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Sample records for accreted arc terranes

  1. Geodynamic models of terrane accretion: Testing the fate of island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and continental fragments in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, J. L.; Buiter, S. J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Crustal growth at convergent margins can occur by the accretion of future allochthonous terranes (FATs), such as island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, and continental fragments. Using geodynamic numerical experiments, we demonstrate how crustal properties of FATs impact the amount of FAT crust that is accreted or subducted, the type of accretionary process, and the style of deformation on the overriding plate. Our results show that (1) accretion of crustal units occurs when there is a weak detachment layer within the FAT, (2) the depth of detachment controls the amount of crust accreted onto the overriding plate, and (3) lithospheric buoyancy does not prevent FAT subduction during constant convergence. Island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and continental fragments will completely subduct, despite having buoyant lithospheric densities, if they have rheologically strong crusts. Weak basal layers, representing pre-existing weaknesses or detachment layers, will either lead to underplating of faulted blocks of FAT crust to the overriding plate or collision and suturing of an unbroken FAT crust. Our experiments show that the weak, ultramafic layer found at the base of island arcs and oceanic plateaus plays a significant role in terrane accretion. The different types of accretionary processes also affect deformation and uplift patterns in the overriding plate, trench migration and jumping, and the dip of the plate interface. The resulting accreted terranes produced from our numerical experiments resemble observed accreted terranes, such as the Wrangellia Terrane and Klamath Mountain terranes in the North American Cordilleran Belt.

  2. Igneous history of the Koyukuk terrane, western Alaska: constraints on the origin, evolution, and ultimate collision of an accreted island arc terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Box, S.E.; Patton, W.W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The Koyukuk terrane consists of volcanic, volcaniclastic, and plutonic rocks which range from Late Paleozoic to Early Cretaceous in age. The terrane crops out in a U-shaped belt which is roughly paralleled by outer belts of ultramafic rocks, oceanic plate basalts and cherts, and retrograded blueschist facies rocks of continental protolith. These rocks have been interpreted as components of a volcanic arc terrane that collided with the North American continental margin in Early Cretaceous time. The Koyukuk terrane consists of four time-stratigraphic units: (1) pre-Middle Jurassic basalts, (2) Middle and Late Jurassic granitic rocks, (3) lower Lower Cretaceous volcanic rocks, and (4) upper Lower Cretaceous volcanic rocks. Limited chemical data from the basalts of unit 1 indicate that they were erupted in a nonarc tectonic environment, possibly in an oceanic island or back arc setting. Units, 2, 3, and 4 have the characteristics of subduction-related volcanic rocks. -from Authors

  3. Middle Jurassic strata link Wallowa, Olds Ferry, and Izee terranes in the accreted Blue Mountains island arc, northeastern Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.D.L. ); Vallier, T. ); Stanley, G.D. Jr. ); Ash, S.R. ); White, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    Middle Jurassic strata atop the Wallowa terrane in northeastern Oregon link the Wallowa, Izee, and Olds Ferry terranes as related elements of a single long-lived and complex oceanic feature, the Blue Mountains island arc. Middle Jurassic strata in the Wallowa terrane include a dacitic ash-flow deposit and contain fossil corals and bivalves of North American affinity. Plant fossils in fluvial sandstones support a Jurassic age and indicate a seasonal temperate climate. Corals in a transgressive sequence traditionally overlying the fluvial units are of Bajocian age and are closely related to endemic varieties of the Western Interior embayment. They are unlike Middle Jurassic corals in other Cordilleran terranes; their presence suggests that the Blue Mountains island arc first approached the North American craton at high paleolatitudes in Middle Jurassic time. The authors consider the Bajocian marine strata and underlying fluvial volcaniclastic units to be a basin-margin equivalent of the Izee terrane, a largely Middle Jurassic (Bajocian) succession of basinal volcaniclastic and volcanic rocks known to overlie the Olds Ferry and Baker terranes.

  4. Tectonic accretion and underplating of mafic terranes in the Late Eocene intraoceanic fore-arc of New Caledonia (Southwest Pacific): geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, Dominique; Aitchison, Jonathan C.; Picard, Christian

    2001-10-01

    This paper deals with the tectonic events that result in the accretion of mafic terranes in the fore-arc region and a close juxtaposition of ultramafic rocks, low grade and high-grade mafic terranes in many collisional orogens. The example is taken from New Caledonia where tectonic accretion, subduction, underplating and obduction of mafic terranes took place during the late Eocene in an intra-oceanic forearc setting. The late Eocene tectonic complex comprised three major terranes: an overlying ultramafic, mainly harzburgitic allochthon named the Ophiolitic Nappe, an intermediate mafic, mainly basaltic off-scraped melange, composed of kilometre-scale slices of oceanic upper crust, called the Poya Terrane, parts of which have been metamorphosed into an eclogite/blueschist facies complex, the Pouebo Terrane; and a lower, continental basement formed by the Norkolk Ridge terranes. Based upon exhaustive sampling of the mafic terranes and field surveys, our tectonic, micropaleontologic and geochemical data reveal that Poya and Pouebo terranes rocks originally formed within one single Campanian to late Paleocene oceanic basin, floored by tholeiitic basalt associated with some minor seamount-related intraplate alkali basalt. The tholeiitic basalt displays a continuous range of compositions spanning between "undepleted" and "depleted" end-members; the former being volumetrically predominant. The overall geochemical and isotopic features indicate an origin from a prominently heterogeneous mantle source during the opening of a marginal basin, the South Loyalty Basin, which almost completely disappeared during Eocene convergence. The opening of this basin originally located to the east of the Norfolk Ridge was synchronous with that of Tasman Sea basin as a consequence of oceanward migration of the west-dipping Pacific subduction zone. Establishing the origin of the ultramafic Ophiolitic Nappe is beyond the scope of this paper; however, it appears to be genetically unrelated to

  5. Terrane accretion: Insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Katharina; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    The oceanic crust is not homogenous, but contains significantly thicker crust than norm, i.e. extinct arcs, spreading ridges, detached continental fragments, volcanic piles or oceanic swells. These (crustal) fragments may collide with continental crust and form accretionary complexes, contributing to its growth. We analyse this process using a thermo-mechanical computer model (i2vis) of an ocean-continent subduction zone. In this model the oceanic plate can bend spontaneously under the control of visco-plastic rheologies. It moreover incorporates effects such as mineralogical phase changes, fluid release and consumption, partial melting and melt extraction. Based on our 2-D experiments we suggest that the lithospheric buoyancy of the downgoing slab and the rheological strength of crustal material may result in a variety of accretionary processes. In addition to terrane subduction, we are able to identify three distinct modes of terrane accretion: frontal accretion, basal accretion and underplating plateaus. We show that crustal fragments may dock onto continental crust and cease subduction, be scrapped off the downgoing plate, or subduct to greater depth prior to slab break off and subsequent exhumation. Direct consequences of these processes include slab break off, subduction zone transference, structural reworking, formation of high-pressure terranes, partial melting and crustal growth.

  6. Gondwanaland origin, dispersion, and accretion of East and Southeast Asian continental terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, I.

    1994-10-01

    East and Southeast Asia is a complex assembly of allochthonous continental terranes, island arcs, accretionary complexes and small ocean basins. The boundaries between continental terranes are marked by major fault zones or by sutures recognized by the presence of ophiolites, mélanges and accretionary complexes. Stratigraphical, sedimentological, paleobiogeographical and paleomagnetic data suggest that all of the East and Southeast Asian continental terranes were derived directly or indirectly from the Iran-Himalaya-Australia margin of Gondwanaland. The evolution of the terranes is one of rifting from Gondwanaland, northwards drift and amalgamation/accretion to form present day East Asia. Three continental silvers were rifted from the northeast margin of Gondwanaland in the Silurian-Early Devonian (North China, South China, Indochina/East Malaya, Qamdo-Simao and Tarim terranes), Early-Middle Permian (Sibumasu, Lhasa and Qiangtang terranes) and Late Jurassic (West Burma terrane, Woyla terranes). The northwards drift of these terranes was effected by the opening and closing of three successive Tethys oceans, the Paleo-Tethys, Meso-Tethys and Ceno-Tethys. Terrane assembly took place between the Late Paleozoic and Cenozoic, but the precise timings of amalgamation and accretion are still contentious. Amalgamation of South China and Indochina/East Malaya occurred during the Early Carboniferous along the Song Ma Suture to form "Cathaysialand". Cathaysialand, together with North China, formed a large continental region within the Paleotethys during the Late Carboniferous and Permian. Paleomagnetic data indicate that this continental region was in equatorial to low northern paleolatitudes which is consistent with the tropical Cathaysian flora developed on these terranes. The Tarim terrane (together with the Kunlun, Qaidam and Ala Shan terranes) accreted to Kazakhstan/Siberia in the Permian. This was followed by the suturing of Sibumasu and Qiangtang to Cathaysialand in the

  7. An accreted continental terrane in northwestern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourier, T.; Laj, C.; Mégard, F.; Roperch, P.; Mitouard, P.; Farfan Medrano, A.

    1988-04-01

    A paleomagnetic study of over 250 cores from 26 sites sampled in Early to Late Cretaceous and Paleogene volcanic, plutonic and sedimentary formations of the Lancones basin in the Piura province of northern Peru, indicates that most of these lithologies carry a stable primary remanent magnetization whose direction is significantly different from that of coeval formations of stable South America. A clockwise rotation ranging from 90° for the lowermost units to 35° for the uppermost ones has been documented, although the lack of precise chronology has not allowed a detailed temporal description. Four sites from Late Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian) formations in the Amotape-Tahuin Range also show a 110° clockwise rotation and yield evidence for a northward displacement. When considered together with previous geological studies, these data are consistent with the hypothesis of the accretion of an Amotape-Tahuin continental terrane to the Peruvian margin in Neocomian times. The accretion was followed by in situ rotation, suggesting a dextral shear regime. These results indicate that the geodynamical evolution of northern Peru is more closely related to the processes observed in Ecuador than to those classically assumed for the Central Andes of Peru.

  8. Three-dimensional velocity structure of Siletzia and other accreted terranes in the Cascadia forearc of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Wells, R.E.; Fisher, M.A.; Flueh, E.; ten Brink, U.S.

    1999-01-01

    Eocene mafic crust with high seismic velocities underlies much of the Oregon and Washington forearc and acts as a backstop for accretion of marine sedimentary rocks from the obliquely subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Arc-parallel migration of relatively strong blocks of this terrane, known as Siletzia, focuses upper crustal deformation along block boundaries, which are potential sources of earthquakes. In a three-dimensional velocity model of coastal Washington, we have combined surface geology, well data, and travel times from earthquakes and controlled source seismic experiments to resolve the major boundaries of the Siletz terrane with the adjacent accreted sedimentary prism and volcanic arc. In southern Washington and northern Oregon the Siletz terrane appears to be a thick block (???20 km) that extends west of the coastline and makes a high-angle contact with the offshore accreted sedimentary prism. On its east flank the high-velocity Siletz terrane boundary coincides with an en echelon zone of seismicity in the arc. In northern Washington the western edge of Siletzia makes a lower-angled, fault-bound contact with the accretionary prism. In addition, alternating, east-west trending uplifts and downwarps of the Siletz terrane centered on the antiformal Olympic Mountains may reflect focusing of north-south compression in the northern part of the Siletz terrane. This compressional strain may result from northward transport and clockwise rotation of the Siletz terrane into the relatively fixed Canadian Coast Mountains restraining bend along the coast.

  9. Continental accretion: From oceanic plateaus to allochthonous terranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Nur, A.; Jones, D.; Cox, A.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the regions of the anomalously high sea-floor topography in today's oceans may be modern allochthonous terranes moving with their oceanic plates. Fated to collide with and be accreted to adjacent continents, they may create complex volcanism, cut off and trap oceanic crust, and cause orogenic deformation. The accretion of plateaus during subduction of oceanic plates may be responsible for mountain building comparable to that produced by the collision of continents. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  10. Mesozoic terrane accretion and formation of the Idaho batholith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaschnig, R. M.; Vervoort, J. D.; Tikoff, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Mesozoic suturing of the Blue Mountains province to North America was accompanied by a complex history of magmatism that ultimately culminated in the formation of the Idaho batholith. The oceanic terranes of the Blue Mountains were most likely assembled offshore in the Late Jurassic and accreted to North America in the Early Cretaceous, probably south of their current latitude. Suturing was followed by a renewal of subduction outboard of the Blue Mountains, leading to tonalitic and trondhjemitic magmatism in the eastern portion of the province from about 130 to 110 Ma. Additional compositionally diverse magmatism within the suture occurred from about 110 to 100 Ma and included the reworking of crustal material from both sides of the suture. This resulting mid-Cretaceous intrusive suite was collapsed by dextral transpressional deformation from ~102 to 92 Ma, leading to the formation of the western Idaho shear zone and transporting the Blue Mountains to their present latitude. During the later stages of WISZ deformation, continental arc magmatism migrated east of the WISZ and produced the early metaluminous phases of the Idaho batholith. By 90 Ma, a large metaluminous continental arc connecting to the Sierra Nevada in the south and Coast Mountains in the north existed in Idaho, but subsequent crustal thickening on the continental side of the WISZ led to pervasive crustal melting in two pulses between ~83 and 54 Ma, which obliterated much of the earlier magmatic history of the batholith. Further magmatism occurred in the Eocene in response to changing plate boundary conditions and onset of extension.

  11. The Late Triassic bivalve Monotis in accreted terranes of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silberling, Norman J.; Grant-Mackie, J. A.; Nichols, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Late Triassic bivalves of the genus Monotis occur in at least 16 of the lithotectonic terranes and subterranes that together comprise nearly all of Alaska, and they also occur in the Upper Yukon region of Alaska where Triassic strata are regarded as representing non-accretionary North America. On the basis of collections made thus far, 14 kinds of Monotis that differ at the species or subspecies level can be recognized from alaska. These are grouped into the subgenera Monotis (Monotis), M. (Pacimonotis), M. (Entomonotis), and M. (Eomonotis). In places, Monotis shells of one kind or another occur in rock-forming abundance. On the basis of superpositional data from Alaska, as well as from elsewhere in North America and Far Eastern Russia, at least four distince biostratigraphic levels can be discriminated utilizing Monotis species. Different species of M. (Eomonotis) characterize two middle Norian levels, both probably within the supper middle Norian Columbianus Ammonite Zone. Two additional levels are recognized in the lower upper Norian Cordilleranus Ammonite Zone utilizing species of M. (Monotis) or M. (Entomonotis), both of which subgenera are restricted to the late Norian. An attached-floating mode of life is commonly attributed to Monotis; thus, these bivalves would have been pseudoplanktonic surface dwellers that were sensitive to surface-water temperature and paleolatitude. Distinctly different kinds of Monotis occur at different paleolatitudes along the Pacific and Arctic margins of the North American craton inboard of the accreted terranes. Comparison between thse craton-bound Monotis faunas and those of the Alaskan terranes in southern Alaska south of the Denali fault were paleoequatorial in latitude during Late Triassic time. Among these terranes, the Alexander terrane was possibly in the southern hemisphere at that time. Terranes of northern Alaska, on the other hand, represent middle, possibly high-middle, northern paleolatitudes.

  12. Circum-Pacific accretion of oceanic terranes to continental blocks: accretion of the Early Permian Dun Mountain ophiolite to the E Gondwana continental margin, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair

    2016-04-01

    Accretionary orogens, in part, grow as a result of the accretion of oceanic terranes to pre-existing continental blocks, as in the circum-Pacific and central Asian regions. However, the accretionary processes involved remain poorly understood. Here, we consider settings in which oceanic crust formed in a supra-subduction zone setting and later accreted to continental terranes (some, themselves of accretionary origin). Good examples include some Late Cretaceous ophiolites in SE Turkey, the Jurassic Coast Range ophiolite, W USA and the Early Permian Dun Mountain ophiolite of South Island, New Zealand. In the last two cases, the ophiolites are depositionally overlain by coarse clastic sedimentary rocks (e.g. Permian Upukerora Formation of South Island, NZ) that then pass upwards into very thick continental margin fore-arc basin sequences (Great Valley sequence, California; Matai sequence, South Island, NZ). Field observations, together with petrographical and geochemical studies in South Island, NZ, summarised here, provide evidence of terrane accretion processes. In a proposed tectonic model, the Early Permian Dun Mountain ophiolite was created by supra-subduction zone spreading above a W-dipping subduction zone (comparable to the present-day Izu-Bonin arc and fore arc, W Pacific). The SSZ oceanic crust in the New Zealand example is inferred to have included an intra-oceanic magmatic arc, which is no longer exposed (other than within a melange unit in Southland), but which is documented by petrographic and geochemical evidence. An additional subduction zone is likely to have dipped westwards beneath the E Gondwana margin during the Permian. As a result, relatively buoyant Early Permian supra-subduction zone oceanic crust was able to dock with the E Gondwana continental margin, terminating intra-oceanic subduction (although the exact timing is debatable). The amalgamation ('soft collision') was accompanied by crustal extension of the newly accreted oceanic slab, and

  13. Accretion in the wake of terrane collision: The Neogene accretionary wedge off Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fruehn, J.; Von Huene, R.; Fisher, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Subduction accretion and repeated terrane collision shaped the Alaskan convergent margin. The Yakutat Terrane is currently colliding with the continental margin below the central Gulf of Alaska. During the Neogene the terrane's western part was subducted after which a sediment wedge accreted along the northeast Aleutian Trench. This wedge incorporates sediment eroded from the continental margin and marine sediments carried into the subduction zone on the Pacific plate. Prestack depth migration was performed on six seismic reflection lines to resolve the structure within this accretionary wedge and its backstop. The lateral extent of the structures is constrained by high-resolution swath bathymetry and seismic lines collected along strike. Accretionary structure consists of variably sized thrust slices that were deformed against a backstop during frontal accretion and underplating. Toward the northeast the lower slope steepens, the wedge narrows, and the accreted volume decreases notwith-standing a doubling of sediments thickness in the trench. In the northeasternmost transect, near the area where the terrane's trailing edge subducts, no frontal accretion is observed and the slope is eroded. The structures imaged along the seismic lines discussed here most likely result from progressive evolution from erosion to accretion, as the trailing edge of the Yakutat Terrane is subducting.

  14. Geology and metallogeny of the Ar Rayn terrane, eastern Arabian shield: Evolution of a Neoproterozoic continental-margin arc during assembly of Gondwana within the East African orogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doebrich, J.L.; Al-Jehani, A. M.; Siddiqui, A.A.; Hayes, T.S.; Wooden, J.L.; Johnson, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    characteristics of the Ar Rayn terrane are analogous to the Andean continental margin of Chile, with opposite subduction polarity. The Ar Rayn terrane represents a continental margin arc that lay above a west-dipping subduction zone along a continental block represented by the Afif composite terrane. The concentration of epithermal, porphyry Cu and IOCG mineral systems, of central arc affiliation, along the AAF suggests that the AAF is not an ophiolitic suture zone, but originated as a major intra-arc fault that localized magmatism and mineralization. West-directed oblique subduction and ultimate collision with a land mass from the east (East Gondwana?) resulted in major transcurrent displacement along the AAF, bringing the eastern part of the arc terrane to its present exposed position, juxtaposed across the AAF against a back-arc basin assemblage represented by the Abt schist of the Ad Dawadimi terrane. Our findings indicate that arc formation and accretionary processes in the Arabian shield were still ongoing into the latest Neoproterozoic (Ediacaran), to about 620-600 Ma, and lead us to conclude that evolution of the Ar Rayn terrane (arc formation, accretion, syn- to postorogenic plutonism) defines a final stage of assembly of the Gondwana supercontinent along the northeastern margin of the East African orogen. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A tectonic reconstruction of accreted terranes along the paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bammel, Brandon

    The southern oceanic margin of Gondwana was nearly 40,000 km long or 24,854.8 miles. The southern margin was the result of the Terra Australis orogen. Spanning 18,000 km or 11,184.7 miles and is proposed as one of the largest and longest lived orogens in Earth history. The paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana consisted of segments of the Australian-Antarctic craton, southern South America (modern Argentina and Chile), southern South Africa, Marie Byrdland, New Zealand and its adjacent continental shelf, the Ellsworth Mountains, and the Transantarctic Mountains. The process of terrane accretion has played a substantial part in the assembly of the continents as they look today. The paleo-Pacific margin of Gondwana was an active region of terrane accretion from the Neoproterozoic to the Late Mesozoic. This research study examines the accretion of terranes across the paleo-Pacific Gondwana margin to provide a comprehensive reconstruction. A paleogeographic basemap was created using PALEOMAP Project maps and the geology data was provided by the School of Geoscience from the University of Witwatersrand of South Africa. Location and data analyzed for terranes were collected building a PDF library of journal articles across numerous geological publications.

  16. Cyclicity in Silurian island-arc carbonates, Alexander terrane, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kittredge, L.E.; Soja, C.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Silurian carbonates from Alaska (Alexander terrane) record the evolution of a submarine platform during waning volcanism in an island arc. A detailed stratigraphic analysis of a 47 meter-thick sequence revealed the existence of cyclically repeated limestones: coral-stromatoporoid wackestones alternate with oncoid packstones and bioturbated, silty lime mudstones. The coral-stromatoporoid deposits are characterized by a low-diversity assemblage of dendroid corals, massive stromatoporoids, Atrypoidea brachiopods, and rare occurrences of biostromes associated with Solenopora, high-spired gastropods, and crinoids. Oncoids typically are 2-6 mm in diameter and form massive, meter-thick units. Coated grains are symmetrically developed, have a shell or algal nucleus, and are also a minor component of coral-stromatoporoid beds. These lithologic units form seven, shallowing-upwards cycles (parasequences) that range in thickness from 3-9 meters. Coral-stomatoporoid wackestones form the base of each cycle and grade upwards into oncoid packstones with silty, lime mudstones at the top. This succession of lithofacies within each cycle reflects an increase in energy levels from relatively deeper water environments to relatively shallower ones. The lack of abrasion in the corals and stromatoporoids suggests predominantly quiet-water conditions in shallow subtidal areas affected by periodic turbulence. Comparison with correlative sections in Alaska and lack of correspondence with global sea level curves suggest that the primary cause of cyclicity was tectonic perturbations with secondary eustatic effects. Cyclic deposition in peri/subtidal sites was terminated by rapid drowning of the carbonate platform during late Silurian orogenesis.

  17. Crustal structure of accreted terranes in southern Alaska, Chugach Mountains and Copper River Basin, from seismic refraction results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Ambos, E.L.; Mooney, W.D.; Christensen, N.I.; Geist, E.

    1991-01-01

    Seismic refraction data were collected along a 320-km-long "transect' line in southern Alaska, crossing the Prince William, Chugach, Peninsular, and Wrangellia terranes, and along several shorter lines within individual terranes. Velocity structure in the upper crust (less than 9-km depth) differs among the four terranes. In contrast, layers in the middle crust (9- to 25-km depth) in some case extend across projected terrane boundaries. The top of a gently north dipping sequence of low- and high-velocity layers (5.7-7.8 km/s), more than 10 km thick, extends from near the surface in the southern Chugach terrane to more than 20-km depth beneath the southern Peninsular terrane. This sequence, truncated by the suture between the Prince William and Chugach terranes, is interpreted to be an underplated "terrane' made up of fragments of the Kula plate and its sedimentary overburden that were accreted during subduction in the late Mesozoic and/or early Tertiary, during or between times of accretion of the Prince William and Chugach terranes. -from Authors

  18. Petrology and tectonics of Phanerozoic continent formation: From island arcs to accretion and continental arc magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Kistler, R.W.; Baird, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mesozoic continental arcs in the North American Cordillera were examined here to establish a baseline model for Phanerozoic continent formation. We combine new trace-element data on lower crustal xenoliths from the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada Batholith with an extensive grid-based geochemical map of the Peninsular Ranges Batholith, the southern equivalent of the Sierras. Collectively, these observations give a three-dimensional view of the crust, which permits the petrogenesis and tectonics of Phanerozoic crust formation to be linked in space and time. Subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America during the Triassic to early Cretaceous was characterized by trench retreat and slab rollback because old and cold oceanic lithosphere was being subducted. This generated an extensional subduction zone, which created fringing island arcs just off the Paleozoic continental margin. However, as the age of the Farallon plate at the time of subduction decreased, the extensional environment waned, allowing the fringing island arc to accrete onto the continental margin. With continued subduction, a continental arc was born and a progressively more compressional environment developed as the age of subducting slab continued to young. Refinement into a felsic crust occurred after accretion, that is, during the continental arc stage, wherein a thickened crustal and lithospheric column permitted a longer differentiation column. New basaltic arc magmas underplate and intrude the accreted terrane, suture, and former continental margin. Interaction of these basaltic magmas with pre-existing crust and lithospheric mantle created garnet pyroxenitic mafic cumulates by fractional crystallization at depth as well as gabbroic and garnet pyroxenitic restites at shallower levels by melting of pre-existing lower crust. The complementary felsic plutons formed by these deep-seated differentiation processes rose into the upper crust, stitching together the accreted terrane, suture and former

  19. Native terranes: examples from the Cordillera

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    The suspect terrane concept has provided a new working hypothesis which has been invaluable for interpreting complex continental margin areas. This concept is restrictive, however, because it allows for only exotic or suspect terrane origins, while there is a growing body of evidence that many terranes have developed in situ. The authors propose that such in situ units be called native terranes. Stratigraphic, metamorphic, and disrupted terranes in the Klamath Mountains of northern California and southern Oregon are examples of native terranes. A variety of oceanic crust and Tethyan seamount-derived units were accreted in a Late Triassic subduction zone in this area. Each of these terranes is highly disrupted, and contains blocks derived from North American units to the east. The incorporation of North American blocks into these terranes, coupled with paleomagnetic data and intrusive relationships, indicates that these exotic block-bearing disrupted terranes developed in their present position adjacent to North America and are therefore native. A coeval blueschist terrane developed inboard of these melanges and is also considered native. A coherent Middle Jurassic arc (.) sequence built upon this melange basement constitutes a native stratigraphic terrane. The present melange basement constitutes a native stratigraphic terrane. The present boundaries of these terranes are typically thrust faults and normal faults which postdate accretion. Similar mixtures of North American and exotic blocks have been noted in coeval accretionary belts in the Sierra Nevada foothills, east-central Oregon and eastern British Columbia.

  20. Diapirs of the Mediterranean ridge: The tectonic regime of an incipient accreted terrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mart, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The occurrence of diapirs in the Mediterranean ridge stems mostly from the massive deposition of salt and gypsum in the Mediterranean basin during the late Miocean. The diapiric emplacement of the evaporitic sequence is not obvious, because the mobilization of the salt beds and the initiation of the diapiric upward flow are constrained by the relatively shallow thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary overburden and by the low heat flow that prevails in the eastern Mediterranean. The diapirs consist also of early Cretaceous shales as well as other gravitationally metastable strata which are less mobile than salt. Studies of subduction trenches and their surroundings show that shallow ridges occur seaward of the trenches in many places. The collisional motion between the African and the Eurasian plates would further enhance accretion of sediments in the Mediterranean ridge, which would attain subaerial exposure, and eventually would become a mountain range accreted to southern Europe. The numerous diapirs of salt and shales that occur in the ridge would be common features in the future accreted terrane, indicating an intermediate extensional phase in the tectonic history of the development of crustal growth.

  1. Timing of terrane accretion in eastern and east-central Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludman, Allan

    1986-05-01

    The Norumbega fault zone is often cited as a post-Acadian suture between exotic blocks, even though stratigraphic, structural, and metamorphic data indicate that there is little offset of the Silurian-Devonian strata that the zone cuts in eastern Maine. Similarly, the Kingman fault zone has been shown by gravity and geochemical studies to separate distinct crustal blocks, whereas mapping shows that it lies entirely within a Silurian turbidite package. These conflicts are resolved if the two fault zones represent boundaries between Ordovician or older crustal blocks that had accreted to form a composite terrane prior to deposition of the cover sequences. The faults now mapped within these younger rocks formed by reactivation of the pre-Silurian boundaries during late Acadian time; movement continued until the late Carboniferous. Most of the accretionary history of Maine had thus ended before the Silurian. A complex composite terrane may have formed during Cambrian-Ordovician time that (1) interacted with cratonic North America during the Taconian orogeny and (2) became the “basement” upon which the Silurian and Lower Devonian strata of eastern Maine were deposited.

  2. Argon-40/argon-39 whole-rock slate ages from the Robertson Bay terrane, northern Victoria Land: Documenting diachronous orogeny as a result of terrane accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmeyer, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In models of tectonic convergence, oceanic material enters subduction zones, descends, and is deformed. Over time subduction cuts across areas of deformation and should become younger in a direction opposite the dip of the subduction zone. Typically, geologists have found it difficult to document this because of insufficient cross-strike exposure, uncertainties in interpretation of radiometric ages, and overprinting of later tectonothermal events. The Robertson Bay and Bowers terranes of northern Victoria Land, which were accreted to the east antarctic craton (Gondwana margin) during the Ordovician Ross Orogeny, offer a unique opportunity to document a potentially diachronous deformation associated with an Ordovician orogeny. Exposed over a large area, these terranes display nearly uniform lithology, low metamorphic grade, and structural style and are combined with the absence of a regionally significant tectonothermal over print. Reconnaissance age analysis by potassium/argon and argon-40/argon-39 methods suggests that ages decrease eastward across the Robertson Bay terrane. The objective is systematically to collect samples of and perform argon-40/argon-39 age analysis on a whole-rock suite from the Bowers and Robertson Bay terranes. The resultant ages would more clearly document the suggested diachronism and allow more rigorous evaluation of the various tectonothermal models proposed for the evolution of the Gondwana margin.

  3. Tectonostratigraphic reconstruction Cretaceous volcano-sedimentary in the northwestern Andes: from extensional tectonics to arc accretion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, S.; Patino, A. M.; Cardona, A.; Mejia, D.; Leon, S.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Valencia, V.; Parra, M.; Hincapie, S.

    2014-12-01

    Active continental margins characterized by continuous convergence experienced overimposed tectonic configurations that allowed the formation of volcanic arcs, back arc basins, transtensional divergent tectonics or the accretion of exotic volcanic terranes. Such record, particularly the extensional phases, can be partially destroyed and obscure by multiple deformational events, the accretion of exotic terranes and strike slip fragmentation along the margin. The tectonic evolution of the northern Andes during the Mesozoic is the result of post Pangea extension followed by the installation of a long-lived Jurassic volcanic arc (209 - 136 ma) that apparently stops between 136 Ma and 110 Ma. The Quebradagrande Complex has been define as a single Lower Cretaceous volcano-sedimentary unit exposed in the western flank of the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes that growth after the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous magmatic hiatus. The origin of this unit have been related either to an oceanic volcanic arc or a marginal basin environment. The existence of such contrasting models reflect the regional perspective followed in published studies and the paucity of detail analysis of the volcano-sedimentary sequences.We integrate multiple approaches including structural mapping, stratigraphy, geochemistry, U-Pb provenance and geochronology to improve the understanding of this unit and track the earlier phases of accumulation that are mask on the overimposed tectonic history. Our preliminary results suggest the existence of different volcano-sedimentary units that accumulated between 100 Ma and 82 Ma.The older Lower Cretaceous sequences was deposited over Triassic metamorphic continental crust and include a upward basin deepening record characterized by thick fan delta conglomerates, followed by distal turbidites and a syn-sedimentary volcanic record at 100 ma. The other sequence include a 85 - 82 Ma fringing arc that was also formed close to the continental margin or

  4. Stratigraphy, geochronology, and accretionary terrane settings of two Bronson Hill arc sequences, northern New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, R.H.; Aleinikoff, J.N.

    2002-01-01

    off the southern Laurentian margin, but northwest of the principal Iapetan suture, or Red Indian line (RIL). The Boil Mountain-Jim Pond-Hurricane Mountain sequence was ramped northwestward over the Chain Lakes massif at ???475 Ma, on the basal Boil Mountain surface. This obduction probably occurred slightly before obduction on the Baie Verte-Brompton surface (BBL), farther NW, over the Laurentian margin, and was followed by Dead River flysch sedimentation, which ended with the abrupt onset of Ammonoosuc-sequence arc magmatism at ???470 Ma. Ammonoosuc eruptions probably ended at ???460 Ma, when Iapetus closed along the Red Indian line. During a following magmatic hiatus of ???3-5 m.y., now represented by portions of the Partridge Formation that overlie the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, subduction polarity reversed, and subduction resumed below the northwest-dipping Brunswick subduction complex (BSC) of New Brunswick, Canada. Quimby-sequence magmatism (???456-435 Ma) on the the newly accreted Laurentian margin occurred above the BSC, whose footwall is now buried to the southeast by mainly Silurian clastic sediments of the Merrimack-Fredericton trough, deposited in the "Fredericton Sea". In Silurian to Early Devonian time, the NW-dipping BSC footwall was paired with a SE-dipping subduction zone that produced arc magmas of the Coastal Volcanic belt, built on the composite Avalon and adjacent peri-Avalonian terranes. Orogen-normal extension produced by rapid rollback of both subduction zones narrowed the Fredericton Sea, produced the Central Maine and Connecticut Valley-Gaspe?? basins, and culminated in the Acadian orogeny when the sea completely closed in Early Devonian time. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Stratigraphy, geochronology, and accretionary terrane settings of two Bronson Hill arc sequences, northern New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, R.H.; Aleinikoff, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    the southern Laurentian margin, but northwest of the principal Iapetan suture, or Red Indian line. The Boil Mountain-Jim Pond-Hurricane Mountain sequence was ramped northwestward over the Chain Lakes massif at ???475 Ma, on the basal Boil Mountain surface. This obduction probably occurred slightly before obduction on the Baie Vert-Brompton surface (BBL), farther NW, over the Laurentian margin, and was followed by Dead River flysch sedimentation, which ended with the abrupt onset of Ammonoosuc-sequence arc magmatism at ???470 Ma. Ammonoosuc eruptions probably ended at ???460 Ma, when Iapetus closed along the Red Indian line. During a following magmatic hiatus of ???3-5 m.y., now represented by portions of the Partridge Formation that overlie the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, subduction polarity reversed, and subduction resumed below the northwest-dipping Brunswick subduction complex (BSC) of New Brunswick, Canada. Quimby-sequence magmatism (???456-435 Ma) on the newly accreted Laurentian margin occurred above the BSC, whose footwall is now buried to the southeast by mainly Silurian clastic sediments of the Merrimack-Fredericton trough, deposited in the "Fredericton Sea". In Silurian to Early Devonian time, the NW-dipping BSC footwall was paired with a SE-dipping subduction zone that produced arc magmas of the Coastal Volcanic belt, built on the composite Avalon and adjacent peri-Avalonian terranes. Orogen-normal extension produced by rapid rollback of both subduction zones narrowed the Fredericton Sea, produced the Central Maine and Connecticut Valley-Gaspe?? basins, and culminated in the Acadian orogeny when the sea completely closed in Early Devonian time. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  6. Stratigraphy, geochronology, and accretionary terrane settings of two Bronson Hill arc sequences, northern New England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Robert H.; Aleinikoff, John N.

    2002-01-01

    southern Laurentian margin, but northwest of the principal Iapetan suture, or Red Indian line (RIL). The Boil Mountain-Jim Pond-Hurricane Mountain sequence was ramped northwestward over the Chain Lakes massif at ∼475 Ma, on the basal Boil Mountain surface. This obduction probably occurred slightly before obduction on the Baie Verte-Brompton surface (BBL), farther NW, over the Laurentian margin, and was followed by Dead River flysch sedimentation, which ended with the abrupt onset of Ammonoosuc-sequence arc magmatism at ∼470 Ma. Ammonoosuc eruptions probably ended at ∼460 Ma, when Iapetus closed along the Red Indian line. During a following magmatic hiatus of ∼3-5 m.y., now represented by portions of the Partridge Formation that overlie the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, subduction polarity reversed, and subduction resumed below the northwest-dipping Brunswick subduction complex (BSC) of New Brunswick, Canada. Quimby-sequence magmatism (∼456-435 Ma) on the the newly accreted Laurentian margin occurred above the BSC, whose footwall is now buried to the southeast by mainly Silurian clastic sediments of the Merrimack-Fredericton trough, deposited in the “Fredericton Sea”. In Silurian to Early Devonian time, the NW-dipping BSC footwall was paired with a SE-dipping subduction zone that produced arc magmas of the Coastal Volcanic belt, built on the composite Avalon and adjacent peri-Avalonian terranes. Orogen-normal extension produced by rapid rollback of both subduction zones narrowed the Fredericton Sea, produced the Central Maine and Connecticut Valley-Gaspé basins, and culminated in the Acadian orogeny when the sea completely closed in Early Devonian time.

  7. Stratigraphy, geochronology, and accretionary terrane settings of two Bronson Hill arc sequences, northern New England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Robert H.; Aleinikoff, John N.

    the southern Laurentian margin, but northwest of the principal Iapetan suture, or Red Indian line. The Boil Mountain-Jim Pond-Hurricane Mountain sequence was ramped northwestward over the Chain Lakes massif at ∼475 Ma, on the basal Boil Mountain surface. This obduction probably occurred slightly before obduction on the Baie Vert-Brompton surface (BBL), farther NW, over the Laurentian margin, and was followed by Dead River flysch sedimentation, which ended with the abrupt onset of Ammonoosuc-sequence arc magmatism at ∼470 Ma. Ammonoosuc eruptions probably ended at ∼460 Ma, when Iapetus closed along the Red Indian line. During a following magmatic hiatus of ∼3-5 m.y., now represented by portions of the Partridge Formation that overlie the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, subduction polarity reversed, and subduction resumed below the northwest-dipping Brunswick subduction complex (BSC) of New Brunswick, Canada. Quimby-sequence magmatism (∼456-435 Ma) on the newly accreted Laurentian margin occurred above the BSC, whose footwall is now buried to the southeast by mainly Silurian clastic sediments of the Merrimack-Fredericton trough, deposited in the “Fredericton Sea”. In Silurian to Early Devonian time, the NW-dipping BSC footwall was paired with a SE-dipping subduction zone that produced arc magmas of the Coastal Volcanic belt, built on the composite Avalon and adjacent peri-Avalonian terranes. Orogen-normal extension produced by rapid rollback of both subduction zones narrowed the Fredericton Sea, produced the Central Maine and Connecticut Valley-Gaspé basins, and culminated in the Acadian orogeny when the sea completely closed in Early Devonian time.

  8. Bathymetric gradients within a Paleozoic Island Arc, southeastern Alaska (Alexander Terrane)

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) limestones belonging to the Heceta Formation reflect bathymetric gradients within the ancient island arc exposed in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. These rocks record the earliest occurrence of widespread carbonate deposition in the region and represent the earliest foundation for shallow-water platform development within the arc. The excellent preservation of platform, platform margin, and slope deposits contrasts with the poor preservation of many marine sediments that originated within other island arcs. Hence, these limestones provide important insights into the styles, processes, and bathymetry of carbonate deposition in island arcs. Carbonate depositional sites within the arc extended laterally from nearshore intertidal and relatively shallow subtidal zones of a marine platform, to the seaward margins of a rimmed shelf, and into deeper subtidal areas of a slope environment. Fossiliferous deposits that originated on the platform comprise a diversity of shelly benthos, including corals and stromatoporoids in growth position. Dasycladacean algae, oncoids, and Amphipora also indicate shallow-water conditions. Organic buildups and reefs were constructed by cyanobacteria, massive stromatoporoids, corals, and algae at the platform margin. Deposition beyond the seaward edge of the shelf is evident from the carbonate turbidites that consist of skeletal debris of shallow-water derivation and an absence of coarse siliciclastic detritus. Sedimentation and resedimentation along a bathymetric gradient within the arc is especially well illustrated by the carbonate breccias that are enclosed within these deep subtidal sediments. They comprise detached stromatolites and clasts of shallow-water origin that were derived from the platform and its margin during periodic slumping of the shelf edge.

  9. Hf Isotopes and Geochemical Evidence Constrain the Nature and Sources of Melting During and After Progressive Accretion of the Wrangellia Composite Terrane to the Southern Alaska Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, E.; Jones, J. V., III; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Plutonic rocks in the western Alaska Range were emplaced prior to, during, and after accretion of the Wrangellia Composite Terrane (WCT) to the southern Alaska margin (locally, Farewell terrane, FT). Docking between (mostly) oceanic WCT and (mostly) Paleozoic continental FT was done largely by ca. 80 Ma on the basis of youngest detrital zircon ages from an overlapping flysch basin and the oldest post-deformational plutons. Plutons before and during progressive basin closure and terrane accretion (~100-76 Ma) were emplaced in WCT basement or proximal to the WCT-FT margin, are calcalkaline diorite to granite, and likely products of the migrating arc associated with closure of the intervening ocean basin. Plutons emplaced after 76 Ma are organized axially and cross into both sides of the inferred suture zone, suggesting an association with faults formed during crustal shortening and transcurrent deformation. These Late Cretaceous gabbro to granodiorite plutons have arc to collisional affinity, some with "adakitic" compositions, possibly due to crustal thickening associated with WCT collision. In contrast, younger Paleocene plutons are spatially scattered and widespread fractionated granites. Hf isotopes and U/Pb ages were measured in zircons from ~110 to ~30 Ma plutons by LA-ICPMS using the split-stream configuration. Maximum eHf decreases gradually over time (+15 to +12) suggesting either more enriched mantle or an increasing role of crustal components in the melt source and/or during magma ascent and emplacement. However, most Late Cretaceous and a subset of Paleocene plutons have anomalously low eHf (+6 to -2). Paleocene granite isotopes correlate with location and basement type; plutons emplaced in Paleozoic basement have lower eHf compared with those in Mesozoic basement. This pattern, most extreme in Paleocene plutons, is also seen in Cretaceous to Eocene plutons where similar-aged rocks were emplaced in both domains, suggesting strong basement control on Hf

  10. Episodic dike intrusions in the northwestern Sierra Nevada, California: Implications for multistage evolution of a Jurassic arc terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Dilek, Y.; Moores, E.M. ); Thy, P. )

    1991-02-01

    In the northwestern Sierra Nevada, California, volcanic and plutonic rocks of the Smartville and Slate Creek complexes, both fragments of a Jurassic arc terrane, are tectonically juxtaposed against ophiolitic and marine rocks that represent late Paleozoic-early Mesozoic oceanic basement. This oceanic basement is intruded by Early Jurassic dikes that are coeval with hypabyssal and plutonic rocks within the Smartville and Slate Creek complexes. These dikes have geochemical characteristics reflecting a depleted and metasomatized source, as commonly observed in modern fore-arc settings and incipient volcanic arcs, and are interpreted to be the conduits for the Early Jurassic arc volcanism, which was built on and across the disrupted oceanic basement. Late Jurassic sheeted dikes intruding the Smartville complex have basaltic compositions compatible with an intra-arc or back-arc origin and indicate that a spreading event occurred within the arc in early Late Jurassic time. These interpretations support models for a complex multistage evolution via episodic magmatism and deformation within a singly ensimatic Jurassic arc terrane west of the North American continent.

  11. Oceanic terranes of S-Central America - 200 Million years of accretion history recorded on the W-edge of the Caribbean Plate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, P. O.; Flores, K.; Bandini, A.; Buchs, D.; Andjic, G.; Baumgartner-Mora, C.

    2012-04-01

    (Chortis Block s. str.), and became exhumed again by the earliest Cretaceous (139 Ma phengite age). A pre-Albian basaltic plateau-like basement is suspected but yet undated in the Matambú Terrane (Central Nicoya Peninsula). It is overlain by the Albian Loma Chumico Formation. A pre-Turonian basement hosting the 90 Ma old Tortugal Picrites and alkaline baselts characterizes the Manzanillo Terrane ( around the Nicoya Gulf, Costa Rica). The overlying Coniacian-Santonian to early Campanian Berrugate Formation represents the first Cretaceous evolved arc activity. It must be located on the edge of the MCOT, since the CLIP is still forming at that time. To the SE of the S-Nicoya fault zone, Turonian-Santonian (~90-85 Ma) oceanic plateaus represent outcrops of the CLIP. These include parts of Herradura (Costa Rica) and the Azuero Plateau (Coiba, Sona and Azuero, Panama). Late Campanian to Paleocene arcs rest on the CLIP: The Golfito Complex (Costa Rica) and the Azuero Arc (Panama), possibly also the San Blas Complex (Panama) and the Serrania de Baudo (W-Colombia). Late Cretaceous to Eocene plateau/seamount basalts and oceanic sediments became accreted during the Early Tertiary: The Tulin Group (Herradura), Quepos, The Osa Igneous Complex, Burica, the Osa Mélange (Costa Rica/Panama), and the Azuero Accretionary Complex (Panama).

  12. Paleozoic to Jurassic terrane accretion along the northeastern margin of Tibet plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Yongjiang; Genser, Johann; Ren, Shoumai

    2010-05-01

    The Tibet plateau is considered to have been constructed by a number of basement terranes accreted to the Eurasian margin during Paleozoic to Mesozoic times, and accretion is interpreted to have progressed southwards. The northern margin, exposed in Altyn and Qilian Mountains, is generally considered as an Lower Paleozoic orogen including previously subducted ultra-high successions (Yin and Harrison, 2000; Xiao et al., 2009). Previous tectonic models of the Qaidam block and adjacent mountain ranges at the northeastern margin of the Tibet plateau assumed a minor role of Indosinian tectonism in that region, and firm evidence was only reported from eastern Kunlun Mountains (e.g., Liu et al., 2005). Based on four sources of new data, we propose that the Indosinian tectonism was much more widespread in the northeastern Qaidam block and adjacent mountain ranges, Altyn and Qilian Mts., as believed before and we propose a new tectonic model. The new data sources comprise: (1) 40Ar/39Ar dating of detrital white mica of Jurassic to Pliocene sandstones from the north-eastern Qaidam basin fill; (2) interpretation of Ordovician, Devonian and Jurassic sedimentary successions, from which we interpret the Jurassic successions as intramontane molasse to the Indosinian orogen; (3) 40Ar/39Ar dating of detrital white mica in recent rivers from the southern Qilian Shan revealing possible basement sources in the Qilian Shan draining towards the Qaidam basin; and (4) structural study of basement rocks and subordinate 40Ar/39Ar mineral ages of metamorphic basement rocks. An Ordovician greywacke exposed in the eastern Qaidam basin (W of Delinghua) yields three 40Ar/39Ar age groups of detrital white mica: 900-922, 610-654 and 527-554 Ma. Furthermore, similar old age groups centering at ca. 670 and 1010 Ma are virtually widespread in recent rivers from Qilian Mountains and clearly demonstrate the presence of Panafrican and Grenvillian tectonic elements in the southern Qilian Mts. at the

  13. Bokan Mountain peralkaline granitic complex, Alexander terrane (southeastern Alaska): evidence for Early Jurassic rifting prior to accretion with North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dostal, Jaroslav; Karl, Susan M.; Keppie, J. Duncan; Kontak, Daniel J.; Shellnutt, J. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The circular Bokan Mountain complex (BMC) on southern Prince of Wales Island, southernmost Alaska, is a Jurassic peralkaline granitic intrusion about 3 km in diameter that crosscuts igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the Alexander terrane. The BMC hosts significant rare metal (rare earth elements, Y, U, Th, Zr, and Nb) mineralization related to the last stage of BMC emplacement. U–Pb (zircon) and 40Ar/39Ar (amphibole and whole-rock) geochronology indicates the following sequence of intrusive activity: (i) a Paleozoic basement composed mainly of 469 ± 4 Ma granitic rocks; (ii) intrusion of the BMC at 177 ± 1 Ma followed by rapid cooling through ca. 550 °C at 176 ± 1 Ma that was synchronous with mineralization associated with vertical, WNW-trending pegmatites, felsic dikes, and aegirine–fluorite veins and late-stage, sinistral shear deformation; and (iii) intrusion of crosscutting lamprophyre dikes at >150 Ma and again at ca. 105 Ma. The peralkaline nature of the BMC and the WNW trend of associated dikes suggest intrusion during NE–SW rifting that was followed by NE–SW shortening during the waning stages of BMC emplacement. The 177 Ma BMC was synchronous with other magmatic centres in the Alexander terrane, such as (1) the Dora Bay peralkaline stock and (2) the bimodal Moffatt volcanic suite located ~30 km north and ~100 km SE of the BMC, respectively. This regional magmatism is interpreted to represent a regional extensional event that precedes deposition of the Late Jurassic – Cretaceous Gravina sequence that oversteps the Wrangellia and Alexander exotic accreted terranes and the Taku and Yukon–Tanana pericratonic terranes of the Canadian–Alaskan Cordillera.

  14. Aleutian terranes from Nd isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, R. W.; Kay, S. M.; Rubenstone, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Nd isotope ratios substantiate the identification of oceanic crustal terranes within the continental crustal basement of the Aleutian island arc. The oceanic terranes are exposed in the westernmost Aleutians, but to the east, they are completely buried by isotopically distinct arc-volcanic rocks. Analogous oceanic terranes may be important components of the terrane collages that comprise the continents.

  15. The Kan River Gneiss terrane of central Côte D'Ivoire: mylonitic remnants of an ancient magmatic arc?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, J.

    1992-11-01

    The Kan River Gneisses (KRG) which crop out to the east of the Birrimian Fetekro supracrustal belt in central Cote d'Ivoire are described. They comprise a TTG intrusive suite, part of which has been metamorphosed to amphibolite facies and extensively deformed by strike-slip deformation. These gneisses are considered to have been originally linked to the better known Dabakala Gneiss to the north. The eastern and western boundaries of the KRG are defined by major crustal shear zones which separate discrete lithostratigraphic terranes. To the east, the Comoe flysch basin lies beyond the Dimbokro strike-slip shear zone. The Boni Andokro shear zone marks the boundary between the KRG and the Toumodi Volcanic Group (TVG) to the west, where there is evidence of shortening and transcurrent movement. The KRG are geochemically similar to modern volcanic arc granites. They are clearly petrologically distinct from the calc-alkaline intrusive granitoids which intrude the TVG, and which geochemically resemble modern volcanic arc and syn-collisional granites. The KRG terrane resembles a deformed magmatic arc. In view of the nature of its eastern and western boundaries, its relations with neighbouring terranes are considered suspect.

  16. Crustal thickness variation from a continental to an island arc terrane: Clues from the gravity signatures of the Central Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manalo, Pearlyn C.; Dimalanta, Carla B.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.; Ramos, Noelynna T.; Queaño, Karlo L.; Yumul, Graciano P.

    2015-05-01

    Offshore and ground gravity data were utilized to estimate crustal thickness across the Central Philippines where a transition from continental to island arc terrane occurs. Significant differences in gravity anomalies were observed between the Palawan Microcontinental Block (PCB) and the Philippine Mobile Belt (PMB), two major terranes that came together through arc-continent collision. Islands of the PCB (Mindoro, Tablas, Romblon, Sibuyan and western Panay), made up of an assortment of continent-derived sedimentary and igneous rocks and slivers of ophiolitic bodies, register lower Bouguer anomalies compared to that displayed by Masbate Island in the PMB. The calculated crustal thickness of this region exhibits a complex Moho topography of non-uniform depth across the collision zone with the thickest parts (∼32 km) corresponding with ophiolitic units emplaced consequent to arc-continent collision. On the other hand, relatively thinner crust (∼21 km) within the collision zone coincides with areas surmised to have undergone attenuation following intra-arc rifting. The same characteristics are observed offshore of western Mindoro and within the Marinduque Basin, areas known to have experienced crustal thinning following regional tectonic rearrangements that triggered riftings and intra-basin openings.

  17. Hurricane Mountain Formation melange: history of Cambro-Ordovician accretion of the Boundary Mountains terrane within the northern Appalachian orthotectonic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, G.M.; Boudette, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Hurricane Mountain Formation (HMF) melange and associated ophiolitic and volcanogenic formations of Cambrian and lowermost Ordovician age bound the SE margin of the Precambrian Y (Helikian) Chain Lakes Massif in western Maine. HMF melange matrix, though weakly metamorphosed, contains a wide variety of exotic greenschist to amphibolite facies blocks as components of its polymictic assemblage, but blocks of high-grade cratonal rocks such as those of Chain Lakes or Grenville affinity are lacking. Formations of melange exposed in structural culminations of Cambrian and Ordovician rocks NE of the HMF in Maine and in the Fournier Group in New Brunswick are lithologically similar and probably tectonically correlative with the HMF; taken together, they may delineate a common pre-Middle Ordovician tectonic boundary. The authors infer that the Hurricane Mountain and St. Daniel melange belts define the SE and NW margins of the Boundary Mountains accreted terrane (BMT), which may consist of cratonal basement of Chain Lakes affinity extending from eastern Gaspe (deBroucker and St. Julien, 1985) to north-central New Hampshire. The Laurentian continental margin, underlain by Grenville basement, underplated the NW margin of this terrane, marked by the SDF suture zone, in late Cambrian to early Ordovician time, while terranes marked by Cambrian to Tremadocian (.) lithologies dissimilar to the Boundary Mountains terrane were accreted to its outboard margin penecontemporaneously. The docking of the Boundary Mountains terrane and the initiation of its peripheral melanges are equated to the Penobscottian disturbance.

  18. Petrology and tectonic significance of gabbros, tonalites, shoshonites, and anorthosites in a late Paleozoic arc-root complex in the Wrangellia Terrane, southern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, J.S. ); Barker, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Plutonic rocks intrusive into the late Paleozoic Tetelna Formation of southern Alaska are the underpinnings of the late Paleozoic Skolai arc of the Wrangellia Terrane. There are four groups of intrusive rocks within the Skolai arc: (1) Gabbro-diorite plutons that contain gabbroic to anorthositic cumulates along with a differentiated series of gabbros and diorites of basaltic to andesitic composition; (2) Silicic intrusions including tonalite, granodiorite, and granite; (3) Monzonitic to syenitic plutonic rocks of the Ahtell complex and related dikes and sills; (4) Fault-bounded bytownite anorthosite of uncertain age and association. These anorthosites may be related to post-Skolai, Nikolai Greenstone magmatism. The silicic rocks yield discordant U-Pb zircon ages of 290-320 Ma (early to late Pennsylvanian). The monzonitic rocks of the Ahtell complex have shoshonitic chemistry. Similar shoshonitic rocks are widespread in both the Wrangellia terrane and the neighboring Alexander terrane and intrude the contact between the two. In modern oceanic arcs, shoshonitic rocks are typically associated with tectonic instability occurring during the initial stages of subduction or just prior to or during termination or flip of an established subduction zone. The nature of any tectonic instability which may have led to the cessation of subduction in the Skolai arc is unclear. Possibilities include collision of the arc with a ridge, an oceanic plateau, another arc, or a continental fragment. One possibility is that the shoshonitic magmatism marks the late Paleozoic amalgamation of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane. The scarcity of arc rocks predating the shoshonites in the Alexander terrane supports this possibility, but structural corroboration is lacking.

  19. The timing of Jurassic orogenesis in the continental arc terrane of the western US Cordillera: Jackston Mountains, northwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, M.J.; Wright, J.E. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Pre-Nevadan, Jurassic orogenesis appears to be characteristic of many Mesozoic arc assemblages of the western US Cordillera. In most places this deformation is Middle Jurassic ([approximately]170--160 Ma). The authors recent work in the Black Rock Desert (BRD) documents an episode of Early Jurassic metamorphism and tectonism in the Jackson Mountains (JM). Here, an extensive arc section, including the Norian to Middle ( ) Jurassic Happy Creek Volcanics and Early to Middle Jurassic plutons, indicate vigorous arc magmatism in the arly Mesozoic. Among the southwest flank of the range the lower Mesozoic section is overridden by an east vergent thrust sheet carrying upper Paleozoic rocks of the McGill Canyon Unit. Another thrust package is located on the same side of the range, but further to the north, and contains variably metamorphosed clastic rocks, carbonate, and mafic volcanics. There is also an abrupt drop in metamorphic grade across the main thrust fault where greenschist facies rocks are in contact with virtually unmetamorphosed Happy Creek Volcanics. Two plutons with U/Pb zircon age of 188 [+-] 2 Ma and 193 [+-] 3 Ma crosscut the northern thrust fault. These relations suggest than an episode of regional metamorphism followed by E-W compressional tectonism was completed during the Early Jurassic in this portion of the arc terrane. These results differ significantly from previous studies that have interpreted all compressive deformation in the JM to have taken place between the Middle Jurassic and Cretaceous. The authors new data indicate that pre-Nevada Jurassic deformation is somewhat older in the BRD than that documented in other parts of the Mesozoic arc. Because voluminous Jurassic magmatism also began at an earlier time (Early Jurassic) in the BRD than elsewhere, they suggest that deformation and metamorphis within the arc may be facilitated and localized during periods of high heat flux related to magmatic input.

  20. Carbonate bank sedimentation in a volcaniclastic arc setting: Lower Carboniferous limestones of the eastern Klamath terrane, California

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    Carboniferous volcaniclastic-arc deposits of the eastern Klamath terrane, California, include Late Visean/Namurian limestone lenses that formed as small carbonate banks. The limestone lenses, within the Bragdon and Baird formations, reach 17 m in thickness and 1.2 km in length. Slope deposits consist of argillaceous spiculitic wackestone, and bank-edge deposits include ooid grainstone, Striatifera packstone, argillaceous phylloid algal packstone, and argillaceous skeletal packstone, Bank-interior deposits include skeletal wackestone/packstone and argillaceous sandy mudstone. The limestone lenses overlie proximal deltaic deposits of thick-bedded volcaniclastic sandstone and conglomerate. Carbonate banks developed on delta lobes during intervals of minimal clastic sedimentation, possibly related to sea-level rise and volcanic quiescence. The carbonate banks were short-lived depositional systems, and they were covered by prograding deposits of younger volcaniclastic sands.

  1. Dispersed Remnants of a Northeast Pacific Fringing Arc: Upper Paleozoic Terranes of Permian McCLOUD Faunal Affinity, Western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. Meghan

    1987-12-01

    Two fragmentary, subparallel belts of terranes within the western North American Cordillera contain upper Paleozoic rocks and are characterized by contrasting lithotectonic assemblages and contrasting Permian faunal affinity. These two belts are (A) volcanic-arc related successions of Permian McCloud faunal affinity (McCloud belt) and (B) subduction-related accretionary complexes of Permian Tethy an faunal affinity (Cache Creek belt). This paper supports the hypothesis that the fragmentary terranes of the McCloud belt once constituted parts of a northeast Pacific fringing-arc system and, in constrast to some earlier interpretations, concludes that the volcanic arc evolved above an eastward dipping subduction zone. The absolute distance between this arc and western North America during the late Paleozoic cannot be constrained, however, there is little evidence to suggest closure of a major (>10³ km) ocean basin or protracted periods of westward dipping subduction. Parts of Devonian to Permian volcanic island arc sequences of the western U.S. Cordillera are represented in the northern Sierra, eastern Klamath, Bilk Creek, Grindstone, and Chilliwack terranes. These scattered volcanic arc remnants share several fundamental characteristics: (1) The sequences were constructed across continental-affinity basement assemblages. (2) They underwent similar tectonic evolution during late Paleozoic time, such as coeval pulses in volcanism and related depositional histories. (3) They contain Early Permian McCloud-type fauna, of distinctive biogeographic affinity. (4) McCloud belt terranes are spatially and possibly genetically related to westward lying accretionary complexes of the Cache Creek belt which contain fragments of Upper Triassic blueschist and Permian limestone blocks bearing Tethyan Permian fusulinids and corals. Based on the presence of distinctive Early Permian McCloud fauna, the island arc remnants discussed in this paper are referred to as the McCloud belt. The

  2. Wandering terranes in southern Alaska: The Aleutia Microplate and implications for the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, Michael S.; Cooper, Alan K.

    1983-04-01

    Paleomagnetic and geological data suggest that much of southern Alaska is a collage of tectonostratigraphic terranes which originated in Mesozoic time at paleolatitudes far south of their present position. The time of `docking' of the terranes against cratonic Alaska is critical to defining their amalgamated size and extent during their northward motion as well as their role in the evolution of the Bering Sea. One of the largest of the tectonostratigraphic terranes, the Peninsular terrane of south central and southwestern Alaska, extends offshore along the outer Bering Sea continental margin (Beringia). Paleomagnetic data suggest that this terrane has moved northward through all of Cenozoic time, but geologic data imply that the terrane had accreted to Alaska by the end of the Mesozoic. In early Cenozoic time the eastern part of the Aleutian arc appears to have been superimposed on the Peninsular terrane, and postulated northward Cenozoic motion of the terrane would therefore have required northward motion of the arc. Two accretion models, based on docking times for terranes in Alaska, are proposed, and they illustrate that large areas of the abyssal Bering Sea, the Alaska Peninsula, the Aleutian arc, and the Beringian continental margin may be part of a superterrane or microplate called Aleutia (microplate as defined by Beck et al. (1980), i.e., a microplate is a displaced segment of lithosphere that has crustal roots, whereas a superterrane is an amalgamation of terranes which may or may not be rootless). Model A implies that the Aleutian arc developed in situ on the southern edge of Aleutia after the microplate had docked. In model B, the final docking time of the Peninsular terrane is late Cenozoic, which implies that the Aleutia microplate encompasses a mammoth area that includes parts of southern Alaska, the Alaska Peninsula, the southern Beringian margin, the abyssal Bering Sea (Kula plate), and the Aleutian arc. If model A is correct, the docking time of

  3. Stable Isotope Evidence for a Complex Fluid Evolution of the Northwestern British Columbia Coast Ranges Related to Terrane Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moertle, J.; Holk, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotope geochemistry reveals a complex fluid evolution for the Western Metamorphic Belt (WMB), Coast Ranges Batholith (CRB), Central Gneiss Complex (CGC) and Coast Ranges Megalineament (CRM). These fluids are a product of a complex tectonic history related to terrane accretion that includes oblique convergence, metamorphism, magmatism, and orogenic collapse. From W-to-E, these fluid systems are as follows. High-pressure greenschist-to-amphibolite facies metasedimentary rocks of the WMB record variable mineral δD (-61 to -104‰) and δ18O (e.g., quartz +9.6 to +13.4‰) values with multiple minerals in apparent isotopic equilibrium (T ~ 450-550°C) suggest a low W/R system dominated by metamorphic fluids. Variable and non-equilibrium δD (-53 to -143‰) and δ18O (e.g., biotite +2.3 to +5.3‰) values from diorites of the Quottoon pluton affected by the ductile CRM suggest a complex evolution that involved both metamorphic and meteoric-hydrothermal fluids in this dextral shear zone; these results differ from those 300 km along strike to the north that documented only metamorphic fluids in the CRM (Goldfarb et al., 1988). Our data and those of Magaritz and Taylor (1976) from granulite facies metasediments of the CGC and plutons of the western CRB reveal homogeneous δD values (-62 to -78‰) and a restricted range of δ18O values (e.g., quartz +8.5 to +11.5‰) with all minerals in equilibrium at T > 570°C indicate a system dominated by magmatic fluids. Calculated whole-rock δ18O values (~ +7‰) for the Quottoon pluton and CRB intrusive rocks suggest a mantle origin for these magmas. Reinterpretation of very low δD (< -150‰) and quartz-feldspar δ18O pairs that display extreme disequilibrium (feldspar δ18O values as low as -5‰) from the Ponder pluton, eastern CRB, and Hazelton Group point reveals that the major meteoric-hydrothermal system that affected these rocks was related to Eocene detachment faulting along the Shames Lake fault system, a

  4. Zedong terrane revisited: An intra-oceanic arc within Neo-Tethys or a part of the Asian active continental margin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang-Liang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Ji, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Jian-Gang

    2014-02-01

    Precise timing of the India-Asia collision is important to constrain the evolution history of both the Himalayan orogen and the Tibetan Plateau. It has been proposed that the Indian plate first collided with an intra-oceanic arc at ˜55 Ma, and then the composite terrane collided with the Asian continent at ˜35 Ma. The Zedong terrane has been suggested to represent the vestige of such an intra-oceanic arc developed within the Neo-Tethys Ocean, as some volcanic rocks with high K2O have been classified as shoshonites. In this study, we present detailed geochemical and geochronological data of various types of magmatic rocks (including volcanic, cumulate and granitic rocks) widely exposed in the Zedong terrane to constrain the formation age and tectonic setting of the Zedong terrane. We found that the Zedong volcanic rocks belong to calc-alkaline series rather than shoshonites and high K2O contents in some volcanic rocks resulted from alteration. The basalts are highly enriched in LREE and LILE, but strongly depleted in HFSE, indicating they were derived from a metasomatized mantle. Presence of hornblende phenocryst in both gabbros and hornblendites indicates that the cumulates were produced from hydrous basalts through crystallization. The granitic rocks have adakite-like compositional characteristics, i.e., high Sr/Y ratios but low Y contents, which were formed by melting of a thickened lower crust. Zircons from six samples, including a volcanic rock (an andesite), three cumulates (a hornblendites, a hornblende-bearing gabbro and a gabbro) and two granitic (a tonalite and a granodiorite) rocks, have been dated to yield identical ages of ˜155-160 Ma. This suggests that the volcanic eruption and plutonic emplacement were coevally developed in the Zedong terrane. Zircons from both the andesite and the cumulates have similar positive ɛHf(t) values (˜+11.6 to +16.7), indicating they were stemmed from similarly depleted mantle sources. Meanwhile, zircons from the

  5. Rhyolitic calderas of the Yukon-Tanana Terrane, east central Alaska: volcanic remnants of a mid-Cretaceous magmatic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Foster, H.L.; Smith, James G.

    1990-01-01

    Four large but poorly exposed rhyolitic calderas are present in the Yukon-Tanana terrane (YTT) in east central Alaska. At least two are mid-Cretaceous in age (~93 Ma). Similar volcanic rocks, the South Fork Volcanics, occur northeast of the Tintina fault in Yukon Territory. Evidence for the calderas consists of thick deposits of devitrified crystal- and lithic-rich densely welded tuff, interpreted as caldera fill, associated with lava domes or shallow intrusive rocks. Coeval outflow sheets have been largely stripped by erosion. The calderas are preserved within a northeast trending depression extending across the axis of the elongate mid-Cretaceous plutonic province. Trace element abundances in andesites and rhyolites associated with the caldera structures are similar to those of volcanic and plutonic rocks of subduction-related magmatic arcs developed on continental crust and thus are suggestive of formation in such an environment. Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous rocks in the YTT near the calderas are interpreted to have been emplaced in a more extensional setting when the subduction-related magmatic front was farther oceanward. -Authors

  6. Reinterpretation of Mesozoic ophiolite arc, and blueschist terranes in southwestern Baja California

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlock, R.L. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    The nature and significance of disrupted Mesozoic oceanic rocks on Isla Santa Margarita and Isla Magdalena, western Baja California Sur, have been reinterpreted on the basis of detailed mapping and petrologic studies. Three structural units are recognized. (1) The upper plate consists of ophiolitic, arc, and forearc basin rocks. Ophiolitic rocks, including metamorphosed ultramafic rocks, gabbro, dikes, volcanic rocks, and chert, underwent strong contractional deformation and penetrative greenschist-facies metamorphism. Arc rocks, including gabbro, a dike and sill complex, compositionally diverse volcanic rocks, lahars, and volcaniclastic strata, lack a penetrative fabric and are weakly metamorphosed. Forearc basin rocks consist of unmetamorphosed conglomerated and rhythmically bedded siliciclastic turbidites. (2) The lower plate is a subduction complex consisting of weakly to moderately foliated and metamorphosed pillow and massive lavas, breccia, and tuff( ), interbedded red and green siliceous argillite, and rare radiolarian ribbon chert and limestone. Blueschist-facies metamorphism is indicated by lawsonite, aragonite, sodic amphibole, and sodic clino-pyroxene. (3) Serpentine-matrix melange crops out in shallowly dipping fault zones between the upper and lower plates. The structural and petrologic characteristics of the Mesozoic units, the geometry of contacts between them, and the age of extension are similar to those in the Isla Cedros-Vizcalno Peninsula region, 400 km to the northwest. The author infers that syn-subduction extension was a regional event that affected much of the western Baja forearc during the Late Cretaceous and Paleogene.

  7. Accretion of the Archean Slave province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, T. M.

    1989-01-01

    Continental rift models have long been applied to the Archean Slave province of northwestern Canada. A reassessment of these models shows them to be incompatible with observed geological relations and suggests that contractional tectonic models may be more appropriate than extensional ones. Regions composed of different rock suites (e.g., orthogneisses vs. mafic volcanics) are separated by high-strain zones recording large displacements. It is proposed that the high-strain zones separate four distinct terranes that have been juxtaposed during collisional orogenesis. From west to east, these include the Anton terrane, interpreted as an Archean microcontinent; the Sleepy Dragon terrane, possibly an exhumed more eastern part of the Anton terrane; the Contwoyto terrane, a westward-verging fold and thrust belt containing tectonic slivers of greenstone volcanics; and the Hackett River volcanic terrane, interpreted as an Archean island arc. The Contwoyto and Hackett River terranes represent a paired accretionary prism and island-arc system that formed above an east-dipping subduction zone. These collided with the Anton microcontinent, producing a basement nappe, expressed as the Sleepy Dragon terrane, during the main accretion event within the Slave province. The whole tectonic assemblage was intruded by late-kinematic to postkinematic granitoids.

  8. Early Jurassic Volcanism in the South Lhasa Terrane, Southern Tibet: Record of Back-arc Extension in the Active Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhu, D. C.; Wang, Z.; Liu, D.; Mo, X.

    2015-12-01

    Indus-Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone (IYZSZ) represents the Mesozoic remnants of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean lithosphere after its northward subduction beneath the Lhasa Terrane. The evolution of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean prior to India-Asia collision remains unclear. To explore this period of history, we investigate zircon U-Pb geochronology, geochemistry and Nd-Hf isotopes of the Early Jurassic bimodal-like volcanic sequence around Dagze area, south Tibet. The volcanic sequence comprises calc-alkaline basalts to rhyolites whereas intermediate components are volumetrically restricted. Zircons from a basaltic andesite yielded crystallization age of 178Ma whereas those from 5 silicic rocks were dated at 183-174Ma, which suggest that both the basaltic and the silicic rocks are coeval. The basaltic rocks are enriched in LREE and LILE, and depleted in HFSE, with Epsilon Nd(t) of 1.6-4.0 and zircon Epsilon Hf(t) of 0.7-11.8, which implies that they were derived from a heterogenetic mantle source metasomatized by subduction components. Trace element geochemistry shows that the basaltic rocks are compositionally transitional from normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB) to island arc basalts (IAB, e.g. Zedong arc basalts of ~160-155Ma in the south margin of Lhasa Terrane), with the signature of immature back-arc basin basalts. The silicic rocks display similar Nd-Hf isotopic features of the Gangdese batholith with Epsilon Nd(t) of 0.9-3.4 and zircon Epsilon Hf(t) of 2.4-17.7, indicating that they were possibly generated by anatexis of basaltic juvenile lower crust, instead of derived from the basaltic magma. These results support an Early to Middle Jurassic (183-155Ma) model that the back-arc extension tectonic setting were existing in the active continental margin in the south Lhasa Terrane.

  9. Displacement Partitioning, Boundary-Parallel Terrane Migration, and Arc-Parallel Extension in the Aleutian Islands Based on Structural Analysis and GPS Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave Lallemant, H. G.; Oldow, J. S.; Lewis, D. S.

    2001-12-01

    -parallel, anastomosing, dextral strike-slip faults which dissect both the forearc and the volcanic arc. These observations support the contention that the Aleutian transpressional terrane (arc, forearc, and portion of the backarc) migrates toward the west and undergoes arc-parallel stretching as a result of the steadily east to west increase in the arc-parallel component of convergence.

  10. Biogeographic complexity in Triassic bivalves of the Wallowa terrane, northwestern US: oceanic islands, not continents, provide the best analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    High levels of endemism and complex, overlapping biogeographic patterns characterize modern molluscan faunas of the Hawaiian Islands and the Triassic bivalve fauna of the Wallowa volcanic-arc terrane in Hells Canyon, Oregon. Such biogeographic complexities and high levels of endemism in many modern and Mesozoic island settings constrain the use of faunal data as a primary basis for paleogeographic reconstruction of accreted terranes. Large, taxonomically diver samples are required to identify genuine biogeographic patterns in these insular settings. Selective use of individual species, genera, or families to reconstruct terrane paleogeography may give misleading results.

  11. Differential preservation in the geologic record of intraoceanic arc sedimentary and tectonic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Records of ancient intraoceanic arc activity, now preserved in continental suture zones, are commonly used to reconstruct paleogeography and plate motion, and to understand how continental crust is formed, recycled, and maintained through time. However, interpreting tectonic and sedimentary records from ancient terranes after arc-continent collision is complicated by preferential preservation of evidence for some arc processes and loss of evidence for others. In this synthesis we examine what is lost, and what is preserved, in the translation from modern processes to the ancient record of intraoceanic arcs. Composition of accreted arc terranes differs as a function of arc-continent collision geometry. 'Forward-facing' collision can accrete an oceanic arc on to either a passive or an active continental margin, with the arc facing the continent and colliding trench- and forearc-side first. In a 'backward-facing' collision, involving two subduction zones with similar polarity, the arc collides backarc-first with an active continental margin. The preservation of evidence for contemporary sedimentary and tectonic arc processes in the geologic record depends greatly on how well the various parts of the arc survive collision and orogeny in each case. Preservation of arc terranes likely is biased towards those that were in a state of tectonic accretion for tens of millions of years before collision, rather than tectonic erosion. The prevalence of tectonic erosion in modern intraoceanic arcs implies that valuable records of arc processes are commonly destroyed even before the arc collides with a continent. Arc systems are most likely to undergo tectonic accretion shortly before forward-facing collision with a continent, and thus most forearc and accretionary-prism material in ancient arc terranes likely is temporally biased toward the final stages of arc activity, when sediment flux to the trench was greatest and tectonic accretion prevailed. Collision geometry and tectonic

  12. Use and abuse of crustal accretion calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, John S.; Cole, James C.; Stoeser, Douglas B.; Quick, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Recent attempts to calculate the average growth rate of continental crust for the Late Proterozoic shield of Arabia and Nubia are subject to large geological uncertainties, and widely contrasting conclusions result from dissimilar boundary conditions. The four greatest sources of divergence are (1) the extent of 620-920 Ma arc-terrane crust beneath Phanerozoic cover; (2) the extent of pre-920 Ma continental crust within the arc terranes; (3) the amount of postaccretion magmatic addition and erosion; and (4) the aggregate length and average life span of Late Proterozoic magmatic-arc systems that formed the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Calculations restricted to the relatively well known Arabian segment of the Arabian-Nubian Shield result in average crustal growth rates and arc accretion rates comparable to rates for modern arc systems, but we recognize substantial uncertainty in such results. Critical review of available geochemical, isotopic, and geochronological evidence contradicts the often stated notion that intact, pre-920 Ma crust is widespread in the eastern Arabian Shield. Instead, the arc terranes of the region apparently were "contaminated" with sediments derived, in part, from pre-920 Ma crust. Available geologic and radiometric data indicate that the Arabian-Nubian Shield and its "Pan-African" extensions constitute the greatest known volume of arc-accreted crust on Earth that formed in the period 920-620 Ma. Thus, the region may truly represent a disproportionate share of Earth's crustal growth budget for this time period.

  13. A simple tectonic model for crustal accretion in the Slave Province: A 2.7-2.5 Ga granite greenstone terrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, P. F.

    1986-01-01

    A prograding (direction unspecified) trench-arc system is favored as a simple yet comprehensive model for crustal generation in a 250,000 sq km granite-greenstone terrain. The model accounts for the evolutionary sequence of volcanism, sedimentation, deformation, metamorphism and plutonism, observed througout the Slave province. Both unconformable (trench inner slope) and subconformable (trench outer slope) relations between the volcanics and overlying turbidities; and the existence of relatively minor amounts of pre-greenstone basement (microcontinents) and syn-greenstone plutons (accreted arc roots) are explained. Predictions include: a varaiable gap between greenstone volcanism and trench turbidite sedimentation (accompanied by minor volcanism) and systematic regional variations in age span of volcanism and plutonism. Implications of the model will be illustrated with reference to a 1:1 million scale geological map of the Slave Province (and its bounding 1.0 Ga orogens).

  14. Magmatic and kinematic history of Siletzia, a Paleocene-Eocene accreted oceanic terrane in the Oregon Coast Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. E.; Bukry, D.; Wooden, J. L.; Friedman, R. M.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    The basalt basement of the Oregon and Washington Coast Ranges, known as the Siletz terrane or Siletzia after the type Siletz River Volcanics of Oregon, consists of more than 2 million km3 of Paleocene and early Eocene tholeiitic and alkalic basalt sutured to North America in Eocene time. Siletzia is up to 30 km thick in Oregon and thins northward; it is thought to be an oceanic plateau or island chain, possibly created near the Yellowstone hotspot. Most Siletz lavas were erupted between 56 and 49 Ma based on 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb ages of flows. The ages are consistent with measured magnetic polarities of lavas and coccolith zones (CP8b to 11) from interbedded sediments, and they become younger to the north. Sedimentary interbeds also contain continentally-derived cobbles near Roseburg, OR and in the Olympic Mountains, suggesting some of the basalt flows were erupted close to the margin. Some researchers consider Siletzia the product of marginal rifting, slab window or hot spot magmatism during ridge subduction. Siletzia may have been much larger; similar rocks are found as far north as the Yakutat terrane in Alaska and south into California. Geologic mapping near Roseburg, Tillamook, and the Willapa Hills, along with U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, paleomagnetism, and coccolith zones provide constraints on Siletzia's final docking in Oregon at 51 Ma. Low thermal maturity for Tyee basin fill deposited on Siletzia and its shallowing upward section are incompatible with rifting. Slip vectors from the basin-bounding faults indicate margin-normal thrusting ocurred from the start of basin filling. Margin-parallel folding and thrusting of Siletzia, which was disrupted by subsequent clockwise block rotation, can be restored to its original NW strike and indicates a NW-trending continental margin at the time of collision. After collision, Siletzia migrated modestly northward (< 300 km from paleomagnetic evidence), rotating clockwise into its present position. Collision was followed by a

  15. Bedrock geology and tectonic evolution of the Wrangellia, Peninsular, and Chugach terranes along the Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect in the Chugach Mountains and southern Copper River Basin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plafker, G.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Lull, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Trans-Alaskan Crustal Transect in the southern Copper River Basin and Chugach Mountains traverses the margins of the Peninsular and Wrangellia terranes, and the adjacent accretionary oceanic units of the Chugach terrane to the south. The southern Wrangellia terrane margin consists of a polymetamorphosed magmatic arc complex at least in part of Pennsylvanian age (Strelna Metamorphics and metagranodiorite) and tonalitic metaplutonic rocks of the Late Jurassic Chitina magmatic arc. The southern Peninsular terrane margin is underlain by rocks of the Late Triassic(?) and Early Jurassic Talkeetna magmatic arc (Talkeetna Formation and Border Ranges ultramafic-mafic assemblage) on Permian or older basement rocks. The Peninsular and Wrangellia terranes are parts of a dominantly oceanic superterrane (composite Terrane II) that was amalgamated by Late Triassic time and was accreted to terranes of continental affinity north of the Denali fault system in the mid- to Late Cretaceous. The Chugach terrane in the transect area consists of three successively accreted units. A regional thermal event that culminated in early middle Eocene time (48-52 Ma) resulted in widespread greenschist facies metamorphism and plutonism. -from Authors

  16. Formation of cratonic mantle keels by arc accretion: Evidence from S receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Meghan S.; Eaton, David W.

    2010-09-01

    Delineating mantle interfaces can provide important clues for understanding the formation of continents. We use S-wave receiver functions to investigate lithospheric structure along a transect extending from Vancouver Island to Baffin Island. Observed Sp converted waves allow for interpretation of boundaries in the depth range expected for tectonic plates. Receiver functions show a distinct negative amplitude feature, interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, at shallow depths beneath British Columbia (˜85km), deepening abruptly at the eastern edge of the Cordillera to ˜260km beneath the Canadian Shield. Dipping mid-lithospheric discontinuities extend beneath several giant ca. 1.8 Ga epicontinental magmatic arcs, consistent with formation of cratonic lithosphere by arc accretion. This model provides a plausible explanation for global mid-lithospheric discontinuities within cratons and aids in understanding their formation.

  17. Structural analysis of terrane accretions in the eastern Brooks Range and adjacent areas in central Alaska and Canada. Technical progress report No. 6

    SciTech Connect

    Coney, P.J.; Harms, T.A.

    1985-03-14

    Work on radiolarian separation and identification of samples from the Sylvester Allochthon is nearing completion. A preliminary chronostratigraphic chart showing the age range and lithologic type of all dated units has been drawn. The comparative petrography of lithologies from the Sylvester Allochthon and the Angayucham and Mosquito Terranes, and from deformed clastic rocks of the Venetie Terrane is being studied. Several preliminary structure sections have been drawn across the Sylvester Terrane. (ACR)

  18. Crustal melting and magma mixing in a continental arc setting: Evidence from the Yaloman intrusive complex in the Gorny Altai terrane, Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Sun, Min; Buslov, Mikhail M.; Cai, Keda; Zhao, Guochun; Kulikova, Anna V.; Rubanova, Elena S.

    2016-05-01

    Granitoids and their hosted mafic enclaves may retain important information on crust-mantle interaction, and thus are significant for study of crustal growth and differentiation. An integrated petrological, geochronological and geochemical study on the granitoid plutons of the Yaloman intrusive complex from the Gorny Altai terrane, northwestern Central Asian Orogenic Belt, was conducted to determine their source nature, petrogenesis and geodynamics. Mafic enclaves are common in the plutons, and a zircon U-Pb age (389 Ma ± 4 Ma) indicates that they are coeval with their granitoid hosts (ca. 393-387 Ma). Petrographic observations reveal that these mafic enclaves probably represent magmatic globules commingled with their host magmas. The relatively low SiO2 contents (46.0-60.7 wt.%) and high Mg# (38.9-56.5) further suggest that mantle-derived mafic melts served as a crucial component in the formation of these mafic enclaves. The granitoid hosts, including quartz diorites and granodiorites, are I-type in origin, possessing higher SiO2 contents (60.2-69.9 wt.%) and lower Mg# (32.0-44.2). Their zircon Hf and whole-rock Nd isotopic compositions indicate that the magmas were dominated by remelting of Neoproterozoic (0.79-1.07 Ga) crustal materials. Meanwhile, the geochemical modeling, together with the common occurrence of igneous mafic enclaves and the observation of reversely zoned plagioclases, suggests that magma mixing possibly contributed significantly to the geochemical variation of the granitoid hosts. Our results imply that mafic magmas from the mantle not only provided substantial heat to melt the lower crust, but also mixed with the crust-derived melts to form the diverse granitoids. The oxidizing and water-enriched properties inferred from the mineral assemblages and compositions imply that the granitoid plutons of the Yaloman intrusive complex were possibly formed in a continental arc-related setting, which is also supported by their geochemistry. The

  19. Tectono-stratigraphic terrane map of Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Nokleberg, W.J.; Brew, D.A.; Grantz, A.; Plafker, G.; Moore, T.E.; Patton, W.W. Jr. ); Mollstalcup, E.J. ); Miller, T.P. )

    1993-04-01

    A new terrane map compelled at a scale of 2.5 million is a comprehensive portrayal of the major tectono-stratigraphic terranes, pre-accretionary plutonic rocks, faults or sutures that bound terranes, and younger overlap sedimentary , volcanic, and plutonic assemblages of Alaska. Terranes are divided by tectonic affinity into cratonal, passive continental margin, metamorphosed continental margin, continental margin arc, island arc, oceanic crust, sea mount, ophiolite, accretionary wedge, subduction zone, turbidite basin, and metamorphic environments. Overlap assemblages consist of sequences of sedimentary, volcanic, and plutonic rocks that link or weld together adjacent terranes after emplacement, and provide important constraints on the timing of tectonic juxtaposition. Groups of terranes and overlap assemblages, with similar tectonic environments and geologic histories, can be correlated within Alaska and into the adjacent Canadian Cordillera. These groups include: (1) highly deformed and metamorphosed continental margin terranes (Seward, Coldfoot, Ruby, Yukon-Tanana, Kootenay) that are interpreted either as displaced fragments of the North American or other continental margins; (2) ophiolite terranes (Angayucham, Tozitna, Inoko, Seventymile, Slide Mountain) that are interpreted as remnants of one or more major, long-lived, Paleozoic and early Mesozoic oceanic basins; (3) Jurassic and Early Cretaceous island arc terranes (Koyukuk, Togiak, Nyac) that are interpreted as remnants of a discontinuous, short-lived, Mesoxoic island arc system; and (4) the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous Kahiltna and Gravina-Nutzotin overlap assemblages that are interpreted as parts of a major arc and flysch sequence.

  20. Continental growth through accreted oceanic arc: Zircon Hf-O isotope evidence for granitoids from the Qinling orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, Yuan-Bao; Gao, Shan; Qin, Zheng-Wei; Hu, Zhao-Chu; Zheng, Jian-Ping; Yang, Sai-Hong

    2016-06-01

    The continental crust is commonly viewed as being formed in subduction zones, but there is no consensus on the relative roles of oceanic or continental arcs in the formation of the continental crust. The main difficulties of the oceanic arc model are how the oceanic arcs can be preserved from being subducted, how we can trace the former oceanic arcs through their high-Si products, and how the oceanic arcs can generate the high-Si, K-rich granitoid composition similar to the upper continental crust. The eastern Qinling orogen provides an optimal place to address these issues as it preserves the well-exposed Erlangping oceanic arc with large amounts of granitoids. In this study, we present an integrated investigation of zircon U-Pb ages and Hf-O isotopes for four representative granitoid plutons in the Erlangping unit. In situ zircon SIMS U-Pb dating indicated that the Zhangjiadazhuang, Xizhuanghe, and Taoyuan plutons formed at 472 ± 7, 458 ± 6 and 443 ± 5 Ma, respectively, all of which postdated the deep subduction of the Qinling microcontinent under the Erlangping oceanic arc. The Zhangjiadazhuang, Xizhuanghe, and Taoyuan plutons are sodic granitoid and have highly positive εHf(t) (+7.6 to +12.9) and relatively low δ18O (4.7-5.0‰) values, which were suggested to result from prompt remelting of hydrothermally altered lower oceanic crust of the accreted Erlangping oceanic arc. The zircon grains from the Manziying monzogranitic pluton show similar Hf-O isotopic compositions to those of the Xizhuanghe pluton, and thus the Manziying monzogranitic pluton was likely derived from the dehydration melting of previous tonalites as exemplified by the Xizhuanghe pluton. The deep subduction of Qinling microcontinent resulted in the accretion of the Erlangping oceanic arc, which implies that arc-continent collision provides an effective way for preventing oceanic arcs from being completely subducted. The highly positive εHf(t) and relatively low δ18O values of zircon

  1. Tracing source terranes using U-Pb-Hf isotopic analysis of detrital zircons: provenance of the Orhanlar Unit of the Palaeotethyan Karakaya subduction-accretion complex, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaömer, Timur; Ayda Ustaömer, Petek; Robertson, Alastair; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Sandstones of the Late Palaeozoic-Early Mesozoic Karakaya Complex are interpreted to have accumulated along an active continental margin related to northward subduction of Palaeotethys. The age of deposition and provenance of the sandstones are currently being determined using radiometric dating of detrital zircons, coupled with dating of potential source terranes. Our previous work shows that the U-Pb-Hf isotopic characteristics of the sandstones of all but one of the main tectonostratigraphic units of the Karakaya Complex are compatible with a provenance that was dominated by Triassic and Permo-Carboniferous magmatic arc-type rocks, together with a minor contribution from Lower to Mid-Devonian igneous rocks (Ustaömer et al. 2015). However, one of the tectono-stratigraphic units, the Orhanlar Unit, which occurs in a structurally high position, differs in sedimentary facies and composition from the other units of the Karakaya Complex. Here, we report new isotopic age data for the sandstones of the Orhanlar Unit and also from an extensive, associated tectonic slice of continental metamorphic rocks (part of the regional Sakarya Terrane). Our main aim is to assess the provenance of the Orhanlar Unit sandstones in relation to the tectonic development of the Karakaya Complex as a whole. The Orhanlar Unit is composed of shales, sandstone turbidites and debris-flow deposits, which include blocks of Devonian radiolarian chert and Carboniferous and Permian neritic limestones. The sandstones are dominated by rock fragments, principally volcanic and plutonic rocks of basic-to-intermediate composition, metamorphic rocks and chert, together with common quartz, feldspar and mica. This modal composition contrasts significantly with the dominantly arkosic composition of the other Karakaya Complex sandstones. The detrital zircons were dated by the U-Pb method, coupled with determination of Lu-Hf isotopic compositions using a laser ablation microprobe attached to a multicollector

  2. Tracing source terranes using U-Pb-Hf isotopic analysis of detrital zircons: provenance of the Orhanlar Unit of the Palaeotethyan Karakaya subduction-accretion complex, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaömer, Timur; Ayda Ustaömer, Petek; Robertson, Alastair; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Sandstones of the Late Palaeozoic-Early Mesozoic Karakaya Complex are interpreted to have accumulated along an active continental margin related to northward subduction of Palaeotethys. The age of deposition and provenance of the sandstones are currently being determined using radiometric dating of detrital zircons, coupled with dating of potential source terranes. Our previous work shows that the U-Pb-Hf isotopic characteristics of the sandstones of all but one of the main tectonostratigraphic units of the Karakaya Complex are compatible with a provenance that was dominated by Triassic and Permo-Carboniferous magmatic arc-type rocks, together with a minor contribution from Lower to Mid-Devonian igneous rocks (Ustaömer et al. 2015). However, one of the tectono-stratigraphic units, the Orhanlar Unit, which occurs in a structurally high position, differs in sedimentary facies and composition from the other units of the Karakaya Complex. Here, we report new isotopic age data for the sandstones of the Orhanlar Unit and also from an extensive, associated tectonic slice of continental metamorphic rocks (part of the regional Sakarya Terrane). Our main aim is to assess the provenance of the Orhanlar Unit sandstones in relation to the tectonic development of the Karakaya Complex as a whole. The Orhanlar Unit is composed of shales, sandstone turbidites and debris-flow deposits, which include blocks of Devonian radiolarian chert and Carboniferous and Permian neritic limestones. The sandstones are dominated by rock fragments, principally volcanic and plutonic rocks of basic-to-intermediate composition, metamorphic rocks and chert, together with common quartz, feldspar and mica. This modal composition contrasts significantly with the dominantly arkosic composition of the other Karakaya Complex sandstones. The detrital zircons were dated by the U-Pb method, coupled with determination of Lu-Hf isotopic compositions using a laser ablation microprobe attached to a multicollector

  3. Pre-Mesozoic terranes and the tectonic framework of the Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Pre-Mesozoic rocks beneath the Gulf Coastal Plain reflect the late Precambrian (Pc)-Cambrian (Cb) rifted continental margin and the late Paleozoic Appalachian-Ouachita orogen (AOO). The AL promontory of Pc continental crust is bounded by a NW-striking transform margin (AL-OK transform) and a NE-striking rifted margin (southern Blue Ridge rift). Terrane accretion during the AOO differed markedly on the orthogonal adjacent sides of the AL promontory (ALp). Late Paleozoic compressional fabrics and terrane-boundary sutures, as well as extensional fabrics of the older rifted margin, influenced the geometry of Mesozoic extension and opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Along the SW side of the ALp, arc-continent collision resulted in accretion of an arc and subduction complex onto the margin of N American crust. The Ouachita allochthon includes off-shelf passive-margin rocks in an accretionary prism and synorogenic turbidites that represent a forearc basin and trench. Carbonate-shelf strata of the N American passive margin remained in place beneath the Ouachita allochthon. Along the southeast side of the ALp, passive-margin carbonate-shelf rocks are imbricated in the Appalachian thrust belt and bordered by an internal metamorphic belt of accreted terranes; both are underlain by relatively shallow Pc basement. The SE-dipping Suwannee-Wiggins suture terminates the shallow continental crust, truncates previously accreted terranes, and forms the boundary between N America and the Suwannee terrane. Mesozoic extensional structures include NE-and NW-striking fault systems. A NE-striking Triassic graben overlies the Suwannee-Wiggins suture, suggesting that Mesozoic extension used the Late Paleozoic compressional fabric of the suture. A NW-striking system of Triassic fault-bounded basins coincides with the trace of the Cb AL-OK transform fault, suggesting that the older crustal boundary controlled the location of a Mesozoic transform/transfer fault system.

  4. Nd isotopic anatomy of a pebble conglomerate from the Murihiku terrane of New Zealand: Record of a varied provenance along the Mesozoic Gondwanaland margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Carol D.; Mortimer, Nick; Goles, Gordon G.

    2005-12-01

    The Murihiku terrane is a volcano-sedimentary terrane of Late Permian to Early Cretaceous age that forms part of a collage of accreted terranes in the Eastern Province of New Zealand. These terranes record a history of deposition along the Gondwanaland margin, and include terranes of oceanic character (e.g. Brook Street terrane) and terranes dominated by continental detritus (e.g. Torlesse terrane). The Murihiku terrane is of particular interest because it is relatively large, one of the least structurally deformed terranes, and preserves a long (˜120 m.y) record of sedimentation. Previous studies have suggested that the Murihiku terrane preserves a record of change in provenance from predominantly mafic, juvenile sources to dominantly felsic volcanic sources in Middle to Late Triassic time interpreted as containing contributions from Precambrian continental crust, and modest amounts of detritus supplied directly from this old crust [Frost, C.D., Coombs, D.S., 1989. Nd isotope character of New Zealand sediments: Implications for terrane concepts and crustal evolution. American Journal of Science 289, 744-770.; Roser, B.P., Coombs, D.S., Korsch, R.J., Campbell, J.D., 2002. Whole-rock geochemical variations and evolution of the arc-derived Murihiku Terrane, New Zealand. Geological Magazine 139, 665-685.]. We present Nd isotopic data from a Late Triassic (Rhetian; Otapirian local stage; 200-206 Ma) roundstone cobble conglomerate from near Gore, South Island, New Zealand. The sandstone matrix of this conglomerate has an initial ɛNd of + 3.0 and Sm/Nd of 0.219, values that are intermediate between the more radiogenic Nd isotopic and higher Sm / Nd ratios of older Murihiku siltstones and less radiogenic, lower Sm / Nd, younger siltstones. Clasts within this matrix are mainly volcanic: we analyzed basaltic-andesite, andesite and dacite pebbles along with a volcanogenic sandstone pebble and hypabyssal quartz diorite clast. These pebbles have initial ɛNd between + 3

  5. Assembly of the Lhasa and Qiangtang terranes in central Tibet by divergent double subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Li, Shi-Min; Cawood, Peter A.; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wang, Li-Quan

    2016-02-01

    Integration of lithostratigraphic, magmatic, and metamorphic data from the Lhasa-Qiangtang collision zone in central Tibet (including the Bangong suture zone and adjacent regions of the Lhasa and Qiangtang terranes) indicates assembly through divergent double sided subduction. This collision zone is characterized by the absence of Early Cretaceous high-grade metamorphic rocks and the presence of extensive magmatism with enhanced mantle contributions at ca. 120-110 Ma. Two Jurassic-Cretaceous magmatic arcs are identified from the Caima-Duobuza-Rongma-Kangqiong-Amdo magmatic belt in the western Qiangtang Terrane and from the Along Tso-Yanhu-Daguo-Baingoin-Daru Tso magmatic belt in the northern Lhasa Terrane. These two magmatic arcs reflect northward and southward subduction of the Bangong Ocean lithosphere, respectively. Available multidisciplinary data reconcile that the Bangong Ocean may have closed during the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous (most likely ca. 140-130 Ma) through arc-arc "soft" collision rather than continent-continent "hard" collision. Subduction zone retreat associated with convergence beneath the Lhasa Terrane may have driven its rifting and separation from the northern margin of Gondwana leading to its accretion within Asia.

  6. Intraoceanic Arc Tectonic and Sedimentary Processes: Translation from Modern Activity to Ancient Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draut, A. E.; Clift, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    Records of ancient intraoceanic arc activity, now preserved in continental suture zones, are used to reconstruct paleogeography, plate motion, collision and accretion events, and to understand how continental crust is formed, recycled, and maintained through time. However, interpreting tectonic and sedimentary records after arc-continent collision is complicated by preservation of evidence for some processes and loss of evidence for others. We examine what is lost, and what is preserved, in the translation from modern processes to the ancient record of oceanic subduction zones. Composition of accreted arc terranes differs as a function of arc-continent collision geometry. ';Forward-facing' collision can accrete an oceanic arc onto either a passive or an active continental margin, with the arc facing the continent and colliding trench- and forearc-side first. In ';backward-facing' collision, involving two subduction zones with similar polarity, the arc collides backarc-first with an active continental margin. The preservation of evidence for contemporary sedimentary and tectonic arc processes in the geologic record depends greatly on how well the various parts of the arc survive collision and orogeny in each case. Preservation of arc terranes likely is biased towards those that were in tectonic accretion for tens of millions of years before collision, rather than tectonic erosion. The prevalence of tectonic erosion in modern oceanic subduction zones implies that valuable records of arc processes are commonly destroyed even before collision with a continent. Arc systems are most likely to undergo tectonic accretion shortly before forward-facing collision with a continent, and thus most forearc and accretionary-prism material in ancient arc terranes likely is temporally biased toward the final stages of arc activity, when sediment flux to the trench was greatest. Collision geometry and tectonic erosion vs. accretion are important controls on the ultimate survival of

  7. Paleoproterozoic rocks of central Colorado: Accreted arcs or extended older crust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Barbara M.; Bickford, M. E.

    2001-11-01

    Paleoproterozoic (1770 1735 Ma) bimodal volcanic rocks in central Colorado have been considered to represent southward growth of Laurentia by arc accretion. Although the bimodality of these rocks suggests an extensional continental setting rather than continental or oceanic arcs, there has been little evidence for pre 1800 Ma crust south of the Wyoming craton other than the 1840 ± 1 Ma Elves Chasm pluton in the Upper Granite Gorge of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. We report SHRIMP U-Pb ages of inherited zircons from metarhyolites and plutons in central Colorado that are latest Archean earliest Proterozoic (2520 2000 Ma) and Trans-Hudson Penokean (1878 1814 Ma). Associated quartzites contain detrital zircons with mean ages of 1735 Ma, indicating only local derivation. A meta-arkose, however, contains detrital zircons of Trans-Hudson Penokean and Archean ages. We believe it likely that the 1900 1800 Ma Trans-Hudson Penokean orogens, including Archean enclaves, extended farther south and west than is currently thought, and were the source of the bimodal volcanic rocks and associated plutons during the period 1770 1700 Ma.

  8. Early Neoproterozoic multiple arc-back-arc system formation during subduction-accretion processes between the Yangtze and Cathaysia blocks: New constraints from the supra-subduction zone NE Jiangxi ophiolite (South China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Shui; Gao, Jun; Klemd, Reiner; Jiang, Tuo; Zhai, Qing-Guo; Xiao, Xu-Chang; Liang, Xin-Quan

    2015-11-01

    ophiolite originated from an isotopically homogeneous depleted mantle source. The diversity of MORB- to IAB-like basalts and the presence of Fe-Ti basalts favor a formation of the NE Jiangxi ophiolite during the initial rifting phase of an intra-oceanic back-arc basin between an oceanic arc (Huaiyu Terrane) and the continental margin of the Yangtze Block (Jiuling Terrane) at ca. 990 Ma. Both the present and previous studies imply that multiple arc-back-arc systems formed during long-lasting subduction-accretion processes between the Yangtze and Cathaysia blocks during the early Neoproterozoic.

  9. Exotic terranes of western California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McWilliams, M.O.; Howell, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Numerous distinct geological terranes compose the North American Cordillera1; there may be as many as 50 terranes in California alone2. Critical to deciphering the history of Cordilleran tectonic assembly is an understanding of the displacement history of individual terranes. It is therefore important to know: (1) whether a terrane has undergone significant motion with respect to the stable craton (that is, whether it is allochthonous or exotic); (2) if so, when relative motion started and stopped; (3) from where an individual terrane originated; and (4) the nature of interterrane movements. We consider here the problem of determining whether the now-juxtaposed Salinian and Stanley Mountain terranes of California became amalgamated at or near their present position with respect to cratonic North America, or if they collided at a considerable distance from their present positions and were later accreted to North America as a composite package. The palaeomagnetic data that we present indicate that the latter was the case. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Tectonics and terranes of the Southeastern Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The southeastern Caribbean plate (Ca) is comprised of the following terranes: Tobago, Grenada Basin, St. Vincent, Araya-Margarita, and Paria-Trinidad-Barbardos (PTB). All are alient relative to South America (SA) east of Caracas except for PTB, which is of continental provenance and parautochthonous and lies within the principal movement zone of the Ca-Sa plate boundary. The Tobago terrane extends between the eastern Venezuelan coastline and the Grenada Basin. On its south, the Tobago terrane overrode PTB and the South American passive margin during Neogene oblique collision. The Mesozoic tectonostratigraphy of the Tobago terrane is not unlike that of the Colombian Basin, suggesting the Tobago may belong to the Pacific-derived Caribbean plate. The Grenada Basin terrane consists of Eocene and older oceanic crust that now occupies the southern Lesser Antilles arc platform and the southern Grenada Basin. Such crust abducted southward below the Tobago terrane in mid-Cenozoic time, probably taking up boundary-normal shortening during oblique collision of the Ca and Sa plates. The oceanic crust of the GB terrane arose by backarc spreading of unknown orientation. The St. Vincent terrane extends north in the Antilles from St. Vincent; it is defined by thick crust, perhaps an old arc basement. The Araya-Margarita terrane is a probable subduction complex of Mesozoic age of metamorphism that has been transported far eastward from an unknown site with the Ca plate.

  11. Variscan terrane boundaries in the Odenwald-Spessart basement, Mid-German Crystalline Zone: New evidence from ocean ridge, intraplate and arc-derived metabasaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, T. M.; Lee, S.-H.; Schmädicke, E.; Frimmel, H. E.; Okrusch, M.

    2015-04-01

    different age must have occurred during the formation of the continental arc precursor rocks. Retrogressed eclogites from the eastern Odenwald are tholeiitic metabasalts with chondrite-normalised flat rare earth element patterns, intermediate to high TiO2 concentrations and very low Th/Nb ratios. The least retrogressed eclogites lack negative Nb-Ta anomalies. In addition, the rocks have depleted Nd isotope compositions (εNd360 Ma = 7.1-8.5), Nd model ages of 470-425 Ma, superchondritic 147Sm/144Nd ratios and 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios similar to bulk Earth. These features are consistent with the notion that the eclogite protoliths originated in a shallow, depleted mid-ocean ridge mantle and were emplaced in a mid-ocean ridge setting. During crustal emplacement, the composition of these rocks was variably modified by subduction-related fluids and/or assimilation of crustal material. The hitherto unknown differences in the composition and genesis of the various amphibolites in the southern and northern Spessart basement require revision of existing tectonostratigraphic models for the area. Instead of representing one contiguous unit, the various amphibolites are interpreted to belong to two different terranes that became juxtaposed in the Spessart-Odenwald basement. These terranes are separated by a major fault (Otzberg-Michelbach Fault Zone), along which rocks of inferred peri-Gondwana origin, now exposed in the western Odenwald and the northernmost Spessart were thrust onto probable Baltica/Avalonia-derived rocks that are exposed as a tectonic window in the eastern Odenwald and the central and southern Spessart. It is further suggested that the Otzberg-Michelbach Fault Zone is part of the lithospheric-scale Rheic Suture.

  12. Nd, Pb, Sr, and O isotopic characterization of Saudi Arabian Shield terranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoeser, D.B.; Frost, C.D.

    2006-01-01

    New Nd, Sr and O isotopic data for granitoid rocks of the Saudi Arabian Shield are presented together with published Nd, Pb, Sr and O isotopic data and all available geologic and geochronologic information to re-evaluate the terranes defined for the Saudi Arabian part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Three groups of terranes are identified: 1) the western arc terranes, 2) the eastern arc terranes, and 3) the Khida terrane. The Khida terrane is the only terrane composed of pre-Neoproterozoic continental crust. The western arc terranes are of oceanic arc affinity, and have the least radiogenic Pb and Sr and most radiogenic Nd isotopic compositions and some of the lowest ??18O values of any rocks of the Saudi Arabian Shield. Although some previous studies have characterized the eastern arc terranes as of continental affinity, this study shows that they too are composed of Neoproterozoic oceanic arcs, although their sources have slightly elevated 208Pb/204Pb, Nd, Sri, and ??18O values compared to the western arc terranes. These data suggest that either the isotopic composition of the mantle source for the western arc terranes is more depleted than that of the eastern arc terranes or the eastern arc terranes have been mixed with a small amount of cratonic source material, or both. We further elaborate on the Hulayfah-Ad Dafinah fault zone as a major boundary within the Saudi Arabian portion of the East African Orogen. With further study, its northern extension may be shown to pass through what has been defined as the Hail terrane, and its southern extension appears to lie under cover east of the Tathlith-Malahah terrane and extend into Yemen. It may represent the collision zone between East and West Gondwana, and at the very least it is an important suture between groups of arc terranes of contrasting isotopic composition caught between two converging continents.

  13. Devonian granitoids and their hosted mafic enclaves in the Gorny Altai terrane, northwestern Central Asian Orogenic Belt: crust-mantle interaction in a continental arc setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Sun, Min

    2016-04-01

    of the Yaloman intrusive complex. Our data imply that mantle-derived melts not only provided heat to melt the pre-existing Neoproterozoic crustal materials but also served as an important component in controlling the geochemical diversity of the granitoids. The mineral assemblages and compositions suggest that the Yaloman intrusive complex was possibly crystallized from a relatively oxidizing and water-enriched magma chamber, indicative of a continental-arc related tectonic setting in stead of a collisional origin as previously proposed. Collectively, our study suggests that the widespread Devonian granitoids within the Gorny Altai terrane signify significant vertical crustal growth and differentiation via underplating of subduction-related mafic melts. Acknowledgement This study is financially supported by the Major Research Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2014CB44801 and 2014CB448000), Hong Kong Research Grant Council (HKU705311P and HKU704712P) and National Science Foundation of China (41273048).

  14. The open scars of Latin America: The Bolivian Orocline as a basament-related hinge, and the influence of accreted terranes on the paleomagnetic rotational patterns of the Chilean forearc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Gomez, M. A.; Arriagada, C.; Gómez, I.; Roperch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    We made a paleomagnetic study in two separate zones of the Chilean forearc, between 18-22ºS and between 28-32ºS, sampling igneous and sedimentary rocks with ages ranging from Triassic to Miocene. More than 500 samples showed a stable magnetization, with hematite and magnetite being the principal carriers of magnetism. The rotation pattern obtained, added to previously published paleomagnetic data, show a continuous database for the Chilean forearc, between 19 and 35ºS, allowing us to separate distinct patterns in 4 major rotational zones: (1) Between 18-19.5ºS there is a strong anticlockwise rotational pattern, in agreement with the data known in southern Peru. (2) Between 19.5-22.5ºS, there is little to no rotation, with the southern limit being related to a major structural feature: The Antofagasta-Calama Lineament. (3) Between 22.5-29ºS there is a strong clockwise rotation pattern of nearly 30º. (4) Between 29-32ºS there is again a little to non-rotational pattern, in the area of the Pampean flat-slab. Overlapping these zones and the recognized accreted terranes boundaries shows a clear spatial relation between these and the limits of the rotated zones. We propose that the limits of this rotational domains can be linked to basament hinge-like weakness zones that helped to create the margin curvatures observed today. Under this model, the bolivian orocline would be the result of the opening of a hinge, helped by other geodynamics features like sea mountains and ridges, at the limit between the old accreted paleozoic terranes of Antofalla and Arequipa.

  15. Neoproterozoic oceanic arc remnants in the Moroccan Anti-Atlas: reconstructing deep to shallow arc crustal sequence and tracking Pan-African subduction-accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Antoine; Berger, Julien; Baele, Jean-Marc; Bruguier, Olivier; Diot, Hervé; Ennih, Nasser; Plissart, Gaëlle; Monnier, Christophe; Spagna, Paul; Watlet, Arnaud; Vandycke, Sara

    2015-04-01

    established that they were recrystallized under garnet-granulites P-T conditions (up to ~1000°C at 12 kbar). Preliminary geochemical data of hornblende-gabbros and garnet-bearing granulites portray similar trace geochemical signatures ((La/Sm)N: 0.8-1.6 ; (Nb/La) < 0.46) as studied paleo-arc complexes. These P-T results and new geochemical data argue that Asmlil mafic complex could represent a deep arc root comparable to the deep section of exposed oceanic arcs (i.e. Kohistan, Talkeetna, Amalaoulaou). We propose that Iriri and Asmlil units depict the deep-to-shallow sequence of a single Cryogenian oceanic arc (760-740 Ma), as discrete exposures along the southern edge of Anti-Atlas ophiolitic assemblages. Nevertheless, this primary arc has been likely broke up and intruded by subsequent hydrous arc-related magmas under medium- to high-grade P-T conditions (700 to 650 Ma). We interpret this period as an oceanic pre-collision stage when subduction geometry is intensively perturbed (c.g. composite subductions, polarity inversion), doping production of typical hydrous arc magma that intrudes original arc. This complex arc melange has been lastly accreted and sealed on the West African Craton margin.

  16. Mesozoic petrotectonic development of the Sawyers Bar suprasubduction-zone arc, central Klamath Mountains, northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.G.

    1999-08-01

    The Sawyers Bar area of the central Klamath Mountains, California, consists of three tectonically juxtaposed supracrustal units: (1) on the east, the Stuart Fork metabasalt-metachert-metagraywacke terrane above the low-angle, east-dipping Soap Creek Ridge thrust; (2) the medial North Fork ophiolitic terrane, composed of intercalated St. Clair Creek laminated cherts and fine-grained quartzofeldspathic argillites, interstratified with and overlain by two mafic igneous, largely extrusive suites--North Fork (sensu stricto) mildly alkaline basalts, and Salmon River basaltic-diabasic-gabbroic arc tholeiites; and (3) the cherty, Eastern Hayfork metagraywacke melange terrane west of the minor, high-angle Twin Sisters fault. Mineral and bulk-rich elemental and isotopic data, integrated with geologic mapping, document deformation and fluid-rock interaction in the upper few kilometers of a suprasubduction-zone basaltic arc during tectonic accretion to the western margin of North America or a nearby offshore arc. The geologic history is advanced.

  17. Late Triassic Batang Group arc volcanic rocks in the northeastern margin of Qiangtang terrane, northern Tibet: partial melting of juvenile crust and implications for Paleo-Tethys ocean subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shao-Qing; Tan, Jun; Wei, Jun-Hao; Tian, Ning; Zhang, Dao-Han; Liang, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Jia-Jie

    2015-03-01

    The Batang Group (BTG) volcanic rocks in the Zhiduo area, with NW-trending outcrops along the northeastern margin of the Qiangtang terrane (northern Tibet), are mainly composed of volcaniclastic rocks, dacite and rhyolite. Major and trace element, Sr and Nd isotope, zircon U-Pb and Hf isotope data are presented for the BTG dacites. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry zircon U-Pb dating constrains the timing of volcanic eruption as Late Triassic (221 ± 1 Ma). Major and trace element geochemistry shows that the BTG volcanic rocks are classified as calc-alkaline series. All samples are enriched in large-ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements with negative-slightly positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.47-1.15), and depleted in high field strength elements and heavy rare earth elements. In addition, these rocks possess less radiogenic Sr [(87Sr/86Sr) i = 0.7047-0.7078], much radiogenic Nd (ɛNd( t) = -4.2 to -1.3) and Hf (ɛHf( t) = 4.0-6.6) isotopes, suggesting that they probably originated from partial melting of a crustal source containing a mantle-derived juvenile component. The inferred magma was assimilated by crustal materials during ascending and experienced significant fractional crystallization. By combining previously published and the new data, we propose that the BTG volcanic rocks were genetically related to southwestward subduction of the Ganzi-Litang ocean (a branch of Paleo-Tethys) in the northeastern margin of the Qiangtang terrane. Given the coeval arc-affinity magmatic rocks in the region, we envisage that the Ganzi-Litang ocean may extend from the Zhongdian arc through the Yidun terrane to the Zhiduo area, probably even further northwest to the Tuotuohe area.

  18. LA ICP MS and Ion Probe U-Pb dating of igneous and metasedimentary units in the NE Pontides, NE Turkey: evidence of Peri-Gondwanan terrane accretion, Late Palaeozoic magmatism/metamorphism and Early Mesozoic extension along the S Eurasian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaömer, Timur; Robertson, Alastair H. F.; Gerdes, Axel; Ayda Ustaömer, P.

    2010-05-01

    experienced lead loss, with a lower intercept at 326 Ma. One magmatic zircon from this intrusion gave an age of 358 Ma (early Carboniferous), interpreted as the crystallisation age. Metamorphic rims of these zircons cluster around 330 Ma, viewed as the time of peak Variscan metamorphism. We interpret the E Pontide region (e.g. Artvin area) as part of an active S-Eurasian continental margin during Late Palaeozoic. Accretion/collision of Peri-Gondwanan terrane(s) was likely responsible for Variscan deformation/metamorphism. Newly accreted Peri-Gondwanan crust was intruded by granitic rocks during early Carboniferous, possibly in response to delamination/slab-break off processes. Following exhumation, the Eurasian margin remained relatively inactive and erosional during Late Carboniferous-Triassic. Related to regional northward subduction of Palaeotethys, the S-Eurasian margin underwent tectonic extension and deep-marine basin formation during Early Jurassic. The dyke swarm and Toarcian felsic plutons were emplaced into extended crust behind a continental margin magmatic arc. Short-lived Mid-Jurassic compression may reflect collision of an oceanic edifice (seamount/continental fragment) with the subduction trench. Extension resumed during Late Jurassic associated with Oxfordian magmatism. A S-facing subsiding passive margin existed during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, followed by northward subduction and arc magmatism (E Pontide Arc). SSZ-type ophiolites were regionally obducted during latest Cretaceous, followed by Eocene telescoping of the Eurasian margin during final closure of Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan ocean.

  19. Crustal Accretion at Subduction Initiation Along Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc and the Link to SSZ Ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, O.; Tani, K.; Reagan, M. K.; Kanayama, K.; Umino, S.; Harigane, Y.; Sakamoto, I.

    2014-12-01

    occurred at c. 52 Ma, and transition from forearc basalt to normal arc magmatism took 7-8 million years. Combined with the age information from SSZ-ophiolites, significant constraints on time scale of subduction initiation and associated crustal accretion might be obtained.

  20. Sr-isotopic composition of marbles from the Puerto Galera area (Mindoro, Philippines): additional evidence for a Paleozoic age of a metamorphic complex in the Philippine island arc

    SciTech Connect

    Knittel, U.; Daniels, U.

    1987-02-01

    The Sr-isotopic composition of marbles from the Puerto Galera area (Mindoro, Philippines) is compatible with either a Tertiary or a Paleozoic age. The former is considered as unlikely because nonmetamorphic sediments of that age overlie the metamorphic complex. This implies that the metamorphic complex does not represent the basement of the Philippine arc but is an accreted terrane.

  1. Australian Palaeozoic palaeomagnetism and tectonics—I. Tectonostratigraphic terrane constraints from the Tasman Fold Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. McA.; Li, Z. X.; Thrupp, G. A.; Schmidt, P. W.

    The Tasman Fold Belt (TFB) of Eastern Australia can be divided into three meridional orogenic realms: the Kanmantoo, Lachlan-Thomson and New England Orogens. The geological histories of the orogens overlap, but each is distinctive. The Kanmantoo Orogen was provenance-linked to the Australian craton in the Early Cambrian, and accreted to Australia by Late Cambrian. There are many possible tectonostratigraphic terranes in the Lachlan Fold Belt (LFB) but these can be simplified to two major amalgamated terranes by the Middle Silurian. All the LFB terranes appear provenance-linked in the Ordovician, and were progressively covered, from the west, during the Late Silurian to Late Devonian, by a quartzose overlap assemblage. The New England Orogen has a fragmentary Early Palaeozoic history, but from the Devonian onwards its geology is related to a series of volcanic island and continental margin magmatic arcs. There is some evidence of provenance-linking between the Lachlan and New England Orogens in the Devono-Carboniferous but docking is not demonstrated until the mid-Carboniferous. The few reliable pre-Late Carboniferous palaeomagnetic poles available from the TFB come from the eastern LFB. The poles post-date accretion of the LFB to the Australian craton. Thus, the possibility that parts of the Lachlan-Thomson and New England Orogens contain exotic elements is yet to be tested palaeomagnetically.

  2. Active Arc-Continent Accretion in Timor-Leste: New Structural Mapping and Quantification of Continental Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, G. W.; McQuarrie, N.; Bakker, R.; van Hinsbergen, D. J.; Harris, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    The island of Timor represents the active accretion of the Banda volcanic arc to the Australian continental margin. Arc accretion marks the final closure of an ocean basin in the canonic Wilson tectonic cycle, yet the incipient stages as visible now on Timor are still poorly understood. In particular, ocean closure brings continental material into the subduction zone as part of the down-going plate. The positive buoyancy of this subducting continental crust presents a complex problem in crustal dynamics, with possible effects on overall plate motions, migration and/or reversal of the active subduction zone, and the modes of faulting within the upper crust. New mapping in Timor-Leste has provided a detailed view of the structural repetition of Australian continental sedimentary units structurally below overriding Banda Arc material. The central Dili-Same transect begins in the north with the low-grade metamorphic Aileu Formation of Australian affinity, thrust over the time-equivalent more proximal Maubisse Formation to the south. These in turn are thrust over the Australian intra-continental strata, the Triassic Aitutu and the Permian Cribas Formations. The Aitutu and Cribas Formations are deformed in a series of faulted ENE-striking anticlines exposed along the central axis of Timor. The southern end of the transect reveals a 15-km wide piggyback basin of synorogenic marine clays north of another faulted anticline of Aututu and Cribas on the south coast. The eastern Laclo-Barique transect exposes a deeper erosional level, showing three regional NNE-striking thrust faults with approximately 3 km spacing and 50-75 km along-strike extent, each one repeating the Aitutu and Cribas stratigraphy. The strike of Australian-affinity units in the eastern transect is rotated 50-60 degrees to the north compared to the units in the central transect. The Jurassic Wailuli shales and the Bobonaro tectonic mélange act as the upper décollement between this duplex and the Lolotoi

  3. Provenance of Permian-Triassic Gondwana Sequence Units Accreted to the Banda Arc: Constraints from U/Pb and Hf Analysis of Zircons and Igneous Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. A.; Spencer, C. J.; Harris, R. A.; Hoiland, C.

    2011-12-01

    Analysis of zircons from Australian affinity Permo-Triassic units of the Timor region yield age distributions with large peaks at 230-400 Ma and 1750-1900 Ma (n=435). Similar zircon age peaks are also found in rocks from NE Australia and the eastern Cimmerian block. It is likely that these terranes, which are now widely separated, were once part of the northern edge of Gondwana near what is now the NW margin of Australia. The Cimmerian Block was removed from Gondwana during Early Permian rifting and initiation of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. Hf analysis of zircon from the Aileu Complex in Timor and Kisar shows bimodal (juvenial and evolved) magmatism in the Gondwana Sequence of NW Australia at ~300 Ma. The magmatic event produced basalt with rift valley and ocean floor geochemical affinities, and rhyolite. Similar rock types and isotopic signatures are also found in Permo-Triassic igneous units throughout the Cimmerian continental block. The part of the Cimmerian Block with zircon distributions most like the Gondwana Sequence of NW Australia is the terranes of northern Tibet and Malaysia. The large 1750-1900 Ma zircon peak is much more wide spread, and appears in terranes from Baoshan (SW China) to Borneo. The Permo-Triassic rocks of the Timor region fill syn-rift intracratonic basins that successfully rifted in the Jurassic to form the NW margin of Australia. This passive continental margin first entered the Sunda Trench in the Timor region at around 8 Ma causing the Permo-Triassic rocks to accrete to the edge of the Asian Plate and emerge as a series of mountainous islands in the young collision zone. Eventually, the Australian continental margin will collide with the southern edge of the Asian plate and these Gondwana terranes will rejoin. However, it may be difficult to reconstruct the various ventures of they made over the past 300 Ma.

  4. The Pelagonian terrane in Greece: a piece of peri-Gondwanan mosaic of the Eastern Mediterranean and a new piece of information about the geological evolution of Avalonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlatkin, Olga; Avigad, Dov; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-04-01

    The North-East Mediterranean region is a crustal mosaic comprised of proximal (Cadomian) and exotic (Avalonian) peri-Gondwanan terranes that were accreted to the European margin and repeatedly reshaped during several orogenic events, including Caledonian, Variscan and Alpine. The Pelagonian terrane in Greece is a peri-Gondwanan terrane of the Avalonian affinity: the properties of its >700 Ma-aged "Proto-Pelagonian" basement are attesting its peri-Amazonian origin. Our new survey reveals the Proto-Pelagonian rocks in most of the basement outcrops. Additionally, 600 Ma-aged orthogneisses were discovered, which is typical for the Avalonian magmatic arc. Here we also report the data obtained on the overstep Late Ediacaran to Early Mesozoic Pelagonian rock section, using U-Pb-Hf isotope geochemistry, and supported by structural and lithological observations. The Late Ediacaran Pelagonian metasedimentary sequence yields mainly magmatic ages between 750-560 Ma with Hf-TDM ages of 1.0-1.4 Ga, indicating the detrital transport exclusively from the Avalonian microcontinent that was insular at that time. These data are well correlated with the correspondent Avalonian sequences from Atlantic Canada and the British Midlands. It is generally suggested that Avalonian terranes were detached from Gondwana by the Rheic Ocean opening in the Early Ordovician and accreted to the European margin in the course of the Caledonian orogeny, while the Cadomian terranes have detached and accreted later, during the Variscan convergence. Despite this, no Caledonian magmatism is manifested within Pelagonian basement. Moreover, the post-Caledonian zircon data displays no Caledonian zircon ages, with a gap between 520 and 350 Ma. Voluminous intrusion of late-Variscan (ca. 300 Ma) Pelagonian granites indicates the upper-plate position for the Pelagonian terrane at that time. It suggests that the Pelagonian terrane wasn't involved in the Caledonian orogeny, but had remained adjacent to Gondwana or

  5. Terrane Stations: intra-oceanic subduction assembled western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigloch, K.; Mihalynuk, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The western quarter of North America consists of accreted terranes, crustal blocks that were added to the margin in a series of collisions over the past 200 million years - but why? The most widely accepted explanation posits a scenario analogous to Andean subduction, with these terranes conveyed to the continental margin while the oceanic Farallon plate subducted under it. Yet purely Andean-style subduction under North America is questionable as a terrane delivery mechanism, since no comparable accretion sequence took place along the South American margin, and since North American terranes are of very varied provenance. We consider this geological question directly related to a geodynamical one: Why has it been so difficult to reconcile - even on the largest scale - the geometries and locations of slabs in the lower-mantle, as imaged by seismic tomography, with Cretaceous plate reconstructions of the North American west coast (unless anomalous mantle rheology or ad hoc shifts of absolute reference frame are invoked)? This problem was recognized soon after the discovery of the massive, lower-mantle "Farallon slabs" by Grand (1994), but has recently been aggravated by the discovery of additional, more westerly deep slabs (Sigloch et al. 2008), thanks to USArray. Not all of these slabs can be Farallon, unless very non-vertical and/or uneven slab sinking behavior is allowed for. As a joint solution, we offer a radical reinterpretation of paleogeography and test it quantitatively: The seas west of Cretaceous North America must have resembled today's western Pacific. The Farallon and two more plates subducted into the intra-oceanic trenches of a vast archipelago in the eastern Panthalassa (proto-Pacific) ocean, both from the east and the west. The trenches remained stationary throughout much of Jurassic and Cretaceous times, depositing the massive, near-vertical slab walls imaged in the lower mantle today. On their overriding plates, island arcs and subduction complexes

  6. Continental accretion: contrasting Mesozoic and Early Proterozoic tectonic regimes in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condie, Kent C.; Chomiak, Beverly

    1996-11-01

    Mesozoic terranes, tectonic setting may differ, whereas in most Early Proterozoic terranes tectonic setting appears to have remained the same. Unlike the Mesozoic terranes, which were fragmented during collision and displaced along transcurrent faults, Early Proterozoic terranes show no evidence of major transcurrent offset. Using accretion age windows of 120 My for the Mesozoic and 115 My for the Early Proterozoic, we obtain total crustal accretion rates of 1.33 km 3/y and 1.73 km 3/y, respectively, for 6000 km of strike length in each case. Early Proterozoic crustal accretion in southwestern North America was strikingly different from that in northwestern North America during the Mesozoic. Mesozoic accretion involves transformation of mafic oceanic terranes into continental crust. In contrast, most of the juvenile Early Proterozoic crust appears to have evolved directly into mature continental crust without passing through an 'oceanic' stage. This probably occurred in a continental margin arc system. Our results also indicate that oceanic terranes cannot evolve into continental crust as closed chemical systems. Although some Mesozoic oceanic terranes began to evolve into continental crust before accretion to North America, most of the transition occurred during and shortly after accretion. This may have been accomplished by incompatible element enrichment associated with subduction-related processes beneath collisionally thickened crust. The accreted Mesozoic crust has not yet evolved into mature continental crust and whether it will depends on the duration of subduction processes along the continental margin in the future.

  7. Geochemical and isotopic perspectives on the origin and evolution of the Siletzia Terrane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. A.; Weis, D.; Mullen, E.; Kerr, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Siletzia terrane, located in the Cascadia forearc region of Oregon, Washington and Vancouver Island, consists of a series of accreted basaltic pillow lavas, massive flows and intrusive sheets. It represents a late Paleocene-Eocene oceanic large igneous province (LIP), previously proposed to represent an accreted oceanic plateau, hotspot island chain, backarc basin, island arc, or a sequence of slab window volcanics formed by ridge subduction. A province-wide geochemical reassessment of the terrane, including new high precision Sr-Pb-Nd-Hf isotope data on basaltic samples, has been used to assess the validity of the proposed tectonomagmatic models for Siletzia. The trace element data show REE patterns that are flat to LREE enriched with an absence of any arc signatures. These features are comparable to other oceanic plateaus such as the Ontong Java and the Caribbean and so therefore support a mantle plume origin. Initial isotope ratios range from 206Pb/204Pb = 18.869 - 19.673, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.527 - 15.609, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.551 - 39.220, ɛHf = +9.0 - 14.8, ɛNd = +5.0 - 8.0 and 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70304 - 0.70397. The isotope signatures become more varied southward across the terrane and reveal two trends: i) HIMU-DMM and ii) another extending from DMM towards the Imnaha component, thought to represent the mantle plume source of the Columbia River Basalts and Yellowstone 1,2. The data may support the previously proposed idea that the volcanism of the Siletzia terrane represents initial melting of the mantle plume head of the Yellowstone hotspot 3,4,5. Other evidence indicating a LIP origin includes the relatively rapid eruption/intrusion of an estimated magma volume of 2.6 x 106 km3 6 between ~56-49 Ma 5, which, in conjunction with our new elemental and isotopic data, indicates that the Siletzia terrane most likely represents an accreted oceanic plateau. 1. Wolff et al., (2008) Nature Geoscience 1, 177-180. 2. Jean et al., (2014) EPSL 389, 119-131 3. Duncan (1982

  8. Pebbles from Barkerville and Slide Mountain terranes in a Quesnel terrane conglomerate: Evidence for pre-Jurassic deformation of the Barkerville and Slide Mountain terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, David W. A.; Greenwood, Hugh J.; Ross, John V.

    1990-10-01

    Rocks of the Quesnel Lake area belong to three terranes. These are, from east to west, the Barkerville terrane (a continental prism sequence), the Slide Mountain terrane (an ocean-floor sequence), and the Quesnel terrane (an island-arc-marginal basin sequence). The major deformation of these rocks occurred during the Jurassic. There has been renewed discussion recently as to whether the Barkerville terrane was deformed prior to the Jurassic. Two conglomerate localities within the Quesnel terrane contain clasts we identify as being derived from deformed rocks of the Barkerville and Slide Mountain terranes. These include gneiss, orthoquartzite, graphitic phyllite, and grit from the Barkerville, and serpentine-talc and chromite fragments from the Slide Mountain terrane. Some clasts inferred to be from the Barkerville terrane show two predeposition foliations, implying two phases of deformation prior to the deposition of the conglomerate (Middle Jurassic at the latest). One of these events may be deformation associated with the intrusion of Devonian granitoid bodies. Deformation must also have accompanied the emplacement of the Slide Mountain terrane some time between its deposition (Mississippian-Permian) and its erosion (Triassic-Jurassic).

  9. Gondwanan basement terranes of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen: Baltican, Saharan and West African hafnium isotopic fingerprints in Avalonia, Iberia and the Armorican Terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bonnie J.; Collins, William Joseph; Murphy, James Brendan; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel; Hand, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Iberia, Avalonia and the "Armorican" terranes form key constituents of the Variscan-Appalachian orogen, but their Neoproterozoic origins along the northern Gondwanan margin continue to be strongly debated. Here, we present a new detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf dataset from Neoproterozoic-Silurian sedimentary sequences in NW Iberia and Avalonia, in conjunction with the comprehensive existing datasets from potential source cratons, to demonstrate that the provenance of each terrane is relatively simple and can be traced back to three major cratons. The enigmatic Tonian-Stenian detrital zircons in autochthonous Iberian rocks were derived from the Saharan metacraton in the latest Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian. Avalonia is commonly considered to have been derived from the Amazonian margin of Gondwana, but the hafnium isotopic characteristics of the detrital zircon grains in early Neoproterozoic rocks bear much stronger similarities to Baltica. The hafnium isotopic array also suggests the early Avalonian oceanic arc was built on a sliver of "Grenvillian-type crust" (~ 2.0-1.0 Ga) possibly of Baltican affinity at ~ 800 Ma, prior to accretion with a continental margin at ~ 640 Ma. The Upper Allochthon of Iberia is frequently linked to the West African Craton in the late Neoproterozoic-early Cambrian, however the hafnium isotopic array presented here does not support this connection; rather it is more similar to the hafnium array from Avalonia. The Armorican terranes have strong detrital zircon isotopic links to the West African Craton during the late Neoproterozoic-Cambrian.

  10. Tectonic evolution of the East Junggar terrane, CAOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xing-Wang

    2016-04-01

    The East Junggar terrane is one of the important tectonic units of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB; Zonenshain et al., 1990). Debate surrounds the tectonics of the East Junggar area, including tectonic setting, age, basement nature, subduction polarity and collisional time between the East Junggar terrane and Junggar block (e.g., Xiao et al., 2008, 2011; Long et al., 2012; Huang et al., 2012). Among the two popular models, one suggests that the Junggar is a continental block (e.g. Zhang et al., 1984, 1993; Watson et al., 1987; Xiao et al., 1992; He et al., 1994; Li et al., 2000; Charvet et al., 2001, 2007; Xu et al., 2003; Zhao et al., 2003; Buslov et al., 2004; Xu and Ma, 2004; Dong et al., 2009; Bazhenov et al., 2012; Choulet et al., 2012; Zhang et al., 2012). The other model proposes that the Junggar has a basement of Paleozoic oceanic crust (e.g., Carroll et al., 1990; Zheng et al., 2007) or oceanic island arc complexes (e.g., Coleman, 1989; Chen and Jahn, 2004; Windley et al., 2007) of the Altaid Paleozoic rocks (e.g., Sengör et al., 1993; Sengör and Natal'in, 1996; Allen and Vincent, 1997; Filippova et al., 2001; Xiao et al., 2004a, 2004b, 2008, 2009, 2010a, 2010b, 2012). The tectonics in the Eastern Junggar area are interpreted to be related to late Paleozoic intra-oceanic accretion induced by northward subduction of the Junggar oceanic lithosphere (e.g. Xiao et al., 2008, 2009; Biske and Seltmann, 2010; Wan et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2011) or by the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic lithosphere (Zhang et al., 2004; Wong et al., 2010; Su et al., 2012). Recently, we did detailed field survey and petrological, geochemical and chronological analysis of the metamorphosed volcanic rocks and magmatic rocks, and new discovered gneiss and magnetite quartzite enclaves from the Taheir tectonic window in the East Junggar region which is situated between the Zaisan-Erqis-the Main Mongolian Lineament-suture and the Kelameili suture. The new results

  11. Subduction erosion of the Jurassic Talkeetna-Bonanza arc and the Mesozoic accretionary tectonics of western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clift, P.D.; Pavlis, T.; DeBari, S.M.; Draut, A.E.; Rioux, M.; Kelemen, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Jurassic Talkeetna volcanic arc of south-central Alaska is an oceanic island arc that formed far from the North American margin. Geochronological, geochemical, and structural data indicate that the arc formed above a north-dipping subduction zone after ca. 201 Ma. Magmatism migrated northward into the region of the Talkeetna Mountains ca. 180 Ma. We interpret this magmatism as the product of removal of the original forearc while the arc was active, mainly by tectonic erosion. Rapid exhumation of the arc after ca. 160 Ma coincided with the sedimentation of the coarse clastic Naknek Formation. This exhumation event is interpreted to reffect collision of the Talkeetna arc with either the active margin of North America or the Wrangellia composite terrane to the north along a second north-dipping subduction zone. The juxtaposition of accreted trench sedimentary rocks (Chugach terrane) against the base of the Talkeetna arc sequence requires a change from a state of tectonic erosion to accretion, probably during the Late Jurassic (before 150 Ma), and definitely before the Early Cretaceous (ca. 125 Ma). The change from erosion to accretion probably reflects increasing sediment flux to the trench due to collision ca. 160 Ma. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  12. The Late Cambrian Takaka Terrane, NW Nelson, New Zealand: Accretionary-prism development and arc collision followed by extension and fan-delta deposition at the SE margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Re-evaluation of field and lab data indicates that the Cambrian portion of the Takaka Terrane in the Cobb Valley area of NW Nelson, New Zealand preserves the remnants of an accretionary prism complex, across which the Lockett Conglomerate fan-delta was deposited as a consequence of extension. Previous work has recognized that the structurally disrupted lower Takaka Terrane rocks present an amalgam of sedimentary and igneous rocks generated prior to convergence (Junction Formation) or during convergence (Devil River Volcanics Group, Haupiri Group), including arc-related and MORB components. Portions of the sequence have in the past been loosely described as an accretionary prism. Reevaluation of the detailed mapping, sedimentological and provenance studies shows that remnants of a stratigraphic sequence (Junction Formation, Devil River Volcanics Group, Haupiri Group) can be traced through 10 fault-bounded slices, which include a mélange-dominated slice (Balloon Mélange). These slices are the remnants of the accretionary prism; the stratigraphy within each slice generally youngs to the east, and the overall pattern of aging (based on relative age from provenance studies, sparse fossils, stratigraphic relations, and limited isotopic data) indicates that the older rocks generally dominate fault slices to the east, and younger rocks dominate fault slices to the west, delineating imbricate slices within an eastward-dipping subduction zone, in which the faults record a complex history of multi-phase reactivation. The Lockett Conglomerate is a ~500-m thick fan-delta conglomerate that is the preserved within one of the fault slices, where it is stratigraphically and structurally highest unit in the lower Takaka Terrane; it is also present as blocks within the Balloon Melange. The Lockett Conglomerate is marine at its base and transitions upwards to fluvial facies. The Lockett Conglomerate has previously been interpreted to result from erosion consequent on continued

  13. Late Cretaceous - Paleogene forearc sedimentation and accretion of oceanic plateaus and seamounts along the Middle American convergent margin (Costa Rica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Peter O.; Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Andjic, Goran

    2016-04-01

    The Late Cretaceous-Paleogene sedimentation pattern in space and time along the Middle American convergent margin was controlled by the accretion of Pacific plateaus and seamounts. The accretion of more voluminous plateaus must have caused the temporary extinction of the arc and tectonic uplift, resulting in short lived episodes of both pelagic and neritic biogenic sedimentation. By the Late Eocene, shallow carbonate environments became widespread on a supposed mature arc edifice, that is so far only documented in arc-derived sediments. In northern Costa Rica forearc sedimentation started during the Coniacian-Santonian on the Aptian-Turonian basement of the Manzanillo Terrane. The arrival and collision of the Nicoya Terrane (a CLIP-like, 139-83 Ma Pacific plateau) and the Santa Elena Terrane caused the extinction of the arc during late Campanian- Early Maastrichtian times, indicated by the change to pelagic limestone sedimentation (Piedras Blancas Formation) in deeper areas and shallow-water rudistid - Larger Benthic Foraminfera limestone on tectonically uplifted areas of all terranes. Arc-derived turbidite sedimentation resumed in the Late Maastrichtian and was again interrupted during the Late Paleocene - Early Eocene, perhaps due to the underplating of a yet unknown large seamount. The extinction of the arc resulted in the deposition of the siliceous pelagic Buenavista Formation, as well as the principally Thanetian Barra Honda carbonate platform on a deeply eroded structural high in the Tempisque area. In southern Costa Rica the basement is thought to be the western edge of the CLIP. It is Santonian-Campanian in age and is only exposed in the southwestern corner of Herradura. Cretaceous arc-forearc sequences are unknown, except for the Maastrichtian-Paleocene Golfito Terrane in southeastern Costa Rica. The distribution and age of shallow/pelagic carbonates vs. arc-derived detrital sediments is controlled by the history of accretion of Galápagos hot spot

  14. The western transverse ranges microplate as a native terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Reed, W.E. )

    1994-04-01

    Palocurrent measurements from the entire Cretaceous section of the western Transverse Ranges microplate (WTRM) yield a northerly flow direction. Point count data indicate a mixed provenance for both conglomerates and associated sandstones. The dominant provenance was mixed magmatic arc/recycled orogen and disected/transitional arc terranes. Petrographic, quantitative SEM and microprobe analysis also indicate the presence of diagnostic Franciscan mineralogy in these sediments, including glaucophane, riebeckite, lawsonite, and serpentine, suggesting derivation from a subduction complex. Olistoclasts of chert, jadeitic graywacke, serpentine and blueschist are found intermixed within the arc-derived sediments. Olistoclasts range in size from sub-millimeter to centimeter scale and olistoliths range up to 150 m. Well preserved internal bedding in some of the olistoliths suggest emplacement by landsliding indicating very short transport distance. This Franciscan material represents the oldest melange-derived material reported from this part of California and documents uplift and erosion of the subduction complex earlier than previously suggested. These data are consistent with deposition in a Cretaceous fore-arc basin located west or south of the San Diego area. The allochthonous WTRM of southern California can be reconstructed to an originally north-south oriented fore-arc basin. After deposition of the Sespe Formation (22 Ma [+-]) the microplate was slivered by strike-slip faults and rotated clockwise approximately 90[degrees], after which, the block again accreted against the continental margin. Our reconstruction suggest that depositional and structural trends for Eocene and Cretaceous sediments is likely to be different from that in the Miocene Monterey pay zones in the Santa Barbara channel region. If our reconstruction is correct, exploration strategy for Eocene and Cretaceous petroleum in the southern California Bight should take this tectonic model into account.

  15. Lower precambrian of the Keivy Terrane, Northeastern Baltic Shield: A stratigraphic succession or a collage of tectonic sheets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagansky, V. V.; Raevsky, A. B.; Mudruk, S. V.

    2011-03-01

    spatiotemporal succession that resulted in the formation of a Paleoproterozoic supercontinent and the Baltic Shield as its fragment. This succession began with the amalgamation and deformation of the Archean terranes in the northeast of the Baltic Shield during the Lapland-Kola Orogeny, the Keivy Terrane showing a record of the earliest reworking (1.97-1.93 Ga). The succession completed in the southern and southwestern parts of the shield (1.80 Ga) after the Svecofennian Orogeny, expressed in the accretion of island-arc terranes composed of Paleoproterozoic juvenile crust to the continent.

  16. The Tachakoucht-Iriri-Tourtit arc complex (Moroccan Anti-Atlas): Neoproterozoic records of polyphased subduction-accretion dynamics during the Pan-African orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Antoine; Berger, Julien; Baele, Jean-Marc; Diot, Hervé; Ennih, Nasser; Plissart, Gaëlle; Monnier, Christophe; Watlet, Arnaud; Bruguier, Olivier; Spagna, Paul; Vandycke, Sara

    2016-05-01

    We report new mapping, tectonic, metamorphic and U-Pb zircon dating data on the polyphased Tachakoucht-Iriri and Tourtit arc-related units within the Moroccan Pan-African belt (Sirwa window, Anti-Atlas). The studied area contains four different sub-units, from south to north: (1) the Tachakoucht gneisses intruded to its northern part by (2) Iriri intrusions. To the north, the Tachakoucht-Iriri massif is thrusted by (3) the south-verging 760 Ma Khzama ophiolitic sequence intruded by (4) the Tourtit meta-granitic complex. The Tachakoucht gneiss represents former andesitic to dacitic porphyritic rocks crystallized around 740-720 Ma in an intra-oceanic arc setting (IOAS). Subsequently, it has been buried and metamorphosed to 700 °C, 8 kbar in response to early accretion of the arc onto the West African Craton (WAC). This tectono-metamorphic event also led to the dismembering and stacking of back-arc ophiolite onto the arc unit. Subsequently, the Iriri intrusions, a suite of hydrous mafic dykes (hornblende gabbro and fine-grained basalt) and ultramafic (hornblendite) plutons showing subduction zone affinities, intruded the Tachakoucht gneiss under P-T conditions of 750-800 °C and 2-5 kbar. Emplacement of Iriri intrusions led locally to pronounced partial melting of the Tachakoucht gneiss and to the production of leucogranitic melts. These melts crop out into the Iriri-Tachakoucht gneiss contacts as leucogneissic bands (former leucosomes, dated at 651 ± 5 Ma) but also intruded the Khzama ophiolite to form the Tourtit granite (dated at 651 ± 3 Ma). These ages (651-641 Ma) also constrain the timing of Iriri intrusion emplacement. The entire complex has been overprinted by a second deformation event under greenschist to amphibolite facies conditions marked by transposition of primary structures and a development of mylonitic shear zones. These results and those published on the Bou Azzer window show that two phases of subduction-related magmatism occurred in the Anti

  17. Controls on Crustal Accretion Along the Back-Arc East Scotia Ridge: Constraints From Bathymetry and Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, B. L.; Georgen, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Similar to regions such as the Lau Basin, the eastern Scotia Sea is a geologically complex area that involves multiple plate boundary types. The East Scotia Ridge (ESR), the focus of this investigation, is an intermediate-rate back-arc spreading center. The north-south striking ESR is divided into ten segments separated by non-transform offsets, and spreading along the ridge is estimated to have begun approximately 20 Ma. The ESR is presently located approximately 2000 km to the east of Bouvet Island, near the triple junction of the Mid-Atlantic, American-Antarctic, and Southwest Indian ridges. Earlier studies suggested that the northernmost and southernmost ESR segments erupt basalt with Bouvet plume geochemical affinity. To constrain controls on ESR crustal production processes, this investigation calculates mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) using satellite-derived and shipboard data sources. Along the ridge axis, the MBA profile is dominated by a long-wavelength gradient in which values decrease by roughly 90 mGal from north to south. De-trended MBA (MBAdet) was determined by removing a residual plane from a regional MBA map, and ΔMBAdet was defined as the maximum along-segment change in MBAdet, usually between segment center and segment ends. Relative ΔMBAdet highs exist at most ESR segment centers, with magnitudes up to 50-60 mGal. This pattern is different from that observed along most mid-ocean ridges, although it is similar to that found along the back-arc Lau spreading centers (e.g., Martinez and Taylor, Nature 2002). Values of Na8, Fe8, and 87Sr/86Sr for the ESR were obtained from the published literature (e.g., Leat et al., J. Petrol 2000; Fretzdorff et al., J. Petrol 2002). Segment-averaged values of Na8, Fe8, and 87Sr/86Sr, as well as ΔMBAdet, are significantly correlated with the distance from each segment center to the nearest subducting slab end (R-squared > 0.485). However, correlations of each of these four variables with both segment spreading rate

  18. Seismic evidence of spatially variable magmatic crustal accretion during the opening of the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prada, Manel; Sallarès, Valentí; Ranero, César R.; Vendrell, Montserrat G.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Zitellini, Nevio; de Franco, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The Tyrrhenian back-arc basin formed as a result of the migration of subduction fronts towards the East and Southeast during the Neogene time. The complex evolution of this subduction system caused differences concerning the degree of back-arc extension from North to South; while rifting affected the northern region, continental break-up occurred in the central and southern regions. Recent results obtained from integration of geological and modern geophysical data revealed the presence of a magmatically-modified crust beneath the Cornaglia and Campania Terraces followed by mantle exhumation beneath the Magnaghi and Vavilov basins, implying abrupt variations of magmatic crustal accretion in few kilometres. Here we present more evidences of this heterogeneous magmatic activity by analysing the crustal and uppermost mantle structure beneath the Cornaglia Terrace along three geophyisical cross-sections of the basin. Crustal structure and Moho geometry along each transect are constrained by a 2D P-wave velocity model obtained by joint refraction and reflection travel-time tomography, a coincident Multichannel Seismic image and the corresponding P-wave velocity-derived gravity modelling. From North to South of the Cornaglia Terrace, mean lower crustal velocity increases from the northern region (6.4-6.7 km/s) to the central part (6.8-6.9 km/s), and drastically decreases southwards (5.9-6.1 km/s). Along-axis lower crustal velocity variations are in accordance with variations in the degree of crustal extension. While in the northern and southern regions the crust thins up to 7-8 km thick, in the central part extension leads to crustal break up and later mantle exhumation. Based on these results and on an exhaustive velocity analysis, we suggest that these variations reveal a different degree of magmatism along the terrace axis. The highest magmatic activity is focused beneath the central and most extended region of the terrace, whereas it is less important in the northern

  19. Evolution of eclogite facies metamorphism in the St. Cyr klippe, Yukon-Tanana terrane, Yukon, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Meredith Blair

    The St. Cyr klippe hosts well preserved to variably retrogressed eclogites found as sub-meter to hundreds of meter scale lenses within quartzofeldspathic schists in the Yukon-Tanana terrane, Canadian Cordillera. The St. Cyr area consists of structurally imbricated, polydeformed, and polymetamorphosed units of continental arc and oceanic crust. The eclogite-bearing quartzofeldspathic schists form a 30 by 6 kilometer thick, northwest-striking, coherent package. The schists consist of metasediments and felsic intrusives that are intercalated on the tens of meter scale. The presence of phengite and Permian age zircon crystallized under eclogite facies metamorphic conditions indicates that the eclogite was metamorphosed in situ with its quartzofeldspathic host. I investigated the metamorphic evolution of the eclogite-facies rocks in the St. Cyr klippe using isochemical phase equilibrium thermodynamic (pseudosection) modeling. I constructed P-T pseudosections in the system Na2O-K2O-CaO-FeO-O2-MnO-MgO-Al2O 3-SiO2-TiO2-H2O for the bulk-rock composition of an eclogite and a host metatonalite. In combination with petrology and mineral compositions, St. Cyr eclogites followed a five-stage clockwise P-T path. Peak pressure conditions for the eclogites and metatonalites reached up to 3.2 GPa, well within the coesite stability field, indicating the eclogites reached ultrahigh-pressure conditions. Decompression during exhumation occurred with a corresponding temperature increase. SHRIMP-RG zircon dating shows that the protolith of the eclogites formed within the Yukon-Tanana terrane during early, continental arc activity, between 364 and 380 Ma, while the metatonalite protolith formed at approximately 334 Ma, during the Little Salmon Cycle of the Klinkit phase of Yukon-Tanana arc activity. Both the eclogites and the metatonalites were then subducted to mantle depths and metamorphosed to ultrahigh-pressure conditions during the late Permian, between 266 and 271 Ma. The results of

  20. Accretion of southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data from southern Alaska indicate that the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes collided with central Alaska probably by 65 Ma ago and certainly no later than 55 Ma ago. The accretion of these terranes to the mainland was followed by the arrival of the Ghost Rocks volcanic assemblage at the southern margin of Kodiak Island. Poleward movement of these terranes can be explained by rapid motion of the Kula oceanic plate, mainly from 85 to 43 Ma ago, according to recent reconstructions derived from the hot-spot reference frame. After accretion, much of southwestern Alaska underwent a counterclockwise rotation of about 50 ?? as indicated by paleomagnetic poles from volcanic rocks of Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary age. Compression between North America and Asia during opening of the North Atlantic (68-44 Ma ago) may account for the rotation. ?? 1987.

  1. The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Paleoproterozoic Green Mountain arc: A composite(?), bimodal, oceanic, fringing arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.S.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    The inferred subduction affinity of the ~1780-Ma Green Mountain arc, a dominantly bimodal igneous terrane (together with immature marine and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks) accreted to the southern margin of the Wyoming province, is integral to arc-accretion models of the Paleoproterozoic growth of southern Laurentia. Conversely, the dominantly bimodal nature of many putative arc-related igneous suites throughout southern Laurentia, including the Green Mountain arc, has also been used to support models of growth by extension of pre-existing crust. We report new geochemical and isotopic data from ~1780-Ma gabbroic and granodioritic to tonalitic rocks of the Big Creek Gneiss, interpreted as consanguineous with previously studied metavolcanic rocks of the Green Mountain Formation.The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss mafic rocks show clear geochemical signatures of a subduction origin and provide no supporting evidence for extensional tectonism. The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss felsic rocks are attributed to partial melting of mafic and/or mixed lower-crustal material. The bimodal nature of the suite results from the combination of arc basalts and felsic crustal melts. The lack of andesite is consistent with the observed tholeiitic differentiation trend of the mafic magmas. The lower e{open}Nd(1780Ma) values for the felsic rocks vs. the mafic rocks suggest that the unexposed lower crust of the arc may be older than the arc and that Trans-Hudson- or Penokean-aged rocks possibly form the substratum of the arc. Our results reinforce previous interpretations that arc-related magmatism played a key role in the Paleoproterozoic crustal growth of southern Laurentia, but also support the possibility of unexposed older crust as basement to the arcs. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Timing of igneous accretion, composition, and temporal relation of the Kassandra-Sithonia rift-spreading center within the eastern Vardar suture zone, Northern Greece: insights into Jurassic arc/back-arc systems evolution at the Eurasian plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, Nikolay; Marchev, Peter; Moritz, Robert; Filipov, Petyo

    2015-10-01

    In the Hellenides of northern Greece, the Kassandra-Sithonia and Central Chalkidiki ophiolites constitute the Vardar suture zone against the Serbo-Macedonian margin of Eurasia. The mafic-intermediate to acid members in the crustal section of the Kassandra-Sithonia ophiolites have N- and E-MORB signatures compatible with an origin in a back-arc spreading center. The MORB mantle source has received subduction zone input from the nearby Paikon arc system as revealed by LILE and LREE enrichments. A diorite from the Gerakini complex presumably belonging to the Central Chalkidiki ophiolites shows more enriched HFSE and REE patterns relative to MORB and Na-rich character compared to the Kassandra-Sithonia ophiolites. The Sithonia ophiolite crystallization spans from 159 to 149 Ma, and the Gerakini complex diorite crystallized at 173 Ma as derived from new U-Pb zircon geochronology. The main cluster of Permo-Carboniferous, a small cluster of Neoproterozoic-Cambrian and few Proterozoic, Ordovician, Devonian, Triassic and Middle Jurassic inherited zircons derive from the Serbo-Macedonian margin units. Thus, a Late Jurassic ca. 10 Ma lasting igneous accretion of the Kassandra-Sithonia back-arc crust within the eastern Vardar zone is now well constrained and corroborated by Berriasian-Early Valanginian supra-ophiolite cover limestones. Instead of an affinity to the Central Chalkidiki ophiolites, the Gerakini diorite exhibits chemical similarity to the Chortiatis arc magmatic suite of the Circum-Rhodope belt within the eastern Vardar zone. The Gerakini diorite predates the Sithonia ophiolite in which the Chortiatis arc suite supplied Middle Jurassic inherited zircons. The Chortiatis arc compared with arc-related Evros ophiolites of the Circum-Rhodope belt in Thrace region shows the same 173-160 Ma life span and tectonic setting, implying the extension of the arc systems across the north Aegean Sea. Based on these new temporal constraints, a tectonic scenario of Jurassic

  3. Peninsular terrane basement ages recorded by Paleozoic and Paleoproterozoic zircon in gabbro xenoliths and andesite from Redoubt volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Historically Sactive Redoubt volcano is an Aleutian arc basalt-to-dacite cone constructed upon the Jurassic–Early Tertiary Alaska–Aleutian Range batholith. The batholith intrudes the Peninsular tectonostratigraphic terrane, which is considered to have developed on oceanic basement and to have accreted to North America, possibly in Late Jurassic time. Xenoliths in Redoubt magmas have been thought to be modern cumulate gabbros and fragments of the batholith. However, new sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb ages for zircon from gabbro xenoliths from a late Pleistocene pyroclastic deposit are dominated by much older, ca. 310 Ma Pennsylvanian and ca. 1865 Ma Paleoproterozoic grains. Zircon age distributions and trace-element concentrations indicate that the ca. 310 Ma zircons date gabbroic intrusive rocks, and the ca. 1865 Ma zircons also are likely from igneous rocks in or beneath Peninsular terrane basement. The trace-element data imply that four of five Cretaceous–Paleocene zircons, and Pennsylvanian low-U, low-Th zircons in one sample, grew from metamorphic or hydrothermal fluids. Textural evidence of xenocrysts and a dominant population of ca. 1865 Ma zircon in juvenile crystal-rich andesite from the same pyroclastic deposit show that this basement has been assimilated by Redoubt magma. Equilibration temperatures and oxygen fugacities indicated by Fe-Ti–oxide minerals in the gabbros and crystal-rich andesite suggest sources near the margins of the Redoubt magmatic system, most likely in the magma accumulation and storage region currently outlined by seismicity and magma petrology at ∼4–10 km below sea level. Additionally, a partially melted gabbro from the 1990 eruption contains zircon with U-Pb ages between ca. 620 Ma and ca. 1705 Ma, as well as one zircon with a U-Th disequilibrium model age of 0 ka. The zircon ages demonstrate that Pennsylvanian, and probably Paleoproterozoic, igneous rocks exist in, or possibly beneath, Peninsular

  4. The Sikhote-Alin orogenic belt, Russian South East: Terranes and the formation of continental lithosphere based on geological and isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanchuk, A. I.; Kemkin, I. V.; Kruk, N. N.

    2016-04-01

    The Sikhote-Alin orogenic belt, Russian South East, consists of folded terranes made up of Jurassic and Early Cretaceous accretionary prisms, turbidite basins, and island arc terranes that are overlapped unconformably by undeformed upper Cenomanian to Cenozoic volcanic deposits. The Jurassic and Early Cretaceous accretionary prisms, together with the Early Cretaceous island arc, are related to subduction of the Paleo-Pacific plate. The turbidite basin, which began to form at the beginning of the Early Cretaceous, is related to left-lateral movement of the Paleo-Pacific plate along the Paleo-Asian continental margin. The collage of terranes that make up the Sikhote-Alin orogenic belt was amalgamated in two stages. The first began after Jurassic subduction beneath the Asian continent was terminated, and the second took place in the late Albian, when the Early Cretaceous island arc collided with the continental margin. Intense deformation of the terranes took place along the continental margin in the form of large-scale translations from south to north, together with oroclinal folding. The deformation resulted in rapid thickening of sediments in the upper crust, resulting in turn in the formation of granitic-metamorphic material in the continental lithosphere. In the southwestern part of the Sikhote-Alin orogen, granites were intruded during the Hauterivian-Aptian, while the entire orogenic belt was affected by intrusions in the late Albian-early Cenomanian. Synorogenic intraplate volcanic rocks and alkaline ultramafic-mafic intrusions also testify to the fact that the orogenic processes in the Sikhote-Alin were related to a transform continental margin, and not to subduction. Geochemical and Nd isotopic data indicate, the primary continental crust of the Sikhote-Alin was of a "hybrid" nature, consisting of juvenile basic components accreted from an oceanic plate and recycled sedimentary material derived from the erosion of ancient blocks.

  5. Circum-North Pacific tectonostratigraphic terrane map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Monger, James W.H.; Baranov, Boris B.; Byalobzhesky, Stanislav G.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.; Feeney, Tracey D.; Fujita, Kazuya; Gordey, Steven P.; Grantz, Arthur; Khanchuk, Alexander I.; Natal'in, Boris A.; Natapov, Lev M.; Norton, Ian O.; Patton, William W., Jr.; Plafker, George; Scholl, David W.; Sokolov, Sergei D.; Sosunov, Gleb M.; Stone, David B.; Tabor, Rowland W.; Tsukanov, Nickolai V.; Vallier, Tracy L.; Wakita, Koji

    1994-01-01

    after accretion of most terranes in the region; (2) Cenozoic and Mesozoic basinal deposits that occur within a terrane or on the craton; (3) plutonic rocks. The postaccretion igneous units are identified by age-lithologic abbreviations and by name. These overlap assemblages and basinal deposits formed mainly during sedimentation and magmatism that occurred after accretion of terranes to each other or to a continental margin. Overlap assemblages provide minimum ages on the timing of accretion of terranes. Some Cenozoic and Mesozoic overlap assemblages and basinal deposits, as well as fragments of terranes, are extensively offset by movement along postaccretion faults. In addition, in onshore areas, the map depicts major preaccretion plutonic rocks that are limited to individual terranes. and in offshore areas. the map depicts major oceanic plates,-ocean floor magnetic lineations. oceanic spreading ridges, and seamounts. The map consists of five sheets. Sheets I and 2 depict, at a scale of I :5.000.000. the tectonostratigraphic terranes. preaccretion plutonic rocks, and postaccretion Cenozoic and Mesozoic overlap sedimentary, volcanic. and plutonic assemblages, and basinal deposits for the Circum- orth Pacific including the Russian Far East, northern Hokkaido Island of Japan, Alaska. the Canadian Cordillera, part of the U.S.A. Pacific Northwest. and adjacent offshore areas. Sheet 3 provides the list of map units for Sheets I and 2. Sheet 4 is a index map showing generalized onshore terranes and overlap assemblages for onshore parts of the Circum-North Pacific at a scale of I: I 0,000,000. Sheet 4 is a guide to the more complicated onshore features depicted on Sheets I and 2. Sheet 5 is an index map showing the major geographic regions for the Circum-North Pacific. Significant differences exist between the representation of onshore and offshore geology on Sheets I and 2. These are: (I) compared to the onshore part of the map, the offshore part is depicted in a more

  6. Ophiolitic terranes of northern and central Alaska and their correlatives in Canada and northeastern Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, W.W. Jr. )

    1993-04-01

    All of the major ophiolitic terranes (Angayucham, Tozitna, Innoko, Seventymile, and Goodnews terranes) in the northern and central Alaska belong to the Tethyan-type' of Moores (1982) and were obducted onto Paleozoic and Proterozoic continental and continental margin terranes in Mesozoic time. Tethyan-type' ophiolitic assemblages also occur in the Slide Mountain terrane in the Canadian Cordillera and extend from western Alaska into northeastern Russia. Although investigators have suggested widely different ages from their times of abduction onto the continent, these ophiolitic terranes display some remarkably similar features: (1) they consist of a stack of imbricated thrust slices dominated by ocean floor sediments, basalt, and high-level gabbro of late Paleozoic and Triassic age; (2) their mafic-ultramafic complexes generally are confined to the uppermost thrust sheets; (3) they lack the large tectonic melanges zones and younger accretionary flysch deposits associated with the ophiolitic terranes of southern Alaska and the Koryak region of northeastern Russia; (4) blueschist mineral assemblages occur in the lower part of these ophiolite terranes and (or) in the underlying continental terranes; and (5) they are bordered on their outboard' side by Mesozoic intraoceanic volcanic arc terranes. Recent geochemical and geologic studies of the mafic-ultramafic complexes in the Anagayucham and Tozitna terranes strongly suggest they were generated in a supra-subduction zone (SSZ) and that they are directly overlain by volcanic rocks of the Koyukuk terrane.

  7. Character, distribution, and tectonic significance of accretionary terranes in the Central Alaska Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David L.; Silberling, N. J.; Gilbert, Wyatt; Coney, Peter

    1982-05-01

    The central part of the Alaska Range near Mount McKinley is composed of nine separate tectonostratigraphic terranes that were accreted in southern Alaska during late Mesozoic time. These terranes now form long, linear, fault-bounded belts that are subparallel to the Denali fault on the north but oblique to the fault on the south. The postaccretion right lateral offset along the Denali fault system is about 200 km. From north to south the major terranes are (1) Yukon-Tanana terrane, metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks, mostly undated, but including rocks of known late Paleozoic age; polymetamorphosed with terminal events in late Mesozoic, (2) Pingston terrane, isoclinally folded Upper Triassic deep-water silty limestone, quartzite, and carbonaceous slate, folded with upper Paleozoic phyllite, chert, tuff, and minor limestone, (3) McKinley terrane, upper Paleozoic flysch, chert, and minor limestone, intruded by large gabbro sills and dikes and overlain by thick piles of Triassic porphyritic pillow lava; the top of the section is thick sequence of upper Mesozoic conglomerate, flysch, chert, and phyllite, (4) Dillinger terrane, very thick sequence of strongly folded lower Paleozoic micaceous sandstone (turbidites), graptolitic shale, and deep-water limestone, locally overlain unconformably by Jurassic fossiliferous sandstone or Triassic (?) pillow basalt, (5) Windy terrane, heterogeneous assemblage of serpentinite, basalt, tuff, and chert (= ophiolite?) with Paleozoic and Mesozoic flysch and blocks of mid-Paleozoic fossiliferous limestone, (6) Mystic terrane, predominantly upper Paleozoic flysch and conglomerate, but also includes lower Paleozoic graptolitic shale, pillow basalt, and shallow-water limestone, and upper Paleozoic fossiliferous limestone, sandstone, chert, and undated pillow basalt, (7) Chulitna terrane, Upper Devonian ophiolite overlain by upper Paleozoic chert, volcanic conglomerate, limestone, and flysch, capped by Lower Triassic limestone and Upper

  8. Accretion, subduction, and underplating along the southern Alaska continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Plafker, G.; Ambos, E.L.; Fuis, G.S.; Mooney, W.D.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Campbell, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    In 1984-1985 the Trans Alaska Crustal Transect (TACT) program completed geologic, seismic refraction, gravity, and magnetic studies along a 350-km-long corridor that extends northward from the Gulf of Alaska coast near Cordova to the Denali fault at the Richardson Highway. From south to north, this segment of the transect traverses: 1) part of the Prince William terrance (PWT), composed of an accreted Paleocene and Eocene deep-sea fan complex, oceanic volcanic rocks, and pelagic sediments; 2) the Chugach terrane (CGT) composed of a) accreted Late Cretaceous flysch and oceanic basaltic rocks, b) accreted and subducted (.) Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous sheared melange, and c) subducted Early (.) Jurassic or older blueschist/greenschist; and 3) Wrangellia-Peninsular terranes (WRT/PET) consisting primarily of late Paleozoic intraoceanic andesitic arc rocks with associated mafic and ultramafic plutonic rocks, an overlying distinctive Triassic sedimentary and volcanic sequence, and superposed intrusive and extrusive magmatic rocks of the Jurassic Talkeetna arc. At the southern margin of both the CGT and WRT/PET, shallow high-velocity zones characterized by positive gravity and magnetic anomalies reflect uplift of mafic and ultramafic basement along these thrusts. The Contact and Border Ranges fault systems appear to merge into a subhorizontal low-velocity zone of uncertain origin that underlies the CGT and southern WRT/PET at 5-9 km depth. A few kilometers beneath the shallow low-velocity zone in a 30-km-thick stack of eight northward-dipping layers of alternating high and low velocity, interpreted as subducted and underplated mantle and oceanic crust rocks. Distribution of earthquake hypocenters suggests that active subduction involves at least the lowest two and possibly the lower four layers.

  9. Application of cladistics to terrane history—parsimony analysis of qualitative geological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Gavin C.

    Hypotheses of terrane dispersal or accretion can be represented graphically as branching diagrams (cladograms), but an assessment of competing hypotheses of terrane history requires a method of analysis of supporting evidence which resolves the most parsimonious explanation of all available data. Cladistics is a rigorous analytical method first developed for phylogeny reconstruction (i.e. biological history), but applicable to any hierarchical data set. Given appropriate definitions, the various types of geological, geophysical and biological data used to support hypotheses of fragmentation or fusion history for geological regions (terranes) assumed to have had independent geological histories can be organized hierarchically. Terrane fragmentation is equivalent to phylogenetic splitting of biological taxa, and standard algorithms for parsimony analysis may be directly applied. Terrane accretion may be represented as a coalescing area cladogram, and the supporting evidence also forms a hierarchical data set, but with two main differences. The less general attributes historically precede the more general (the reverse applies in phylogeny reconstruction), and the branching points (nodes on the cladogram), unlike hypothetical common ancestors in phylogeny reconstruction, represent defined geographic areas, with a geological structure which can be investigated. In cladistic reconstruction of evolutionary history the common ancestors are hypothetical, and their attributes can only be inferred from the distribution of attributes amongst the terminals (known biological taxa); in contrast, the end product of terrane accretion is a composite structure (geological province) within which juxtaposition of terranes may eliminate some of the possible historical sequences which led to its formation.

  10. The Wisconsin magmatic terrane: An Early Proterozoic greenstone-granite terrane formed by plate tectonic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, K. J.; Laberge, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Wisconsin magmatic terrane (WMT) is an east trending belt of dominantly volcanic-plutonic complexes of Early Proterozoic age (approx. 1850 m.y.) that lies to the south of the Archean rocks and Early Proterozoic epicratonic sequence (Marquette Range Supergroup) in Michigan. It is separated from the epicratonic Marquette Range Supergroup by the high-angle Niagara fault, is bounded on the south, in central Wisconsin, by Archean gneisses, is truncated on the west by rocks of the Midcontinent rift system, and is intruded on the east by the post-orogenic Wolf river batholith. The overall lithologic, geochemical, metallogenic, metamorphic, and deformational characteristics of the WMT are similar to those observed in recent volcanic arc terranes formed at sites of plate convergence. It is concluded that the WMT represents an evolved oceanic island-arc terrane accreated to the Superior craton in the Early Proterozoic. This conclusion is strengthened by the apparent absence of Archean basement from most of the WMT, and the recent recognition of the passive margin character of the epicratonic Marquette Range Supergroup.

  11. Southeastern Alaska tectonostratigraphic terranes revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Brew, D.A.; Ford, A.B.

    1985-04-01

    The presence of only three major tectonostratigraphic terranes (TSTs) in southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia (Chugach, Wrangell, and Alexander) is indicated by critical analysis of available age, stratigraphic, and structural data. A possible fourth TST (Stikine) is probably an equivalent of part or all of the Alexander. The Yakutat block belongs to the Chugach TST, and both are closely linked to the Wrangell and Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs; the Gravina TST is an overlap assemblage. THe Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs is subdivided on the basis of age and facies. The subterranes within it share common substrates and represent large-scale facies changes in a long-lived island-arc environment. The Taku TSTs is the metamorphic equivalent of the upper part (Permian and Upper Triassic) of the Alexander(-Stikine) TSTs with some fossil evidence preserved that indicates the age of protoliths. Similarly, the Tracy Arm TST is the metamorphic equivalent of (1) the lower (Ordovician to Carboniferous) Alexander TST without any such fossil evidence and (2) the upper (Permian to Triassic) Alexander(-Stikine) with some newly discovered fossil evidence. Evidence for the ages of juxtaposition of the TSTs is limited. The Chugach TST deformed against the Wrangell and Alexander TSTs in late Cretaceous. Gravina rocks were deformed at the time and also earlier. The Wrangell TST was stitched to the Alexander(-Stikine) by middle Cretaceous plutons but may have arrived before its Late Jurassic plutons were emplaced. The Alexander(-Stikine) and Cache Creek TSTs were juxtaposed before Late Triassic.

  12. Central Appalachian Exotic Terranes and Exposures of Former Orogenic Middle Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    In the northern and southern Appalachians, rocks that formed Paleozoic orogenic middle crust mostly are exposed within or directly inboard of terranes that originated near Gondwana. Most outcrops of the Paleozoic orogenic middle crust of the eastern edge of Laurentia occur adjacent to these exotic terranes. However, a narrow belt of Paleozoic orogenic middle crust is exposed in the Piedmont of the central Appalachians despite the absence of recognized exotic terranes. The presence of these deformed, amphibolite facies rocks raises the questions: "Did central Appalachian orogeny occur in the absence of accreted exotic terranes?" and, more generally, "Is exotic terrane collision required for exhumation of Appalachian former middle crust?" Previous U/Pb isotopic dating of spots in detrital zircon revealed the presence of Gondwanan terranes in three locations in the central Appalachians: central Virginia, central Maryland, and southeastern Pennsylvania. Two new samples collected near the discovery locations in Virginia and Maryland yielded prominent peaks in zircon U/Pb age distributions at ca. 630-610 Ma, confirming the Gondwanan affinity of these rocks. Hf isotopic compositions of spots in these upper Neoproterozoic zircon grains range to both more and less depleted than spots in zircon from the few possible Laurentian granitic sources, consistent with derivation of the zircon from Gondwana. Abundant 1700-1000 Ma detrital zircon rules out the West Africa Craton as a potential source; Amazonia is the most likely ultimate source of the zircon. The extent of the exotic terrane(s) in the central Appalachian Piedmont remains enigmatic due to uncertain connections between isolated exposures of the terrane(s). Nevertheless, the discovery of one or more exotic terranes in the central Appalachian Piedmont underscores the relationship between exotic terranes and exposed former middle crust in the Appalachians. This relationship may be a feature of several other major

  13. Scaphopoda from the Alexander Terrane, Southeast Alaska-The first occurrence of Scaphopoda in the Silurian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, D.M.; Blodgett, R.B.; Baichtal, J.

    2006-01-01

    The scaphopods Dentalium hecetaensis n. sp. and Rhytiodentalium cf. kentuckyensis Pojeta et Runnegar, 1979, are described from Ludlow-age strata of the Heceta Limestone on Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska. This is the first occurrence of Silurian scaphopods known to date. They are part of a diverse macrobenthic fauna of the Alexander terrane, an accreted southern Alaskan terrane of Siberian or Uralian affinities. ?? 2006 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS.

  14. From intra-oceanic subduction to arc accretion and arc-continent collision: Insights from the structural evolution of the Río San Juan metamorphic complex, northern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Valverde-Vaquero, Pablo; Rojas-Agramonte, Yamirka; Jabites, Janet; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The Río San Juan metamorphic complex exposes a segment of a high-pressure subduction-accretionary complex built during Caribbean island arc-North America continental margin convergence. It is composed of accreted arc- and oceanic-derived metaigneous rocks, serpentinized peridotites and minor metasediments forming a structural pile. Combined detailed mapping, structural and metamorphic analysis, and geochronology show that the deformation can be divided into five main events (D1-D5). An early subduction-related D1 deformation and M1 metamorphism produced greenschist (mafic rocks of the Gaspar Hernández peridotite-tectonite), blueschist and eclogite (metamafic blocks in the Jagua Clara mélange), high-P epidote-amphibolite and eclogite (Cuaba unit), and lower blueschist and greenschist-facies conditions (Morrito unit). This was followed by M2 decompression and cooling in the blueschist, greenschist and low-P amphibolite-facies conditions. The shape of the retrograde P-T path, the age of the exhumation-related D2 structures, and the tectonic significance of D2 deformation are different in each structural unit. Published U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages and T-t/P-t estimations reveal diachronic Turonian-Coniacian to Maastrichtian retrograde M2 metamorphism in the different structural units of the complex, during a consistent D2 top-to-the-NE/ENE tectonic transport. Regionally, a similar top-to-the-ENE tectonic transport also took place in the metasedimentary nappes of the Samaná complex during the Eocene to earliest Miocene. This kinematic compatibility indicates a general northeastward progradation of deformation in the northern Caribbean convergent margin, as the successive tectonic incorporation of arc, oceanic and continental-derived terrains to the developing Caribbean subduction-accretionary complex took place. D3-D5 deformations are discontinuous and much less penetrative, recording the evolution from ductile to brittle conditions of deformation in the complex

  15. Tectonic evolution of the East Junggar terrane, CAOB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xing-Wang

    2016-04-01

    The East Junggar terrane is one of the important tectonic units of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB; Zonenshain et al., 1990). Debate surrounds the tectonics of the East Junggar area, including tectonic setting, age, basement nature, subduction polarity and collisional time between the East Junggar terrane and Junggar block (e.g., Xiao et al., 2008, 2011; Long et al., 2012; Huang et al., 2012). Among the two popular models, one suggests that the Junggar is a continental block (e.g. Zhang et al., 1984, 1993; Watson et al., 1987; Xiao et al., 1992; He et al., 1994; Li et al., 2000; Charvet et al., 2001, 2007; Xu et al., 2003; Zhao et al., 2003; Buslov et al., 2004; Xu and Ma, 2004; Dong et al., 2009; Bazhenov et al., 2012; Choulet et al., 2012; Zhang et al., 2012). The other model proposes that the Junggar has a basement of Paleozoic oceanic crust (e.g., Carroll et al., 1990; Zheng et al., 2007) or oceanic island arc complexes (e.g., Coleman, 1989; Chen and Jahn, 2004; Windley et al., 2007) of the Altaid Paleozoic rocks (e.g., Sengör et al., 1993; Sengör and Natal'in, 1996; Allen and Vincent, 1997; Filippova et al., 2001; Xiao et al., 2004a, 2004b, 2008, 2009, 2010a, 2010b, 2012). The tectonics in the Eastern Junggar area are interpreted to be related to late Paleozoic intra-oceanic accretion induced by northward subduction of the Junggar oceanic lithosphere (e.g. Xiao et al., 2008, 2009; Biske and Seltmann, 2010; Wan et al., 2011; Yang et al., 2011) or by the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic lithosphere (Zhang et al., 2004; Wong et al., 2010; Su et al., 2012). Recently, we did detailed field survey and petrological, geochemical and chronological analysis of the metamorphosed volcanic rocks and magmatic rocks, and new discovered gneiss and magnetite quartzite enclaves from the Taheir tectonic window in the East Junggar region which is situated between the Zaisan-Erqis-the Main Mongolian Lineament-suture and the Kelameili suture. The new results

  16. Gondwanan/peri-Gondwanan origin for the Uchee terrane, Alabama and georgia: Carolina zone or Suwannee terrane(?) and its suture with Grenvillian basement of the Pine Mountain window

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steltenpohl, M.G.; Mueller, P.M.; Heatherington, A.L.; Hanley, T.B.; Wooden, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Taconian) has been reported. This younger history, together with the ages of metaigneous rocks and evidence for pre-Grenville basement, suggests the Uchee terrane is likely of Gondwanan origin and may he related to Carolina zone terranes that accreted during the Alleghanian orogeny. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  17. Geochemistry and U-Pb zircon ages of plutonic rocks from the Algodões granite-greenstone terrane, Troia Massif, northern Borborema Province, Brazil: Implications for Paleoproterozoic subduction-accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Felipe Grandjean da; Palheta, Edney Smith de Moraes; Rodrigues, Joseneusa Brilhante; Gomes, Iaponira Paiva; Vasconcelos, Antonio Maurilio

    2015-04-01

    The Algodões metavolcano-sedimentary sequence is located at the northern margin of the Archean/Paleoproterozoic Troia Massif, northern Borborema Province (NE Brazil). It represents a well-preserved Paleoproterozoic greenstone-like sequence affected by two major plutonic events. The early plutonism, represented by the Cipó orthogneisses, mainly comprises biotite-bearing metatonalites, which share similar geochemical signatures with Archean tonalite-trondjhemite-granodiorite (TTG). For these rocks, we report U-Pb (LA-ICPMS) zircon ages of 2189 ± 14 Ma and 2180 ± 15 Ma. A subsequent plutonic magmatism occurred at ˜2150-2130 Ma and is mainly represented by hornblende-bearing dioritic to tonalitic orthogneisses of the Madalena Suite and São José da Macaoca Complex. Geochemical data indicate that these dioritic/tonalitic orthogneisses have adakitic characteristics and strongly suggest mantle-related magmas. A (sensu stricto) granite plutonism (Serra da Palha orthogneisses) also intruded the Algodões sequence and yielded U-Pb (LA-ICPMS) zircon age of 2150 ± 16 Ma. These granitic orthogneisses show high-K content, A-type characteristics and probably derived from partial melting of a crustal (tonalitic) source. We suggest that the early ˜2190-2160 Ma TTG plutons probably developed in intra-oceanic arc setting, whereas the following ˜2150-2130 Ma adakitic plutons and A-type granitic magmatism developed in response to arc-continent collision.

  18. Origin and pre-Cenozoic evolution of the Qiangtang terrane basement, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongbao; Bons, Paul D.; Wang, Genhou

    2013-04-01

    Central Tibet, with its high-pressure rocks, is a key area to unravel the evolution of the Proto-, Paleo- and Meso-Tethys. However, due to its remoteness and difficult field conditions, relative little is known of the area. Here we present new evidence on the Paleozoic and Mesozoic evolution of the Qiangtang Terrane, located between the Jinsha suture zone in the north and Banggong-Nujiang suture zone in the south. A >500-km-long east-west trending high-pressure metamorphic belt divides the Qiangtang Terrane into the North Qiangtang Terrane and the South Qiangtang terrane. Different hypotheses have been proposed for the origin and pre-Cenozoic evolution of the Qiangtang Terrane. In the Central Qiangtang Terrane, an unconformity with basal conglomerate separates the basement from overlying middle Ordovician strata. Based on structural analysis of basement and cover units, detailed geochronology (including detrital and magmatic zircons) and comparison with surrounding micro-plates (such as Lhasa Terrane, Himalaya Terrane and Southern China Terrane) we conclude that the basement of the Qiangtang Terrane was connected with Gondwana as a passive margin of the Proto-Tethys during the Early Paleozoic. The occurrence of Late Triassic eclogite and glaucophane-bearing schists in the Central Qiangtang Terrane indicates the existence of a suture zone between the North and South Qiangtang Terrane before the Late Triassic (Liu et al., 2011). This suture zone resulted from closure of the Palaeo-Tethys between the two terranes and obduction of the melange onto the basement of South Qiangtang before 210 Ma. ~275 Ma E-W oriented dyke swarms in the north of the South Qiangtang Terrane indicate opening of the Palaeo-Tethys in a back-arc setting between the North and South Qiangtang Terrane, during roll-back retreat of the Proto-Tethys further north. Late Permian to Early Triassic subduction related volcanism and the 236-219 Ma adakitic volcanic series are related to southward

  19. Oblique collision and accretion of the Netherlands Leeward Antilles island arc: A structural analysis of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Amanda Gail

    2007-12-01

    The Netherlands Leeward Antilles volcanic island arc is an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. The Leeward Antilles islands (Aruba, Curacao, and Bonaire) are located offshore western Venezuela, within the obliquely convergent diffuse plate boundary zone. Outcrop analysis, microthermometry, and 2D marine seismic reflection data provide evidence of three generations of regional deformation since the Late Cretaceous. Outcrop analysis of structural features, including faults, joints, and veins, characterizes the kinematic history of the islands. Fluid inclusion analysis of quartz and calcite veins coupled with apatite fission-track dating provides the island exhumation history. Finally, marine reflection seismic data processing and interpretation of newly acquired data elucidates offshore structures to integrate with our onshore results. The oldest regional deformation, resulting in both ductile (D1) and brittle (F 1) structures, is attributed to displacement partitioning along the arcuate Caribbean plate boundary. Associated crustal thinning initiated island exhumation, at a rate of 0.18 km/my, from a maximum burial depth of 6 km in the Late Cretaceous (˜89 Ma). Coeval with D1/F1 deformation and exhumation, stretching of the island arc resulted in extensive basin rifting that separated the island blocks. At ˜55 Ma, a change in the relative motion of the Caribbean plate altered plate boundary dynamics. Displacement along the right-lateral Caribbean transform fault and Oca - San Sebastian - El Pilar strike-slip fault system created a wrench tectonic regime within the diffuse plate boundary zone. A second generation of brittle structures (F2) developed while the islands were at a maximum burial depth of 2 km during the Paleocene/Eocene. Since ˜45 Ma, continued motion along the strike-slip fault systems and oblique plate convergence resulted in the youngest generation of structural features (F3). Regional

  20. Paleomagnetic data from Alaska: reliability, interpretation and terrane trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbert, William

    1990-11-01

    Virtually the entire body of paleomagnetic data collected from southern Alaska depicts a clear decrease in paleolatitude with increasing age, strongly suggesting that southern Alaska represents a displaced terrane. In this paper, paleomagnetic studies from southern Alaska have been classified with respect to a Quality Index that is based on four criteria. These criteria are the presence of both polarities of magnetic remanence, stepwise thermal or alternating field demagnetization of specimens, principal component analysis of demagnetization data, and a successful fold test. Of the 51 studies compiled, only four from southern Alaska and one from western Canada are demonstrated to satisfy all criteria and fall therefore in the category of Group 3, ("highly reliable"). Two studies from southern Alaska satisfy three of the four criteria, lacking both polarities of characteristic remanence, and are judged to be of Group 2 ("reliable"). Two of these paleomagnetic studies constrain the accretion time of the southern Alaska terrane to the relatively stationary region of central Alaska north of the Denali fault. Four paleomagnetic studies from the southern Alaska terrane show a distinct paleolatitude anomaly when compared with their expected paleolatitudes from the North American apparent polar wander path. Using the model of Engebretson et al. (1984), a series of models are presented to best fit these highly reliable and reliable paleomagnetic studies. The model preferred in this article assumes an accretion time with North America of 50 Ma, and documents pre-50 Ma displacement of the southern Alaska terrane on the Kula plate. If the Ghost Rocks paleomagnetic magnetizations (Plumley et al., 1983) are assumed to be of earliest Tertiary age, this model fits all of the low paleolatitudes observed in southern Alaska. Models incorporating coastwise translation of the southern Alaska terrane along the western boundary of the North America plate and a 50 Ma suturing age of this

  1. From intra-oceanic subduction to arc accretion and oblique arc-continent collision: Insights from the P-T-D-t path of the southern Río San Juan metamorphic complex, northern Dominican Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, J.; Valverde-Vaquero, P.; Rojas-Agramonte, Y.; Gabites, J.; Pérez-Estaún, A.

    2012-04-01

    +zoisite-bearing felsic melts exhibit a positive Ce anomaly relative to chondrite, an overall flat HREE pattern, and no significant negative Eu anomaly, which provide evidence for zircon growth under eclogite facies conditions. Structural and sedimentary data confirm the existence of a regional, Late Oligocene to Miocene contractional event in the complex (D3), as well as two additional late brittle deformations (D4 and D5). The compilation of this pressure-temperature-deformation-time path supports that an early subduction-related D1 deformation and high-P M1 metamorphism, was followed by a D2 extensional shearing deformation and M2 retrograde decompression, at exhumation rates of 3-4 km/Ma. The dominant tectonic mechanism responsible for exhumation of high-P rocks in the Cuaba Unit was therefore the D2 extensional tectonics, which caused tectonic juxtaposition and local metamorphic pressure gaps within the structural pile. This P-T-D-t evolution indicates that the Cuaba Unit experienced initial subduction, subsequent underplating below the forearc wedge of an island-arc, and final exhumation in the accretionary prism. At the regional scale, the Cuaba unit could be a fragment of the proto-Pacific arc that collided and was accreted bellow the E-facing, intra-oceanic, Caribbean island-arc, prior to final oblique collision with the paleo-continental margin of North America.

  2. Kinematics of the mosquito terrane, Coldfoot Area, Alaska: Keys to Brooks Range tectonics: Final report, Project No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, T.A.; Coney, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    Within the large-scale geometry of the Brooks Range, the Angayucham terrane occurs as a vast overthrust sheet. From the north flank of the Ruby terrane it underlies the Koyukuk basin and stretches north as the roof thrust to the various nappe terranes of the Brooks Range. The tectonic relationship of the Ruby terrane to the south flank of the Brooks Range lies largely obscured beneath the Angayucham in the eastern apex of the Koyukuk basin. The Mosquito terrane occurs as a window through the Angayucham at this juncture. The composition and structures of the Mosquito terrane reveal that is the result of shear along a sub-horizontal step or flange within the prominent, through-going dextral strike-slip fault system which cuts across the eastern Koyukuk basin and southeastern Brooks Range. Units of the Mosquito were derived from both the Angayucham and Ruby terranes. A consistent tectonic fabric imposed upon them is kinematically linked to the strike-slip system and indicates a northeasterly direction of transport across the terrane. The presence of Ruby-correlative units within the Mosquito suggests the Ruby underlies the Angayucham and that it is in contact with terrances of the southern Brooks Range at that structural level along high-angle strike-slip faults. These relationships demonstrate that an episode of dextral transpression is the latest in the history of terrane accretion and tectonic evolution of the Brooks Range. 35 refs.

  3. Resolving rock exhumation versus surface uplift during arc-continent accretion on the island of Timor by integrating thermochronology and micropaleontology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, G. W.; McQuarrie, N.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J.; Bakker, R.; Reiners, P. W.; Willett, S.

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of the island of Timor is the result of active accretion of the Banda volcanic arc to the Australian continent. Since collision began in the latest Miocene, a mountain range over 2,900 m in elevation has been raised, much of the Indonesian throughflow linking the Pacific and Indian Oceans has been closed, and the final accretion stages of slab breakoff and subduction polarity reversal may have begun. New thermochronologic and micropaleontological data from Timor-Leste reveal a detailed history of both rock and surface uplift in the central portion of Timor Island. Micropaleontological data is taken from synorogenic basins in Viqueque near the southern coast and in Caiaco, 120 km to the west of Viqueque and farther to the hinterland. These data indicate surface uplift from lower bathyal depth between 5.5 and 4.4 Ma to upper-middle bathyal depth around 3.3 Ma. Uplift is further suggested by a facies change around 4.4 Ma from deep-marine chalk deposits to clay, turbiditic sandstone and debris flow deposits with fossil wood remains, showing nearby emergence. The data suggest a phase of uplift in these basins of up to 1.4 km in about 1 Myr with an uplift rate of about 1.4 mm/yr. Uplift rates since 3.3 Ma may have dropped to less than 0.2 mm/yr. In the central mountain belt between these synorogenics, thermochronologic data show that rapid exhumation was concurrent with and continued after the rapid surface uplift recorded in the basins. Along the northern coast of Timor, zircon (U-Th)/He ages are 4.4 Ma in the east (at Hilimanu) and young to about 1.5 Ma in the west (at Liquica and Ermera). Thermal models suggest exhumation that was possibly as fast as 6.4 mm/yr from as deep as 9 km. To the south and east of the higher grade zircon (U-Th)/He data, apatite (U-Th)/He ages indicate notably less exhumation. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages from the northern and southern foothills in the east (Manatuto district) vary from 3.5 to 5.5 Ma while ages cluster around 2.0 Ma in

  4. Laurentian and Baltican components of Terranes in NW Washington: Implications for Displacement of Paleozoic Terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schermer, E. R.; Brown, N.; Gehrels, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    New field, U-Pb, and Lu-Hf data constrain the geologic history, age, and origin of the Yellow Aster Complex (YAC) in NW Washington, and suggest that this Paleozoic arc terrane originated along the paleo-Arctic margin of NE Laurentia. Field work shows the oldest YAC consists of quartzo-feldspathic paragneiss (meta-arkosic sandstone + conglomerate) and quartzose calc-silicate gneiss (meta-calcareous siltstone) in gradational contact. Paragneisses are cut by syn- and post-tectonic intrusions, and faulted against granitic orthogneiss. U-Pb results show that 1) maximum depositional ages of paragneisses are Silurian to early Devonian (399 to 434 Ma); 2) quartzose calc-silicate gneisses show a broad age peak from 1000-1900 Ma, while quartzofeldspathic gneisses contain several distinct Precambrian age peaks, including at 1.8-2.0 Ga and 2.4-2.5 Ga; 3) Both gneisses contain early Paleozoic grains with peaks at ~400-420 and ~450-460 Ma; 4) pre-tectonic orthogneiss and syn- and post-tectonic dikes range from 410 to 398 Ma; 4) All intrusive rocks contain apparently xenocrystic ~450 Ma grains. Lu-Hf data show that nearly all Paleozoic grains have negative epsilon Hf values, and zircons in the meta-arkose samples are more highly evolved than those in the calc-silicate. Several meta-arkose samples yield epsilon Hf values of -40 to -50, which is rare in the North American Cordillera, and requires the involvement of Early Archean crustal components. The most likely source region is Greenland, which implies derivation from the paleo-Arctic margin of northeastern Laurentia or Baltica. The chemistry and petrology of the igneous rocks suggest the terrane was in a continental arc setting during or very shortly after deposition of the sedimentary rocks. The data suggest that sedimentation, deformation, metamorphism, and magmatism all occurred within a brief (~15 m.y.) period in the early Devonian. These relationships suggest a Caledonian origin for YAC prior to translation to the

  5. Accretion tectonics and crustal structure in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coney, P.J.; Jones, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The entire width of the North American Cordillera in Alaska is made up of "suspect terranes". Pre-Late Cretaceous paleogeography is poorly constrained and the ultimate origins of the many fragments which make up the state are unclear. The Prince William and Chugach terranes accreted since Late Cretaceous time and represent the collapse of much of the northeast Pacific Ocean swept into what today is southern Alaska. Greater Wrangellia, a composite terrane now dispersed into fragments scattered from Idaho to southern Alaska, apparently accreted into Alaska in Late Cretaceous time crushing an enormous deep-marine flysch basin on its inboard side. Most of interior eastern Alaska is the Yukon Tanana terrane, a very large entirely fault-bounded metamorphic-plutonic assemblage covering thousands of square kilometers in Canada as well as Alaska. The original stratigraphy and relationship to North America of the Yukon-Tanana terrane are both obscure. A collapsed Mesozoic flysch basin, similar to the one inboard of Wrangellia, lies along the northern margin. Much of Arctic Alaska was apparently a vast expanse of upper Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic deep marine sediments and mafic volcanic and plutonic rocks now scattered widely as large telescoped sheets and Klippen thrust over the Ruby geanticline and the Brooks Range, and probably underlying the Yukon-Koyukuk basin and the Yukon flats. The Brooks Range itself is a stack of north vergent nappes, the telescoping of which began in Early Cretaceous time. Despite compelling evidence for thousands of kilometers of relative displacement between the accreted terranes, and large amounts of telescoping, translation, and rotation since accretion, the resulting new continental crust added to North America in Alaska carries few obvious signatures that allow application of currently popular simple plate tectonic models. Intraplate telescoping and strike-slip translations, delamination at mid-crustal levels, and large-scale lithospheric

  6. Deformation and sedimentation along a developing terrane suture: Eastern Sunda forearc, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.L.; Silver, E.A.; Prasetyo, H.; Meyer, A.W.

    1986-12-01

    The collision of the eastern Sunda arc with northwest Australia has resulted in the development of a suture between the Sumba ridge and Sawu-Timor terranes along a zone of intraforearc convergence. The developing suture varies from the low-angle Sawu thrust, with attendant mud diapirs in the Sumba basin, to high-angle reverse faults near a basement high of the underthrust Sumba ridge terrane. Bottom currents, associated with the flow of Pacific Ocean deep water into the Indian Ocean, have eroded the terranes and subsequently deposited the detritus in an assemblage of contourites along the suture. This study reveals the high structural variability of a terrane suture and the oceanographic influence on the deposition of overlap assemblages.

  7. The Mars Hill Terrane: An enigmatic southern Appalachian terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, L.A.; Johnson, P.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The Mars Hill Terrane (MHT) in the Appalachian Blue Ride Belt is bordered by complex, locally reactivated thrust and strike-slip faults. On the east, the MHT is bounded by the allochthonous, ensimatic Toe Terrane (TT) across the diachronous, ductile Holland Mountain-Soque River Fault System. The MHT is separated on the northwest from ensialic Laurentian basement (LB), by the Fries-Hayesville Fault System. On the south, the MHT is truncated by the Shope Fork Fault. The MHT is characterized by migmatitic biotite-pyroxene-hornblende gneiss, but contains 1--1.8 b.y. old quartz-feldspar gneisses, plus ultramafic rocks, calc-silicate rocks, mica schists and gneisses, and Neoproterozoic Bakersville gabbros. This rock assemblage contrasts with that of the adjoining terranes. The only correlative units between the MHT and adjoining terranes are Neoproterozoic gabbro, Ordovician-Devonian granitoid plutons, and ultramafic rocks. Gabbro links the MHT with LB rocks. Apparently similar calc-silicate rocks differ petrographically among terranes. During Taconic or Acadian events, both the TT and MHT reached amphibolite to granulite metamorphic grade, but the LB did not exceed greenschist grade. The data conflict. The O-D plutons, ultramafic rocks, and metamorphic histories suggest that the TT had docked with the MHT by Ordovician time. The premetamorphic character of the Holland Mtn.-Soque River Fault System supports that chronology. Neoproterozoic gabbros suggest a MHT-LB link by Cambrian time, but the LB experienced neither O-D plutonism nor Paleozoic amphibolite-granulite facies metamorphism.

  8. Compositional Variability of the Mantle beneath West Antarctica and its Relationship to Terrane Tectonics: Evidence from Mantle Xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. J.; Gibson, S. A.; Leat, P. T.; Vaughan, A. P. M.

    2009-04-01

    This work examines the petrography and mineral chemistry of sixteen previously undescribed mantle xenoliths suites from the West Antarctic Peninsula. The xenoliths are from the Jones Mountains (a Palaeozoic volcanic arc terrane on the margin of Gondwana), Adelaide Island (a Mesozoic volcanic arc terrane) and Alexander Island (an accretionary complex). They were entrained by subduction and rift-related magmatism, including 50 Ma calc-alkaline lamprophyres (Adelaide Island) and 10-5 Ma alkali basalts (Alexander Island and Jones Mountains). The xenoliths range in composition from pyroxenites (Adelaide Island) to spinel peridotites (Alexander Island and Jones Mountains). At Alexander Island, the spinel peridotites occur as both ‘fertile' lherzolites and ‘depleted' harzburgites. The xenoliths show a wide variation in mineral chemistry, for example olivine varies from Fo91.5 in the harzburgites to Fo71 in the pyroxenites. Significant variations have also been observed in the major-element chemistry of the pyroxenes. Those in the spinel peridotites are Cr-diopsides whereas those in the pyroxenites are Al-augites. Rare-earth element patterns of clinopyroxenes and Cr/(Cr+Al) ratios of spinels provide information on the origin of the xenoliths. We conclude that the harzburgites experienced a complex evolution involving extraction of up to 20% melt, perhaps in the mantle wedge, followed by accretion on to the base of the lithosphere and enrichment in Cr by large degree hydrous melts (boninites). There is also evidence of enrichment in strongly incompatible trace elements by carbonate melts and fluids from the subducted Phoenix plate. However, some of the spinel lherzolites from Alexander Island, and also those from the Jones Mountains, have compositions that are similar to fertile mantle and have not been subjected to large scale melting. The pyroxenites from Adelaide Island are believed to represent samples of veined lithospheric mantle caused by percolation and reaction

  9. The Western Sierras Pampeanas: Protracted Grenville-age history (1330-1030 Ma) of intra-oceanic arcs, subduction-accretion at continental-edge and AMCG intraplate magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapela, C. W.; Pankhurst, R. J.; Casquet, C.; Baldo, E.; Galindo, C.; Fanning, C. M.; Dahlquist, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    basic amphibolites with geochemical fingerprints of emplacement in a more mature crust, and (ii) a 1027 ± 17 Ma TTG juvenile suite, which is the youngest Grenville-age magmatic event registered in the Western Sierras Pampeanas. The geodynamic history in both study areas reveals a complex orogenic evolution, dominated by convergent tectonics and accretion of juvenile oceanic arcs to the continent.

  10. Siberia, the wandering northern terrane, and its changing geography through the Palaeozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocks, L. Robin M.; Torsvik, Trond H.

    2007-05-01

    The old terrane of Siberia occupied a very substantial area in the centre of today's political Siberia and also adjacent areas of Mongolia, eastern Kazakhstan, and northwestern China. Siberia's location within the Early Neoproterozoic Rodinia Superterrane is contentious (since few if any reliable palaeomagnetic data exist between about 1.0 Ga and 540 Ma), but Siberia probably became independent during the breakup of Rodinia soon after 800 Ma and continued to be so until very near the end of the Palaeozoic, when it became an integral part of the Pangea Supercontinent. The boundaries of the cratonic core of the Siberian Terrane (including the Patom area) are briefly described, together with summaries of some of the geologically complex surrounding areas, and it is concluded that all of the Palaeozoic underlying the West Siberian Basin (including the Ob-Saisan Surgut area), Tomsk Terrane, Altai-Sayan Terranes (including Salair, Kuznetsk Alatau, Batenov, Kobdin and West Sayan), Ertix Terrane, Barguzin Terrane, Tuva-Mongol Terrane, Central Mongolia Terrane Assemblage, Gobi Altai and Mandalovoo Terranes, Okhotsk Terrane and much of the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma region all formed parts of peri-Siberia, and thus rotated with the main Siberian Craton as those areas were progressively accreted to the main Siberian Terrane at various times during the latest Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic. The Ertix Terrane is a new term combining what has been termed the "Altay Terrane" or "NE Xinjiang" area of China, and the Baytag, Baaran and Bidz terranes of Mongolia. The Silurian Tuvaella brachiopod fauna is restricted only to today's southern parts of peri-Siberia. Thus, allowing for subsequent rotation, the fauna occurs only in the N of the Siberian Terrane, and, as well as being a helpful indicator of what marginal terranes made up peri-Siberia, is distinctive as being the only Silurian fauna known from northern higher latitudes globally. In contrast, the other terranes adjacent to peri

  11. Magmatism and Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits of the Southern Ancestral Cascade Arc, Western Nevada and Eastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Henry, Christopher D., (compiler); Vikre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    hornblende, biotite, and pyroxene phenocrysts. Seven epithermal gold-silver deposits with >1 Moz gold production, several large elemental sulfur deposits, and many large areas (10s to >100 km2) of hydrothermally altered rocks are present in the southern ancestral arc, especially south of latitude 40°N. These deposits are principally hosted by intermediate to silicic lava dome complexes; only a few deposits are associated with mafic- to intermediate-composition stratovolcanoes. Large deposits are most abundant and well developed in volcanic fields whose evolution spanned millions of years. Most deposits are hundreds of thousands to several million years younger than their host rocks, although some quartz-alunite deposits are essentially coeval with their host rocks. Variable composition and thickness of crustal basement is the primary control on mineralization along the length of the southern ancestral arc; most deposits and large alteration zones are localized in basement rock terranes with a strong continental affinity, either along the edge of the North American craton (Goldfield, Tonopah) or in an accreted terrane with continental affinities (Walker Lake terrane; Aurora, Bodie, Comstock Lode, Paradise Peak). Epithermal deposits and quartz-alunite alteration zones are scarce to absent in the northern part of the ancestral arc above an accreted island arc (Black Rock terrane) or unknown basement rocks (Modoc Plateau). Walker Lane structures and areas that underwent large magnitude extension during the Late Cenozoic (areas with Oligocene-early Miocene volcanic rocks dipping >40°) do not provide regional control on mineralization. Instead, these features may have served as local-scale conduits for mineralizing fluids.

  12. Brook street and Murihiku terranes of New Zealand in the context of a mobile South Pacific Gondwana margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, J. D.

    1994-10-01

    Data from geochemistry, isotope studies and paleomagnetism suggest that both the Permian arc-dominated Brook Street terrane and Triassic-Jurassic Murihiku forearc basin terrane are unrelated to each other and that both are allochthonous with respect to the Gondwana margin. The Murihiku terrane lies farther from the Gondwana margin but its fauna and flora have strong Gondwana affinities and closely resemble those of autochthonous epi-Gondwana basins in Australia and Argentina. All terranes within New Zealand are elongate parallel to the Gondwana margin but very few can be clearly identified in the Australian and Antarctic continental crust that abuts New Zealand in Cretaceous Gondwana reconstructions. Similarly, some Australia terranes do not appear to continue into New Zealand or Antarctica. This suggests that breakup was influenced significantly by old terrane boundaries and also that there was considerable terrane mobility in the active Gondwana margin before the Cretaceous. A systematic comparison of arc chemistry, geochronology, biota, and paleomagnetism is desirable to constrain the development of the South Pacific margin between Australia and South America in the Mesozoic.

  13. A new view into the Cascadia subduction zone and volcanic arc: Implications for earthquake hazards along the Washington margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Trehu, A.M.; Luetgert, J.H.; Miller, K.; Kilbride, F.; Wells, R.E.; Fisher, M.A.; Flueh, E.; ten Brink, U.S.; Christensen, N.I.

    1998-01-01

    In light of suggestions that the Cascadia subduction margin may pose a significant seismic hazard for the highly populated Pacific Northwest region of the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Research Center for Marine Geosciences (GEOMAR), and university collaborators collected and interpreted a 530-km-long wide-angle onshore-offshore seismic transect across the subduction zone and volcanic arc to study the major structures that contribute to seismogenic deformation. We observed (1) an increase in the dip of the Juan de Fuca slab from 2??-7?? to 12?? where it encounters a 20-km-thick block of the Siletz terrane or other accreted oceanic crust, (2) a distinct transition from Siletz crust into Cascade arc crust that coincides with the Mount St. Helens seismic zone, supporting the idea that the mafic Siletz block focuses seismic deformation at its edges, and (3) a crustal root (35-45 km deep) beneath the Cascade Range, with thinner crust (30-35 km) east of the volcanic arc beneath the Columbia Plateau flood basalt province. From the measured crustal structure and subduction geometry, we identify two zones that may concentrate future seismic activity: (1) a broad (because of the shallow dip), possibly locked part of the interplate contact that extends from ???25 km depth beneath the coastline to perhaps as far west as the deformation front ???120 km offshore and (2) a crustal zone at the eastern boundary between the Siletz terrane and the Cascade Range.

  14. Is the Liverpool Land Eclogite Terrane, Eastern Greenland Caledonides, Baltican, Laurentian, or Both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, H. K.; Johnston, S. M.; Belousova, E. A.; Griffin, W. L.; Hartz, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Liverpool land Eclogite Terrane (LLET) is a small (≈200 km2) high pressure metamorphic terrane at the southern tip of the Eastern Greenland Caledonides. Recent publications propose the LLET is a subducted Baltic terrane that underplated the Eastern Greenland Caledonides during the ca. 400 Ma Scandian Orogeny and was stranded in Greenland (Laurentia) during the opening of the Atlantic. However Johnston et al. (2011) proposed the LLET is actually a composite terrane comprised of a mid-crustal, high-pressure (granulite facies) terrane, the Jaettedal Complex, tectonically juxtaposed during the Scandian orogeny against a higher pressure (eclogite-facies), peridotite-bearing, metamorphic terrane, the Tvaerdal complex. The composite Tvaerdal/Jaettedal Terrane (now the LLET) was subsequently exhumed from beneath a Laurentian plutonic continental arc terrane, the Hurry Inlet Complex. U-Pb Precambrian ages from the Tvaerdal Complex obtained by LA-ICPMS from detrital zircons (this study) as well as published zircon dates do not distinctly match the published Proterozoic zircon age patterns of basins and crystalline complexes from either Laurentia or Baltica, therefore not resolving the provenance of the Tvaerdal Complex. However, Paleozoic zircon U-Pb dates (this study and the literature) demonstrate the Tvaerdal Complex underwent relatively short-lived high pressure/ultrahigh pressure metamorphism and subsequent anatectic melting between 415-385 Ma while recent work by Johnston et al. (2014) indicates the Jaettedal Complex underwent an earlier, much longer evolution between 460-412 Ma. The older ages from the Jaettedal coincide with ages obtained from the overlying Hurry Inlet Complex as well as other Greenland igneous terranes suggesting the Jaettedal Complex is a Laurentian terrane involved in the lengthy evolution of a continental arc complex along the eastern Greenland margin during the closure of Iapetus. The paucity of concordant 460-412 ages from the Tvaerdal

  15. Oceanic island arc stratigraphy in the Caribbean region: don't take it for granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, D. K.; Smith, A. L.; Schellekens, J. H.

    1991-11-01

    reflect arc development on thick oceanic crust (for example, a plateau). Submarine volcanic arc facies associations (OADS II) occur only in the northern Virgin Islands (Water Island Formation) and Bonaire (Washikemba Formation). Typically, great structural thicknesses (5-10 km) of arc-related strata are preserved, although condensed arc sequences built upon accreted terranes are present locally (southwest Puerto Rico, Grenada). On Grenada, the active magmatic platform is underlain by overthrust forearc(?) basin strata, indicating that magmatic platforms may grow by means other than volcanic aggradation.

  16. A mid-Permian chert event: widespread deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murchey, B.L.; Jones, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Radiolarian and conodont of Permian siliceous rocks from twenty-three areas in teh the circum-Pacific and Mediterranean regions reveal a widespread Permian Chert Event during the middle Leonardian to Wordian. Radiolarian- and (or) sponge spicule-rich siliceous sediments accumulated beneath high productivity zones in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins. Most of these deposits now crop out in fault-bounded accreted terranes. Biogenic siliceous sediments did not accumulate in terranes lying beneath infertile waters including the marine sequences in terranes of northern and central Alaska. The Permian Chert Event is coeval with major phosphorite deposition along the western margin of Pangea (Phosphoria Formation and related deposits). A well-known analogue for this event is middle Miocene deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments beneath high productivity zones in many parts of the Pacific and concurrent deposition of phosphatic as well as siliceous sediments in basins along the coast of California. Interrelated factors associated with both the Miocene and Permian depositional events include plate reorientations, small sea-level rises and cool polar waters. ?? 1992.

  17. From magmatic accretion to mantle exhumation in the Tyrrhenian basin: New data challenge conceptual models of continental back-arc extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallares, Valenti; Prada, Manuel; Ranero, Cesar R.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Zitellini, Nevio

    2015-04-01

    The Tyrrhenian Sea constitutes a young, well-preserved example of Mediterranean back-arc oceanic basin. It opened mainly between Tortonian and mid-Pliocene as a response to the E-SE migration of the Apennines- Calabrian subduction system. We present a new interpretation of the crustal affinity and tectonic structure of the central Tyrrhenian basin, which considerably differs from previous ones, using coincident wide-angle and multi-channel seismic reflection profiles and gravity data acquired in the MEDOC-2010 survey. The basin displays three distinct basement domains with different petrological affinity based on their velocity and velocity-derived density structure. The first domain includes the continental crust of Campania and the conjugate Sardinia margin, where extension has thinned the crust from 20 km under the coastline to 13 km in 60 km. The second domain, that includes the Cornaglia Terrace and its conjugate Campania Terrace, displays an unequivocal, although spatially variable, magmatic signature that can be interpreted as either magmatically intruded or back-arc-type oceanic crust. A sharp transition is observed between this domain and the central, deepest part of the basin, which shows a seismic signature that is characteristic of exhumed mantle rock domains. Several large seamounts of the third domain (e.g. Vavilov) are underlain by 10-20-km-wide, relatively low velocity anomalies interpreted as younger magmatic bodies locally intruding the exhumed mantle. The juxtaposition of continental crust, magmatic crust and exhumed mantle with further volcanic intrusions challenges not only previous models for the formation of the Tyrrhenian and other Mediterranean back-arc basins, but also well-established conceptual models of continental extension. We illustrate that this particular configuration of crustal domains can be explained as a sequence of back-arc spreading phases controlled by the variations in the relative location of the spreading axis and the

  18. Arc petrogenesis in southern Ireland and the Isle of Man: Implications for Ordovician accretionary history and constraints from Late Caledonian plutonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritschle, Tobias; Daly, J. Stephen; Whitehouse, Martin J.; McConnell, Brian; Buhre, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Peri-Laurentian and peri-Gondwanan magmatic arcs and microcontinents, and their attendant sedimentary basins were assembled during the Caledonian Orogeny (c. 490 - 400 Ma) to form the Irish and British lithosphere. Accretion of these terranes to Laurentia and subsequent closure of the Iapetus Ocean initiated the generation of widespread Late Caledonian plutons (c. 425 - 400 Ma). Petrogenetic investigation of Ordovician arc-related rocks aims to test possible terrane affinities, using geochemical data from the arcs and related rocks as well as isotopic signatures preserved within Late Caledonian granites. SIMS zircon U-Pb geochronology has provided middle to early Ordovician ages for volcanic rocks with arc affinities from Avoca (Ireland, c. 463 Ma) and a newly discovered volcanic sequence from Port-e-Vullen (Isle of Man, c. 473 Ma). Granitic rocks from Leinster (Ireland), interpreted as arc plutons, yielded late to middle Ordovician ages of c. 457 - 454 Ma (Croghan Kinshelagh) and c. 462 - 459 Ma (Graiguenamanagh), similar to the c. 457 Ma age of the Dhoon Granite (Isle of Man). Oxygen isotopic compositions of zircons from the Ordovician volcanic and plutonic rocks are close to or slightly heavier than mantle values (δ18O generally < 7 ‰). Lu-Hf zircon compositions suggest different terrane affinities: relatively juvenile ɛHfT values (c. +8.5 - +5.3) for the Avoca volcanics are similar to those of the older unit of the Croghan Kinshelagh Granite, whereas the Port-e-Vullen volcanics and the Graiguenamanagh Granite have less radiogenic ɛHfT values (c. +4.4 - +1.3). The present-day geographic distribution of these rocks and petrogenetic inferences from their North American correlatives invite comparison with the Avalonian and the Ganderian microcontinent, respectively[1]. These constraints are supported by inherited zircons and corresponding isotopic analyses. ɛHfT values (c. +11.5 - +1.5) from magmatic zircons of the Dhoon Granite and the younger unit of the

  19. Is the Rattlesnake Creek terrane out of place with respect to other terranes in the Klamath Mountains, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Wyld, S.J.; Wright, J.E. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    The Rattlesnake Creek terrane (RCT) of the western Klamath Mtns. (KM) represents an Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic arc assemblage constructed on a serpentinite matrix melange basement. Following Saleeby (1992), melange basement is believed to be the disrupted remnants of a Paleozoic( ) oceanic fracture zone. Overlying arc volcanics include a lower group of pillowed to massive basalts with tholeiitic IAB chemistry and an upper group of cpx-phyric lavas and volcaniclastics with calc-alkaline to shoshinitic IAB chemistry. Volcanogenic rocks are interbedded with chert, argillite and epiclastic rocks derived from a terrigenous source. Gabbroic to dioritic intrusions, dated at 212--198 Ma (U/Pb zircon), intrude both melange basement and overlying arc strata and are interpreted as the intrusive roots of the arc. Collectively, these relations suggest that the RCT did not originate in or develop adjacent to the rest of the KM province, although cross-cutting relations require that the RCT was situated adjacent to the KM by [approximately]170 Ma. The authors propose a model in which the RCT was translated, probably by fore-arc strike slip faulting in response to oblique subduction, from a point of origin elsewhere along the early Mesozoic Cordillera margin, most likely the western Sierra Nevada.

  20. The Khida terrane - Geology of Paleoproterozoic rocks in the Muhayil area, eastern Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoeser, D.B.; Whitehouse, M.J.; Stacey, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The bulk of the Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia is underlain by Neoproterozoic terranes of oceanic affinity that were accreted during Pan-African time (about 680- 640Ma). Geologicalmappingandisotopicinvestigations during the 1980’s,however, provided the first evidence for Paleoproterozoic continental crust within the east- central part of the shield in Saudi Arabia. These studies delineated an older basement domain, herein referred to as the Khida terrane (Fig. l), which is defined as that part of the southern Afif composite terrane underlain by Paleoproterozoicto Archean continental crust (Stoeser and Stacey, 1988). The isotopic and geochronologic work to support our current studies within the Khida terrane are discussed in a companion abstract (Whitehouse et al., this volume). The regional geology and geochronology of the region has been summarized in detail by Johnson (1996). The current study is based on the continued use of samples previously collected in the Khida area by the authors and others as well as new field work conducted by us in 1999. This work further defines the occurrence of late Paleoproterozoic rocks at Jabal Muhayil, which is located at the eastern margin of the exposed terrane (Fig. 1). Our isotopic work is at an early stage and this abstract partly relates geologic problems that remain to be resolved. 

  1. Middle Proterozoic age for the Montpelier Anorthosite, Goochland terrane, eastern Piedmont, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Horton, J.W., Jr.; Walter, M.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium-lead dating of zircons from the Montpelier Anorthosite confirms previous interpretations, based on equivocal evidence, that the Goochland terrane in the eastern Piedmont of Virginia contains Grenvillian basement rocks of Middle Proterozoic age. A very few prismatic, elongate, euhedral zircons, which contain 12-29 ppm uranium, are interpreted to be igneous in origin. The vast majority of zircons are more equant, subangular to anhedral, contain 38-52 ppm uranium, and are interpreted to be metamorphic in origin. One fraction of elongate zircon, and four fragments of a very large zircon (occurring in a nelsonite segregation) yield an upper intercept age of 1045 ?? 10 Ma, interpreted as the time of anorthosite crystallization. Irregularly shaped metamorphic zircons are dated at 1011 ?? 2 Ma (weighted average of the 207Pb/206Pb ages). The U-Pb isotopic systematics of metamorphic titanite were reset during the Alleghanian orogeny at 297 ?? 5 Ma. These data provide a minimum age for gneisses of the Goochland terrane that are intruded by the anorthosite. Middle Proterozoic basement rocks of the Goochland terrane may be correlative with those in the Shenandoah massif of the Blue Ridge tectonic province, as suggested by similarities between the Montpelier Anorthosite and the Roseland anorthosite. Although the areal extent of Middle Proterozoic basement and basement-cover relations in the eastern Piedmont remain unresolved, results of this investigation indicate that the Goochland terrane is an internal massif of Laurentian crust rather than an exotic accreted terrane.

  2. Late Jurassic Crustal Thickening in the Mesozoic Arc of Ecuador and Colombia: Implications on the Evolution of Continental Arcs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, J.; Cardona, A.; Blanco-Quintero, I.; Valencia, V.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of South America during the Jurassic is related to the subduction of the Farallon plate and the formation of a series of continental arcs. In the northern Andes such arcs have been considered as controlled by extensional dominated tectonics. Paleomagnetic constraints have also suggested that between the Early and Late Jurassic several crustal domains were translate along the continental margin in association with strain partitioning in the convergent margin. A review of the character of the Salado terrane in the Cordillera Real of Ecuador indicates that it includes extensively deformed and metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary rocks that have achieved a greenschist to amphibolite facies event with chloritoid and garnet. This rocks are tightly associated with a ca. 143 Ma syn-tectonic granodiorite to monzogranite batholith that is also extensively milonitized.A similar Late Jurassic crustal thickening event that apparently affected volcano-sedimentary rocks have been also recently suspected in the Central Cordillera of the Colombian Andes in association with Jurassic plutonic rocks (Blanco-Quintero et al., 2013) It is therefore suggested that during the Late Jurassic the Northern Andes experienced significant contractional tectonics. Such crustal thickening may be related to either the active subduction setting were the crustal slivers formed in relation to oblique convergence are transfered and re-accreted to the margin and triggered the deformational event or to a collisional event associated to the arrival of an allocthonous terrane. New geochronological constraints on the metamorphic evolution and precise understanding on the relations between magmatism and deformation are going to be obtain in the Salado Terrane to appropriately test this hypothesis and contribute to the understanding of the extensional to compressional tectonic switching in continental arcs. Blanco-Quintero, I. F., García-Casco, A., Ruíz, E. C., Toro, L. M., Moreno, M

  3. The Phase Space of z~1.2 SpARCS Clusters: Using Herschel to Probe Dust Temperature as a Function of Environment and Accretion History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, A. G.; Webb, T. M. A.; Yee, H. K. C.; Muzzin, A.; Wilson, G.; van der Burg, R. F. J.; Balogh, M. L.; Shupe, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    We present a five-band Herschel study (100-500 μm) of three galaxy clusters at z˜ 1.2 from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey. With a sample of 120 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, we investigate the role of environment on galaxy properties utilizing the projected cluster phase space (line-of-sight velocity versus clustercentric radius), which probes the time-averaged galaxy density to which a galaxy has been exposed. We divide cluster galaxies into phase-space bins of (r/{r}200)× ({{Δ }}v/{σ }v), tracing a sequence of accretion histories in phase space. Stacking optically star-forming cluster members on the Herschel maps, we measure average infrared star formation rates, and, for the first time in high-redshift galaxy clusters, dust temperatures for dynamically distinct galaxy populations—namely, recent infalls and those that were accreted onto the cluster at an earlier epoch. Proceeding from the infalling to virialized (central) regions of phase space, we find a steady decrease in the specific star formation rate and increase in the stellar age of star-forming cluster galaxies. We perform a probability analysis to investigate all acceptable infrared spectral energy distributions within the full parameter space and measure a ˜ 4σ drop in the average dust temperature of cluster galaxies in an intermediate phase-space bin, compared to an otherwise flat trend with phase space. We suggest one plausible quenching mechanism which may be consistent with these trends, invoking ram-pressure stripping of the warmer dust for galaxies within this intermediate accretion phase. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  4. Stratigraphic and isotopic link between the northern Stikine terrane and an ancient continental margin assemblage, Canadian Cordillera

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.L.; Gehrels, G.E.; Patchett, P.J. ); Mihalynuk, M.G. )

    1991-12-01

    Geologic and isotopic data strongly imply a Late Triassic depositional link between a juvenile volcanic arc (northern Stikine terrane) and an outboard ancient continental margin assemblage (Nisling terrane) in the Canadian Cordillera. Two sandstone samples and a schist clast from a conglomerate layer at the base of the Upper Triassic Stuhini Group (northern Stikine terrane) have Nd-depleted mantle model ages of 1400-1430 and 1600 Ma, respectively; other Stuhini Group rocks have model ages of 390,660 and 690 Ma. Three samples of Nisling terrane schist and gneiss yield Nd model ages of 910, 1770, and 2450 Ma and highly radiogenic {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios. These isotopic data corroborate stratigraphic evidence that detritus at the base of northern Stikine was shed from the Nisling terrane and strengthen interpretations that these terranes became linked by Late Triassic time. Thus, Upper Triassic strata of the northern Stikine terrane may have accumulated on top of or adjacent to an exotic continental fragment, a rifted fragment of the North American margin, or the in situ North American margin.

  5. Paleomagnetism and question of original location of the Permian Brook Street Terrane, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haston, Roger B.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Landis, C. A.; Coombs, D. S.

    1989-08-01

    Over 400 rock samples from 30 sites were collected for paleomagnetic study from the volcanogenic section in the Brook Street terrane within the Takitimu Mountains in western Southland, New Zealand. The section includes igneous and sedimentary rocks of the Permian Takitimu Group and White Hill Intrusive Suite. Many of the samples show a partial or complete remagnetization in the present field because of a recent acquisition of viscous remanent magnetization. An Early Permian direction (inclination = 46.1°, declination = 257°), isolated from the Heartbreak and Chimney Peaks formations of the Takitimu Group, indicates a low paleolatitude to midpaleolatitude, position (27° ± 5°) for the Brook Street terrane. Directions from the Late Permian (?) White Hill Intrusives (inclination = 64.6°, declination = 173.3°) suggest a slightly higher paleolatitude than the Early Permian Takitimu Group directions and 70°-90° of intervening clockwise rotation. Plate reconstructions and paleomagnetic data predict a high paleolatitude for the New Zealand margin of Gondwana throughout the late Paleozoic and Mesozoic. The low paleolatitude to middle paleolatitude, implied by the Early Permian Brook Street result, together with the oceanic nature of the Brook Street arc, suggest that the Brook Street terrane is allochthonous to the margin of Gondwana. A published Late Triassic/Early Jurassic paleomagnetic pole from the adjacent Murihiku terrane indicates a high paleolatitude. This suggests that the Brook Street and Murihiku terranes are genetically distinct.

  6. Features and geotectonic evolution of the Alxa Terrane at North Qilian Mountains in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaozhi; Zhengmin, Min

    2015-04-01

    The Alxa Terrane in west China, covered with Badain Jaran and Tengger Deserts at the earth's surface, lies geographically on the north of the Qilian-Mountains Structural Belt and the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau with intense tectonic activities. The Mongolian Plateau with Cenozoic activities and the Ordos Plateau are on the north and east of the terrane separately. Tectonically the terrane lies among the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, the Qilian-Qinling Orogenic Belt in the Tarim Plate, and the North China Craton. In view of its special geotectonic location, the knowledge about the Alxa Terrane generation and evolution would be significant to the understanding of plates and terranes convergence and evolution in west China and to hydrocarbon exploration in those small and medium basins in the Hexi Corridor. The conclusions include (1) the Alxa Terrane is a component part in the west of the North China Plate instead of a part separated from the Tarim Plate. Neoarchean rocks occurring in the Beidashan area in west Alxa are mainly composed of granodiorite gneiss with typical TTG gneiss features. The age of the magmatic zircon nucleus is about 2522±30 Ma, which is basically consistent with that of TFG gneiss pervasively distributing in the North China Craton; (2) the Alxa Terrane was a relatively isolated small terrane in the Archaean and Proterozoic Eras. The lithologies of the crystalline basement are different from those in the Tarim and North China Plates. Tectothermal events took place 800-1000 Ma and 400-600 Ma ago separately in Alxa, which had few signatures in the North China Plate. The North China Plate and the Alxa Terrane converged in the south and diverged in the north due to the impact of the Caledonian Movement and then merged at the early stage of the Middle Ordovician. During the Middle Hercynian Movement, the Paleoasian Ocean in the north closed and new crust appeared in the Early Permian to form the trench-arc-basin system at the north margin. During the Late

  7. Evidence for Late Eocene emplacement of the Malaita Terrane, Solomon Islands: Implications for an even larger Ontong Java Nui oceanic plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrave, Robert J.

    2013-06-01

    Most tectonic models for the Solomon Islands Arc invoke a Miocene collision with the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) to halt cessation of Pacific Plate subduction, initiate Australian Plate subduction, and emplace the Malaita Terrane, which shares the characteristic basement age and geochemistry of OJP. Existing paleomagnetic evidence, however, required the Malaita Terrane to have been fixed to the arc from at least the Late Eocene. New sampling has yielded a paleomagnetic pole from Aptian-Albian limestones and mudstones that falls between the apparent polar wander paths for the Australian Plate and OJP, confirming the extended period of residence of the Malaita Terrane on the arc. Arc-derived turbidities within Late Eocene through Miocene limestones on Malaita and Santa Isabel, and related clasts in broadly contemporary sandstones and conglomerates on Santa Isabel, also attest to early emplacement. Modeling the emplacement at 35 Ma satisfies both the paleomagnetic data and the sediment provenance. Continuing the reconstruction to 125 Ma leaves the Malaita Terrane far from OJP at the time of plateau formation. OJP is now understood to have formed as part of a larger Ontong Java Nui, also comprising the Hikurangi and Manihiki plateaus, separated by spreading during the Cretaceous. Restoring the separation of the known elements, and invoking an additional triple junction, unites the (now largely subducted) Malaita Terrane with the rest of Ontong Java Nui. Subduction of substantial areas of the Ontong Java Nui plateau, with little geological signal other than a reduction in arc volcanism, is a corollary.

  8. The radiolarian evidence for the accretion of the Fu-saki Formation with the inferred oceanic plate stratigraphy: A case of weakly-metamorphosed accretionary complex in Ishigaki Jima, southern Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    The island of Ishigaki Jima, located in the western part of the southern Ryukyu Arc, Japan, is underlain by a basement comprising the Tumuru and Fu-saki formations. The former is a pelitic glaucophane schist with a metamorphic age of 220-190 Ma, and the latter is a weakly metamorphosed accretionary complex, composed mainly of chert, mudstone and sandstone with minor amounts of limestone and mafic rocks. The Fu-saki Formation was weakly metamorphosed at ∼140 Ma. Latest Carboniferous-Early Jurassic microfossils have been obtained from the limestones, cherts and siliceous mudstones of this formation, but no fossils have been collected from the phyllitic mudstones. The radiolarian fauna of the phyllitic mudstones described herein indicates a late Pliensbachian-early Toarcian (Early Jurassic) age. This result, when combined with existing data, enables the reconstruction of an oceanic plate stratigraphy, showing a succession of (in ascending order) Upper Carboniferous-Triassic cherts, Sinemurian-lower Pliensbachian siliceous mudstones and upper Pliensbachian-lower Toarcian phyllitic mudstones and sandstones. The radiolarians from the phyllitic mudstones are important in constraining the timing of the accretion of the Fu-saki Formation to the base of the Tumuru Formation.

  9. Kilbuck terrane: Oldest known rocks in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Box, S.E. ); Moll-Stalcup, E.J.; Wooden, J.L. ); Bradshaw, J.Y. )

    1990-12-01

    The Kilbuck terrane in southwestern Alaska is a narrow, thin crustal sliver or flake of amphibolite facies orthogneiss. The igneous protolith of this gneiss was a suite of subduction-related plutonic rocks. U-Pb data on zircons from trondhjemitic and granitic samples yield upper-intercept (igneous) ages of 2,070 {plus minus}16 and 2,040 {plus minus}74 Ma, respectively. Nd isotope data from these rocks suggest that a diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite suite ({epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) = +2.1 to +2.7; T is time of crystallization) evolved from partial melts of depleted mantle with no discernible contamination by older crust, whereas a coeval granitic pluton ({epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) = {minus}5.7) contains a significant component derived from Archean crust. Orthogneisses with similar age and Nd isotope characteristics are found in the Idono complex 250 km to the north. Early Proterozoic rocks are unknown elsewhere in Alaska. However, Phanerozoic plutons cutting several continental terranes in Alaska (southern Brooks Range and Ruby, Seward, and Yukon-Tanana terranes) have Nd isotope compositions indicative of Early Proterozoic (or older) crustal components that could be correlative with rocks of the Kilbuck terrane. Rocks with similar igneous ages in cratonal North America are rare, and those few that are known have Nd isotope compositions distinct from those of the Kilbuck terrane. Conversely, provinces with Nd model ages of 2.0-2.1 Ga are characterized by extensive 1.8 Ga or younger plutonism, which is unknown in the Kilbuck terrane. At present the case for a North American parentage of the Kilbuck terrane is not compelling. The possibility that the Kilbuck terrane was displaced from provinces of similar age in other cratons (e.g., Australian, Baltic, Guiana, and west African shields), or from the poorly dated Siberian craton, cannot be excluded.

  10. New late Precambrian-Cambrian U-PB zircon ages for zoned intrusives in the western Carolina terrane, Spartanburg and Union Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, A.J. . Physical Sciences); Wright, J.E. . Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    The geology of the western Carolina terrane comprises zoned mafic-ultramafic intrusive complexes intruding a volcanic pile of basalts and basaltic andesites; this package is interpreted to represent an episode of intra-arc rifting prior to regional metamorphism and foliation formation. New U-Pb zircon ages from the Mean Crossroads complex in northwestern South Carolina along the central Piedmont suture confirm relative ages obtained by detailed mapping. Two foliated meta-diorites yield U-Pb dates of 580 Ma, interpreted to be crystallization ages. A foliated meta-quartz diorite yields a U-Pb date of 535 Ma interpreted to be a crystallization age. These ages are broadly contemporary with those inferred by other workers for the Battleground Formation in the type locality of the Kings Mountain belt. An undeformed, unmetamorphosed diorite intruding these metamorphosed zoned complex intrusives also yields an age of 535 Ma. Hence the authors believe that intra-arc rifting and regional metamorphism both occurred c. 535 Ma. While petrographic and Ar-Ar studies support subsequent regional metamorphic overprint(s), or at least static recrystallization and/or uplift through hornblende-biotite-muscovite blocking temperatures for Ar in mid- to late-Paleozoic time, the 535 Ma, undeformed, unmetamorphosed intrusive suggest late Precambrian regional metamorphism and deformation was the event responsible for regional greenschist-lower amphibolite facies metamorphism and foliation formation in this area of the Piedmont. This seems to contradict correlations with middle Ordovician fabric elements in the eastern Piedmont as well as the idea that this metamorphism and fabric development are related to presumed early Paleozoic accretion of the Carolina arc to Laurentia. They have also dated a foliated megacrystic granite that cuts the central Piedmont suture (325 Ma, U-Pb zircon), and the Bald Rock granite (326 Ma, U-Pb zircon).

  11. Terrane-controlled crustal shear wave splitting in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, David; Christensen, Nikolas I.; Ross, Zachary E.; Wu, Francis T.

    2016-01-01

    Taiwan is the result of arc-continent collision associated with the convergence of the Philippine Sea plate with the eastern Eurasian plate continental margin. The locus of deformation is found in eastern Taiwan in the form of mountain building (Central Range) with underlying thickened lithosphere. Rapid tectonic exhumation in the Central Range has uncovered low-to-high-grade metamorphic rocks marked by steep cleavage. We carried out a crustal seismic anisotropy study across Taiwan, producing a database of over 27,000 local earthquake shear wave splitting measurements. Additionally, we carried out rock physics measurements of metamorphic outcrop samples to quantify shear wave rock anisotropy. We produced a map of station-averaged splitting measurements across Taiwan. Patterns of fast shear wave directions correlate with tectonic terranes produced by plate convergence. Deformation-related mineral-preferred orientation in the metamorphic rocks produces a significant amount of the crustal anisotropy in the Taiwan collision zone.

  12. Central America arc volcanic geochemistry: What do we know and what more do we need?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, E. K.; Stern, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    This study uses geochemical data for the Central America volcanic arc (CAVA) from the most comprehensive online data portal, Earthchem.org, to assess the quality of data available to the scientific community, geographic sampling bias versus volcano volume, and statistical analyses of CAVA geochemistry. These statistical studies use new or underutilized visualization techniques to present and interpret volcanic heterogeneities and trends associated with tectonic features along the arc. CAVA volcanoes range widely in type, volume, and composition within individual volcanoes and between volcanic complexes. Mean volcanic complex SiO2 concentrations range from 50-70% wt% and Mg# from 44-66. El Salvadoran and Nicaraguan samples, some of which erupted through continental crust of the Chortis terrane, are dominated by high- to medium-Fe tholeiitic to calcalkalic lavas. These lavas have lower incompatible trace element concentrations than do Guatemalan and Costa Rican lavas, erupted through accreted oceanic island arc and Chorotega oceanic plateau crust, which define medium- to low-Fe calcalkalic suites. In addition to providing a valuable representation of CAVA geochemistry, this comprehensive study is useful in identifying where data is lacking. Comprehensive volcanic arc studies are difficult to implement due to the complexity of the tectonic system. Sampling sites are limited due to rugged terrain, limited road access, extreme foliage, or political boundaries. For example, the data obtained for this study show that nearly 21% of samples are from Arenal volcano, which represents less than 0.5% of the volume of the volcanic arc complexes in the data set. Meanwhile, Irazú-Turrialba makes up 11% of the arc volume and less than 4% of the sample set. Since most of the volcano volume is buried by younger lavas, only the outer volcanic layers are typically sampled.

  13. Arc-continent collision and the formation of continental crust: A new geochemical and isotopic record from the Ordovician Tyrone Igneous Complex, Ireland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Schouten, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Collisions between oceanic island-arc terranes and passive continental margins are thought to have been important in the formation of continental crust throughout much of Earth's history. Magmatic evolution during this stage of the plate-tectonic cycle is evident in several areas of the Ordovician Grampian-Taconic orogen, as we demonstrate in the first detailed geochemical study of the Tyrone Igneous Complex, Ireland. New U-Pb zircon dating yields ages of 493 2 Ma from a primitive mafic intrusion, indicating intra-oceanic subduction in Tremadoc time, and 475 10 Ma from a light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched tonalite intrusion that incorporated Laurentian continental material by early Arenig time (Early Ordovician, Stage 2) during arc-continent collision. Notably, LREE enrichment in volcanism and silicic intrusions of the Tyrone Igneous Complex exceeds that of average Dalradian (Laurentian) continental material that would have been thrust under the colliding forearc and potentially recycled into arc magmatism. This implies that crystal fractionation, in addition to magmatic mixing and assimilation, was important to the formation of new crust in the Grampian-Taconic orogeny. Because similar super-enrichment of orogenic melts occurred elsewhere in the Caledonides in the British Isles and Newfoundland, the addition of new, highly enriched melt to this accreted arc terrane was apparently widespread spatially and temporally. Such super-enrichment of magmatism, especially if accompanied by loss of corresponding lower crustal residues, supports the theory that arc-continent collision plays an important role in altering bulk crustal composition toward typical values for ancient continental crust. ?? 2009 Geological Society of London.

  14. Native Terranes of the Central Klamath Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Gary G.

    1986-12-01

    The Klamath Mountains of northern California and southern Oregon contain several good examples of terranes which have developed in situ. The term "native" is proposed for five of these terranes and all terranes whose development can be tied to an adjacent cratonal area. The Klamath terranes discussed herein include disrupted, stratigraphic, and metamorphic types. Three disrupted terranes, the Rattlesnake Creek, eastern Hayfork, and North Fork, contain fossiliferous blocks derived from both North American and exotic sources. The unique mixed faunal assemblage, stratigraphic ties to North America in the source terranes of the blocks, and paleomagnetic evidence indicate that the tectonic and sedimentary processes responsible for mixing these blocks occurred in proximity to North America, not distant from the terranes' present positions. Coeval blueschist metamorphism in a fourth, inboard terrane, the Stuart Fork, suggests that all four terranes developed during a Late Triassic to Early Jurassic subduction event. A fifth, stratigraphic terrane, the western Hayfork, was constructed upon the assembled disrupted and metamorphic terranes in the Middle Jurassic. Disrupted terranes with similar mixtures of North American and exotic faunas occur throughout the Cordillera from central California possibly as far north as British Columbia. Late Triassic deformation has been documented in several of these terranes, suggesting that (1) subduction operated along at least this portion of North America during the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic, and (2) many additional Cordilleran terranes should also be considered native.

  15. The Grenvillian Namaqua-Natal fold belt adjacent to the Kaapvaal Craton: 1. Distribution of Mesoproterozoic collisional terranes deduced from results of regional surveys and selected profiles in the western and southern parts of the fold belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliston, W. P.; Schoch, A. E.; Cole, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sixteen tectonic terranes of the Namaqua-Natal metamorphic complex are distinguished (the Aggeneys, Agulhas, Bladgrond, Gamka, Grootdrink, Grünau, Fraserburg, Upington, Margate, Mossel, Mzumbe, Okiep, Olifantshoek, Steinkopf, Pofadder, and Tugela terranes). Evidence obtained from field investigations in the outcrop regions of Namaqualand and Natal are correlated with the geophysical data, enabling recognition of terrane suboutcrops in the regions covered by Phanerozoic deposits in the south. This is illustrated by nine selected profiles over the western and southern parts of the metamorphic complex. Four terranes that have not been observed in outcrop are postulated (Agulhas, Fraserburg, Gamka and Mossel terranes) and may represent extensions of some of the Natal terranes (Mzumbe and Margate terranes). The depth to Moho is generally about 40 km, diminishing dramatically at the present continental edge to as little as 15 km. Listric thrust ramps may originate on rises of the gently undulating topography of the Moho zone. Zones of thrusting and later shearing often exploit older structures and fabrics. The terranes that participated in the Grenvillian Namaqua-Natal Orogeny exhibit a dichotomy of vergences regionally. Those that moved to the northeast and north accreted onto the Archaean Kaapvaal Craton before becoming part of the Kalahari Craton. Terranes with vergences to the south and southwest were amalgamated onto other Archaean cratons. All of the composite cratons took part in the assembly of Rodinia.

  16. Provenance change of sediment input in the northeastern foreland of Pamir related to collision of the Indian Plate with the Kohistan-Ladakh arc at around 47 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jimin; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Ji, Weiqiang; Fu, Bihong; Wang, Jiangang; Jin, Chunsheng

    2016-02-01

    The Pamir plateau forms a prominent tectonic salient that marks the western end of the Himalayan orogen containing several terranes that were accreted to Eurasia from the Late Paleozoic to Cenozoic. A detailed knowledge of the tectonic evolution of the Pamir salient during the Cenozoic is important for our understanding of the intracontinental deformation in the western Himalaya. Although the tectonic evolution of the Pamir salient has long been studied, the timing of collision between the Indian Plate and the Kohistan-Ladakh arc is still a matter of debate. We present new U-Pb ages and Hf isotopes of detrital zircons, magnetic fabrics, and stable isotopes from the foreland basin on the northeastern margin of the Pamir that indicate a change in sediment provenance started at about 47 Ma. Sediments in the southwest Tarim Basin were partially derived from the uplifted and eroded Karakoram and Kohistan terranes created by the collision between the Indian Plate and the Kohistan-Ladakh arc at circa 47 Ma, as a result of northward thrusting and propagation of the Indian Plate under Eurasia.

  17. Geochemistry of siliciclastic rocks in the Peninsular, Chugach, and Prince William terranes: Implications for the tectonic evolution of south central Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.A.; Casey, J.F. . Dept. of Geosciences); Bradley, D. . Branch of Alaskan Geology); Kusky, T. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    According to some interpretations, south-central Alaska consists of a series of unrelated terranes juxtaposed by dominantly strike-slip motions some time after formation. Alternatively, these so-called terranes may be related components of a seaward-facing arc, forearc, and accretionary prism. To shed new light on the tectonic history of this area, 150 samples of siliciclastic rocks were analyzed for major, trace, and rare earth elements (REE). Shales were sampled from the Upper Cretaceous Matanuska and Paleogene Chickaloon Fms. of the Peninsular Terrane (forearc basin); argillaceous melange matrix from the Mesozoic McHugh Complex and slate from turbidites of the Upper Cretaceous Valdez Group of the Chugach Terrane (landward part of accretionary prism); and slate from turbidites of the Paleogene Orea Group of the Prince William Terrane (seaward part of accretionary prism). One tectonic model that may fit these geochemical data requires an early linkage between the Peninsular and Chugach-Prince William composite terranes. The geochemical signatures suggest that the McHugh Complex was derived from a mafic volcanic source and may represent an early accretionary stage of sediments derived from an oceanic arc. The progressive continental enrichment of the Valdez and Orca Groups may reflect later accretionary processes during and/or after the collision of the Talkectna arc with the North American continent. The similar increasingly continental source documented in the geochemistry of the forearc basin shales of the Matanuska and Chickaloon Fms. may suggest: that the presently defined Peninsular, Chugach, and Prince William terranes collectively represent one continuously evolving, seaward facing arc, forearc, and accretionary prism complex.

  18. Segmentation of the Cascade Arc Based on Compositional and Sr and Nd Isotopic Variations in Primitive Volcanic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Grunder, A. L.

    2006-12-01

    We define four segments in the Cascade Volcanic Arc based on 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd of primitive volcanic rocks: 1) The North segment extends 450 km from Mt. Meager to Glacier Peak; 2) the 350-km Columbia segment includes volcanoes from Mt. Rainier to Mt. Jefferson; 3) the 250 km Central segment comprises the portion of the arc between the Three Sisters and Crater Lake; and 4) the 350-km South segment includes Mt. Shasta to Mt. Lassen. Isotopic data were compiled for primitive bulk composition (MgO concentrations >8 wt.% MgO) as a fingerprint mantle sources. The North segment has a range in 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7030-0.7037 and is distinguished by the predominance of calcalkaline basalts (CAB) and few low K tholeiites (LKT). The North segment lies on the North Cascade craton where convergence is near orthogonal. Oblique subduction occurs beneath the Columbia, Central, and South segments. The Columbia segment (87Sr/86Sr of 0.7028-0.7037) has both LKT and CABs as well as enriched ocean island-like basalts (OIB) that are found both on the arc axis and, especially at the Simcoe Volcanic Field, behind the arc. This segment lies primarily on the accreted Tertiary oceanic plateau terrane of the Columbia Embayment. The Central segment is dominated by LKT with lesser CAB and has the most restricted Sr isotopic range (0.7034- 0.7038). Like the South segment, the Central segment mainly overlies accreted terranes stitched by Mesozoic plutons and has Basin and Range (B&R) extension behind as well as locally within the arc. Medicine Lake Volcano, on the margin of the B&R behind Mt. Shasta is also dominated by LKT and has a narrow isotopic range like the Central segment. This suggests that the LKT's are related to extension in the arc. The South segment is distinguished by the widest Sr isotopic range (0.7028-0.7042) and the presence of high Mg basaltic andesite and andesite compositions in addition to LKT and CABs. These arc segments broadly correspond to physical segments that were

  19. The evolution of the neoproterozoic São Gabriel juvenile terrane, southern Brazil based on SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages and ?18O data on detrital zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lena, L. O.; Pimentel, M. M.; Philipp, R. P.; Armstrong, R. A.; Sato, K.

    2013-12-01

    . This is explained by the installation of a continental magmatic arc along the western margin of the Rio de La Plata Craton. Period III took place between ca. 690-650 represented by the accretion of the arc system to the Rio de La Plata Craton. In this timeframe only continental crust-derived magmas are recognized and no mantle δ18O values are observed. In summary, our data provides an insight into the progressive evolution of the São Gabriel terrane from an intra-oceanic subduction zone at ca. 879-750 Ma to a continental arc setting (ages < 690 Ma) into three distinct periods, which preceded ocean closure and continental collision at the end of the Neoproterozoic.

  20. 3D Lithospheric Structure in an Arc-Continent Collisional Setting: Results from the EarthScope IDOR Passive Seismic Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, A. C.; Russo, R. M.; Mocanu, V. I.; Foster, D. A.; Bremner, P. M.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; VanDecar, J. C.; Hole, J. A.; Tikoff, B.

    2014-12-01

    We present new images of lithospheric structure obtained from P-to-S receiver functions at 86 broadband seismic stations we deployed as part of the EarthScope IDOR experiment. The high-quality data of the IDOR survey allowed us to image in detail the crustal thickness, and the structure of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Blue Mountains accreted terranes and the Paleozoic margin of North America. At the surface, the ~110 Ma suture between the arc terranes and the North American Craton is marked by the dextral transpressional system of the Western Idaho Shear Zone (WISZ), which closely follows the Sr 0.706 isopleth. Long-lived magmatism (108 - 50 Ma) of the Idaho Batholith occurred during and after the WISZ deformation. We constructed more than 7000 P-to-S teleseismic receiver functions using iterative time domain deconvolution, and we used H-k grid search, inversion, and common conversion point stacking (CCP) to image the lithospheric structure. Moho depths vary from 35-40 km beneath the Blue Mountain terranes and the extended regions of central Idaho, and shallow to ~30 km in the central part of the IDOR network. We see a clear break in the continuity of the Moho across the WISZ, with depths increasing from 30 to 40 km east of the WISZ. We also see a strong mid-crustal converting interface at 15-20 km depth beneath the Idaho Batholith on the east side of the WISZ. To the east, beneath the Lost River Range and Pahsimeroi valley, we see an offset in Moho depth possibly related to Basin-and-Range extension. A strong shallow contrast in crustal velocities beneath the West Snake River Plain is probably due to Columbia River Basalts and sedimentary cover. We observe a horizontal, continuous positive amplitude phase at ~90 km across the entire network that we interpret as the Mid-Lithospheric Discontinuity. A second positive amplitude phase varies from ~120 km beneath the accreted terranes to ~140 km beneath the western margin of the North American Craton. The

  1. Late Paleozoic orogeny in Alaska's Farewell terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D.C.; Dumoulin, J.; Layer, P.; Sunderlin, D.; Roeske, S.; McClelland, B.; Harris, A.G.; Abbott, G.; Bundtzen, T.; Kusky, T.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence is presented for a previously unrecognized late Paleozoic orogeny in two parts of Alaska's Farewell terrane, an event that has not entered into published scenarios for the assembly of Alaska. The Farewell terrane was long regarded as a piece of the early Paleozoic passive margin of western Canada, but is now thought, instead, to have lain between the Siberian and Laurentian (North American) cratons during the early Paleozoic. Evidence for a late Paleozoic orogeny comes from two belts located 100-200 km apart. In the northern belt, metamorphic rocks dated at 284-285 Ma (three 40Ar/39Ar white-mica plateau ages) provide the main evidence for orogeny. The metamorphic rocks are interpreted as part of the hinterland of a late Paleozoic mountain belt, which we name the Browns Fork orogen. In the southern belt, thick accumulations of Pennsylvanian-Permian conglomerate and sandstone provide the main evidence for orogeny. These strata are interpreted as the eroded and deformed remnants of a late Paleozoic foreland basin, which we name the Dall Basin. We suggest that the Browns Fork orogen and Dall Basin comprise a matched pair formed during collision between the Farewell terrane and rocks to the west. The colliding object is largely buried beneath Late Cretaceous flysch to the west of the Farewell terrane, but may have included parts of the so-called Innoko terrane. The late Paleozoic convergent plate boundary represented by the Browns Fork orogen likely connected with other zones of plate convergence now located in Russia, elsewhere in Alaska, and in western Canada. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Two flysch belts having distinctly different provenance suggest no stratigraphic link between the Wrangellia composite terrane and the paleo-Alaskan margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hults, Chad P.; Wilson, Frederic H.; Donelick, Raymond A.; O'Sullivan, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    The provenance of Jurassic to Cretaceous flysch along the northern boundary of the allochthonous Wrangellia composite terrane, exposed from the Lake Clark region of southwest Alaska to the Nutzotin Mountains in eastern Alaska, suggests that the flysch can be divided into two belts having different sources. On the north, the Kahiltna flysch and Kuskokwim Group overlie and were derived from the Farwell and Yukon-Tanana terranes, as well as smaller related terranes that were part of the paleo-Alaskan margin. Paleocurrent indicators for these two units suggest that they derived sediment from the north and west. Sandstones are predominantly lithic wacke that contain abundant quartz grains, lithic rock fragments, and detrital mica, which suggest that these rocks were derived from recycled orogen and arc sources. Conglomerates contain limestone clasts that have fossils matching terranes that made up the paleo-Alaskan margin. In contrast, flysch units on the south overlie and were derived from the Wrangellia composite terrane. Paleocurrent indicators for these units suggest that they derived sediment from the south. Sandstones are predominantly feldspathic wackes that contain abundant plagioclase grains and volcanic rock fragments, which suggest these rocks were derived from an arc. Clast compositions in conglomerate south of the boundary match rock types of the Wrangellia composite terrane. The distributions of detrital zircon ages also differentiate the flysch units. Flysch units on the north average 54% Mesozoic, 14% Paleozoic, and 32% Precambrian detrital zircons, reflecting derivation from the older Yukon-Tanana, Farewell, and other terranes that made up the paleo-Alaskan margin. In comparison, flysch units on the south average 94% Mesozoic, 1% Paleozoic, and 5% Precambrian zircons, which are consistent with derivation from the Mesozoic oceanic magmatic arc rocks in the Wrangellia composite terrane. In particular, the flysch units on the south contain a large

  3. Geochemistry of Devonian and Carboniferous of sedimentary rocks in the Tsetserleg terrane, Hangay-Hentey basin, central Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purevjav, N.; Roser, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Hangay-Hentey basin forms part of the Central Asian Orogen Belt in central Mongolia. Contrasting hypotheses have been proposed explain its origin, and its tectonic evolution and provenance are controversial. Many studies to date have been based on geological evidence and only limited petrographic and geochemical analysis is available. The Hangay-Hentey basin is divided into seven terranes, of which the Tsetserleg terrane is one. The Tsetserleg terrane consists of siliceous- clastic sediments deposited in a turbidite environment. It is divided into the Middle Devonian Erdenetsogt Formation (sandstone, siltstone, shale and jasper), Middle-Upper Devonian Tsetserleg Formation (sandstone and siltstone), and the Lower Carboniferous Jargalant Formation (finer grained sandstone and mudstone) Sandstone petrography and major and trace element geochemistry of mudstones and sandstones has been used in attempt to constrain some aspects of provenance, tectonic setting and weathering of these Devonian and Carboniferous sediments. The Devonian sandstones are moderately sorted, and composed of sub-angular to sub-rounded quartz, plagioclase, microcline and rock fragments, and a few grains of chlorite and mica. Volcanic (dacite and rhyolite) lithics dominant the lithic population (Lv/L >0.90), and QFL values suggest deposition in an undissected to transitional arc environment. Geochemically the sandstones immature and are classed as wackes, while the mudstones are classed as shales. Major and trace element concentrations of 94 sandstones and mudstones indicate both the Devonian and Carboniferous sediments in the Tsetserleg terrane were mainly derived from felsic sources, although more intermediate detritus dominates in some samples. Major element data suggests deposition probably occurred in an Active Continental Margin setting (ACM), but scatter into the ARC field means an evolved continental island arc (CIA) setting or back arc environment is also possible. Chemical Index of

  4. Geochemical recognition of a captured back-arc basin metabasaltic complex, southwestern Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Donato, M.M. )

    1991-09-01

    An extensive fault-bounded amphibolite terrane of Late Jurassic (145 {plus minus} 2 Ma) metamorphic age occurring in the northeastern Klamath Mountains of southern Oregon has been recognized as the remnants of an ancient back-arc basin. In spite of through metamorphic recrystallization under amphibolite-facies conditions, the amphibolite locally displays relict igneous textures which suggest that the protoliths included basaltic dikes or sills, shallow diabase intrusions, and gabbros. The major- and minor-element chemistry of the amphibolite indicates that some alteration of original compositions has occurred. Nevertheless, certain elements (e.g. Zr, Ti, Y, Hf, P, Th, Ta, and the REE) were probably immobile and retain their original igneous abundances, Chondrite-normalized REE patterns are similar to those of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB): concave-downward and flat or slightly LREE-depleted, with abundances about six to 30 times chondritic values. Patterns are slightly LREE-enriched and HREE-depleted relative to average MORB. Most samples plot in or near MORB fields in tectonomagmatic discrimination diagrams, but relative enrichment in Th, and the LREE suggest the involvement of subduction-related fluids in magma genesis. In this regard, the amphibolite is very similar to some back-arc basin basalts. The geochemical data, together with the present-day geologic context, indicate that the tectonic setting of eruption/intrusion was probably within a back-arc basin that existed inboard (east) of a pre-Nevadan volcanic arc. The basalt (now amphibolite) and the overlying sediments (now the May Creek Schist) were metamorphosed and deformed during accretion to North America during the Late Jurassic Nevadan orogeny.

  5. Geophysical modeling of the northern Appalachian Brompton-Cameron, Central Maine, and Avalon terranes under the New Jersey Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maguire, T.J.; Sheridan, R.E.; Volkert, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    A regional terrane map of the New Jersey Coastal Plain basement was constructed using seismic, drilling, gravity and magnetic data. The Brompton-Cameron and Central Maine terranes were coalesced as one volcanic island arc terrane before obducting onto Laurentian, Grenville age, continental crust in the Taconian orogeny [Rankin, D.W., 1994. Continental margin of the eastern United States: past and present. In: Speed, R.C., (Ed.), Phanerozoic Evolution of North American Continent-Ocean Transitions. DNAG Continent-Ocean Transect Volume. Geological Society of America, Boulder, Colorado, pp. 129-218]. Volcanic island-arc rocks of the Avalon terrane are in contact with Central Maine terrane rocks in southern Connecticut where the latter are overthrust onto the Brompton-Cameron terrane, which is thrust over Laurentian basement. Similarities of these allochthonous island arc terranes (Brompton-Cameron, Central Maine, Avalon) in lithology, fauna and age suggest that they are faulted segments of the margin of one major late Precambrian to early Paleozoic, high latitude peri-Gondwana island arc designated as "Avalonia", which collided with Laurentia in the early to middle Paleozoic. The Brompton Cameron, Central Maine, and Avalon terranes are projected as the basement under the eastern New Jersey Coastal Plain based on drill core samples of metamorphic rocks of active margin/magmatic arc origin. A seismic reflection profile across the New York Bight traces the gentle dipping (approximately 20 degrees) Cameron's Line Taconian suture southeast beneath allochthonous Avalon and other terranes to a 4 sec TWTT depth (approximately 9 km) where the Avalonian rocks are over Laurentian crust. Gentle up-plunge (approximately 5 degrees) projections to the southwest bring the Laurentian Grenville age basement and the drift-stage early Paleozoic cover rocks to windows in Burlington Co. at approximately 1 km depth and Cape May Co. at approximately 2 km depths. The antiformal Shellburne

  6. Correspondence of ores of silver and gold with basement terranes in the American southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titley, S. R.

    1991-04-01

    The ratios of silver to gold produced from epigenetic ore districts of the American southwest reveal a consistency of value ranges, differing by an order of magnitude, that may be identified with either one or the other of two geologic terranes in which the ores occur. A discriminating value of the ratio is about 17.5∶1, the ratio of crustal abundance given by Ahrens (1965). (No further significance is attributed to this value, at this time, beyond the fact that it appears to establish a reasonable separation of values on the basis of geographic occurrence.) Ores relatively enriched in Ag occur in terranes floored by thick Proterozoic clastic and Paleozoic marine successions, and ores relatively enriched in Au lie above or within a Proterozoic basement dominated by maficfelsic volcanic (arc) successions. Proterozoic granites occur in each region. The values of the ratio are broadly consistent within each terrane, irrespective of the age of ore formation, the ore deposit style, associated igneous rocks, structural control, differing interpreted styles of subduction, and weathering histories. These characteristics and associations support a hypothesis that metallogenic signatures of ore districts in this region are fundamentally related to the crust in which the ores occur.

  7. Dynamics of continental accretion.

    PubMed

    Moresi, L; Betts, P G; Miller, M S; Cayley, R A

    2014-04-10

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon. PMID:24670638

  8. Mesozoic-Cenozoic basins of Western China as example of partitioned retro-arc foreland basin system

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, S.A.; Zuchang, X.; Carroll, A.; McKnight, C.

    1988-01-01

    Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary basins of Xinjiang Autonomous Region, western China, occupy a retro-arc foreland position with respect to the southern Eurasian convergent continental margin. Yet these basins differ in many ways from retro-arc foreland basins in other parts of the world. In North America, for instance, the Cretaceous Rocky Mountain foreland basin overlies basement that has been an integral part of cratonal North America since the Precambrian. The region had a long early Paleozoic history as a divergent continental margin and was later modified by relatively modest continental growth through accretionary tectonics. Once established in the Mesozoic, the Rocky Mountain foreland basin was a structurally simple, large, integrated basin, with the exception of the Laramide time-space segment of the foreland system. In contrast, the Mesozoic-Cenozoic foreland basins of Xinjiang are markedly partitioned, reflecting the process and architecture of major tectonic accretion from the Paleozoic through the collision of India in the Tertiary. The stage was set for a partitioned Mesozoic foreland with the Paleozoic suturing of the Siberia and Tarim cratons and intervening terranes. Although the margins of these blocks were deformed and uplifted during collision, their interiors persisted as depocenters into the foreland basin phase during the Mesozoic. The foreland basins of western China apparently represent poorly documented end members in the spectrum of retro-arc foreland basins. The Chinese examples occur in a region characterized by extreme continental growth through tectonic accretion. Reactivation of structural trends inherited from pre-foreland history were key factors in segmentation of the foreland.

  9. Precise U-Pb Zircon Constraints on the Earliest Magmatic History of the Carolina Terrane.

    PubMed

    Wortman; Samson; Hibbard

    2000-05-01

    The early magmatic and tectonic history of the Carolina terrane and its possible affinities with other Neoproterozoic circum-Atlantic arc terranes have been poorly understood, in large part because of a lack of reliable geochronological data. Precise U-Pb zircon dates for the Virgilina sequence, the oldest exposed part, constrain the timing of the earliest known stage of magmatism in the terrane and of the Virgilina orogeny. A flow-banded rhyolite sampled from a metavolcanic sequence near Chapel Hill, North Carolina, yielded a U-Pb zircon date of 632.9 +2.6/-1.9 Ma. A granitic unit of the Chapel Hill pluton, which intrudes the metavolcanic sequence, yielded a nearly identical U-Pb zircon date of 633 +2/-1.5 Ma, interpreted as its crystallization age. A felsic gneiss and a dacitic tuff from the Hyco Formation yielded U-Pb zircon dates of 619.9 +4.5/-3 Ma and 615.7 +3.7/-1.9 Ma, respectively. Diorite and granite of the Flat River complex have indistinguishable U-Pb upper-intercept dates of 613.9 +1.6/-1.5 Ma and 613.4 +2.8/-2 Ma. The Osmond biotite-granite gneiss, which intruded the Hyco Formation before the Virgilina orogeny, crystallized at 612.4 +5.2/-1.7 Ma. Granite of the Roxboro pluton, an intrusion that postdated the Virgilina orogeny, yielded a U-Pb upper intercept date of 546.5 +3.0/-2.4 Ma, interpreted as the time of its crystallization. These new dates both provide the first reliable estimates of the age of the Virgilina sequence and document that the earliest known stage of magmatism in the Carolina terrane had begun by 633 +2/-1.5 Ma and continued at least until 612.4 +5.2/-1.7 Ma, an interval of approximately 25 m.yr. Timing of the Virgilina orogeny is bracketed between 612.4 +5.2/-1.7 Ma and 586+/-10 Ma (reported age of the upper Uwharrie Formation). The U-Pb systematics of all units studied in the Virgilina sequence are simple and lack any evidence of an older xenocrystic zircon component, which would indicate the presence of a continental

  10. Segmentation of the Cascade Arc as indicated by Sr and Nd isotopic variation among diverse primitive basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mariek E.; Grunder, Anita L.; Rowe, Michael C.

    2008-02-01

    In the central Oregon Cascades, extension of the arc has promoted eruption of primitive basalts that are of three types, calcalkaline (CAB), low K tholeiitic (LKT) and rare absarokitic (ABS) in the forearc. Based on a comparison with the distribution of primitive magma types and their 87Sr/ 86Sr and 143Nd/ 144Nd isotopic signature in the Cascades, we divide the arc into four segments that correspond to distinct tectonic settings and reflect mantle domains and melting regimes at depth. The segments are: 1) the North Segment from Mt. Meager to Glacier Peak; 2) the Columbia Segment from Mt. Rainier to Mt. Jefferson; 3) the Central Segment from the Three Sisters to Medicine Lake, and 4) the South Segment from Mt. Shasta to Lassen Peak. Calcalkaline basalts (CABs) are found all along the arc axis and are produced by fluxing of variable mantle domains by subduction-derived fluid. In the South Segment, the degree of fluxing and melting is greatest as indicated by high 87Sr/ 86Sr and Ba/Ce of CABs relative to other types of ambient basalt and is consistent with the greater abundance of high-Mg basaltic andesite, relative to other segments. High flux and abundant melt is enhanced by the presence of a slab window and subduction of the altered and deformed Gorda Plate. In the northern part of the arc, small degrees of flux melting are coupled with the presence of an enriched mantle component to yield abundant high-field strength element-enriched (HFSE-rich) basalts. Extension and higher heat flow favors the production of abundant low potassium tholeiites LKT in the Central Segment. A distinct shift in 87Sr/ 86Sr of low LKTs occurs between the Columbia and Central Segments (0.7028 vs. 0.7034, respectively), which we interpret as juxtaposition of mantle of accreted oceanic terranes, including the enriched large igneous province Siletz Terrane, with encroaching mantle related to the adjacent Basin and Range Province. The latter, although depleted, carries an enrichment signature

  11. Crustal seismicity in the back-arc region of the southern central Andes from historic to modern times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Patricia Monica

    The western margin of South America between 30°S and 36°S is seismically active. While the largest magnitude earthquakes are the interplate subduction zone events, the historically most devastating earthquakes have been the moderate-to-large magnitude earthquakes with depths < 35 km in the Andean back-arc. This region is characterized by accreted terranes later reactivated during Mesozoic extensional processes. Crustal seismicity in the back-arc is related to the thin-skinned Precordillera (PC) fold-thrust belt and the thick-skinned Sierras Pampeanas (SP) basement-cored uplifts overlying the flat slab segment. South of 33°S, the active volcanic arc above the normally dipping subducted plate is also seismically active at crustal depths. In this study we combined historical and regional broadband seismic data to characterize moderate-to-large earthquakes and the crustal structure in this region. We have digitized and modeled teleseismic records of the 1944 and 1952 San Juan, Argentina PC earthquakes. Both events have shallow source depths, short duration of the source time functions with a thrusting focal solution for the 1944 (Mw 7.0) earthquake and a major strike-slip component in the 1952 (Mw 6.8) earthquake solution. By modeling regional broadband waveforms collected during the CHile-ARgentina Geophysical Experiment (CHARGE) during 2000 and 2002 we constrained the seismic moment tensor and improved focal depths for 27 crustal (3.5 < Mw < 5.1) earthquakes. We found predominantly thrust-fault focal mechanisms and focal depths of 10-26 km for earthquakes over the flat slab region; the eastern SP and active arc have earthquakes with strike-slip focal mechanisms and shallower depths. We used these same earthquakes to determine the crustal structure using raypaths that sample different geologic terranes. Our results indicate high Vp, low Vs for the northern Cordillera, PC and western SP thicker crust; low Vp, low Vs and a thinner crust beneath the arc (south of 33

  12. Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic constraints on the origin of silicic lavas in the northern Cascade Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martindale, M.; Mullen, E.; Weis, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Cascade Arc is the type-locality for a 'hot' subduction zone, where the downgoing slab is young and subduction is relatively slow; a unique setting for studying the controls on silicic (>56 wt% SiO2) magma genesis [1,2]. We present high precision Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic and trace element data for silicic lavas and country rocks from the major centres of the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt (GVB) in British Columbia, which are hosted by the Mesozoic Coast Plutonic Complex and accreted Coast Belt terranes. In isotopic plots, the silicic GVB lavas define mixing curves between northern Cascadia Basin sediment [3] and Juan de Fuca MORB. The silicic GVB lavas have lower ɛNd, and higher ɛHf, 87Sr/86Sr, 208Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb for a given 206Pb/204Pb than co-existing alkalic mafic lavas [2,4] which define a separate isotopic cluster. The alkalic mafic lavas have OIB-like trace element compositions [2,4], but the silicic lavas are calc-alkaline with a typical 'arc' trace element signature. Geochemical systematics suggest that a mafic, isotopically 'depleted' contaminant may be affecting the composition of GVB silicic lavas. However, modelling indicates that slab melts do not constitute a major component of the lavas despite high slab temperatures. Geochemical models also rule out the accreted Coast Belt terranes as an assimilant. However, AFC modelling using 147 Ma Cloudburst quartz diorite [5] as the assimilant can explain both the trace element and isotopic compositional range displayed by GVB silicic magmas, consistent with the Coast Plutonic Complex as a major component of the deep crust in this region. Crustal assimilation would have partially overprinted any alkalic mantle-derived signature of parental magmas, while imparting a calc-alkaline arc signature to resulting silicic magmas. [1] Green & Harry (1999) EPSL, 171; [2] Mullen & Weis (2013) G3, 14; [3] Carpentier et al. (2014) Chem Geol, 382; [4] Mullen & Weis (2015) EPSL, 414; [5] Friedman & Armstrong (1995) GSA

  13. Paleomagnetic contributions to the Klamath Mountains terrane puzzle-a new piece from the Ironside Mountain batholith, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, Edward A.; Gromme, C. Sherman; Irwin, W. Porter

    2013-01-01

    We obtained paleomagnetic samples from six sites within the Middle Jurassic Ironside Mountain batholith (~170 Ma), which constitutes the structurally lowest part of the Western Hayfork terrane, in the Klamath Mountains province of northern California and southern Oregon. Structural attitudes measured in the coeval Hayfork Bally Meta-andesite were used to correct paleomagnetic data from the batholith. Comparing the corrected paleomagnetic pole with a 170-Ma reference pole for North America indicates 73.5° ± 10.6° of clockwise rotation relative to the craton. Nearly one-half of this rotation may have occurred before the terrane accreted to the composite Klamath province at ~168 Ma. No latitudinal displacement of the batholith was detected.

  14. Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous magmatism in the Lhasa terrane and its tectonic implications: Evidences from detrital zircons in the Nyingchi Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Harris, Nigel; Xu, Wang-Chun; Pan, Fa-Bin

    2016-02-01

    The Late Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the Lhasa terrane remains poorly understood due to the paucity of the Late Paleozoic magmatic rocks exposed at the surface. Detrital zircons in the sedimentary rocks can provide a record of magmatic rocks that have been eroded. Here we report detrital zircon U-Pb ages, trace-element and Hf isotopic data of metasedimentary rocks from the Nyingchi Complex in the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. Detrital zircons from the metasedimentary rocks yield major age populations of 330-364 Ma, 490-800 Ma, 1000-1200 Ma, and 1500-1800 Ma. The weighted mean ages of the youngest three detrital zircons indicate Carboniferous (~ 330 Ma) depositional age for their sedimentary protoliths. Provenance analysis indicates that the sedimentary detritus was sourced from the Lhasa terrane itself. The presence of abundant 330-364 Ma detrital zircons indicates that the Lhasa terrane was characterized by Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous magmatism. The trace-element compositions of the 330-364 Ma detrital zircons indicate that their magmatic host rocks mainly include mafic rocks and granitoids, and minor carbonatite. Some mafic host rocks probably formed in rift-related tectonic setting, and the others formed in arc-related tectonic settings. The granitic host rocks were S-type granites. The 330-391 Ma zircons have negative εHf(t) values (- 19.3 to - 2.5), suggesting that their magmatic host rocks resulted from partial melting of the enriched mantle or ancient crustal materials. Combined with previous studies, we propose that the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous magmatic rocks in the Lhasa terrane probably formed in an arc-back-arc system which resulted from the southward subduction of the Paleo-Tethys oceanic crust. The back-arc basin developed as the Sumdo Paleo-Tethys ocean, which began to shrink as oceanic crust subducted northwards underneath the North Lhasa terrane during the Late Carboniferous-Permian and finally closed during the Triassic.

  15. Geochronology and geochemistry of Paleozoic plutons in the Alxa Terrane: petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Zhao, Guochun

    2016-04-01

    Situated between the Tarim Craton and the North China Craton (NCC), the Paleozoic magmatic record in the Alxa Terrane places important constraints on the accretionary orogenesis of the southern Paleo-Asian Ocean (PAO) forming the southern section of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. New results of LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock major- and trace-element compositions reveal two groups of diorites and granitoids in the Alxa Terrane. One group consists of diorites and granitoids that were emplaced at 458-440 Ma, characterized by lower Al2O3/TiO2 ratios and higher TiO2 contents, implying high temperature - low pressure crystallization conditions and a shallow source region. In contrast, the second group consists of granitoids that were formed at 417-407 Ma, displaying low high rare earth elements, very high Sr/Y ratios and mostly positive Eu anomalies, suggesting low temperature - high pressure crystallization conditions and source regions at deep crustal levels where garnet is stable in the residual phase. Both of two groups are mostly calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline, and depleted in Nb, Ta and Ti and enriched in Ba, K and Sr, suggesting an arc affinity related to a PAO oceanic subduction regime since the Late Ordovician. Both zircon ɛHf(t) and whole-rock ɛNd(t) values decrease from 458 Ma to 440 Ma but increase from 417 Ma to 407 Ma, whereas whole-rock initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios display an opposite trend. Such an isotopic change suggests a tectonic switch from an advancing to a retreating subduction setting in the Early Devonian. Compiled with previous studies, we suggest that the early Paleozoic magmatic arc existing in the Alxa Terrane represented the western extension of the super-large early Paleozoic active continental margin on the northern margin of the NCC.

  16. The Record of Collision and Accretion in the History of a Convergent Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.; Cayley, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Convergent margins become congested when they try to swallow buoyant, exotic crust or an oceanic swell associated with anomalously buoyant plume material. Mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the sites of significant lateral continental growth. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordillera and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back arc basin development, often related to subduction roll back and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. In previous work, (Mason et al, 2010), we found that buoyant material ingested by a subduction zone produces a relative advance of the local region of the trench (either reduced rollback or absolute advance) naturally leading to the characteristic indentation of the plate boundary by the plateau. Depending on the strength and buoyancy of the incoming anomaly relative to the oceanic lithosphere, it may be subducted or it may be accreted with the associated formation of a slab window. Extending this model to ocean-continent convergent zones (Moresi et al, 2014), we show how the indentation of buoyant exotic material also dominates terrane accretion. When large blocks of material congest a subduction zone, the subduction zone needs to undergo signficiant re-arrangement for convergence to continue. We have modelled this process and observe characteristic patterns in the deformation of the over-riding plate, in the timing of the escape of material from behind the indenter, and in the oroclinal geometry that remains once the collision has completed. References Mason, W. G., Moresi, L., Betts, P. G

  17. Kilbuck terrane: oldest known rocks in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Box, S.E.; Moll-Stalcup, E. J.; Wooden, J.L.; Bradshaw, J.Y.

    1990-01-01

    The Kilbuck terrane in southwestern Alaska is a narrow, thin crustal sliver or flake of amphibolite facies orthogneiss. The igneous protolith of this gneiss was a suite of subduction-related plutonic rocks. U-Pb data on zircons from trondhjemitic and granitic samples yield upper-intercept (igneous) ages of 2070 ?? 16 and 2040 ?? 74 Ma, respectively. Nd isotope data from these rocks suggest that a diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite suite (??Nd[T] = +2.1 to +2.7; T is time of crystallization) evolved from partial melts of depleted mantle with no discernible contamination by older crust, whereas a coeval granitic pluton (??Nd[T] = -5.7) contains a significant component derived from Archean crust. Orthogneisses with similar age and Nd isotope characteristics are found in the Idono complex 250 km to the north. Early Proterozoic rocks are unknown elsewhere in Alaska. The possibility that the Kilbuck terrane was displaced from provinces of similar age in other cratons (e.g., Australian, Baltic, Guiana, and west African shields), or from the poorly dated Siberian craton, cannot be excluded. -from Authors

  18. Detrital zircon record of the early Paleozoic meta-sedimentary rocks in Russian Altai: Implications on their provenance and the tectonic nature of the Altai-Mongolian terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Sun, Min; Cai, Keda; Buslov, Mikhail M.; Zhao, Guochun; Rubanova, Elena S.; Voytishek, Elena E.

    2015-09-01

    An integrated U-Pb and Hf-isotope study on detrital zircons from the early Paleozoic meta-sedimentary rocks along the Charysh-Terekta-Ulagan-Sayan suture zone in Russian Altai was conducted in order to trace their provenance and tectonic setting. Most of the zircons possess oscillatory zoning and high Th/U ratios (> 0.1), indicating their magmatic origin. The investigated samples yield similar zircon populations, i.e., dominant groups with late Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic ages, followed by those from Mesoproterozoic to late Neoproterozoic and minor ones from Archean to middle Mesoproterozoic, indicating multiple tectono-thermal events in the source area. Comparison with surrounding tectonic units shows that the Tuva-Mongolian terrane and its adjacent island arcs possibly provided substantial materials to the sedimentary basin. These rocks show detrital zircon age patterns and Hf-isotope compositions similar to their counterparts in the Chinese Altai and Tseel terrane in western Mongolia, but different from those in the Gorny Altai terrane. Therefore, the investigated meta-sedimentary units possibly represented the northernmost segment of the Altai-Mongolian terrane. With combination of previous studies in the Chinese Altai and Tseel terrane, our data suggest that the Altai-Mongolian terrane possibly represents a coherent continental arc-accretionary prism system built upon the active margin of the western Mongolia during the Cambrian to Ordovician and thus does not support the micro-continent model with a passive margin. A compilation of U-Pb and Hf-isotope data of detrital zircons from the whole Altai-Mongolian terrane shows that the source area (i.e., the western Mongolia) underwent two most extensive magmatic activities at ca. 1.02-0.67 Ga and 0.67-0.43 Ga. These zircons possess both positive and negative εHf(t) values, suggesting significant crustal growth and reworking during the magmatic activities. Our study underlines a crucial role of Precambrian

  19. Nature and melting processes of the lithosphere beneath the North-East Qiangqtang terrane, Central Tibet, during Eocene times.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goussin, Fanny; Guillot, Stéphane; Schulmann, Karel; Cordier, Carole; Oliot, Emilien; Replumaz, Anne; Roperch, Pierrick; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    At the time of the collision with India (~55Ma), the southern margin of Asia was a composite continental domain resulting from an already long history of successive accretions of different terranes having different rheologies. Knowledge about the structure, composition and thermal state of the Tibetan lithosphere through time is thus fundamental to understand the respective contributions of pre-Cenozoïc and Cenozoïc tectonics in the building of the Plateau to its present-day elevations. We focused on the boundary between the Qiangtang terrane to the south, and the Songpan-Ganze terrane to the north. We jointly studied deep crustal xenoliths and associated (ultra-)potassic magmatism from the Eocene basins of Nangqian and Xialaxiu (Qinghai Province, China), north of the Qiangtang terrane. The aims were to retrieve the composition and the thermal state of the lower crust during Eocene times, to study the behavior of the lower crust and lithospheric mantle of the Eastern Qiangtang terrane and the adjacent Songpan-Ganze terrane at the time of the collision, and the link with the magmatic activity. Crustal xenoliths are of two types: biotite-rich, amphibole bearing metasediments; and garnet-bearing quartzo-feldspathic gneisses. Such assemblages are typical of very high-grade amphibolite and granulite facies metamorphism; further study should allow us to quantify the pressures and temperatures those rocks experienced until the time they were sampled by their host lavas. Major element geochemistry places the c.a. 51-49 Ma (Spurlin et al., 2005) Xialaxiu volcanic field in a fairly differentiated (SiO2~65-70 wt%) high-K field of the calc-alcaline series. Trace element analysis suggests a strong crustal contamination of the primary mantellic melts. C.a. 38-37 Ma (Spurlin et al., 2005) Nangqian magmatic bodies span across the alkaline series, with high to extreme (K2O~6wt%) values. Complex major and trace element patterns, coupled with high-resolution microprobe data on

  20. Steady rotation of the Cascade arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Ray E.; McCaffrey, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Displacement of the Miocene Cascade volcanic arc (northwestern North America) from the active arc is in the same sense and at nearly the same rate as the present clockwise block motions calculated from GPS velocities in a North American reference frame. Migration of the ancestral arc over the past 16 m.y. can be explained by clockwise rotation of upper-plate blocks at 1.0°/m.y. over a linear melting source moving westward 1–4.5 km/m.y. due to slab rollback. Block motion and slab rollback are in opposite directions in the northern arc, but both are westerly in the southern extensional arc, where rollback may be enhanced by proximity to the edge of the Juan de Fuca slab. Similarities between post–16 Ma arc migration, paleomagnetic rotation, and modern GPS block motions indicate that the secular block motions from decadal GPS can be used to calculate long-term strain rates and earthquake hazards. Northwest-directed Basin and Range extension of 140 km is predicted behind the southern arc since 16 Ma, and 70 km of shortening is predicted in the northern arc. The GPS rotation poles overlie a high-velocity slab of the Siletzia terrane dangling into the mantle beneath Idaho (United States), which may provide an anchor for the rotations.

  1. A geologic guide to Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve, Alaska; a tectonic collage of northbound terranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winkler, Gary R.; with contributions by MacKevett, E. M., Jr.; Plafker, George; Richter, D.H.; Rosenkrans, D.S.; Schmoll, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve, the largest unit in the U.S. National Park System, encompasses near 13.2 million acres of geological wonderments. This geologic guide presents history of exploration and Earth-science investigation; describes the complex geologic makeup; characterizes the vast college of accretion geologic terranes in this area of Alaska's continental margin; recapitulates the effects of earthquakes, volcanoes, and glaciers; characterizes the copper and gold resources of the parklands; and describes outstanding locales within the park and preserve area. A glossary of geologic terms and a categorized list of additional sources of information complete this report.

  2. U-Pb Geochronologic, Nd Isotopic, and Geochemical Evidence for the Correlation of the Chopawamsic and Milton Terranes, Piedmont Zone, Southern Appalachian Orogen.

    PubMed

    Coler; Wortman; Samson; Hibbard; Stern

    2000-07-01

    We report U-Pb crystallization ages from four metavolcanic rocks and two granitic gneiss samples as well as whole-rock chemical analyses and Sm-Nd isotopic ratios from 25 metaigneous and metasedimentary rocks from the Chopawamsic and Milton terranes, southern Appalachian Orogen. A metarhyolite sample from the Chopawamsic Formation and a metabasalt sample from the Ta River Formation in the Chopawamsic terrane have indistinguishable U-Pb crystallization ages of 471.4+/-1.3 Ma and 470.0+1.3/-1.5 Ma, respectively. A sample from the Prospect granite that intruded metavolcanic rocks of the Ta River Formation yields a younger U-Pb date of 458.0+/-1 Ma. Metarhyolite and granitic gneiss samples from the northern part of the Milton terrane yield U-Pb dates of 458.5+3.8/-1.0 Ma and 450+/-1.8 Ma, respectively. Metavolcanic and metaplutonic rocks from both terranes span a range in major element composition from basalt to rhyolite. Trace element concentrations in these samples show enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements K, Ba, and Rb and depletion in high field strength elements Ti and Nb, similar to those from island arc volcanic rocks. Initial epsilon(Nd) values and T(DM) ages of the metaigneous and metasedimentary samples range from 0.2 to -7.2 and from 1200 to 1700 Ma for the Chopawamsic terrane and from 3.7 to -7.2 and from 850 to 1650 Ma for the Milton terrane. The crystallization ages for the metavolcanic and metaplutonic samples from both terranes indicate that Ordovician magmatism occurred in both. Similar epsilon(Nd) values from representative samples from both terranes suggest that both were generated from an isotopically similar source. Xenocrystic zircons from metavolcanic rocks in the Chopawamsic terrane have predominately Mesoproterozoic (207)Pb/(206)Pb ages (600-1300 Ma), but a single Archean (2.56 Ga) core was also present. The xenocrystic zircons and the generally negative epsilon(Nd) values indicate that both terranes are composed of isotopically evolved

  3. The Cosmos greenstone succession, Agnew-Wiluna greenstone belt, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia: Geochemistry of an enriched Neoarchaean volcanic arc succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Joux, A.; Thordarson, T.; Fitton, J. G.; Hastie, A. R.

    2014-09-01

    The geodynamic setting of the Neoarchaean Eastern Goldfields Superterrane (EGS) of the Yilgarn Craton is the subject of debate. Some authors propose plume models, while others advocate variants on a subduction accretion model for the origin of mineralised greenstone belt sequences. Felsic volcanism in the Kalgoorlie Terrane, the westernmost terrane of the EGS, is considered to have a tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite/dacite (TTG/D) geochemical affinity. The Cosmos greenstone succession, which lies in the Agnew-Wiluna greenstone belt (AWB) of the Kalgoorlie Terrane, contains several komatiite-hosted nickel sulphide deposits, the volcanic footwall to which consists of an intercalated succession of fragmental and coherent rocks ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to rhyolite. Light rare earth elements (LREEs) and large ion-lithophile elements (LILEs) are strongly enriched relative to high field strength elements (HFSEs) across all volcanic units, and the rocks display strong positive Pb and negative Nb anomalies. These geochemical characteristics resemble closely those of modern high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonite continental arc successions. Contrasting REE, LILE and HFSE concentrations, coupled with assimilation-fractional crystallisation (AFC) modelling, shows that the intercalated dacitic and andesitic volcanic rocks within the footwall succession are not co-genetic. Xenocrystic zircons within the felsic volcanic lithologies indicate that some assimilation of older continental crust contributed to the generation of the footwall volcanic sequence. The geochemical characteristics of the Cosmos volcanic succession indicate that parental melts were derived via partial melting of enriched peridotite that had been contaminated by subducted crustal material within the mantle wedge of a subduction zone. In contrast, two younger felsic porphyry intrusions, which cross-cut the volcanic succession, have a distinct TTG/D affinity. Therefore, these intrusions are

  4. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  5. The basement of the Eastern Cordillera, Colombia: An allochthonous terrane in northwestern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero Suarez, A.

    The fault system of the Borde Llanero of Colombia represents the limit between two early Paleozoic geologic provinces: the Guiana Shield (Gondwana) to the east, and an allochthonous terrane — formerly a piece of the North American continent — to the west. The Baudó Range, the Western Cordillera, and the western flank of the Central Cordillera are the result of post-Jurassic accretion. In contrast the pre-Emsian metamorphic rocks of the eastern flank of the Central Cordillera, of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia, and of the Mérida Andes correspond to an allochthonous terrane that was accreted to the north-western continental border of South America during the collision between North America and Gondwana in Silurian-Early Devonian times. Geochronologic and petrographic data indicate the presence of the Grenvillian granulite belt, represented by the Garzón-Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta belt. This belt is separated from the Guiana Shield by a magmatic tract which is parallel to the Borde Llanero of Venezuela and Colombia. The late Paleozoic regional metamorphism in the Northern Andes of Colombia occurred during Late Silurian-Early Devonian times. Since the late Emsian, a sedimentary cycle was initiated on this allochthonous basement. The faunal records of northwestern South America and the North American continent are indistinguishable for that time. This similarity clearly shows that both northwestern South America and the North American regions of the Appalachians and New Mexico belong to the same paleobiogeographic province. The faunal communication in this case supports the idea of the immediate neighborhood of the two continents.

  6. Linking Tengchong Terrane in SW Yunnan with Lhasa Terrane in southern Tibet through magmatic correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jincheng; Zhu, Dicheng; Dong, Guochen; Zhao, Zhidan; Wang, Qing

    2016-04-01

    New zircon U-Pb data, along with the data reported in the literature, reveal five phases of magmatic activity in the Tengchong Terrane since the Early Paleozoic with spatial and temporal variations summarized as: Cambrian-Ordovician (500-460 Ma) to the eastern, minor Triassic (245-206 Ma) in the eastern and western, abundant Early Cretaceous (131-114 Ma) in the eastern, extensive Late Cretaceous (77-65 Ma) in the central, and Paleocene-Eocene (65-49 Ma) in the central and western Tengchong Terrane, in which the Cretaceous-Eocene magmatism was migrated from east to west (Xu et al., 2012). The increased zircon eHf(t) of the Early Cretaceous granitoids from -12.3 to -1.4 at ca. 131-122 Ma to -4.6 to +7.1 at ca. 122-114 Ma identified for the first time in this study and the magmatic flare-up at ca. 53 Ma in the central and western Tengchong Terrane (Wang et al., 2014, Ma et al., 2015) indicate the increased contributions from mantle- or juvenile crust-derived components. The spatial and temporal variations and changing magmatic compositions with time in the Tengchong Terrane closely resemble the Lhasa Terrane in southern Tibet. Such similarities, together with the data of stratigraphy and paleobiogeography (Zhang et al., 2013), enable us to propose that the Tengchong Terrane in SW Yunnan is most likely linked with the Lhasa Terrane in southern Tibet, both of which experience similar tectonomagmatic histories since the Early Paleozoic. References Ma, L.Y., Wang, Y.J., Fan, W.M., Geng, H.Y., Cai, Y.F., Zhong, H., Liu, H.C., Xing, X.W., 2014. Petrogenesis of the early Eocene I-type granites in west Yingjiang (SW Yunnan) and its implication for the eastern extension of the Gangdese batholiths. Gondwana Research 25, 401-419. Wang, Y.J., Zhang, L.M., Cawood, P.A., Ma, L.Y., Fan, W.M., Zhang, A.M., Zhang, Y.Z., Bi, X.W., 2014. Eocene supra-subduction zone mafic magmatism in the Sibumasu Block of SW Yunnan: Implications for Neotethyan subduction and India-Asia collision

  7. Crustal recycling and the aleutian arc

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, R.W.; Kay, S.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Two types of crustal recycling transfer continental crust back into its mantle source. The first of these, upper crustal recycling, involves elements that have been fractionated by the hydrosphere-sediment system, and are subducted as a part of the oceanic crust. The subduction process (S-process) then fractionates these elements, and those not removed at shallow tectonic levels and as excess components of arc magmas are returned to the mantle. Newly determined trace element composition of Pacific oceanic sedimants are variable and mixing is necessary during the S-process, if sediment is to provide excess element in the ratios observed in Aleutian arc magmas. Only a small fraction of the total sediment subducted at the Aleutian trench is required to furnish the excess elements in Aleutian arc magmas. Ba and {sub 10}Be data indicate that this small fraction includes a contribution from the youngest subducted sediment. The second type of recycling, lower crustal recycling, involves crystal cumulates of both arc and oceanic crustal origin, and residues from crustal melting within arc crust. Unlike the silicic sediments, recycled lower crust is mafic to ultramafic in composition. Trace element analyses of xenoliths representing Aleutian arc lower crust are presented. Recycling by delamination of lower crust and attached mantle lithosphere may occur following basalt eclogite phase transformations that are facilitated by terrane suturing events that weld oceanic island arcs to the continents. The relative importance of upper and lower crustal recycling exerts a primary control on continental crustal composition.

  8. Monazite geochronology and geothermobarometry in polymetamorphic host rocks of volcanic-hosted massive sulphide mineralizations in the Mesoproterozoic Areachap Terrane, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Kai; Schulz, Bernhard; Bailie, Russell; Gutzmer, Jens

    2015-11-01

    The Areachap Terrane represents the medium-to high-grade metamorphic and deformed remnants of a Mesoproterozoic (ca. 1240-1300 Ma) volcanic arc bound to the margin of the Archean Kaapvaal Craton in the east, and the polydeformed and metamorphosed Proterozoic Namaqua Province in the west. There has been protracted debate as to the exact nature, origin, age and tectonic evolution of this terrane, adjacent to an important Mesoproterozoic crustal suture between the Archean Kaapvaal Craton and the Namaqua Province, which developed during the ∼1200-1000 Ma Namaquan Orogeny. The Areachap Terrane comprises highly deformed bimodal volcanic and volcano sedimentary successions that host a number of massive sulphide base metal orebodies. Samples from three of these orebodies at different locations were analysed to determine the age and P-T conditions of metamorphism along the Areachap Terrane. Metamorphic ages were determined by electron microprobe chemical dating of monazite. Garnet- and amphibole-bearing mineral assemblages were used for geothermobarometry at the Areachap Mine, located in the northern sector of the Areachap Terrane, monazite geochronology yields evidence for two populations of Th-U-Pb-ages at 1432 ± 30 Ma - a possible protolith age - and a metamorphic age of 1153 ± 21 Ma. Kantienpan and Copperton, representing the central and southern sector of the Areachap Terrane respectively, yield monazite ages for a younger metamorphic event with U-Th-Pb-ages of 1108 ± 19 Ma and 1104 ± 17 Ma, respectively. Geothermobarometric data give a differentiated view on the metamorphic evolution of the Areachap Terrane. An arc consistent clockwise P-T evolution path and upper amphibolite-facies peak metamorphic conditions are consistent at the three locations. The Areachap site shows a short prograde development with 8.0 kbar maximum pressure at circa 700 °C maximum temperature and a subsequent retrograde metamorphism. At Kantienpan, on the other hand, maximum metamorphic

  9. SHRIMP U-Pb evidence for a Late Silurian age of metasedimentary rocks in the Merrimack and Putnam-Nashoba terranes, eastern New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wintsch, R.P.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Walsh, G.J.; Bothner, W.A.; Hussey, A.M.; Fanning, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    U-Pb ages of detrital, metamorphic, and magmatic zircon and metamorphic monazite and titanite provide evidence for the ages of deposition and metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks from the Merrimack and Putnam-Nashoba terranes of eastern New England. Rocks from these terranes are interpreted here as having been deposited in the middle Paleozoic above Neoproterozoic basement of the Gander terrane and juxtaposed by Late Paleozoic thrusting in thin, fault-bounded slices. The correlative Hebron and Berwick formations (Merrimack terrane) and Tatnic Hill Formation (Putnam-Nashoba terrane), contain detrital zircons with Mesoproterozoic, Ordovician, and Silurian age populations. On the basis of the age of the youngest detrital zircon population (???425 Ma), the Hebron, Berwick and Tatnic Hill formations are no older than Late Silurian (Wenlockian). The minimum deposition ages of the Hebron and Berwick are constrained by ages of cross-cutting plutons (414 ?? 3 and 418 ?? 2 Ma, respectively). The Tatnic Hill Formation must be older than the oldest metamorphic monazite and zircon (???407 Ma). Thus, all three of these units were deposited between ???425 and 418 Ma, probably in the Ludlovian. Age populations of detrital zircons suggest Laurentian and Ordovician arc provenance to the west. High grade metamorphism of the Tatnic Hill Formation soon after deposition probably requires that sedimentation and burial occurred in a fore-arc environment, whereas time-equivalent calcareous sediments of the Hebron and Berwick formations probably originated in a back-arc setting. In contrast to age data from the Berwick Formation, the Kittery Formation contains primarily Mesoproterozoic detrital zircons; only 2 younger grains were identified. The absence of a significant Ordovician population, in addition to paleocurrent directions from the east and structural data indicating thrusting, suggest that the Kittery was derived from peri-Gondwanan sources and deposited in the Fredericton Sea

  10. Using SHRIMP zircon dating to unravel tectonothermal events in arc environments. The early Palaeozoic arc of NW Iberia revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abati, J.; Castineiras, P.G.; Arenas, R.; Fernandez-Suarez, J.; Barreiro, J.G.; Wooden, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Dating of zircon cores and rims from granulites developed in a shear zone provides insights into the complex relationship between magmatism and metamorphism in the deep roots of arc environments. The granulites belong to the uppermost allochthonous terrane of the NW Iberian Massif, which forms part of a Cambro-Ordovician magmatic arc developed in the peri-Gondwanan realm. The obtained zircon ages confirm that voluminous calc-alkaline magmatism peaked around 500Ma and was shortly followed by granulite facies metamorphism accompanied by deformation at c. 480Ma, giving a time framework for crustal heating, regional metamorphism, deformation and partial melting, the main processes that control the tectonothermal evolution of arc systems. Traces of this arc can be discontinuously followed in different massifs throughout the European Variscan Belt, and we propose that the uppermost allochthonous units of the NW Iberian Massif, together with the related terranes in Europe, constitute an independent and coherent terrane that drifted away from northern Gondwana prior to the Variscan collisional orogenesis. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Seismic images of a Grenvillian terrane boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milkereit, B.; Forsyth, D. A.; Green, A.G.; Davidson, A.; Hanmer, S.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Hinze, W. J.; Mereu, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    A series of gently dipping reflection zones extending to mid-crustal depths is recorded by seismic data from Lakes Ontario and Erie. These prominent reflection zones define a broad complex of southeast-dipping ductile thrust faults in the interior of the Grenville orogen. One major reflection zone provides the first image of a proposed Grenvillian suture—the listric boundary zone between allochthonous terranes of the Central Gneiss and Central Metasedimentary belts. Curvilinear bands of reflections that may represent "ramp folds" and "ramp anticlines" that originally formed in a deep crustal-scale duplex abut several faults. Vertical stacking of some curvilinear features suggests coeval or later out-of-sequence faulting of imbricated and folded thrust sheets. Grenvillian structure reflections are overlain by a thin, wedge-shaped package of shallow-dipping reflections that probably originates from sediments deposited in a local half graben developed during a period of post-Grenville extension. This is the first seismic evidence for such extension in this region, which could have occurred during terminal collapse of the Grenville orogen, or could have marked the beginning of pre-Appalachian continental rifting.

  12. Archean terrane docking: upper crust collision tectonics, Abitibi greenstone belt, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. U.; Daigneault, R.; Mortensen, J. K.; Chown, E. H.

    1996-11-01

    The northern (NVZ) and southern volcanic zones (SVZ) of the Abitibi greenstone belt are separated by the major E-trending Destor-Porcupine-Manneville fault zone (DPMFZ). The DPMFZ is interpreted to be the locus of Archean terrane docking between the older diffuse volcanic arc of the NVZ (2730-2710 Ma) and the younger arc segments of the SVZ (2705-2698 Ma). Two distinct evolutionary phases can be documented along the DPMFZ of the Abitibi greenstone belt and include (1) arc-arc collision occurring between 2697 and 2690 Ma, and (2) arc fragmentation between 2689 and 2680 Ma. Identification of these two events along the DPMFZ is based on detailed structural studies, sedimentary basin analysis, and precise UPb age determinations. The thrusting event, representative of the arc-arc collision phase, is characterized by shallow north-dipping foliations (20-40°) and dip-parallel stretching lineations in the eastern Manneville segment of the DPMFZ. Local overturned mafic pillowed units suggest recumbent folding. Late strike-slip or transcurrent movement displayed in the late-orogenic sedimentary Duparquet Basin records the arc fragmentation phase. Basin geometry, E-trending en-echelon folds, shallow E-plunging stretching lineations and a late NE-striking cleavage cross-cutting the folds support a dextral shear sense along the western Destor-Porcupine segment of the DPMFZ. The sedimentary facies observed in the basin are consistent with those of modern strike-slip basins located along the East Anatolian fault, Turkey (Hazar Lake) and the Hope fault, New Zealand (Hanmer Basin). Precise UPb zircon age determinations from porphyry stocks located at the northern and southern limits of the Duparquet Basin, yielded 2681 ± 1 Ma and 2689 +3.2-2.9 Ma, respectively. These ages constrain the rapid change from thrusting to transcurrent movement. It is apparent that once thrusting ceased the response to oblique subduction continued in the form of strike-slip displacement. Modern

  13. Interpretation of ages of arc magmatism, metamorphism, and collisional tectonics in the taconian orogen of western New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratcliffe, N.M.; Hames, W.E.; Stanley, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Available geochronologic ages of volcanic and intrusive rocks of the Taconian arc complex of western New England suggest that the Shelburne Falls and Bronson Hill arcs are not temporally or spatially discrete. Arc activity ranges from earliest Ordovician to Silurian. Activity in the Early and Middle Ordovician coincided with outboard accretionary tectonics and metamorphism that was contemporaneous with the older igneous activity in the Shelburne Falls arc and Bronson Hill arcs. Activity at about 455 to 445 Ma coincides with the collisional stage of the Taconian orogeny that affected Caradocian and older rocks of the Laurentian margin. The 455 to 445 Ma range for the collisional stage of Taconian orogeny in western New England is bracketed by biostratigraphic ages of sedimentary rocks formed on the Laurentian margin and 40Ar/39Ar ages of prograde hornblende formed during Taconian metamorphism. The previous 40Ar/39Ar age estimate of 465 Ma for this collisional and metamorphic event is now known to be too old because this age violates the age of metasedimentary rocks involved in the collisional tectonics. Acceptance of the newer 40Ar/39Ar age estimates of 445 to 450 Ma for Taconian metamorphism during collision establishes the contemporaneity with arc activity in the Bronson Hill arc. Taken together these data support the concept of a long-lived volcanic arc terrane(s) that prograded oceanward. Collision with this time-composite arc terrane(s) in the Caradocian produced the Taconian orogeny rather than the collision of a separate and smaller arc called the "Shelburne Falls arc" by Karabinos and others (1998).

  14. Paleogeographic reconstruction of northwestern Oregon based on Eocene freshwater deposition in accreted terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ries, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    Freshwater deposits exposed in the Coast Range of Oregon have been identified by the absence of marine organisms, significant floral remains, and the identification of a freshwater fish assemblage. These facies have been correlated with foraminiferal and lithologic horizons from test wells from the Mist Gas field of northwestern Oregon. Consistent records of inner neritic and marginal marine deposition in the Narizian stage, upper Cowlitz Formation, suggest the existence of an Eocene volcanic archipelago. Foraminiferal correlation through this stage is complicated by the absence of stratigraphically significant species in several of the wells. Floral remains from exposed sections have provided diverse elements, allowing paleogeographic reconstruction. A sea level coastal swamp was dominated by a subtropical flora consisting of Sabalites, Platanophyllum, and Equisetum. The swamp was apparently backed by higher altitude volcanic uplands dominated by a more temperate flora including Cornus, Chamaecyparis, Ailanthus, Pinus, and Picea.

  15. Seismic anisotropy of the subcrustal lithosphere in Europe: Another clue to recognition of accreted terranes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babuška, Vladislav; Plomerová, J.

    P-wave residuals computed relative to a reference Earth model and normalized for effects originating in focal regions and along ray paths in the deep mantle provide information on deep lithospheric structure. The variations of the directionally independent representative average residuals, which are computed for waves arriving from different azimuths and with steep incidence angles, reflect compositional and thermal inhomogeneities. In our model they are attributed to variations of the lithosphere thickness. On the other hand, the variations of relative residuals that depend on the angles of azimuth and incidence form spatial patterns suggesting the existence of large-scale dipping anisotropic structures in the subcrustal lithosphere. The P-velocity anisotropy of these structures (9-11% on the average) agrees with the anisotropy of olivine ultramafites as measured in the laboratory. Orientations of the deep anisotropic structures change in the vicinity of important tectonic suture zones, for example, at the suture between the Saxothuringicum and Moldanubicum in central Europe, at the Insubric line in the Alps, and at the deep contact between the Rhodopean Massif and the Moesian Platform in the central Balkans. The structures probably retain preferred orientations of olivine crystals originating from an ancient oceanic lithosphere and may thus represent relict paleosubduction zones by which the continental lithosphere grew in the past.

  16. Oblique collision and accretion of the Netherlands Leeward Antilles to South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, A. G.; Avé Lallemant, H. G.

    2007-04-01

    Accretion of the Netherlands Leeward Antilles volcanic island arc to northern South America (offshore Venezuela) was accompanied by deformation and clockwise block rotation. Structural analysis of Aruba, Curaçao, and Bonaire indicates that they were deformed during at least one ductile event (D1) and three brittle events (F1 - F3). The first deformation phase (D1 and F1) began in the Early Cretaceous, at approximately 110 Ma. Deformation features are consistent with displacement partitioning at the obliquely convergent Caribbean-Atlantic (proto-Caribbean) plate boundary. This deformation was accompanied by an approximate 90° clockwise rotation of the forearc terrane. The onset of the second phase of deformation (F2) occurred in the Eocene (˜55 Ma), also accompanied by a small amount of rotation, and structures are consistent with wrench tectonics in a pull-apart regime. This coincided with the collision of the Caribbean plate with the Great Bahama Bank and the initiation of convergence between North and South America. The youngest deformation structures and rotation (F3) are also associated with wrench faulting. Likely, motion along the Oca fault and the Caribbean plate transform fault initiated a major restraining bend in the late Paleogene. Beginning ˜12 Ma, the northeastward escape of the Maracaibo block further increased the complexity of tectonism at the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. Deformation structures are consistent with a total of 135° clockwise rotation of the Leeward Antilles islands and regional diachronous deformation from west to east since the Early Cretaceous.

  17. Observations of accreting pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Thomas A.; Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Wilson, Robert B.; Finger, Mark H.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss recent observations of accreting binary pulsars with the all-sky BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. BATSE has detected and studied nearly half of the known accreting pulsar systems. Continuous timing studies over a two-year period have yielded accurate orbital parameters for 9 of these systems, as well as new insights into long-term accretion torque histories.

  18. Geomorphic terranes of the central Klamath Mountains: Applications to ecosystem management

    SciTech Connect

    De La Fuente, J.; Biery, E.; Creasy, M.; Elder, D.; Haessig, P.; Laurent, T.; Snavely, W. )

    1993-04-01

    Five geomorphic terranes have been identified in the Dillon Mountain area, about 20 miles southwest of Happy Camp, California. These terranes are defined as lands with similar geologic histories, where modern geomorphic processes are similar, and where soils and biotic communities are similar. They include: (1) slump/earthflow terrane; (2) glacial deposit terrane; (3) mountain slope terrane; (4) headwall terrane (steep, fan-shaped headwaters of first order drainages); and (5) inner gorge terrane (the steep landform which develops adjacent to rapidly downcutting streams). These primary geomorphic terranes are further subdivided on a basis of lithology, slope gradient, and geomorphic setting. Geomorphic terrane maps are derived from primary data layers in a geographic information system (GIS). The primary data layers include field-generated lithology, structure, and geomorphology. Slope gradient information is also used, and is derived from digital terrain data, modified by field observations. The distribution of geomorphic terranes is strongly influenced by local stratigraphy, which includes portions of the Western Jurassic Belt (Galice Formation), and the Western Paleozoic and Triassic Belt (Rattlesnake Creek, and Hayfork terranes). Tectonic and climatic events of the Pleistocene Epoch also played a major role in the formation and distribution of geomorphic terranes. These included rapid uplift, seismic activity, and alternating glacial and interglacial conditions. Work is underway to refine the geomorphic terranes by applying other variables such as bedrock structure, precipitation zones, and elevation zones.

  19. A Dangling Slab, Amplified Arc Volcanism, Mantle Flow and Seismic Anisotropy in the Kamchatka Plate Corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Levin, V.; Brandon, M. T.; Lees, J.; Peyton, V.; Gordeev, E.; Ozerov, A.

    2001-12-01

    southern Kamchatka coast in Oligocene-Miocene times. Three ``cape terranes'' (Shipunsky, Kronotsky, Kamchatka) along the coastline are exotic, with geologic similarities to present-day Western Aleutian islands, and may have accreted in a ``caulking-gun'' process as the triple junction migrated NE. The late Cenozoic transfer of arc volcanism from the Sredinny range to the eastern volcanic front of Kamchatka may have been facilitated by the progressive replacement of a shallow-dipping Komandorsky slab with a steeply-dipping Pacific slab.

  20. Thondhjemite of the Talkeetna Mountains: An unusually large low-K pluton in Alaska's Peninsular terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, A.B.; Arth, J.G.; Csejtey, B. )

    1993-04-01

    An unusually large, elongate Jurassic pluton of trondhjemite, about 120- by 10--15 km in dimensions, intruded Jurassic plutonic and metamorphic rocks of the Peninsular terrane in the central Talkeetna Mountains of south-central Alaska. Muscovite and biotite yield minimum ages of 150--145 Ma. The N40[degree]E-trending body is concordant with regional structures. It is the youngest member of a subduction-related Jurassic plutonic suite in the Peninsular terrane that, along with Wrangellia, was accreted to the North American continent in the middle Cretaceous. Rocks, commonly sheared, are medium to coarse grained and leucocratic (CI = 3--9). Biotite is the chief mafic mineral. Minor muscovite and garnet are common and green hornblende rare. Samples (n = 27) from the body's entire length have an average Mg[number sign] of 45 and an SiO[sub 2] continuum of 67--74% (avg. 70.7%). High Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] (14.4--17.9%, avg. 16.5%) is typical of continental trondhjemite. Averages for Zr (109 ppm) and Nb (3.5 ppm) and the ratios K/Rb (491) and Zr/Nb (34) are typical of orogenic igneous rocks of subduction origin. Four samples analyzed have low ([sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr)[sub i] (avg. 0.7036). Very low Rb/Sr (avg. 0.027) is similar to Idaho batholith trondhjemites. REE patterns with low to moderate LREE and HREE with flat patterns and low contents suggest residual garnet or hornblende during partial melting or fractionation. The pluton appears homogeneous in outcrop. However, some geographic variations in chemistry, as in SiO[sub 2] contents and especially in Eu/Eu[sup *], suggest existence of perhaps three regionally separate plumbing systems, or chambers in which different processes such as plagioclase accumulation or hornblende fractionation were active.

  1. Seismic Structure of the Jemez Lineament, New Mexico: Evidence for Heterogenous Accretion and Extension in Proterozoic Time, and Modern Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, B. M.; Levander, A.; Miller, K. C.; Eshete, T.

    2001-12-01

    Southwestern North America is the result of a long and complex geologic history that spans from the Proterozoic time, when assembly of the southwestern part of the continent began, to the present. Geological and geophysical observations suggest that the lithospheric structures produced during the assembly of the continent profoundly influenced subsequent modifications to the southwest. The primary objective of the Continental Dynamics of Rocky Mountains (CDROM) project is to investigate the processes that have produced the present structure of the Rocky Mountains lithosphere and to understand the legacy of the Archean and Proterozoic accretionary boundaries. One of the enigmatic features investigated in CDROM is the Jemez Lineament, an 800 km long alignment of Tertiary volcanic centers that extends across Arizona and northern New Mexico following the southern margin of the Yavapai-Mazatzal Proterozoic terrane boundary. The Jemez lineament was the target of deep seismic reflection and crustal refraction profiling. The reflection profile extends about 150 km parallel to the front of the southern Rocky Mountains and crosses the southern edge of the lineament at high angle near Las Vegas NM. The seismic reflection profile exhibits a striking difference in reflectivity and crustal structure north and south of Las Vegas. To the north the reflection profile images a broad, south dipping, strongly reflecting, ramp structure, traceable to depths of 30-32km. The ramp is overprinted in places by a complex set of bright layered reflections. We interpret the south-dipping ramp as a suture formed during Proterozoic island arc accretion and the bright reflections as Jemez lineament recent intrusives that have ponded at several crustal depths, and are present locally in outcrop. We speculate that the intrusives used the Proterozoic suture as a pathway through the crust to the surface. To the south, the entire middle crust is characterized by a 35 km wide antiform that may have

  2. Early Proterozoic magmatism and tectonism related to southward-dipping subduction and microcontinental accretion in central Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Maass, R.S.; Brown, B.A. )

    1992-01-01

    A polydeformed and polymetamorphosed terrane of Archean and lower Proterozoic volcanic, plutonic, and sedimentary rocks is exposed in central Wisconsin. The central Wisconsin terrane (CWT) consists primarily of 2,800 and 2,500 Ma gneisses and 1,820-1,890 Ma igneous rocks emplaced into these gneisses during the Penokean orogeny. North of a poorly define northwest-trending suture zone is the 1,8180-1,890 Ma Penokean island-arc terrane of northern Wisconsin, which lacks Archean rocks. Archean and Penokean metamorphism of the CWT each ranged from lower greenschist to upper amphibolite facies. Grade was typically lower to upper amphibolite facies at 2,800 Ma and lower amphibolite facies during the Penokean orogeny. Locally, a third metamorphic event, possibly 2,500 Ma, has been recognized. The grade of Penokean metamorphism is spatially related to plutons in some areas, but not in others. Most of the CWT underwent one or more phases of deformation during the Penokean orogeny, but at least part of the CWT escaped deformation at this time. A well developed subvertical mineral lineation attributed to diapirism is present in and around many Penokean plutons. The spatial and temporal pattern of igneous activity suggests that the Penokean orogeny involved two simultaneously operating southward-dipping subduction zones. The northern zone produced the island-arc terrane. The southern zone dipped under the CWT microcontinent, producing a continental arc. Petrographic and isotopic data from subsurface samples suggest that the CWT does not extend into southern Wisconsin.

  3. Late Proterozoic-Paleozoic evolution of the Arctic Alaska-Chukotka terrane based on U-Pb igneous and detrital zircon ages: Implications for Neoproterozoic paleogeographic reconstructions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amato, J.M.; Toro, J.; Miller, E.L.; Gehrels, G.E.; Farmer, G.L.; Gottlieb, E.S.; Till, A.B.

    2009-01-01

    similar to those in the peri-Gondwanan Avalonian-Cadomian arc system, the Timanide orogen of Baltica, and other circum-Arctic terranes that were proximal to Arctic Alaska prior to the opening of the Amerasian basin in the Early Cretaceous. Our Neoproterozoic reconstruction places the Arctic Alaska-Chukotka terrane in a position near Baltica, northeast of Laurentia, in an arc system along strike with the Avalonian-Cadomian arc terranes. Previously published faunal data indicate that Seward Peninsula had Siberian and Laurentian links by Early Ordovician time. The geologic links between the Arctic Alaska-Chukotka terrane and eastern Laurentia, Baltica, peri-Gondwanan arc terranes, and Siberia from the Paleoproterozoic to the Paleozoic help to constrain paleogeographic models from the Neoproterozoic history of Rodinia to the Mesozoic opening of the Arctic basin. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  4. Cloud Arcs

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... causing much of the air near the centers of the arcs to rise. This air spreads out horizontally in all directions as it rises and ... is now quite weak and on meeting the undisturbed air it can rise again slightly - possibly assisting in the formation of new small cumulus ...

  5. Theory of wind accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, N. I.; Postnov, K. A.; Kochetkova, A. Yu.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.

    2014-01-01

    A review of wind accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries is presented. We focus attention to different regimes of quasi-spherical accretion onto the neutron star: the supersonic (Bondi) accretion, which takes place when the captured matter cools down rapidly and falls supersonically toward NS magnetospghere, and subsonic (settling) accretion which occurs when plasma remains hot until it meets the magnetospheric boundary. Two regimes of accretion are separated by an X-ray luminosity of about 4 × 1036 erg/s. In the subsonic case, which sets in at low luminosities, a hot quasi-spherical shell must be formed around the magnetosphere, and the actual accretion rate onto NS is determined by ability of the plasma to enter the magnetosphere due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We calculate the rate of plasma entry the magnetopshere and the angular momentum transfer in the shell due to turbulent viscosity appearing in the convective differentially rotating shell. We also discuss and calculate the structure of the magnetospheric boundary layer where the angular momentum between the rotating magnetosphere and the base of the differentially rotating quasi-spherical shell takes place. We show how observations of equilibrium X-ray pulsars Vela X-1 and GX 301-2 can be used to estimate dimensionless parameters of the subsonic settling accretion theory, and obtain the width of the magnetospheric boundary layer for these pulsars.

  6. TRANSPORT OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN KARST TERRANES: OUTLINE AND SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical spills that reach an aquifer in karst terranes do not behave like those in granular or highly fractured aquifers. pills reaching diffuse-flow aquifers display relatively slow transport, are radially dispersive, and can be tracked through the use of monitoring wells. pill...

  7. Geophysical constraints for terrane boundaries in southern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Alexandra; Schulmann, Karel; Munschy, Marc; Miehe, Jean-Marc; Edel, Jean-Bernard; Lexa, Ondrej; Fairhead, Derek

    2014-10-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is a typical accretionary orogen divided into numerous lithostratigraphic terranes. In theory, these terranes should be characterized by contrasting magnetic and gravity signatures owing to their dissimilar petrophysical properties. To test this hypothesis, the extent of tectonostratigraphic terranes in southern Mongolia was compared with the potential field data. The analysis reveals that the terrane boundaries are not systematically defined by strong gravity and magnetic gradients. The correlation of the magnetic signal with the geology reveals that the magnetic highs coincide with Late Carboniferous to Early Permian volcanic-plutonic belts. The matched filtering shows a good continuity of signal along the boundaries of these high magnetic anomalies toward the deeper crustal levels which may indicate the presence of deeply rooted tectonomagmatic zones. The axes of high-density bodies in the western and central parts of the study area are characterized by periodic alternations of NW-SE trending gravity anomalies corresponding to up to 20 km wide cleavage fronts of Permo-Triassic age. The matched filtering analysis shows good continuity of signal to the depth of these gravity highs which may indicate presence of deeply rooted high-strain zones. The magnetic signal is interpreted to be as the result of a giant Permo-Triassic magmatic event associated with lithosphere-scale deformation, whereas the gravity pattern is related to the postaccretionary shortening of the CAOB between the North China and Siberia cratons.

  8. The Nature of Mare Basalts in the Procellarum KREEP Terrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Gillis, Jeffrey J.; Korotev, Randy L.; Jolliff, Bradley L.

    2000-01-01

    Unlike Apollo 12 and 15 basalts, many mare lavas of the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT) have Th concentrations of 2.5-6 ppm and perhaps greater, as well as high TiO2. Lunar "picritic" volcanic glasses from the PKT have a similar range.

  9. Origin of Silurian reefs in the Alexander Terrane of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1991-04-01

    Lower to Upper Silurian (upper Llandovery-Ludlow) limestones belonging to the Heceta Formation record several episodes of reef growth in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. As the oldest carbonates of wide-spread distribution in the region, the Heceta limestones represent the earliest development of a shallow-marine platform within the Alexander arc and the oldest foundation for reef evolution. These deposits provide important insights into the dynamic processes, styles, and bathymetry associated with reef growth in tectonically active oceanic islands. Massive stromatoporoids, corals, and red algae are preserved in fragmental rudstones and represent a fringing reef that formed at the seaward edge of the incipient marine shelf. Accessory constituents in this reef include crinoids and the cyanobacterium Girvanella. Small biostromes were constructed by ramose corals and stromatoporoids on oncolitic substrates in backreef or lagoonal environments. These buildups were associated with low-diversity assemblages of brachiopods and with gastropods, amphiporids, calcareous algae and cyanobacteria. Microbial boundstones reflect the widespread encrustation of cyanobacteria and calcified microproblematica on shelly debris as stromatolitic mats that resulted in the development of a stromatactoid-bearing mud mound and a barrier reef complex. Epiphytaceans, other microbes, and aphrosalpingid sponges were the primary frame-builders of the barrier reefs. These buildups attained significant relief at the shelf margin and shed detritus as slumped blocks and debris flows into deep-water sites along the slope. The similarity of these stromatolitic-aphrosalpingid reefs to those from Siluro-Devonian strata of autochthonous southwestern Alaska suggests paleobiogeographic ties of the Alexander terrane to cratonal North America during the Silurian.

  10. Detailed structure and stratigraphy of the eastern Marble Mountain terrane, Klamath Mountains, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.E.; Hacker, B.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Amphibolite-grade rocks in the eastern Marble Mountains (MM), N. California, consist of several fault-bounded, SSE-dipping lithotectonic units. Each unit is ca. 2 km thick and is characterized by differences in rock type, metamorphism, and structural style. The lowermost unit composed of well-foliated and lineated epidote amphibolite grading upward into clinopyroxene-bearing amphibolite with a consistent NE-SW lineation. Structurally overlying these rocks are andalusite- and staurolite-bearing, epidote-amphibolite facies rocks (Wright Lake assemblage (WLa)) that have variable foliation and lineation orientations. The WLa consists of meta-supracrustal rocks with well-preserved relict textures, and massive, meta-ultramafic rock. Supracrustal rocks include polymict conglomerate and breccia, fine- to medium-grained clastic rocks, alkalic pillow basalt, chert, and carbonate. Conglomerate clasts include partially recrystallized granitoids and quartzite. Previous studies have interpreted the WLa to represent a fragment of oceanic crust, but coeval coarse-grained sedimentation and alkalic volcanism, small volume of mafic volcanics, conglomerate composition, and lack of oceanic plutonic and hypabyssal rocks suggest deposition in an arc-related rift or transtensional basin. Previous studies have also described the terrane as melange, but recognition of local pseudostratigraphy allows mapping of multiply folded, isoclinal, nappe-like structures. Small-scale nappes are generally 100+ m thick and are imbricated with massive meta-ultramafic rocks along gently to steeply east-dipping shear zones. Shear zones are characterized by metamorphosed ultramafic fault rocks that suggest a range of brittle to ductile behavior. Regionally distributed, Ar/Ar hornblende ages of 149.9[+-]0.4, 150.3[+-]0.6, 152.1[+-]4.7, 152.5[+-]2.5 Ma and Ar/Ar biotite ages of 148.8[+-]2.6 and 149.9[+-]0.4 Ma indicate the MM terrane cooled rapidly through ca. 500--300 C in the Late Jurassic.

  11. Plutonic ultramafic-mafic complexes of the Vel'may terrane, eastern Chukotka (Russia): first petrological results and preliminary geodynamic interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledneva, G. V.; Bazylev, B. A.; Kuzmin, D.; Ishiwatari, A.; Kononkova, N. N.; Sokolov, S. D.

    2012-04-01

    The Vel'may terrane (eastern Chukotka) is commonly considered as a continuity of the South Anyui Suture (SAS) zone (western Chukotka) and the Angaucham terrane (Brooks Range, Alaska), which marks the southern boundary of the Arctic Alaska - Chukotka displaced continental microplate (AACM). The correlation of terranes bounding the microplate is based on findings of similar upper Triassic (Norian) faunas (Tynankergav, Bychkov, 1987; Sokolov et al., 2009) and the ubiquitous occurrence of ultramafic-mafic plutonic complexes attributed to be ophiolite fragments. However, plutonic complexes of the Vel'may terrane haven't been petrologically investigated till now. In the study area they spatially associate with upper Jurassic-lower Cretaceous deposits of the Cross Bay zone and upper Triassic sequences of the Kolyuchinskaya Bay zone. In the Cross Bay zone ultramafic and mafic rocks compose small tectonic slices and are represented by non-spreading subduction-related restite spinel harzburgites and shallow-level plagioclase peridotite and gabbro cumulates (crystallization pressure is estimated at 3.5±1 and 1.5±1 kb ((Schmidt, 1992), respectively) closely resembling fragments of an ophiolitic assemblage. In the Kolyuchinskaya Bay zone tectonic slices of ultramafic and mafic rocks are dominated by clinopyroxene-bearing dunites, hornblende wehrlites/olivine clinopyroxenites and hornblende gabbros. This rocks are high-pressure cumulates (crystallization pressure is estimated at 8±1 kb (Schmidt, 1992)) of lower crustal magma-chambers originated in a mature island-arc or an Andean-type active continental margins. Remnants of subduction-related ophiolite and magma-chambers are typical of sutures indicative of an arc-continent collision; and they occur widely in the SAS zone (Lychagin, 1985; Ganelin, Sylantyev, 2008) and the Angayucham terrane (Loney, Himmelberg, 1989). Thus, the Vel'may terrane can be considered as a possible marker of the AACM boundary. This work was supported

  12. Oxygen isotope constraints on the origin of island arc granitoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, R. J.; Cavosie, A. J.; Valley, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    Granitic intrusions in island arcs constitute additions of juvenile crust from oceanic environs that ultimately get accreted to continents. The genesis of island arc granitoids is thus important to studies of the growth of oceanic and continental crust. Puerto Rico (USA) is a composite island arc terrane that preserves a record of plutonism from 85 Ma to 38 Ma (Cavosie et al., 2007 AGU). Mid-crustal granitoid plutons are exposed (~1 to 500 km2), but their origins are unknown, as no suspected parental magmas associated with the plutons (e.g., gabbro) are exposed. This study uses petrography, WR major elements, and oxygen isotopes of WR and zircon from granitoids and xenoliths to place better constraints on the origin of granitoid in the Greater Antilles island arc. WR δ18O analyses were made with laser fluorination by IRMS at the Univ. of Wisconsin (uncertainties = 0.10 to 0.20‰, 2sd). The main plutons (Caguas, Rio Blanco, San Lorenzo, Utuado, Vieques) yield primitive δ18O(WR) values, ranging from 6.24 to 7.72‰ over a range of wt.% SiO2= 58.03 to 66.54. Smaller stocks (<20 km2) yield higher δ18O(WR) values, ranging from 7.47 to 10.27‰. Qualitative petrographic analysis reveals that granitoids with δ18O(WR) >~7.5‰ are partially to pervasively altered. Zircon preserves magmatic δ18O and is used here to quantitatively evaluate the measured δ18O(WR) values. If δ18O(Zrc) and wt.% SiO2 are known, a comparison of measured vs. predicted δ18O(WR) can be made (Valley et al., 2005, CMP). The measured δ18O(WR) values record variable amounts of alteration, ranging from virtually undetectable, to WR δ18O elevations of ~4‰, indicative of low-T subsolidus alteration. The Δ18O (WR-Zrc) values using calculated δ18O(WR) yield the following fractionations: -1.57 to 1.00‰ for granodiorites (wt.% SiO2=66 to 57); -0.85‰ for diorite (wt.% SiO2=55); and -0.56‰ for the only gabbro analyzed (wt.% SiO2=50). Mafic xenoliths (53-57 wt.% SiO2) from 4 granitoids yield

  13. Provenance of sandstones in the Golconda terrane, north central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.A. )

    1991-02-01

    The upper Paleozoic Golconda terrane of north-central Nevada is a composite of several structurally bounded subterranes made of clastic, volcanic, and carbonate rocks. The clastic rocks provide important clues for the interpretation of the provenance and paleogeographic settings of the different lithologic assemblages found in these subterranes. Two petrographically distinct sandstones are identified in the Golconda terrane in the Osgood Mountains and the Hot springs Range of north-central Nevada. The sandstone of the Mississippian Farrel Canyon Formation, part of the Dry Hills subterrane, is characterized by quartzose and sedimentary and lithic-rich clasts with a small feldspar component. in contrast, the sandstone of the Permian Poverty Peak (II) subterrane is a silty quartzarenite with no lithic component, and a very limited feldspar component. The sandstone of the Farrel Canyon Formation is similar to nonvolcanic sandstones reported from elsewhere in the Golconda terrane. Modal data reflect a provenance of a recycled orogen and permit the interpretation that it could have been derived from the antler orogen as has been proposed for other sandstones of the golconda terrane. The sandstone of the Poverty Peak (II) subterrane is more mature than any of the other sandstones in either the Golconda terrane, the Antler overlap sequence, or the Antler foreland basin sequence. Modal data put the Poverty Peak (II) sandstone in the continental block provenance category. The distinct extrabasinal provenances represented in these different sandstones support the idea that the Golconda basin was made up of complex paleogeographic settings, which included multiple sources of extrabasinal sediment.

  14. Tectonostratigraphic Terranes of the Circum-Pacific Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Voo, Rob

    Have you always wondered where the Tujunga, Baldy, and Cortez terranes might be located today, let alone during the Cretaceous or early Tertiary? This book may provide the answer, because in a little less than 600 pages for $32, which includes a marvelously produced color map of the entire Circum-Pacific region, one can read almost everything one wants to know about Earth's “ring of fire” and its displaced or suspect terranes. The printing, proofreading, illustrations, and references are all of the highest caliber, and the book is handsomely produced indeed. In page-by-page reading, I found maybe five typographical errors, but I will spare you the details.The contents of the book are divided into five parts, comprising principles or applications of terrane analysis and four unequally long parts on the four quadrants of the Pacific coasts. The northeast quadrant includes Alaska, the Canadian Cordillera, the U.S. coastal and Rocky Mountain belts, and Mexico; the northwest includes Kamchatka, northeast Asia, China, Japan, Taiwan, and the Philippines; the southwest section has articles on Australia, Malaya, Indonesia, New Zealand, and Antarctica; and the southeast comprises the Andes from Colombia to southern Chile. The book offers introductory text for beginning students of terrane analysis, as well as plenty of useful details and data for the expert who needs a handy reference volume. Subject matter or emphasis ranges from hydrocarbon generation in marginal basins, biogeography, paleomagnetism, geochronology, and structural and metamorphic aspects to stratigraphy and shows how the entire discipline of geological sciences is contributing to terrane analysis. There is literally something here for everyone in solid Earth science.

  15. The Ust-Belaya ophiolite terrane, West Koryak Orogen: Isotopic dating and paleotectonic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palandzhyan, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The Ust-Belaya ophiolite terrane in the West Koryak Orogen, which is the largest in northeastern Asia, consists of three nappe complexes. The upper Ust-Belaya Nappe is composed of a thick (>5 km) sheet of fertile peridotites and mafic rocks (remnants of the proto-Pacific lithosphere); its upper age boundary is marked by Late Neoproterozoic plagiogranites. In the middle Tolovka-Otrozhny Nappe, the Late Precambrian lherzolite-type ophiolites are supplemented by fragments of tectonically delaminated harzburgite-type ophiolites, which make up the Tolovka rock association. The isotopic age of metadacite (K-Ar method, whole-rock sample) and zircons from plagiogranite porphyry (U-Pb method, SHRIMP) determines the upper chronological limit of the Tolovka ophiolites as 262-265 Ma ago. It is suggested that igneous rocks of these ophiolites were generated in a backarc basin during the Early Carboniferous and then incorporated into the fold-nappe structure in the Mid-Permian. This was the future basement of the Koni-Taigonos arc, where the Early Carboniferous ophiolites together with Late Neoproterozoic precursors were subject to low-temperature metamorphism and intruded by plagiogranite porphyry dikes in Permian-Triassic. The polymicte serpentinite mélange, which was formed in the accretionary complex of the Koni-Taigonos arc comprises rock blocks of the upper units of Late Precambrian ophiolites (in particular, plagiogranite), the overlying Middle to Upper Devonian and Early Carboniferous deposits, as well as Early Carboniferous (?) Tolovka ophiolites and meta-ophiolites. Mélange of this type with inclusions of Late Precambrian "oceanic" granitoids also developed in the lower Utyosiki Nappe composed of Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous sedimentary and volcanic sequences, the formation of which was related to the next Uda-Murgal island-arc systems.

  16. The intra-oceanic Cretaceous (~ 108 Ma) Kata-Rash arc fragment in the Kurdistan segment of Iraqi Zagros suture zone: Implications for Neotethys evolution and closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sarmad A.; Ismail, Sabah A.; Nutman, Allen P.; Bennett, Vickie C.; Jones, Brian G.; Buckman, Solomon

    2016-09-01

    The Kata-Rash arc fragment is an allochthonous thrust-bound body situated near Penjween, 100 km northeast of Sulymannia city, Kurdistan Region, within the Iraqi portion of the Zagros suture zone. It forms part of the suprasubduction zone 'Upper Allochthon' terranes (designated as the Gimo-Qandil Group), which is dominated by calc-alkaline andesite and basaltic-andesite, rhyodacite to rhyolite, crosscut by granitic, granodioritic, and dioritic dykes. Previously, rocks of the Kata-Rash arc fragment were interpreted as a part of the Eocene Walash volcanic group. However, SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dates on them of 108.1 ± 2.9 Ma (Harbar volcanic rocks) and 107.7 ± 1.9 Ma (Aulan intrusion) indicate an Albian-Cenomanian age, which is interpreted as the time of igneous crystallisation. The Aulan intrusion zircons have initial εHf values of + 8.6 ± 0.2. On a Nb/Yb-Th/Yb diagram, all Kata-Rash samples fall within the compositional field of arc-related rocks, i.e. above the mid-ocean-ridge basalt (MORB)-ocean island basalt (OIB) mantle array. Primitive-mantle-normalised trace-element patterns for the Kata-Rash samples show enrichment in the large ion lithophile elements and depletion in the high-field-strength elements supporting their subduction-related character. Low Ba/La coupled with low La/Yb and Hf/Hf* < 1 for the Aulan sample with initial εHf of + 8.6 ± 0.2 is interpreted as the magma dominated by contributions from fluid fluxing of the mantle wedge and lesser contributions of low temperature melt from subducted slab sediment, in an oceanic setting. This mechanism can explain the sub-DM initial εHf value, without the need to invoke melting of significantly older (continental) crust in an Andean setting. We interpret the Kata-Rash igneous rocks as a fragment of the Late Cretaceous suprasubduction zone system (named here the Kata-Rash arc) that most likely developed within the Neotethys Ocean rather than at a continental margin. Subsequently during the latest Cretaceous

  17. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  18. Rotating Bondi Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu; Han, Du-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of accretion flow onto a black hole are determined by the physical condition of gas at large radius. When the gas has no angular momentum and is polytropic, the accretion flow becomes the classic Bondi flow. The mass accretion rate in such case is an eigenvalue and uniquely determined by the density and the temperature of the surrounding gas for a given black hole mass. When the gas has angular momentum above some critical value, the angular momentum of the gas should be removed by viscosity to reach the black hole horizon. We study, within the slim disk approximation, rotating polytropic accretion flow with alpha viscosity as an an extension of the Bondi flow. The characteristics of the accretion flow are now determined by the temperature, density, and angular momentum of the gas at the outer boundary. We explore the effects of the viscosity parameter and the outer boundary radius on the physical characteristic of the flow, especially on the mass accretion rate, and compare the result with previous works of Park (2009) and Narayan & Fabian (2011).

  19. The nature and timing of tectonism in the western facies terrane of Nevada and California; an outline of evidence and interpretations derived from geologic maps of key areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketner, Keith Brindley

    1998-01-01

    Along the outer miogeocline of Nevada and Southern California, lower Paleozoic siliceous sediments and basalt flows, the western facies terrane emerged in Late Devonian time and were deeply eroded; but structural evidence that this event, the Antler Orogeny, involved intense folding and thrust faulting is notably scarce. Almost all the intense folding and thrust faulting of Proterozoic to Permian strata dates from the Jurassic to Eocene interval. If this tectonic history is valid, then the genesis of the Antler Orogeny is reduced to a question of vertical tectonics. Pre-Jurassic contraction involving subduction and collision with island arcs is not indicated or required, but the ultimate origin of Paleozoic tectonism remains unclear.

  20. Plate Margin Deformation and Active Tectonics Along the Northern Edge of the Yakutat Terrane in the Saint Elias Orogen, Alaska and Yukon, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhn, Ronald L.; Sauber, Jeanne; Cotton, Michele M.; Pavlis, Terry L.; Burgess, Evan; Ruppert, Natalia; Forster, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    The northwest directed motion of the Pacific plate is accompanied by migration and collision of the Yakutat terrane into the cusp of southern Alaska. The nature and magnitude of accretion and translation on upper crustal faults and folds is poorly constrained, however, due to pervasive glaciation. In this study we used high-resolution topography, geodetic imaging, seismic, and geologic data to advance understanding of the transition from strike-slip motion on the Fairweather fault to plate margin deformation on the Bagley fault, which cuts through the upper plate of the collisional suture above the subduction megathrust. The Fairweather fault terminates by oblique-extensional splay faulting within a structural syntaxis, allowing rapid tectonic upwelling of rocks driven by thrust faulting and crustal contraction. Plate motion is partly transferred from the Fairweather to the Bagley fault, which extends 125 km farther west as a dextral shear zone that is partly reactivated by reverse faulting. The Bagley fault dips steeply through the upper plate to intersect the subduction megathrust at depth, forming a narrow fault-bounded crustal sliver in the obliquely convergent plate margin. Since . 20 Ma the Bagley fault has accommodated more than 50 km of dextral shearing and several kilometers of reverse motion along its southern flank during terrane accretion. The fault is considered capable of generating earthquakes because it is linked to faults that generated large historic earthquakes, suitably oriented for reactivation in the contemporary stress field, and locally marked by seismicity. The fault may generate earthquakes of Mw <= 7.5.

  1. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  2. Late Triassic, arc-related, potassic igneous rocks in the North American Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortimer, N.

    1986-12-01

    Igneous rocks of Late Triassic age are widespread in the Cordillera of western North America and, except in Wrangellia, consist of subduction-related plutonic and volcanic suites. Many of these, including those in the Stikinia, Quesnellia, Rattlesnake Creek, and Jackson terrenes and in southern California, are clinopyroxene rich and belong to high-potassium and shoshonitic rock series, features that are generally absent from older and younger igneous rocks in the same terranes. The Late Triassic subduction-related rocks are exposed in two discontinuous belts that lie east and west of the Cache Creek terrane in Canada and correlative melange terranes farther south. Stratigraphic and structural data suggest that these belts were spatially separate magmatic arcs in Late Triassic time. Tectonic implications of this analysis include an explanation of Middle Jurassic Cordilleran deformation as the result of collision of the western with the eastern belt, absence of Late Triassic links between Stikinia and Quesnellia, disassociation of Stikinia with terranes in northwestern Nevada, and tentative correlation of the Wallowa (Seven Devils) terrane with Stikinia rather than Wrangellia. *Present address: New Zealand Geological Survey, Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Private Bag, Dunedin, New Zealand

  3. Ringed Accretion Disks: Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczyński mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider a recently proposed model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) that can be corotating or counter-rotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  4. Terrane Definition From Textural Measures of Aeromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettings, M.

    2007-12-01

    The vertical and horizontal magnetization in the Earth's crust is an anisotropic multifractal distribution, and this results in a horizontal multifractal distribution of magnetic anomalies at and above the Earth's surface. Discreet lithologic terranes are frequently observed to exhibit a characteristic pattern or "texture" of anomalies in aeromagnetic maps. Multifractal measures provide some tools useful in quantifying different textures and the scaling properties of aeromagnetic anomalies in map view can be used to define boundaries between terranes of different magnetic textures. If the source depths are not too large, the magnetic textural measures of lithologic units can be used to map their extent beneath cover. Although magnetic anomaly textures are generally visible to the eye on aeromagnetic anomaly images, the actual boundary between two textures is frequently difficult to determine with certainty. The use of quantitative textural measures provides a more objective framework for the boundary definition problem. A high resolution aeromagnetic survey over an area of highly variable geology has been used as a test area for these studies. Two robust measures that have proven useful for textural analysis are: the number of extrema per unit area; and the surface area per unit area in a window moving over the gridded aeromagnetic data. The former measures the "noisiness" of the data, and the latter depends on anomaly amplitudes and discriminates between large and small magnetizations. Window sizes for texture analysis are typically a few km square because geologic terranes of interest are generally of the order of tens of km in characteristic dimension. Other measures investigated are based on the scaling properties of the field within the window computed from the structure function for various exponents. The minima of the structure function define the characteristic sizes of anomalies, analogous to the power spectrum for a periodic function, and the maxima

  5. Tectonic evolution of forearc nappes of the active Banda arc-continent collision: Origin, age, metamorphic history and structure of the Lolotoi Complex, East Timor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standley, Carl E.; Harris, Ron

    2009-12-01

    An integrated multidisciplinary investigation of the Lolotoi Complex of East Timor (Timor Leste) indicates that it is part of the Banda forearc that was metamorphosed and rapidly exhumed during the Eocene and accreted to the NW Australian continental margin during Late Miocene to present arc-continent collision. Greenschist, graphitic phyllite, quartz-mica schist, amphibolite and pelitic schist dominate metamorphic rock types. Mineral, whole rock, and trace element geochemical analyses of metabasites indicate protolith compositions consistent with tholeiitic basalt and basaltic andesite with mixed MORB and oceanic arc affinities. Metapelite schist is mostly composed of metasedimentary units derived from mafic to intermediate rocks with oceanic to continental volcanic arc provenance. Thermobarometric calculations show peak metamorphic conditions of 530 °C to 680 °C for garnet-biotite pairs and amphibole, and peak pressures of 5 to 10 kbar for garnet-aluminosilicate-quartz-plagioclase assemblages. Peak metamorphism occurred at 45.36 ± 0.63 Ma, as indicated by Lu-Hf analyses of garnet. Detrital zircon grains have a U/Pb age distribution with spikes at 663, 120 and 87 Ma, which is typical of detrital zircon ages throughout the Great Indonesian Arc of Asia, but is distinct from Australian affinity units. These data indicate deposition and later metamorphism occurred after 87 Ma. Structural analyses of the metamorphic rocks and their sedimentary and volcanic cover units reveals 5-6 deformational phases of alternating shortening and extension. There is little to no evidence of strike-slip deformation. Phases 1-4 are inferred as pre-Oligocene from age determinations. Phases 5 and 6 are most likely related to latest Miocene to Pliocene nappe emplacement and Pliocene to present collisional deformation. Kinematic indicators show mostly top to the SE directed shortening and top to the south and SE extension. Structural mapping indicates that the Lolotoi Complex and some of

  6. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Lee, Cin-Ty; Manga, Michael

    2014-05-01

    as intra-oceanic arcs. We also present new geochemical and age data from the Peninsular Ranges Batholith that are consistent with this model. The evolution of crustal thickness sets front location, while the ratio of intrusive to extrusive magmatism (reflected in eruptive output but also crustal geochemical indices) increases with thickness and duration of magmatic accretion.

  7. Ductile deformations of opposite vergence in the eastern part of the Guerrero Terrane (SW Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas-Prieto, J. C.; Monod, O.; Faure, M.

    2000-10-01

    The Teloloapan volcanic arc in SW Mexico represents the easternmost unit of the Guerrero Terrane. It is overthrust by the Arcelia volcanic unit and is thrust over the Guerrero-Morelos carbonate platform. These major structures result from two closely related tectonic events: first, an eastward verging, ductile deformation (D1) characterized by an axial-plane schistosity (S1) supporting an E-W trending mineral stretching lineation (L1) and associated with synschistose isoclinal, curvilinear folds (F1). Numerous kinematic indicators such as asymmetrical pressure-shadows, porphyroclast systems, and micro-shear bands (S-C structures) indicate a top-to-the-east shear along L1. This first deformation was followed by another ductile event (D2) that produced a crenulation cleavage (S2) associated with westward overturned folds (F2), hence showing that the vergence of D2 is opposite to that of D1. Regionally, both D1 and D2 deformations have been identified east and west of the Teloloapan unit, in the Arcelia volcanic rocks as well as in the Mexcala flysch of Late Cretaceous age overlying the Guerrero-Morelos platform. This implies that all three units were deformed and thrust simultaneously, during the Late Cretaceous or Paleocene, prior to the deposition of the overlying, undeformed Eocene red beds of the Balsas group.

  8. Metamorphism in the Tlikakila Complex, Lake Clark National Park, Alaska: Does it Record the Collision of the Peninsular Terrane With Alaska?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, J. M.; Bogar, M. J.; Calvert, A. T.

    2001-12-01

    The Tlikakila complex is a ~80 km x ~5 km belt of variably metamorphosed and deformed rocks thought to be part of the Peninsular terrane of southern Alaska. This project uses detailed mapping, structural analysis, and thermochronology to address the tectonic evolution of rocks thought to be part of the Peninsular terrane in southern Alaska. Both meta-igneous and metasedimentary rocks of Triassic (?) age are exposed. Meta-igneous protoliths include mafic (gabbro, basalt) and ultramafic rocks. Metasedimentary protoliths include limestone, chert, and other siliceous sediments. Metapelites are rare. Metamorphic rocks in the study area include two distinct occurrences. Smaller outcrops, appear to be roof pendants in Tertiary plutons. At Kasna Creek, near Kontrashibuna Lake, limestone beds were contact metamorphosed with copper sulfide mineralization within a mafic pluton. Larger outcrops in the Tlikakila complex are more continuous, more pervasively deformed, and more recrystallized. A new 40Ar/39Ar analysis of white mica from a metasedimentary rock in the Tlikakila complex located just southwest of Saddle Lake yielded a monotonically increasing age spectrum, with the oldest high-temperature step giving a date of around 160 Ma, and the low-temperature step giving a date of 60.5 Ma. The oldest date could represent the timing of greenschist facies metamorphism of the Tlikakila complex. It is interesting that this 160 Ma date is similar to the youngest of the Middle to Late Jurassic plutons (174-158 Ma) in the Alaska-Aleutian Range batholith, considered to be part of the Peninsular terrane. Metamorphism in the Tlikakila complex could be related to the onset of the collision of the Peninsular terrane with Alaska, which also resulted in the cessation of arc magmatism. The youngest date from this sample overlaps with existing 59-63 Ma K-Ar dates from Tertiary volcanic and plutonic rocks in the area and records new mica growth associated with Tertiary magmatism.

  9. Zircon U-Pb ages and geochemistry of granitoids in the Truong Son terrane, Vietnam: Tectonic and metallogenic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Mei-Feng; Lin, Fang-Cheng; Fan, Wen-Yu; Deng, Qi; Cong, Feng; Tran, My-Dung; Zhu, Hua-Ping; Wang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    Truong Son terrane, one of the most important tectonic and metallogenic terranes in Indochina block, is composed of many volcano-plutonic complexes. Reported here is geochronological and geochemical data obtained from six different volcano-plutonic complexes. The new data reveals that the granite from the Hai Van complex is 438 Ma in age, and shows collision-related geochemical characteristics; whereas another five samples from five volcano-plutonic complexes present consistent emplacement and crystallization ages ranging from 261 to 242 Ma. Dien Bien granodiorite, Phia Bioc monzogranite and Dong Trau rhyolite display typical subduction-related calc-alkaline affinity (e.g., depletion in Nb-Ta and Ti and enrichment in Rb and La), while monzogranite from Song Ma complex displays collision-related shoshoniteseries and granites from Bengiang-Queson complex are related to post-collision calc-alkaline series. Based on these observations, in combination with the previous published geochronological data, we propose that at least four major stages of magmatic activities occurred during the Paleozoic and the Early Mesozoic through the Truong Son terrane: Ordovician-Silurian (420-470 Ma), Late Carboniferous-Early Permian (280-300 Ma), Late Permian to Mid-Triassic (245-270 Ma) and Middle-Late Triassic (200-245 Ma). These magmatic activities are not only attributed to the Tethyan Song Ma ocean southwestward subduction but also related to Paleo Tamky-Phuoc Son oceanic bidirectional subduction. Synthesized with regional metallogenic data, we identified three metallogenic epochs: (1) Late Carboniferous-Early Permian (280-300 Ma) arc-magmatic hydrothermal Cu-Au-Fe polymetallic metallogenic system related to the Tamky-Phuoc Son ocean north-dipping subduction; (2) Late Permian-Middle Triassic (245-280 Ma) arc-magmatic hydrothermal Cu-Au-Fe and orogenic W-Sn-Au polymetallic metallogenic system, which linked to both Paleo-Tethyan Song Ma ocean south-dipping subduction and Tamky

  10. A major 2.1 Ga event of mafic magmatism in west Africa: An Early stage of crustal accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouchami, Wafa; Boher, Muriel; Michard, Annie; Albarede, Francis

    1990-10-01

    environments. Back-arc or low-Ti continental flood basalts provide a marginally good agreement but still face some difficulties. Oceanic flood basalts similar to those which form oceanic plateaus (e.g. in the Nauru basin) and later accreted to continents as allochtonous terranes represent the most acceptable modern analogue of many Proterozoic basalts. It is suggested that deep plumes piercing young lithosphere can generate huge amounts of tholeiites in a short time. Birimian basalts, like many Early Proterozoic basalts, may also be viewed as recent equivalents of the Archean greenstone belts. The modern komatiite of Gorgona Island is suggested to fit this model of intraplate volcanism. Although the 2.1 Ga magmatic event in West Africa has gone virtually unnoticed in the literature, it extends over several thousand kilometers and compares with the distribution of mantle-derived magmatic activity in other major orogenic provinces (e.g. Superior). It shows that the growth rate of continents cannot be extrapolated from the data obtained solely from the best studied continents (North America, Europe, Australia). If such large crustal segments were overlooked, a spurious pattern of episodic activity of the mantle could arise.

  11. Continent-arc collision in the Banda Arc imaged by ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, Robert W.; Miller, Meghan S.; O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Harris, Cooper W.; Roosmawati, Nova; Teofilo da Costa, Luis

    2016-09-01

    The tectonic configuration of the Banda region in southeast Asia captures the spatial transition from subduction of Indian Ocean lithosphere to subduction and collision of the Australian continental lithosphere beneath the Banda Arc. An ongoing broadband seismic deployment funded by NSF is aimed at better understanding the mantle and lithospheric structure in the region and the relationship of the arc-continent collision to orogenesis. Here, we present results from ambient noise tomography in the region utilizing this temporary deployment of 30 broadband instruments and 39 permanent stations in Indonesia, Timor Leste, and Australia. We measure dispersion curves for over 21,000 inter-station paths resulting in good recovery of the velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Savu Sea, Timor Leste, and the Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT) region of Indonesia. The resulting three dimensional model indicates up to ∼25% variation in shear velocity throughout the plate boundary region; first-order velocity anomalies are associated with the subducting oceanic lithosphere, subducted Australian continental lithosphere, obducted oceanic sediments forming the core of the island of Timor, and high velocity anomalies in the Savu Sea and Sumba. The structure in Sumba and the Savu Sea is consistent with an uplifting forearc sliver. Beneath the island of Timor, we confirm earlier inferences of pervasive crustal duplexing from surface mapping, and establish a link to underlying structural features in the lowermost crust and uppermost mantle that drive upper crustal shortening. Finally, our images of the volcanic arc under Flores, Wetar, and Alor show high velocity structures of the Banda Terrane, but also a clear low velocity anomaly at the transition between subduction of oceanic and continental lithosphere. Given that the footprint of the Banda Terrane has previously been poorly defined, this model provides important constraints on tectonic reconstructions that

  12. Structure, age, and geodynamic settings of early Neoproterozoic magmatic complexes of the Central Asian fold belt exemplified by the Holbo Nur zone of Songin terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Kozlovsky, A. M.; Salnikova, E. B.; Kozakov, I. K.; Kovach, V. P.; Kotov, A. B.; Tomurtogoo, O.

    2015-11-01

    The Holbo Nur zone of Songin terrane in the Central Asian fold belt is a rare example of slightly metamorphosed paleoceanic complexes that were formed at the initial stages of the Paleoasian ocean evolution. The zone encompasses three tectonic slices. Rhyolites of the island arc series have been dated back to 888 ± 2 Ma; the formation of the island arc lasted from 888 to 859 Ma. The differences in the geological structure, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of igneous rocks constituting the tectonic slices of the Holbo Nur zone imply spatial isolation of these complexes during their formation in the Paleoasian ocean. They were tectonically juxtaposed between 859 and 790 Ma ago, which is evident from postkinematic granitoids.

  13. The age and composition of the pre-Cenozoic basement of the Jalisco Block: implications for and relation to the Guerrero composite terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, Victor A.; Righter, Kevin; Rosas-Elguera, Jose; López-Martínez, Margarita; Grove, Marty

    2013-09-01

    The Jalisco Block is thought to be part of the Guerrero terrane, but the nature and age of the underlying crystalline basement are largely unknown. We have collected a suite of schists, granitoids, and weakly metamorphosed marine sediments from various parts of the Jalisco Block including Atenguillo and Ameca, Mascota and San Sebastián, Cuale, Puerto Vallarta, Punta Mita, Yelapa, and Tomatlán. The schists range in age from 135 to 161 Ma, with many exhibiting Proterozoic and Phanerozoic zircon ages. The granitoids range in age from 65 to 90 Ma, and are calc-alkaline compositionally—similar to granitoids from the Puerto Vallarta and Los Cabos batholiths. The Jalisco granitoids also experienced similar uplift rates to granitoids from the regions to the north and south of the Jalisco Block. The marine sediments yield a maximum depositional age of 131 Ma, and also contain a significant zircon population with ages extending back to the Archean. Granitoids from this study define two age groups, even after the effects of thermal resetting and different closure temperatures are considered. The 66.8-Ma silicic ash flow tuff near Union de Tula significantly expands the extent of this Cretaceous-Paleocene age ash flow tuff unit within the Jalisco Block, and we propose calling the unit "Carmichael silicic ash flow tuff volcanic succession" in honor of Ian Carmichael. The ages of the basement schists in the Jalisco Block fully overlap with the ages of terranes of continental Mexico, and other parts of the Guerrero terrane in the south, confirming the autochthonous origin of the Jalisco Block rather than exotic arc or allochthonous origin. Geologic data, in combination with geochronologic and oxygen isotopic data, suggest the evolution of SW Mexico with an early 200-1,200-Ma passive margin, followed by steep subduction in a continental arc setting at 160-165 Ma, then shallower subduction by 135 Ma, and finally, emplacement of granitoids at 65-90 Ma.

  14. Magnetospheric accretion in EX Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Peter; Kospal, Agnes; Bouvier, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    We propose to observe EX Lup, the prototype of the EXor class of young eruptive stars, in order to understand how the accretion process works in the quiescent system. Here, we request 2.6 hours of telescope time on Spitzer, to carry out a mid-infrared photometric monitoring, which we will supplement with simultaneous ground-based optical and near-infrared data. The multi-wavelength light curves will allow us to reliably separate the effects of fluctuating accretion rate from the rotation of the star. By analyzing the variations of the accretion rate we will determine whether EX Lup accretes through a few stable accretion columns or several short-lived random accretion streams. With this campaign, EX Lup will become one of the T Tauri systems where the accretion process is best understood.

  15. Weld arc simulator

    DOEpatents

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  16. Massive star formation by accretion. I. Disc accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haemmerlé, L.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Charbonnel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Massive stars likely form by accretion and the evolutionary track of an accreting forming star corresponds to what is called the birthline in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. The shape of this birthline is quite sensitive to the evolution of the entropy in the accreting star. Aims: We first study the reasons why some birthlines published in past years present different behaviours for a given accretion rate. We then revisit the question of the accretion rate, which allows us to understand the distribution of the observed pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) stars in the HR diagram. Finally, we identify the conditions needed to obtain a large inflation of the star along its pre-MS evolution that may push the birthline towards the Hayashi line in the upper part of the HR diagram. Methods: We present new pre-MS models including accretion at various rates and for different initial structures of the accreting core. We compare them with previously published equivalent models. From the observed upper envelope of pre-MS stars in the HR diagram, we deduce the accretion law that best matches the accretion history of most of the intermediate-mass stars. Results: In the numerical computation of the time derivative of the entropy, some treatment leads to an artificial loss of entropy and thus reduces the inflation that the accreting star undergoes along the birthline. In the case of cold disc accretion, the existence of a significant swelling during the accretion phase, which leads to radii ≳ 100 R⊙ and brings the star back to the red part of the HR diagram, depends sensitively on the initial conditions. For an accretion rate of 10-3M⊙ yr-1, only models starting from a core with a significant radiative region evolve back to the red part of the HR diagram. We also obtain that, in order to reproduce the observed upper envelope of pre-MS stars in the HR diagram with an accretion law deduced from the observed mass outflows in ultra-compact HII regions, the fraction of the

  17. The volcanoes of an oceanic arc from origin to destruction: A case from the northern Luzon Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yu-Ming; Song, Sheng-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Volcanoes were created, grew, uplifted, became dormant or extinct, and were accreted as part of continents during continuous arc-continent collision. Volcanic rocks in Eastern Taiwan's Coastal Range (CR) are part of the northern Luzon Arc, an oceanic island arc produced by the subduction of the South China Sea Plate beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. Igneous rocks are characterized by intrusive bodies, lava and pyroclastic flows, and volcaniclastic rocks with minor tephra deposits. Based on volcanic facies associations, Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry, and the geography of the region, four volcanoes were identified in the CR: Yuemei, Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Near-vent facies associations show different degrees of erosion in the volcanic edifices for Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Yuemei lacks near-vent rocks, implying that Yuemei's main volcanic body may have been subducted at the Ryukyu Trench with the northward motion of the Philippine Sea Plate. These data suggest a hypothesis for the evolution of volcanism and geomorphology during arc growth and ensuing arc-continent collision in the northern Luzon Arc, which suggests that these volcanoes were formed from the seafloor, emerging as islands during arc volcanism. They then became dormant or extinct during collision, and finally, were uplifted and accreted by additional collision. The oldest volcano, Yuemei, may have already been subducted into the Ryukyu Trench.

  18. Accretion disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    Accretion disk electrodynamic phenomena are separable into two classes: (1) disks and coronas with turbulent magnetic fields; (2) disks and black holes which are connected to a large-scale external magnetic field. Turbulent fields may originate in an alpha-omega dynamo, provide anomalous viscous transport, and sustain an active corona by magnetic buoyancy. The large-scale field can extract energy and angular momentum from the disk and black hole, and be dynamically configured into a collimated relativistic jet.

  19. Matter accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the fundamental neutron star parameters, such as the mass and the magnetic field strength, were experimentally determined in accreting neutron star systems. Some of the relevant data and the models used to derive useful information from them, are reviewed concentrating mainly on X-ray pulsars. The latest advances in our understanding of the radiation mechanisms and the transfer in the strongly magnetized polar cap regions are discussed.

  20. Accretion disk coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Holt, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations of partial X-ray eclipses from 4U1822-37 have shown that the central X-ray source in this system is diffused by a large Compton-thick accretion disk corona (ADC). Another binary, 4U2129-47, also displays a partial eclipse and contains an ADC. The possible origin of an ADC is discussed and a simple hydrostatic evaporated ADC model is developed which, when applied to 4U1822-37, 4U2129+47 and Cyg X-3, can explain their temporal and spectral properties. The quasi-sinusoidal modulation of all three sources can be reconciled with the partial occultation of the ADC by a bulge at the edge of the accretion disk which is caused by the inflowing material. The height of this bulge is an order of magnitude larger than the hydrostatic disk height and is the result of turbulence in the outer region of the disk. The spectral properties of all three sources can be understood in terms of Compton scattering of the original source spectrum by the ADC. Spectral variations with epoch in Cyg X-3 are probably caused by changes in the optical depth of the corona. A consequence of our model is that any accreting neutron star X-ray source in a semi-detached binary system which is close to its Eddington limit most likely contains an optically thick ADC.

  1. MASS ACCRETION RATE OF ROTATING VISCOUS ACCRETION FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Myeong-Gu

    2009-11-20

    The mass accretion rate of transonic spherical accretion flow onto compact objects such as black holes is known as the Bondi accretion rate, which is determined only by the density and the temperature of gas at the outer boundary. A rotating accretion flow has angular momentum, which modifies the flow profile from the spherical Bondi flow, and hence its mass accretion rate, but most work on disc accretion has taken the mass flux to be given with the relation between that parameter and external conditions left uncertain. Within the framework of a slim alpha disk, we have constructed global solutions of the rotating, viscous, hot accretion flow in the Paczynski-Wiita potential and determined its mass accretion rate as a function of density, temperature, and angular momentum of gas at the outer boundary. We find that the low angular momentum flow resembles the spherical Bondi flow and its mass accretion rate approaches the Bondi accretion rate for the same density and temperature at the outer boundary. The high angular momentum flow on the other hand is the conventional hot accretion disk with advection, but its mass accretion rate can be significantly smaller than the Bondi accretion rate with the same boundary conditions. We also find that solutions exist only within a limited range of dimensionless mass accretion rate m-dotident toM-dot/M-dot{sub B}, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate and M-dot{sub B} is the Bondi accretion rate: when the temperature at the outer boundary is equal to the virial temperature, solutions exist only for 0.05approxaccretion rate is roughly independent of the radius of the outer boundary but inversely proportional to the angular momentum at the outer boundary and proportional to the viscosity parameter, m-dotapprox =9.0 alphalambda{sup -1} when 0.1 approx

  2. Transcurrent displacement of tectonic terranes in the central Appalachian Piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The metamorphic Piedmont of southeastern Pennsylvania is crosscut by a significant system of steeply dipping ductile shear zones with late- to post-orogenic transcurrent displacement. Geologic evidence suggests that at least some of these shear zones are responsible for hundreds of kilometers of dextral displacement, juxtaposing lithologic units with very different origins and tectonic histories across relatively narrow deformation zones. As a result, the present distribution of lithologies does not reflect Taconic (or earlier) collision at this place on the Laurentian margin. Type-section Wissahickon schist, exposed in the Philadelphia terrane, was metamorphosed to amphibolite facies before or during the Taconic orogeny. This terrane, bounded to the west by the Rosemont shear zone and to the north by the Cream Valley-Huntingdon Valley shear zone system, has been translated southwestward with respect to autochthonous Laurentian lithologies by dextral displacement on these shear zones since peak metamorphism of the schist. Published Late Ordovician ages from the Rosemont shear zone provide a minimum age for peak metamorphism of Wissahickon schist and a maximum age for displacement on the younger Huntingdon Valley-Cream Valley shear zone system. Therefore, peak metamorphic mineral assemblages in Wissahickon schist cannot be used to constrain Taconic collision models for this part of the Appalachians; rather, these mineral assemblages record evidence of (possibly earlier) orogeny elsewhere.

  3. Lineaments in basement terrane of the Peninsular Ranges, Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M. (Principal Investigator); Lamar, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS and Skylab images reveal a number of prominent lineaments in the basement terrane of the Peninsular Ranges, Southern California. The major, well-known, active, northwest trending, right-slip faults are well displayed; northeast and west to west-northwest trending lineaments are also present. Study of large-scale airphotos followed by field investigations have shown that several of these lineaments represent previously unmapped faults. Pitches of striations on shear surfaces of the northeast and west trending faults indicate oblique slip movement; data are insufficient to determine the net-slip. These faults are restricted to the pre-tertiary basement terrane and are truncated by the major northwest trending faults. They may have been formed in response to an earlier stress system. All lineaments observed in the space photography are not due to faulting, and additional detailed geologic investigations are required to determine the nature of the unstudied lineaments, and the history and net-slip of fault-controlled lineaments.

  4. Reconnaissance paleomagnetic study of the Eocene Admiralty Island volcanics, southeast Alaska: evidence for pre-late Eocene accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Panuska, B.C.; Decker, J.

    1985-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data have shown that many of the terranes in southern and southeastern Alaska originated in equatorial paleolatitudes. The ages(s) of accretion of these terranes is much debated and paleomagnetic studies constraining this age are limited. As part of a larger study, reconnaissance samples of the Admiralty Island Volcanics (Eocene) were collected at Deepwater Point and Little Pybus Bay on the southern coast of Admiralty Island. Thermal or AF cleaning effectively isolated stable magnetic components in most specimens. Homoclinal dip of the flows precludes a fold test and reversals were not observed. However, 3 penecontemporaneous feeder dikes have magnetic directions which are statistically different from the magnetic directions of the flows they intrude (baked contact test). In addition, the flows have not been affected by a regional overprinting observed in most pre-Tertiary rocks. Thus, these magnetic directions are provisionally interpreted as primary. Assuming a reversed geomagnetic polarity during the eruption of the flows, the mean direction is not significantly different than the expected North American direction. Although more data are necessary to prove a primary remanence and to insure that secular variation has been averaged out, the preliminary evidence suggests that the Southern Alaska superterrane had accreted to North American by Eocene time. These results are similar to findings in south central Alaska, which also suggest that the major terrane translation and had been completed by the early Tertiary.

  5. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  6. Tracing trends in erosion and exhumation during the Middle-Late Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the Farewell terrane, SW Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, B. A.; Malkowski, M. A.; Bradley, D. C.; Fujita, K.; O'Sullivan, P. B.

    2010-12-01

    mono- and polycrystalline quartz, plagioclase, as well as a strong lithic volcanic component reflective of arc and recycled origin source areas. At present, much of the stratigraphic and structural evolution of Farewell terrane has yet to be documented however, preliminary provenance trends from the Dillinger and Mystic subterrane may reflect an initial stage of exhumation and detrital contributions from sources areas along the eastern and central Uralian Seaway (e.g. Baltica, Siberia, and Taimyr regions). Provenance trends from the uppermost strata in the Farewell may reflect and introduction of detritus from the northern or western margins of Laurentia potentially reflecting a paleogeographic location in the central to western Uralian seaway by Late Paleozoic time. Alternatively, it could be argued that the younger parts of the Mystic subterrane have been linked with Laurentia since origin and have no geologic or paleogeographic link with the older parts of the Farewell terrane.

  7. Fluid flow, element migration, and petrotectonic evolution of the Early Mesozoic central Klamath Island arc, northwesternmost California. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.G.

    1992-12-11

    Investigations in the central Klamath Mountains (KM) have documented the presence of a polymetamorphosed suite of highly magnesian basaltic rocks, the Yellow Dog greenstones, in the Sawyers Bar (SB) terrane of the western Triassic and Paleozoic belt. The assemblage was laid down, altered and metasomatized during the hypothesized collapse of a Phillipine Sea-type back-arc basin which brought the westerly SB oceanic arc terrane into juxtaposition with the inboard, pre-existing Stuart Fork subduction complex, and more easterly KM terranes in an immature island arc setting. Supporting research has concentrated on elucidating the areal extent and structural/stratigraphic relations of these mafic/ultramafic Yellow Dog metavolcanic units, and has documented the insignificant degree of crustal contamination of the melts by associated terrigenous metasediments. The thermal structure and its evolution in the central KM evidently reflects surfaceward advective transport of magmatic energy derived from the partly fused downgoing oceanic slab, as well as hydrothermal fluid circulation. Clarification of the thermal evolution of this crust-constructional event in the immature basaltic island arc are the goals of the research now underway, emptying both field and geochemical methods. Continuing work is documenting the flow and P-T history of aqueous fluids through the evolving KM arc, utilizing electron microprobe and oxygen isotopic data. The authors have nearly finished a regional reconnaissance map showing the distribution of the lavas throughout the California part of the KM. Application of the terrane concept to the central KM has also been reevaluated in the light of regional petrotectonic relationships. Investigations of the regional and contact metamorphism/metasomatism of the SB metasedimentary pile are in progress.

  8. Launching jets from accretion belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Ron; Soker, Noam

    2016-05-01

    We propose that sub-Keplerian accretion belts around stars might launch jets. The sub-Keplerian inflow does not form a rotationally supported accretion disk, but it rather reaches the accreting object from a wide solid angle. The basic ingredients of the flow are a turbulent region where the accretion belt interacts with the accreting object via a shear layer, and two avoidance regions on the poles where the accretion rate is very low. A dynamo that is developed in the shear layer amplifies magnetic fields to high values. It is likely that the amplified magnetic fields form polar outflows from the avoidance regions. Our speculative belt-launched jets model has implications on a rich variety of astrophysical objects, from the removal of common envelopes to the explosion of core collapse supernovae by jittering jets.

  9. Accreting X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation describes the behavior of matter in environments with extreme magnetic and gravitational fields, explains the instability/stability of accretion disks in certain systems, and discusses how emergent radiation affects accretion flow. Magnetic field measurements are obtained by measuring the lowest cyclotron absorption line energy, observing the cutoff of accretion due to centrifugal inhibition and measuring the spin-up rate at high luminosity.

  10. Early to Late Paleoproterozoic magmatism in NE Brazil: The Alto Moxotó Terrane and its tectonic implications for the Pre-West Gondwana assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Lauro Cézar Montefalco de Lira; Dantas, Elton Luiz; Santos, Edilton José dos; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Lima, Haroldo Monteiro

    2015-03-01

    The Alto Moxotó Terrane is a Paleoproterozoic inlier within the Transversal Domain of the Neoproterozoic Borborema Province (NE Brazil). An isotopic and whole-rock geochemistry study has been performed in the Sucuru region (Paraiba State, NE Brazil) which revealed a long-lived evolution for this terrane. The first event is Siderian-aged, dated on 2.44 Ga, being represented by granitic to granodioritic banded orthogneisses and migmatites of the basement. They correspond to meta to peraluminous high-K calc-alkaline series, where geochemical patterns besides zircon features and Nd isotopic data indicate that they were formed in a convergent tectonic environment with reworking of an older Archean continental crust. This basement was intruded by different magmatic suites through two distinct tectono-magmatic events. The older one is Rhyacian-aged recorded by emplacement of the Carmo mafic-ultramafic suite and Pedra d'Água granitic suite, with ages varying from 2.15 to 2.0 Ga. The Carmo Suite shows compositions similar to tholeiitic and minor calc-alkaline series and geochemical patterns of a depleted source. These general chemical characteristics are compatible with an arc-related magmatism in early stages of subduction. The Pedra d'Água suite corresponds to middle to peraluminous high-K calc-alkaline magmatism which presents a typical magmatic arc geochemical signature. The negative ɛNd (t) values suggest a strong continental component for genesis of these magmas. The last tectonomagmatic episode occurred in the Statherian-Calymmian boundary and is represented by bimodal magmatic association of the Serra da Barra Suite, dated around 1.6 Ga. The dominant felsic rocks present an evolved composition and correspond to typical metaluminous sub-alkaline suite. The trace-element and REE patterns of both mafic and mainly felsic rocks suggest a within-plate setting. The attributed source is of crustal derivation, which is supported by the negative ɛNd (t) values. A mantle

  11. An Early Proterozoic metamorphic basement of the Tuva-Mongolia microcontinent as a part of the Tunka fold-nappe terrane (South Siberia): constraints from U/Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhimulev, Fedor; Safonova, Inna; Ryabinin, Alexander; Buslov, Mikhail

    2010-05-01

    The eastern Altai-Sayan orogenic belt in South Siberia was formed in the Ordovician as a direct result of the collision between the Siberian continent and the Tuva-Mongolia (TM) microcontinent. In this part of the Altai-Sayan, carbonate and terrigenous rocks are widespread and commonly regarded as deformed fragments of the sedimentary cover of the TM microcontinent. The TM microcontinent basement has a complex structure including small blocks of the Early Proterozoic continental crust and accreted Proterozoic island-arc units. The Gargan block, the western edge of which is considered to be Tuva-Mongolia, is the only reliable Early Proterozoic metamorphic unit of the TM basement. The ages of other high-grade metamorphic complexes in the region are Ordovician though, formed during the Siberia-TM collision, and therefore can not be regarded as fragments of the microcontinental basement as has been done hitherto. Further eastward, tectonic nappes dominated by biotite gneisses occur within the fold-and-thrust structure of the Tunka terrane. The gneisses, which are hardly mylonitized and include boudins of garnet-amphibolite, which are intruded by migmatite veins. The gneiss nappes are thrust on the red Carboniferous conglomerates and sandstones of the Sagansair Formation, which is a synorogenic continental molasse. Zircon grains were extracted from the gneissic units and dated by ICP-MS (U/Pb). All the dated grains are (sub)rounded, mostly unzoned, however, several grains display core and rims. The U/Pb dating yielded the ages of 2.7 - 2.4 Ga in the cores and 2.0 - 1.7 Ga in the rims. The gneiss nappe is one of a package of several nappes, all thrust over the Siberian Craton to the north. The gneisses nappe is thrust over the tectonically emplaced metacarbonate cover of the TM microcontinent. We suggest that these gneissic units are an eastern fragment of the TM microcontinent basement. Exhumation of the gneiss nappe consequently possibly took place during a Late

  12. Turbulent Distortion of Condensate Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazoume, R.; Orou Chabi, J.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1997-01-01

    When a simple model for the relationship between the density-temperature fluctuation correlation and mean values is used, we determine that the rate of change of turbulent intensity can influence directly the accretion rate of droplets. Considerable interest exists in the accretion rate for condensates in nonequilibrium flow with icing and the potential role which reactant accretion can play in nonequilibrium exothermic reactant processes. Turbulence is thought to play an important role in such flows. It has already been experimentally determined that turbulence influences the sizes of droplets in the heterogeneous nucleation of supersaturated vapors. This paper addresses the issue of the possible influence of turbulence on the accretion rate of droplets.

  13. Chronologic constraints on the tectonic evolution of the Wilson Lake terrane of the Grenville Province, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reno, B. L.; Korhonen, F. J.; Stout, J. H.; Waight, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Wilson Lake terrane in central Labrador, Canada is one of a number of terranes that make up the Grenville Province, representing the northern extent of the Grenville Orogen in North America. Many of these terranes record evidence of two orogenies: the Labradorian Orogeny at ca. 1710-1600 Ma, and the Grenville Orogeny at ca. 1080-980 Ma. The rocks in the Wilson Lake terrane are interpreted to have been subjected to peak pressures of ~0.95 GPa and ~930°C during the Labradorian Orogeny (Korhonen et al., in prep., Stability of sapphirine + quartz in the Wilson Lake terrane: calculated equilibria in NCKFMASHTO). The final amalgamation of the Wilson Lake terrane over the underlying Parautochthonous Belt is interpreted to have occurred during the Grenville Orogeny, when the terrane was subjected to a lower-T (500-350°C) overprinting. However, petrologic and chronologic evidence for the Grenville orogeny is limited in the Wilson Lake terrane. Here we present results from a monazite chemical (U-Th)-Pb chronologic study in order to provide constraints on the metamorphic history of the Wilson Lake terrane. Monazite was analyzed in samples of orthopyroxene + sillimanite + quartz bearing and sapphirine + quartz bearing gneisses from throughout the Wilson Lake terrane. These samples contain two distinct populations of monazite: 1) a population of large (up to ~500 μm) monazite exhibits distinct core and rim zoning in yttrium X-ray compositional maps, and occurs predominately in the melanosome of the rocks, and 2) a population of smaller (up to ~50 μm) unzoned monazite rarely occurs in quartz-rich layers of the rocks. In a majority of the melanosome-hosted monazite, (U-Th)-Pb chemical ages yield cores and rims with statistically similar Labradorian ages of ca. 1705-1675 Ma. However, one sample from the middle of the terrane yields monazite grains with Labradorian age cores (ca. 1710 Ma) and post-Labradorian rims (ca. 1590 Ma). Monazite from the second, quartz

  14. GPR Imaging of Fault Related Folds in a Gold-Bearing Metasedimentary Sequence, Carolina Terrane, Southern Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemer, J. A.; Bobyarchick, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Carolina terrane comprises Ediacaran to earliest Paleozoic mixed magmatic and sedimentary assemblages in the central and eastern Piedmont of the Southern Appalachian Mountains. The terrane was primarily deformed during the Late Ordovician Cherokee orogeny, that reached greenschist facies metamorphism. The Albemarle arc, a younger component of the Carolina terrane, contains volcanogenic metasedimentary rocks with intercalated mainly rhyolitic volcanic rocks. Regional inclined to overturned folds with axial planar cleavage verge southeast. At mesoscopic scales (exposures of a few square meters), folds sympathetic with regional folds are attenuated or truncated by ductile shear zones or contractional faults. Shear and fault zones are most abundant near highly silicified strataform zones in metagraywacke of the Tillery Formation; these zones are also auriferous. GPR profiles were collected across strike of two silicified, gold-bearing zones and enclosing metagraywacke to characterize the scale and extent of folding in the vicinity of ore horizons. Several GSSI SIR-3000 / 100 MHz monostatic GPR profiles were collected in profiles up to 260 meters long. In pre-migration lines processed for time zero and background removal, several clusters of shallow, rolling sigmoidal reflectors appeared separated by sets of parallel, northwest-dipping reflective discontinuities. These features are inferred to be reverse faults carrying contractional folds. After migration with an average velocity of 0.105 m/ns, vertical heights of the inferred folds became attenuated but not removed, and contractional fault reflections remained prominent. After migration, a highly convex-up cluster of reflections initially assumed to be a fold culmination resolved to an elliptical patch of high amplitudes. The patch is likely an undisclosed shaft or covered trench left by earlier gold prospecting. In this survey, useful detail appeared to a depth of 7.5 meters, and only a few gently inclined

  15. Implications of magmatic records for Neotethyan subduction beneath the Eurasian margin (Lhasa terrane, southern Tibet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jieqing; Aitchison, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Evidence for magmatism is widely developed in the Lhasa terrane of southern Tibet. Much of this is related to northward subduction of the Neotethyan Ocean prior the India-Eurasia collision. To better understand the tectono-magmatism, we systematically studied the published data for Middle Jurassic-Eocene igneous rocks in southern Tibet. Many of these rocks formed during two important intervals from ca. 110-80 Ma and ca. 65-40 Ma. On the basis of the reported rocks in this area, we considered the possibility that a Neotethyan mid-ocean ridge was subducted during the early peak episode (ca. 110-80 Ma). With this ridge subduction system, hot asthenosphere rose up through a slab window causing both oceanic slab and mantle wedge melting that resulted in peak volcanism during the Late Cretaceous. As young and hot crust at a mid-ocean ridge has a relatively low density, and thus potentially positive buoyancy, the subduction of a buoyant mid-ocean ridge may have led to a reduction in the angle of subduction. Evidence for termination of arc magmatism by the flat subducted oceanic slab is recorded by a magmatic gap ca. 80-65 Ma. Around ca. 65 Ma, the magmatic record appears again accompanied by a southward migration that represents resumption of an oceanic slab subduction at a normal subduction angle. Subsequently, magmatism lasts to ca. 36 Ma before the India-Eurasia collision and reached a peak of activity associated with a magmatic flare-up at 50 Ma. In this subduction system, some magmatic processes triggered formation of porphyry ore deposits and affected the temporal and spatial distribution of ores.

  16. Double saloon door tectonics in the Japan Sea, Fossa Magna, and the Japanese Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    A number of criteria considered diagnostic of double saloon door rifting and seafloor spreading are matched by data from the Japanese Arc. These include: a pair of terranes, SW and NE Honshu, which rotated in opposite directions from 22-21 Ma to 14-11 Ma; rotated terranes which comprise a retro-arc fold/thrust belt attached to an accretionary wedge intruded by a magmatic arc; contemporaneous backarc extension from 24 to 21 Ma which is brought to a halt by progressive collision of the Izu-Bonin and Japan Arcs from 15 to 5 Ma; isolation of blocks of thicker continental crust by areas of thin continental or oceanic crust, during backarc rifting; such isolation may be due to simultaneous rifting or to progressively seaward rifts, associated with ridge jumps towards the subduction zone; opposite rotations are accommodated by subduction rollback demonstrated by seaward migration of the volcanic front from 30-26 Ma to 16-15 Ma; concurrent development of a major arc-orthogonal rift, the Fossa Magna, from 23-18 Ma to 14 Ma, which was thereafter inverted from 15 Ma to the Recent; a northeast propagating rift in the northern Japan Basin demonstrated by the relationship of linear magnetic anomalies to the mapped continent ocean boundary. Driving mechanisms for double saloon door tectonics are discussed in relation to various reconstructions of the northwest Pacific. Opposite rotational torques, leading to opposite terrane rotations, may be caused by rollback of a curved trench hingeline, or by the divergent slab sinking forces of the Pacific and Philippine Sea Plates.

  17. Exploring a contagion model for karst terrane evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kemmerly, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical and geomorphic implications of a contagion model of karst depression and initiation are explored with particular emphasis on (1) identifying the parent versus daughter depression subpopulations; (2) analyzing the spatial characteristics of each subpopulation; and (3) defining the contagious karst mechanism and hot it is transmitted along solution-enlarged joints. The contagious karst mechanism suggests that the presence of one or more parent depressions does increase the the probability of daughter depressions developing along solution-enlarged joints that radiate outward from beneath parent depressions. In karst terranes where the contagious model applies, a well defined infrastructure exists with several important elements. The interaction of these elements in the infrastructure result in depressions occurring in clusters. The clusters tend to be randomly distributed and consist typically of a centrally located parent depression surrounded by numerous daughter depressions.

  18. RADIATIVELY EFFICIENT MAGNETIZED BONDI ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Teyssier, Romain

    2012-01-10

    We have carried out a numerical study of the effect of large-scale magnetic fields on the rate of accretion from a uniform, isothermal gas onto a resistive, stationary point mass. Only mass, not magnetic flux, accretes onto the point mass. The simulations for this study avoid complications arising from boundary conditions by keeping the boundaries far from the accreting object. Our simulations leverage adaptive refinement methodology to attain high spatial fidelity close to the accreting object. Our results are particularly relevant to the problem of star formation from a magnetized molecular cloud in which thermal energy is radiated away on timescales much shorter than the dynamical timescale. Contrary to the adiabatic case, our simulations show convergence toward a finite accretion rate in the limit in which the radius of the accreting object vanishes, regardless of magnetic field strength. For very weak magnetic fields, the accretion rate first approaches the Bondi value and then drops by a factor of {approx}2 as magnetic flux builds up near the point mass. For strong magnetic fields, the steady-state accretion rate is reduced by a factor of {approx}0.2 {beta}{sup 1/2} compared to the Bondi value, where {beta} is the ratio of the gas pressure to the magnetic pressure. We give a simple expression for the accretion rate as a function of the magnetic field strength. Approximate analytic results are given in the Appendices for both time-dependent accretion in the limit of weak magnetic fields and steady-state accretion for the case of strong magnetic fields.

  19. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  20. Cryogenian alkaline magmatism in the Southern Granulite Terrane, India: Petrology, geochemistry, zircon U-Pb ages and Lu-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, M.; Yang, Qiong-Yan; Ram Mohan, M.; Tsunogae, T.; Shaji, E.; Satyanarayanan, M.

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Granulite Terrane (SGT) in India preserves the records of the formation and recycling of continental crust from Mesoarchean through Paleoproterozoic to Neoproterozoic and Cambrian, involving multiple subduction-accretion-collision associated with major orogenic cycles. A chain of unmetamorphosed and undeformed alkaline magmatic intrusions occurs along the northern margin of the SGT aligned along paleo-suture zones. Here we investigate two representative plutons from this suite, the Angadimogar syenite (AM) and the Peralimala alkali granite (PM) through field, petrological, geochemical, zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf studies. Magma mixing and mingling textures and mineral assemblages typical of alkaline rocks are displayed by these plutons. The whole-rock major and trace element data characterize their alkaline nature. In trace element discrimination diagrams, the AM rocks straddle between the VAG (volcanic-arc granites) and WPG (within plate granites) fields with most of the samples confined to the VAG field, whereas the PM rocks are essentially confined to the WPG field. The diversity in some of the geochemical features between the two plutons is interpreted to be the reflection of source heterogeneities. Most zircon grains from the AM and PM plutons display oscillatory zoning typical of magmatic crystallization although some grains, particularly those from the PM pluton, show core-rim structures with dark patchy zoned cores surrounded by irregular thin rims resulting from fluid alteration. The weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of the magmatic zircons from three samples of the AM syenite are in the range of 781.8 ± 3.8 Ma to 798 ± 3.6 Ma and those from two samples of the PM alkali granite yield ages of 797.5 ± 3.7 Ma and 799 ± 6.2 Ma. A mafic magmatic enclave from the AM pluton shows weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 795 ± 3.3 Ma. The AM and PM plutons also carry rare xeneocrystic zircons which define upper intercept concordia ages of 3293 ± 13 Ma and 2530

  1. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Lee, C.; Manga, M.

    2012-12-01

    The position of active volcanism relative to the trench in arcs depends on melt focusing processes within the mantle wedge and the geometric parameters of subduction. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where backarc extension dominates, exhibit a more stationary front in time relative to the trench. In addition, crustal indices of magmatism as measured by the ratio of trace elements La/Yb or isotopes 87}Sr/{86Sr covary with arc front migration (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust. Thickening proceeds through intrusive as well as extrusive volcanism, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. Migration rate is set by the mantle melt flux into the crust, which decreases as thickening occurs. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop an analytic model of this process that produces migration rates consistent with published data and explains arc fronts that do not move (dominated by extension, such as in the case of intra-oceanic arcs). We present new geochemical and age data from the Peninsular Ranges Batholith that are also consistent with

  2. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  3. [Arc welder's lung].

    PubMed

    Molinari, Luciana; Alvarez, Clarisa; Semeniuk, Guillermo B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis of electric arc welder or siderotic pneumoconiosis was described by Doig and McLaughlin in 1936 as a lung disease caused by chronic inhalation of iron fumes in electric arc welders. We present a case report of electric arc welder siderosis associated with high levels of ferritin, without findings of iron deposit in any other organ. PMID:21163741

  4. AGN flickering and chaotic accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Andrew; Nixon, Chris

    2015-10-01

    Observational arguments suggest that the growth phases of the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei have a characteristic time-scale ˜105 yr. We show that this is the time-scale expected in the chaotic accretion picture of black hole feeding, because of the effect of self-gravity in limiting the mass of any accretion-disc feeding event.

  5. Morphodynamics of Accreting Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, P.; Gelfenbaum, G.; Sherwood, C. R.; Kaminsky, G. M.

    2002-12-01

    Beaches along the Pacific Northwest coast of the US have been shown to have large seasonal variability in shoreline position with several 10's of meters of recession occurring during the winter (high-energy waves) and typically similar scales of beach recovery during the summer (low-energy waves). However, many beaches along the Columbia River littoral cell (northwest Oregon and southwest Washington) have exhibited net residual progradation of several meters per year over decades, resulting in significant shoreline realignment. This historical shoreline advance has been primarily due to the dispersal of sand from the flanks of the ebb-tidal deltas following jetty construction at the entrances to the Columbia River and Grays Harbor. The installation of jetties removed the shallow shoals from the influence of tidal currents, resulting in a shoreface profile that was too shallow for the inherent wave energy. Onshore transport of large quantities of sand occurred over the next several decades, decreasing through time. While much of the original source material is now exhausted, many beaches today are still rapidly accreting on inter-annual time scales. Gradients in alongshore sediment transport, net onshore directed cross-shore sediment transport within the surf zone, and cross-shore feeding from a shoreface out of equilibrium with forcing conditions may each be partially responsible for this continued accretion. The primary morphodynamic mechanism for sub-aerial beach growth, and shoreline progradation on a seasonal scale, is hypothesized to be the development, onshore migration, and welding of inter-tidal (swash) bars to the upper beach face. To investigate the processes and morphodynamics associated with accreting beaches we have completed two field experiments and are applying computational models that link measured sediment transport to wave and current forcing. Experiments completed in Spring 2001 and Summer 2002 combined process measurements with observations of

  6. Microwave ice accretion meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magenheim, Bertram (Inventor); Rocks, James K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system for indicating ice thickness and rate of ice thickness growth on surfaces is disclosed. The region to be monitored for ice accretion is provided with a resonant surface waveguide which is mounted flush, below the surface being monitored. A controlled oscillator provides microwave energy via a feed point at a controllable frequency. A detector is coupled to the surface waveguide and is responsive to electrical energy. A measuring device indicates the frequency deviation of the controlled oscillator from a quiescent frequency. A control means is provided to control the frequency of oscillation of the controlled oscillator. In a first, open-loop embodiment, the control means is a shaft operated by an operator. In a second, closed-loop embodiment, the control means is a processor which effects automatic control.

  7. Fore-arc migration in Cascadia and its neotectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Ray E.; Weaver, Craig S.; Blakely, Richard J.

    1998-08-01

    Neogene deformation, paleomagnetic rotations, and sparse geodetic data suggest the Cascadia fore arc is migrating northward along the coast and breaking up into large rotating blocks. Deformation occurs mostly around the margins of a large, relatively aseismic Oregon coastal block composed of thick, accreted seamount crust. This 400-km-long block is moving slowly clockwise with respect to North America about a Euler pole in eastern Washington, thus increasing convergence rates along its leading edge near Cape Blanco, and creating an extensional volcanic arc on its trailing edge. Northward movement of the block breaks western Washington into smaller, seismically active blocks and compresses them against the Canadian Coast Mountains restraining bend. Arc-parallel transport of fore-arc blocks is calculated to be up to 9 mm/yr, sufficient to produce damaging earthquakes in a broad deformation zone along block margins.

  8. Extension, disruption and translation of an orogenic wedge by exhumation of large ultrahigh pressure terranes: Two examples from the Norwegian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, H. K.; Cuthbert, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    We propose the thrust-dominated accretion of an orogenic wedge during continental subduction can be succeeded by stretching, disruption and passive transport of the frontal part of the wedge on top of an exhuming high pressure/ultrahigh pressure (HP/UHP) metamorphic terrane. Initial thrusting occurs when cratons collide and one subducts beneath the other into the mantle. The subducted craton undergoes HP/UHP metamorphism while an accretionary orogenic wedge develops at its junction with the overlying craton. The subsequent exhumation of the HP/UHP terrane either by true extension and/or buoyancy-driven extrusion reverses the shear traction along its upper boundary from its earlier foreland-directed thrust motion to hinterland-directed normal displacement. This normal-sense shear stretches the orogenic wedge and can potentially detach a fragment of its frontal part away from the rearward part, allowing it to be carried passively towards the foreland on the exhuming plate with the length of displacement a function of the amount of exhumation of the HP/UHP terrane. The Jotun and Trondheim Basin Nappe Complexes of the Caledonide orogenic wedge in southern and central Scandinavia were thrust (sensu stricto) E/SE onto the Baltic Shield during the Scandian Orogeny when the western edge of Baltica subducted into the mantle beneath Laurentia to form the HP/UHP Western Gneiss Complex (WGC). Kinematic indicators along the basal décollements of orogenic wedge allochthons indicate a change in shear sense from top-E/SE to top-W/NW at the same time (≈415 Ma) radiometric ages indicate the WGC began exhumation from the mantle. The shear traction along the top of the exhuming WGC stretched the Jotun and Trondheim Basin allochthons, then broke them into segments, and finally separated the frontal part of some of the allochthons away from the main body, causing them to be carried passively E/SE as the WGC continued to exhume out of the mantle. The lack of fragmentation and absence

  9. Pennsylvanian pluton stitching of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane, Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.C.; Bergman, S.C.; Cushing, G.W. ); Plafker, G. ); Campbell, R.B.; Dodds, C.J. ); McClelland, W.C. ); Mueller, P.A. ); MacKevett, E.M. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    A quartz monzonite-syenite-alkali granite plutonic complex in eastern Alaska crosscuts the contact of the Alexander terrane and Wrangellia and intrudes the basement rocks of both terranes. Zircon U-Pb data indicate an intrusion age of 309 {plus minus} 5 Ma (Middle Pennsylvanian) for the pluton, and {sup 40}K-{sup 40}Ar age for hornblende separates indicate cooling to about 450 C during Middle Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time. The new field relations and age data demonstrate the Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane were contiguous during the Middle Pennsylvanian. This conclusion provides an important new constraint on paleogeographic reconstructions of the northwest Cordillera, and necessitates reassessment of stratigraphic and paleomagnetic data that were cited as evidence that the terranes evolved separately until the late Mesozoic.

  10. Paleozoic paleomagnetism and northward drift of the Alexander Terrane, southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Der Voo, Rob; Jones, Meridee; Gromme, C. Sherman; Eberlein, G. Donald; Churkin, Michael, Jr.

    1980-10-01

    Paleozoic limestone, graywacke, sandstone, milestone, red beds and volcanic rocks of the Alexander terrane, southeastern Alaska, have yielded six paleomagnetic pole positions after thermal and alternating-field demagnetization. These poles are from sample groups of late Middle Ordovician, Late Ordovician, Devonian, Late Devonian, and early and late Carboniferous age. To test various tectonic models for the structural development of this part of western North America, the paleomagnetic results are compared to those for the North American craton. It is found that the observed inclination and declination values deviate significantly from the values predicted for the present-day position of the Alexander terrane (55.5N, 133.5W). Better matching can be obtained for a paleoposition of the terrane at about 40N, 120W, in the present position of western Nevada and northeastern California. In addition, an in situ 25° clockwise rotation of the terrane is required to restore it to its original position.

  11. ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, S. H.; Martin, R. G.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a model for the long-term evolution of a circumplanetary disk that is fed mass from a circumstellar disk and contains regions of low turbulence (dead zones). We show that such disks can be subject to accretion-driven outbursts, analogous to outbursts previously modeled in the context of circumstellar disks to explain FU Ori phenomena. Circumplanetary disks around a proto-Jupiter can undergo outbursts for infall accretion rates onto the disks in the range M-dot{sub infall} approx. 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, typical of accretion rates in the T Tauri phase. During outbursts, the accretion rate and disk luminosity increases by several orders of magnitude. Most of the planet mass growth during planetary gas accretion may occur via disk outbursts involving gas that is considerably hotter than predicted by steady state models. For low infall accretion rates M-dot{sub infall} {approx}< 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} that occur in late stages of disk accretion, disk outbursts are unlikely to occur, even if dead zones are present. Such conditions are favorable for the formation of icy satellites.

  12. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  13. Properties of accretion disk coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, J.; Dove, J.; Staubert, R.; Begelman, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of accretion disk corona in a parameter regime suitable for Galactic black hole candidates are considered and the results of an analysis of these properties using a self-consistent Monte Carlo code are presented. Examples of the coronal temperature structure, the shape and angular dependency of the spectrum and the maximum temperature allowed for each optical depth of the corona are presented. It is shown that the observed spectrum of the Galactic black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 cannot be explained by accreting disk corona models with a slab geometry, where the accretion disk is sandwiched by the comptonizing medium.

  14. Wind accretion: Theory and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakura, N. I.; Postnov, K. A.; Kochetkova, A. Yu.; Hjalmarsdotter, L.; Sidoli, L.; Paizis, A.

    2015-07-01

    A review of wind accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries is presented. We focus on different regimes of quasi-spherical accretion onto the neutron star (NS): the supersonic (Bondi) accretion, which takes place when the captured matter cools down rapidly and falls supersonically towards the NS magnetosphere, and subsonic (settling) accretion which occurs when plasma remains hot until it meets the magnetospheric boundary. These two regimes of accretion are separated by an X-ray luminosity of about 4 × 1036 erg s-1. In the subsonic case, which sets in at lower luminosities, a hot quasi-spherical shell must form around the magnetosphere, and the actual accretion rate onto NS is determined by the ability of the plasma to enter the magnetosphere due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In turn, two regimes of subsonic accretion are possible, depending on plasma cooling mechanism (Compton or radiative) near the magnetopshere. The transition from the high-luminosity with Compton cooling to the lowluminosity (Lx ≲ 3 × 1035 erg s-1) with radiative cooling can be responsible for the onset of the off states repeatedly observed in several low-luminosity slowly accreting pulsars, such as Vela X-1, GX 301-2, and 4U 1907+09. The triggering of the transitionmay be due to a switch in the X-ray beam pattern in response to a change in the optical depth in the accretion column with changing luminosity. We also show that in the settling accretion theory, bright X-ray flares (~1038-1040 erg) observed in supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXT) can be produced by sporadic capture of magnetized stellar wind plasma. At sufficiently low accretion rates, magnetic reconnection can enhance the magnetospheric plasma entry rate, resulting in copious production of X-ray photons, strong Compton cooling and ultimately in unstable accretion of the entire shell. A bright flare develops on the free-fall time scale in the shell, and the typical energy released in an SFXT bright flare corresponds to the mass

  15. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  16. Monitoring ARC services with GangliARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, D.; Karpenko, D.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring of Grid services is essential to provide a smooth experience for users and provide fast and easy to understand diagnostics for administrators running the services. GangliARC makes use of the widely-used Ganglia monitoring tool to present web-based graphical metrics of the ARC computing element. These include statistics of running and finished jobs, data transfer metrics, as well as showing the availability of the computing element and hardware information such as free disk space left in the ARC cache. Ganglia presents metrics as graphs of the value of the metric over time and shows an easily-digestable summary of how the system is performing, and enables quick and easy diagnosis of common problems. This paper describes how GangliARC works and shows numerous examples of how the generated data can quickly be used by an administrator to investigate problems. It also presents possibilities of combining GangliARC with other commonly-used monitoring tools such as Nagios to easily integrate ARC monitoring into the regular monitoring infrastructure of any site or computing centre.

  17. To accrete or not accrete, that is the question

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von, Huene R.

    1986-01-01

    Along modern convergent margins tectonic processes span a spectrum from accretion to erosion. The process of accretion is generally recognized because it leaves a geologic record, whereas the process of erosion is generally hypothetical because it produces a geologic hiatus. Major conditions that determine the dominance of accretion or erosion at modern convergent margins are: 1) rate and direction of plate convergence, 2) sediment supply and type in the trench, and 3) topography of the subducting ocean floor. Most change in structure has been ascribed to plate motion, but both erosion and accretion are observed along the same convergence margin. Thus sediment supply and topography are probably of equivalent importance to plate motion because both erosion and accretion are observed under constant conditions of plate convergence. The dominance of accretion or erosion at a margin varies with the thickness of trench sediment. In a sediment flooded trench, the proportions of subducted and accreted sediment are commonly established by the position of a decollement along a weak horizon in the sediment section. Thus, the vertical variation of sediment strength and the distribution of horizontal stress are important factors. Once deformation begins, the original sediment strength is decreased by sediment remolding and where sediment thickens rapidly, increases in pore fluid pressure can be pronounced. In sediment-starved trenches, where the relief of the subducting ocean floor is not smoothed over, the front of the margin must respond to the topography subducted as well as that accreted. The hypothesized erosion by the drag of positive features against the underside of the upper plate (a high stress environment) may alternate with erosion due to the collapse of a margin front into voids such as graben (a low stress environment). ?? 1986 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  18. Far-travelled permian chert of the North Fork terrane, Klamath mountains, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, E.A.; Irwin, W.P.; Blome, C.D.

    1996-01-01

    Permian chert in the North Fork terrane and correlative rocks of the Klamath Mountains province has a remanent magnetization that is prefolding and presumably primary. Paleomagnetic results indicate that the chert formed at a paleolatitude of 8.6?? ?? 2.5?? but in which hemisphere remains uncertain. This finding requires that these rocks have undergone at least 8.6?? ?? 4.4?? of northward transport relative to Permian North America since their deposition. Paleontological evidence suggests that the Permian limestone of the Eastern Klamath terrane originated thousands of kilometers distant from North America. The limestone of the North Fork terrane may have formed at a similar or even greater distance as suggested by its faunal affinity to the Eastern Klamath terrane and more westerly position. Available evidence indicates that convergence of the North Fork and composite Central Metamorphic-Eastern Klamath terranes occurred during Triassic or Early Jurassic time and that their joining together was a Middle Jurassic event. Primary and secondary magnetizations indicate that the new composite terrane containing these and other rocks of the Western Paleozoic and Triassic belt behaved as a single rigid block that has been latitudinally concordant with the North American craton since Middle Jurassic time.

  19. Geochemistry, petrography, and zircon U-Pb geochronology of Paleozoic metaigneous rocks in the Mount Veta area of east-central Alaska: implications for the evolution of the westernmost part of the Yukon-Tanana terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Day, Warren C.; Aleinikoff, John N.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of new mapping, whole-rock major, minor, and trace-element geochemistry, and petrography for metaigneous rocks from the Mount Veta area in the westernmost part of the allochthonous Yukon–Tanana terrane (YTT) in east-central Alaska. These rocks include tonalitic mylonite gneiss and mafic metaigneous rocks from the Chicken metamorphic complex and the Nasina and Fortymile River assemblages. Whole-rock trace-element data from the tonalitic gneiss, whose igneous protolith was dated by SHRIMP U–Pb zircon geochronology at 332.6 ± 5.6 Ma, indicate derivation from tholeiitic arc basalt. Whole-rock analyses of the mafic rocks suggest that greenschist-facies rocks from the Chicken metamorphic complex, a mafic metavolcanic rock from the Nasina assemblage, and an amphibolite from the Fortymile River assemblage formed as island-arc tholeiite in a back-arc setting; another Nasina assemblage greenschist has MORB geochemical characteristics, and another mafic metaigneous rock from the Fortymile River assemblage has geochemical characteristics of calc-alkaline basalt. Our geochemical results imply derivation in an arc and back-arc spreading region within the allochthonous YTT crustal fragment, as previously proposed for correlative units in other parts of the terrane. We also describe the petrography and geochemistry of a newly discovered tectonic lens of Alpine-type metaharzburgite. The metaharzburgite is interpreted to be a sliver of lithospheric mantle from beneath the Seventymile ocean basin or from sub-continental mantle lithosphere of the allochthonous YTT or the western margin of Laurentia that was tectonically emplaced within crustal rocks during closure of the Seventymile ocean basin and subsequently displaced and fragmented by faults.

  20. The geochemistry of the Neogene Halmahera Arc, eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Emily Jane

    . Similarities in certain incompatible trace element characteristics between volcanic rocks of the Mariana and Halmahera arc suggest both arcs are products of a variably depleted mantle beneath the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP). Pb isotopic data from the Halmahera arc, combined with data from back-arc basaltic rocks from the PSP, suggests an I-MORB-type mantle wedge exists beneath this plate and hence that it was once part of the Indo-Australian plate. Volcanic rocks from west and south Bacan lie outside the isotopic ranges displayed by lavas from Obi, north Bacan and Halmahera, reaching extreme Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios consistent with the assimilation of a continental component. Isotopic analyses of Permo-Triassic granitic material, found exposed in the Sula-Banggai islands. New Guinea margin, and Queensland, NE Australia, indicate that this is the most likely contaminant of volcanic rocks in the south Bacan region. In contrast, volcanic rocks from west Bacan are contaminated with a component similar in isotopic composition to highly metamorphosed rocks found exposed in the Sibela Mountains, south Bacan. The geochemical signature and age of the Halmahera arc lavas has implications for the arrival and movement of continental crust in the region. Combined with stratigraphic and tectonic knowledge of the region this study has been used to construct a possible model for the development of the Halmahera arc. The contaminated signature of the Bacan Neogene volcanic rocks supports the hypothesis of overthrusting of ophiolitic and continental material, derived from the PSP and Australian plates respectively, due to collision between the Australian continent and a PSP arc during the Early Miocene. This initiated the development of the Sorong Fault Zone, which was responsible for the recent movement of these 'terranes' into the southern Molucca Sea region.

  1. He-accreting white dwarfs: accretion regimes and final outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Yungelson, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    The behaviour of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) subject to direct helium accretion is extensively studied. We aim to analyse the thermal response of an accreting WD to mass deposition at different timescales. The analysis has been performed for initial WD masses and accretion rates in the range 0.60-1.02 M⊙ and 10-9-10-5 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. Thermal regimes in the parameter space MWD-dot{M}_He leading to formation of red-giant-like structures, steady burning of He, and mild, strong and dynamical flashes have been identified and the transition between these regimes has been studied in detail. In particular, the physical properties of WDs experiencing the He-flash accretion regime have been investigated to determine the mass retention efficiency as a function of the accretor total mass and accretion rate. We also discuss to what extent the building up of a He-rich layer via H burning could be described according to the behaviour of models accreting He-rich matter directly. Polynomial fits to the obtained results are provided for use in binary population synthesis computations. Several applications for close binary systems with He-rich donors and CO WD accretors are considered and the relevance of the results for interpreting He novae is discussed.

  2. Stratigraphic, structural and U-Pb geochronologic investigation of lower Paleozoic eugeoclinal strata in the Kootenay Arc, NE Washington and SE British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Kootenay Arc in northwestern Washington and southeastern British Columbia is transitional between: (1) lower Paleozoic autochthonous miogeoclinal strata and Paleozoic to Mesozoic eugeoclinal terranes of uncertain paleogeographic affinity (e.g., the Quesnel terrane); and (2) areas where Devono-Mississippian tectonism was of a compressional nature, and areas in northern British Columbia and southern Yukon Territory where coeval deformation was evidently of an extensional nature. Stratigraphic, structural, and U-Pb geochronologic studies focussed primarily on portions of the Lardeau Group in the Trout Lake area in the northern Kootenay Arc and the Covada Group in the southern Kootenay Arc. As a result of these studies, the following concepts are proposed: (1) lower Paleozoic eugeoclinal strata can be correlated along the length of the Arc; (2) these strata are in fault contact with miogeoclinal strata along the length of the Arc; (3) a contractional event of pre-Mississippian and perhaps Devono-Mississippian age is recorded in the Kootenay Arc; (4) despite faulted contacts, the eugeoclinal strata are parautochthonous and derived from adjacent portions of North America; and (5) structures and stratigraphy in the Kootenay Arc are broadly correlative with those in the Roberts Mountains allochthon in central Nevada. Two important implications of this study are that: (1) through a series of stratigraphic linkages it can be demonstrated that the Quesnel terrane, a Mesozoic arc-related assemblage often regarded on the basis of faunal evidence to be exotic, is parautochthonous; and (2) the Antler Orogeny, often regarded as a localized disturbance, affected at least 1,200 km of the Cordilleran margin, and perhaps the entire Cordilleran margin.

  3. Isotopic age constraints on provenance of exotic terranes, latest Permian collision and fast Late Triassic post-collisional cooling and tectonic exhumation of the Korean collision belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Koenraad; Han, Seokyoung; Ruffet, Gilles; Yi, Keewook

    2016-04-01

    The Korean peninsula is located in the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent where major late Palaeozoic to early Mesozoic continental collision zones, like the Central Asian Orogenic Belt and the Central China Orogen, merge with circum-Pacific subduction-accretion systems. We present an integrated view of the Korean collision belt using recent Ar/Ar laser-probe step-heating single grain ages from the uppermost Gyeonggi Massif, central Korea's Palaeoproterozoic high-grade granite-gneiss terrane affected by Permo-Triassic metamorphism, the bordering Hongseong zone and the overlying Imjingang belt and the correlative Taean Formation, as well as SHRIMP isotopic ages of detrital zircons from meta-sandstones from the latter metamorphic marine turbidite sequences. We show that early Paleozoic isolated exotic terranes form part of the collision belt and were reworked in Permo-Triassic time. Age spectra of zircons from mature meta-sandstones in the Misan Formation (Imjingang Belt) and Taean Formation do not match the age distribution of the Gyeonggi Massif, to which both are usually assigned, as they show only subordinate 1.9-1.8 Ga and ~2.5 Ga age modes but dominant 441-426 Ma and 978-919 Ma peaks. Much of the sediment appears to have been derived from distant, exotic middle Paleozoic and Early Neoproterozoic magmatic sources, not present in Gyeonggi or other Korean basement massifs. The youngest concordant zircon ages are: 394, 398 and 402 Ma, showing that both formations are at least of Early Devonian age. Terranes with a substratum with Early Neoproterozoic and Silurian-Devonian granitoids are present in the South Chinese Cathaysia Terrane and in the Qinling Terrane (Central China Orogen). Both formations may, hence, represent the submarine fan part of a routing system and a delta-shelf system originally situated in China. The Taean Formation and Imjingang Belt are thus exotic Paleozoic terranes tectonically emplaced in the Korean collision belt. Muscovite, biotite

  4. Nd-Hf isotopic mapping of Late Mesozoic granitoids in the East Qinling orogen, central China: Constraint on the basements of terranes and distribution of Mo mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Tao; Ke, Changhui; Yang, Yang; Li, Jinbao; Li, Yinghong; Qi, Qiuju; Lv, Xingqiu

    2015-05-01

    during Archaean to Neoproterozic, different from a typical accretion orogen. The old sources of the granitoids and basements of the terranes constrain the distribution, scale and number of the Mo mineralization and deposits. Mo mineralization is closely related to the small granitic bodies with old continental component sources and Mo deposits are mainly hosted by the terranes with oldest basement. The scale and number of the Mo mineralization and deposits decreased from the southern margin of the NCB to SQB.

  5. Timing the structural events in the Palaeoproterozoic Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane and adjacent Maluwe basin, West African craton, in central-west Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kock, G. S.; Théveniaut, H.; Botha, P. M. W.; Gyapong, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Maluwe basin, north-adjacent to the Sunyani basin, is the northernmost of the northeast-trending Eburnean volcaniclastic depositories in Ghana. These basins are separated from one another by remnants of Eoeburnean crust, all formed during the evolution of an arc-backarc basins complex in a Palaeoproterozoic intraoceanic environment. The Bolé-Nangodi belt terrane to the northwest, of mostly Eoeburnean crust is fault bounded with the Maluwe basin along the northeast-trending Bolé-Navrongo fault zone. The stratigraphic sequence, which was the key to unravelling the structural evolution of the study area, was established by means of field observations aided by precision SHRIMP geochronology. The quartzitic, pelitic, quartzofeldspathic and granitic gneisses of the Eoeburnean crust (>2150 Ma) experienced complex metamorphic mineral growth and migmatitization, mostly under static crustal conditions and were subjected to several deformation episodes. The foliated mafic and metasedimentary enclaves within the Ifanteyire granite establish deformation to have taken place prior to ˜2195 Ma, while the tectonically emplaced Kuri amphibolites within the 2187-Ma gneissic Gondo granite indicate a stage of rifting followed by collision. Deformation of granite dykes in the Gondo granites at ˜2150 Ma concluded the development of the Eoeburnean orogenic cycle (DEE). The Sawla Suite, contemporaneous with the deposition of the Maluwe Group, intruded the tectonic exhumed Bolé-Nangodi terrane during extension between ˜2137 and 2125 Ma. The rifting separated the Abulembire fragment from the Bolé-Nangodi terrane. During subsequent northwestward subduction of young back-arc basin oceanic crust the volcaniclastic strata of the Maluwe Group and Sawla granitoids were deformed (DE1) under chlorite/sericite greenschist-grade conditions. The NE-trending folds had subhorizontal axes and subvertical axial planes. Simultaneous to the DE1 orogenesis the molasses of the Banda Group was

  6. Metamorphism of San Antonio Terrane metapelites, San Gabriel Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, L.; Ishimatsu, J.; Schneiderman, J.S. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Pelitic schists and gneisses from the San Antonio terrane in the eastern San Gabriel Mountains consist of garnet, biotite, plagioclase, quartz, sillimanite, cordierite, hercynite [+-] alkali feldspar. Large garnet porphyroblasts contain quartz, plagioclase and sillimanite inclusions. Cordierite occurs as haloes around garnet porphyroblasts and as small subgrains always associated with hercynite and together replacing sillimanite blades. Hercynite additionally appears to have nucleated on the edges of sillimanite blades. Contrary to previous investigations, hercynite appears to be a late mineral phase. Reaction textures described above have been used to calculate a set of net-transfer reactions that can be used (1) to characterize all possible exchanges of matter between minerals in the system and (2) to construct a reaction space for the system. Fourteen thin sections with large garnet porphyroblasts and abundant biotite were used for microprobe analysis. Detailed probe analyses show well-developed zoning in the plagioclase and alkali feldspar whose character varies depending on location in the thin section relative to neighboring minerals. Generally, large plagioclase porphyroblasts display normal zoning and are not as calcium-rich as plagioclase inclusions in the garnet. Garnet porphyroblasts have flat zoning profiles due to high temperatures of metamorphism. Pressures and temperatures of metamorphism have been calculated from these assemblages using garnet-biotite geothermometry and quartz-garnet-aluminosilicate-plagioclase geobarometry.

  7. Geophysical constraints on the lunar Procellarum KREEP Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Robert E.

    2013-04-01

    The Moon's Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT) is distinguished by unique geochemistry and extended volcanic history. Previous thermal-conduction models using enhanced radionuclide abundances in subcrustal potassium, rare earth elements, and phosphorus (KREEP) predicted the existence of a contemporary upper-mantle melt zone as well as heat flow consistent with Apollo measurements. Here I show that such models also predict large gravity or topography anomalies that are not observed. If the topography is suppressed by a rigid lithosphere, it is possible to eliminate the gravity anomaly and still match heat flow by completely fractionating the excess radionuclides into a thin crust. This implies that upper-mantle heat sources for mare volcanism were spatially discontinuous or transient and that radionuclides defining the PKT are not necessarily directly related to mare volcanic sources. However, the mantle temperature of a crustally fractionated PKT is insufficient to match the observed electrical conductivity: globally enhanced mantle heating or a thick megaregolith may be required. Alternatively, upper-mantle enrichment in iron, hydrogen, or aluminum can provide the requisite conductivity. Iron is the most plausible: the derived lower limit to the upper-mantle magnesium number 75-80% is consistent with seismic modeling. Regardless of the specific mechanism for electrical-conductivity enhancement, the overall excellent match to simple thermal-conduction models indicates that the lunar upper mantle is not convecting at present.

  8. Long arc stabilities with various arc gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, K.; Takeda, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Noguchi, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new arc torch for use in magnetically driven arc device was developed with a commercially available TIG welding arc torch. The torch has a water-cooling system to the torch nozzle and has a nozzle nut to supply a swirling-free plasma gas flow. Its endurance against arc thermal load is examined. Features of its generated arc are investigated.

  9. Galactic Fountains and Gas Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinacci, F.; Binney, J.; Fraternali, F.; Nipoti, C.; Ciotti, L.; Londrillo, P.

    2010-06-01

    Star-forming disc galaxies such as the Milky Way need to accrete >~1 Msolar of gas each year to sustain their star formation. This gas accretion is likely to come from the cooling of the hot corona, however it is still not clear how this process can take place. We present simulations supporting the idea that this cooling and the subsequent accretion are caused by the passage of cold galactic-fountain clouds through the hot corona. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability strips gas from these clouds and the stripped gas causes coronal gas to condense in the cloud's wake. For likely parameters of the Galactic corona and of typical fountain clouds we obtain a global accretion rate of the order of that required to feed the star formation.

  10. ACCRETING CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS: OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-01-20

    I calculate the spectral energy distributions of accreting circumplanetary disks using atmospheric radiative transfer models. Circumplanetary disks only accreting at 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} around a 1 M{sub J} planet can be brighter than the planet itself. A moderately accreting circumplanetary disk ( M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; enough to form a 10 M{sub J} planet within 1 Myr) around a 1 M{sub J} planet has a maximum temperature of ∼2000 K, and at near-infrared wavelengths (J, H, K bands), this disk is as bright as a late-M-type brown dwarf or a 10 M{sub J} planet with a ''hot start''. To use direct imaging to find the accretion disks around low-mass planets (e.g., 1 M{sub J} ) and distinguish them from brown dwarfs or hot high-mass planets, it is crucial to obtain photometry at mid-infrared bands (L', M, N bands) because the emission from circumplanetary disks falls off more slowly toward longer wavelengths than those of brown dwarfs or planets. If young planets have strong magnetic fields (≳100 G), fields may truncate slowly accreting circumplanetary disks ( M-dot ≲10{sup −9} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and lead to magnetospheric accretion, which can provide additional accretion signatures, such as UV/optical excess from the accretion shock and line emission.

  11. How do accretion discs break?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Suzan

    2016-07-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. In this study, we first calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. We compare the disc precession torque with the disc viscous torque to determine whether the disc should warp or break. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. To check our analytical findings, we perform 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations using the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and enhances accretion on to the central object. For some inclinations, the disc goes through strong Kozai cycles. Disc breaking promotes markedly enhanced and variable accretion and potentially produces high-energy particles or radiation through shocks. This would have significant implications for all binary systems: e.g. accretion outbursts in X-ray binaries and fuelling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The behaviour we have discussed in this work is relevant to a variety of astrophysical systems, for example X-ray binaries, where the disc plane may be tilted by radiation warping, SMBH binaries, where accretion of misaligned gas can create effectively random inclinations and protostellar binaries, where a disc may be misaligned by a variety of effects such as binary capture/exchange, accretion after binary formation.

  12. Multiple migmatite events and cooling from granulite facies metamorphism within the Famatina arc margin of northwest Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, Sean R.; Roeske, Sarah M.; McClelland, William C.; Ellis, Joshua R.; Jourdan, Fred; Renne, Paul R.; Vervoort, Jeffrey D.; Vujovich, Graciela I.

    2014-01-01

    The Famatina margin records an orogenic cycle of convergence, metamorphism, magmatism, and extension related to the accretion of the allochthonous Precordillera terrane. New structural, petrologic, and geochronologic data from the Loma de Las Chacras region demonstrate two distinct episodes of lower crustal migmatization. The first event preserves a counterclockwise pressure-temperature path in kyanite-K-feldspar pelitic migmatites that resulted in lower crustal migmatization via muscovite dehydration melting at ˜12 kbar and 868°C at 461 ±1.7 Ma. The shape of the pressure temperature path and timing of metamorphism are similar to those of regional midcrustal granulites and suggest pervasive Ordovician migmatization throughout the Famatina margin. One-dimensional thermal modeling coupled with regional isotopic data suggests Ordovician melts remained at temperatures above their solidus for 20-30 Ma following peak granulite facies metamorphism, throughout a time period marked by regional oblique convergence. The onset of synconvergent extension occurred only after regional migmatites cooled beneath their solidus and was synchronous with the cessation of Precordillera terrane accretion at ˜436 Ma. The second migmatite event was regionally localized and occurred at ˜700°C and 12 kbar between 411 and 407 Ma via vapor saturated melting of muscovite. Migmatization was synchronous with extension, exhumation, and strike-slip deformation that likely resulted from a change in the plate boundary configuration related to the convergence and collision of the Chilenia terrane.

  13. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  14. Interpretation of tectonic setting in the Phetchabun Volcanic Terrane, Northern Thailand: Evidence from enhanced airborne geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangsomphong, Arak; Thitimakorn, Thanop; Charusiri, Punya

    2015-08-01

    Re-processed aeromagnetic data with enhancement approaches of reduction to the pole, high pass filtering and shaded relief have been used to interpret complex subsurface structures of the Carboniferous to Triassic Phetchabun Volcanic Terrane (PVT) which is largely covered by thick Cenozoic sediment deposits. Interpretation of the enhanced aeromagnetic data reveals four distinct structural domains in the PVT, viz. Northern, Eastern, Central, and Western domains. Within these domains, high magnetic units are recognized, namely elongate, ring, circular, and dipolar spot units. The elongate unit in the Central domain is characterized by a deformation zone with northwest-southeast trending, sinistral shearing. East-west trending and the northeast-southwest trending faults cross-cut several magnetic units in the Central domain, with sinistral and dextral movements, respectively. Three major fault directions have been identified, including the northeast-southwest trending sinistral faults, north-south trending dextral faults, and northwest-southeast trending dextral faults. The younger spot units are small intrusive bodies largely situated along these latest fault segments. The aeromagnetic interpretation results, together with relevant current field verification, as well as previous geochronological and petrochemical investigations, have lead to the clarification of structural development in the PVT. The elongate units are interpreted to represent Late Carboniferous intrusive bodies. They occurred as a result of an eastward subduction of the Nakhonthai oceanic plate beneath the Indochina continental plate, along the Loei suture. The elongate units are also reflected in a north-south trending deformation zone formed by the east-west compressional tectonics. The ring units are considered to have formed in a Permo-Triassic volcanic arc, whereas the circular units represent equigranular intrusive bodies which formed in a response to the second phase of eastward subduction

  15. Archaean Crustal Growth, Proterozoic Terrane Amalgamation and the Pan-African Orogeny, as Recorded in the NE African Sedimentary Record.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, Y.; Fielding, L.; Millar, I.; Butterworth, P.; Andò, S.; Padoan, M.; Barfod, D. N.; Kneller, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    The cratons of Central Africa are formed of various blocks of Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic crust, flanked or truncated by Palaeoproterozoic to Mesoproterozoic orogenic belts. The geology of east Africa has largely been shaped by the events of the Pan-African Orogeny when east and west Gondwana collided to form 'Greater Gondwana' at the end of the Neoproterozoic. The Pan-African orogeny in NE Africa involved the collision of Archaean cratons and the Saharan Metacraton with the Arabian Nubian Shield, a terrane comprising Neoproterozoic juvenile oceanic island arcs. Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, eroded from the Pan-African orogenies, blanket much of NE Africa. Detrital data from these Phanerozoic cover sedimentary rocks, and modern rivers draining both the cover the basement, provide a wealth of information on basement evolution, of particular relevance for regions where the basement itself is poorly exposed due to ancient or modern sedimentary cover. From samples collected in Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt, we provide combined U-Pb and Hf-isotope zircon, U-Pb rutile and Ar-Ar mica datasets, heavy mineral analyses, and bulk trace element data, from Archaean basement, Phanerozoic cover and modern river sediment from the Nile and its tributaries to document the evolution of the North African crust. The data document early crust-forming events in the Congo Craton and Sahara Metacraton, phased development of the Arabian Nubian Shield culminating in the Neoproterozoic assembly of Gondwana during the Pan African Orogeny, and the orogen's subsequent erosion, with deposition of voluminous Phanerozoic cover.

  16. Dynamics of Continental Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to swallow buoyant exotic crust. Accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North and South American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. Both the modern and ancient examples are characterised by episodic switches between extension and shortening associated with transitions from collision of exotic crust and subduction related rollback. We present three-dimensional dynamic models that show for the first time how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back arc region. The complexity of the morphology and evolution of the system are driven by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonal to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, but infer that this is a global phenomena throughout Earth's evolution.

  17. Zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic and geochemical constraints on the origin of the paragneisses from the Jiaobei terrane, North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Houxiang; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhu, Xiyan; Santosh, M.; Hong, Tao; Ge, Songsheng

    2016-01-01

    addition, the protoliths of the paragneisses might have been deposited during 2.47-2.42 Ga. High and heterogeneous ICV values of the paragneisses could imply a chemically immature source. A number of geochemical indicators and tectonic discrimination diagrams together indicate an island arc or active continent margin setting for the deposition of the protoliths of the paragneisses in the Jiaobei terrane. Together with the nearly contemporaneous igneous rocks, it can be inferred that the convergent margin setting was possibly operative during the Late Neoarchean-Early Paleoproterozoic transition in the Jiaobei terrane.

  18. Late Cretaceous ARC to MORB compositional switch in the Quebradagrande Complex, Colombian Andes: understanding the long term tectonic evolution of a magmatic arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, J. S.; Cardona, A.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial and compositional characters of arc rocks are sensible markers of the tectonic changes experienced by convergent margins and therefore provide a fundamental view to the continuous tectonic evolution of active margins. The Early to Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes have been related to the growth and accretion of different continental and oceanic arc systems that were juxtaposed at the beginning of the Andean Orogeny in the Late Cretaceous. The Quebradagrande Complex is a tectonostratigraphic unit made of mafic to intermediate plutonic rocks, basic to intermediate volcanic flows and associated marine sedimentary rocks that have been related to a single Albian arc or back-arc environment that discontinuously outcrops along the western margin of the Central Cordillera of Colombia. New field, geochronological and geochemical data from the plutonic and volcanic rocks of the Quebradagrande complex shows that the pre-90-80 Ma volcanic arc rocks are intruded by ca. 90 Ma pyroxene gabbroic and hornblende dioritic plutons with medium to pegmatitic grain size characterized by a contrasting MORB-type signature. We related the compositional change to a transient modification of the convergent margin system, where and extensional roll-back related configuration or the subduction of an oceanic ridge allows the flux of the astenospheric mantle. This continental magmatic arc was subsequently deformed due to the collision and accretion of an allocthonous oceanic arc that migrate from the southeast Pacific at the beginning of the Andean orogeny.

  19. Tectonomagmatic setting and provenance of the Santa Marta Schists, northern Colombia: Insights on the growth and approach of Cretaceous Caribbean oceanic terranes to the South American continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Bustamante, C.; García-Casco, A.; Ojeda, G.; Ruiz, J.; Saldarriaga, M.; Weber, M.

    2010-10-01

    Metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary rocks accreted to the northern South American continental margin are major vestiges of the Caribbean oceanic plate evolution and its interactions with the continent. Selected whole rock geochemistry, Nd-Sr isotopes and detrital zircon geochronology were obtained in metabasic and metasedimentary rocks from the Santa Marta and San Lorenzo Schists in northernmost Colombia. Trace element patterns are characterized by primitive island arc and MORB signatures. Similarly initial 87Sr/ 86Sr-ɛ Nd isotopic relations correlate with oceanic arcs and MORB reservoirs, suggesting that the protoliths were formed within a back-arc setting or at the transition between the inta-oceanic arc and the Caribbean oceanic crust. Trace element trends from associated metasedimentary rocks show that the provenance was controlled by a volcanic arc and a sialic continental domain, whereas detrital U/Pb zircons from the Santa Marta Schists and adjacent southeastern metamorphic units show Late Cretaceous and older Mesozoic, Late Paleozoic and Mesoproterozoic sources. Comparison with continental inland basins suggests that this arc-basin is allocthonous to its current position, and was still active by ca. 82 Ma. The geological features are comparable to other arc remnants found in northeastern Colombia and the Netherland Antilles. The geochemical and U/Pb detrital signatures from the metasedimentary rocks suggest that this tectonic domain was already in proximity to the continental margin, in a configuration similar to the modern Antilles or the Kermadec arc in the Pacific. The older continental detritus were derived from the ongoing Andean uplift feeding the intra-oceanic tectonic environment. Cross-cutting relations with granitoids and metamorphic ages suggest that metamorphism was completed by ca. 65 Ma.

  20. Anatexis of garnet amphibolites from a subduction zone metamorphic terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, S.S.; Barton, M.D.; Ernst, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    Concomitant rehydration, metasomatism and amphibolitization of eclogite blocks from a mafic/ultramafic complex of the Catalina Schist terrane, southern California, at estimated metamorphic P approx. 8-12 kb, T approx. 600/sup 0/-700/sup 0/C was apparently accompanied by partial melting of some blocks. Mobilizates of An approx./sub 10-20/ plagioclase (PL) +/- zoisite (ZO) + quartz (QZ) + celadonitic (Si approx. 3.3 p.f.u.) white mica (WM) +/- tourmaline range from stringers and dikelets (approx. 1 cm-0.5 m) in migmatitic amphibolite blocks to dikes approx. 30 m x 3 m which intrude the surrounding, locally enstatite + chlorite +/- talc +/- aluminous actinolite +/- anthophyllite-bearing ultramafic matrix. The uniform phase proportions and the coarse-grained (PL to approx. 20 cm) pegmatitic, graphic, and myrmekitic textures displayed by the dikes and dikelets suggest that they crystallized from silicate melts. WM and ZO appear to be magmatic phases. Fe-rich GT is migmatitic portions of blocks exhibits higher Mg/(Mg + Ca) p.f.u. than GT in restitic portions of blocks; rims are richer in Mg than cores. Field relations, microprobe mineral chemistry, and bulk compositions suggest the pegmatites are low fractions of amphibolite-derived partial melt. Abundant fluid inclusions occur in GT, QZ, PL and clinopyroxene. T/sub h/ for primary H/sub 2/O-rich, low salinity L + V inclusions in GT and QZ from a migmatite range from 136-169/sup 0/C; estimates of T limits for entrapment are 530-640/sup 0/C at 8 kb, 650-780/sup 0/C at 10 kb. H/sub 2/O-rich fluids evidently enabled metasomatism, amphibolitization, and anatexis of (originally) eclogitic rocks at the P-T conditions reflected by the metamorphic mineral assemblages.

  1. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Hillary

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  2. Paleomagnetic rotations and the Cenozoic tectonics of the Cascade Arc, Washington, Oregon, and California

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.E. )

    1990-11-10

    Paleomagnetic results from Cenozoic (62-12 Ma) volcanic rocks of the Cascade arc and adjacent indicate that moderate to large clockwise rotations are an important component of the tectonic history of the arc. Two mechanisms of rotation are suggested by the regional pattern of paleomagnetic rotations. The progressive increase in rotation toward the coast in arc and forearc rocks results from distributed dextral shear, which is likely driven by oblique subduction of oceanic plates to the west. Simple shear rotation is accommodated in the upper crust by strike-slip faulting. The right-lateral Mount St. Helens seismic zone may be an active manifestation of this process. Dextral shear probably obscures a subequal contribution to arc and forearc rotation that is driven by intraarc or backarc extension. This rotation is suggested by the average southward increase in continental margin rotations into the region outboard of the Basin and Range. The southward increase in rotation parallels a change in the arc tectonic regime from largely compressional in northern Washington to extensional in Oregon. Concomitant with this change is a southward increase in the volume of eruptive rocks and the number of basaltic vents in the arc. A progressive eastward shift of the arc volcanic front with time in the rotated arc terrane is the result of the westward pivoting of the arc block in front of a zone of extension since Eocene time. Westward migration of bimodal Basin and Range volcanism since at least 16 Ma is tracking westward rotation of the frontal arc block and growth of the Basin and Range in its wake.

  3. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  4. Classical Accreting Pulsars with NICER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Soft excesses are very common center dot Lx > 1038 erg/s - reprocessing by optically thick material at the inner edge of the accretion disk center dot Lx < 1036 erg/s - photoionized or collisionally heated diffuse gas or thermal emission from the NS surface center dot Lx 1037 erg/s - either or both types of emission center dot NICER observations of soft excesses in bright X-ray pulsars combined with reflection modeling will constrain the ionization state, metalicity and dynamics of the inner edge of the magnetically truncated accretion disk Reflection models of an accretion disk for a hard power law - Strong soft excess below 3 keV from hot X-ray heated disk - For weakly ionized case: strong recombination lines - Are we seeing changes in the disk ionization in 4U1626-26? 13 years of weekly monitoring with RXTE PCA center dot Revealed an unexpectedly large population of Be/X-ray binaries compared to the Milky Way center dot Plotted luminosities are typical of "normal" outbursts (once per orbit) center dot The SMC provides an excellent opportunity to study a homogenous population of HMXBs with low interstellar absorption for accretion disk studies. Monitoring with NICER will enable studies of accretion disk physics in X-ray pulsars center dot The SMC provides a potential homogeneous low-absorption population for this study center dot NICER monitoring and TOO observations will also provide measurements of spinfrequencies, QPOs, pulsed fluxes, and energy spectra.

  5. Jets from magnetized accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Ryoji

    When an accretion disk is threaded by large scale poloidal magnetic fields, the injection of magnetic helicity from the accretion disk drives bipolar outflows. We present the results of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of jet formation from a torus initially threaded by vertical magnetic fields. After the torsional Alfvén waves generated by the injected magnetic twists propagate along the large-scale magnetic field lines, magnetically driven jets emanate from the surface of the torus. Due to the magnetic pinch effect, the jets are collimated along the rotation axis. Since the jet formation process extracts angular momentum from the disk, it enhances the accretion rate of the disk material. Through three-dimensional (3D) global MHD simulations, we confirmed previous 2D results that the magnetically braked surface of the disk accretes like an avalanche. Owing to the growth of non-axisymmetric perturbations, the avalanche flow breaks up into spiral channels. Helical structure also appears inside the jet. When magnetic helicity is injected into closed magnetic loops connecting the central object and the accretion disk, it drives recurrent magnetic reconnection and outflows.

  6. Characterizing Accreting White Dwarf Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the population, mass distribution, and evolution of accreting white dwarfs impacts the entire realm of binary interaction, including the creation of Type Ia supernovae. We are concentrating on accreting white dwarf pulsators, as the pulsation properties allow us a view of how the accretion affects the interior of the star. Our ground- based photometry on 11 accreting pulsators with corresponding temperatures from HST UV spectra suggest a broad instability strip in the range of 10500 to 16000K. Additionally, tracking a post-outburst heated white dwarf as it cools and crosses the blue edge and resumes pulsation provides an independent method to locate the empirical instability strip. Determining a post-outburst cooling curve yields an estimate of the amount of heating and the accreted mass during the outburst. We request additional photometry of 2 objects that present unique properties: GW Lib which has not yet returned to its pre-outburst pulsation spectrum after 6 yrs, and EQ Lyn which returned to its pre- outburst pulsation after 3 yrs but is now turning on and off without ongoing outbursts. Following the pulsation spectrum changes over stretches of several nights in a row will provide specific knowledge of the stability of the observed modes.

  7. Metamorphism of tectonic terranes in the eastern marginal zone of the Appalachian orogen, New England

    SciTech Connect

    Hepburn, J.C.; Olszewski, W.J.; Guidotti, C.V.

    1985-01-01

    Southeastern New England is subdivided into three major fault bounded tectonic terranes, each with a distinctive metamorphic history. The easternmost, the Avalon Terrane, has generally been metamorphosed no higher than the lower greenschist facies. Evidence for pre-Alleghanian metamorphism includes a Proterozoic Z(.) event, contact metamorphism adjacent to Ord.-Dev. alkaline plutons, and granulite facies crustal xenoliths in Mesozoic dikes. To the west the Nashoba Terrane has been deformed and polymetamorphosed to the sill. and 2nd sill. zones between approximately 415 and 450 m.y., based on ages of associated granitic and migmatitic rocks. 730 m.y. assumed basement gneisses (fish Brook) have likely experienced Late PC metamorphism. In the Merrimack Trough, here including the Massabesic Gneiss, the metamorphic grade ranges from the greenschist facies on the east to the 2nd sillimanite zones on the west toward the Massabesic. The two metamorphic events present here must predate the intrusion of the Exeter Diorite (473 m.y .), indicating one or both may be PC. To the east, the fault bounded Rye Formation has also experienced two pre- 470 m.y. metamorphisms (and -sill.) However, the terrane east of the Turtle Head Fault Zone (THFZ) has many similarities to the Boston Platform including general (Late PC.) lower greenschist metamorphism. Also, the area between the Norumbega FZ and the THFZ has experienced high grade metamorphism of probable Silurian age and thus may be similar to the Nashoba Terrane.

  8. Evolution of Massive Protostars Via Disk Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2010-09-01

    Mass accretion onto (proto-)stars at high accretion rates \\dot{M}_* > 10^{-4} M_{⊙} yr^{-1} is expected in massive star formation. We study the evolution of massive protostars at such high rates by numerically solving the stellar structure equations. In this paper, we examine the evolution via disk accretion. We consider a limiting case of "cold" disk accretion, whereby most of the stellar photosphere can radiate freely with negligible backwarming from the accretion flow, and the accreting material settles onto the star with the same specific entropy as the photosphere. We compare our results to the calculated evolution via spherically symmetric accretion, the opposite limit, whereby the material accreting onto the star contains the entropy produced in the accretion shock front. We examine how different accretion geometries affect the evolution of massive protostars. For cold disk accretion at 10-3 M sun yr-1, the radius of a protostar is initially small, R *sime a few R sun. After several solar masses have accreted, the protostar begins to bloat up and for M * ~= 10 M sun the stellar radius attains its maximum of 30-400 R sun. The large radius ~100 R sun is also a feature of spherically symmetric accretion at the same accreted mass and accretion rate. Hence, expansion to a large radius is a robust feature of accreting massive protostars. At later times, the protostar eventually begins to contract and reaches the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) for M * ~= 30 M sun, independent of the accretion geometry. For accretion rates exceeding several 10-3 M sun yr-1, the protostar never contracts to the ZAMS. The very large radius of several hundreds R sun results in the low effective temperature and low UV luminosity of the protostar. Such bloated protostars could well explain the existence of bright high-mass protostellar objects, which lack detectable H II regions.

  9. Late Triassic alkaline complex in Sulu UHP terrane: Implications for post-collisional magmatism along the continental subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Song, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    In order to insight into crust-mantle interaction triggered by partial melting of the subudcted continental crust during its exhumation, we carried out a combined study on Shidao alkaline complex in the Sulu ultrahigh pressure (UHP) terrane. The alkaline complex is composed of shoshonitic to ultrapotassic gabbro, pyroxene syenite, amphibole syenite, quartz syenite, and granite. Field researches suggest that the mafic rocks are earlier than the felsic ones in sequence. LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb dating on them gives Late Triassic ages of 214 ± 2 to 200 ± 3 Ma from mafic to felsic rocks. These ages are a bit younger than Late Triassic ages for partial melting of the Sulu UHP terrane during exhumation, indicating syn-exhumation magmatism during continental collision. The alkaline rocks have wide ranges of SiO2 (49.7 - 76.7 wt.%), MgO (8.25 - 0.03 wt.%),total Fe2O3 (9.23 - 0.47 wt.%), CaO (8.39 - 0.39 wt.%), Ni (126.0 - 0.07 ppm), and Cr (182.0 - 0.45 ppm) contents. Other major oxides are regularly changed with SiO2. The alkaline rocks have characteristics of arc-like patterns in the trace element distribution, e.g., enrichment of LREE and LILE (Rb, Ba, Th and U), depletion of HFSE (Nb, Ta, P and Ti), and positive Pb anomalies. From the mafic to felsic rocks, (La/Yb)N ratios and contents of the total REE, Sr and Ba are decreased but Rb contents are increased. The alkaline rocks also display features of A2-type granitoids, suggesting a post-collisional magmatism. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70575 and 0.70927) and negative ɛNd(t) values (-18.6 to -15.0) for whole-rock. The homogeneous initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and ɛNd(t) values of the alkaline rocks are almost unchanged with SiO2 and MgO contents, suggesting a fractional crystallization (FC) process from a same parental magma. Our studies suggest a series of crust-mantle interaction processes along the continental subduction interface as follows: (1) melts from partial melting of the subducted continental

  10. The Architecture, Chemistry, and Evolution of Continental Magmatic Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducea, Mihai N.; Saleeby, Jason B.; Bergantz, George

    2015-05-01

    Continental magmatic arcs form above subduction zones where the upper plate is continental lithosphere and/or accreted transitional lithosphere. The best-studied examples are found along the western margin of the Americas. They are Earth's largest sites of intermediate magmatism. They are long lived (tens to hundreds of millions of years) and spatially complex; their location migrates laterally due to a host of tectonic causes. Episodes of crustal and lithospheric thickening alternating with periods of root foundering produce cyclic vertical changes in arcs. The average plutonic and volcanic rocks in these arcs straddle the compositional boundary between an andesite and a dacite, very similar to that of continental crust; about half of that comes from newly added mafic material from the mantle. Arc products of the upper crust differentiated from deep crustal (>40 km) residual materials, which are unstable in the lithosphere. Continental arcs evolve into stable continental masses over time; trace elemental budgets, however, present challenges to the concept that Phanerozoic arcs are the main factories of continental crust.

  11. Black hole accretion disc impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihajoki, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analytic model for computing the luminosity and spectral evolution of flares caused by a supermassive black hole impacting the accretion disc of another supermassive black hole. Our model includes photon diffusion, emission from optically thin regions and relativistic corrections to the observed spectrum and time-scales. We test the observability of the impact scenario with a simulated population of quasars hosting supermassive black hole binaries. The results indicate that for a moderate binary mass ratio of 0.3, and impact distances of 100 primary Schwarzschild radii, the accretion disc impacts can be expected to equal or exceed the host quasar in brightness at observed wavelength λ = 510 nm up to z = 0.6. We conclude that accretion disc impacts may function as an independent probe for supermassive black hole binaries. We release the code used for computing the model light curves to the community.

  12. Episodic Accretion in Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audard, M.; Ábrahám, P.; Dunham, M. M.; Green, J. D.; Grosso, N.; Hamaguchi, K.; Kastner, J. H.; Kóspál, Á.; Lodato, G.; Romanova, M. M.; Skinner, S. L.; Vorobyov, E. I.; Zhu, Z.

    In the last 20 years, the topic of episodic accretion has gained significant interest in the star-formation community. It is now viewed as a common, although still poorly understood, phenomenon in low-mass star formation. The FU Orionis objects (FUors) are long-studied examples of this phenomenon. FU Orionis objects are believed to undergo accretion outbursts during which the accretion rate rapidly increases from typically 10-7 to a few 10-4 M⊙ yr-1, and remains elevated over several decades or more. EXors, a loosely defined class of pre-main-sequence stars, exhibit shorter and repetitive outbursts, associated with lower accretion rates. The relationship between the two classes, and their connection to the standard pre-main-sequence evolutionary sequence, is an open question: Do they represent two distinct classes, are they triggered by the same physical mechanism, and do they occur in the same evolutionary phases? Over the past couple of decades, many theoretical and numerical models have been developed to explain the origin of FUor and EXor outbursts. In parallel, such accretion bursts have been detected at an increasing rate, and as observing techniques improve, each individual outburst is studied in increasing detail. We summarize key observations of pre-main-sequence star outbursts, and review the latest thinking on outburst triggering mechanisms, the propagation of outbursts from star/disk to disk/jet systems, the relation between classical EXors and FUors, and newly discovered outbursting sources — all of which shed new light on episodic accretion. We finally highlight some of the most promising directions for this field in the near- and long-term.

  13. Origin of granulite terranes and the formation of the lowermost continental crust.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, S R; Mezger, K

    1989-04-21

    Differences in composition and pressures of equilibration between exposed, regional granulite terranes and suites of granulite xenoliths of crustal origin indicate that granulite terranes do not represent exhumed lowermost crust, as had been thought, but rather middle and lower-middle crustal levels. Application of well-calibrated barometers indicate that exposed granulites record equilibration pressures of 0.6 to 0.8 gigapascal (20 to 30 kilometers depth of burial), whereas granulite xenoliths, which also tend to be more mafic, record pressures of at least 1.0 to 1.5 gigapascals (35 to 50 kilometers depth of burial). Thickening of the crust by the crystallization of mafic magmas at the crust-mantle boundary may account for both the formation of regional granulite terranes at shallower depths and the formation of deep-seated mafic crust represented by many xenolith suites. PMID:17738304

  14. Paleozoic paleomagnetism and northward drift of the Alexander terrane, southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Der Voo, R.; Jones, M.; Gromme, C.S.; Eberlein, G.D.; Churkin, M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Paleozoic limestone, greywacke, sandstone, mudstone, red beds and volcanic rocks of the Alexander terrane, SE Alaska, have yielded six paleomagnetic pole positions after thermal and alternating-field demagnetization. These poles are from sample groups of late Middle Ordovician, Late Ordovician, Devonian, Late Devonian, and early and late Carboniferous age. To test various tectonic models for the structural development of this part of western N America, the paleomagnetic results are compared to those for the N American craton. It is found that the observed inclination and declination values deviate significantly from the values predicted for the present-day position of the Alexander terrance (55.5 N, 133.5 W). Better matching can be obtained for a paleoposition of the terrane at about 40 N, 120 W, in the present position of western Nevada and NE California. In addition, an in situ 25o clockwise rotation of the terrane is required to restore it to its original position.-Authors

  15. Exhumation of (ultra-)high-pressure terranes: concepts and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, C. J.

    2013-02-01

    The formation and exhumation of high and ultra-high-pressure, (U)HP, rocks of crustal origin appears to be ubiquitous during Phanerozoic plate subduction and continental collision events. Exhumation of (U)HP material has been shown in some orogens to have occurred only once, during a single short-lived event; in other cases exhumation appears to have occurred multiple discrete times or during a single, long-lived, protracted event. It is becoming increasingly clear that no single exhumation mechanism dominates in any particular tectonic environment, and the mechanism may change in time and space within the same subduction zone. Subduction zone style and internal force balance change in both time and space, responding to changes in width, steepness, composition of subducting material and velocity of subduction. In order for continental crust, which is relatively buoyant compared to the mantle even when metamorphosed to (U)HP assemblages, to be subducted to (U)HP conditions, it must remain attached to a stronger and denser substrate. Buoyancy and external tectonic forces drive exhumation, although the changing spatial and temporal dominance of different driving forces still remains unclear. Exhumation may involve whole-scale detachment of the terrane from the subducting slab followed by exhumation within a subduction channel (perhaps during continued subduction) or a reversal in motion of the entire plate (eduction) following the removal of a lower part of the subducting slab. Weakening mechanisms that may be responsible for the detachment of deeply subducted crust from its stronger, denser substrate include strain weakening, hydration, melting, grain size reduction and the development of foliation. These may act locally to form narrow high-strain shear zones separating stronger, less-strained crust or may act on the bulk of the subducted material, allowing whole-scale flow. Metamorphic reactions, metastability and the composition of the subducted crust all affect

  16. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

  17. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  18. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  19. A kinematic model for the formation of the Siletz-Crescent forearc terrane by capture of coherent fragments of the Farallon and Resurrection plates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Wilson, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    The volcanic basement of the Oregon and Washington Coast ranges has been proposed to represent a pair of tracks of the Yellowstone hotspot formed at a mid-ocean ridge during the early Cenozoic. This interpretation has been questioned on many grounds, especially that the range of ages does not match the offshore spreading rates and that the presence of continental coarse clastic sediments is difficult to reconcile with fast convergence rates between the oceanic plates and North America. Updates to basement geochronology and plate motion history reveal that these objections are much less serious than when they were first raised. Forward plate kinematic modeling reveals that predicted basement ages can be consistent with the observed range of about 55–49 Ma, and that the entire basement terrane can form within about 300 km of continental sources for clastic sediments. This kinematic model indicates that there is no firm reason to reject the near-ridge hotspot hypothesis on the basis of plate motions. A novel element of the model is the Resurrection plate, previously proposed to exist between the Farallon and Kula plates. By including the defunct Resurrection plate in our reconstruction, we are able to model the Farallon hotspot track as docking against the Oregon subduction margin starting about 53 Ma, followed by docking of the Resurrection track to the north starting about 48 Ma. Accretion of the Farallon plate fragment and partial subduction of the Resurrection fragment complicates the three-dimensional structure of the modern Cascadia forearc. We interpret the so-called “E” layer beneath Vancouver Island to be part of the Resurrection fragment. Our new kinematic model of mobile terranes within the Paleogene North American plate boundary allows reinterpretation of the three-dimensional structure of the Cascadia forearc and its relationship to ongoing seismotectonic processes.

  20. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  1. A Laurentian margin back-arc: the Ordovician Wedowee-Emuckfaw-Dahlonega basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barineau, Clinton I.; Tull, James F.; Holm-Denoma, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Independent researchers working in the Talladega belt, Ashland-Wedowee-Emuckfaw belt, and Opelika Complex of Alabama, as well as the Dahlonega gold belt and western Inner Piedmont of Alabama, Georgia, and the Carolinas, have mapped stratigraphic sequences unique to each region. Although historically considered distinct terranes of disparate origin, a synthesis of data suggests that each includes lithologic units that formed in an Ordovician back-arc basin (Wedowee-Emuckfaw-Dahlonega basin—WEDB). Rocks in these terranes include varying proportions of metamorphosed mafic and bimodal volcanic rock suites interlayered with deep-water metasedimentary rock sequences. Metavolcanic rocks yield ages that are Early–Middle Ordovician (480–460 Ma) and interlayered metasedimentary units are populated with both Grenville and Early–Middle Ordovician detrital zircons. Metamafic rocks display geochemical trends ranging from mid-oceanic-ridge basalt to arc affinity, similar to modern back-arc basalts. The collective data set limits formation of the WEDB to a suprasubduction system built on and adjacent to upper Neoproterozoic–lower Paleozoic rocks of the passive Laurentian margin at the trailing edge of Iapetus, specifically in a continental margin back-arc setting. Overwhelmingly, the geologic history of the southern Appalachians, including rocks of the WEDB described here, indicates that the Ordovician Taconic orogeny in the southern Appalachians developed in an accretionary orogenic setting instead of the traditional collisional orogenic setting attributed to subduction of the Laurentian margin beneath an exotic or peri-Laurentian arc. Well-studied Cenozoic accretionary orogens provide excellent analogs for Taconic orogenesis, and an accretionary orogenic model for the southern Appalachian Taconic orogeny can account for aspects of Ordovician tectonics not easily explained through collisional orogenesis.

  2. Dislocations of the cretaceous and cenozoic complexes of the northern part of the West Sakhalin Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golozubov, V. V.; Kasatkin, S. A.; Malinovskii, A. I.; Nechayuk, A. E.; Grannik, V. M.

    2016-07-01

    The contemporary structure of the West Sakhalin Terrane started to form in the Pleistocene and the process of its formation continues up to now in a setting of ENE (60°-90°) shortening. Evidence of the preceding NE (30°-45°) compression was revealed during the study. This compression prevailed in the Eocene-Pliocene. Under the settings of NE (30°-45°) compression, dextral displacements occurred along the West Sakhalin and Tym'-Poronai fault systems, bounding the West Sakhalin Terrane.

  3. Integrated seismic model of the crust and upper mantle of the Trans-European Suture zone between the Precambrian craton and Phanerozoic terranes in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde-Piórko, Monika; Świeczak, Marzena; Grad, Marek; Majdański, Mariusz

    2010-01-01

    The structure and evolution of the Trans-European Suture zone (TESZ), contact between Precambrian Europe to the northeast and Phanerozoic terranes to the southwest is one of the main tectonic questions in Europe. The knowledge of the crustal structure, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary and mantle transition zone between two seismic discontinuities at depths "410" and "660" km, is one of the most important issues to understand the Earth's dynamics. To create a mantle model of the TESZ and surroundings we used different seismic data collected along the 950 km long POLONAISE'97 profile P4. Previous results of 2-D ray-tracing and P-wave travel time modelling and new results of P-wave travel time residuals methods and receiver function sections provide facts about the seismic structure from the surface down to 900 km depth. In the TESZ a large basin, about 125 km wide, is filled with sedimentary strata (Vp < 6.0 km s - 1 ) to about 20 km depth. This basin is asymmetric with its northeast margin being most abrupt. The crystalline crust under this basin is only about 20 km thick today indicating that the lithosphere of Baltica was either thinned drastically or terminated along the northeast margin of the basin. The East European craton (EEC) has a ~ 45 km thick three-layered crust. The crust of the accreted terranes to the southwest is relatively thin (~ 30 km) and similar to that found in other non-cratonal areas of Western Europe. The lower crust is relatively fast (Vp > 7.0 km s - 1 ) along most of the P4 profile. However, lower values to the southwest may indicate the termination of Baltica. High velocity (~ 8.35 km s - 1 ) uppermost mantle lies beneath the Avalonia/Variscan terranes, and may be due to rifting and/or subduction. The seismic lithosphere thickness for the EEC is about 200 km, while it is only 90 km in the Palaeozoic platform (PP). The mantle transition zone is shallower and about 30 km thicker under the EEC, which could be due to thermal conditions

  4. Stellar X-ray accretion signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, C.; Guenther, M.

    2016-06-01

    Accretion is observed in a wide range objects with partially overlapping properties. In this contribution, we study accretion in young stars, where we can directly observe the accretion shock on the stellar surface in the X-ray regime. High-resolution grating spectroscopy allows us to infer the properties of the accretion streams. I will present results from our recent 250 ks XMM-Newton/Chandra program targeting the prototypical T Tau system such as strong X-ray variability despite constant mass accretion, abundances typical for accreting stars, but line ratios typically not found in accreting stars. Finally, I will compare these results with other systems focusing on potentially different accretion modes.

  5. Crustal structure of the Caribbean-northeastern South America arc-continent collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, Gail L.; Mann, Paul; Escalona, Alejandro; Aitken, Trevor J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the results of a 568-km-long regional wide-angle seismic profile conducted in the southeastern Caribbean that crosses an active island arc, a remnant arc, two basins possibly floored by oceanic crust, an allochthonous terrane of forearc affinity, and the passive margin of northern South America. The velocity structures of the Late Cretaceous Aves Ridge remnant arc and Miocene and younger Lesser Antilles arc are remarkably similar, which implies that magmatic processes have remained moderately steady over time. Crustal thickness is ˜26 km at the Aves Ridge and ˜24 km at the Lesser Antilles arc. In comparison to the Izu-Bonin and Aleutian arcs, the Lesser Antilles arc is thinner and has no evidence for a lower crustal cumulate layer, which is consistent with the estimated low magma production rates of the Lesser Antilles arc. Crustal thickness beneath the Grenada and Tobago basins is 4-10 km, and the velocity structure suggests that these basins could be floored by oceanic crust. A decrease of ˜1 km/s in average seismic velocity of the upper crust is observed from NW to SE across the North Coast fault zone; we argue that this marks the suture between the far-traveled Caribbean arc and the passive margin of the South American continent. Current strike-slip motion between the Caribbean and South American plates is located ˜30 km to the south, and thus material originally deposited on the South American passive margin has now been transferred to the Caribbean plate.

  6. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  7. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  8. Filtered cathodic arc source

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    Disclosed is a continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45{degrees} to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  9. Viscosity in spherically symmetric accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Arnab K.

    2003-10-01

    The influence of viscosity on the flow behaviour in spherically symmetric accretion has been studied here. The governing equation chosen has been the Navier-Stokes equation. It has been found that at least for the transonic solution, viscosity acts as a mechanism that detracts from the effectiveness of gravity. This has been conjectured to set up a limiting scale of length for gravity to bring about accretion, and the physical interpretation of such a length scale has been compared with the conventional understanding of the so-called `accretion radius' for spherically symmetric accretion. For a perturbative presence of viscosity, it has also been pointed out that the critical points for inflows and outflows are not identical, which is a consequence of the fact that under the Navier-Stokes prescription, there is a breakdown of the invariance of the stationary inflow and outflow solutions - an invariance that holds good under inviscid conditions. For inflows, the critical point gets shifted deeper within the gravitational potential well. Finally, a linear stability analysis of the stationary inflow solutions, under the influence of a perturbation that is in the nature of a standing wave, has indicated that the presence of viscosity induces greater stability in the system than has been seen for the case of inviscid spherically symmetric inflows.

  10. Counter-rotating accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyda, S.; Lovelace, R. V. E.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Romanova, M. M.; Koldoba, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Counter-rotating discs can arise from the accretion of a counter-rotating gas cloud on to the surface of an existing corotating disc or from the counter-rotating gas moving radially inwards to the outer edge of an existing disc. At the interface, the two components mix to produce gas or plasma with zero net angular momentum which tends to free-fall towards the disc centre. We discuss high-resolution axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of viscous counter-rotating discs for the cases where the two components are vertically separated and radially separated. The viscosity is described by an isotropic α-viscosity including all terms in the viscous stress tensor. For the vertically separated components, a shear layer forms between them and the middle part of this layer free-falls to the disc centre. The accretion rates are increased by factors of ˜102-104 over that for a conventional disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity. The vertical width of the shear layer and the accretion rate are strongly dependent on the viscosity and the mass fraction of the counter-rotating gas. In the case of radially separated components where the inner disc corotates and the outer disc rotates in the opposite direction, a gap between the two components opens and closes quasi-periodically. The accretion rates are ≳25 times larger than those for a disc rotating in one direction with the same viscosity.

  11. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  12. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  13. Back-arc with frontal-arc component origin of Triassic Karmutsen basalt, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.; Sutherland, Brown A.; Budahn, J.R.; Plafker, G.

    1989-01-01

    The largely basaltic, ???4.5-6.2-km-thick, Middle to Upper Triassic Karmutsen Formation is a prominent part of the Wrangellian sequence. Twelve analyses of major and minor elements of representative samples of pillowed and massive basalt flows and sills from Queen Charlotte and Vancouver Islands are ferrotholeiites that show a range of 10.2-3.8% MgO (as normalized, H2O- and CO2-free) and related increases in TiO2 (1.0-2.5%), Zr (43-147 ppm) and Nb (5-16 ppm). Other elemental abundances are not related simply to MgO: distinct groupings are evident in Al2O3, Na2O and Cr, but considerable scatter is present in FeO* (FeO + 0.9Fe2O3) and CaO. Some of the variation is attributed to alteration during low-rank metamorphism or by seawater - including variation of Ba, Rb, Sr and Cu, but high-field-strength elements (Sc, Ti, Y, Zr and Nb) as well as Cr, Ni, Cu and rare-earth elements (REE's) were relatively immobile. REE's show chondrite-normalized patterns ranging from light-REE depleted to moderately light-REE enriched. On eleven discriminant plots these analyses fall largely into or across fields of within-plate basalt (WIP), normal or enriched mid-ocean-ridge tholeiite (MORB) and island-arc tholeiite (IAT). Karmutsen basalts are chemically identical to the stratigraphically equivalent Nikolai Greenstone of southern Alaska and Yukon Territory. These data and the fact that the Karmutsen rests on Sicker Group island-arc rocks of Paleozoic age suggest to us that: 1. (1) the basal arc, after minor carbonate-shale deposition, underwent near-axial back-arc rifting (as, e.g., the Mariana arc rifted at different times); 2. (2) the Karmutsen basalts were erupted along this rift or basin as "arc-rift" tholeiitite; and 3. (3) after subsequent deposition of carbonates and other rocks, and Jurassic magmatism, a large fragment of this basalt-sediment-covered island arc was accreted to North America as Wrangellia. The major- and minor-elemental abundances of Karmutsen basalt is modeled

  14. Lithologic evidence of the Transverse Ranges as a native terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Reed, W.E. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Transverse Ranges (TR) of southern California can be subdivided structurally into eight tectonic blocks. Analysis of paleoflow indicators and clast lithologies of Upper Cretaceous conglomerates within these blocks provide insights into the tectonic history of the TR and the interrelationships between the tectonic blocks. A thick conglomeratic section of Upper Cretaceous sediments is preserved in the Santa Ynez block. Paleoflow indicators show a northerly transport direction throughout the section. Lithologic analysis reveals a section dominated by sedimentary and quartzite clasts, with subordinate numbers of felsic plutonic and various volcanic lithologies. Plotting these data on modified QFL diagrams suggests a magmatic arc provenance area. Clasts of unaltered quartz arenite were noted in several Santa Ynez samples. Upper Cretaceous conglomerates in the San Rafael block are higher in sedimentary clasts and have a lower proportion of quartzite clasts than those in the Santa Ynez block. This, plus the presence of quartz arenite clasts in the Santa Ynez block, suggests that the stratigraphic section in these two blocks was deposited by two different fan systems which coalesced from different provenance areas. Removal of approximately 90[degree] of clockwise rotation (as suggested by paleomagnetic declination data) and 70 km of right-lateral slip places the pre-Tertiary Western TR in a reconstructed position west of San Diego. Thus, the Penninsular Ranges Batholith and associated rocks would have provided the sediment to the Cretaceous fan systems. The northerly flow directions be reconstructed to a westerly flow direction, which matches flow directions measured in Cretaceous fan sequences currently exposed in the San Diego area. Thus, this model successfully accounts for the northerly-directed paleoflow direction measured in the Western TR, and the magmatic arc provenance indicated by the lithologic data.

  15. Damping of prominence longitudinal oscillations due to mass accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, Michael S.; Luna, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    We study the damping of longitudinal oscillations of a prominence thread caused by the mass accretion. We suggested a simple model describing this phenomenon. In this model we considered a thin curved magnetic tube filled with the plasma. The prominence thread is in the central part of the tube and it consists of dense cold plasma. The parts of the tube at the two sides of the thread are filled with hot rarefied plasma. We assume that there are flows of rarefied plasma toward the thread caused by the plasma evaporation at the magnetic tube footpoints. Our main assumption is that the hot plasma is instantaneously accommodated by the thread when it arrives at the thread, and its temperature and density become equal to those of the thread. Then we derive the system of ordinary differential equations describing the thread dynamics. We solve this system of ordinary differential equations in two particular cases. In the first case we assume that the magnetic tube is composed of an arc of a circle with two straight lines attached to its ends such that the whole curve is smooth. A very important property of this model is that the equations describing the thread oscillations are linear for any oscillation amplitude. We obtain the analytical solution of the governing equations. Then we obtain the analytical expressions for the oscillation damping time and periods. We find that the damping time is inversely proportional to the accretion rate. The oscillation periods increase with time. We conclude that the oscillations can damp in a few periods if the inclination angle is sufficiently small, not larger that 10°, and the flow speed is sufficiently large, not less that 30 km s-1. In the second model we consider the tube with the shape of an arc of a circle. The thread oscillates with the pendulum frequency dependent exclusively on the radius of curvature of the arc. The damping depends on the mass accretion rate and the initial mass of the threads, that is the mass of the

  16. Geochemical and isotopic composition of Pan-African metabasalts from southwestern Gondwana: Evidence of Cretaceous South Atlantic opening along a Neoproterozoic back-arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Thomas M.; Frimmel, Hartwig E.; Gaucher, Claudio; Bossi, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    A lithogeochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope study of former oceanic crustal rocks from the Cuchilla Dionisio Terrane in the southern Dom Feliciano Belt, Uruguay (La Tuna amphibolites) and metabasites in the Chameis Subterrane of the Marmora Terrane in the Gariep Belt, Namibia/South Africa shows that these rocks are compositionally very similar and probably represent the same unit on opposite sides of the modern South Atlantic. The mafic rocks from both terranes are tholeiitic metabasalts and -andesites and have depleted rare earth element patterns, generally low TiO2 (< 1.5 wt.%), very low Th/Nb ratios and lack negative Nb-Ta anomalies, all features that are typical of ‘normal' mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB) and/or back-arc basin basalts (BABB). In addition, both rock suites have extremely depleted Nd isotope compositions (εNd630 Ma = 6.7-9.4), superchondritic 147Sm/144Nd ratios, and low 206Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb initial ratios. The 87Sr/86Sr initial ratios of the La Tuna mafic rocks are low, whereas the Chameis metagabbro samples have higher, possibly alteration-related ratios. The geochemical and isotopic signatures are consistent with the formation of both rock suites in the same mature Neoproterozoic back-arc basin (Marmora Basin), supporting conclusions drawn from earlier provenance studies of metasedimentary units from these terranes. Other mafic rocks from the Marmora Terrane are interpreted as ocean island basalts that formed in a within-plate setting. A corollary of the conclusion that the mafic rocks in the Cuchilla Dionisio and Marmora Terranes formed in the same back-arc basin is (1) that the main Pan-African suture between the Río de la Plata Craton and the Kalahari Craton lies to the west of the Dom Feliciano Belt in South America, and (2) that the opening of the modern South Atlantic did not occur along that suture but along the axis of the Neoproterozoic Marmora back-arc basin.

  17. Geochemistry of black shales from the Neoarchaean Sandur Superterrane, India: First cycle volcanogenic sedimentary rocks in an intraoceanic arc trench complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikyamba, C.; Kerrich, R.

    2006-09-01

    The ˜2.7 Ga Sandur Superterrane (SST), of the western Dharwar craton, is a collage of greenstone terranes having distinct lithotectonic associations; volcanic associations are prevalent. Fine-grained metasedimentary rocks, which are optimal for provenance studies, are sparse in greenstone terranes of this craton. However, extensive shale sequences are present in the eastern volcanic terrane (EVT) and the eastern felsic volcanic terrane (EFVT) of the SST. Within the EVT, the black shales are stratigraphically associated with black cherts, metabasalt and banded iron formation (BIF), and underlain by greywackes. Shales have compositions of tholeiitic basalt in terms of TiO 2, Cr, Co, Ni, V, and Sc contents, and plot near the arc basalt endmember on the Th/Sc versus Sc mixing hyperbola. In contrast, Archean average upper continental crust of Taylor and McLennan [Taylor, S.R., McLennan, S.M., 1985. The Continental crust: Its Composition and Evolution. Blackwell, Oxford, 307p.; Taylor, S.R., McLennan, S.M., 1995. The geochemical evolution of the continental crust. Rev. Geophys.33, 241-265], plots mid-hyperbola indicative of bimodal arc magma provenance. Accordingly, the Sandur shales likely had a catchment in an oceanic arc or back-arc dominated by tholeiitic basalts. Specifically, Nb/Th ratios 1.5-2.5 in shales are close to those of Archean arc basalts (1-4), so a plateau or ocean island basalt source, where Nb/Th >8, can be ruled out. Compositionally, cherts are shale highly diluted by silica, with positive Eu anomalies, and are interpreted to be hydrothermal sediments precipitated from reduced fluids during periods of limited siliciclastic input. In the shales, variable SiO 2 and Fe 2O 3 contents, depletions of MnO, MgO, and Na 2O, and positive to negative Eu anomalies, but gains of K relative to arc basalt compositions, are interpreted as due to hydrothermal alteration. Greywackes underlying the shales have two compositions. Type I is similar to the shales, whereas

  18. Origin of the Luobusa diamond-bearing peridotites from the sub-arc mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuanzhou; Zhang, Chang; Wu, Fuyuang; Chung, Sunlin

    2016-04-01

    accreted through a plume activity (Yang et al., 2014) up to the lithospheric mantle beneath the Lhasa terrane, where they have been metasomatized by Neo-Tethyan subduction processes. This sub-arc lithospheric mantle was exhumed at seafloor during the Early Cretaceous, in response to the fore-arc hyperextension (Maffione et al., 2015), and intruded by mafic dykes resulting from decompression melting of the ascended asthenosphere (Zhang et al., 2015). Reference Maffione, M. et al. Forearc hyperextension dismembered the south Tibetan ophiolites. Geology 46, 475-478 (2015). Robinson, P. T. et al. The origin and significance of crustal minerals in ophiolitic chromitites and peridotites. Gond. Res., 486-506 (2015). Yang, J. S. et al. Diamond- and coesite-bearing chromitites from the Luobusa ophiolite, Tibet. Geology 35, 875-878 (2007). Yang, J. S., Robinson, P. T. & Dilek, Y. Diamonds in ophiolites. Elements 10, 127-130 (2014). Zhang, C., Liu, C. Z., Wu, F. Y., Zhang, L. L. & Ji, W. Q. Geochemistry and geochronology of maifc rocks from the Luobusa ophiolite, South Tibet. Lithos, 10.1016/j.lithos.2015.1006.1031 (2015). Zhou, M. F., Robinson, P. T., Malpas, J. & Li, Z. J. Podiform chromitites in the Luobusa Ophiolite (Southern Tibet): Implications for melt-rock interaction and chromite segregation in the upper mantle. J. Petrol. 37, 3-21 (1996).

  19. Uvá complex, the oldest orthogneisses of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic terrane of central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, Hardy; Junior, Farid Chemale; Fuck, Reinhardt Adolfo; Dussin, Ivo Antônio

    2013-11-01

    The Archean-Paleoproterozoic terrane of central Brazil is an exotic and allochthonous part of the Tocantins Province, a large Brasiliano/Pan-African orogen of the South American Platform formed during the Brasiliano orogeny. The terrane amalgamated to the province during the late stages of the orogeny as a crustal segment consisting of six Archean orthogneiss complexes and five low-grade metamorphic, in part Paleoproterozoic (Rhyacian) greenstone belts. The Uvá complex is the southernmost orthogneiss association of the Archean-Paleoproterozoic terrane of central Brazil. New U-Pb LA-ICP-MS data from zircon crystals show that the complex formed at least during two magmatic stages. The older consists of polydeformed tonalite and granodiorite batholitic and diorite stock protoliths with igneous age of 3040 Ma to 2930 Ma. The youngest comprises tonalite, monzogranite and granodiorite tabular bodies formed between 2876 and 2846 Ma. As compared to the orthogneisses of the northern portion of the terrane, both the oldest and youngest granitogenesis stages of the Uvá complex are, in average, about 150 Ma older. This suggests that the northern and southern orthogneisses formed during different times as independent crustal segments, but when and why they amalgamated is still under investigation.

  20. Chemistry of the Calcalong Creek lunar meteorite and its relationship to lunar terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. H.; Boynton, W. V.

    2003-04-01

    The Calcalong Creek lunar meteorite is a polymict breccia that contains clasts of both highlands and mare affinity. Reported here is a compilation of major, minor, and trace element data for bulk, clast, and matrix samples determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Petrographic information and results of electron microprobe analyses are included. The relationship of Calcalong Creek to lunar terranes, especially the Procellarum KREEP Terrane and Feldspathic Highlands Terrane, is established by the abundance of thorium, incompatible elements and their KREEP-like CI chondrite normalized pattern, FeO, and TiO2. The highlands component is associated with Apollo 15 KREEP basalt but represents a variant of the KREEP-derived material widely found on the moon. Sources of Calcalong Creek's mare basalt components may be related to low-titanium (LT) and very low-titanium (VLT) basalts seen in other lunar meteorites but do not sample the same source. The content of some components of Calcalong Creek are found to display similarities to the composition of the South Pole-Aitken Terrane. What appear to be VLT relationships could represent new high aluminum, low titanium basalt types.

  1. The statistical difference between bending arcs and regular polar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullen, A.; Fear, R. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Karlsson, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the Polar UVI data set by Kullen et al. (2002) of 74 polar arcs is reinvestigated, focusing on bending arcs. Bending arcs are typically faint and form (depending on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By direction) on the dawnside or duskside oval with the tip of the arc splitting off the dayside oval. The tip subsequently moves into the polar cap in the antisunward direction, while the arc's nightside end remains attached to the oval, eventually becoming hook-shaped. Our investigation shows that bending arcs appear on the opposite oval side from and farther sunward than most regular polar arcs. They form during By-dominated IMF conditions: typically, the IMF clock angle increases from 60 to 90° about 20 min before the arc forms. Antisunward plasma flows from the oval into the polar cap just poleward of bending arcs are seen in Super Dual Auroral Radar Network data, indicating dayside reconnection. For regular polar arcs, recently reported characteristics are confirmed in contrast to bending arcs. This includes plasma flows along the nightside oval that originate close to the initial arc location and a significant delay in the correlation between IMF By and initial arc location. In our data set, the highest correlations are found with IMF By appearing at least 1-2 h before arc formation. In summary, bending arcs are distinctly different from regular arcs and cannot be explained by existing polar arc models. Instead, these results are consistent with the formation mechanism described in Carter et al. (2015), suggesting that bending arcs are caused by dayside reconnection.

  2. Silurian trace fossils in carbonate turbidites from the Alexander Arc of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) body and trace fossils from the Heceta Formation are preserved in the oldest widespread carbonates in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. They represent the earliest shelly benthos to inhabit a diversity of marine environments and are important indicators of the early stages in benthic community development within this ancient island arc. The trace fossils are significant because they add to a small but growing body of knowledge about ichnofaunas in deep-water Paleozoic carbonates. Proximal to medial carbonate turbidites yield a low-diversity suite of trace fossils that comprises five distinct types of biogenic structures. Bedding planes reveal simple epichnial burrows (Planolites), cross-cutting burrows (Fucusopsis), and tiny cylindrical burrows. These and other casts, including chondrites( )-like burrow clusters, represent the feeding activities (fodinichnia) of preturbidite animals. Hypichnial burrows and rare endichnial traces reflect the activities of postturbidite animals. Broken and offset traces indicate that infaunal biota commenced burrowing before slumping and subsequent soft-sediment deformation. The abundance and density of trace fossils increases offshore in the medial turbidites associated with a decrease in the size and amount of coarse particles and with an increase in mud and preserved organic material. Although diversity levels are similar in the proximal and medial turbidite facies, they are much lower than in Paleozoic siliciclastic turbidites. This may reflect unfavorable environmental conditions for infaunal biota or paleobiogeographic isolation of the Alexander terrane during the Silurian. A greater use of trace fossils in terrane analysis will help to resolve this issue and should provide new data for reconstructing the paleogeography of circum-Pacific terranes.

  3. A Sm-Nd eclogite and U-Pb detrital zircon study of a probable Baltic HP-UHP metamorphic terrane in the Greenland Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. M.; Brueckner, H. K.; Belousova, E. A.; Medaris, L. G., Jr.; Griffin, W. L.; Hartz, E. H.; Hemming, S. R.; Bubbico, R.

    2015-12-01

    Liverpool Land, at the southern tip of the Greenland Caledonides, exposes the small eclogite-facies, peridotite-bearing Tvaerdal complex tectonically juxtaposed against the mid-crustal, high-pressure granulite facies Jaettedal complex. Recent literature supports a Laurentian origin for the Jættedal complex, but the structurally lower Tværdal complex has been tentatively correlated with Baltica. Their juxtaposition raises the possibility of lower plate to upper plate terrane transfer during continental subduction. Pressure-temperature estimates from Tvaerdal eclogites indicate ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic conditions during recrystallization. Sm-Nd mineral isochrons from the eclogites indicate UHP recrystallization occured ≈400 millions years ago, the same time HP/UHP metamorphism occurred in the Western Gneiss Complex of the Scandinavian Caledonides. Almost half of detrital zircons collected from a modern stream channel within the Tvaerdal complex give LA-ICPMS U-Pb ages of 1.68 and 1.3-0.95 Ma ages, which are dates characteristic of both Baltic and Laurentia. However, none of the detrital zircons give the Archean or ≈1.8 Ga Proterozoic ages that are also characteristic of Laurentia. Most of the remaining detrital zircons from the Tvaerdal Complex give younger U-Pb ages that range between 411-375 Ma which contrast with the older 450-410 Ma ages obtained from the Jaettedal as well as from other gneiss terranes in the southern Greenland Caledonides. The different age patterns provide compelling evidence that the Tvaerdal Complex is indeed an orphaned Baltic Terrane. The Jaettedal complex took part in the lengthy evolution of a compressional continental arc complex along the eastern Laurentian margin during the closure of Iapetus while the Tvaerdal complex was a fragment of the approaching Baltic passive margin. Eclogite-facies metamorphism of the Tvaerdal Complex occurred when Iapetus closed and the edge of Baltica subducted to UHP mantle conditions

  4. Basaltic Martian analogues from the Baikal Rift Zone and Mongolian terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgurewicz, J.; Kostylew, J.

    2007-08-01

    In order to compare the results of studies of the western part of the Valles Marineris canyon on Mars there have been done field works on terrestrial surface areas similar with regard to geological setting and environmental conditions. One of the possible terrestrial analogues of the Valles Marineris canyon is the Baikal Rift Zone [1]. Field investigations have been done on the south end of the Baikal Lake, in the Khamar-Daban massif, where the outcrops of volcanic rocks occur. The second part of the field works has been done in the Mongolian terranes: Mandalovoo, Gobi Altay and Bayanhongor, because of environmental conditions being similar to those on Mars. The Mandalovoo terrane comprises a nearly continuous Paleozoic islandarc sequence [2]. In the Gobi Altay terrane an older sequence is capped by younger Devonian-Triassic volcanic-sedimentary deposits [2]. The Bayanhongor terrane forms a northwest-trending, discontinuous, narrow belt that consists of a large ophiolite allochton [3]. The collected samples of basalts derive from various geologic environments. The CORONA satellite-images have been used for the imaging of the Khamar-Daban massif and the Mandalovoo terrane. These images have the same spatial resolution and range as the Mars Orbiter Camera images of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. In the Mandalovoo terrane these images allowed to find an area with large amounts of tectonic structures, mainly faults (part of the Ongi massif), similar to the studied area on Mars. Microscopic observations in thin sections show diversification of composition and structures of basalts. These rocks have mostly a porphyric structure, rarely aphyric. The main components are plagioclases, pyroxenes and olivines phenocrysts, in different proportions. The groundmass usually consist of plagioclases, pyroxenes and opaques. The most diversified are basalts from the Mandalovoo terrane. Infrared spectroscopy has been used to analyse the composition of the rock material and compare

  5. New Insights from Seismic Imaging over the Youanmi Terrane, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Omid; Juhlin, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The Youanmi terrane is located in the central parts of the Yilgarn craton, Western Australia, an Archean granite-greenstone unit containing numerous mineral deposits such as gold, base metals, nickel, uranium and gemstones. The terrane is surrounded by the Kalgoorlie and Narryer terranes to the east and west, respectively. To the southwest it is bounded by the South West terrane. In order to study the transitions between the Youanmi terrane and the surrounding terranes, as well as identifying potential mineral rich areas, the Geological Survey of Western Australia acquired three deep crustal 2D seismic profiles with a total length of about 700 km in 2010. Correlated record lengths of 20 seconds allow the deep structure of the crust to be investigated with the data, down to Moho depths and greater. Initial processing using a conventional 2D flow show a highly reflective crust with several interesting features. We have now reprocessed the data following mainly the previous processing flow, but with a focus on the shallower crust, less than 10 seconds (about 27 km). Due to the complex geology in the region, 3D aspects of the structures need to be considered in the data processing. Therefore, we investigated the effect of cross-dip corrections to the data. The cross-dip correction has two advantages; (i) reflections are more coherent and enhanced after the correction and (ii) the orientation and dip angle of the geological structures of the corresponding reflections can be identified in the cross-line direction. Where the profiles intersect each other sparse 3D processing can be performed. First arrival travel-time tomography was also tested on parts of the dataset. Travel-time inversion may provide better velocity models at shallow depths than standard reflection seismic processing provides. Preliminary results show that the travel-time tomography has a depth of investigation of about 1 km, a depth that is of interest for mining purposes. Therefore, the tomography

  6. The thermal, metamorphic and magmatic evolution of a rapidly exhuming terrane: the Nanga Parbat Massif, northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, A. G.

    The Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif (NPHM) is the most northerly outcrop of Indian Plate rocks in the Himalayan orogen, exposed by rapid recent exhumation through the structurally overlying Kohistan Island Arc in northern Pakistan. Exhumation has been achieved by erosion in the apparent absence of extensional tectonics. Metabasaltic dykes intruded into polymetamorphic basement rocks provide time markers that distinguish early from late fabrics that probably correlated with Precambrian and Himalayan deformation respectively. Nanga Parbat is anomalous within the Himalayan orogen for both the timing and nature of metamorphism and anatexis. A multidisciplinary approach allows the thermal history to be tightly constrained. Metamorphism is characterised by cordierite growth during near-isothermal decompression. Garnet inclusion assemblages record P-T conditions of 720 +/- 50 deg C and 7.5 +/- 1.5 kbar, while spinel-cordierite intergrowths unique to the massif interior formed at 710 +/- 60 deg C and 5.0 +/- 1.1 kbar. Lower grade assemblages are exposed towards the massif margins. Tourmaline leucogranite plutons and sheets are characterised by similar trace element geochemistry to Miocene High Himalayan granites, indicative of vapour-absent crustal melting as would result from rapid decompression, but were emplaced more than 10 million years later. More recently, fluid infiltration into conjugate shear zones accommodating vertical stretching in the core of the massif resulted in anatexis and the formation of restitic cordierite-bearing pods. 40Ar-39Ar studies indicate regional cooling below 400 deg C as recently as 1 Ma, and the distribution of excess 40Ar in basement samples is indicative of magmatic/metamorphic fluids at depths > 10 km. One-dimensional thermal modelling indicates that increasing cooling rates through time do not require increasing exhumation rates because advection of heat results in a steepened near-surface geotherm. These models predict both the style and

  7. Structural analysis of the Carolina-Inner Piedmont terrane boundary: Implications for the age and kinematics of the central Piedmont suture, a terrane boundary that records Paleozoic Laurentia-Gondwana interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Thomas E.

    1998-06-01

    New field mapping along the Carolina-Inner Piedmont terrane boundary in South Carolina and eastern Georgia reveals preaccretionary, synaccretionary, and postaccretionary faults. The dextral strike-slip Lowndesville shear zone is adjacent to a ˜50-km-long segment of the terrane boundary. However, the Lowndesville shear zone is correlated eastward with the dextral strike-slip Beaver Creek shear zone, which is within the Carolina terrane and predates ˜415 Ma. The Lowndesville shear zone is overprinted by a dextral strike-slip phyllonite zone, named the Deal Creek shear zone. The Deal Creek shear zone is correlated eastward with the Gold Hill-Silver Hill shear zone which is also within the Carolina terrane and records dextral strike-slip motion between ˜400 and ˜325 Ma. The Cross Anchor and Mulberry Creek faults both truncate the Lowndesville and the Deal Creek shear zones and form the terrane boundary. The Mulberry Creek fault, probably of Triassic-Jurassic age, juxtaposes the Lowndesville shear zone adjacent to the Carolina-Inner Piedmont terrane boundary west of Waterloo, South Carolina. The Cross Anchor fault is the terrane boundary east of Waterloo, South Carolina, and forms the southeastern boundary of the Whitmire reentrant. Crosscutting relationships indicate that the Cross Anchor fault is the oldest fault which juxtaposes the Carolina and Inner Piedmont terranes in the study area. These structural interpretations and available geochronological data indicate that the Cross Anchor fault is a ˜325 Ma thrust fault and may be the central Piedmont suture. An early Alleghanian suture resolves the problem of inserting the Carolina terrane into the western Iapetus Ocean.

  8. ALICE—ARC integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlik, C.; Gregersen, A. R.; Kleist, J.; Peters, A.; Saiz, P.

    2008-07-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a module implementing the functionalities necessary to achieve AliEn job submission and management to ARC enabled sites.

  9. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  10. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N.

    2006-02-15

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  11. Obscured accretion from AGN surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignali, Cristian

    2014-07-01

    Recent models of super-massive black hole (SMBH) and host galaxy joint evolution predict the presence of a key phase where accretion, traced by obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) emission, is coupled with powerful star formation. Then feedback processes likely self-regulate the SMBH growth and quench the star-formation activity. AGN in this important evolutionary phase have been revealed in the last decade via surveys at different wavelengths. On the one hand, moderate-to-deep X-ray surveys have allowed a systematic search for heavily obscured AGN, up to very high redshifts (z~5). On the other hand, infrared/optical surveys have been invaluable in offering complementary methods to select obscured AGN also in cases where the nuclear X-ray emission below 10 keV is largely hidden to our view. In this review I will present my personal perspective of the field of obscured accretion from AGN surveys.

  12. Cyclotron Resonance in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    Cyclotron Resonance Absorption/Scattering features provide direct measurement of magnetic field strength in the line forming region. This has enabled the estimation of magnetic field strengths of nearly two dozen neutron stars in accreting high mass binary systems. With improved spectroscopic sensitivity, new X-ray observatories such as NuSTAR, Astrosat and Hitomi are opening the doors to studying detailed features such as the line shape and phase dependence with high significance. Such studies will help understand the nature of matter accumulation in, and outflow from, the magnetically confined accretion column on the neutron star. This talk will describe the results of MHD simulations of the matter flow in such systems, the diagnostics of such flows using cyclotron lines, and comparison with recent observations from NuSTAR and Astrosat.

  13. Late Carboniferous collision between the Tarim and Kazakhstan-Yili terranes in the western segment of the South Tian Shan Orogen, Central Asia, and implications for the Northern Xinjiang, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bao-Fu; He, Guo-Qi; Wang, Xue-Chao; Guo, Zhao-Jie

    2011-12-01

    The Tian Shan of Central Asia is located in the southwestern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB, also known as the Central Asian Orogenic System or CAOS). Formation of the South Tian Shan Orogen is a diachronous, scissors-like process during the Paleozoic and its western segment in China-Kyrgyzstan contiguous regions is accepted as the site of the final collision zone between the Tarim craton to the south and the Kazakhstan-Yili terrane to the north in the Late Paleozoic. However, when the final collision occurred is still in hot debate. Particularly, an end-Permian to Triassic collisional model is recently proposed for the western segment of the South Tian Shan Orogen. This even leads to the speculation that the complicated accretion-collision processes in the Northern Xinjiang of western China, which involved the terrane amalgamation in the East and West Junggar and the collision between the Altai and Kazakhstan terranes and between the Yili-Central Tian Shan and Junggar terranes, were finally terminated during the end-Permian to mid-Triassic, rather than the Late Paleozoic as usually accepted. Obviously, the western segment of the South Tian Shan Orogen also presents the key issue associated with the termination time of accretion-collision processes in the Northern Xinjiang. A collisional model that is derived from the knowledge of the Himalayan Orogen is helpful for establishing a sequence of major tectonothermal events in the western segment of the South Tian Shan Orogen and constraining the time of collision between the Tarim craton and the Kazakhstan-Yili terrane. For the western segment of the South Tian Shan Orogen, the end-Permian to Triassic collisional model is mainly based on Triassic zircon U-Pb ages of 234 to 226 Ma from the West Tian Shan eclogite and two suspected Late Permian radiolarian specimens Albaillella excelsa Ishiga, Kito and Imoto (?) from the Baleigong ophiolitic mélange. Actually, the poor preservation of the two radiolarian

  14. Oceanic crust of the Grenada Basin in the Southern Lesser Antilles Arc Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speed, R. C.; Walker, J. A.

    1991-03-01

    Seismic refraction data permit the southern Lesser Antilles arc and surrounding regions to be divided by the velocity of their basement. We propose that high-velocity basement of the arc platform beneath the Grenadine islands and below a part of the Tobago Trough forearc basin is oceanic and continuous and was originally connected with oceanic crust of the Grenada Basin. Low-velocity basements of the Tobago terrane and the arc platform from St. Vincent north lie south and north, respectively, of the high-velocity basement of the arc platform. An oceanic origin of this high-velocity crust in the Grenadines is argued to be more plausible than an origin as unroofed lower arc crust. The segment of probable oceanic crust in the arc platform was greatly uplifted during development of the present island arc, mainly in late Neogene time, relative to the Grenada Basin and Tobago Trough. Accepting the proposition of shallow oceanic crust in the Grenadines, early middle Eocene and possibly older pillow basalts of Mayreau, the oldest rock unit of the southern Lesser Antilles arc platform, may be an exposure of such basement. Major and minor element compositions of Mayreau Basalt are indicative of a spreading rather than arc origin. The stratigraphy of the pillow basalts indicates extrusion in an open marine environment, distant or shielded from sources of arc or continental sediment, followed by a period of pelagic sedimentation above the carbonate compensation depth. The Eocene basalt and pelagic cover formed a relatively deep floor of a marine basin in which arc-derived turbidites and pelagic sediments accumulated over the succeeding 25-30 ma. Such basalts thus indicate a probable spreading origin of the Grenada Basin and an age of cessation of spreading in the region of Mayreau in Eocene time. The configuration of the Eocene basin and the direction of spreading, however, are unknowns. Regional structural relationships imply the spreading was probably backarc, an origin also

  15. Persistent Patterns in Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Frolov, Andrei V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-03

    We present a set of new characteristic frequencies associated with accretion disks around compact objects. These frequencies arise from persistent rotating patterns in the disk that are finite in radial extent and driven purely by the gravity of the central body. Their existence depends on general relativistic corrections to orbital motion and, if observed, could be used to probe the strong gravity region around a black hole. We also discuss a possible connection to the puzzle of quasi-periodic oscillations.

  16. Spiral Waves in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlaftis, Emilios

    A review with the most characteristic spiral waves in accretion disks of cataclysmic variables will be presented. Recent work on experiments targeting the detection of spiral waves from time lapse movies of real disks and the study of permanent spiral waves will be discussed. The relevance of spiral waves with other systems such as star-planet X-ray binaries and Algols will be reviewed.

  17. Accretion disks around black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramowicz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The physics of accretion flow very close to a black hole is dominated by several general relativistic effects. It cannot be described by the standard Shakura Sunyaev model or by its relativistic version developed by Novikov and Thome. The most important of these effects is a dynamical mass loss from the inner edge of the disk (Roche lobe overflow). The relativistic Roche lobe overflow induces a strong advective cooling, which is sufficient to stabilize local, axially symmetric thermal and viscous modes. It also stabilizes the non-axially-symmetric global modes discovered by Papaloizou and Pringle. The Roche lobe overflow, however, destabilizes sufficiently self-gravitating accretion disks with respect to a catastrophic runaway of mass due to minute changes of the gravitational field induced by the changes in the mass and angular momentum of the central black hole. One of the two acoustic modes may become trapped near the inner edge of the disk. All these effects, absent in the standard model, have dramatic implications for time-dependent behavior of the accretion disks around black holes.

  18. Magnetically Torqued Thin Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluźniak, W.; Rappaport, S.

    2007-12-01

    We compute the properties of a geometrically thin, steady accretion disk surrounding a central rotating, magnetized star. The magnetosphere is assumed to entrain the disk over a wide range of radii. The model is simplified in that we adopt two (alternate) ad hoc, but plausible, expressions for the azimuthal component of the magnetic field as a function of radial distance. We find a solution for the angular velocity profile tending to corotation close to the central star and smoothly matching a Keplerian curve at a radius where the viscous stress vanishes. The value of this ``transition'' radius is nearly the same for both of our adopted B-field models. We then solve analytically for the torques on the central star and for the disk luminosity due to gravity and magnetic torques. When expressed in a dimensionless form, the resulting quantities depend on one parameter alone, the ratio of the transition radius to the corotation radius. For rapid rotators, the accretion disk may be powered mostly by spin-down of the central star. These results are independent of the viscosity prescription in the disk. We also solve for the disk structure for the special case of an optically thick alpha disk. Our results are applicable to a range of astrophysical systems including accreting neutron stars, intermediate polar cataclysmic variables, and T Tauri systems.

  19. Pulsed Long Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a method and an appliance for pulsed arc welding. The method supports dosage of energy required for melting each bead of electrode metal starting from the detachment of a bead. The appliance including a sensor to register bead detachment shows this moment due to the voltage burst in the arc space. Transferred beads of electrode metal are of similar size because of the dosage of energy used for melting each bead, as the consequence, the process is more stable and starting conditions to transfer electrode metal are similar, as the result, a produced weld is improved.

  20. Arc electrode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Berns, D.; Heberlein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The project consisted of two parts: (1) the cathode interaction studies which were a continuation of previous work and had the objective of increasing our understanding of the microscopic phenomena controlling cathode erosion in arc jet thrusters, and (2) the studies of the anode attachment in arc jet thrusters. The cathode interaction studies consisted of (1) a continuation of some modeling work in which the previously derived model for the cathode heating was applied to some specific gases and electrode materials, and (2) experimental work in which various diagnostics was applied to the cathode. The specific diagnostics used were observation of the cathode tip during arcing using a Laser Strobe Video system in conjunction with a tele-microscope, a monochromator with an optical multichannel analyzer for the determination of the cathode temperature distribution, and various ex situ materials analysis methods. The emphasis of our effort was shifted to the cathode materials analysis because a parallel project was in place during the second half of 1993 with a visiting scientist pursuing arc electrode materials studies. As a consequence, the diagnostic investigations of the arc in front of the cathode had to be postponed to the first half of 1994, and we are presently preparing these measurements. The results of last year's study showed some unexpected effects influencing the cathode erosion behavior, such as increased erosion away from the cathode tip, and our understanding of these effects should improve our ability to control cathode erosion. The arc jet anode attachment studies concentrated on diagnostics of the instabilities in subsonic anode attachment arc jet thrusters, and were supplemental measurements to work which was performed by one of the authors who spent the summer as an intern at NASA Lewis Research Center. A summary of the results obtained during the internship are included because they formed an integral part of the study. Two tasks for 1994, the

  1. Crustal structure of the Archaean granite-greenstone terrane in the northern portion of the Kaapvaal Craton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debeer, J. H.; Stettler, E. H.; Barton, J. M., Jr.; Vanreenen, D. D.; Bearncombe, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Recent investigations of the electrical resistivity, gravity and aeromagnetic signatures of the various granite-greenstone units in the northern portion of the Kaapvaal craton have revealed three features of significance: (1) the Archean greenstone belts are shallow features, rarely exceeding 5 km in depth; (2) the high resistivity upper crustal layer typical of the lower grade granite-greenstone terranes is absent in the granulite facies terrane; and (3) the aeromagnetic lineation patterns allow the granite-greenstone terrane to be subdivided into geologically recognizable tectono-metamorphic domains on the basis of lineation frequency and direction. A discussion follows.

  2. Stratigraphy, petrology, and structure of the Pingston terrane, Mount Hayes C-5 and C-6 quadrangles, eastern Alaska Range, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokleberg, W. J.; Schwab, C. E.; Miyaoka, R. T.; Buhrmaster, C. L.

    Recent field, petrologic, and structural studies of the Pingston terrane in the Mount Hayes C-5 and C-6 quandrangles reveal that in this area the terrane: (1) has a highly distinctive stratigraphy, age, petrology (relict textures, relict minerals, and metamorphic facies), and structure; and (2) differs markedly from that described in previous studies. These more recent studies indicate that the major rock types, in order of decreasing abundance, are meta-andesite, metadacite and metarhyodacite flows and (or) tuff, metabasalt, metagabbro, metavolcanic graywacke, metagray-wacke, metasiltstone, metaquartzite or metachert, and very sparse marble. The general petrography of the major rock units in the Pingston terrane is given.

  3. The Khida terrane - Geochronological and isotopic evidence for Paleoproterozoic and Archean crust in the eastern Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitehouse, M.J.; Stoeser, D.B.; Stacey, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The Khida terrane of the eastern Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia has been proposed as being underlain by Paleoproterozoic to Archean continental crust (Stoeser and Stacey, 1988). Detailed geological aspects of the Khida terrane, particularly resulting from new fieldwork during 1999, are discussed in a companion abstract (Stoeser et al., this volume). We present conventional and ion- microprobe U-Pb zircon geoenronology, Nd whole-rock, and feldspar Pb isotopic data that further elucidate the pre-Pan-African evolution of the Khida terrane. Locations for the Muhayil samples described below are shown in figure 2 of Stoeser et al. (this volume). 

  4. Controls on the Geometry of Accretion Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, M.; Bell, R. E.; Buck, W. R.; Creyts, T. T.

    2012-12-01

    Basal accretion occurs when meltwater refreezes onto the base of an ice sheet. Thick packages (900-1100m) of accretion ice are identified in radio-echo sounding data as plume-shaped reflectors above the basal reflector and below isochronous layers of meteoric ice. Accretion reflectors have been imaged in both Antarctica and Greenland rising to a height of 1/3-1/2 of the ice sheet thickness and extending in the flow direction as far as 100 km. Here we use a two-dimensional thermomechanical higher order flowline model coupled to a basal hydrology model to investigate the freezing rates and energy budgets of basal accretion processes. Simple order-of-magnitude estimates for the freezing rate based on the observed height of the reflectors and the assumption that all ice under the observed reflector consists of accretion ice indicate very large freezing rates, on the order of 10-100 cm/yr. We test two end-member possibilities for the formation of the basal accretion bodies: high accretion rates and complex basal deformation. The first possibility is that the freezing rates are very large. The second possibility is that the ice under the observed reflector is a mixture of accreted and meteoric ice. If the ice below the accretion reflector is a mixture, the freezing rates can be much smaller than the simple estimates. If the freezing rates are small, then complex basal deformation must be invoked to cause accretion ice to override meteoric ice to a height of 1/3-1/2 the ice thickness. In the basal deformation case, low freezing rates predict a maximum thickness of 100-200m of accretion ice. The remaining ice beneath the reflector will be deformed meteoric ice. Both cases make testable predictions. If the accretion rates are very high and supercooling is the dominant process, accretion cannot use up all of the subglacial water. In this high rate scenario there will be water at the melting point exiting the accretion site. Alternatively if the accretion is part of a complex

  5. Planetary migration, accretion, and atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian M.

    This dissertation explores three distinct projects in the field of planetary formation and evolution: type I migration, cessation of mass accretion, and the atmospheric dynamics of hot Jupiters. All three of these projects touch on outstanding or unresolved issues in the field. Each attempts to unify analytic and numerical approaches in order to physically motivate solutions while simultaneously probing areas currently inaccessible to purely analytic approaches. The first section, type I migration, explores the outstanding problem of the rapid inward migration of low mass planets embedded in protoplanetary disks. Analytic estimates of migration predict characteristic timescales that are much shorter then either observed disk lifetimes or theoretical core-accretion formation timescales. If migration is actually as efficient as these analytic estimates predict, planet formation across the observed range of masses and semimajor axis' is difficult. Here I introduce several new formalisms to both allow the disk to adiabatically adjust to the presence of a planet and include the effect of axisymmetric disk self-gravity. I find that these modifications increase migration timescales by approximately 4 times. In addition to these numerical improvements, I present simulations of migration in lower sound-speed regions of the disk on the grounds that self shadowing within the disk could yield substantially cooler gas temperatures then those derived by most irradiated disk models. In such regions the planetary perturbation excites a secondary instability, leading to the formation of vortices. These vortices cause a substantial reduction in the net torque, increasing migration timescales by up to approximately 200 times the analytically predicted rate. The second section addresses the mechanism for shutting off accretion onto giant planets. According to the conventional sequential accretion scenario, giant planets acquire a majority of their gas in a runaway phase. Conventional

  6. Magnetic Signatures and Curie Surface Trend Across an Arc-Continent Collision Zone: An Example from Central Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manalo, Pearlyn C.; Dimalanta, Carla B.; Ramos, Noelynna T.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.; Queaño, Karlo L.; Yumul, Graciano P.

    2016-05-01

    Ground and aeromagnetic data are combined to characterize the onshore and offshore magnetic properties of the central Philippines, whose tectonic setting is complicated by opposing subduction zones, large-scale strike-slip faulting and arc-continent collision. The striking difference between the magnetic signatures of the islands with established continental affinity and those of the islands belonging to the island arc terrane is observed. Negative magnetic anomalies are registered over the continental terrane, while positive magnetic anomalies are observed over the Philippine Mobile Belt. Several linear features in the magnetic anomaly map coincide with the trace of the Philippine Fault and its splays. Power spectral analysis of the magnetic data reveals that the Curie depth across the central Philippines varies. The deepest point of the magnetic crust is beneath Mindoro Island at 32 km. The Curie surface shallows toward the east: the Curie surface is 21 km deep between the islands of Sibuyan and Masbate, and 18 km deep at the junction of Buruanga Peninsula and Panay Island. The shallowest Curie surface (18 km) coincides with the boundary of the arc-continent collision, signifying the obduction of mantle rocks over the continental basement. Comparison of the calculated Curie depth with recent crustal thickness models reveals the same eastwards thinning trend and range of depths. The coincidence of the magnetic boundary and the density boundary may support the existence of a compositional boundary that reflects the crust-mantle interface.

  7. Paleomagnetic study on the Triassic rocks from the Lhasa Terrane, Tibet, and its paleogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanan; Cheng, Xin; Yu, Lei; Yang, Xingfeng; Su, Hailun; Peng, Ximing; Xue, Yongkang; Li, Yangyang; Ye, Yakun; Zhang, Jin; Li, Yuyu; Wu, Hanning

    2016-05-01

    We present paleomagnetic results from the newly discovered Early-Middle and Late Triassic marine sediments of the Lhasa Terrane. Orientated samples were collected from 32 sites (330 samples) on the north side of the Dibu Co Lake (84.7°E, 30.9°N), Coqên County, in the western region of the Lhasa terrane. Rock magnetic data revealed that most of the samples were dominated by magnetite and/or pyrrhotite. The stepwise demagnetization curves illustrated three-components: a low temperature component (Component A) near the present-day field (PDF), a secondary remanent magnetization (Component B) that may be from the Cretaceous Period, and a high-temperature component (Component C). The Component C were isolated from the Early-Middle Triassic rocks in 8 sites (47 specimens) and from the Late Triassic rocks in 6 sites (37 specimens). The Component C of the Early-Middle Triassic rocks passed a reversal test (B class, 95% confidence level) and a fold test (99% confidence level), that of the Late Triassic rocks passed a fold test (95% confidence level). The corresponding paleopoles for the Early-Middle and Late Triassic periods of the Lhasa Terrane were at 18.9°N, 208.4°E with A95 = 3.9° and 19.6°N, 211.8°E with A95 = 10.7°, respectively. We suggest that the Lhasa Terrane maintained a relative stable latitude (16.5 ± 3.9°S and 18.4 ± 10.7°S) in the southern hemisphere during the Triassic Period before moving northwards and amalgamating with the main body of Eurasia. The Qiangtang and Lhasa terranes, which were located at the mid-low latitudes of the southern hemisphere, might have been isolated between Eurasia and Gondwanaland since the Early Triassic Period. The Meso-Tethys, potentially represented by the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone (BNS) between the Lhasa and Qiangtang terranes, opened up in the Early-Middle Triassic Period and expanded during the entire course of the Triassic Period.

  8. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  9. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  10. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  11. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  12. Paleomagnetic Evidence for Significant Rotations Within the Aleutian Island Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, D. B.; Krutikov, L.

    2006-12-01

    Present-day motion of the Pacific plate relative to the North American plate changes along the Aleutian arc from normal convergence in the east to transform motion in the west. It was postulated by Geist et al. (Tectonics 7, 327-341, 1988) that strain partitioning could result in tectonic segmentation of the lithosphere, caused by increasing obliquity of plate convergence and characterized by clockwise rotation and westward translation of discrete blocks. Their analysis of the present day morphology and tectonic setting of the western half of the arc suggests the presence of rotated blocks, and implies that the rotation is ongoing. Published high-quality paleomagnetic data from the far western end of the arc show rotations that are compatible with this model. This result is based on rocks of Eocene (Bering and Medny Islands) and Miocene (Shemya Island) age, thus the magnetically observed rotations could have occurred at any time since their origin. New paleomagnetic and geochronologic data from Miocene age volcanic rocks on Amchitka Island also indicate clockwise rotation at some time since the rocks were formed (13.8+/-0.2 Ma). However, two other high-quality paleomagnetic data sets from Eocene/Oligocene aged sediments from the eastern part of the arc (Atka and Umnak Islands) are significantly rotated in the same clockwise sense as the western end. Since plate convergence at these two eastern sites has been roughly normal since mid-Eocene time, strain partitioning related to oblique convergence is unlikely to be the cause of the rotation. Models involving rotation of the entire island arc to explain the similarity in magnitude and sense of the rotations seen in the paleomagnetic data require large relative latitude changes between the two ends of the arc. Though possible, such a model would put serious constraints on scenarios for the tectonic development of the Bering Sea Plate required to accommodate the degree of rotation suggested by the data. The answer may

  13. Star formation sustained by gas accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy

    2014-07-01

    Numerical simulations predict that metal-poor gas accretion from the cosmic web fuels the formation of disk galaxies. This paper discusses how cosmic gas accretion controls star formation, and summarizes the physical properties expected for the cosmic gas accreted by galaxies. The paper also collects observational evidence for gas accretion sustaining star formation. It reviews evidence inferred from neutral and ionized hydrogen, as well as from stars. A number of properties characterizing large samples of star-forming galaxies can be explained by metal-poor gas accretion, in particular, the relationship among stellar mass, metallicity, and star-formation rate (the so-called fundamental metallicity relationship). They are put forward and analyzed. Theory predicts gas accretion to be particularly important at high redshift, so indications based on distant objects are reviewed, including the global star-formation history of the universe, and the gas around galaxies as inferred from absorption features in the spectra of background sources.

  14. Devonian and carboniferous arcs of the oyu tolgoi porphyry Cu-Au district, South Gobi region, Mongolia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wainwright, A.J.; Tosdal, R.M.; Forster, C.N.; Kirwin, D.J.; Lewis, P.D.; Wooden, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The Central Asian orogenic belt consists of microcontinental blocks and mobile belts positioned between the Siberian craton and the Tarim and North China cratons. Extending across Asia for 5000 km, the belt consists of terranes that decrease in age southward away from the Siberian craton. A time-stratigraphic-structural sequence for the rocks is critical to defining the tectonic evolution of the belt. In the Oyu Tolgoi area of the South Gobi Desert (Mongolia), Devonian and Carboniferous rocks record the construction of multiple arcs, formation of a giant porphyry Cu-Au system, exhumation, and polyphase deformation. The oldest rocks are basaltic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks of the Devonian Alagbayan Group intruded by Late Devonian quartz monzodiorite stocks and dikes, which host giant porphyry Cu-Au deposits. The rocks were exhumed, overlain by pyroclastic rocks, and then tectonically buried by marine mafic supracrustal rocks prior to the youngest Devonian granodiorite intrusions. The postmineral Carboniferous Gurvankharaat Group unconformably overlying the deformed terrane consists of effusive, pyroclastic, subvolcanic and volcaniclastic rocks, as well as sedimentary units. The supracrustal rocks underwent polyphase shortening after 330 Ma and prior to 290 Ma. Variations in stratigraphic sequences suggest that the region is underlain by a submarine arc that became emergent during the Upper Devonian and remained subaerial to shallow subaqueous through much of the Carboniferous. Xenocrystic zircons in igneous rocks suggest that the offshore arcs were sufficiently close to ancient crust to have interacted with detritus shed into marine basins, most likely from the Siberian craton and fringing early Paleozoic terranes. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  15. Warm dark haloes accretion histories and their gravitational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Mahdi, Hareth S.; Power, Chris; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2014-11-01

    We study clusters in warm dark matter (WDM) models of a thermally produced dark matter particle 0.5 keV in mass. We show that, despite clusters in WDM cosmologies having similar density profiles as their cold dark matter (CDM) counterparts, the internal properties, such as the amount of substructure, show marked differences. This result is surprising as clusters are at mass scales that are a thousand times greater than that at which structure formation is suppressed. WDM clusters gain significantly more mass via smooth accretion and contain fewer substructures than their CDM brethren. The higher smooth mass accretion results in subhaloes which are physically more extended and less dense. These fine-scale differences can be probed by strong gravitational lensing. We find, unexpectedly, that WDM clusters have higher lensing efficiencies than those in CDM cosmologies, contrary to the naive expectation that WDM clusters should be less efficient due to the fewer substructures they contain. Despite being less dense, the larger WDM subhaloes are more likely to have larger lensing cross-sections than CDM ones. Additionally, WDM subhaloes typically reside at larger distances, which radially stretches the critical lines associated with strong gravitational lensing, resulting in excess in the number of clusters with large radial cross-sections at the ˜2σ level. Though lensing profile for an individual cluster vary significantly with the line of sight, the radial arc distribution based on a sample of ≳100 clusters may prove to be the crucial test for the presence of WDM.

  16. Lithium synthesis in microquasar accretion.

    PubMed

    Iocco, Fabio; Pato, Miguel

    2012-07-13

    We study the synthesis of lithium isotopes in the hot tori formed around stellar mass black holes by accretion of the companion star. We find that sizable amounts of both stable isotopes 6Li and 7Li can be produced, the exact figures varying with the characteristics of the torus and reaching as much as 10(-2) M⊙ for each isotope. This mass output is enough to contaminate the entire Galaxy at a level comparable with the original, pregalactic amount of lithium and to overcome other sources such as cosmic-ray spallation or stellar nucleosynthesis. PMID:23030150

  17. Evolution of magnetically rotating arc into large area arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Wan-Wan; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Zha, Jun; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2015-06-01

    An arc channel tends to shrink due to its conductivity increasing with the increase of temperature. In this study, to generate large area arc plasma, we construct a magnetically rotating arc plasma generator, which mainly consists of a lanthanide tungsten cathode (13 mm in diameter), a concentric cylindrical graphite anode chamber (60 mm in diameter) and a solenoid coil for producing an axial magnet field. By controlling the cold gas flow, the magnetically rotating arc evolves from constricted mode to diffuse mode, which almost fills the whole arc chamber cross section. Results show that the diffuse arc plasma has better uniformity and stability. The formation mechanism of large area arc plasma is discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11035005, 11475174, and 50876101) and the Science Instrument Foundation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y201162).

  18. Pulsed Accretion onto Eccentric and Circular Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Diego J.; Lai, Dong

    2016-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of circumbinary accretion onto eccentric and circular binaries using the moving-mesh code AREPO. This is the first set of simulations to tackle the problem of binary accretion using a finite-volume scheme on a freely moving mesh, which allows for accurate measurements of accretion onto individual stars for arbitrary binary eccentricity. While accretion onto a circular binary shows bursts with period of ∼ 5 times the binary period P b, accretion onto an eccentric binary is predominantly modulated at the period ∼ 1{P}{{b}}. For an equal-mass circular binary, the accretion rates onto individual stars are quite similar to each other, following the same variable pattern in time. By contrast, for eccentric binaries, one of the stars can accrete at a rate 10–20 times larger than its companion. This “symmetry breaking” between the stars, however, alternates over timescales of order 200P b and can be attributed to a slowly precessing, eccentric circumbinary disk. Over longer timescales, the net accretion rates onto individual stars are the same, reaching a quasi-steady state with the circumbinary disk. These results have important implications for the accretion behavior of binary T Tauri stars and supermassive binary black holes.

  19. Bondi accretion onto cosmological black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkowski, Janusz; Malec, Edward

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we investigate a steady accretion within the Einstein-Straus vacuole, in the presence of the cosmological constant. The dark energy damps the mass accretion rate and—above a certain limit—completely stops the steady accretion onto black holes, which, in particular, is prohibited in the inflation era and after (roughly) 1012 years from the big bang (assuming the presently known value of the cosmological constant). Steady accretion would not exist in the late phases of the Penrose’s scenario—known as the Weyl curvature hypothesis—of the evolution of the Universe.

  20. Accretion flows govern black hole jet properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koljonen, K.; Russell, D.; Fernández Ontiveros, J.; Miller-Jones, J.; Russell, T.; Curran, P.; Soria, R.; Markoff, S.; van der Horst, A.; Casella, P.

    2015-07-01

    The process of jet formation in accreting black holes, and the conditions under which it occurs is currently hotly debated, with competing models predicting the jet power to be governed by black hole spin, the magnetic field strength, the location of the jet base, the mass accretion rate and/or the properties of the inner accretion flow. We present new results that show empirical correlations between the accretion flow properties and the spectral energy distribution of the jets launched from accreting black holes. The X-ray power law is directly related to the particle energy distribution in the hot accretion flow. We find that the photon index of this power law correlates with the characteristic break frequency in the jet spectrum emitted near the jet base, and the jet luminosity up to the break frequency. The observed correlations can be explained by the energy distribution of electrons in the hot accretion flow being subsequently channeled into the jet. These correlations represent a new inflow--outflow connection in accreting black holes, and demonstrate that the spectral properties of the jet rely most critically on the conditions in the inner accretion flow, rather than other parameters such as the black hole mass or spin.

  1. Pulsed Accretion onto Eccentric and Circular Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Diego J.; Lai, Dong

    2016-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of circumbinary accretion onto eccentric and circular binaries using the moving-mesh code AREPO. This is the first set of simulations to tackle the problem of binary accretion using a finite-volume scheme on a freely moving mesh, which allows for accurate measurements of accretion onto individual stars for arbitrary binary eccentricity. While accretion onto a circular binary shows bursts with period of ˜ 5 times the binary period P b, accretion onto an eccentric binary is predominantly modulated at the period ˜ 1{P}{{b}}. For an equal-mass circular binary, the accretion rates onto individual stars are quite similar to each other, following the same variable pattern in time. By contrast, for eccentric binaries, one of the stars can accrete at a rate 10–20 times larger than its companion. This “symmetry breaking” between the stars, however, alternates over timescales of order 200P b and can be attributed to a slowly precessing, eccentric circumbinary disk. Over longer timescales, the net accretion rates onto individual stars are the same, reaching a quasi-steady state with the circumbinary disk. These results have important implications for the accretion behavior of binary T Tauri stars and supermassive binary black holes.

  2. Resolving Variations in the Tectonostratigraphic Terrane Structure of New England using Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, John

    Passive teleseismic data were collected with a 17-station broadband seismic array deployed from Vermont to Massachusetts. The purpose of the array was to detect changes in crustal seismic velocity structure related to the regional tectonostratigraphic terranes using receiver functions. Ps conversions from the Moho and mid-crust were observed and a cross-section of the crustal structure beneath the seismic array was produced. The crustal cross-section reveals a synclinal structure related to the Taconic orogeny, a remnant Iapetan oceanic slab, a plausible surface-location of the Red Indian Line, and several terrane boundaries that can be projected from their proposed surface locations into the deeper crust based on crustal-horizon offsets observed in the receiver function data.

  3. Geological investigations of pre-late Jurassic terranes in the southernmost Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsythe, R. D.

    Pre-Late Jurassic terranes of the Patagonian Archipelago were investigated. Their regional stratigraphic and structural characteristics were surveyed. Their significance in the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic evolution of South America were determined. Pre-Late Jurassic rocks within the archipelago are distributed in two belts. Within the outer belt the Madre de Dios Archipielago was studied in detail. Pre-Late Jurassic rocks of this area are divisible into three mappable units. These three units are interpreted to be part of a late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic accretionary prism that was located along the ancestral Pacific margin of the South American sector of Gondwana. Within the inner belt, the region of Peninsula Staines was studied in detail. In this region greenschist facies metamorphism and pervasive deformation fabrics prevent stratigraphic subdivision of the terrane. However the lithologies present are correlative with the outer belt suggesting that they also were part of the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic accretionary prism.

  4. A Detailed Geochemical Study of Island Arc Crust: The Talkeetna Arc Section, South-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, A. R.; Debari, S. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Clift, P. D.; Blusztajn, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Talkeetna arc section in south-central Alaska is recognized as the exposed upper mantle and crust of an accreted, Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic island arc. Detailed geochemical studies of layered gabbronorite from the middle and lower crust of this arc and a diverse suite of volcanic and plutonic rocks from the middle and upper crust provide crucial data for understanding arc magma evolution. We also present new data on parental magma compositions for the arc. The deepest level of the arc section consists of residual mantle and ultramafic cumulates adjacent to garnet gabbro and basal gabbronorite interlayered with pyroxenite. The middle crust is primarily layered gabbronorite, ranging from anorthosite to pyroxenite in composition, and is the most widespread plutonic lithology. The upper mid crust is a heterogenous assemblage of dioritic to tonalitic rocks mixed with gabbro and intruded by abundant mafic dikes and chilled pillows. The upper crust of the arc is comprised of volcanic rocks of the Talkeetna Formation ranging from basalt to rhyolite. Most of these volcanic rocks have evolved compositions (<5% MgO, Mg# <60) and overlap the composition of intermediate to felsic plutonic rocks (<3.5% MgO, Mg# <45). However, several chilled mafic rocks and one basalt have primitive characteristics (>8% MgO, Mg# >60). Ion microprobe analyses of clinopyroxene in mid-crustal layered gabbronorites have parallel REE patterns with positive-sloping LREE segments (La/Sm(N)=0.05-0.17; mean 0.11) and flat HREE segments (5-25xchondrite; mean 10xchondrite). Liquids in REE equilibrium with the clinopyroxene in these gabbronorite cumulates were calculated in order to constrain parental magmas. These calculated liquids(La/Sm(N)=0.77-1.83; mean 1.26) all fall within the range of dike and volcanic rock(La/Sm(N)=0.78-2.12; mean 1.23) compositions. However, three lavas out of the 44 we have analyzed show strong HREE depletion, which is not observed in any of the liquid compositions

  5. Evidence for the Jurassic arc volcanism of the Lolotoi complex, Timor: Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Ik; Kwon, Sanghoon; Kim, Sung Won

    2014-12-01

    We report the first sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb zircon ages with geochemical data from metavolcanic rocks in the Lolotoi complex, Timor. The zircon U-Pb ages of two andesitic metavolcanic rocks yield a permissible range of the Middle Jurassic extrusion from 177 Ma to 174 Ma. The geochemical data indicate that the origins of the basaltic and andesitic metavolcanic rocks are products of prolonged oceanic crust and arc magmatism, respectively. They are originated from partial melting of lherzolites, providing an insight into the tectonic evolution of the forearc basements of the Banda volcanic arc. Thus, parts of the Banda forearc basement are pieces of allochthonous oceanic basalts and Jurassic arc-related andesites accreted to the Sundaland during the closure of Mesotethys, and are incorporated later into the Great Indonesian Volcanic Arc system along the southeastern margin of the Sundaland.

  6. Eastern boundary of the Siletz terrane in the Puget Lowland from gravity and magnetic modeling with implications for seismic hazard analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. L.; Blakely, R. J.; Wells, R. E.; Dragovich, J.

    2011-12-01

    gravity anomalies for the Lowland. Based on this work, the likely position of the eastern boundary of the Siletz terrane is east of the Puget Sound and west of the foothills of the Cascade arc, extending in a north-trending line through Lake Washington and merging to the north with the Southern Whidbey Island fault zone. Our preferred location agrees with suggested locations from past study of seismic data targeted at the Seattle basin, but we extend that location through the entire Puget Lowland by analysis of magnetic potential calculated from aeromagnetic data. We also find that the boundary is sharp and most likely dips west, suggesting a reverse-fault juxtaposition of Crescent rocks against Western Melange belt lithologies. The Crescent itself contains steeply dipping packages of basalt of contrasting magnetic character, indicating significant deformation within the Crescent formation under the Seattle uplift. Finally, the boundary location implies that the eastern third of the Seattle basin is shallower than previously estimated from gravity data.

  7. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  8. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  9. Tectonically reset Rb-Sr system during Late Ordovician terrane assembly in lapetus, western Ireland

    SciTech Connect

    Kennan, P.S.; Murphy, F.C.

    1987-12-01

    The uncertainty of a ca. 460 Ma age of mylonitization of acid igneous rocks in the western Irish Caledonides required reevaluation of the published Rb-Sr whole-rock data. The authors found that the data support an alternative ca. 426 +/- 10 Ma age of mylonitic resetting. This time of deformation relates to the assembly of suspect terranes during Late Ordovician closure of the Iapetus ocean.

  10. Potassium metasomatism of volcanic and sedimentary rocks in rift basins, calderas and detachment terranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, C. E.; drographic basins.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical, mineralogical, and oxygen-isotopic changes accompanying K-metasomatism are described. The similarities with diagenetic reactions in both deep marine and alkaline, saline-lake environments are noted. The common occurrence of K-metasomatism in upper-plate rocks of detachment terranes indicates that the early stage of severe regional extension causes crustal downwarping and, in arid to semi-arid regions, development of closed hydrographic basins.

  11. Paleomagnetic evidence that the central block of Salinia (California) is not a far-traveled terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whidden, K.J.; Lund, S.P.; Bottjer, D.J.; Champion, D.; Howell, D.G.

    1998-01-01

    New paleomagnetic results from Late Cretaceous (75-85 m.y.) red beds on the central block of Salinia indicate that Salinia was located within 6?? (in latitude) of its current cratonal North American position during the Late Cretaceous (after correction for Neogene San Andreas Fault transport). The red beds formed as alluvial-fan overbank deposits with hematite cement deposited directly on Salinian granites in the La Panza Range. Paleomagnetic analysis shows two components of magnetization in the red beds, a low-blocking-temperature present-day overprint residing in goethite and a high-blocking-temperature (>600??) component residing in hematite. The hematite magnetization is a chemical remanent magnetization which formed soon after deposition during pedogenesis. The bedding-corrected hematite remanence contains a magnetic polarity stratigraphy with antipodal normal and reversed directions. Twenty-three Class I sites (??95 < 20??) have an average hematite direction with inclination = 54.4?? and declination = 18.2?? (??95 = 6.1??) after structural correction. These paleomagnetic data suggest that Salinia resided at about 35??N latitude during the Late Cretaceous, within 6?? of its current location adjacent to cratonal North America. By contrast, a summary of paleomagnetic data from the Peninsular Ranges terrane and the Sur-Obispo terrane, which are currently outboard of Salinia, shows northward transport of these terranes of 12,.o\\ to 22?? relative to their current locations in North America since the Cretaceous. The offsets increase systematically away from the craton with the most outboard Sur-Obispo terrane (which is composed of accretionary prism and distal forearc material) showing the largest degree of northward translation.

  12. Controls on accretion of flysch and melange belts at convergent margins: evidence from the Chugach Bay thrust and Iceworm melange, Chugach accretionary wedge, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kusky, T.M.; Bradley, D.C.; Haeussler, P.J.; Karl, S.

    1997-01-01

    Controls on accretion of flysch and melange terranes at convergent margins are poorly understood. Southern Alaska's Chugach terrane forms the outboard accretionary margin of the Wrangellia composite terrane, and consists of two major lithotectonic units, including Triassic-Cretaceous melange of the McHugh Complex and Late Cretaceous flysch of the Valdez Group. The contact between the McHugh Complex and the Valdez Group on the Kenai Peninsula is a tectonic boundary between chaotically deformed melange of argillite, chert, greenstone, and graywacke of the McHugh Complex and a less chaotically deformed melange of argillite and graywacke of the Valdez Group. We assign the latter to a new, informal unit of formational rank, the Iceworm melange, and interpret it as a contractional fault zone (Chugach Bay thrust) along which the Valdez Group was emplaced beneath the McHugh Complex. The McHugh Complex had already been deformed and metamorphosed to prehnite-pumpellyite facies prior to formation of the Iceworm melange. The Chugach Bay thrust formed between 75 and 55 Ma, as shown by Campanian-Maastrichtian depositional ages of the Valdez Group, and fault-related fabrics in the Iceworm melange that are cut by Paleocene dikes. Motion along the Chugach Bay thrust thus followed Middle to Late Cretaceous collision (circa 90-100 Ma) of the Wrangellia composite terrane with North America. Collision related uplift and erosion of mountains in British Columbia formed a submarine fan on the Farallon plate, and we suggest that attempted subduction of this fan dramatically changed the subduction/accretion style within the Chugach accretionary wedge. We propose a model in which subduction of thinly sedimented plates concentrates shear strains in a narrow zone, generating melanges like the McHugh in accretionary complexes. Subduction of thickly sedimented plates allows wider distribution of shear strains to accommodate plate convergence, generating a more coherent accretionary style

  13. Simultaneous batholith emplacement, terrane/continent collision, and oroclinal bending in the Blue Mountains Province, North American Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žák, Jiří; Verner, Kryštof; Tomek, Filip; Holub, František V.; Johnson, Kenneth; Schwartz, Joshua J.

    2015-06-01

    The North American Cordillera is a classic example of accretionary orogen, consisting of multiple oceanic terranes attached to the western margin of Laurentia during the Mesozoic times. Although the Cordillera is linear for most parts, terrane boundaries are at a high angle to the overall structural grain in several segments of the orogen, which has been a matter of longstanding controversy as to how and when these orogenic curvatures formed. This paper discusses mechanisms, kinematics, and timing of initiation of one of these major curvatures, the Blue Mountains Province in northeastern Oregon. Here magmatic fabric patterns and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in the Wallowa batholith record three phases of progressive deformation of the host Wallowa terrane during Early Cretaceous. First is terrane-oblique ~NE-SW shortening, interpreted as recording attachment of the amalgamated oceanic and fringing terranes to the continental margin during dextral convergence at ~140 Ma. Deformation subsequently switched to pure shear-dominated ~NNE-SSW shortening associated with crustal thickening, caused by continued impingement of the amalgamated Blue Mountains superterrane into a presumed westward concave reentrant in the continental margin at ~135-128 Ma. Upon impingement (at ~126 Ma), the northern portion of the superterrane became "locked," leading to reorientation of the principal shortening direction to ~NNW-SSE while its still deformable southern portion rotated clockwise about a vertical axis. We thus propose oblique bending as the main mechanism of the orocline formation whereby horizontal compressive forces resulting from plate convergence acted at an angle to the terrane boundaries.

  14. Swept wing ice accretion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1990-01-01

    An effort to develop a three-dimensional modeling method was initiated. This first step towards creation of a complete aircraft icing simulation code builds on previously developed methods for calculating three-dimensional flow fields and particle trajectories combined with a two-dimensional ice accretion calculation along coordinate locations corresponding to streamlines. This work is a demonstration of the types of calculations necessary to predict a three-dimensional ice accretion. Results of calculations using the 3-D method for a MS-317 swept wing geometry are projected onto a 2-D plane normal to the wing leading edge and compared to 2-D results for the same geometry. It is anticipated that many modifications will be made to this approach, however, this effort will lay the groundwork for future modeling efforts. Results indicate that the flow field over the surface and the particle trajectories differed for the two calculations. This led to lower collection efficiencies, convective heat transfer coefficients, freezing fractions, and ultimately ice accumulation for the 3-D calculation.

  15. Ringed Accretion Disks: Equilibrium Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  16. Using multiple chemical systems in zircon to unravel the evolution of high-grade terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris; Taylor, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Since the turn of the century the rare earth element (REE) partitioning between zircon and garnet has facilitated the coupling of U-Pb ages to metamorphism, particularly in the granulite facies. The combination of in situ analysis and rapid data acquisition, particularly through combined techniques such as Laser Ablation Split Stream (LASS), means that complex terranes can be interrogated with increasing detail. However this detail provided by large datasets must also be combined with an understanding of the processes involved, for example the relative mobility of the REE and U-Pb systems with zircon grains that have withstood intense P-T conditions to varying degrees. For example, some high-temperature metapelites that seem to have all the right ingredients for the "equilibrium" to be achieved (e.g. they contain garnet, zircon, monazite and rutile, they've melted and experienced temperatures in excess of 900 °C) display variations in the REE partitioning between zircon and garnet that varies over the length-scale of a single thin section. This presentation seeks to highlight some complexities in the application of these undoublty useful techniques to high-temperature metamorphic rocks from a number of terranes and hopefully provide some useful comments on developing more efficient strategies to characterise the P-T-t evolution of high-grade terranes.

  17. North America as an exotic terrane'' and the origin of the Appalachian--Andean Mountain system

    SciTech Connect

    Dalziel, I.W.D; Gahagan, L.M. . Inst. for Geophysics); Dalla Salda, L.H. . Centro de Investigaciones Geologicas)

    1992-01-01

    North America was sutured to Gondwana in the terminal Alleghanian event of Appalachian orogenesis, thus completing the late Paleozoic assembly of Pangea. The suggestion that the Pacific margins of East Antarctica-Australia and Laurentia may have been juxtaposed during the Neoproterozoic prompts reevaluation of the widely held assumptions that the ancestral Appalachian margin rifted from northwestern Africa during the earliest Paleozoic opening of Iapetus, and remained juxtaposed to that margin, even though widely separated from it at times, until the assembly of Pangea. The lower Paleozoic carbonate platform of northwestern Argentina has been known for a long time to contain Olenellid trilobites of the Pacific or Columbian realm. Although normally regarded as some kind of far-travelled terrane that originated along the Appalachian margin of Laurentia, it has recently been interpreted as a fragment detached from the Ouachita embayment of Laurentia following Taconic-Famatinian collision with Gondwana during the Ordovician. The Oaxaca terrane of Mexico, on the other hand, contains a Tremadocian trilobite fauna of Argentine-Bolivian affinities, and appears to have been detached from Gondwana following the same collision. The Wilson cycle'' of Iapetus ocean basin opening and closing along the Appalachian and Andean orogens may have involved more than one such continental collision during clockwise drift of Laurentia around South America following late Neoproterozoic to earliest Cambrian separation. Together with the collisions of baltic and smaller terranes with Laurentia, this could explain the protracted Paleozoic orogenic history of both the Appalachian and proto-Andean orogens.

  18. Low Angle Contact Between the Oaxaca and Juárez Terranes Deduced From Magnetotelluric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzate-Flores, Jorge A.; Molina-Garza, Roberto; Corbo-Camargo, Fernando; Márquez-Ramírez, Víctor

    2016-04-01

    We present the electrical resistivity model along a profile perpendicular to the Middle America trench in southern Mexico that reveals previously unrecognized tectonic features at upper to mid-crustal depths. Our results support the hypotheses that the upper crust of the Oaxaca terrane is a residual ~20 km thick crust composed by an ~10 km thick faulted crustal upper layer and an ~10 km thick hydrated and/or mineralized layer. Oaxaca basement overthrust the younger Juárez (or Cuicateco) terrane. The electrical resistivity model supports the interpretation of a slab subducting at a low angle below Oaxaca. Uplift in the Oaxaca region appears to be related to fault reactivation induced by low angle subduction. In the Juárez terrane, isostatic forces may contribute to uplift because it is largely uncompensated. In the Sierra Madre del Sur, closer to the coast, uplift is facilitated by slab-dehydration driven buoyancy. Both gravity and resistivity models are consistent with a thinned upper crust in the northeast end of the profile.

  19. Deformation and chemical reaction in an ultramafic terrane boundary: the Livingstone Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Crase, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Livingstone Fault is a >1000 km long terrane boundary that defines the eastern margin of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt in New Zealand. The fault is spectacularly exposed where it juxtaposes ultramafic parts of the ophiolite belt (e.g. peridotite, serpentinite) against quartzofeldspathic rocks of the continental Caples Terrane. In such areas, the fault consists of a 50-400 m-wide foliated serpentinite shear zone entraining competent pods of massive serpentinite, Caples Terrane rocks and various volcanic rocks. The Livingstone Fault provides an excellent example of deformation styles (e.g. distributed vs. localized) and chemical reactions where peridotite, serpentinite and quartzofeldspathic rocks are juxtaposed, a common situation in many plate tectonic settings (e.g. portions of the San Andreas Fault, central and southern sectors of the Alpine Fault). We will present some initial results of fieldwork carried out in the Olivine Wilderness Area (NE of Milford Sound) focusing on: 1) the transition from intact peridotite to partly serpentinized peridotite to a fully serpentinized shear zone, 2) the distribution of strain within the serpentinite shear zone, 3) the significance of highly localized slip within entrained pods of peridotite and serpentinite, and 4) the nature and possible mechanical effects of talc-forming metasomatic reactions between serpentinite and quartzofeldspathic rocks.

  20. Lithospheric structures and Precambrian terrane boundaries in northeastern Botswana revealed through magnetotelluric profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miensopust, M. P.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Garcia, X. A.; Evans, R. L.; Khoza, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    Within the framework of the Southern African MagnetoTelluric EXperiment (SAMTEX) a focused study was undertaken to gain better knowledge of the lithospheric geometries and structures of the westerly extension of the Zimbabwe Craton into Botswana, with the overarching aim to increase our understanding of southern African tectonics. The area of interest is located in northeastern Botswana, where Kalahari sands cover most of the geological terranes, and little is known about lithospheric structures and thickness. Some of the regional scale terrane boundary locations, defined based on potential field data, may be not sufficiently accurate for local scale studies. Investigation of the NNW-SSE orientated, 600 km long ZIM line profile crossing the Zimbabwe craton, Magondi mobile belt and Ghanzi-Chobe belt showed that the Zimbabwe craton is characterized by thick ( ˜ 220 km) resistive lithosphere, consistent with geochemical and geothermal estimates from kimberlite samples of the Orapa and Letlhakane pipes ( ˜ 175 km west of the profile). The lithospheric mantle of the Ghanzi-Chobe belt is resistive but the lithosphere is only about 180 km thick. At crustal depths a northwards-dipping boundary between the Ghanzi-Chobe and the Magondi belts is identified, and two mid- to lower-crustal conductors are discovered in the Magondi belt. The crustal terrane boundary between the Magondi and Ghanzi-Chobe belts is found to be located further to the north, and the southwestern boundary of the Zimbabwe craton might be further to the west, than previously inferred from potential field data.

  1. Origin of Siletzia, an Accreted Large Igneous Province in the Cascadia Forearc, and the Early History of the Yellowstone Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. E.; Bukry, D.; Friedman, R. M.; Pyle, D. G.; Duncan, R. A.; Haeussler, P. J.; Wooden, J.

    2014-12-01

    Siletzia as named by Irving (1979) is a Paleogene large igneous province forming the oceanic basalt basement of coastal OR, WA and S. BC that was accreted to North America in the early Eocene. U-Pb (magmatic, detrital zircon) and 40Ar/39Ar ages constrained by mapping, global coccolith (CP) zones, and magnetic polarities permit correlation of basalts with the geomagnetic polarity time scale of Gradstein et al. (2012). Siletzia was rapidly erupted 56-49 Ma (Chron 25-22), and accretion was completed between 51 and 49 Ma in Oregon. Magmatism continued until ca. 46 Ma with emplacement of a basalt sill complex during or shortly after accretion. Siletzia's great crustal thickness, rapid eruption, and timing of accretion are consistent with formation as an oceanic plateau. Eight m.y. after accretion, margin-parallel extension and regional dike swarms mark the Tillamook magmatic episode in the forearc (41.6 Ma; CP zone 14a; Chron 19r). We examined the origin of Siletzia and the possible role of a long-lived Yellowstone hotspot (YHS) in an open source plate modeling program. In most reference frames, the YHS is on or near an inferred northeast-striking Kula- Farallon and/or Resurrection-Farallon ridge 60 to 50 Ma. The YHS thus could have provided a 56-49 Ma source on the Farallon plate for Siletzia, which accreted to North America by 50 Ma. A sister plateau, the Eocene basalt basement of the Yakutat terrane, now in Alaska, formed on the adjacent Kula (or Resurrection) plate and accreted to coastal British Columbia at about the same time. Following accretion of Siletzia, the leading edge of North America overrode the YHS ca. 42 Ma. The encounter with an active YHS may explain the voluminous high-Ti tholeiitic to alkalic magmatism of the 42-34 Ma Tillamook episode and extension in the forearc. Clockwise rotation of western Oregon about a pole in the backarc has since moved the Tillamook center and underlying Siletzia northward ~250 km from the probable hotspot track on North

  2. Late Cretaceous infant intra-oceanic arc volcanism, the Central Pontides, Turkey: Petrogenetic and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygül, Mesut; Okay, Aral I.; Oberhänsli, Roland; Schmidt, Alexander; Sudo, Masafumi

    2015-11-01

    A tectonic slice of an arc sequence consisting of low-grade metavolcanic rocks and overlying metasedimentary succession is exposed in the Central Pontides north of the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture separating Laurasia from Gondwana-derived terranes. The metavolcanic rocks mainly consist of basaltic andesite/andesite and mafic cognate xenolith-bearing rhyolite with their pyroclastic equivalents, which are interbedded with recrystallized pelagic limestone and chert. The metasedimentary succession comprises recrystallized micritic limestone with rare volcanogenic metaclastic rocks and stratigraphically overlies the metavolcanic rocks. The geochemistry of the metavolcanic rocks indicates an arc setting evidenced by depletion of HFSE (Ti, P and Nb) and enrichment of fluid mobile LILE. Identical trace and rare earth elements compositions of basaltic andesites/andesites and rhyolites suggest that they are cogenetic and derived from a common parental magma. The arc sequence crops out between an Albian-Turonian subduction-accretionary complex representing the Laurasian active margin and an ophiolitic mélange. Absence of continent derived detritus in the arc sequence and its tectonic setting in a wide Cretaceous accretionary complex suggest that the Kösdağ Arc was intra-oceanic. Zircons from two metarhyolite samples give Late Cretaceous (93.8 ± 1.9 and 94.4 ± 1.9 Ma) U/Pb ages. These ages are the same as the age of the supra-subduction ophiolites in western Turkey, which implies that that the Kösdağ Arc may represent part of the incipient arc formed during the generation of the supra-subduction ophiolites. The low-grade regional metamorphism in the Kösdağ Arc is constrained to 69.9 ± 0.4 Ma by 40Ar/39Ar muscovite dating indicating that the arc sequence became part of a wide Tethyan Cretaceous accretionary complex by the latest Cretaceous. Non-collisional cessation of the arc volcanism is possibly associated with southward migration of the magmatism as in the Izu

  3. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  4. ARC and Melting Efficiency of Plasma ARC Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, J. C.; Nunes, A. C.; Evans, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    A series of partial penetration Variable Polarity Plasma Arc welds were made at equal power but various combinations of current and voltage on 2219 Aluminum. Arc efficiency was measured calorimetrically and ranged between 48% and 66% for the conditions of the welds. Arc efficiency depends in different ways on voltage and current. The voltage effect dominates. Raising voltage while reducing current increases arc efficiency. Longer, higher voltage arcs are thought to transfer a greater portion of arc power to the workpiece through shield gas convection. Melting efficiency depends upon weld pool shape as well as arc efficiency. Increased current increases the melting efficiency as it increases the depth to width ratio of the weld pool. Increased plasma gas flow does the same thing. Higher currents are thought to raise arc pressure and depress liquid at the bottom of the weld pool. More arc power then transfers to the workpiece through increasing plasma gas convection. If the power is held constant, the reduced voltage lowers the arc efficiency, while the pool shape change increases the melting efficiency,

  5. Arc jet diagnostics tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Two objectives were addressed during a 10 week 1988 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). These objectives were the evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species in an arc jet environment, and the determination of atomic recombination coefficients for reaction cured glass (RCG) coated high temperature surface insulation (HRSI) materials subjected to simulated reentry conditions. Evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species provided some of the first measurements of point compositions in arc jet tunnel environments. A major objective of this project centered around the sampling residence time. A three staged vacuum sampling system pulled the molecules and atoms from the arc jet to a quadrupole ionization mass spectrometer in 400 milliseconds. Conditions investigated included a composition survey across the nozzle exit at 3 cm z-distance from the nozzle exit for 3 different currents. Also, a point composition survey was taken around a shock created by the presence of a blunt body.

  6. Modelling the Accretion History of the Galactic Disk (and the Gravitational Lensing of a High-z Galaxy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Over its long history, the Milky Way is expected to have accreted many dwarf galaxies. The debris from the destruction of most of these dwarf galaxies will by now be fully phase-mixed throughout the Galaxy and hence undetectable as local over-densities in position-space. However, the debris from these systems could have distinct kinematic signatures that may help distinguish these stars from, for example, the Galactic disk. We aim to construct a reliable method of determining the contributions to the Milky Way disk from accreted structures that could be applied to current kinematic data sets, such as SDSS's APOGEE survey. In an effort to mimic the kinematic traits of an accreted satellite, we construct single-orbit models to compare to a cosmologically motivated simulation of satellite accretion. We find that these orbit models adhere to the kinematic signatures of certain types of accreted galaxies better than others, giving us insight on which parameters to trust when searching for accreted populations. As a bonus, we describe a separate project in which we attempt to deduce the intrinsic properties of the 8 o'clock arc, a gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxy at redshift 2.73. Using the lensmodel code and its pixel-based source reconstruction extension pixsrc, we derive a de-lensed image of the galaxy in the source plane.

  7. Two radically different exhumation models for the Qiangtang Terrane, Central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongbao; Bons, Paul D.

    2014-05-01

    A century after the discovery of blueschist rocks in the central Qiangtang Terrane, the debate on their origin is still ongoing. Although all authors agree that the blueschists derive from subduction of oceanic crust, two radically different models are proposed. The "underthrust model" envisages early Mesozoic subduction mélange to have been thrust southwards (from the Jinsa Suture Zone, 200 km to the North) under Paleozoic crust of the Qiangtang Terrane. The subduction mélange, with high-pressure rocks, are thought to have exhumed by normal faulting in a large metamorphic core complex. The alternative "in-situ subduction model" puts the suture with northward subduction closer by at the Longmu Co-Shuanhu Suture Zone that separates the North and South Qiangtang terranes. In this model, allochtonous mélange is thrust over autochtonous Paleozoic basement in a south-vergent imbricate thrusts system. The models have far-reaching consequences for the crustal structure of central Tibet, as the first predicts the middle and lower crust to consist of subduction mélange overlain by Qiangtang basement and onshore Carboniferous-Triassic sediments, whereas the second predicts these rocks to overlie the Qiangtang basement of North-Gondwana provenance. To resolve this issue we combined detailed mapping in the central Qiangtang Terrane with 3D structural modelling using ASTER satellite images and the software package Move(TM). The high topography makes it possible to constrain the location and orientation of large-scale (>kms) structures, such as major faults. We found that Ordovician to Carboniferous sediments unconformably overly low-metamorphic grade pre-Ordovician basement rocks, together forming the autochtonous Paleozoic basement. This is overlain by a stack of shallowly dipping thrust sheets of subduction mélange, high-pressure rocks, as well as Permo-Triassic sediments. With the subduction mélange overlying the autochtonous basement, we prefer the in-situ subduction

  8. Crustal and upper mantle structure of central Qiangtang terrane (Tibet Plateau) imaged with magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, S.; Hu, X.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Since the Tethys Ocean closed, the ongoing collision between India and Aisa continents has created the Tibet Plateau, which is the most spectacular topographic feature on the surface of the earth. In the last decades, a large number of geological and geophysical studies have been undertaken in the Tibet Plateau, but most of these studies were focused on southern Tibet, where the collision of the Indian tectonic plate with Eurasia was occurred, and southeast Tibet, where lateral extrusion of crustal material may be occurred, absent in the central Tibet. As research continues, it has become clear that a complete understanding of the formation and deformation of the Tibet Plateau requires a study of the entire plateau. The Qiangtang terrane is located in the central Tibet Plateau. In 1993-1994, three profiles of broadband MT data (320 Hz to 2000 s) along N-S trending ranges from 86°E to 91°E were collected by China University of Geoscience in central Qiangtang terrane for the purpose of oil and gas exploration, the previous interpretation was focused on the shallow structures. In this study, we reanalyze the three MT profiles to produce more detailed images of the deep electrical structure of the Qiangtang terrane. Dimensionality analysis and geoelectric strike analysis of these data show that they appear to be two dimensional. 2-D inversion model show that there is a pervasive conductivity layer in the mid- to lower crustal and upper mantle, especially in the north Qiangtang terrane, which was considered to be the result of partial melt. The partial melt fraction is sufficient for crustal flow to occur. The similarity of the inversion models of the three profiles show that there is west-east crustal flow along the Jinsha River suture in central Qiangtang terrane, which seems to be western extension of the crustal flow observed in southeast Tibet by Bai et al. (2010). The inversion results also show difference of the electrical structure between the west and east

  9. Plasma physics of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concepts and phenomena that are needed to understand X- and gamma-ray sources are discussed. The capture of material from the wind or from the atmosphere or envelope of a binary companion star is described and the resulting types of accretion flows discussed. The reasons for the formation of a magnetosphere around the neutron star are explained. The qualitative features of the magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars are then described and compared with the qualitative features of the geomagnetosphere. The conditions for stable flow and for angular and linear momentum conservation are explained in the context of accretion by magnetic neutron stars and applied to obtain rough estimates of the scale of the magnetosphere. Accretion from Keplerian disks is then considered in some detail. The radial structure of geometrically thin disk flows, the interaction of disk flows with the neutron star magnetosphere, and models of steady accretion from Keplerian disks are described. Accretion torques and the resulting changes in the spin frequencies of rotating neutron stars are considered. The predicted behavior is then compared with observations of accretion-powered pulsars. Magnetospheric processes that may accelerate particles to very high energies, producing GeV and, perhaps, TeV gamma-rays are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms that decelerate and eventually stop accreting plasma at the surfaces of strongly magnetic neutron stars are described.

  10. Pulsed accretion in a variable protostar.

    PubMed

    Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Flaherty, Kevin; Balog, Zoltan; Gutermuth, Robert

    2013-01-17

    Periodic increases in luminosity arising from variable accretion rates have been predicted for some pre-main-sequence close binary stars as they grow from circumbinary disks. The phenomenon is known as pulsed accretion and can affect the orbital evolution and mass distribution of young binaries, as well as the potential for planet formation. Accretion variability is a common feature of young stars, with a large range of amplitudes and timescales as measured from multi-epoch observations at optical and infrared wavelengths. Periodic variations consistent with pulsed accretion have been seen in only a few young binaries via optical accretion tracers, albeit intermittently with accretion luminosity variations ranging from zero to 50 per cent from orbit to orbit. Here we report that the infrared luminosity of a young protostar (of age about 10(5) years) increases by a factor of ten in roughly one week every 25.34 days. We attribute this to pulsed accretion associated with an unseen binary companion. The strength and regularity of this accretion signal is surprising; it may be related to the very young age of the system, which is a factor of ten younger than the other pulsed accretors previously studied. PMID:23283175

  11. Accretion in the galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Alex Courtney

    2000-10-01

    The Milky Way disk is enveloped in a diffuse, dynamically-hot collection of stars and star clusters collectively known as the ``stellar halo''. Photometric and chemical analyses suggest that these stars are ancient fossils of the galaxy formation epoch. Yet, little is known about the origin of this trace population. Is this system merely a vestige of the initial burst of star formation within the decoupled proto-Galaxy, or is it the detritus of cannibalized satellite galaxies? In an attempt to unravel the history of the Milky Way's stellar halo, I performed a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 55 metal-poor stars possessing ``extreme'' kinematic properties. It is thought that stars on orbits that either penetrate the remote halo or exhibit large retrograde velocities could have been associated with assimilated (or ``accreted'') dwarf galaxies. The hallmark of an accreted halo star is presumed to be a deficiency (compared with normal stars) of the α-elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti) with respect to iron, a consequence of sporadic bursts of star formation within the diminutive galaxies. Abundances for a select group of light metals (Li, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), iron-peak nuclides (Cr, Fe, Ni), and neutron-capture elements (Y, Ba) were calculated using line-strengths measured from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectral observations collected with the Keck I 10-m and KPNO 4-m telescopes. The abundances extracted from the spectra reveal: (1)The vast majority of outer halo stars possess supersolar [α/Fe] > 0.0) ratios. (2)The [α/Fe] ratio appears to decrease with increasing metallicity. (3)The outer halo stars have lower ratios of [α/Fe] than inner halo stars at a given metallicity. (4)At the largest metallicities, there is a large spread in the observed [α/Fe] ratios. (5)[α/Fe] anti-correlates with RAPO. (6)Only one star (BD+80° 245) exhibits the peculiar abundances expected of an assimilated star. The general conclusion extracted from these data is that the

  12. Structural Analyses of the Kahiltna Terrane: A Kinematic Record of the Collision of the Talkeetna Superterrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bier, S. E.; Fisher, D.

    2002-12-01

    Macro-, meso-, and microscale structural analyses from several localities across the ~1000 km Kahiltna Terrane provide valuable kinematic insights into the late Cretaceous collision between the Talkeetna superterrane and North America. The Kahiltna Terrane, a Jurassic-Cretaceous flysch basin inboard of the Talkeetna superterrane (Wrangellia, Peninsular, and Alexander terranes), contains incremental strain indicators that record a history of oblique collision and subsequent deformation in a strike-slip regime. A comparison of structural data from localities across the Kahiltna terrane suggests a unique history not yet described in previous work on south-central Alaskan tectonics. Data was collected from the Reindeer Hills area, the northwestern Talkeetna Mountains, Denali National Park, the Peters Hills, and the Tordrillo Mountains. In the Reindeer Hills, a melange zone occurs as a series of exposures dismembered by ongoing strike slip faulting between the flysch of the Kahiltna terrane and the precollisional edge of the North American continent. This melange is characterized by fault-bounded blocks of Paleozoic limestone and sandstone within an argillite matrix with a conspicuous scaly fabric. The blocks range in size from 10 cm to tens of meters; and melange fish indicate a south-directed shear sense. The melange is overlain by a red and green (Triassic-Jurassic?) conglomerate along an unconformity that likely marks the base of a perched slope basin near the toe of an accretionary wedge. The strike of bedding and cleavage in this area trends EW. The fold axes trend NW-SE and folds verge to the south. In the northwest corner of the Talkeetna Mountains, the structure is dominated by north vergent folds and faults. The strike of bedding trends ~025°; whereas the strike of the cleavage is ~060°. Both cleavage and bedding dip to the southeast. The fold axes trend roughly NE-SW. North of the Denali Fault System, in Denali National Park, strike of bedding is ~122° and

  13. Dynamics of subduction, accretion, exhumation and slab roll-back: Mediterranean scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirel, C.; Brun, J.; Burov, E. B.; Wortel, M. J.; Lebedev, S.

    2010-12-01

    A dynamic orogen reveals various tectonic processes brought about by subduction: accretion of oceanic and continental crust, exhumation of UHP-HP rocks, and often, back-arc extension. In the Mediterranean, orogeny is strongly affected by slab retreat, as in the Aegean and Tyrrhenian Seas. In order to examine the different dynamic processes in a self-consistent manner, we perform a parametric study using the fully coupled thermo-mechanical numerical code PARAFLAM. The experiments reproduce a subduction zone in a slab pull mode, with accretion of one (the Tyrrhenian case) and two continental blocks (the Aegean case) that undergo, in sequence, thrusting, burial and exhumation. The modeling shows that despite differences in structure between the two cases, the deformation mechanisms are fundamentally similar and can be described as follows. The accretion of a continental block at the trench beneath the suture zone begins with its burial to UHP-HP conditions and thrusting. Then the continental block is delaminated from its subducting lithosphere. During the subduction-accretion process, the angle of the subducting slab increases due to the buoyancy of the continental block. When the oceanic subduction resumes, the angle of the slab decreases to reach a steady-state position. The Aegean and Tyrrhenian scenarios diverge at this stage, due naturally to the differences of their accretion history. When continental accretion is followed by oceanic subduction only, the continental block that has been accreted and detached stays at close to the trench and does not undergo further deformation, despite the continuing rollback. The extensional deformation is located further within the overriding plate, resulting in continental breakup and the development of an oceanic basin, as in the Tyrrhenian domain. When the continental accretion is followed first by oceanic subduction and then by accretion of another continental block, however, the evolution of the subduction zone is

  14. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  15. Island-arc carbonates: characterization and recognition in the ancient geologic record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, C. M.

    1996-10-01

    Carbonates of island-arc origin that are preserved in Paleozoic-Mesozoic terranes of the North American Cordillera exhibit a distinctive suite of paleontologic and lithologic features and share a fundamental similarity with limestones forming in modern volcanic arcs. This study provides the first detailed synthesis of carbonate depositional systems in island arcs and documents primary sedimentary constituents based on facies relationships and faunal communities. Models are developed that show patterns in the long-term evolution of shallow marine organisms and the construction, evolution, and demise of carbonate platforms in island arcs. A suite of criteria is identified that may be used to differentiate island-arc carbonates from limestones that accumulated in other platform settings. Biogeographic isolation, prolonged subsidence, steep submarine slopes and tectonic instability of volcanic edifices contribute to the development of relatively high levels of species endemism, impoverished normal marine faunas, complex provincial affinities, and relict biotas in limestones that are characterized by exceptionally thick platform and periplatform sequences, fringing and barrier reefs at the shelf margin, extensive lagoonal deposits and rapid lateral and vertical facies changes. Although destructive tectonic and geologic processes in island arcs may hinder determining the original size and extent of the carbonate platform, and particular facies types may not be represented (e.g., fringing and barrier reefs may be replaced by sand shoals at the platform, margin), many characteristics have potential value for identifying carbonates of island-arc origin in the ancient rock record. Apart from being associated with calc-alkaline volcanic and volcaniclastic assemblages, the most valuable suite of features for recognizing island-arc carbonates is marine biotas that exhibit elevated levels of endemism and mixed paleobiogeographic affinities, extraordinary thicknesses of platform

  16. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  17. Effects of ice accretions on aircraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Frank T.; Khodadoust, Abdollah

    2001-11-01

    This article is a systematic and comprehensive review, correlation, and assessment of test results available in the public domain which address the aerodynamic performance and control degradations caused by various types of ice accretions on the lifting surfaces of fixed wing aircraft. To help put the various test results in perspective, overviews are provided first of the important factors and limitations involved in computational and experimental icing simulation techniques, as well as key aerodynamic testing simulation variables and governing flow physics issues. Following these are the actual reviews, assessments, and correlations of a large number of experimental measurements of various forms of mostly simulated in-flight and ground ice accretions, augmented where appropriate by similar measurements for other analogous forms of surface contamination and/or disruptions. In-flight icing categories reviewed include the initial and inter-cycle ice accretions inherent in the use of de-icing systems which are of particular concern because of widespread misconceptions about the thickness of such accretions which can be allowed before any serious consequences occur, and the runback/ridge ice accretions typically associated with larger-than-normal water droplet encounters which are of major concern because of the possible potential for catastrophic reductions in aerodynamic effectiveness. The other in-flight ice accretion category considered includes the more familiar large rime and glaze ice accretions, including ice shapes with rather grotesque features, where the concern is that, in spite of all the research conducted to date, the upper limit of penalties possible has probably not been defined. Lastly, the effects of various possible ground frost/ice accretions are considered. The concern with some of these is that for some types of configurations, all of the normally available operating margins to stall at takeoff may be erased if these accretions are not

  18. Electric arc heater is self starting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.

    1966-01-01

    Remote method initiates an electric arc over a large range of gaps between two water-cooled electrodes of an arc-heated wind tunnel without disassembling the arc unit. This type of starting system can be used on both three-phase ac arc heaters and dc arc heaters.

  19. Accreting Neutron Stars as Astrophysical Laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2004-01-01

    In the last year, we have made an extremely important breakthrough in establishing the relationship between thermonuclear burst oscillations in accreting neutron stars and the stellar spin. More broadly, we have continued t o make significant scientific progress in all four of the key focus areas identified in our original proposal: (1) the disk-magnetosphere interaction in neutron stars, (2) rapid variability in accreting neutron stars, (3) physics of accretion flows, and (4) fundamental properties of neutron stars. A list of all publications that have arising from this work since the start of our program is given.

  20. Lyman edges - Signatures of accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, A. L.

    1992-05-01

    Accretion disks are thought to provide the ultraviolet emission seen in the big blue bump of quasars. However, observations of the UV spectra of quasars do not show the additional signatures predicted by the accretion disk models. This paper will concentrate on just one of those signatures - the Lyman edge. Two studies are briefly discussed which explore the Lyman edge region of both high and low redshift quasars (Antonucci, Kinney, and Ford 1989 and Koratkar, Kinney, and Bohlin 1992). Both studies find that Lyman edges are not present in quasar spectra as frequently as predicted by the models or at the strength predicted by accretion disk models.

  1. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-01-01

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ(18)O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time. PMID:27272610

  2. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N.; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-01-01

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ18O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time. PMID:27272610

  3. Low palaeoelevation of the northern Lhasa terrane during late Eocene: Fossil foraminifera and stable isotope evidence from the Gerze Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yi; Zhang, Kexin; Garzione, Carmala N.; Xu, Yadong; Song, Bowen; Ji, Junliang

    2016-06-01

    The Lhasa terrane is a key region for understanding the paleoelevation of the southern Tibetan Plateau after India-Asia collision. The Gerze Basin, located in the northern part of the Lhasa terrane, is a shortening-related basin. We discovered Lagena laevis (Bandy) fossils in upper Eocene strata of the Gerze Basin. This type of foraminifera is associated with lagoon and estuarine environments, indicating that the northern part of the Lhasa terrane was near sea level during the late Eocene. We speculate that these foraminifera were transported inland by storm surges to low elevation freshwater lakes during times of marine transgressions. This inference is consistent with the relatively positive δ18O values in carbonate from the same deposits that indicate low palaeoelevations close to sea level. Considering the palaeoelevation results from the nearby Oligocene basins at a similar latitude and the volcanic history of the Lhasa terrane, we infer that large-magnitude surface uplift of the northern Lhasa terrane occurred between late Eocene and late Oligocene time.

  4. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  5. Diffuse Crustal Accretion at the Southern Terminus of the Malaguana-Gadao Ridge, Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.; Fryer, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    The mode of extension and crustal accretion in backarc basins is strongly affected by proximity to the arc volcanic front. The factor that likely has the strongest control on these processes is mantle water content. At Mid-Ocean Ridges, the small amount of water in the mantle is efficiently extracted into the melt, dehydrating the residual material and increasing the viscosity and strength of the lithosphere. This may aid in focusing melt generated over a broad (~200+ km wide) zone in the mantle toward a narrow zone of crustal accretion ~1-2 km wide. In the near-arc setting, the continuous flux of water into the mantle wedge should oppose lithospheric dehydration and inhibit strengthening of the lithosphere, which may allow deformation, volcanism, and crustal accretion to occur over a broad area instead of along a narrow axis. A possible example of this process can be observed at the southern terminus of the Malaguana-Gadao Ridge, a backarc spreading center in the Southern Mariana Trough, at the southern end of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana convergent margin. The spreading axis, which forms an axial high in this area, abruptly terminates at 143˚20'E, 12˚37'N and is replaced by a broad zone of active volcanism and tectonism characterized by short volcanic ridges, volcanic cones, and low-relief grabens. This study uses deep-towed and ship multibeam sonar, gravity, and magnetics data collected during an early 2012 cruise on R/V Thomas G. Thompson (TN273) along with available geophysical and geochemical data in the Southern Mariana Trough to gain insight into the nature of the diffuse crustal accretion process. Evidence of a similar transition from organized to "disorganized" spreading can also be observed at Valu Fa Ridge in the southern Lau basin and other backarc spreading centers. This suggests that this process is not unique to the Southern Mariana Trough, and may be an important mode of crustal accretion in a variety of backarc settings where there is extension in

  6. Late Neogene kinematics of intra-arc oblique shear zones: The Petilia-Rizzuto Fault Zone (Calabrian Arc, Central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, J. P.

    1994-10-01

    compression and extension (related to pulsating thrust wedge dynamics with phases of accretion and underthrusting respectively) and (3) regional, compressive interplate stress (middle Messinian-middle Pliocene). All structures are overprinted by post middle Pleistocene extensional faulting (related to rapid uplift of intra-arc massifs) and reversal along thrust planes and transcurrent faults. This extensional collapse reflects isostatic adjustments in response to plate rupture which was provoked by regional compressive stress.

  7. Further paleomagnetic results for lower Permian basalts of the Baoshan Terrane, southwestern China, and paleogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingchao; Yang, Zhenyu; Tong, Ya-Bo; Wang, Heng; Gao, Liang; An, Chunzhi

    2015-05-01

    The Baoshan Terrane of southwestern China is considered to have been part of the Cimmerian block during the late Paleozoic; consequently, knowledge of its paleoposition and geological evolution can provide constraints on the Permian breakup of northern East Gondwana. Therefore, we conducted paleomagnetic and rockmagnetic studies on lower Permian basalts from four localities in the Baoshan Terrane. The basalts hold a stable characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) at high temperatures (300-680 °C) that is carried by magnetite, maghemite, and hematite with both pseudo-single and multiple domains. To test the reliability of data from these volcanic rocks, we analyzed the geomagnetic secular variation (GSV) and reliability of both the present data and previous paleomagnetic data. The results from 23 sites yield a single reversed polarity directed downwards to the southwest, giving a site-mean direction of Dg/Ig = 156.7°/56.6° (kg = 8.0, α95 = 11.4°) before tilt correction, and Ds/Is = 218.3°/60.1° (ks = 14.1, α95 = 8.4°) after tilt correction. The result passed the fold test, but the GSV was able to be averaged out in only two sections. All available data were examined section-by-section using the angular dispersion (SB) of virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) to ensure that the GSV was completely averaged out. Because the dispersion in declinations is likely to have been affectedby subsequent tectonic deformation, the paleosecular variation (PSV) could not be evaluated from all the data amassed from different sections, and the PSV was able to be removed from only four (combined) sections. A small-circle fit of these VGPs gives an averaged paleocolatitude of 51.9° ± 3.7° (N = 31 sites) centered on 24°N, 99°E. The result indicates that the sampled area of the Baoshan Terrane was located at a latitude of 38°S ± 3.7° during the late early Permian. A comparison of this result with early Permian data from Gondwanan blocks suggests that the Baoshan Terrane

  8. Paleomagnetic constraints on the Mesozoic drift of the Lhasa terrane (Tibet) from Gondwana to Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenyu; Lippert, Peter; Ding, Lin; Song, Peiping; Yue, Yahui; van Hinsbergen, Douwe

    2016-04-01

    The Mesozoic plate tectonic history of Gondwana-derived crustal blocks of the Tibetan Plateau is hotly debated, but so far, paleomagnetic constraints quantifying their paleolatitudinal drift history remain sparse. Here, we compile existing data published mainly in Chinese literature and provide a new, high-quality, well-dated paleomagnetic pole from the ˜180 Ma Sangri Group volcanics of the Lhasa terrane. Our Sangri Group pole is calculated from pre-folding characteristic remanent magnetizations carried by thermoremanent magnetizations in low-Ti titanomagnetite and titanohematite in basalts and basaltic andesites that we have dated using zircon U-Pb geochronology. Forty-two lava sites (68%) meet our quality criteria and provide an average direction of D±ΔD = 341.9±3.4° , I±ΔI = -13.3±6.5° , A95 = 3.4, K = 42.9, n=42, corresponding to a paleolatitude of ˜6° S. The A95 value falls within the n-dependent confidence envelope of Deenen et al. (2011) (A95min=2.7; A95max=7.8), indicating that the data scatter can be straightforwardly explained by paleosecular variation of the paleomagnetic field alone. In addition, positive fold tests are consistent with a pre-folding remanence acquisition. Our new pole confirms a trend in existing data of variable quality that suggests the Lhasa terrane rifted from Gondwana in Late Triassic rather than Permian time, as widely perceived. A total northward drift of ˜ 4500 km between ˜220 and ˜130 Ma yields a reasonable average paleolatitudinal plate motion rate of 5 cm/yr. Our results are consistent with both an Indian or an Australian original position of the Lhasa terrane and cannot directly discriminate between these two interpretations. Nonetheless, we show that paleomagnetic data can provide a strong constraint on Mesozoic plate kinematics of the Tethyan realm. Our study also underscores the need for new, high-quality and well-dated paleomagnetic poles from the Paleozoic and Mesozoic of the Tibetan terranes.

  9. Geophysical Investigations of a Proterozoic Carbonatite Terrane, southeast Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, K. M.; Ponce, D. A.; Miller, D. M.; Peacock, J.; Miller, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the world's largest rare-earth element-rich carbonatite deposits is located in the eastern Mojave Desert at Mountain Pass, California. The eastern Mojave Desert carbonatite terrane consists of a ~1.7 Ga gneiss and schist rocks that are host to a ~1.417 Ga (Premo, 2013) ultrapotassic intrusive suite (shonkinite, syenite, and granite) and a ~1.375 Ga (DeWitt, 1983) carbonatite deposit . Regional geophysical data indicate that this carbonatite terrane occurs within a north-northwest trending ~1-km wide bench in a gravity high and along the eastern edge of a prominent magnetic high in the eastern Clark Mountain Range. To improve our understanding of the geophysical and structural framework of the eastern Mojave carbonatite terrane, we collected over 2,300 gravity stations and over 640 physical rock property samples. Carbonatite rocks typically have distinct gravity, magnetic, and radioactive signatures because they are relatively dense, often contain magnetite, and are commonly enriched in thorium and/or uranium. Contrary to this trend, our results show that the carbonatite deposit is essentially nonmagnetic with an average susceptibility of 0.18 x 10-3 SI (n=31), and the ultrapotassic intrusive suite is very weakly magnetic with an average susceptibility of 2.0 x 10-3 SI (n=36). However, these rocks are found along a steep gradient of a prominent aeromagnetic anomaly. The lack of magnetic signature from the rocks of the eastern Mojave carbonatite terrane suggests alteration of magnetic minerals. This is corroborated by its location within a broader alteration zone and observed magnetic low. If so, such an alteration event occurred after emplacement of the carbonatite deposit, which likely remobilized rare earth elements in the surrounding rocks. Further, an alteration event is consistent with geology, high rare-earth element concentration, and unusual geochemistry of the carbonatite deposit. Temporal constraints (DeWitt, 1987; Premo, 2013) also suggest

  10. Turbidite facies in an ancient subduction complex: Torlesse terrane, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKinnon, T.C.; Howell, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Torlesse terrane of New Zealand is an ancient subduction complex consisting of deformed turbidite-facies rocks. These are mainly thick-bedded sandstone (facies B and C) with subordinate mudstone (facies D and E), comparable to inner- and middle-fan deposits of a submarine fan. Strata were deposited in trench-floor and trench-slope settings that received sandy sediment from slope-cutting submarine canyons. The dominance of sandstone suggests that some mudstone may have been selectively subducted. Construction of a detailed sediment dispersal model is not possible because tectonic deformation has largely destroyed original facies relationships and paleocurrent patterns. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  11. The ``Procellarum KREEP terrane'': Implications for mare volcanism and lunar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Mark Allen

    Geophysical, remote sensing, and sample data all suggest that the Procellarum and Imbrium region of the Moon (here named the ``Procellarum KREEP Terrane'') is a unique geochemical province. Evidence in support of this hypothesis include the following observations: (1)Gamma-ray data obtained from orbiting spacecraft show that this region of the Moon is highly enriched in incompatible and heat producing elements (i.e., ``KREEP''). (2)Geochemical studies of Imbrium's ejecta suggest that a large portion of the lunar crust in this locale is composed of a material similar in composition to Apollo 15 KREEP basalt. And (3)geophysically derived crustal thickness maps show that only impact basins that formed within this region have been modified, most likely by viscous relaxation and/or voluminous KREEP basalt volcanism. KREEP basalt has about 300 times more uranium and thorium than ordinary chondrites so this infers that a large portion of Moon's heat-producing elements are located within this single crustal province. The spatial distribution of mare volcanism closely parallels the confines of the Procellarum KREEP terrane. We model the Moon's thermal evolution using a simple thermal conduction model and show that partial melting of the mantle beneath the Procellarum KREEP terrane is a likely outcome due to the high abundance of heat producing elements that are found there. Specifically, by placing a 10-km KREEP basalt layer at the base of the crust in this terrane, our model predicts that mare volcanism should span most of the Moon's history, and that the depth of melting in the mantle should increase with time to a maximum depth of about 600 km. We suggest that the 500-km seismic discontinuity that is observed in the Apollo seismic data may represent this maximum depth of melting. Furthermore, the KREEP-basalt layer in our model is found to remain partially molten for a few billion years. Thus, when the Imbrium basin formed this impact most likely excavated into a

  12. Formation of the Late Palaeozoic Konya Complex and comparable units in southern Turkey by subduction-accretion processes: Implications for the tectonic development of Tethys in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair H. F.; Ustaömer, Timur

    2009-07-01

    . Both the Permian and the Triassic sediments pass upwards without a break into a Middle Triassic-Upper Cretaceous platform carbonate succession, which was overthrust by accretionary melange and ophiolites during latest Cretaceous time. The Mesozoic carbonate platform and the underlying Konya Complex experienced polyphase deformation and partial high-temperature/low-pressure metamorphism related to Alpine (Late Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic) closure of Tethys. Comparison of Tauride and Pontide units suggests the deformed Konya Complex Upper Palaeozoic carbonate platform has Gondwanan affinities. We also compare the Complex with other Upper Palaeozoic units in southern Turkey, including the Tekedere unit (Lycian Nappes) and the Karaburun and Chios melanges. All of these units are interpreted to have formed by subduction/accretion processes. Alternative possible settings involve northward subduction, southward subduction, or terrane displacement (strike-slip). Northward subduction beneath Eurasia requires collisional assembly with Gondwana, possibly during the latest Triassic "Cimmerian orogeny" for which there is little evidence. A southward-dipping subduction zone would need to be located some distance outboard of the Gondwana margin as there is little evidence of Upper Palaeozoic arc magmatism in the Tauride platform. Emplacement as an exotic terrane, probably derived from further west in the Balkan region is also possible.

  13. Accretion Timescales from Kepler AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2015-01-01

    We constrain AGN accretion disk variability mechanisms using the optical light curves of AGN observed by Kepler. AGN optical fluxes are known to exhibit stochastic variations on timescales of hours, days, months and years. The excellent sampling properties of the original Kepler mission - high S/N ratio (105), short sampling interval (30 minutes), and long sampling duration (~ 3.5 years) - allow for a detailed examination of the differences between the variability processes present in various sub-types of AGN such as Type I and II Seyferts, QSOs, and Blazars. We model the flux data using the Auto-Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) representation from the field of time series analysis. We use the Kalman filter to determine optimal mode parameters and use the Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) to select the optimal model. We find that optical light curves from Kepler AGN cannot be fit by low order statistical models such as the popular AR(1) process or damped random walk. Kepler light curves exhibit complicated power spectra and are better modeled by higher order ARMA processes. We find that Kepler AGN typically exhibit power spectra that change from a bending power law (PSD ~ 1/fa) to a flat power spectrum on timescales in the range of ~ 5 - 100 days consistent with the orbital and thermal timescales of a typical 107 solar mass black hole.

  14. Accretion of Ghost Condensate by Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A

    2004-06-02

    The intent of this letter is to point out that the accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes could be extremely efficient. We analyze steady-state spherically symmetric flows of the ghost fluid in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole and calculate the accretion rate. Unlike minimally coupled scalar field or quintessence, the accretion rate is set not by the cosmological energy density of the field, but by the energy scale of the ghost condensate theory. If hydrodynamical flow is established, it could be as high as tenth of a solar mass per second for 10MeV-scale ghost condensate accreting onto a stellar-sized black hole, which puts serious constraints on the parameters of the ghost condensate model.

  15. Heat transfer on accreting ice surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, Keiko; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Based on previous observations of glaze ice accretion on aircraft surfaces, a multizone model with distinct zones of different surface roughness is demonstrated. The use of surface roughness in the LEWICE ice accretion prediction code is examined. It was found that roughness is used in two ways: (1) to determine the laminar to turbulent boundary-layer transition location; and (2) to calculate the convective turbulent heat-transfer coefficient. A two-zone version of the multizone model is implemented in the LEWICE code, and compared with experimental convective heat-transfer coefficient and ice accretion results. The analysis of the boundary-layer transition, surface roughness, and viscous flowfield effects significantly increased the accuracy in predicting heat-transfer coefficients. The multizone model was found to significantly improve the ice accretion prediction for the cases compared.

  16. Gravitomagnetic acceleration from black hole accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, J.; Mathews, G. J.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate how the motion of the neutral masses in an accretion disk orbiting a black hole creates a general-relativistic magnetic-like (gravitomagnetic) field that vertically accelerates neutral particles near an accretion disk upward and then inward toward the axis of the accretion disk. Even though this gravitomagnetic field is not the only mechanism contributing to the production of jets, it presents a novel means to identify one general relativistic effect from a much more complicated problem. In addition, as the accelerated material above or below the accretion disk nears the axis with a nearly vertical direction, a frame-dragging effect twists the trajectories around the axis thus contributing to the collimation of the jet.

  17. Planetary science: Iron fog of accretion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, William W.

    2015-03-02

    Here, pinpointing when Earth's core formed depends on the extent of metal–silicate equilibration in the mantle. Vaporization and recondensation of impacting planetesimal cores during accretion may reconcile disparate lines of evidence.

  18. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  19. TAMA. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, H.

    1994-06-03

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  20. U-Pb zircon and geochemical evidence for bimodal mid-Paleozoic magmatism and syngenetic base-metal mineralization in the Yukon-Tanana terrane, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Wooden, J.L.; Hopkins, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    New SHRIMP (sensitive, high-resolution ion microprobe) U-Pb zircon ages and trace element geochemical data for mafic and felsic metaigneous rocks of the pericratonic Yukon-Tanana terrane in east-central Alaska help define the tectonic setting of mid-Paleozoic magmatism and syngenetic hydrothermal Zn-Pb-Ag mineralization along the ancient Pacific margin of North America. We compare data from similar greenschist-facies sequences of bimodal volcanic and subvolcanic rocks associated with carbonaceous and siliciclastic marine sedimentary rocks, in the Wood River area of the Alaska Range and the Salcha River area of the Yukon-Tanana Upland, and from amphibolite-facies augen gneiss and mafic gneiss (amphibolite) in the Goodpaster River area of the upland. Allowing for analytical uncertainties, igneous crystallization age ranges of 376-353 Ma, 378-346 Ma, and 374-358 Ma are indicated by 13 new SHRIMP U-Pb dates for the Wood River, Salcha River, and Goodpaster River areas, respectively. Bimodal magmatism is indicated by Late Devonian crystallization ages for both augen gneiss (371 ?? 3 and 362 ?? 4 Ma) and associated orthoamphibolite (369 ?? 3 Ma) in the upland and by stratigraphic interleaving of mafic and felsic rocks in the Alaska Range. Metabasites in all three study areas have elevated HFSE (high field strength element) and REE (rare earth element) contents indicative of generation in a within-plate (extensional) tectonic setting. Within-plate trace element signatures also are indicated for peralkaline metarhyolites that host the largest volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the Bonnifield district in the Wood River area and for metarhyolite tuff interlayered with the carbonaceous Nasina assemblage, which hosts sedimentary exhalative sulfide occurrences in the Salcha River area. Most of the other felsic metaigneous samples from the Alaska Range and the Yukon-Tanana Upland have geochemical signatures that are similar to those of both average upper continental crust

  1. Sources of granite magmatism in the Embu Terrane (Ribeira Belt, Brazil): Neoproterozoic crust recycling constrained by elemental and isotope (Sr-Nd-Pb) geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Campos Neto, Mario da Costa

    2016-07-01

    Whole rock elemental and Sr-Nd isotope geochemistry and in situ K-feldspar Pb isotope geochemistry were used to identify the sources involved in the genesis of Neoproterozoic granites from the Embu Terrane, Ribeira Belt, SE Brazil. Granite magmatism spanned over 200 Ma (810-580 Ma), and is dominated by crust-derived relatively low-T (850-750 °C, zircon saturation) biotite granites to biotite-muscovite granites. Two Cryogenian plutons show the least negative εNdt (-8 to -10) and highest mg# (30-40) of the whole set. Their compositions are strongly contrasted, implying distinct sources for the peraluminous (ASI ∼ 1.2) ∼660 Ma Serra do Quebra-Cangalha batholith (metasedimentary rocks from relatively young upper crust with high Rb/Sr and low Th/U) and the metaluminous (ASI = 0.96-1.00) ∼ 630 Ma Santa Catarina Granite. Although not typical, the geochemical signature of these granites may reflect a continental margin arc environment, and they could be products of a prolonged period of oceanic plate consumption started at ∼810 Ma. The predominant Ediacaran (595-580 Ma) plutons have a spread of compositions from biotite granites with SiO2 as low as ∼65% (e.g., Itapeti, Mauá, Sabaúna and Lagoinha granites) to fractionated muscovite granites (Mogi das Cruzes, Santa Branca and Guacuri granites; up to ∼75% SiO2). εNdT are characteristically negative (-12 to -18), with corresponding Nd TDM indicating sources with Paleoproterozoic mean crustal ages (2.0-2.5 Ga). The Guacuri and Santa Branca muscovite granites have the more negative εNdt, highest 87Sr/86Srt (0.714-0.717) and lowest 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb, consistent with an old metasedimentary source with low time-integrated Rb/Sr. However, a positive Nd-Sr isotope correlation is suggested by data from the other granites, and would be consistent with mixing between an older source predominant in the Mauá granite and a younger, high Rb/Sr source that is more abundant in the Lagoinha granite sample. The

  2. Accretion, winds and outflows in young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, H. M.

    2013-02-01

    Young stars and planetary systems form in molecular clouds. After the initial radial infall an accretion disk develops. For classical T Tauri stars (CTTS, F-K type precursors) the accretion disk does not reach down to the central star, but it is truncated near the co-rotation radius by the stellar magnetic field. The inner edge of the disk is ionized by the stellar radiation, so that the accretion stream is funneled along the magnetic field lines. On the stellar surface an accretion shock develops, which is observed over a wide wavelength range as X-ray emission, UV excess, optical veiling and optical and IR emission lines. Some of the accretion tracers, e.g. Hα, can be calibrated to measure the accretion rate. This accretion process is variable on time scales of hours to years due to changing accretion rates, stellar rotation and reconfiguration of the magnetic field. Furthermore, many (if not all) accreting systems also drive strong outflows which are ultimately powered by accretion. However, the exact driving mechanism is still unclear. Several components could contribute to the outflows: slow, wide-angle disk winds, X-winds launched close to the inner disk rim, and thermally driven stellar winds. In any case, the outflows contain material of very different temperatures and speeds. The disk wind is cool and can have a molecular component with just a few tens of km s-1, while the central component of the outflow can reach a few 100 km s-1. In some cases the inner part of the outflow is collimated to a small-angle jet. These jets have an onion-like structure, where the inner components are consecutively hotter and faster. The jets can contain working surfaces, which show up as Herbig-Haro knots. Accretion and outflows in the CTTS phase do not only determine stellar parameters like the rotation rate on the main-sequence, they also can have a profound impact on the environment of young stars. This review concentrates on CTTS in near-by star forming regions where

  3. Of Eggs and Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Thomas, P. C.; Helfenstein, P.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Hedman, M. M.; Agarwal, M.

    2012-10-01

    New scenarios for the origins of Saturn’s rings/interior moons have directed scientific attention to the region just exterior to Saturn’s main rings. Four satellites (Aegaeon = Ae; Anthe = An; Methone = Me; Pallene = Pa) discovered by the Cassini mission on either side of Mimas’s orbit perhaps comprise a distinct class of ring-moon. They are tiny (R = 0.3-2.5 km); three (AeAnMe) are trapped in co-rotation resonances with Mimas and reside within ring-arcs; and at least two (MePa) have remarkably regular shapes. Images with pixel scales as fine as 27 m taken in May 2012 reveal Methone to be ovoid within 10 m (from sub-pixel limb detection) and devoid of any craters (>130 m) across its 9 km2 of surface; Pallene and even tiny Aegaeon have similar appearances in lesser-quality images. Numerical simulations demonstrate that particles comprising the surrounding ring-arcs populate the same resonances as their embedded moons; escape speeds from the moons are < 0.5 m/s, smaller than the 2 m/s that dynamically characterize the resonant well. We investigate the gentle transfer of particles back and forth between the ring-arcs and any embedded bodies. In this environment, the moons’ shapes are smooth equipotentials; electrostatic effects may also determine how grains settle to surfaces. Considering these shapes to represent equipotential surfaces for rotating, tidally distorted, homogeneous bodies, we infer mean satellite densities of 250+/-60 (Pa), 310+/-30 (Me), and 540+/-120 (Ae) kg m-3. About half of Methone’s leading hemisphere is covered by a sharply bounded, lemon-shaped, relatively dark region, having a form reminiscent of Mimas’s thermal anomaly (Howett et al. 2011). Its (601 nm) albedo is 13% lower than the bounding brighter material. An irregularly shaped, even-darker (by 4%) blotch straddles the apex of the moon’s motion. Impacts with circum-planetary meteoroids and plasma are likely responsible for these features.

  4. Thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of X-ray bursts from binary pulsars and globular clusters are reviewed. The previously proposed hypothesis is considered that such X-ray bursts result from thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars. A general scenario for this mechanism is outlined, and numerical computations of the evolution of the surface layers of an accreting neutron star are discussed. The relation of these calculations to X-ray bursts and other phenomena is examined. Possible improvements in the numerical calculations are suggested.

  5. Asymmetric Accretion Flows within a Common Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    This paper examines flows in the immediate vicinity of stars and compact objects dynamically inspiralling within a common envelope (CE). Flow in the vicinity of the embedded object is gravitationally focused, leading to drag and potentially to gas accretion. This process has been studied numerically and analytically in the context of Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion (HLA). Yet, within a CE, accretion structures may span a large fraction of the envelope radius, and in so doing sweep across a substantial radial gradient of density. We quantify these gradients using detailed stellar evolution models for a range of CE encounters. We provide estimates of typical scales in CE encounters that involve main sequence stars, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes with giant-branch companions of a wide range of masses. We apply these typical scales to hydrodynamic simulations of three-dimensional HLA with an upstream density gradient. This density gradient breaks the symmetry that defines HLA flow, and imposes an angular momentum barrier to accretion. Material that is focused into the vicinity of the embedded object thus may not be able to accrete. As a result, accretion rates drop dramatically, by one to two orders of magnitude, while drag rates are only mildly affected. We provide fitting formulae to the numerically derived rates of drag and accretion as a function of the density gradient. The reduced ratio of accretion to drag suggests that objects that can efficiently gain mass during CE evolution, such as black holes and neutron stars, may grow less than implied by the HLA formalism.

  6. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  7. Disk accretion by magnetic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, P.; Lamb, F. K.

    1978-01-01

    A model for disk accretion by a rotating magnetic neutron star is proposed which includes a detailed description of matter flow in the transition region between the disk and the magnetosphere. It is shown that the disk plasma cannot be completely screened from the stellar magnetic field and that the resulting magnetic coupling between the star and the disk exerts a significant torque on the star. On the assumption that the distortion of the residual stellar field lines threading the disk is limited by reconnection, the total accretion torque on the star is calculated. The calculated torque gives period changes in agreement with those observed in the pulsating X-ray sources and provides a natural explanation of why a fast rotator like Her X-1 has a spin-up rate much below the conventional estimate for slow rotators. It is shown that for such fast rotators, fluctuations in the mass-accretion rate can produce fluctuations in the accretion torque about 100 times larger. For sufficiently fast rotators or, equivalently, for sufficiently low accretion rates, the star experiences a braking torque even while accretion continues and without any mass ejection from its vicinity.

  8. Bondi accretion in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Valeriya; Ciotti, Luca; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2016-05-01

    Accretion on to central massive black holes in galaxies is often modelled with the Bondi solution. In this paper we study a generalization of the classical Bondi accretion theory, considering the additional effects of the gravitational potential of the host galaxy, and of electron scattering in the optically thin limit. We provide a general analysis of the bias in the estimates of the Bondi radius and mass accretion rate, when adopting as fiducial values for the density and temperature at infinity the values of these quantities measured at finite distance from the central black hole. We also give general formulae to compute the correction terms of the critical accretion parameter in relevant asymptotic regimes. A full analytical discussion is presented in the case of an Hernquist galaxy, when the problem reduces to the discussion of a cubic equation, therefore allowing for more than one critical point in the accretion structure. The results are useful for observational works (especially in the case of systems with a low Eddington ratio), as well as for numerical simulations, where accretion rates are usually defined in terms of the gas properties near the black hole.

  9. Bondi accretion in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Valeriya; Ciotti, Luca; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    Accretion on to central massive black holes in galaxies is often modelled with the Bondi solution. In this paper, we study a generalization of the classical Bondi accretion theory, considering the additional effects of the gravitational potential of the host galaxy, and of electron scattering in the optically thin limit. We provide a general analysis of the bias in the estimates of the Bondi radius and mass accretion rate, when adopting as fiducial values for the density and temperature at infinity the values of these quantities measured at finite distance from the central black hole. We also give general formulae to compute the correction terms of the critical accretion parameter in relevant asymptotic regimes. A full analytical discussion is presented in the case of a Hernquist galaxy, when the problem reduces to the discussion of a cubic equation, therefore, allowing for more than one critical point in the accretion structure. The results are useful for observational works (especially in the case of systems with a low Eddington ratio), as well as for numerical simulations, where accretion rates are usually defined in terms of the gas properties near the black hole.

  10. Heating and Cooling in Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries accrete enough mass over their lifetimes to replace their entire crust. The accreted matter undergoes a series of nuclear reactions in the crust as it is compressed by continued accretion to higher density. These reactions, which include electron captures, neutron emissions, and pycnonuclear reactions, heat the crust and core of the neutron star. In this talk I will discuss what we can learn from observations of transiently accreting neutron stars in quiescence, when accretion has turned off and we can see emission from the neutron star directly. The quiescent luminosity of these neutron stars constrains the neutrino emissivity in the neutron star core. In systems with long accretion outbursts, observations of thermal relaxation of the crust in quiescence enable, for the first time, constraints on the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the crust. In this way, low mass X-ray binary neutron stars offer a remarkable chance to constrain the properties of dense neutron-rich matter, such as neutron superfluidity and pasta phases in the inner crust of neutron stars.

  11. Accretion of the Archean Slave Province

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusky, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    Detailed field studies of selected areas in the greenstone belts of the Slave Province of Canada were presented. This area was long cited as a type area by supporters of the (now generally abandoned) rift model of greenstone belts. It was shown that a plate tectonic interpretation accounted more successfully for the regional geology and identified four terranes that had experienced complex divergent and convergent histories between 2.7 and 3.4 Ga. A dismembered ophiolite was identified and a late episode of widespread granitic intrusion was recognized.

  12. Geochemistry and isotopic evolution of the central African Domes, Bangweulu and Irumide regions: Evidence for cryptic Archean sources and a Paleoproterozoic continental arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debruyne, David; Van Wilderode, Jorik; Balcaen, Lieve; Vanhaecke, Frank; Muchez, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    The interregional cratonic relations between the Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic basement units surrounding the Neoproterozoic Central African Copperbelt are still largely unresolved, although they are regarded as major potential metal sources. This study focuses on the Domes region basement at depth below the Copperbelt and its relationship to the neighboring Bangweulu Block and its destabilized margin, the Irumide Belt. We applied an integrated whole rock petrochemical and Sm-Nd isotopic approach to major lithological units to assess the proposed mid-Proterozoic arc setting for the Domes basement inliers along with their relationship to the neighboring areas. The available petrochemical and isotopic data for the Paleoproterozoic eastern Domes granitoids and magmatic units in the SW Bangweulu Block is consistent with a continental arc setting. Moreover, the mid-Paleoproterozoic Nd isotope ratios preclude an island arc because they are significantly less radiogenic than the depleted mantle. Predominantly Archean and Early Paleoproterozoic depleted mantle model ages in all terranes indicate limited juvenile input during Paleo- and Mesoproterozoic magmatic phases. Finally, broadly similar model ages in the Domes inliers and the Bangweulu-Irumide region suggest a relationship between these terranes.

  13. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  14. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  15. A Paleozoic Japan-type subduction-accretion system in the Beishan orogenic collage, southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongfang; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Han, Chunming; Tian, Zhonghua

    2015-05-01

    Magmatic arcs ascribed to oceanic lithosphere subduction played a dominant role in the construction of the accretionary Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). The Beishan orogenic collage, situated between the Tianshan Orogen to the west and the Inner Mongolia Orogen to the east, is a key area to understanding the subduction and accretionary processes of the southern CAOB. However, the nature of magmatic arcs in the Beishan and the correlation among different tectonic units along the southern CAOB are highly ambiguous. In order to investigate the subduction-accretion history of the Beishan and put a better spatial and temporal relationship among the tectonic belts along the southern CAOB, we carried out detailed field-based structural geology and LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb geochronological as well as geochemical studies along four cross-sections across crucial litho-tectonic units in the central segment of the Beishan, mainly focusing on the metamorphic assemblages and associated plutons and volcanic rocks. The results show that both the plutonic and volcanic rocks have geochemical characteristics similar to those of subduction-related rocks, which favors a volcanic arc setting. Zircons from all the plutonic rocks yield Phanerozoic ages and the plutons have crystallization ages ranging from 464 ± 2 Ma to 398 ± 3 Ma. Two volcanic-sedimentary rocks yield zircons with a wide age range from Phanerozoic to Precambrian with the youngest age peaks at 441 Ma and 446 Ma, estimated to be the time of formation of the volcanic rocks. These new results, combined with published data on ophiolitic mélanges from the central segment of the Beishan, favor a Japan-type subduction-accretion system in the Cambrian to Carboniferous in this part of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. The Xichangjing-Niujuanzi ophiolite probably represents a major suture zone separating different tectonic units across the Beishan orogenic collage, while the Xiaohuangshan-Jijitaizi ophiolitic mélange may represent a

  16. An arc-sequencing algorithm for intensity modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, D. M.; Cao, D.; Afghan, M. K. N.; Earl, M. A.

    2007-02-15

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is an intensity modulated radiation therapy delivery technique originally proposed as an alternative to tomotherapy. IMAT uses a series of overlapping arcs to deliver optimized intensity patterns from each beam direction. The full potential of IMAT has gone largely unrealized due in part to a lack of robust and commercially available inverse planning tools. To address this, we have implemented an IMAT arc-sequencing algorithm that translates optimized intensity maps into deliverable IMAT plans. The sequencing algorithm uses simulated annealing to simultaneously optimize the aperture shapes and weights throughout each arc. The sequencer enforces the delivery constraints while minimizing the discrepancies between the optimized and sequenced intensity maps. The performance of the algorithm has been tested for ten patient cases (3 prostate, 3 brain, 2 head-and-neck, 1 lung, and 1 pancreas). Seven coplanar IMAT plans were created using an average of 4.6 arcs and 685 monitor units. Additionally, three noncoplanar plans were created using an average of 16 arcs and 498 monitor units. The results demonstrate that the arc sequencer can provide efficient and highly conformal IMAT plans. An average sequencing time of approximately 20 min was observed.

  17. Ar/Ar age data of muscovite from the Keivy Terrane (central Kola Peninsula, arctic European Russia) imply a prolonged fluid-assisted recrystallisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, K.; Ruffet, G.; Marker, M.

    2012-04-01

    Single grain muscovite 40Ar/39Ar age data from metasediments of the