Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Virginia Albaneso

    2012-01-01

    In the last 15 years there has been little research about the design of resident assistant (RA) training programs in higher education (Bowman & Bowman, 1995, 1998; Wesolowski, Bowman, & Adams, 1996). A RA is an enrolled student who is selected, trained, and supervised to serve as a part-time, paraprofessional employee for a housing and/or…

  6. Modeling the hydrologic and economic efficacy of stormwater utility credit programs for US single family residences

    EPA Science Inventory

    As regulatory pressure to reduce the environmental impact of urban stormwater intensifies, U.S. municipalities increasingly seek a dedicated source of funding for stormwater programs, such as a stormwater utility. In rare instances, single family residences are eligible for utili...

  7. Reaching Residents of Green Communities: Evaluation of a Unique Environmental Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostetler, Mark; Swiman, Elizabeth; Prizzia, Anna; Noiseux, Krystal

    2008-01-01

    Often in green communities, homeowner understanding is left out of the project. We evaluated the impact of a new environmental education program installed in a green community, Town of Harmony, Florida. Consisting of educational kiosks, website, and brochure, we evaluated whether Harmony residents' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors…

  8. Current Practice in the Evaluation of Resident Outdoor Education Programs: Report of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth; Hammerman, William

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes methods (subjective, objective, or both) used by administrators to evaluate resident outdoor education programs. The 144 surveys returned (41 percent response rate) and 171 evaluation instruments submitted were used to determine what and who are assessed and how the evaluation is conducted. Includes a model of the evaluation development…

  9. 38 CFR 17.48 - Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program. 17.48 Section 17.48 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.48 Compensated Work...

  10. 38 CFR 17.48 - Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program. 17.48 Section 17.48 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.48 Compensated Work...

  11. 38 CFR 17.48 - Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program. 17.48 Section 17.48 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.48 Compensated Work...

  12. 38 CFR 17.48 - Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compensated Work Therapy/Transitional Residences program. 17.48 Section 17.48 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.48 Compensated Work...

  13. Advanced general dentistry program directors' attitudes and behaviors regarding pediatric dental training for residents.

    PubMed

    Massey, Christi Sporl; Raybould, Ted P; Skelton, Judith; Wrightson, A Stevens; Smith, Tim A

    2008-03-01

    The oral health of children became a more prominent concern with the U.S. surgeon general's report on oral health in America in 2000. The purpose of our study was 1) to assess General Practice Residency (GPR) and Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) (here jointly referred to as advanced general dentistry [AGD] programs) directors' current behaviors with regard to pediatric training of residents and 2) to assess their attitudes about which components of pediatric oral health training should be included in AGD programs. A twenty-one item survey was mailed to all GPR and AEGD programs accessed through the American Dental Association website. Seventy percent of directors (N=187) completed and returned the survey. Responses indicated that AGD residents receive adequate clinical exposure to pediatric patients and provide much-needed services to uninsured, underinsured, and underserved people. Although clinical training in pediatric treatment was high, didactic hours focused on pediatric treatment did not seem commensurate with clinical activity. Program directors indicated strong attitudinal support for teaching residents many components of pediatric oral health care, although most directors have concerns over increasing didactic hours spent on pediatric oral health due to already crowded curricula. Approximately 88 percent of directors said that they would implement a pediatric oral health module in their curricula if they had access to one.

  14. Resident recruitment.

    PubMed

    Longmaid, H Esterbrook

    2003-02-01

    This article has introduced the reader to the critical components of successful recruitment of radiology residents. With particular attention to the ACGME institutional and program requirements regarding resident recruitment, and an explanation of the support systems (ERAS and NRMP) currently available to those involved in applicant review and selection, the article has sought to delineate a sensible approach to recruitment. Successful recruiters have mastered the essentials of these programs and have learned to adapt the programs to their needs. As new program directors work with their departments' resident selection committees, they will identify the factors that faculty and current residents cite as most important in the successful selection of new residents. By structuring the application review process, exploiting the power of the ERAS, and crafting a purposeful and friendly interview process, radiology residency directors can find and recruit the residents who best match their programs. PMID:12585436

  15. Potential pros and cons of external healthcare performance evaluation systems: real-life perspectives on Iranian hospital evaluation and accreditation program

    PubMed Central

    Jaafaripooyan, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Performance evaluation is essential to quality improvement in healthcare. The current study has identified the potential pros and cons of external healthcare evaluation programs, utilizing them subsequently to look into the merits of a similar case in a developing country. Methods: A mixed method study employing both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis techniques was adopted to achieve the study end. Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) and professionals were approached for two-stage process of data collection. Results: Potential advantages included greater attractiveness of high accreditation rank healthcare organizations to their customers/purchasers and boosted morale of their personnel. Downsides, as such, comprised the programs’ over-reliance on value judgment of surveyors, routinization and incurring undue cost on the organizations. In addition, the improved, standardized care processes as well as the judgmental nature of program survey were associated, as pros and cons, to the program investigated by the professionals. Conclusion: Besides rendering a tentative assessment of Iranian hospital evaluation program, the study provides those running external performance evaluations with a lens to scrutinize the virtues of their own evaluation systems through identifying the potential advantages and drawbacks of such programs. Moreover, the approach followed could be utilized for performance assessment of similar evaluation programs. PMID:25279381

  16. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V.; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Conclusion Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits. PMID:27507540

  17. Does accreditation stimulate change? A study of the impact of the accreditation process on Canadian healthcare organizations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One way to improve quality and safety in healthcare organizations (HCOs) is through accreditation. Accreditation is a rigorous external evaluation process that comprises self-assessment against a given set of standards, an on-site survey followed by a report with or without recommendations, and the award or refusal of accreditation status. This study evaluates how the accreditation process helps introduce organizational changes that enhance the quality and safety of care. Methods We used an embedded multiple case study design to explore organizational characteristics and identify changes linked to the accreditation process. We employed a theoretical framework to analyze various elements and for each case, we interviewed top managers, conducted focus groups with staff directly involved in the accreditation process, and analyzed self-assessment reports, accreditation reports and other case-related documents. Results The context in which accreditation took place, including the organizational context, influenced the type of change dynamics that occurred in HCOs. Furthermore, while accreditation itself was not necessarily the element that initiated change, the accreditation process was a highly effective tool for (i) accelerating integration and stimulating a spirit of cooperation in newly merged HCOs; (ii) helping to introduce continuous quality improvement programs to newly accredited or not-yet-accredited organizations; (iii) creating new leadership for quality improvement initiatives; (iv) increasing social capital by giving staff the opportunity to develop relationships; and (v) fostering links between HCOs and other stakeholders. The study also found that HCOs' motivation to introduce accreditation-related changes dwindled over time. Conclusions We conclude that the accreditation process is an effective leitmotiv for the introduction of change but is nonetheless subject to a learning cycle and a learning curve. Institutions invest greatly to conform to

  18. Graduate students' self assessment of competency in grief education and training in core accredited rehabilitation counseling programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchetti, Richard Jude

    The study examined whether 93 master's level rehabilitation counselor trainees from select Midwestern CORE-accredited schools report having been adequately trained to identify and work with clients who are having grief-related issues from a loss or disability. Using the Grief Counseling Competency Scale (GCCS), participants showed a wide range of scores regarding personal competency related to grief; however, scores tended to be low when examining skills and knowledge relating to grief, with most respondents scoring between "this barely describes me" and "this somewhat describes me." Although presence or history of a disability was found to be related to personal competency, a number of variables were not related, including: gender, age, race/ethnicity, course work in grief theories and grief interventions, practica/internship setting, and attitudes toward people with disabilities. Implications for further research are discussed.

  19. Student-faculty perceptions of multicultural training in accredited marriage and family therapy programs in relation to students' self-reported competence.

    PubMed

    Inman, Arpana G; Meza, Marisol M; Brown, Andraé L; Hargrove, ron K

    2004-07-01

    Although the marriage and family therapy field's recent attention to multicultural issues is laudable, there appears to be little clarity on what constitutes an effective multicultural training program and the impact of the effects of such training on trainee multicultural competence. The field continues to be challenged at different levels-training, practice, research, the setting of the standards and the work of the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education, and the goals and strategic plan of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Board. This study focused on assessing the extent of multicultural integration at different levels of training and the relationship between such training and students' perception of their own multicultural competence. PMID:15293654

  20. 10 CFR 431.21 - Procedures for recognition and withdrawal of recognition of accreditation bodies and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of accreditation bodies and certification programs. 431.21 Section 431.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... for recognition and withdrawal of recognition of accreditation bodies and certification programs. (a... Department. If the Department believes that an accreditation body or certification program that has...

  1. 10 CFR 431.21 - Procedures for recognition and withdrawal of recognition of accreditation bodies and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of accreditation bodies and certification programs. 431.21 Section 431.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... for recognition and withdrawal of recognition of accreditation bodies and certification programs. (a... Department. If the Department believes that an accreditation body or certification program that has...

  2. 10 CFR 431.21 - Procedures for recognition and withdrawal of recognition of accreditation bodies and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of accreditation bodies and certification programs. 431.21 Section 431.21 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY... for recognition and withdrawal of recognition of accreditation bodies and certification programs. (a... Department. If the Department believes that an accreditation body or certification program that has...

  3. IMIA Dynamic Accreditation Procedure: Suggestions, Simplicity and Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Marcano-Cedeño, Alexis; Wageih, Mohamed A; Gómez, Enrique J; Mantas, John

    2015-01-01

    The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) is the world body for biomedical and health informatics (BMHI). IMIA accreditation program allows the health and medical informatics programs around the world to reach to an international level. Staffs (professors, students, education programmes directors, others) that work on the accredited BMHI programs will have the opportunity to be engaged with organizations that possess a world-class research and education profile from other countries, which will have great impacts on their field at their institutions, within their country providing the high quality overall health services. IMIA accreditation procedure is usually a long process and slightly complicated. The goal of this paper is to illustrate and to simplify the IMIA accreditation process to increase the success of the applicants. Toward more dynamic IMIA accreditation procedure, the paper presents 4 steps: translation, IMIA-Accreditation Step by Step Guideline, Questions and Answers, and finally the (new) Labelling System. PMID:26152968

  4. Return on investment: benefits and challenges of baccalaureate nurse residency program.

    PubMed

    Pine, Rosemary; Tart, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    There are high rates of turnover among graduate nurses within the first year of employment. As the costs of recruitment and orientation have increased, employers are examining new strategies for increasing retention among this population. The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, partnered with an academic institution and University Health Consortium to apply an implementation strategy where graduate nurses participate in a year-long residency program. The residents attended monthly sessions that addressed pertinent needs of the group. During this 1-year period turnover decreased from 50% to 13% and return on investment was 326.5%.

  5. Recent trends in resident career choices after plastic surgery training.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Fernando A; Chang, Eric I; Suliman, Ahmed; Tseng, Charles Y; Bradley, James P

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the initial career choice of plastic surgery residents after completion of training during the last five years and to identify any factors that may influence choice of career path. Demographic data were obtained from graduates of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited US plastic surgery residency programs between the years of 2005 and 2010. The type of practice and pursuit of fellowship were recorded for each graduate. Sex, age at graduation, marital status, dependents, advanced degrees, previous research, type of training program, primary residency, and length of plastic surgery training were also documented. Comparison of outcomes between the two plastic surgery training pathways (integrated vs independent) was analyzed. Data were collected for 424 graduates from 37 different training programs. Of these programs, 11% were from the West coast, 32% from Midwest, 33% from East coast, and 24% from the South. Seventy-nine percent of residents were male, mean age at graduation was 35 (2.89) years. Forty-nine percent of residents were married, 30% had one or more dependents, 6% had advanced degrees, and 18% had previous research experience. Fifty-eight percent of graduates were from independent programs. Forty-eight percent of residents pursued private practice immediately after graduation, 8% pursued academic practice, 41% pursued specialty fellowships, and 3% had military commitments. Most of the residents chose to pursue private practice on completion of residency. Independent residents were significantly more likely to pursue private practice immediately compared to integrated/combined residents. No other factors were significant for practice choice.

  6. Acceptability of HPV vaccine for males and preferences for future education programs among Appalachian residents.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Paul L; Oldach, Benjamin R; Randle, Katherine E; Katz, Mira L

    2014-03-01

    Appalachia is a geographic region with several disparities related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, yet little is known about acceptability of HPV vaccine for males among Appalachian residents. HPV vaccine acceptability and preferences for future HPV vaccine education programs were examined among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Focus groups and in-depth interviews were conducted with Appalachian Ohio residents between July and October 2011. Participants (n = 102 from 24 focus groups and 5 in-depth interviews) included four key stakeholder groups: health care providers, community leaders, parents with adolescent sons, and young adult men ages 18 to 26 years. Support for vaccinating males against HPV was high among participants, despite low awareness and knowledge about HPV vaccine for males. Participants reported three categories of potential barriers to vaccinating males against HPV: concerns about vaccine safety and side effects, access to care and vaccination logistics, and gender and cultural issues. Participants reported that HPV vaccine was viewed as being only for females in their communities and that receiving the vaccine may be emasculating or embarrassing to males. Participants suggested that future HPV vaccine education programs mainly target parents, include basic information about HPV-related diseases and HPV vaccine (e.g., number of doses, cost), and present the vaccine as having the potential to prevent cancer (as opposed to preventing genital warts). Acceptability of HPV vaccine for males was high among residents of Appalachian Ohio. Future HPV vaccine education programs in Appalachia should address common potential barriers to vaccination and help destigmatize vaccination among males.

  7. Discrimination against international medical graduates in the United States residency program selection process

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Available evidence suggests that international medical graduates have improved the availability of U.S. health care while maintaining academic standards. We wondered whether studies had been conducted to address how international graduates were treated in the post-graduate selection process compared to U.S. graduates. Methods We conducted a Medline search for research on the selection process. Results Two studies provide strong evidence that psychiatry and family practice programs respond to identical requests for applications at least 80% more often for U.S. medical graduates than for international graduates. In a third study, a survey of surgical program directors, over 70% perceived that there was discrimination against international graduates in the selection process. Conclusions There is sufficient evidence to support action against discrimination in the selection process. Medical organizations should publish explicit proscriptions of discrimination against international medical graduates (as the American Psychiatric Association has done) and promote them in diversity statements. They should develop uniform and transparent policies for program directors to use to select applicants that minimize the possibility of non-academic discrimination, and the accreditation organization should monitor whether it is occurring. Whether there should be protectionism for U.S. graduates or whether post-graduate medical education should be an unfettered meritocracy needs to be openly discussed by medicine and society. PMID:20100347

  8. Understanding the challenges to facilitating active learning in the resident conferences: a qualitative study of internal medicine faculty and resident perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sawatsky, Adam P.; Zickmund, Susan L.; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2015-01-01

    Background In the Next Accreditation System, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outlines milestones for medical knowledge and requires regular didactic sessions in residency training. There are many challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, and we need to better understand resident learning preferences and faculty perspectives on facilitating active learning. The goal of this study was to identify challenges to facilitating active learning in resident conferences, both through identifying specific implementation barriers and identifying differences in perspective between faculty and residents on effective teaching and learning strategies. Methods The investigators invited core residency faculty to participate in focus groups. The investigators used a semistructured guide to facilitate discussion about learning preferences and teaching perspectives in the conference setting and used an ‘editing approach’ within a grounded theory framework to qualitative analysis to code the transcripts and analyze the results. Data were compared to previously collected data from seven resident focus groups. Results Three focus groups with 20 core faculty were conducted. We identified three domains pertaining to facilitating active learning in resident conferences: barriers to facilitating active learning formats, similarities and differences in faculty and resident learning preferences, and divergence between faculty and resident opinions about effective teaching strategies. Faculty identified several setting, faculty, and resident barriers to facilitating active learning in resident conferences. When compared to residents, faculty expressed similar learning preferences; the main differences were in motivations for conference attendance and type of content. Resident preferences and faculty perspectives differed on the amount of information appropriate for lecture and the role of active participation in resident conferences

  9. Cultural Competency Training in a New-Start Rural/Frontier Family Practice Residency Program: A Cultural Immersion Integrative Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Barbara J.; Pastorino, Ray

    The Alaska Family Practice Residency (AFPR) is a graduate medical education training program for family physicians headed for rural and remote practice sites. Located in Anchorage and affiliated with the University of Washington family practice residency network, the program has an integrated curriculum aimed at preparing family physicians to…

  10. Assessing Competency and Training of Upper Endoscopy in a General Surgery Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Powers, William F.; Hooks, W. Borden; Kilbourne, S. Nicole; Clancy, Thomas V.; Hope, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Guidelines for optimal endoscopic training for surgical residents have not been formally integrated into modern teaching programs. Our purpose was to apply two endoscopic evaluation tools (EE-1 and EE-2) designed to measure surgical resident competency in the performance of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Methods Prospectively collected data were reviewed from consecutive EGDs in a single institution by a single attending surgeon over 3 years (July 2008 to July 2011). Demographic, procedural, and outcome data were collected. Residents were graded at the completion of each procedure by the attending surgeon using EE-1 and EE-2. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and comparisons based on PGY levels were made using Fisher’s exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results All procedures (N = 50) were performed by residents under the direct attending surgeon supervision. Average patient age was 51 years (range, 31-79 years), 66% were women, and 66% were Caucasian. PGY-3 residents performed 62% of the procedures. Average resident participation was 84% of each procedure. Biopsies were performed in 80% of patients and dilatations in 16%. All EGDs were successfully completed (average time, 13.1 min). EE-1 results demonstrated significantly different grades (P < 0.05) among PGY levels in seven of eight variables. EE-2 grades were significantly different (P < 0.05) among PGY levels in all 10 variables with a general trend of improvement as PGY level increased. There were no mortalities or morbidities. Conclusions Residents can perform EGDs safely and expeditiously with appropriate supervision. Methods to assess competency continue to evolve and should remain an area of active research.

  11. A supervised training program in flexible sigmoidoscopy: evaluating skills from residency training to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lewan, R B; Baskin, W N; Sharon, M W; Greenlaw, R L; Frakes, J T; Vidican, D E

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a training program in flexible sigmoidoscopy for family practice residents, we prospectively studied the performance of four residents during their training and after graduation. One hundred and four training exams performed with the assistance of an experienced gastroenterologist were compared with 118 unassisted post-training, post-residency exams. The mean depth of insertion for the post-training period was 51.1 +/- 1.2 cm, which was significantly greater (P less than .05, Student's t test) than the mean training period depth of 47.6 +/- 1.2 cm. There was no significant difference in the identification of polyps or cancer between the training and post-training periods. The mean duration of an exam was 17.3 +/- 0.6 minutes in the post-training period. No significant complications were encountered in either period. The residency trained family physicians obtained results similar to those reported by trained endoscopists in depth of examination and pathology detected, although their examinations required more time. We conclude that this model of training was effective in the development of flexible sigmoidoscopy procedural skill for family practice residents.

  12. Accreditation of Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirel, Ergün

    2016-01-01

    The higher education institutes aspire to gain reputation of quality having accreditation from internationally recognized awarding bodies. The accreditation leads and provides quality assurance for education. Although distance learning becomes a significant part of the education system in the 21st century, there is still a common opinion that the…

  13. Faculty Participation in Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Academic Senate.

    The California Community Colleges are accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), a non-governmental organization providing the public with a means of recognizing institutions that meet established standards of good practice. Accreditation is carried out by visiting teams, composed of staff and governing board members…

  14. Balancing Stakeholders' Interests in Evolving Teacher Education Accreditation Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Alison

    2008-01-01

    While Australian teacher education programs have long had rigorous accreditation pathways at the University level they have not been subject to the same formal public or professional scrutiny typical of professions such as medicine, nursing or engineering. Professional accreditation for teacher preparation programs is relatively new and is linked…

  15. An Overview of U.S. Accreditation--Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Judith S.

    2012-01-01

    Accreditation in the United States is about quality assurance and quality improvement. It is a process to scrutinize higher education institutions and programs. Accreditation is private (nongovernmental) and nonprofit--an outgrowth of the higher education community and not of government. It is funded primarily by the institutions and programs that…

  16. Accountability and Accreditation for Special Libraries: It Can Be Done!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glockner, Brigitte

    2004-01-01

    Health librarians are very familiar with the accreditation process in hospitals. In 2000 the first ALIA National Policy Congress recommended that accreditation of special libraries should be implemented. The proposed guidelines have been roughly based on the EQuIP Program of the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards. This program is…

  17. The CPA Exam as a Postcurriculum Accreditation Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barilla, Anthony G.; Jackson, Robert E.; Mooney, J. Lowell

    2008-01-01

    Business schools often attain accreditation to demonstrate program efficacy. J. A. Marts, J. D. Baker, and J. M. Garris (1988) hypothesized that candidates from Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB)-accredited accounting programs perform better on the CPA exam than do candidates from non-AACSB-accredited…

  18. COAMFTE Accreditation and California MFT Licensing Exam Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Benjamin E.; Kunker, Shelly A.; Brown, Stephen W.; Saiki, Dustin Y.

    2011-01-01

    Professional accreditation of graduate programs in marital and family therapy (MFT) is intended to ensure the strength of the education students receive. However, there is great difficulty in assessing the real-world impact of accreditation on students. Only one measure is applied consistently to graduates of all MFT programs, regardless of…

  19. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills.

    PubMed

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Nendaz, Mathieu; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Sommer, Johanna; Gut, Anne; Baroffio, Anne; Dolmans, Diana; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-12-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are scarce as well as studies that go beyond self-reported data. The aim of the study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of a training program for clinical supervisors on how to give feedback on residents' CS in clinical practice. The authors designed a pretest-posttest controlled study in which clinical supervisors working in two different medical services were invited to attend a sequenced and multifaceted program in teaching CS over a period of 6-9 months. Outcome measures were self-perceived and observed feedback skills collected during questionnaires and three videotaped objective structured teaching encounters. The videotaped feedbacks made by the supervisors were analysed using a 20-item feedback rating instrument. Forty-eight clinical supervisors participated (28 in the intervention, 20 in the control group). After training, a higher percentage of trained participants self-reported and demonstrated statistically significant improvement in making residents more active by exploring residents' needs, stimulating self-assessment, and using role playing to test strategies and checking understanding, with effect sizes ranging from 0.93 to 4.94. A training program on how to give feedback on residents' communication skills was successful in improving clinical supervisors' feedback skills and in helping them operate a shift from a teacher-centered to a more learner-centered approach.

  20. Establishment of a General Medicine Residency Training Program in Rural West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Drislane, Frank W.; Akpalu, Albert; Wegdam, Harry H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Ghana, a developing country in West Africa, has major medical burdens in taking care of a large population with limited resources. Its three medical schools produce more than 200 graduates per year, but most emigrate to developed lands after training. Ghana is working to educate and retain locally trained physicians, but it is difficult to get them to work in rural settings where the need is greatest. This article details the establishment of a General Medicine residency at a 150-bed hospital in rural Ghana. Early training comprises 6 months each in Medicine, Surgery, OB/GYN, and Pediatrics; the hospital in Techiman also has a Surgery residency. House officers choose the program for more hands-on experience than they can get in larger centers. They perform many tasks, including surgery, sooner and more independently than do residents in developed countries. The training program includes a morning report, clinical teaching rounds, and rotations on in-patient wards and in the Emergency Department and clinics. Teaching focuses on history, physical examination, good communication, and proper follow-up, with rigorous training in the OR and some clinical research projects pertinent to Ghana. Trainees work hard and learn from one another, from a dedicated faculty, and by evaluating and treating very sick patients. Ghana’s rural residencies offer rigorous and attractive training, but it is too soon to tell whether this will help stem the “brain drain” of young physicians out of West Africa. PMID:25191148