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Sample records for accreting binary systems

  1. Planetesimal Accretion in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.; Scholl, H.

    2000-11-01

    Planetesimal accretion in close binary systems is a complex process for the gravitational perturbations of the companion star on the planetesimal orbits. These perturbations excite high eccentricities that can halt the accumulation process of planetesimals into planets also in those regions around the star where stable planetary orbits would eventually be possible. However, the evolution of a planetesimal swarm is also affected by collisions and gas drag. In particular, gas drag combined with the secular perturbations of the secondary star forces a strong alignment of all the planetesimal periastra. Since periastra are also coupled to eccentricities via the secular perturbations of the companion, the orbits of the planetesimals, besides all being aligned, also have very close values of eccentricity. This orbital ``phasing'' strongly reduces the contribution of the eccentricity to the relative velocities between planetesimals, and the impact speeds are dominated by the Keplerian shear: accretion becomes possible. This behavior is not limited to small planetesimals but also affects bodies as large as 100 km in diameter. The effects of gas drag are in fact enhanced by the presence of the constant forced component in the orbital eccentricity of the planetesimals. We describe analytically the periastron alignment by using the secular equations developed by Heppenheimer, and we test the prediction of the theory with a numerical code that integrates the orbits of a swarm of planetesimals perturbed by gas drag and collisions. The gas density is assumed to decrease outward, and the collisions are modeled as inelastic. Our computations are focused on the α Centauri system, which is a good candidate for terrestrial planets as we will show. The impact velocities between planetesimals of different sizes are computed at progressively increasing distances from the primary star and are compared with estimates for the maximum velocity for accretion. According to our simulations in

  2. Evolution of an accretion disc in binary black hole systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Toma, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    We investigate evolution of an accretion disc in binary black hole (BBH) systems and possible electromagnetic counterparts of the gravitational waves from mergers of BBHs. Perna et al. proposed a novel evolutionary scenario of an accretion disc in BBHs in which a disc eventually becomes 'dead', i.e. the magnetorotational instability (MRI) becomes inactive. In their scenario, the dead disc survives until a few seconds before the merger event. We improve the dead disc model and propose another scenario, taking account of effects of the tidal torque from the companion and the critical ionization degree for MRI activation more carefully. We find that the mass of the dead disc is much lower than that in the Perna's scenario. When the binary separation sufficiently becomes small, the mass inflow induced by the tidal torque reactivates MRI, restarting mass accretion on to the black hole. We also find that this disc 'revival' happens more than thousands of years before the merger. The mass accretion induced by the tidal torque increases as the separation decreases, and a relativistic jet could be launched before the merger. The emissions from these jets are too faint compared to gamma-ray bursts, but detectable if the merger events happen within ≲10 Mpc or if the masses of the black holes are as massive as ∼105 M⊙.

  3. Smearing of mass accretion rate variation by viscous processes in accretion disks in compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-09-01

    Variation of mass supply rate from the companion can be smeared out by viscous processes inside an accretion disk. Hence, by the time the flow reaches the inner edge, the variation in X-rays need not reflect the true variation of the mass supply rate at the outer edge. However, if the viscosity fluctuates around a mean value, one would expect the viscous time scale t_{{visc}} also to spread around a mean value. In high mass X-ray binaries, which are thought to be primarily wind-fed, the size of the viscous Keplerian disk is smaller and thus such a spread could be lower as compared to the low mass X-ray binaries which are primarily fed by Roche lobe overflow. If there is an increasing or decreasing trend in viscosity, the interval between enhanced emission would be modified systematically. In the absence of a detailed knowledge about the variation of mass supply rates at the outer edge, we study ideal circumstances where modulation must take place exactly in orbital time scales, such as when there is an ellipticity in the orbit. We study a few compact binaries using long term All Sky monitor (ASM) data (1.5-12 keV) of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and all sky survey data (15-50 keV) of Swift satellites by different methods to look for such smearing effects and to infer what these results can tell us about the viscous processes inside the respective disks. We employ three different methods to seek imprints of periodicity on the X-ray variation and found that in all the cases, the location of the peak in the power density spectra is consistent with the orbital frequencies. Interestingly, in high mass X-ray binaries the peaks are sharp with high rms values, consistent with a small Keplerian disk in a wind fed system. However, in low mass X-ray binaries with larger Keplerian disk component, the peaks are spreaded out with much lower rms values. X-ray reflections, or superhump phenomena which may also cause such X-ray modulations would not be affected by the size of

  4. Circumbinary ring, circumstellar disks, and accretion in the binary system UY Aurigae

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ya-Wen; Ho, Paul T. P.; Dutrey, Anne; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Di Folco, Emmanuel; Piétu, Vincent; Gueth, Fréderic; Beck, Tracy; Boehler, Yann; Bary, Jeff; Simon, Michal

    2014-09-20

    Recent exo-planetary surveys reveal that planets can orbit and survive around binary stars. This suggests that some fraction of young binary systems which possess massive circumbinary (CB) disks may be in the midst of planet formation. However, there are very few CB disks detected. We revisit one of the known CB disks, the UY Aurigae system, and probe {sup 13}CO 2-1, C{sup 18}O 2-1, SO 5(6)-4(5) and {sup 12}CO 3-2 line emission and the thermal dust continuum. Our new results confirm the existence of the CB disk. In addition, the circumstellar (CS) disks are clearly resolved in dust continuum at 1.4 mm. The spectral indices between the wavelengths of 0.85 mm and 6 cm are found to be surprisingly low, being 1.6 for both CS disks. The deprojected separation of the binary is 1.''26 based on our 1.4 mm continuum data. This is 0.''07 (10 AU) larger than in earlier studies. Combining the fact of the variation of UY Aur B in R band, we propose that the CS disk of an undetected companion UY Aur Bb obscures UY Aur Ba. A very complex kinematical pattern inside the CB disk is observed due to a mixing of Keplerian rotation of the CB disk, the infall and outflow gas. The streaming gas accreting from the CB ring toward the CS disks and possible outflows are also identified and resolved. The SO emission is found to be at the bases of the streaming shocks. Our results suggest that the UY Aur system is undergoing an active accretion phase from the CB disk to the CS disks. The UY Aur B might also be a binary system, making the UY Aur a triple system.

  5. Anomalous accretion activity and the spotted nature of the DQ Tau binary system

    SciTech Connect

    Bary, Jeffrey S.; Petersen, Michael S.

    2014-09-01

    We report the detection of an anomalous accretion flare in the tight eccentric pre-main-sequence binary system DQ Tau. In a multi-epoch survey consisting of randomly acquired low- to moderate-resolution near-infrared spectra obtained over a period of almost 10 yr, we detect a significant and simultaneous brightening of four standard accretion indicators (Ca II infrared triplet, the Paschen and Brackett series H I lines, and He I 1.083 μm), on back-to-back nights (φ = 0.372 and 0.433) with the flare increasing in strength as the system approached apastron (φ = 0.5). The mass accretion rate measured for the anomalous flare is nearly an order of magnitude stronger than the average quiescent rate. While previous observations established that frequent, periodic accretion flares phased with periastron passages occur in this system, these data provide evidence that orbitally modulated accretion flares occur near apastron, when the stars make their closest approach to the circumbinary disk. The timing of the flare suggests that this outburst is due to interactions of the stellar cores (or the highly truncated circumstellar disks) with material in non-axisymmetric structures located at the inner edge of the circumbinary disk. We also explore the optical/infrared spectral type mismatch previously observed for T Tauri stars (TTSs) and successfully model the shape of the spectra from 0.8 to 1.0 μm and the strengths of the TiO and FeH bands as manifestations of large cool spots on the surfaces of the stellar companions in DQ Tau. These findings illustrate that a complete model of near-infrared spectra of many TTSs must include parameters for spot filling factors and temperatures.

  6. Variable accretion processes in the young binary-star system UY Aur

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Jordan M.; Eisner, J. A.; Kulesa, Craig; McCarthy, Don; Salyk, Colette E-mail: jeisner@as.arizona.edu E-mail: dmccarthy@as.arizona.edu

    2014-09-01

    We present new K-band spectroscopy of the UY Aur binary star system. Our data are the first to show H{sub 2} emission in the spectrum of UY Aur A and the first to spectrally resolve the Brγ line in the spectrum of UY Aur B. We see an increase in the strength of the Brγ line in UY Aur A and a decrease in Brγ and H{sub 2} line luminosity for UY Aur B compared to previous studies. Converting Brγ line luminosity to accretion rate, we infer that the accretion rate onto UY Aur A has increased by 2 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} per year since a rate of zero was observed in 1994. The Brγ line strength for UY Aur B has decreased by a factor of 0.54 since 1994, but the K-band flux has increased by 0.9 mag since 1998. The veiling of UY Aur B has also increased significantly. These data evince a much more luminous disk around UY Aur B. If the lower Brγ luminosity observed in the spectrum of UY Aur B indicates an intrinsically smaller accretion rate onto the star, then UY Aur A now accretes at a higher rate than UY Aur B. However, extinction at small radii or mass pile-up in the circumstellar disk could explain decreased Brγ emission around UY Aur B even when the disk luminosity implies an increased accretion rate. In addition to our scientific results for the UY Aur system, we discuss a dedicated pipeline we have developed for the reduction of echelle-mode data from the ARIES spectrograph.

  7. Constraining Accreting Binary Populations in Normal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, Bret; Hornschemeier, A.; Basu-Zych, A.; Fragos, T.; Jenkins, L.; Kalogera, V.; Ptak, A.; Tzanavaris, P.; Zezas, A.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray emission from accreting binary systems (X-ray binaries) uniquely probe the binary phase of stellar evolution and the formation of compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes. A detailed understanding of X-ray binary systems is needed to provide physical insight into the formation and evolution of the stars involved, as well as the demographics of interesting binary remnants, such as millisecond pulsars and gravitational wave sources. Our program makes wide use of Chandra observations and complementary multiwavelength data sets (through, e.g., the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey [SINGS] and the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey [GOODS]), as well as super-computing facilities, to provide: (1) improved calibrations for correlations between X-ray binary emission and physical properties (e.g., star-formation rate and stellar mass) for galaxies in the local Universe; (2) new physical constraints on accreting binary processes (e.g., common-envelope phase and mass transfer) through the fitting of X-ray binary synthesis models to observed local galaxy X-ray binary luminosity functions; (3) observational and model constraints on the X-ray evolution of normal galaxies over the last 90% of cosmic history (since z 4) from the Chandra Deep Field surveys and accreting binary synthesis models; and (4) predictions for deeper observations from forthcoming generations of X-ray telesopes (e.g., IXO, WFXT, and Gen-X) to provide a science driver for these missions. In this talk, we highlight the details of our program and discuss recent results.

  8. BINSYN: A Publicly Available Program for Simulating Spectra and Light Curves of Binary Systems with or without Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnell, Albert P.; DeStefano, Paul; Hubeny, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The BINSYN program suite, a collection of programs for analysis of binary star systems with or without an optically thick accretion disk, is available for download from a wiki. This article describes the package, including download instructions. BINSYN produces synthetic spectra of individual binary star components plus a synthetic spectrum of the system. If the system includes an accretion disk, BINSYN also produces a separate synthetic spectrum of the disk face and rim. A system routine convolves the synthetic spectra with filter profiles of several photometric standards to produce absolute synthetic photometry output. The package generates synthetic light curves and determines an optimized solution for system parameters. This article includes illustrative literature references that have used the suite, including mass transfer rates in several cataclysmic binary systems.

  9. Pulsed Accretion onto Eccentric and Circular Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Diego J.; Lai, Dong

    2016-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of circumbinary accretion onto eccentric and circular binaries using the moving-mesh code AREPO. This is the first set of simulations to tackle the problem of binary accretion using a finite-volume scheme on a freely moving mesh, which allows for accurate measurements of accretion onto individual stars for arbitrary binary eccentricity. While accretion onto a circular binary shows bursts with period of ˜ 5 times the binary period P b, accretion onto an eccentric binary is predominantly modulated at the period ˜ 1{P}{{b}}. For an equal-mass circular binary, the accretion rates onto individual stars are quite similar to each other, following the same variable pattern in time. By contrast, for eccentric binaries, one of the stars can accrete at a rate 10-20 times larger than its companion. This “symmetry breaking” between the stars, however, alternates over timescales of order 200P b and can be attributed to a slowly precessing, eccentric circumbinary disk. Over longer timescales, the net accretion rates onto individual stars are the same, reaching a quasi-steady state with the circumbinary disk. These results have important implications for the accretion behavior of binary T Tauri stars and supermassive binary black holes.

  10. Flaring Black Hole Accretion Disk in the Binary System V404 Cygni

    NASA Video Gallery

    On June 15, NASA's Swift caught the onset of a rare X-ray outburst from a stellar-mass black hole in the binary system V404 Cygni. Astronomers around the world are watching the event. In this syste...

  11. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. E.; Gregori, G.; Foster, J. M.; Graham, P.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Busschaert, C.; Charpentier, N.; Danson, C. N.; Doyle, H. W.; Drake, R. P.; Fyrth, J.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Kuranz, C. C.; Loupias, B.; Michaut, C.; Mouchet, M.; Patankar, S.; Skidmore, J.; Spindloe, C.; Tubman, E. R.; Woolsey, N.; Yurchak, R.; Falize, É.

    2016-06-01

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy--gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100-1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions.

  12. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system.

    PubMed

    Cross, J E; Gregori, G; Foster, J M; Graham, P; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Busschaert, C; Charpentier, N; Danson, C N; Doyle, H W; Drake, R P; Fyrth, J; Gumbrell, E T; Koenig, M; Krauland, C; Kuranz, C C; Loupias, B; Michaut, C; Mouchet, M; Patankar, S; Skidmore, J; Spindloe, C; Tubman, E R; Woolsey, N; Yurchak, R; Falize, É

    2016-06-13

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy-gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100-1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions.

  13. Laboratory analogue of a supersonic accretion column in a binary star system

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J. E.; Gregori, G.; Foster, J. M.; Graham, P.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J. -M.; Busschaert, C.; Charpentier, N.; Danson, C. N.; Doyle, H. W.; Drake, R. P.; Fyrth, J.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Kuranz, C. C.; Loupias, B.; Michaut, C.; Mouchet, M.; Patankar, S.; Skidmore, J.; Spindloe, C.; Tubman, E. R.; Woolsey, N.; Yurchak, R.

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical flows exhibit rich behaviour resulting from the interplay of different forms of energy—gravitational, thermal, magnetic and radiative. For magnetic cataclysmic variable stars, material from a late, main sequence star is pulled onto a highly magnetized (B>10 MG) white dwarf. The magnetic field is sufficiently large to direct the flow as an accretion column onto the poles of the white dwarf, a star subclass known as AM Herculis. A stationary radiative shock is expected to form 100–1,000 km above the surface of the white dwarf, far too small to be resolved with current telescopes. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment showing the evolution of a reverse shock when both ionization and radiative losses are important. We find that the stand-off position of the shock agrees with radiation hydrodynamic simulations and is consistent, when scaled to AM Herculis star systems, with theoretical predictions. PMID:27291065

  14. The Nature of the Enigmatic 10-Minute Accreting Binary System ES CET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeghs, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    ES Cet is one of the most compact binary systems known with an orbital period of only 10.3 minutes. Our allocated observations with the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite were performed in January and July 2004, with the data being delivered to the PI in August 2004. Preliminary results were presented by the PI in September 2004 and January 2005. We have also secured supporting optical observations of ES Ceti using the Magellan telescopes (November 2004). The team is currently performing a thorough and final analysis of the X-ray, UV and optical data sets with the latest XMM pipeline software and our own analysis packages.

  15. HYPERCRITICAL ACCRETION, INDUCED GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE, AND BINARY-DRIVEN HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2014-09-16

    We successfully, applied the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm to the explanation of GRB-SNe. The progenitor is a tight binary system composed of a CO core and a NS companion. Furthermore, the explosion of the SN leads to hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion, which reaches the critical mass, gravitationally collapsing to a BH with consequent emission of the GRB. The first estimates of this process were based on a simplified model of the binary parameters and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion rate. We present the first full numerical simulations of the IGC process. We simulate the core-collapse, the SN explosion, and the hydrodynamic evolution of the accreting material falling into the Bondi-Hoyle surface of the NS. For appropriate binary parameters, the IGC occurs in short timescale 102–103 s due to the combined action of photon trapping and neutrino cooling near the NS surface. We also address the observational features of this process.

  16. Minidisks in Binary Black Hole Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Geoffrey; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Newtonian simulations have demonstrated that accretion onto binary black holes produces accretion disks around each black hole (“minidisks”), fed by gas streams flowing through the circumbinary cavity from the surrounding circumbinary disk. We study the dynamics and radiation of an individual black hole minidisk using 2D hydrodynamical simulations performed with a new general relativistic version of the moving-mesh code Disco. We introduce a comoving energy variable that enables highly accurate integration of these high Mach number flows. Tidally induced spiral shock waves are excited in the disk and propagate through the innermost stable circular orbit, providing a Reynolds stress that causes efficient accretion by purely hydrodynamic means and producing a radiative signature brighter in hard X-rays than the Novikov–Thorne model. Disk cooling is provided by a local blackbody prescription that allows the disk to evolve self-consistently to a temperature profile where hydrodynamic heating is balanced by radiative cooling. We find that the spiral shock structure is in agreement with the relativistic dispersion relation for tightly wound linear waves. We measure the shock-induced dissipation and find outward angular momentum transport corresponding to an effective alpha parameter of order 0.01. We perform ray-tracing image calculations from the simulations to produce theoretical minidisk spectra and viewing-angle-dependent images for comparison with observations.

  17. Binary interactions with high accretion rates onto main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiber, Sagiv; Schreier, Ron; Soker, Noam

    2016-07-01

    Energetic outflows from main sequence stars accreting mass at very high rates might account for the powering of some eruptive objects, such as merging main sequence stars, major eruptions of luminous blue variables, e.g., the Great Eruption of Eta Carinae, and other intermediate luminosity optical transients (ILOTs; red novae; red transients). These powerful outflows could potentially also supply the extra energy required in the common envelope process and in the grazing envelope evolution of binary systems. We propose that a massive outflow/jets mediated by magnetic fields might remove energy and angular momentum from the accretion disk to allow such high accretion rate flows. By examining the possible activity of the magnetic fields of accretion disks, we conclude that indeed main sequence stars might accrete mass at very high rates, up to ≈ 10-2 M ⊙ yr-1 for solar type stars, and up to ≈ 1 M ⊙ yr-1 for very massive stars. We speculate that magnetic fields amplified in such extreme conditions might lead to the formation of massive bipolar outflows that can remove most of the disk's energy and angular momentum. It is this energy and angular momentum removal that allows the very high mass accretion rate onto main sequence stars.

  18. Binary accretion rates: dependence on temperature and mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. D.; Clarke, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    We perform a series of 2D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gas accretion on to binaries via a circumbinary disc, for a range of gas temperatures and binary mass ratios (q). We show that increasing the gas temperature increases the accretion rate on to the primary for all values of the binary mass ratio: for example, for q = 0.1 and a fixed binary separation, an increase of normalized sound speed by a factor of 5 (from our `cold' to `hot' simulations) changes the fraction of the accreted gas that flows on to the primary from 10 to ˜40 per cent. We present a simple parametrization for the average accretion rate of each binary component accurate to within a few per cent and argue that this parametrization (rather than those in the literature based on warmer simulations) is relevant to supermassive black hole accretion and all but the widest stellar binaries. We present trajectories for the growth of q during circumbinary disc accretion and argue that the period distribution of stellar `twin' binaries is strong evidence for the importance of circumbinary accretion. We also show that our parametrization of binary accretion increases the minimum mass ratio needed for spin alignment of supermassive black holes to q ˜ 0.4, with potentially important implications for the magnitude of velocity kicks acquired during black hole mergers.

  19. Accreting Binary Populations in the Earlier Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2010-01-01

    It is now understood that X-ray binaries dominate the hard X-ray emission from normal star-forming galaxies. Thanks to the deepest (2-4 Ms) Chandra surveys, such galaxies are now being studied in X-rays out to z approximates 4. Interesting X-ray stacking results (based on 30+ galaxies per redshift bin) suggest that the mean rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity from z=3-4 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), is comparable to the most powerful starburst galaxies in the local Universe. This result possibly indicates a similar production mechanism for accreting binaries over large cosmological timescales. To understand and constrain better the production of X-ray binaries in high-redshift LBGs, we have utilized XMM-Newton observations of a small sample of z approximates 0.1 GALEX-selected Ultraviolet-Luminous Galaxies (UVLGs); local analogs to high-redshift LBGs. Our observations enable us to study the X-ray emission from LBG-like galaxies on an individual basis, thus allowing us to constrain object-to-object variances in this population. We supplement these results with X-ray stacking constraints using the new 3.2 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (completed spring 2010) and LBG candidates selected from HST, Swift UVOT, and ground-based data. These measurements provide new X-ray constraints that sample well the entire z=0-4 baseline

  20. HYPERCRITICAL ACCRETION, INDUCED GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE, AND BINARY-DRIVEN HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2014-10-01

    The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm has been successfully applied to the explanation of the concomitance of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with supernovae (SNe) Ic. The progenitor is a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star (NS) companion. The explosion of the SN leads to hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion, which reaches the critical mass, hence inducing its gravitational collapse to a black hole (BH) with consequent emission of the GRB. The first estimates of this process were based on a simplified model of the binary parameters and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion rate. We present here the first full numerical simulations of the IGC phenomenon. We simulate the core-collapse and SN explosion of CO stars to obtain the density and ejection velocity of the SN ejecta. We follow the hydrodynamic evolution of the accreting material falling into the Bondi-Hoyle surface of the NS all the way up to its incorporation in the NS surface. The simulations go up to BH formation when the NS reaches the critical mass. For appropriate binary parameters, the IGC occurs in short timescales ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} s owing to the combined effective action of the photon trapping and the neutrino cooling near the NS surface. We also show that the IGC scenario leads to a natural explanation for why GRBs are associated only with SNe Ic with totally absent or very little helium.

  1. HYPERCRITICAL ACCRETION, INDUCED GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE, AND BINARY-DRIVEN HYPERNOVAE

    DOE PAGES

    Fryer, Chris L.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2014-09-16

    We successfully, applied the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm to the explanation of GRB-SNe. The progenitor is a tight binary system composed of a CO core and a NS companion. Furthermore, the explosion of the SN leads to hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion, which reaches the critical mass, gravitationally collapsing to a BH with consequent emission of the GRB. The first estimates of this process were based on a simplified model of the binary parameters and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion rate. We present the first full numerical simulations of the IGC process. We simulate the core-collapse, the SN explosion, andmore » the hydrodynamic evolution of the accreting material falling into the Bondi-Hoyle surface of the NS. For appropriate binary parameters, the IGC occurs in short timescale 102–103 s due to the combined action of photon trapping and neutrino cooling near the NS surface. We also address the observational features of this process.« less

  2. MAGNETOSPHERIC ACCRETION IN CLOSE PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Jonhs-Krull, Christopher; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Quijano-Vodniza, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    The transfer of matter between a circumbinary disk and a young binary system remains poorly understood, obscuring the interpretation of accretion indicators. To explore the behavior of these indicators in multiple systems, we have performed the first systematic time-domain study of young binaries in the ultraviolet. We obtained far- and near-ultraviolet HST/COS spectra of the young spectroscopic binaries DQ Tau and UZ Tau E. Here we focus on the continuum from 2800 to 3200 Å and on the C iv doublet (λλ1548.19, 1550.77 Å) as accretion diagnostics. Each system was observed over three or four consecutive binary orbits, at phases ∼0, 0.2, 0.5, and 0.7. Those observations are complemented by ground-based U-band measurements. Contrary to model predictions, we do not detect any clear correlation between accretion luminosity and phase. Further, we do not detect any correlation between C iv flux and phase. For both stars the appearance of the C iv line is similar to that of single Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), despite the lack of stable long-lived circumstellar disks. However, unlike the case in single CTTSs, the narrow and broad components of the C iv lines are uncorrelated, and we argue that the narrow component is powered by processes other than accretion, such as flares in the stellar magnetospheres and/or enhanced activity in the upper atmosphere. We find that both stars contribute equally to the narrow component C iv flux in DQ Tau, but the primary dominates the narrow component C iv emission in UZ Tau E. The C iv broad component flux is correlated with other accretion indicators, suggesting an accretion origin. However, the line is blueshifted, which is inconsistent with its origin in an infall flow close to the star. It is possible that the complicated geometry of the region, as well as turbulence in the shock region, are responsible for the blueshifted line profiles.

  3. A brown dwarf mass donor in an accreting binary.

    PubMed

    Littlefair, S P; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Gänsicke, Boris T; Southworth, John; Watson, C A

    2006-12-08

    A long-standing and unverified prediction of binary star evolution theory is the existence of a population of white dwarfs accreting from substellar donor stars. Such systems ought to be common, but the difficulty of finding them, combined with the challenge of detecting the donor against the light from accretion, means that no donor star to date has a measured mass below the hydrogen burning limit. We applied a technique that allowed us to reliably measure the mass of the unseen donor star in eclipsing systems. We were able to identify a brown dwarf donor star, with a mass of 0.052 +/- 0.002 solar mass. The relatively high mass of the donor star for its orbital period suggests that current evolutionary models may underestimate the radii of brown dwarfs.

  4. Suppression of the accretion rate in thin discs around binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragusa, Enrico; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    We present three-dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations investigating the dependence of the accretion rate on the disc thickness around an equal-mass, circular black hole binary system. We find that for thick/hot discs, with H/R ≳ 0.1, the binary torque does not prevent the gas from penetrating the cavity formed in the disc by the binary (in line with previous investigations). The situation drastically changes for thinner discs; in this case the mass accretion rate is suppressed, such that only a fraction (linearly dependent on H/R) of the available gas is able to flow within the cavity and accrete on to the binary. Extrapolating this result to the cold and thin accretion discs expected around supermassive black hole binary systems implies that this kind of system accretes less material than predicted so far, with consequences not only for the electromagnetic and gravitational waves emissions during the late inspiral phase but also for the recoil speed of the black hole formed after binary coalescence, thus influencing also the evolutionary path both of the binary and of the host galaxy. Our results, being scale-free, are also applicable to equal-mass, circular binaries of stellar mass black holes, such as the progenitor of the recently discovered gravitational wave source GW150914.

  5. Wind-accretion Disks in Wide Binaries, Second-generation Protoplanetary Disks, and Accretion onto White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai B.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2013-02-01

    Mass transfer from an evolved donor star to its binary companion is a standard feature of stellar evolution in binaries. In wide binaries, the companion star captures some of the mass ejected in a wind by the primary star. The captured material forms an accretion disk. Here, we study the evolution of wind-accretion disks, using a numerical approach which allows us to follow the long-term evolution. For a broad range of initial conditions, we derive the radial density and temperature profiles of the disk. In most cases, wind accretion leads to long-lived stable disks over the lifetime of the asymptotic giant branch donor star. The disks have masses of a few times 10-5-10-3 M ⊙, with surface density and temperature profiles that follow broken power laws. The total mass in the disk scales approximately linearly with the viscosity parameter used. Roughly, 50%-80% of the mass falling into the disk accretes onto the central star; the rest flows out through the outer edge of the disk into the stellar wind of the primary. For systems with large accretion rates, the secondary accretes as much as 0.1 M ⊙. When the secondary is a white dwarf, accretion naturally leads to nova and supernova eruptions. For all types of secondary star, the surface density and temperature profiles of massive disks resemble structures observed in protoplanetary disks, suggesting that coordinated observational programs might improve our understanding of uncertain disk physics.

  6. Retrograde binaries of massive black holes in circumbinary accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Context. We explore the hardening of a massive black hole binary embedded in a circumbinary gas disc under a specific circumstance: when the binary and the gas are coplanar and the gas is counter-rotating. The binary has unequal mass and the interaction of the gas with the lighter secondary black hole is the main cause of the braking torque on the binary that shrinks with time. The secondary black hole, revolving in the direction opposite to the gas, experiences a drag from gas-dynamical friction and from direct accretion of part of it. Aims: In this paper, using two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamical grid simulations we investigate the effect of changing the accretion prescriptions on the dynamics of the secondary black hole, which in turn affect the binary hardening and eccentricity evolution. Methods: We find that realistic accretion prescriptions lead to results that differ from those inferred assuming accretion of all the gas within the Roche Lobe of the secondary black hole. Results: When considering gas accretion within the gravitational influence radius of the secondary black hole (which is smaller than the Roche Lobe radius) to better describe gas inflows, the shrinking of the binary is slower. In addition, in this case, a smaller amount of accreted mass is required to reduce the binary separation by the same amount. Different accretion prescriptions result in different discs' surface densities, which alter the black hole's dynamics back. Full 3D Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics realizations of a number of representative cases, run over a shorter interval of time, validate the general trends observed in the less computationally demanding 2D simulations. Conclusions: Initially circular black hole binaries increase their eccentricity only slightly, which then oscillates around small values (<0.1) while they harden. By contrast, initially eccentric binaries become more and more eccentric. A semi-analytical model describing the black hole's dynamics under

  7. Hot accretion flows onto binary and single black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Roman; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Ruiz, Milton; Shapiro, Stuart; Etienne, Zachariah; Pfeiffer, Harald; McKinney, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Accreting black holes (BHs) are at the core of relativistic astrophysics as messengers of the strong-field regime of General Relativity and prime targets of several observational campaigns, including imaging the black hole shadow in SagA* and M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope. Binary Black Holes are one of the most promising gravitational wave sources for adLIGO and Pulsar Timing Arrays and - if accreting - can provide a strong electromagnetic counterpart. I will present results from global GRMHD simulations of both single and binary BHs embedded in a hot, magnetized disk, highlighting differences in their observational appearance including their gravitational and electromagnetic radiation.

  8. Viscosity in accretion discs. [for binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J. I.

    1980-01-01

    Both HerX-1 and SS433 may contain accretion disks slaved to a precessing companion star. If so, it is possible to bound the effective viscosity in these disks. The results, in terms of the disk parameter alpha, are lower bounds of 0.01 for HerX-1 and of 0.1 for SS433.

  9. CIRCUMBINARY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC ACCRETION INTO INSPIRALING BINARY BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Scott C.; Mundim, Bruno C.; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Campanelli, Manuela; Zlochower, Yosef; Krolik, Julian H.; Yunes, Nicolas

    2012-08-10

    We have simulated the magnetohydrodynamic evolution of a circumbinary disk surrounding an equal-mass binary comprising two non-spinning black holes during the period in which the disk inflow time is comparable to the binary evolution time due to gravitational radiation. Both the changing spacetime and the binary orbital evolution are described by an innovative technique utilizing high-order post-Newtonian approximations. Prior to the beginning of the inspiral, the structure of the circumbinary disk is predicted well by extrapolation from Newtonian results: a gap of roughly two binary separation radii is cleared, and matter piles up at the outer edge of this gap as inflow is retarded by torques exerted by the binary; the accretion rate is roughly half its value at large radius. During inspiral, the inner edge of the disk initially moves inward in coordination with the shrinking binary, but-as the orbital evolution accelerates-the inward motion of the disk edge falls behind the rate of binary compression. In this stage, the binary torque falls substantially, but the accretion rate decreases by only 10%-20%. When the binary separation is tens of gravitational radii, the rest-mass efficiency of disk radiation is a few percent, suggesting that supermassive binary black holes could be very luminous at this stage of their evolution. Inner disk heating is modulated at a beat frequency comparable to the binary orbital frequency. However, a disk with sufficient surface density to be luminous may be optically thick, suppressing periodic modulation of the luminosity.

  10. Swings between rotation and accretion power in a binary millisecond pulsar.

    PubMed

    Papitto, A; Ferrigno, C; Bozzo, E; Rea, N; Pavan, L; Burderi, L; Burgay, M; Campana, S; Di Salvo, T; Falanga, M; Filipović, M D; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Possenti, A; Ransom, S M; Riggio, A; Romano, P; Sarkissian, J M; Stairs, I H; Stella, L; Torres, D F; Wieringa, M H; Wong, G F

    2013-09-26

    It is thought that neutron stars in low-mass binary systems can accrete matter and angular momentum from the companion star and be spun-up to millisecond rotational periods. During the accretion stage, the system is called a low-mass X-ray binary, and bright X-ray emission is observed. When the rate of mass transfer decreases in the later evolutionary stages, these binaries host a radio millisecond pulsar whose emission is powered by the neutron star's rotating magnetic field. This evolutionary model is supported by the detection of millisecond X-ray pulsations from several accreting neutron stars and also by the evidence for a past accretion disc in a rotation-powered millisecond pulsar. It has been proposed that a rotation-powered pulsar may temporarily switch on during periods of low mass inflow in some such systems. Only indirect evidence for this transition has hitherto been observed. Here we report observations of accretion-powered, millisecond X-ray pulsations from a neutron star previously seen as a rotation-powered radio pulsar. Within a few days after a month-long X-ray outburst, radio pulses were again detected. This not only shows the evolutionary link between accretion and rotation-powered millisecond pulsars, but also that some systems can swing between the two states on very short timescales.

  11. Radiative efficiency of hot accretion flow and the radio/X-ray correlation in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo

    2016-02-01

    Significant progresses have been made since the discovery of hot accretion flow, a theory successfully applied to the low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) and black hole (BH) X-ray binaries (BHBs) in their hard states. Motivated by these updates, we re-investigate the radiative efficiency of hot accretion flow. We find that, the brightest regime of hot accretion flow shows a distinctive property, i.e. it has a constant efficiency independent of accretion rates, similar to the standard thin disk. For less bright regime, the efficiency has a steep positive correlation with the accretion rate, while for faint regime typical of advection-dominated accretion flow, the correlation is shadower. This result can naturally explain the observed two distinctive correlations between radio and X-ray luminosities in black hole X-ray binaries. The key difference in systems with distinctive correlations could be the viscous parameter, which determines the critical luminosity of different accretion modes.

  12. Evolution of double white dwarf binaries undergoing direct-impact accretion: Implications for gravitational wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Kyle; Breivik, Katelyn; Larson, Shane L.; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2017-01-01

    For close double white dwarf binaries, the mass-transfer phenomenon known as direct-impact accretion (when the mass transfer stream impacts the accretor directly rather than forming a disc) may play a pivotal role in the long-term evolution of the systems. In this analysis, we explore the long-term evolution of white dwarf binaries accreting through direct-impact and explore implications of such systems to gravitational wave astronomy. We cover a broad range of parameter space which includes initial component masses and the strength of tidal coupling, and show that these systems, which lie firmly within the LISA frequency range, show strong negative chirps which can last as long as several million years. Detections of double white dwarf systems in the direct-impact phase by detectors such as LISA would provide astronomers with unique ways of probing the physics governing close compact object binaries.

  13. Effects of Accretion Disks on Spins and Eccentricities of Binaries, and Implications for Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2012-01-01

    Effects of accretion disks on spins and eccentricities of binaries, and implications for gravitational waves. John Baker Space-based gravitational wave observations will allow exquisitely precise measurements of massive black hole binary properties. Through several recently suggested processes, these properties may depend on interactions with accretion disks through the merger process. I will discuss ways that accretion may influence those binary properties which may be probed by gravitational-wave observations.

  14. HST UV observations of the accretion disk corona X-ray binary X1822-371

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchnarewicz, E. M.; Mason, K. O.; Cordova, F. A.

    1995-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided the first ultraviolet orbital light curve of the low-mass X-ray binary X1822-371. The shape of the UV light curve changes with wavelength providing the first direct clues to the temperature of the various system components. The data support the idea that the system contains a thick, structured accretion disk.

  15. Measuring X-ray Binary Accretion State Distributions in Extragalactic Environments using XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Lacey; Lehmer, Bret; Yukita, Mihoko; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Ptak, Andrew; Wik, Daniel R.; Zezas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    X-ray binary systems (XRBs) in the MW can exist in several different accretion states, and many have been found to vary along specific tracks on intensity-color diagrams. Observationally measuring the distributions of these accretion states in a variety of environments can aid in population synthesis modeling and ultimately help us understand the formation and evolution of XRBs and their compact object components (i.e., black holes and neutron stars). Recent innovative studies with NuSTAR have demonstrated the utility of color-color and intensity-color diagrams in differentiating between XRB accretion states in extragalactic environments (NGC 253, M83, and M31). The key to NuSTAR’s success is its sensitivity above »10keV, where spectral differences between accretion states are most pronounced. However, due to the relatively low spatial resolution and large background of NuSTAR, the constraints from these diagrams is limited to only bright sources in nearby galaxies. In this poster, we present evidence that XMM-Newton observations of M83 in the 4.0-12.0 keV range can be used to create similar color-intensity and color-color diagrams and therefore differentiate between these accretion states. We will further discuss plans to leverage XMM-Newton’s vast archive and 17-year baseline to dramatically expand studies of accretion state distributions and state transitions for XRB populations in extragalactic environments.

  16. Accretion Disks Around Binary Black Holes of Unequal Mass: GRMHD Simulations Near Decoupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, Roman; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Pfeiffer, Harald, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report on simulations in general relativity of magnetized disks onto black hole binaries. We vary the binary mass ratio from 1:1 to 1:10 and evolve the systems when they orbit near the binary disk decoupling radius. We compare (surface) density profiles, accretion rates (relative to a single, non-spinning black hole), variability, effective alpha-stress levels and luminosities as functions of the mass ratio. We treat the disks in two limiting regimes: rapid radiative cooling and no radiative cooling. The magnetic field lines clearly reveal jets emerging from both black hole horizons and merging into one common jet at large distances. The magnetic fields give rise to much stronger shock heating than the pure hydrodynamic flows, completely alter the disk structure, and boost accretion rates and luminosities. Accretion streams near the horizons are among the densest structures; in fact, the 1:10 no-cooling evolution results in a refilling of the cavity. The typical effective temperature in the bulk of the disk is approx. 10(exp5) (M / 10(exp 8)M solar mass (exp -1/4(L/L(sub edd) (exp 1/4K) yielding characteristic thermal frequencies approx. 10 (exp 15) (M /10(exp 8)M solar mass) (exp -1/4(L/L (sub edd) (1+z) (exp -1)Hz. These systems are thus promising targets for many extragalactic optical surveys, such as LSST, WFIRST, and PanSTARRS.

  17. The SEDs of Gapped Accretion Disks surrounding Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultekin, Kayhan; Miller, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the observability of a black hole (BH) accretion disk with a gap or a hole created by a secondary BH embedded in the disk. We find that for an interesting range of parameters of BH masses 10^6-10^9 M⊙), orbital separation 1 AU to ~0.1 pc), and gap width (10-190 disk scale heights), the missing thermal emission from a gap manifests itself in an observable decrement in the spectral energy distribution (SED). The change in slope in the broken power law is strongly dependent on the width of the gap in the accretion disk, which in turn is uniquely determined by the mass ratio of the BHs (under our assumptions), such that it scales roughly as q^(5/12). Thus, one can use spectral observations of the continuum of bright AGNs to infer not only the presence of a closely separated BH binary, but also the mass ratio. When the BH merger opens an entire hole (or cavity) in the inner disk, the broadband SED of the AGNs or quasar may serve as a diagnostic. We note future directions for this research.

  18. Black holes in short period X-ray binaries and the transition to radiatively inefficient accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knevitt, G.; Wynn, G. A.; Vaughan, S.; Watson, M. G.

    2014-02-01

    By comparing the orbital period distributions of black hole and neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in the Ritter-Kolb catalogue we show that there is statistical evidence for a dearth of black hole systems at short orbital periods (Porb < 4 h). This could either be due to a true divergence in orbital period distributions of these two types of system, or to black hole LMXBs being preferentially hidden from view at short orbital periods. We explore the latter possibility, by investigating whether black hole LMXBs could be concealed by a switch to radiatively inefficient accretion at low luminosities. The peak luminosity and the duration of X-ray binary outbursts are related to the disc radius and, hence, the orbital period. At short periods, where the peak outburst luminosity drops close to the threshold for radiatively inefficient accretion, black hole LMXBs have lower outburst luminosities, shorter outburst durations and lower X-ray duty cycles than comparable neutron star systems. These factors can combine to severely reduce the detection probability of short period black hole LMXBs relative to those containing neutron stars. We estimate the outburst properties and orbital period distribution of black hole LMXBs using two models of the transition to radiatively inefficient accretion: an instantaneous drop in accretion efficiency (η) to zero, at a fraction (f) of the Eddington luminosity (LEdd) and a power-law efficiency decrease, η ∝ dot{M}^n, for L < f LEdd. We show that a population of black hole LMXBs at short orbital periods can only be hidden by a sharp drop in efficiency, either instantaneous or for n ≳ 3. This could be achieved by a genuine drop in luminosity or through abrupt spectral changes that shift the accretion power out of a given X-ray band.

  19. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotsky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was observed on September of 2002. Data analysis for both observation has been completed: an investigation of the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure. A study of behavior of the emission features as a function of binary orbit shows modulated behavior in one of the systems. A paper on "High-resolution observations of low-mass X-ray binaries" is near completion. The paper includes observations with the Chandra HETG that are not yet completed.

  20. Radio Observations as a Tool to Investigate Shocks and Asymmetries in Accreting White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Jennifer Helen Seng; E-Nova Project

    2017-01-01

    In this dissertation, I use radio observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to reveal that colliding flows within the ejecta from nova explosions can lead to shocks that accelerate particles and produce radio synchrotron emission. In both novae V1723 Aql and V5589 Sgr, radio emission within the first one to two months deviated strongly from the classic thermal model for radio emission from novae. Three years of radio observations of V1723 Aql show that multiple outflows from the system collided to create non-thermal shocks with a brightness temperature of >106 K. After these shocks faded, the radio light curve became roughly consistent with an expanding thermal shell. However, resolved images of V1723 Aql show elongated material that apparently rotates its major axis over the course of 15 months. In the case of nova V5589 Sgr, I show that the early radio emission is dominated by a shock-powered non-thermal flare that produces strong (kTx > 33 keV) X-rays. These findings have important implications for understanding how normal novae generate GeV gamma-rays.Additionally, I present VLA observations of the symbiotic star CH Cyg and two small surveys of symbiotic binaries. Radio observations of CH Cyg tie the ejection of a collimated jet to a change of state in the accretion disk, strengthening the link between bipolar outflows from accreting white dwarfs and other types of accreting compact objects. Next, I use a survey of eleven accretion-driven symbiotic binaries to determine that the radio brightness of a symbiotic system could potentially be used as an indicator of whether it is powered predominantly by shell burning on the surface of the white dwarf or by accretion. This survey also produces the first radio detections of seven of the target systems. In the second survey of seventeen symbiotic binaries, I spatially resolve extended radio emission in several systems for the first time. The results from these surveys provide some support for the

  1. Binary Black Holes, Accretion Disks and Relativistic Jets: Photocenters of Nearby AGN and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrle, Ann E.; Jones, Dayton L.; Meier, David L.; Piner, B. Glenn; Unwin, Stephen C.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most challenging questions in astronomy today is to understand the origin, structure, and evolution of the central engines in the nuclei of quasars and active galaxies (AGNs). The favoured theory involves the activation of relativistic jets from the fueling of a supermassive black hole through an accretion disk. In some AGN an outer optically thick, dusty torus is seen orbiting the black hole system. This torus is probably related to an inner accretion disk - black hole system that forms the actual powerhouse of the AGN. In radio-loud AGN two oppositely-directed radio jets are ejected perpendicular to the torus/disk system. Although there is a wealth of observational data on AGN, some very basic questions have not been definitively answered. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) will address the following three key questions about AGN. 1) Does the most compact optical emission from an AGN come from an accretion disk or from a relativistic jet? 2) Does the separation of the radio core and optical photocenter of the quasars used for the reference frame tie, change on the timescales of their photometric variability, or is the separation stable at the level of a few microarcseconds? 3) Do the cores of galaxies harbor binary supermassive black holes remaining from galaxy mergers? It is not known whether such mergers are common, and whether binaries would persist for a significant time.

  2. Complex Variability of the Hα Emission Line Profile of the T Tauri Binary System KH 15D: The Influence of Orbital Phase, Occultation by the Circumbinary Disk, and Accretion Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Catrina M.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Mundt, Reinhard; Herbst, William; Winn, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    We have obtained 48 high-resolution echelle spectra of the pre-main-sequence eclipsing binary system KH 15D (V582 Mon, P = 48.37 days, e ~ 0.6, MA = 0.6 M ⊙, MB = 0.7 M ⊙). The eclipses are caused by a circumbinary disk (CBD) seen nearly edge on, which at the epoch of these observations completely obscured the orbit of star B and a large portion of the orbit of star A. The spectra were obtained over five contiguous observing seasons from 2001/2002 to 2005/2006 while star A was fully visible, fully occulted, and during several ingress and egress events. The Hα line profile shows dramatic changes in these time series data over timescales ranging from days to years. A fraction of the variations are due to "edge effects" and depend only on the height of star A above or below the razor sharp edge of the occulting disk. Other observed variations depend on the orbital phase: the Hα emission line profile changes from an inverse P-Cygni-type profile during ingress to an enhanced double-peaked profile, with both a blue and a red emission component, during egress. Each of these interpreted variations are complicated by the fact that there is also a chaotic, irregular component present in these profiles. We find that the complex data set can be largely understood in the context of accretion onto the stars from a CBD with gas flows as predicted by the models of eccentric T Tauri binaries put forward by Artymowicz & Lubow, Günther & Kley, and de Val-Borro et al. In particular, our data provide strong support for the pulsed accretion phenomenon, in which enhanced accretion occurs during and after perihelion passage.

  3. COMPLEX VARIABILITY OF THE H{alpha} EMISSION LINE PROFILE OF THE T TAURI BINARY SYSTEM KH 15D: THE INFLUENCE OF ORBITAL PHASE, OCCULTATION BY THE CIRCUMBINARY DISK, AND ACCRETION PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Catrina M.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Mundt, Reinhard; Herbst, William; Winn, Joshua N. E-mail: cmj@rice.edu E-mail: wherbst@wesleyan.edu

    2012-06-01

    We have obtained 48 high-resolution echelle spectra of the pre-main-sequence eclipsing binary system KH 15D (V582 Mon, P = 48.37 days, e {approx} 0.6, M{sub A} = 0.6 M{sub Sun }, M{sub B} = 0.7 M{sub Sun }). The eclipses are caused by a circumbinary disk (CBD) seen nearly edge on, which at the epoch of these observations completely obscured the orbit of star B and a large portion of the orbit of star A. The spectra were obtained over five contiguous observing seasons from 2001/2002 to 2005/2006 while star A was fully visible, fully occulted, and during several ingress and egress events. The H{alpha} line profile shows dramatic changes in these time series data over timescales ranging from days to years. A fraction of the variations are due to 'edge effects' and depend only on the height of star A above or below the razor sharp edge of the occulting disk. Other observed variations depend on the orbital phase: the H{alpha} emission line profile changes from an inverse P-Cygni-type profile during ingress to an enhanced double-peaked profile, with both a blue and a red emission component, during egress. Each of these interpreted variations are complicated by the fact that there is also a chaotic, irregular component present in these profiles. We find that the complex data set can be largely understood in the context of accretion onto the stars from a CBD with gas flows as predicted by the models of eccentric T Tauri binaries put forward by Artymowicz and Lubow, Guenther and Kley, and de Val-Borro et al. In particular, our data provide strong support for the pulsed accretion phenomenon, in which enhanced accretion occurs during and after perihelion passage.

  4. X-Ray Binary Phenomenology and Their Accretion Disk Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    We propose a scheme that accounts for the broader spectral and temporal properties of galactic black hole X-ray transients. The fundamental notion behind this proposal is that the mass accretion rate, dot{M}, of the disks of these systems depends on the radius, as it has been proposed for ADIOS. We propose that, because of this dependence of dot{M} on radius, an accretion disk which is geometrically thin and cool at large radii converts into a geometrically thick, advection dominated, hot disk interior to a transition radius at which the local accretion rate drops below the square of the viscosity parameter, a condition for the existence of advection dominated flows. We argue also that such a transition requires in addition that the vertical disk support be provided by magnetic fields. As discussed in other chapters of this book, the origin of these fields is local to the disk by the Poynting Robertson battery, thereby providing a complete self-contained picture for the spectra and evolution of these systems.

  5. FORMATION OF BINARY MILLISECOND PULSARS BY ACCRETION-INDUCED COLLAPSE OF WHITE DWARFS UNDER WIND-DRIVEN EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ablimit, Iminhaji; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-02-20

    Accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of massive white dwarfs (WDs) has been proposed to be an important channel to form binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Recent investigations on thermal timescale mass transfer in WD binaries demonstrate that the resultant MSPs are likely to have relatively wide orbit periods (≳ 10 days). Here we calculate the evolution of WD binaries taking into account the excited wind from the companion star induced by X-ray irradiation of the accreting WD, which may drive rapid mass transfer even when the companion star is less massive than the WD. This scenario can naturally explain the formation of the strong-field neutron star in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822–37. After AIC the mass transfer resumes when the companion star refills its Roche lobe, and the neutron star is recycled owing to mass accretion. A large fraction of the binaries will evolve to become binary MSPs with an He WD companion, with the orbital periods distributed between ≳ 0.1 days and ≲ 30 days, while some of them may follow the cataclysmic variable-like evolution toward very short orbits. If we instead assume that the newborn neutron star appears as an MSP and that part of its rotational energy is used to ablate its companion star, the binaries may also evolve to be the redback-like systems.

  6. A Spectrum Synthesis Program for Binary Stars with Optically Thick Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnell, A. P.; Hubeny, I.

    1994-12-01

    We recently reported a spectrum synthesis program for binary stars (Linnell & Hubeny, 1994, ApJ, 434, Oct.20). That program now has been extended to include the case of an optically thick accretion disk associated with either of the two stellar components. Our model of the accretion disk uses the Pringle expression (Pringle, 1981, ARA&A, 19, 137) for T_eff values on the accretion disk face, and the results of Hubeny and Plavec (1981, ApJ, 102, 1156) for rim T_eff values. The treatment of the stellar components is the same as in our 1994 paper. The program divides the rim into NRIM latitude values, typically 9, and divides the visible accretion disk face into NRING concentric ring boundaries, typically 31. The individual rings (for both the rim and the face) subdivide into NSEG pixels, typically 101. An individual synthetic spectrum, appropriate to the local T_eff value, is attached to each pixel. For illustration purposes we have used synthetic spectra prepared from Kurucz atmospheres. The extended program constructs a synthetic spectrum for the accretion disk face, rim, the separate stellar components, and the entire system by producing a sum of contributions, at each wavelength (with due allowance for Doppler shift), from each visible pixel on the accretion disk or the separate stellar components, weighted by the projected area of the pixel. A separate program establishes a visibility key for each pixel and cosine of the zenith angle of the observer as seen from each pixel, for the current value of orbital inclination and orbital longitude. These data combine with synthetic spectra in the spectrum synthesis program to determine line of sight light intensities at each wavelength, i.e., the contributions needed for the sum. Separate data from related programs permit a plot of the system projected on the plane of the sky. This project received partial support from NSF grant AST9020459.

  7. CIRCUMBINARY GAS ACCRETION ONTO A CENTRAL BINARY: INFRARED MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION FROM GG Tau A

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Tracy L.; Lubow, S. H.; Bary, Jeffrey S.; Dutrey, Anne; Guilloteau, Stephane; Pietu, Vincent; Simon, M. E-mail: lubow@stsci.edu E-mail: Anne.Dutrey@obs.u-bordeaux1.fr E-mail: pietu@iram.fr

    2012-07-20

    We present high spatial resolution maps of ro-vibrational molecular hydrogen emission from the environment of the GG Tau A binary component in the GG Tau quadruple system. The H{sub 2} v = 1-0 S(1) emission is spatially resolved and encompasses the inner binary, with emission detected at locations that should be dynamically cleared on several hundred year timescales. Extensions of H{sub 2} gas emission are seen to {approx}100 AU distances from the central stars. The v = 2-1 S(1) emission at 2.24 {mu}m is also detected at {approx}30 AU from the central stars, with a line ratio of 0.05 {+-} 0.01 with respect to the v = 1-0 S(1) emission. Assuming gas in LTE, this ratio corresponds to an emission environment at {approx}1700 K. We estimate that this temperature is too high for quiescent gas heated by X-ray or UV emission from the central stars. Surprisingly, we find that the brightest region of H{sub 2} emission arises from a spatial location that is exactly coincident with a recently revealed dust 'streamer' which seems to be transferring material from the outer circumbinary ring around GG Tau A into the inner region. As a result, we identify a new excitation mechanism for ro-vibrational H{sub 2} stimulation in the environment of young stars. The H{sub 2} in the GG Tau A system appears to be stimulated by mass accretion infall as material in the circumbinary ring accretes onto the system to replenish the inner circumstellar disks. We postulate that H{sub 2} stimulated by accretion infall could be present in other systems, particularly binaries and 'transition disk' systems which have dust-cleared gaps in their circumstellar environments.

  8. Accretion and Orbital Inspiral in Gas-assisted Supermassive Black Hole Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-08-01

    Many galaxies are expected to harbor binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in their centers. Their interaction with the surrounding gas results in the accretion and exchange of angular momentum via tidal torques, facilitating binary inspiral. Here, we explore the non-trivial coupling between these two processes and analyze how the global properties of externally supplied circumbinary disks depend on the binary accretion rate. By formulating our results in terms of the angular momentum flux driven by internal stresses, we come up with a very simple classification of the possible global disk structures, which differ from the standard constant \\dot{M} accretion disk solution. The suppression of accretion by the binary tides, leading to a significant mass accumulation in the inner disk, accelerates binary inspiral. We show that once the disk region strongly perturbed by the viscously transmitted tidal torque exceeds the binary semimajor axis, the binary can merge in less than its mass-doubling time due to accretion. Thus, unlike the inspirals driven by stellar scattering, the gas-assisted merger can occur even if the binary is embedded in a relatively low-mass disk (lower than its own mass). This is important for resolving the “last parsec” problem for SMBH binaries and understanding powerful gravitational wave sources in the universe. We argue that the enhancement of accretion by the binary found in some recent simulations cannot persist for a long time and should not affect the long-term orbital inspiral. We also review existing simulations of SMBH binary-disk coupling and propose a numerical setup which is particularly well suited to verifying our theoretical predictions.

  9. Accretion Processes in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Martínez-País, Ignacio; Shahbaz, Tariq; Casares Velázquez, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    List of contributors; List of participants; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1. Accretion disks Henk Spruit; 2. The evolution of binary systems Philipp Podsiadlowski; 3. Accretion onto white dwarfs Brian Warner; 4. Accretion in X-ray binary systems Robert I. Hynes; 5. X-ray binary populations in galaxies Giuseppina Fabbiano; 6. Observational characteristics of accretion onto black holes I Chris Done; 7. Observational characteristics of accretion onto black holes II Rob Fender; 8. Computing black hole accretion John F. Hawley; Appendix: Piazzi Smyth, the Cape of Good Hope, Tenerife and the siting of large telescopes Brian Warner.

  10. Accretion and Magnetic Reconnection in the Classical T Tauri Binary DQ Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Ardila, David R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Ciardi, David R.; Johns-Krull, Christopher; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Quijano-Vodniza, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    The theory of binary star formation predicts that close binaries (a < 100 au) will experience periodic pulsed accretion events as streams of material form at the inner edge of a circumbinary disk (CBD), cross a dynamically cleared gap, and feed circumstellar disks or accrete directly onto the stars. The archetype for the pulsed accretion theory is the eccentric, short-period, classical T Tauri binary DQ Tau. Low-cadence (∼daily) broadband photometry has shown brightening events near most periastron passages, just as numerical simulations would predict for an eccentric binary. Magnetic reconnection events (flares) during the collision of stellar magnetospheres near periastron could, however, produce the same periodic, broadband behavior when observed at a one-day cadence. To reveal the dominant physical mechanism seen in DQ Tau’s low-cadence observations, we have obtained continuous, moderate-cadence, multiband photometry over 10 orbital periods, supplemented with 27 nights of minute-cadence photometry centered on four separate periastron passages. While both accretion and stellar flares are present, the dominant timescale and morphology of brightening events are characteristic of accretion. On average, the mass accretion rate increases by a factor of five near periastron, in good agreement with recent models. Large variability is observed in the morphology and amplitude of accretion events from orbit to orbit. We argue that this is due to the absence of stable circumstellar disks around each star, compounded by inhomogeneities at the inner edge of the CBD and within the accretion streams themselves. Quasiperiodic apastron accretion events are also observed, which are not predicted by binary accretion theory.

  11. The Origin of Warped, Precessing Accretion Disks in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Philip R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1997-01-01

    The radiation-driven warping instability discovered by Pringle holds considerable promise as the mechanism responsible for producing warped, precessing accretion disks in X-ray binaries. This instability is an inherently global mode of the disk, thereby avoiding the difficulties with earlier models for the precession. Here we follow up on earlier work to study the linear behavior of the instability in the specific context of a binary system. We treat the influence of the companion as an orbit-averaged quadrupole torque on the disk. The presence of this external torque allows the existence of solutions in which the direction of precession of the warp is retrograde with respect to disk rotation, in addition to the prograde solutions that exist in the absence of external torques.

  12. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    More than half of all main sequence stars, and an even larger fraction of pre-main sequence stars, reside in binary or multiple systems (Duquennoy and Mayor 1991; Mathieu et al. 2000). The presence of planet-forming material has been indirectly observed around one or both components of some young binaries, and (Mathieu et al. 2000) numerical simulations of the formation of binary stars suggest that disks form within these systems, as well (Bodenheimer et al. 2000). Terrestrial planets and the cores of giant planets are thought to form by an accretion process within a disk of dust and gas (Safronov 1969; Lissauer 1993), and therefore may be common in binary star systems. In this chapter, we present the results from numerical simulations of the final stages of terrestrial planet formation around one or both stars of a binary.

  13. Circinus X-1: a Laboratory for Studying the Accretion Phenomenon in Compact Binary X-Ray Sources. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson-Saba, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the binary X-ray source Circinus X-1 provide samples of a range of spectral and temporal behavior whose variety is thought to reflect a broad continuum of accretion conditions in an eccentric binary system. The data support an identification of three or more X-ray spectral components, probably associated with distinct emission regions.

  14. Double Degenerate Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K.

    2011-09-21

    In this study, angular momentum loss via gravitational radiation in double degenerate binary (DDB)systems (NS + NS, NS + WD, WD + WD, and AM CVn) is studied. Energy loss by gravitational waves has been estimated for each type of systems.

  15. Angular momentum exchange in white dwarf binaries accreting through direct impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sepinsky, J. F.; Kalogera, V. E-mail: vicky@northwestern.edu

    2014-04-20

    We examine the exchange of angular momentum between the component spins and the orbit in semi-detached double white dwarf binaries undergoing mass transfer through direct impact of the transfer stream. We approximate the stream as a series of discrete massive particles ejected in the ballistic limit at the inner Lagrangian point of the donor toward the accretor. This work improves upon similar earlier studies in a number of ways. First, we self-consistently calculate the total angular momentum of the orbit at all times. This includes changes in the orbital angular momentum during the ballistic trajectory of the ejected mass, as well as changes during the ejection/accretion due to the radial component of the particle's velocity. Second, we calculate the particle's ballistic trajectory for each system, which allows us to determine the precise position and velocity of the particle upon accretion. We can then include specific information about the radius of the accretor as well as the angle of impact. Finally, we ensure that the total angular momentum is conserved, which requires the donor star spin to vary self-consistently. With these improvements, we calculate the angular momentum change of the orbit and each binary component across the entire parameter space of direct impact double white dwarf binary systems. We find a significant decrease in the amount of angular momentum removed from the orbit during mass transfer, as well as cases where this process increases the angular momentum of the orbit at the expense of the spin angular momentum of the donor. We conclude that, unlike earlier claims in the literature, mass transfer through direct impact need not destabilize the binary and that the quantity and sign of the orbital angular momentum transfer depends on the binary properties, particularly the masses of the double white dwarf binary component stars. This stabilization may significantly impact the population synthesis calculations of the expected numbers of

  16. Angular momentum role in the hypercritical accretion of binary-driven hypernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, L.; Cipolletta, F.; Fryer, Chris L.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2015-10-12

    Here, the induced gravitational collapse paradigm explains a class of energetic, ${E}_{{\\rm{iso}}}\\gtrsim {10}^{52}$ erg, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with Ic supernovae, recently named binary-driven hypernovae. The progenitor is a tight binary system formed of a carbon–oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta of the exploding CO core trigger a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS, which reaches the critical mass in a few seconds, and gravitationally collapses to a black hole, emitting a GRB. In our previous simulations of this process, we adopted a spherically symmetric approximation to compute the features of the hypercritical accretion process. We here present the first estimates of the angular momentum transported by the supernova ejecta, ${L}_{{\\rm{acc}}},$ and perform numerical simulations of the angular momentum transfer to the NS during the hyperaccretion process in full general relativity. We show that the NS (1) reaches either the mass-shedding limit or the secular axisymmetric instability in a few seconds depending on its initial mass, (2) reaches a maximum dimensionless angular momentum value, ${[{cJ}/({{GM}}^{2})]}_{{\\rm{max}}}\\approx 0.7$, and (3) can support less angular momentum than the one transported by supernova ejecta, ${L}_{{\\rm{acc}}}\\gt {J}_{{\\rm{NS,max}}},$ hence there is an angular momentum excess that necessarily leads to jetted emission.

  17. Angular momentum role in the hypercritical accretion of binary-driven hypernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Becerra, L.; Cipolletta, F.; Fryer, Chris L.; ...

    2015-10-12

    Here, the induced gravitational collapse paradigm explains a class of energetic,more » $${E}_{{\\rm{iso}}}\\gtrsim {10}^{52}$$ erg, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with Ic supernovae, recently named binary-driven hypernovae. The progenitor is a tight binary system formed of a carbon–oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star (NS) companion. The supernova ejecta of the exploding CO core trigger a hypercritical accretion process onto the NS, which reaches the critical mass in a few seconds, and gravitationally collapses to a black hole, emitting a GRB. In our previous simulations of this process, we adopted a spherically symmetric approximation to compute the features of the hypercritical accretion process. We here present the first estimates of the angular momentum transported by the supernova ejecta, $${L}_{{\\rm{acc}}},$$ and perform numerical simulations of the angular momentum transfer to the NS during the hyperaccretion process in full general relativity. We show that the NS (1) reaches either the mass-shedding limit or the secular axisymmetric instability in a few seconds depending on its initial mass, (2) reaches a maximum dimensionless angular momentum value, $${[{cJ}/({{GM}}^{2})]}_{{\\rm{max}}}\\approx 0.7$$, and (3) can support less angular momentum than the one transported by supernova ejecta, $${L}_{{\\rm{acc}}}\\gt {J}_{{\\rm{NS,max}}},$$ hence there is an angular momentum excess that necessarily leads to jetted emission.« less

  18. The Dripping Handrail Model: Transient Chaos in Accretion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Karl; Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We define and study a simple dynamical model for accretion systems, the "dripping handrail" (DHR). The time evolution of this spatially extended system is a mixture of periodic and apparently random (but actually deterministic) behavior. The nature of this mixture depends on the values of its physical parameters - the accretion rate, diffusion coefficient, and density threshold. The aperiodic component is a special kind of deterministic chaos called transient chaos. The model can simultaneously exhibit both the quasiperiodic oscillations (QPO) and very low frequency noise (VLFN) that characterize the power spectra of fluctuations of several classes of accretion systems in astronomy. For this reason, our model may be relevant to many such astrophysical systems, including binary stars with accretion onto a compact object - white dwarf, neutron star, or black hole - as well as active galactic nuclei. We describe the systematics of the DHR's temporal behavior, by exploring its physical parameter space using several diagnostics: power spectra, wavelet "scalegrams," and Lyapunov exponents. In addition, we note that for large accretion rates the DHR has periodic modes; the effective pulse shapes for these modes - evaluated by folding the time series at the known period - bear a resemblance to the similarly- determined shapes for some x-ray pulsars. The pulsing observed in some of these systems may be such periodic-mode accretion, and not due to pure rotation as in the standard pulsar model.

  19. Radio Observations as a Tool to Investigate Shocks and Asymmetries in Accreting White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Jennifer H. S.

    2016-07-01

    This dissertation uses radio observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to investigate the mechanisms that power and shape accreting white dwarfs (WD) and their ejecta. We test the predictions of both simple spherical and steady-state radio emission models by examining nova V1723 Aql, nova V5589 Sgr, symbiotic CH Cyg, and two small surveys of symbiotic binaries. First, we highlight classical nova V1723 Aql with three years of radio observations alongside optical and X-ray observations. We use these observations to show that multiple outflows from the system collided to create early non-thermal shocks with a brightness temperature of ≥106 K. While the late-time radio light curve is roughly consistent an expanding thermal shell of mass 2x10-4 M⊙ solar masses, resolved images of V1723 Aql show elongated material that apparently rotates its major axis over the course of 15 months, much like what is seen in gamma-ray producing nova V959 Mon, suggesting similar structures in the two systems. Next, we examine nova V5589 Sgr, where we find that the early radio emission is dominated by a shock-powered non-thermal flare that produces strong (kTx > 33 keV) X-rays. We additionally find roughly 10-5 M⊙ solar masses of thermal bremsstrahlung emitting material, all at a distance of ~4 kpc. The similarities in the evolution of both V1723 Aql and V5589 Sgr to that of nova V959 Mon suggest that these systems may all have dense equatorial tori shaping faster flows at their poles. Turning our focus to symbiotic binaries, we first use our radio observations of CH Cyg to link the ejection of a collimated jet to a change of state in the accretion disk. We additionally estimate the amount of mass ejected during this period (10-7 M⊙ masses), and improve measurements of the period of jet precession (P=12013 ± 74 days). We then use our survey of eleven accretion-driven symbiotic systems to determine that the radio brightness of a symbiotic system could potentially

  20. The Accretion Disk of the Lithium-Depleted Young Binary St 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Calvet, Nuria; Watson, Dan M.; D'Alessio, P.; Furlan, E.; Sargent, B.; Forrest, W. J.; Uchida, K. I.; Green, J. D.; Sloan, G. C.; Chen, C. H.; Najita, J.; Kemper, F.; Herter, T. L.; Morris, P.; Barry, D. J.; Hall, P.

    2005-01-01

    We presented the infrared spectrum of the young binary system St 34 obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The IRS spectrum clearly shows excess dust emission, consistent with the suggestion of White & Hillenbrand that St 34 is accreting from a circumbinary disk. The disk emission of St 34 is low in comparison with the levels observed in typical T Tauri stars; silicate features at 10 and 20 microns are much weaker than typically seen in T Tauri stars; and excess emission is nearly absent at the shortest wavelengths observed. These features of the infrared spectrum suggest substantial grain growth (to eliminate silicate features) and possible settling of dust to the disk midplane (to reduce the continuum excess emission levels), along with a relatively evacuated inner disk, as expected due to gravitational perturbations by the binary system. Although the position of St 34 in the H-R diagram suggests an age of 8f Myr, assuming that it lies at the distance of the Taurus-Auriga molecular clouds, White & Hillenbrand could not detect any Li I absorption, which would indicate a Li depletion age of roughly 25 Myr or more. We suggest that St 34 is closer than the Taurus clouds by about 30-40 pc and has an age roughly consistent with Li depletion models. Such an advanced age would make St 34 the oldest known low-mass pre-main-sequence object with a dusty accretion disk. The persistence of optically thick dust emission well outside the binary orbit may indicate a failure to make giant planets that could effectively remove dust particles.

  1. Accretion states in X-ray binaries and their connection to GeV emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerding, Elmar

    Accretion onto compact objects is intrinsically a multi-wavelength phenomenon: it shows emis-sion components visible from the radio to GeV bands. In X-ray binaries one can well observe the evolution of a single source under changes of the accretion rate and thus study the interplay between the different emission components.I will introduce the phenomenology of X-ray bina-ries and their accretion states and present our current understanding of the interplay between the optically thin and optically thick part of the accretion flow and the jet.The recent detection of the Fermi Large Area Telescope of a variable high-energy source coinciding with the position of the x-ray binary Cygnus X-3 will be presented. Its identification with Cygnus X-3 has been secured by the detection of its orbital period in gamma rays, as well as the correlation of the LAT flux with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. This will be interpreted in the context of the accretion states of the X-ray binary.

  2. Binary Black Hole Accretion from a Circumbinary Disk: Gas Dynamics inside the Central Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Brian D.; Duffell, Paul; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; Haiman, Zoltan

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamical simulations of circumbinary disk accretion using the finite-volume code DISCO. This code solves the 2D viscous Navier-Stokes equations on a high-resolution moving mesh which shears with the fluid flow, greatly reducing advection errors in comparison with a fixed grid. We perform a series of simulations for binary mass ratios in the range 0.026 <= q <= 1.0, each lasting longer than a viscous time so that we reach a quasi-steady accretion state. In each case, we find that gas is efficiently stripped from the inner edge of the circumbinary disk and enters the cavity along accretion streams, which feed persistent "mini disks" surrounding each black hole. We find that for q >~ 0.1, the binary excites eccentricity in the inner region of the circumbinary disk, creating an overdense lump which gives rise to enhanced periodicity in the accretion rate. The dependence of the periodicity on mass ratio may provide a method for observationally inferring mass ratios from measurements of the accretion rate. We also find that for all mass ratios studied, the magnitude of the accretion onto the secondary is sufficient to drive the binary toward larger mass ratio. This suggests a mechanism for biasing mass-ratio distributions toward equal mass.

  3. Binary black hole accretion from a circumbinary disk: Gas dynamics inside the central cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Farris, Brian D.; Duffell, Paul; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; Haiman, Zoltan

    2014-03-10

    We present the results of two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamical simulations of circumbinary disk accretion using the finite-volume code DISCO. This code solves the 2D viscous Navier-Stokes equations on a high-resolution moving mesh which shears with the fluid flow, greatly reducing advection errors in comparison with a fixed grid. We perform a series of simulations for binary mass ratios in the range 0.026 ≤ q ≤ 1.0, each lasting longer than a viscous time so that we reach a quasi-steady accretion state. In each case, we find that gas is efficiently stripped from the inner edge of the circumbinary disk and enters the cavity along accretion streams, which feed persistent 'mini disks' surrounding each black hole. We find that for q ≳ 0.1, the binary excites eccentricity in the inner region of the circumbinary disk, creating an overdense lump which gives rise to enhanced periodicity in the accretion rate. The dependence of the periodicity on mass ratio may provide a method for observationally inferring mass ratios from measurements of the accretion rate. We also find that for all mass ratios studied, the magnitude of the accretion onto the secondary is sufficient to drive the binary toward larger mass ratio. This suggests a mechanism for biasing mass-ratio distributions toward equal mass.

  4. A transition in circumbinary accretion discs at a binary mass ratio of 1:25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, Daniel J.; Haiman, Zoltán; Duffell, Paul; MacFadyen, Andrew; Farris, Brian

    2016-07-01

    We study circumbinary accretion discs in the framework of the restricted three-body problem (R3Bp) and via numerically solving the height-integrated equations of viscous hydrodynamics. Varying the mass ratio of the binary, we find a pronounced change in the behaviour of the disc near mass ratio q ≡ Ms/Mp ˜ 0.04. For mass ratios above q = 0.04, solutions for the hydrodynamic flow transition from steady, to strongly fluctuating; a narrow annular gap in the surface density around the secondary's orbit changes to a hollow central cavity; and a spatial symmetry is lost, resulting in a lopsided disc. This phase transition is coincident with the mass ratio above which stable orbits do not exist around the L4 and L5 equilibrium points of the R3Bp. Using the DISCO code, we find that for thin discs, for which a gap or cavity can remain open, the mass ratio of the transition is relatively insensitive to disc viscosity and pressure. The q = 0.04 transition has relevance for the evolution of massive black hole binary+disc systems at the centres of galactic nuclei, as well as for young stellar binaries and possibly planets around brown dwarfs.

  5. Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rebecca

    About half of observed exoplanets are estimated to be in binary systems. Understanding planet formation and evolution in binaries is therefore essential for explaining observed exoplanet properties. Recently, we discovered that a highly misaligned circumstellar disk in a binary system can undergo global Kozai-Lidov (KL) oscillations of the disk inclination and eccentricity. These oscillations likely have a significant impact on the formation and orbital evolution of planets in binary star systems. Planet formation by core accretion cannot operate during KL oscillations of the disk. First, we propose to consider the process of disk mass transfer between the binary members. Secondly, we will investigate the possibility of planet formation by disk fragmentation. Disk self gravity can weaken or suppress the oscillations during the early disk evolution when the disk mass is relatively high for a narrow range of parameters. Thirdly, we will investigate the evolution of a planet whose orbit is initially aligned with respect to the disk, but misaligned with respect to the orbit of the binary. We will study how these processes relate to observations of star-spin and planet orbit misalignment and to observations of planets that appear to be undergoing KL oscillations. Finally, we will analyze the evolution of misaligned multi-planet systems. This theoretical work will involve a combination of analytic and numerical techniques. The aim of this research is to shed some light on the formation of planets in binary star systems and to contribute to NASA's goal of understanding of the origins of exoplanetary systems.

  6. Reverse Radiative Shock Experiments Relevant to Accreting Stream-Disk Impact in Interacting Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. K.; Huntington, C. M.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Marion, D. C.; Young, R.; Plewa, T.

    2011-05-01

    In many Cataclysmic Binary systems, mass onto an accretion disk produces a `hot spot’ where the infalling supersonic flow obliquely strikes the rotating accretion disk. This collision region has many ambiguities as a radiation hydrodynamic system, but shock development in the infalling flow can be modeled. Depending upon conditions, it has been argued (Armitage & Livio, ApJ 493, 898) that the shocked region may be optically thin, thick, or intermediate, which has the potential to significantly alter the hot spot's structure and emissions. We report the first experimental attempt to produce colliding flows that create a radiative reverse shock at the Omega-60 laser facility. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires producing a sufficiently fast flow (> 100 km/s) within a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable layers. We will discuss the experimental design, the available data, and our astrophysical context. Funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Prog. in High-Energy-Density Lab. Plasmas, by the Nat. Laser User Facility Prog. in NNSA-DS and by the Predictive Sci. Acad. Alliances Prog. in NNSA-ASC, under grant numbers are DE-FG52-09NA29548, DE-FG52-09NA29034, and DE-FC52-08NA28616.

  7. Accretion and activity on the post-common-envelope binary RR Caeli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, T.; Baptista, R.; Kafka, S.; Dufour, P.; Gianninas, A.; Fontaine, G.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Current scenarios for the evolution of interacting close binaries - such as cataclysmic variables (CVs) - rely mainly on our understanding of low-mass star angular momentum loss (AML) mechanisms. The coupling of stellar wind with its magnetic field, i.e., magnetic braking, is the most promising mechanism believed to drive AML in these stars. There are basically two properties thought to drive magnetic braking: the stellar magnetic field and the stellar wind. Understanding the mechanisms that drive AML therefore requires a comprehensive understanding of these two properties as well. Aims. RR Cae is a well-known nearby (d = 20 pc) eclipsing DA+M binary with an orbital period of P = 7.29 h. The system harbors a metal-rich cool DA white dwarf (WD) and a highly active M-dwarf locked in synchronous rotation. The metallicity of the WD suggests that wind accretion is taking place, which provides a good opportunity to obtain the mass-loss rate of the M-dwarf component. We aim to reach a better understanding of the AML mechanisms in close binaries by characterizing the relevant properties of the M-dwarf component of this system. Methods. We analyzed multi-epoch time-resolved high-resolution spectra of RR Cae in search for traces of magnetic activity and accretion. We selected a number of well-known chromospheric activity indicators and studied their phase-dependence and long-term behavior. Indirect-imaging tomographic techniques were also applied to provide the surface brightness distribution of the magnetically active M-dwarf. The blue part of the spectrum was modeled using a state-of-the-art atmosphere model to constrain the WD properties and its metal enrichment. The latter was used to improve the determination of the mass-accretion rate from the M-dwarf wind. Results. Doppler imaging of the M-dwarf component of RR Cae reveals a polar feature similar to those observed in fast-rotating solar-type stars. Analysis of tomographic reconstruction of the Hα emission

  8. Binary Active Galactic Nuclei in Stripe 82: Constraints on Synchronized Black Hole Accretion in Major Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hai; Wrobel, J. M.; Myers, A. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Yan, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Representing simultaneous black hole accretion during a merger, binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) could provide valuable observational constraints to models of galaxy mergers and AGN triggering. High-resolution radio interferometer imaging offers a promising method for identifying a large and uniform sample of binary AGNs because it probes a generic feature of nuclear activity and is free from dust obscuration. Our previous search yielded 52 strong candidates of kiloparsec-scale binaries over the 92 deg2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 area with 2″-resolution Very Large Array (VLA) images. Here we present 0.″3-resolution VLA 6 GHz observations for six candidates that have complete optical spectroscopy. The new data confirm the binary nature of four candidates and identify the other two as line of sight projections of radio structures from single AGNs. The four binary AGNs at z ˜ 0.1 reside in major mergers with projected separations of 4.2-12 kpc. Optical spectral modeling shows that their hosts have stellar masses between 10.3\\lt {{log}}({M}\\star /{M}⊙ )\\lt 11.5 and velocity dispersions between 120\\lt {σ }\\star \\lt 320 km s-1. The radio emission is compact (≲0.″4) and shows a steep spectrum (-1.8\\lt α \\lt -0.5) at 6 GHz. The host galaxy properties and the Eddington-scaled accretion rates broadly correlate with the excitation state, similar to the general radio-AGN population at low redshifts. Our estimated binary AGN fraction indicates that simultaneous accretion occurs ≥slant {23}-8+15% of the time when a kiloparsec-scale galaxy pair is detectable as a radio-AGN. The high duty cycle of the binary phase strongly suggests that major mergers can trigger and synchronize black hole accretion.

  9. Solar System binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    The discovery of binaries in each of the major populations of minor bodies in the solar system is propelling a rapid growth of heretofore unattainable physical information. The availability of mass and density constraints for minor bodies opens the door to studies of internal structure, comparisons with meteorite samples, and correlations between bulk-physical and surface-spectral properties. The number of known binaries is now more than 70 and is growing rapidly. A smaller number have had the extensive followup observations needed to derive mass and albedo information, but this list is growing as well. It will soon be the case that we will know more about the physical parameters of objects in the Kuiper Belt than has been known about asteroids in the Main Belt for the last 200 years. Another important aspect of binaries is understanding the mechanisms that lead to their formation and survival. The relative sizes and separations of binaries in the different minor body populations point to more than one mechanism for forming bound pairs. Collisions appear to play a major role in the Main Belt. Rotational and/or tidal fission may be important in the Near Earth population. For the Kuiper Belt, capture in multi-body interactions may be the preferred formation mechanism. However, all of these conclusions remain tentative and limited by observational and theoretical incompleteness. Observational techniques for identifying binaries are equally varied. High angular resolution observations from space and from the ground are critical for detection of the relatively distant binaries in the Main Belt and the Kuiper Belt. Radar has been the most productive method for detection of Near Earth binaries. Lightcurve analysis is an independent technique that is capable of exploring phase space inaccessible to direct observations. Finally, spacecraft flybys have played a crucial paradigm-changing role with discoveries that unlocked this now-burgeoning field.

  10. MOCCA-SURVEY database I. Accreting white dwarf binary systems in globular clusters - II. Cataclysmic variables - progenitors and population at birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, Diogo; Giersz, Mirek; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J.; Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Askar, Abbas

    2017-02-01

    This is the second in a series of papers associated with cataclysmic variables (CVs) and related objects, formed in a suite of simulations for globular cluster evolution performed with the MOCCA Monte Carlo code. We study the properties of our simulated CV populations throughout the entire cluster evolution. We find that dynamics extends the range of binary CV progenitor properties, causing CV formation from binary progenitors that would otherwise not become CVs. The CV formation rate in our simulations can be separated into two regimes: an initial burst (≲1 Gyr) connected with the formation of the most massive white dwarfs, followed by a nearly constant formation rate. This result holds for all models regardless of the adopted initial conditions, even when most CVs form dynamically. Given the cluster age-dependence of CV properties, we argue that direct comparisons to observed Galactic field CVs could be misleading, since cluster CVs can be up to four times older than their field counterparts. Our results also illustrate that, due mainly to unstable mass transfer, some CVs that form in our simulations are destroyed before the present day. Finally, some field CVs might have originated from globular clusters, as found in our simulations, although the fraction of such escapers should be small relative to the entire Galactic field CV population.

  11. X-ray reverberation of the inner accretion disc in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttley, Phil; Cassatella, Pablo; Wilkinson, Tony; Wilms, Joern; Pottschmidt, Katja; Hanke, Manfred; Boeck, Moritz

    Rapid fluctuations in the Comptonised emission close to accreting compact objects should lead to reverberation of the accretion disc, both through X-ray heating of the disc (to produce a variable blackbody component) and also correlated changes in the disc reflection component, including the iron K line. If they can be detected, these reverberation signatures can provide powerful constraints on the geometry of the disc and Comptonising regions. The measure-ment of the reverberation delays will provide a natural 'yardstick' to measure the inner disc radius (in km, not R/M!) and so constrain the black hole spin or the neutron star equation of state. I will present new results from XMM-Newton and RXTE observations, which confirm the presence of X-ray reverberation in X-ray binary systems and allow the first measurement of reverberation delays. These results are a pathfinder which highlights the enormous po-tential of high-throughput spectral-timing with the proposed HTRS instrument on board the International X-ray Observatory.

  12. Potential Impacts of ASTRO-H on the Studies of Accreting White Dwarf Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Koji; Yuasa, Tadayuki; Harayama, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takayuki; Ishida, Manabu; Long, Knox S.; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; ASTRO-H Team

    2015-01-01

    Interacting binaries in which a white dwarf accretes material from a companion - cataclysmic variables (CVs) in which the mass loss is via Roche-lobe overflow, and symbiotic stars in which the white dwarf captures the wind of a late type giant - are important populations of X-ray sources. Accretion onto the white dwarf surface often creates shocks with temperatures in the 10-50 keV range. If the post-shock region stays optically thin, it produces multi-temperature plasma emission over the medium to hard X-ray band (~0.5-50 keV). This makes them well-matched to the capabilities of the upcoming ASTRO-H mission, which will allow high-resolution spectroscopy in the 0.3-10 keV range with the microcalorimeter instrument, Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS), and simultaneous imaging spectroscopy in the 5-80 keV range with the Hard X-ray Imager (HXI). We will highlight several areas in which ASTRO-H can make unique contributions to the studies of these binaries. For example, X-ray emitting plasma in many of these systems are expected to have such high densities that only the SXS can provide density diagnostics. The prominent Fe K lines will allow dynamical studies of the X-ray emitting plasma for which velocities of order 1,000 km s-2 are expected. Finally, we discuss the potential of ASTRO-H to study the reflection off the white dwarf surface, both via the continuum bump observable with the HXI and the 6.4 keV fluorescent iron line with the SXS. For near Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs, the gravitational redshift of the latter is within reach of the instrumental capability and may provide the best direct measurement of their masses.

  13. BROWN DWARF BINARIES FROM DISINTEGRATING TRIPLE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo E-mail: Seppo.Mikkola@utu.fi

    2015-04-15

    Binaries in which both components are brown dwarfs (BDs) are being discovered at an increasing rate, and their properties may hold clues to their origin. We have carried out 200,000 N-body simulations of three identical stellar embryos with masses drawn from a Chabrier IMF and embedded in a molecular core. The bodies are initially non-hierarchical and undergo chaotic motions within the cloud core, while accreting using Bondi–Hoyle accretion. The coupling of dynamics and accretion often leads to one or two dominant bodies controlling the center of the cloud core, while banishing the other(s) to the lower-density outskirts, leading to stunted growth. Eventually each system transforms either to a bound hierarchical configuration or breaks apart into separate single and binary components. The orbital motion is followed for 100 Myr. In order to illustrate 200,000 end-states of such dynamical evolution with accretion, we introduce the “triple diagnostic diagram,” which plots two dimensionless numbers against each other, representing the binary mass ratio and the mass ratio of the third body to the total system mass. Numerous freefloating BD binaries are formed in these simulations, and statistical properties are derived. The separation distribution function is in good correspondence with observations, showing a steep rise at close separations, peaking around 13 AU and declining more gently, reaching zero at separations greater than 200 AU. Unresolved BD triple systems may appear as wider BD binaries. Mass ratios are strongly peaked toward unity, as observed, but this is partially due to the initial assumptions. Eccentricities gradually increase toward higher values, due to the lack of viscous interactions in the simulations, which would both shrink the orbits and decrease their eccentricities. Most newborn triple systems are unstable and while there are 9209 ejected BD binaries at 1 Myr, corresponding to about 4% of the 200,000 simulations, this number has grown to

  14. Brown Dwarf Binaries from Disintegrating Triple Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo

    2015-04-01

    Binaries in which both components are brown dwarfs (BDs) are being discovered at an increasing rate, and their properties may hold clues to their origin. We have carried out 200,000 N-body simulations of three identical stellar embryos with masses drawn from a Chabrier IMF and embedded in a molecular core. The bodies are initially non-hierarchical and undergo chaotic motions within the cloud core, while accreting using Bondi-Hoyle accretion. The coupling of dynamics and accretion often leads to one or two dominant bodies controlling the center of the cloud core, while banishing the other(s) to the lower-density outskirts, leading to stunted growth. Eventually each system transforms either to a bound hierarchical configuration or breaks apart into separate single and binary components. The orbital motion is followed for 100 Myr. In order to illustrate 200,000 end-states of such dynamical evolution with accretion, we introduce the “triple diagnostic diagram,” which plots two dimensionless numbers against each other, representing the binary mass ratio and the mass ratio of the third body to the total system mass. Numerous freefloating BD binaries are formed in these simulations, and statistical properties are derived. The separation distribution function is in good correspondence with observations, showing a steep rise at close separations, peaking around 13 AU and declining more gently, reaching zero at separations greater than 200 AU. Unresolved BD triple systems may appear as wider BD binaries. Mass ratios are strongly peaked toward unity, as observed, but this is partially due to the initial assumptions. Eccentricities gradually increase toward higher values, due to the lack of viscous interactions in the simulations, which would both shrink the orbits and decrease their eccentricities. Most newborn triple systems are unstable and while there are 9209 ejected BD binaries at 1 Myr, corresponding to about 4% of the 200,000 simulations, this number has grown to

  15. Planetary Formation and Dynamics in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    As of today, over 500 exoplanets have been detected since the first exoplanet was discovered around a solar-like star in 1995. The planets in binaries could be common as stars are usually born in binary or multiple star systems. Although current observations show that the planet host rate in multiple star systems is around 17%, this fraction should be considered as a lower limit because of noticeable selection effects against binaries in planet searches. Most of the current known planet-bearing binary systems are S-types, meaning the companion star acts as a distant satellite, typically orbiting the inner star-planet system over 100 AU away. Nevertheless, there are four systems with a smaller separation of 20 AU, including the Gamma Cephei, GJ 86, HD 41004, and HD 196885. In addition to the planets in circumprimary (S-type) orbits discussed above, planets in circumbinary (P-type) orbits have been found in only two systems. In this thesis, we mainly study the planet formation in the S-type binary systems. In chapter 1, we first summarize current observational facts of exoplanets both in single-star and binary systems, then review the theoretical models of planet formation, with special attention to the application in binary systems. Perturbative effects from stellar companions render the planet formation process in binary systems even more complex than that in single-star systems. The perturbations from a binary companion can excite planetesimal orbits, and increase their mutual impact velocities to the values that might exceed their escape velocity or even the critical velocity for the onset of eroding collisions. The intermediate stage of the formation process---from planetesimals to planetary embryos---is thus the most problematic. In the following chapters, we investigate whether and how the planet formation goes through such a problematic stage. In chapter 2, we study the effects of gas dissipation on the planetesimals' mutual accretion. We find that in a

  16. Interference as an Origin of the Peaked Noise in Accreting X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veledina, Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    We propose a physical model for the peaked noise in the X-ray power density spectra of accreting X-ray binaries. We interpret its appearance as an interference of two Comptonization continua: one coming from the upscattering of seed photons from the cold thin disk and the other fed by the synchrotron emission of the hot flow. Variations of both X-ray components are caused by fluctuations in mass accretion rate, but there is a delay between them corresponding to the propagation timescale from the disk Comptonization radius to the region of synchrotron Comptonization. If the disk and synchrotron Comptonization are correlated, the humps in the power spectra are harmonically related and the dips between them appear at frequencies related as odd numbers 1:3:5. If they are anti-correlated, the humps are related as 1:3:5, but the dips are harmonically related. Similar structures are expected to be observed in accreting neutron star binaries and supermassive black holes. The delay can be easily recovered from the frequency of peaked noise and further used to constrain the combination of the viscosity parameter and disk height-to-radius ratio α(H/R)2 of the accretion flow. We model multi-peak power spectra of black hole X-ray binaries GX 339-4 and XTE J1748-288 to constrain these parameters.

  17. An accurate geometric distance to the compact binary SS Cygni vindicates accretion disc theory.

    PubMed

    Miller-Jones, J C A; Sivakoff, G R; Knigge, C; Körding, E G; Templeton, M; Waagen, E O

    2013-05-24

    Dwarf novae are white dwarfs accreting matter from a nearby red dwarf companion. Their regular outbursts are explained by a thermal-viscous instability in the accretion disc, described by the disc instability model that has since been successfully extended to other accreting systems. However, the prototypical dwarf nova, SS Cygni, presents a major challenge to our understanding of accretion disc theory. At the distance of 159 ± 12 parsecs measured by the Hubble Space Telescope, it is too luminous to be undergoing the observed regular outbursts. Using very long baseline interferometric radio observations, we report an accurate, model-independent distance to SS Cygni that places the source substantially closer at 114 ± 2 parsecs. This reconciles the source behavior with our understanding of accretion disc theory in accreting compact objects.

  18. Strong Role of Non-stationary Accretion in Spectral Transitions of X-ray Binaries and Implications for Revealing the Accretion Geometry and Broadband Radiation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenfei; Yan, Zhen; Tang, Jing; Wu, Yuxiang

    Observations of spectral transitions from the hard state to the soft state in bright X-ray binaries show strong evidence that the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate plays a dominant role in determining the luminosity at which the spectral transition occurs. This indicates that in many cases, especially accretion in transients during outbursts, the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate is the primary parameter driving high energy phenomena. Although this goes beyond the scope of current stationary model of disk and jet, it tells us that it is the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate that we need to trace observationally. Since state transition is a broadband phenomenon, multi-wavelength observations of spectral transitions of different rate-of-changes of mass accretion rate are expect to reveal the accretion geometry and broadband radiation mechanisms.

  19. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. observation of one of the two objects has taken place and the data were received in late November. The second object is yet to be observed. Over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  20. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was not observed until September of 2002. Data analysis for the new observation is underway. over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  1. LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF DOUBLE WHITE DWARF BINARIES ACCRETING THROUGH DIRECT IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Kyle; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Sepinsky, Jeremy E-mail: vicky@northwestern.edu

    2015-06-10

    We calculate the long-term evolution of angular momentum in double white dwarf binaries undergoing direct impact accretion over a broad range of parameter space. We allow the rotation rate of both components to vary and account for the exchange of angular momentum between the spins of the white dwarfs and the orbit, while conserving the total angular momentum. We include gravitational, tidal, and mass transfer effects in the orbital evolution, and allow the Roche radius of the donor star to vary with both the stellar mass and the rotation rate. We examine the long-term stability of these systems, focusing in particular on those systems that may be progenitors of AM CVn or SNe Ia. We find that our analysis yields an increase in the predicted number of stable systems compared to that in previous studies. Additionally, we find that by properly accounting for the effects of asynchronism between the donor and the orbit on the Roche-lobe size, we eliminate oscillations in the orbital parameters, which were found in previous studies. Removing these oscillations can reduce the peak mass transfer rate in some systems, keeping them from entering an unstable mass transfer phase.

  2. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: The nature of accretion disks of close binary stars: overreflection instability and developed turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Bisikalo, D. V.

    2008-06-01

    The current status of the physics of accretion disks in close binary stars is reviewed, with an emphasis on the hydrodynamic overreflection instability, which is a factor leading to the accretion disk turbulence. The estimated turbulent viscosity coefficients are in good agreement with observations and explain the high angular momentum transfer rate and the measured accretion rate. Based on the observations, a power-law spectrum for the developed turbulence is obtained.

  3. The End of Accretion: The X-Ray Binary/Millisecond Pulsar Transition Object PSR J1023+0038

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Millisecond radio pulsars (MSRPs), those spinning hundreds of times per second, have long been understood to be old pulsars that have been spun up by the accretion of matter from a companion in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) phase. Yet the details of this transformation, particularly the end of the accretion process and the birth of a radio pulsar, remain mysterious. I will describe the discovery and detailed study of the first object known to transition between MSRP and LMXB states, PSR J1023+0038. By dint of a multiwavelength campaign of observations in the RMSP state, we are able to measure all the key system parameters and show the existence of an X-ray shock close to the pulsar-facing side of the companion. Since the discovery of PSR J1023+0038, two more objects (XSS J12270-4859 and M28I) have been found to make the same transition, and the study of these transitioning objects has become an active field of research. Most interestingly, PSR J1023+0038 has transitioned back into an LMXB state, with an active accretion disk and a puzzling increase in gamma-ray flux. Our detailed picture of the system allows us to test models of accretion against the phenomena we observe in PSR J1023+0038, and in fact these observations challenge current models: in spite of the low luminosity of the system (and low inferred accretion rate) some material is penetrating the centrifugal barrier and falling on the neutron-star surface. Key evidence for explaining this puzzling behaviour will come when PSR J1023+0038 returns to an MSRP state and we are able to compare pulsar timing models from after the LMXB state with those we obtained in this work.

  4. The binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1023+0038 during its accretion state - I. Optical variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbaz, T.; Linares, M.; Nevado, S. P.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Casares, J.; Dhillon, V. S.; Marsh, T. R.; Littlefair, S.; Leckngam, A.; Poshyachinda, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present time-resolved optical photometry of the binary millisecond `redback' pulsar PSR J1023+0038 (=AY Sex) during its low-mass X-ray binary phase. The light curves taken between 2014 January and April show an underlying sinusoidal modulation due to the irradiated secondary star and accretion disc. We also observe superimposed rapid flaring on time-scales as short as ˜20 s with amplitudes of ˜0.1-0.5 mag and additional large flare events on time-scales of ˜5-60 min with amplitudes of ˜0.5-1.0 mag. The power density spectrum of the optical flare light curves is dominated by a red-noise component, typical of aperiodic activity in X-ray binaries. Simultaneous X-ray and UV observations by the Swift satellite reveal strong correlations that are consistent with X-ray reprocessing of the UV light, most likely in the outer regions of the accretion disc. On some nights we also observe sharp-edged, rectangular, flat-bottomed dips randomly distributed in orbital phase, with a median duration of ˜250 s and a median ingress/egress time of ˜20 s. These rectangular dips are similar to the mode-switching behaviour between disc `active' and `passive' luminosity states, observed in the X-ray light curves of other redback millisecond pulsars. This is the first time that the optical analogue of the X-ray mode-switching has been observed. The properties of the passive- and active-state light curves can be explained in terms of clumpy accretion from a trapped inner accretion disc near the corotation radius, resulting in rectangular, flat-bottomed optical and X-ray light curves.

  5. Superorbital Periodic Modulation in Wind-Accretion High-Mass X-Ray Binaries from Swift Burst Alert Telescope Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbet, Robin H. D.; Krimm, Hans A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery using data from the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) of superorbital modulation in the wind-accretion supergiant high-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1909+07 (= X 1908+075), IGR J16418-4532, and IGR J16479-4514. Together with already known superorbital periodicities in 2S 0114+650 and IGR J16493-4348, the systems exhibit a monotonic relationship between superorbital and orbital periods. These systems include both supergiant fast X-ray transients and classical supergiant systems, and have a range of inclination angles. This suggests an underlying physical mechanism which is connected to the orbital period. In addition to these sources with clear detections of superorbital periods, IGR J16393-4643 (= AX J16390.4-4642) is identified as a system that may have superorbital modulation due to the coincidence of low-amplitude peaks in power spectra derived from BAT, Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array, and International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory light curves. 1E 1145.1-6141 may also be worthy of further attention due to the amount of low-frequency modulation of its light curve. However, we find that the presence of superorbital modulation is not a universal feature of wind-accretion supergiant X-ray binaries.

  6. THE STRUCTURE OF THE ACCRETION DISK IN THE ACCRETION DISK CORONA X-RAY BINARY 4U 1822-371 AT OPTICAL AND ULTRAVIOLET WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Robinson, Edward L.; Cornell, Mark E.; Hynes, Robert I.; Ashcraft, Teresa A.

    2010-01-20

    The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy of 4U 1822-371 with the Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3 m SMARTS telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. We use the new data to construct its UV/optical spectral energy distribution and its orbital light curve in the UV, V, and J bands. We derive an improved ephemeris for the optical eclipses and confirm that the orbital period is changing rapidly, indicating extremely high rates of mass flow in the system, and we show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km s{sup -1}. We show that the disk has a vertically extended, optically thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to approx0.5 of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically thick base of a disk wind, not as the optical counterpart of the ADC. Like previous models of 4U 1822-371, ours needs a tall obscuring wall near the edge of the accretion disk, but we interpret the wall as a layer of cooler material at the base of the disk wind, not as a tall, luminous disk rim.

  7. Accretion and Outflows in X-ray Binaries: What's Really Going on During X-ray Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Rachel K. D.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Buxton, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    X-ray binaries, consisting of a star and a stellar-mass black hole, are wonderful laboratories for studying accretion and outflows. They evolve on timescales quite accessible to us, unlike their supermassive cousins, and allow the possibility of gaining a deeper understanding of these two common astrophysical processes. Different wavelength regimes reveal different aspects of the systems: radio emission is largely generated by outflows and jets, X-ray emission by inner accretion flows, and optical/infrared (OIR) emission by the outer disk and companion star. The search for relationships between these different wavelengths is thus an area of active research, aiming to reveal deeper connections between accretion and outflows.Initial evidence for a strong, tight correlation between radio and X-ray emission has weakened as further observations and newly-discovered sources have been obtained. This has led to discussions of multiple tracks or clusters, or the possibility that no overall relation exists for the currently-known population of X-ray binaries. Our ability to distinguish among these options is hampered by a relative lack of observations at lower luminosities, and especially of truly X-ray quiescent (non-outbursting) systems. Although X-ray binaries spend the bulk of their existence in quiescence, few quiescent sources have been observed and multiple observations of individual sources are largely nonexistent. Here we discuss new observations of the lowest-luminosity quiescent X-ray binary, A0620-00, and the place this object occupies in investigations of the radio/X-ray plane. For the first time, we also incorporate simultaneous OIR data with the radio and X-ray data.In December 2013 we took simultaneous observations of A0620-00 in the X-ray (Chandra), the radio (EVLA), and the OIR (SMARTS 1.3m). These X-ray and radio data allowed us to investigate similarities among quiescent X-ray binaries, and changes over time for this individual object, in the radio

  8. Accretion-powered Pulsations in an Apparently Quiescent Neutron Star Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Anne M.; Bogdanov, Slavko; Patruno, Alessandro; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Deller, Adam T.; Bassa, Cees; Janssen, Gemma H.; Kaspi, Vicky M.; Lyne, Andrew G.; Stappers, Ben W.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; D'Angelo, Caroline R.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2015-07-01

    Accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars (AMXPs) are an important subset of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in which coherent X-ray pulsations can be observed during occasional, bright outbursts (X-ray luminosity {L}{{X}}˜ {10}36 {erg} {{{s}}}-1). These pulsations show that matter is being channeled onto the neutron star’s magnetic poles. However, such sources spend most of their time in a low-luminosity, quiescent state ({L}{{X}}≲ {10}34 {erg} {{{s}}}-1), where the nature of the accretion flow onto the neutron star (if any) is not well understood. Here we report that the millisecond pulsar/LMXB transition object PSR J1023+0038 intermittently shows coherent X-ray pulsations at luminosities nearly 100 times fainter than observed in any other AMXP. We conclude that in spite of its low luminosity, PSR J1023+0038 experiences episodes of channeled accretion, a discovery that challenges existing models for accretion onto magnetized neutron stars.

  9. X-ray accretion signatures in the close CTTS binary V4046 Sagittarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, H. M.; Liefke, C.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Robrade, J.; Ness, J.-U.

    2006-11-01

    We present Chandra HETGS observations of the classical T Tauri star (CTTS) V4046 Sgr. The He-like triplets of O VII, Ni IX, and Si XIII are clearly detected. Similar to the CTTS TW Hya and BP Tau, the forbidden lines of O VII and Ne IX are weak compared to the intercombination line, indicating high plasma densities in the X-ray emitting regions. The Si XIII triplet, however, is within the low-density limit, in agreement with the predictions of the accretion funnel infall model with an additional stellar corona. V4046 Sgr is the first close binary exhibiting these features. Together with previous high-resolution X-ray data on TW Hya and BP Tau, and in contrast to T Tau, now three out of four CTTS show evidence of accretion funnels.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF THE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 3FGL J1544.6–1125 AS A TRANSITIONAL MILLISECOND PULSAR BINARY IN AN ACCRETING STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Halpern, Jules P.

    2015-04-20

    We present X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical observations of 1RXS J154439.4–112820, the most probable counterpart of the unassociated Fermi-LAT source 3FGL J1544.6–1125. The optical data reveal rapid variability, which is a feature of accreting systems. The X-rays exhibit large-amplitude variations in the form of fast switching (within ∼10 s) between two distinct flux levels that differ by a factor of ≈10. The detailed optical and X-ray behavior is virtually identical to that seen in the accretion-disk-dominated states of the transitional millisecond pulsar (MSP) binaries PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270–4859, which are also associated with γ-ray sources. Based on the available observational evidence, we conclude that 1RXS J154439.4–112820 and 3FGL J1544.6–1125 are the same object, with the X-rays arising from intermittent low-luminosity accretion onto an MSP and the γ-rays originating from an accretion-driven outflow. 1RXS J154439.4–112820 is only the fourth γ-ray-emitting low-mass X-ray binary system to be identified and is likely to sporadically undergo transformations to a non-accreting rotation-powered pulsar system.

  11. CLOSE STELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS BY GRAZING ENVELOPE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Soker, Noam

    2015-02-20

    I suggest a spiral-in process in which a stellar companion grazes the envelope of a giant star while both the orbital separation and the giant radius shrink simultaneously, forming a close binary system. The binary system might be viewed as evolving in a constant state of 'just entering a common envelope (CE) phase.' In cases where this process takes place, it can be an alternative to CE evolution where the secondary star is immersed in the giant's envelope. Grazing envelope evolution (GEE) is made possible only if the companion manages to accrete mass at a high rate and launches jets that remove the outskirts of the giant envelope, hence preventing the formation of a CE. The high accretion rate is made possible by the accretion disk launching jets which efficiently carry the excess angular momentum and energy from the accreted mass. The orbital decay itself is caused by the gravitational interaction of the secondary star with the envelope inward of its orbit, i.e., dynamical friction (gravitational tide). Mass loss through the second Lagrangian point can carry additional angular momentum and envelope mass. The GEE lasts for tens to hundreds of years. The high accretion rate, with peaks lasting from months to years, might lead to a bright object referred to as the intermediate luminosity optical transient (Red Novae; Red Transients). A bipolar nebula and/or equatorial ring are formed around the binary remnant.

  12. Contrasting Behaviour from Two Be/X-ray Binary Pulsars: Insights into Differing Neutron Star Accretion Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. J.; Drave, S. P.; Hill, A. B.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Bird, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the identification of two periodic X-ray signals coming from the direction of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). On detection with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the 175.4 s and 85.4 s pulsations were considered to originate from new Be/X-ray binary (BeXRB) pulsars with unknown locations. Using rapid follow-up INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations, we show the first pulsar (designated SXP175) to be coincident with a candidate high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) in the northern bar region of the SMC undergoing a small Type II outburst. The orbital period (87d) and spectral class (B0-B0.5IIIe) of this system are determined and presented here for the first time. The second pulsar is shown not to be new at all, but is consistent with being SXP91.1 - a pulsar discovered at the very beginning of the 13 year long RXTE key monitoring programme of the SMC. Whilst it is theoretically possible for accreting neutron stars to change spin period so dramatically over such a short time, the X-ray and optical data available for this source suggest this spin-up is continuous during long phases of X-ray quiescence, where accretion driven spin-up of the neutron star should be minimal.

  13. The Behavior of Accretion Disks in Low Mass X-ray Binaries: Disk Winds and Alpha Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayless, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation presents research on two low mass X-ray binaries. The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy with the ACS/SBC on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3-m SMARTS telescope at CTIO. We show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km/s as determined from the Doppler width of the C IV emission line. The broad and shallow eclipse indicates that the disk has a vertically-extended, optically-thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to 50% of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically-thick base of the disk wind. V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115) is a low mass X-ray binary which continues to be a black hole candidate. We have new photometric data of this system from the Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope's high speed CCD photometer at McDonald Observatory. The light curve is largely sinusoidal which we model with two components: a constant light source from the disk and a sinusoidal modulation at the orbital period from the irradiated face of the companion star. This is a radical re-interpretation of the orbital light curve. We do not require a large or asymmetric disk rim to account for the modulation in the light curve. Thus, the orbital inclination is unconstrained in our new model, removing the foundation for any claims of the compact object being a black hole.

  14. Evolution of Close Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yakut, K; Eggleton, P

    2005-01-24

    We collected data on the masses, radii, etc. of three classes of close binary stars: low-temperature contact binaries (LTCBs), near-contact binaries (NCBs), and detached close binaries (DCBs). They restrict themselves to systems where (1) both components are, at least arguably, near the Main Sequence, (2) the periods are less than a day, and (3) there is both spectroscopic and photometric analysis leading to reasonably reliable data. They discuss the possible evolutionary connections between these three classes, emphasizing the roles played by mass loss and angular momentum loss in rapidly-rotating cool stars.

  15. Infalling clouds on to supermassive black hole binaries - I. Formation of discs, accretion and gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicovic, F. G.; Cuadra, J.; Sesana, A.; Stasyszyn, F.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Tanaka, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that most - if not all - galaxies harbour a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus; hence binaries of these massive objects are an inevitable product of the hierarchical evolution of structures in the Universe, and represent an important but thus-far elusive phase of galaxy evolution. Gas accretion via a circumbinary disc is thought to be important for the dynamical evolution of SMBH binaries, as well as in producing luminous emission that can be used to infer their properties. One plausible source of the gaseous fuel is clumps of gas formed due to turbulence and gravitational instabilities in the interstellar medium, that later fall towards and interact with the binary. In this context, we model numerically the evolution of turbulent clouds in near-radial infall on to equal-mass SMBH binaries, using a modified version of the SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics) code GADGET-3. We present a total of 12 simulations that explore different possible pericentre distances and relative inclinations, and show that the formation of circumbinary discs and discs around each SMBH (`mini-discs') depend on those parameters. We also study the dynamics of the formed discs, and the variability of the feeding rate on to the SMBHs in the different configurations.

  16. X-ray observations of the accreting Be/X-ray binary pulsar A 0535+26 in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, I.

    2009-04-01

    Neutron stars are compact objects, characterized by R~10-14 km radius, M~1.4Msun and extremely high central densities ~10e15 g/cm^3. If they are part of a binary system, a flow of matter can take place from the companion star onto the neutron star. The accretion of matter onto neutron stars is one of the most powerful sources of energy in the universe. The accretion of matter takes place under extreme physical conditions, with magnetic fields in the range B~10^(8-15)G, which are impossible to reproduce on terrestrial laboratories. Therefore, accreting neutron stars are unique laboratories to study the matter under extreme conditions. In this thesis, X-ray observations of the accreting Be/X-ray binary A 0535+26 during a normal (type I) outburst are presented. In this system, the neutron star orbits around the optical companion HDE 245770 in an eccentric orbit, and sometimes presents X-ray outbursts (giant or normal) associated with the passage of the neutron star through the periastron. After more than eleven years of quiescence, A 0535+26 showed outbursting activity in 2005. The normal outburst analyzed in this work took place in August/September 2005, and reached a maximum X-ray flux of ~400 mCrab in the 5-100 kev range. The outburst, which lasted for ~30 days, was observed with the RXTE and INTEGRAL observatories. We have measured the spectrum of the source. In particular, two absorption-like features, interpreted as fundamental and first harmonic cyclotron resonant scattering features, have been detected at E~46 kev and E~102 kev with INTEGRAL and RXTE. Cyclotron lines are the only direct way to measure the magnetic field of a neutron star. Our observations have allowed to confirm the magnetic field of A 0535+26 at the site of the X-ray emission to be B~5x10^12 G. We studied the luminosity dependence of the cyclotron line in A 0535+26, and contrary to other sources, we found no significant variation of the cyclotron line energy with the luminosity. Changes of

  17. Spiral structures and temperature distribution in the quiescent accretion disc of the cataclysmic binary V2051 Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, A.; Waniak, W.; Preston, G.; Pych, W.

    2016-12-01

    We present the capabilities of our new code for obtaining Doppler maps implementing the maximum likelihood approach. As test data, we used observations of the dwarf nova V2051 Ophiuchi. The system was observed in quiescence at least 16 d before the onset of the next outburst. Using Doppler maps obtained for ten emission lines covering three orbital cycles, we detected spiral structures in the accretion disc of V2051 Oph. However, these structures could be biased as our data sampled the orbital period of the binary at only eight different orbital phases. Our Doppler maps show evolution from a one-arm wave structure in Hα to two-armed waves in the other lines. The location of the two-arm structures agrees with simulations showing tidally driven spiral waves in the accretion disc. During consecutive cycles, the qualitative characteristics of the detected structures remained similar but the central absorption increased. For the first time, using the Doppler tomography method, we obtained temperature maps of the accretion disc. However, taking into account all the assumptions involved when using our method to retrieve them, the result should be treated with caution. Our maps present a relatively flat distribution of the temperature over the disc, showing no temperature increase at the location of the spiral arms. Using `ring masking', we have revealed an ionized region located close to the expected location of stream-disc interactions. We found the average temperature of the accretion disc to be 5600 K, which is below the critical limit deduced from the disc instability model.

  18. A test of truncation in the accretion discs of X-ray Binaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckersall, A.

    2016-06-01

    The truncated-disc model is generally used to help explain the change between the soft and hard states in X-ray Binaries, where the standard accretion disc is truncated in the inner regions and replaced by a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. There is still disagreement though in the extent of this truncation, particularly in at what point truncation begins. Here we analyze XMM EPIC-pn spectra in both the soft and hard states for a number of galactic XRBs, along with RGS data and the latest absorption and emission models to get an independent fit for the ISM column densities for each source. Specifically, we assume the 'canonical' model where the luminous accretion disc extends down to the innermost stable orbit at 6r_g, and construct a spectral model accounting for thermal, reflection and Compton processes ensuring consistent geometrical properties of the models. Rather than attempting to infer the inner disc location from spectral fitting and/or reflection models, we instead attempt a direct test of whether a consistent model will fit assuming no truncation. We discuss the implications for emission models of XRBs.

  19. Accretion and Magnetic Reconnection in the Pre-Main Sequence Binary DQ Tau as Revealed through High-Cadence Optical Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Ardila, David R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Ciardi, David R.; Herczeg, Gregory; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Vodniza, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Protostellar disks are integral to the formation and evolution of low-mass stars and planets. A paradigm for the star-disk interaction has been extensively developed through theory and observation in the case of single stars. Most stars, however, form in binaries or higher order systems where the distribution of disk material and mass flows are more complex. Pre-main sequence (PMS) binary stars can have up to three accretion disks: two circumstellar disks and a circumbinary disk separated by a dynamically cleared gap. Theory suggests that mass may periodically flow in an accretion stream from a circumbinary disk across the gap onto circumstellar disks or stellar surfaces.The archetype for this theory is the eccentric, PMS binary DQ Tau. Moderate-cadence broadband photometry (~10 observations per orbital period) has shown pulsed brightening events near most periastron passages, just as numerical simulations would predict for a binary of similar orbital parameters. While this observed behavior supports the accretion stream theory, it is not exclusive to variable accretion rates. Magnetic reconnection events (flares) during the collision of stellar magnetospheres at periastron (when separated by 8 stellar radii) could produce the same periodic, broadband behavior when observed at a one-day cadence. Further evidence for magnetic activity comes from gyrosynchrotron, radio flares (typical of stellar flares) observed near multiple periastron passages. To reveal the physical mechanism seen in DQ Tau's moderate-cadence observations, we have obtained continuous, moderate-cadence, multi-band photometry over 10 orbital periods (LCOGT 1m network), supplemented with 32 nights of minute-cadence photometry centered on 4 separate periastron passages (WIYN 0.9m; APO ARCSAT). With detailed lightcurve morphologies we distinguish between the gradual rise and fall on multi-day time-scales predicted by the accretion stream theory and the hour time-scale, rapid-rise and exponential

  20. High-ionization accretion signatures in compact binary candidates from SOAR Telescope observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. S.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Cieslinski, D.; Jablonski, F.; Silva, K. M. G.; Almeida, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The increasing number of synoptic surveys made by small robotic telescopes, like the photometric Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS - Drake et al., 2009, ApJ, 696, 870), represents a unique opportunity for the discovery of new variable objects and also to improve the samples of many classes of variables. Our goal in this work was the discovery of new polars, a subclass of magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (mCVs) with no accretion disk, and Close Binary Supersoft X-ray Sources (CBSS), strong candidates to Type Ia Supernova progenitors. Both are rare objects and probe interesting accretion scenarios. Finding spectral features associated to high-ionization mass accretion constrains the CBSS or magnetic CV nature for the candidates, expanding the hitherto small samples of these classes (specially CBSS) and allowing for detailed observational follow-up. We used the Goodman Spectrograph on SOAR 4.1 m Telescope to search for signatures of high-ionization mass accretion, as He II 468,6 nm emission line and inverted Balmer decrement, on 39 variable objects selected mostly from CRTS. In this sample we found 14 strong candidates to mCVs, 1 Nova in the final stages of eruption, 14 candidates to Dwarf Novae, 5 extragalactic sources (AGN), 1 object previously identified as a Black Hole Nova, 3 objects with pure absorption spectral features and 1 unidentified object with low S/N ratio. The mCVs candidates found in this work will be studied using time-resolved spectroscopic, polarimetric, and photometric observations in a follow-up project.

  1. How do accretion discs break?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Suzan

    2016-07-01

    Accretion discs are common in binary systems, and they are often found to be misaligned with respect to the binary orbit. The gravitational torque from a companion induces nodal precession in misaligned disc orbits. In this study, we first calculate whether this precession is strong enough to overcome the internal disc torques communicating angular momentum. We compare the disc precession torque with the disc viscous torque to determine whether the disc should warp or break. For typical parameters precession wins: the disc breaks into distinct planes that precess effectively independently. To check our analytical findings, we perform 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations using the PHANTOM smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, and confirm that disc breaking is widespread and enhances accretion on to the central object. For some inclinations, the disc goes through strong Kozai cycles. Disc breaking promotes markedly enhanced and variable accretion and potentially produces high-energy particles or radiation through shocks. This would have significant implications for all binary systems: e.g. accretion outbursts in X-ray binaries and fuelling supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The behaviour we have discussed in this work is relevant to a variety of astrophysical systems, for example X-ray binaries, where the disc plane may be tilted by radiation warping, SMBH binaries, where accretion of misaligned gas can create effectively random inclinations and protostellar binaries, where a disc may be misaligned by a variety of effects such as binary capture/exchange, accretion after binary formation.

  2. Chaotic and stochastic processes in the accretion flows of the black hole X-ray binaries revealed by recurrence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suková, Petra; Grzedzielski, Mikolaj; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Both the well known microquasar GRS 1915+105, as well as its recently discovered analogue, IGR J17091-3624, exhibit variability that is characteristic of a deterministic chaotic system. Their specific kind of quasi-periodic flares that are observed in some states is intrinsically connected with the global structure of the accretion flow, which are governed by the nonlinear hydrodynamics. One plausible mechanism that is proposed to explain this kind of variability is the thermal-viscous instability that operates in the accretion disk. The purely stochastic variability that occurs because of turbulent conditions in the plasma, is quantified by the power density spectra and appears in practically all types of sources and their spectral states. Methods: We pose a question as to whether these two microquasars are one of a kind, or if the traces of deterministic chaos, and hence the accretion disk instability, may also be hidden in the observed variability of other sources. We focus on the black hole X-ray binaries that accrete at a high rate and are, therefore, theoretically prone to the development of radiation pressure-induced instability. To study the nonlinear behaviour of the X-ray sources and distinguish between the chaotic and stochastic nature of their emission, we propose a novel method, which is based on recurrence analysis. Widely known in other fields of physics, this powerful method is used here for the first time in an astrophysical context. We estimate the indications of deterministic chaos quantitatively, such as the Rényi's entropy for the observed time series, and we compare them with surrogate data. Results: Using the observational data collected by the RXTE satellite, we reveal the oscillations pattern and the observable properties of six black hole systems. For five of them, we confirm the signatures of deterministic chaos being the driver of their observed variability. Conclusions: We test the method and confirm the deterministic nature of

  3. DPI: Symplectic mapping for binary star systems for the Mercury software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrini, D.

    2015-04-01

    DPI is a FORTRAN77 library that supplies the symplectic mapping method for binary star systems for the Mercury N-Body software package (ascl:1201.008). The binary symplectic mapping is implemented as a hybrid symplectic method that allows close encounters and collisions between massive bodies and is therefore suitable for planetary accretion simulations.

  4. ACCRETION DISK DYNAMO AS THE TRIGGER FOR X-RAY BINARY STATE TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Armitage, Philip J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2015-08-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic accretion disk simulations suggest that much of the energy liberated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can be channeled into large-scale toroidal magnetic fields through dynamo action. Under certain conditions, this field can dominate over gas and radiation pressure in providing vertical support against gravity, even close to the midplane. Using a simple model for the creation of this field, its buoyant rise, and its coupling to the gas, we show how disks could be driven into this magnetically dominated state and deduce the resulting vertical pressure and density profiles. Applying an established criterion for MRI to operate in the presence of a toroidal field, we show that magnetically supported disks can have two distinct MRI-active regions, separated by a “dead zone” where local MRI is suppressed, but where magnetic energy continues to flow upward from the dynamo region below. We suggest that the relative strengths of the MRI zones, and the local poloidal flux, determine the spectral states of X-ray binaries. Specifically, “intermediate” and “hard” accretion states occur when MRI is triggered in the hot, upper zone of the corona, while disks in “soft” states do not develop the upper MRI zone. We discuss the conditions under which various transitions should take place and speculate on the relationship of dynamo activity to the various types of quasi-periodic oscillations that sometimes appear in the hard spectral components. The model also explains why luminous accretion disks in the “soft” state show no signs of the thermal/viscous instability predicted by standard α-models.

  5. Accretion Disk Dynamo as the Trigger for X-Ray Binary State Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Armitage, Philip J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2015-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic accretion disk simulations suggest that much of the energy liberated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can be channeled into large-scale toroidal magnetic fields through dynamo action. Under certain conditions, this field can dominate over gas and radiation pressure in providing vertical support against gravity, even close to the midplane. Using a simple model for the creation of this field, its buoyant rise, and its coupling to the gas, we show how disks could be driven into this magnetically dominated state and deduce the resulting vertical pressure and density profiles. Applying an established criterion for MRI to operate in the presence of a toroidal field, we show that magnetically supported disks can have two distinct MRI-active regions, separated by a “dead zone” where local MRI is suppressed, but where magnetic energy continues to flow upward from the dynamo region below. We suggest that the relative strengths of the MRI zones, and the local poloidal flux, determine the spectral states of X-ray binaries. Specifically, “intermediate” and “hard” accretion states occur when MRI is triggered in the hot, upper zone of the corona, while disks in “soft” states do not develop the upper MRI zone. We discuss the conditions under which various transitions should take place and speculate on the relationship of dynamo activity to the various types of quasi-periodic oscillations that sometimes appear in the hard spectral components. The model also explains why luminous accretion disks in the “soft” state show no signs of the thermal/viscous instability predicted by standard α-models.

  6. Accretion Disks in Algols: Progenitors and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rensbergen, W.; de Greve, J. P.

    2017-02-01

    There are only a few Algols with derived accretion disk parameters. These measurements provide additional constraints for tracing the origin of individual systems. With a modified binary evolution code, series of close binary evolution were calculated. For six Algols with accretion disks we found initial systems that evolve closely into the presently observed system parameters and disk characteristics.

  7. Complicated Structure of Interacting Young Binary System: Outflows and Gas-Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, Tae-Soo; Hayashi, M.; Beck, T. L.; Chris, C. J.; Takami, M.

    2014-07-01

    It is important to understand the formation and evolution of the young binary system because many young stars are born in binary or multiple systems. We report recent discovery of binary jet and wind from UY Aur system with high-angular resolution observation by using NIFS (NIR Integral Field Spectrograph) /GEMINI combined with adaptive optics system, Altair. The primary, UY Aur A, reveals widely opened wind while the secondary, UY Aur B, shows small jets in NIR [Fe II] emission. Outflows from low-mass young binary or multiple systems have been observed from a few tens of samples. Outflows are closely related mass accretion. Many simulations show an accretion flow toward the individual circumstellar disks from the outer circumbinary disk as well as a stream bridge between the circumstellar disks. We will discuss how to use TMT and ALMA for anatomy of young binary systems.

  8. Parameters of radio pulsars in binary systems and globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, A. A.; Malov, I. F.

    2017-02-01

    The parameters of radio pulsars in binary systems and globular clusters are investigated. It is shown that such pulsars tend to have short periods (of the order of several milliseconds). Themagnetic fields of most of the pulsars considered are weak (surface fields of the order of 108-109 G). This corresponds to the generally accepted view that short-period neutron stars are spun up by angular momentum associated with the stellar wind from a companion. However, the fields at the light cylinders in these objects are two to three orders of magnitude higher than for the main population of single neutron stars. The dependence of the pulse width on the period does not differ from the corresponding dependences for single pulsars, assuming the emission is generated inside the polar cap, at moderate distances from the surface or near the light cylinder. The radio luminosities of pulsars in binary systems do not show the correlation with the rate of loss of rotational energy that is characteristic for single pulsars, probably due to the influence of accreting matter from a companion. Moreover, accretion apparently decreases the power of the emergent radiation, and can explain the observed systematic excess of the radio luminosity of single pulsars compared to pulsars in binary systems. The distributions and dependences presented in the article support generally accepted concepts concerning the processes occurring in binary systems containing neutron stars.

  9. Swift J174540.7-290015: a new accreting binary in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Jin, C.; De Marco, B.; Rea, N.; Rau, A.; Haberl, F.; Coti Zelati, F.; Bozzo, E.; Ferrigno, C.; Bower, G. C.; Demorest, P.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the identification of the new Galactic Centre (GC) transient Swift J174540.7-290015 as a likely low-mass X-ray binary located at only 16 arcsec from Sgr A⋆. This transient was detected on 2016 February 6, during the Swift GC monitoring, and it showed long-term spectral variations compatible with a hard- to soft-state transition. We observed the field with XMM-Newton on February 26 for 35 ks, detecting the source in the soft state, characterized by a low level of variability and a soft X-ray thermal spectrum with a high energy tail (detected by INTEGRAL up to ˜50 keV), typical of either accreting neutron stars or black holes. We observed: (i) a high column density of neutral absorbing material, suggesting that Swift J174540.7-290015 is located near or beyond the GC and; (ii) a sub-Solar iron abundance, therefore we argue that iron is depleted into dust grains. The lack of detection of Fe K absorption lines, eclipses or dipping suggests that the accretion disc is observed at a low inclination angle. Radio (Very Large Array) observations did not detect any radio counterpart to Swift J174540.7-290015. No evidence for X-ray or radio periodicity is found. The location of the transient was observed also in the near-infrared (near-IR) with gamma-ray burst optical near-IR detector at MPG/European Southern Observatory La Silla 2.2 m telescope and VLT/NaCo pre- and post-outburst. Within the Chandra error region, we find multiple objects that display no significant variations.

  10. On the role of disks in the formation of stellar systems: A numerical parameter study of rapid accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.

    2009-12-23

    We study rapidly accreting, gravitationally unstable disks with a series of idealized global, numerical experiments using the code ORION. Our numerical parameter study focuses on protostellar disks, showing that one can predict disk behavior and the multiplicity of the accreting star system as a function of two dimensionless parameters which compare the infall rate to the disk sound speed and orbital period. Although gravitational instabilities become strong, we find that fragmentation into binary or multiple systems occurs only when material falls in several times more rapidly than the canonical isothermal limit. The disk-to-star accretion rate is proportional to the infall rate and governed by gravitational torques generated by low-m spiral modes. Furthermore, we also confirm the existence of a maximum stable disk mass: disks that exceed ~50% of the total system mass are subject to fragmentation and the subsequent formation of binary companions.

  11. On the role of disks in the formation of stellar systems: A numerical parameter study of rapid accretion

    DOE PAGES

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Krumholz, Mark R.; ...

    2009-12-23

    We study rapidly accreting, gravitationally unstable disks with a series of idealized global, numerical experiments using the code ORION. Our numerical parameter study focuses on protostellar disks, showing that one can predict disk behavior and the multiplicity of the accreting star system as a function of two dimensionless parameters which compare the infall rate to the disk sound speed and orbital period. Although gravitational instabilities become strong, we find that fragmentation into binary or multiple systems occurs only when material falls in several times more rapidly than the canonical isothermal limit. The disk-to-star accretion rate is proportional to the infallmore » rate and governed by gravitational torques generated by low-m spiral modes. Furthermore, we also confirm the existence of a maximum stable disk mass: disks that exceed ~50% of the total system mass are subject to fragmentation and the subsequent formation of binary companions.« less

  12. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  13. Mass transfer in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, R.; Hatchett, S.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of X-ray heating on gas flows in binary X-ray systems is examined. A simple estimate is obtained for the evaporative wind flux from a stellar atmosphere due to X-ray heating which agrees with numerical calculations by Alme and Wilson (1974) but disagrees with calculations by Arons (1973) and by Basko and Sunyaev (1974) for the Her X-1/HZ Her system. The wind flux is sensitive to the soft X-ray spectrum. The self-excited wind mechanism does not work. Mass transfer in the Hercules system probably occurs by flow of the atmosphere of HZ Her through the gravitational saddle point of the system. The accretion gas stream is probably opaque with atomic density of not less than 10 to the 15th power per cu cm and is confined to a small fraction of 4(pi) steradians. Other binary X-ray systems are briefly discussed.

  14. Delayed outflows from black hole accretion tori following neutron star binary coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Metzger, Brian D.

    2013-10-01

    Expulsion of neutron-rich matter following the merger of neutron star binaries is crucial to the radioactively powered electromagnetic counterparts of these events and to their relevance as sources of r-process nucleosynthesis. Here we explore the long-term (viscous) evolution of remnant black hole accretion discs formed in such mergers by means of two-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations. The evolution of the electron fraction due to charged-current weak interactions is included, and neutrino self-irradiation is modelled as a lightbulb that accounts for the disc geometry and moderate optical depth effects. Over several viscous times (˜1 s), a fraction of ˜10 per cent of the initial disc mass is ejected as a moderately neutron-rich wind (Ye ˜ 0.2) powered by viscous heating and nuclear recombination, with neutrino self-irradiation playing a sub-dominant role. Although the properties of the outflow vary in time and direction, their mean values in the heavy-element production region are relatively robust to variations in the initial conditions of the disc and the magnitude of its viscosity. The outflow is sufficiently neutron-rich that most of the ejecta forms heavy r-process elements with mass number A ≳ 130, thus representing a new astrophysical source of r-process nucleosynthesis, distinct from that produced in the dynamical ejecta. Due to its moderately high entropy, disc outflows contain a small residual fraction ˜1 per cent of helium, which could produce a unique spectroscopic signature.

  15. A Systems-Level Perspective on Engine Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan David; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Talk covers: (1) Problem of Engine Power Loss;(2) Modeling Engine Icing Effects; (3) Simulation of Engine Rollback; (4) Icing/Engine Control System Interaction; (5) Detection of Ice Accretion; (6) Potential Mitigation Strategies.

  16. A jet emission model to probe the dynamics of accretion and ejection coupling in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzac, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Compact jets are probably the most common form of jets in X-ray binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei. They seem to be present in all sources in the so-called hard X-ray spectral state. They are characterised by a nearly flat Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) extending from the radio to the infrared bands. This emission is usually interpreted as partially self absorbed synchrotron emission from relativistic leptons accelerated in the jet. The observed flat spectral shape requires energy dissipation and acceleration of particules over a wide range of distances along the jet. This distributed energy dissipation is likely to be powered by internal shocks caused by fluctuations of the outflow velocity. I will discuss such an internal shock model in the context of black hole binaries. I will show that internal shocks can produce the observed SEDs and also predict a strong, wavelength dependent, variability that resembles the observed one. The assumed velocity fluctuations of the jet must originate in the accretion flow. The model thus predicts a strong connection between the observable properties of the jet in the radio to IR bands, and the variability of the accretion flow as observed in X-rays. If the model is correct, this offers a unique possibility to probe the dynamics of the coupled accretion and ejection processes leading to the formation of compact jets.

  17. Close binary neutron star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marronetti, Pedro

    1999-12-01

    We present a method to calculate solutions to the initial value problem in (3 + 1) general relativity corresponding to binary neutron-star systems (BNS) in irrotational quasi-equilibrium orbits. The initial value equations are solved using a conformally flat spatial metric tensor. The stellar fluid dynamics corresponds to that of systems with zero vorticity in the inertial reference frame. Irrotational systems like the ones analyzed in the present work are likely to resemble the final stages of the evolution of neutron-star binaries, thus providing insights on the inspiral process. The fluid velocity is derived from the gradient of a scalar potential. A numerical program was developed to solve the elliptic equations for the metric fields and the fluid velocity potential. We discuss the different numerical techniques employed to achieve high resolution across the stellar volume, as well as the methods used to find solutions to the Poisson-like equations with their corresponding boundary conditions. We present sequences of quasi-stable circular orbits which conserve baryonic mass. These sequences mimic the time evolution of the inspiral and are obtained without solving the complex evolution equations. They also provide sets of initial value data for future time evolution codes, which should be valid very close to the final merger. We evaluate the emission of gravitational radiation during the evolution through multipole expansions methods.

  18. Near Infrared Excess Energy in Binary System V367 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekera, Saraj

    Spectral energy distribution of the Serpentid type binary V367 Cyg was obtained using several previous photometric measurements made on this system in different spectral bands. We found Near IR excess starting from 3μm and this excess flux is attributed to the free-free emission from the mass accretion disk of the binary system. We adopted the temperature of primary component as 8,000°K. We added the free-free emission flux of the circumstellar disk to the black body energy of the primary component to find a best fit for the observed near infrared excess flux. In this fitting we left the electron density of the circumstellar disk ne of the free-free emission as a free parameter. We found that volume emission measure of the circumstellar disk is ˜ 9 × 1059 cm-3.

  19. COMPARING THE ACCRETION DISK EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE AND NEUTRON STAR X-RAY BINARIES FROM LOW TO SUPER-EDDINGTON LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Weng Shanshan; Zhang Shuangnan E-mail: zhangsn@ihep.ac.cn

    2011-09-20

    Low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) are systems in which a low-mass companion transfers mass via Roche-lobe overflow onto a black hole (BH) or a weakly magnetized neutron star (NS). It is believed that both the solid surface and the magnetic field of an NS can affect the accretion flow and show some observable effects. Using the disk emission dominant data, we compare the disk evolution of the two types of systems from low luminosity to super-Eddington luminosity. As the luminosity decreases the disk in the NS LMXB 4U1608-522 begins to leave the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) at much higher luminosity ({approx}0.1 L{sub Edd}), compared with BH LMXBs at much lower luminosity ({approx}0.03 L{sub Edd}), due to the interaction between the NS magnetosphere and accretion flow. However, as the luminosity increases above a critical luminosity, the disks in BH and NS LMXBs trace the same evolutionary pattern, because the magnetosphere is restricted inside ISCO, and then both the NS surface emission and (dipole) magnetic field do not significantly affect the secular evolution of the accretion disk, which is driven by the increased radiation pressure in the inner region. We further suggest that the NS surface emission provides additional information about the accretion disk not available in BH systems. Through the observed NS surface emission, we argue that the disk thickness H/R is less than 0.3-0.4, and that the significant outflow from the inner disk edge exists at a luminosity close to Eddington luminosity.

  20. The near-infrared properties of compact binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Cynthia Suzanne

    , the light curve has a hump outside of primary eclipse which was modeled as flux from the secondary star when irradiated by a 0.2-0.3 Lsolar source. The light curve has a dip at φ = 0.5 which is consistent with an eclipse of the irradiated face of the secondary star by an opaque accretion disk. The accretion disk has a brightness temperature profile much flatter than the theoretical profile of a steady- state disk. The disk is asymmetric, with the front of the disk (the side facing the secondary star at mid-eclipse) hotter than the back. The bright spot, which appears in visible disk maps of SW Sex, is not seen in the NIR light curve. I also present H-band light curves of the X-ray binary system, A0620-00, and NIR spectra of two X-ray binaries, CI Cam, and the relativistic jet source, SS 433. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. A Systems-Level Perspective on Engine Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation sector. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. This work focuses on developing an accurate and reliable algorithm for detecting the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor of a generic 40,000 lbf thrust class engine. The algorithm uses only the two shaft speed sensors and works regardless of engine age, operating condition, and power level. In a 10,000-case Monte Carlo simulation, the detection approach was found to have excellent capability at determining ice accretion from sensor noise with detection occurring when ice blocks an average of 6.8% of the low pressure compressor area. Finally, an initial study highlights a potential mitigation strategy that uses the existing engine actuators to raise the temperature in the low pressure compressor in an effort to reduce the rate at which ice accretes.

  2. An interacting binary system powers precessing outflows of an evolved star.

    PubMed

    Boffin, Henri M J; Miszalski, Brent; Rauch, Thomas; Jones, David; Corradi, Romano L M; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Day-Jones, Avril C; Köppen, Joachim

    2012-11-09

    Stars are generally spherical, yet their gaseous envelopes often appear nonspherical when ejected near the end of their lives. This quirk is most notable during the planetary nebula phase, when these envelopes become ionized. Interactions among stars in a binary system are suspected to cause the asymmetry. In particular, a precessing accretion disk around a companion is believed to launch point-symmetric jets, as seen in the prototype Fleming 1. Our finding of a post-common-envelope binary nucleus in Fleming 1 confirms that this scenario is highly favorable. Similar binary interactions are therefore likely to explain these kinds of outflows in a large variety of systems.

  3. The Accretion-Ejection Mechanisms in X-ray Binaries: an Unified View

    SciTech Connect

    Petrucci, P. O.; Foellmi, C.; Ferreira, J.; Henri, G.; Belmont, R.; Malzac, J.

    2009-05-11

    We present a new keplerian accretion disc solution, the so-called Jet Emitting Disc (JED hereafter), which is part of global self-consistent disc-jet MHD structure. In our framework, a large scale, organized vertical magnetic field is threading the JED giving birth, when conditions are met, to stationnary self-collimated non relativistic jets. The main condition is that the magnetic pressure P{sub mag} must be of the order of the total pressure P{sub tot} in the JED and a direct consequence is a jet torque largely dominating the viscuous torque. This in turn implies an accretion velocity of the order of the sound speed and then a density much lower than a standard accretion disc. Moreover, most of the accretion power P{sub acc} being extracted by the jet, only part of it (<50%) is liberated in the JED as heating power.

  4. Magnetic viscosity: outbursts and outflows in accretion driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meintjes, P. J.; Breedt, E.

    In this paper magnetic viscosity is investigated in magnetized accretion discs. It will be shown that the effective coupling between the magnetic field of a slow-rotator and an accretion disc, can be a very effective mechanism to drive episodes of high mass accretion onto the surface of a compact object. Outside the corotation radius, angular momentum is effectively transferred outwards through a propeller-type process from the magnetospheric field and magnetic bubbles that are formed as a result of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which can result in a centrifugal barrier and accumulation of disc matter outside the corotation radius which will become unstable at some point, triggering enhanced inward mass advection as a result of a magneto-gravitational instability. This may lead to periods of enhanced mass accretion and associated disc brightening, which may explain the dwarf novae phenomenon in certain disc accreting cataclysmic variables. This may be accompanied by mass outflows from the disc and possible non-thermal emission. The description of magnetic viscosity presented in this paper will rely on the values of two constants, i.e. the Hartmann and Reynolds numbers of the magnetized disc plasma. For both these numbers above unity, magnetic stresses in the disc can play a very important role in the kinematics of the plasma in disc accreting systems.

  5. Multi-wavelength emissions from the millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038 during an accretion active state

    SciTech Connect

    Takata, J.; Leung, Gene C. K.; Wu, E. M. H.; Cheng, K. S.; Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Hui, C. Y.; Xing, Yi; Wang, Zhongxiang; Cao, Yi; Tang, Sumin E-mail: akong@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2014-04-20

    Recent observations strongly suggest that the millisecond pulsar binary PSR J1023+0038 has developed an accretion disk since 2013 June. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of PSR J1023+0038, which reveals that (1) its gamma-rays suddenly brightened within a few days in 2013 June/July and has remained at a high gamma-ray state for several months; (2) both UV and X-ray fluxes have increased by roughly an order of magnitude; and (3) the spectral energy distribution has changed significantly after the gamma-ray sudden flux change. Time variabilities associated with UV and X-rays are on the order of 100-500 s and 50-100 s, respectively. Our model suggests that a newly formed accretion disk, due to the sudden increase of the stellar wind, could explain the changes of all these observed features. The increase of UV is emitted from the disk, and a new component in gamma-rays is produced by inverse Compton scattering between the new UV component and pulsar wind. The increase of X-rays results from the enhancement of injection pulsar wind energy into the intra-binary shock due to the increase of the stellar wind. We also predict that the radio pulses may be blocked by the evaporated winds from the disk, and the pulsar is still powered by rotation.

  6. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Quintana, E. V.; Adams, F. C.; Chambers, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Most stars reside in binary/multiple star systems; however, previous models of planet formation have studied growth of bodies orbiting an isolated single star. Disk material has been observed around one or both components of various young close binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such disks, they can remain dynamically stable for very long times. We have simulated the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets in both circumbinary disks around 'close' binary star systems with stellar separations ($a_B$) in the range 0.05 AU $\\le a_B \\le$ 0.4 AU and binary eccentricities in the range $0 \\le e \\le 0.8$ and circumstellar disks around individual stars with binary separations of tens of AU. The initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and around individual stars in the Alpha Centauri system (Quintana et al. 2002, A.J., 576, 982); giant planets analogous to Jupiter and Saturn are included if their orbits are stable. The planetary systems formed around close binaries with stellar apastron distances less than or equal to 0.2 AU with small stellar eccentricities are very similar to those formed in the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn, whereas planetary systems formed around binaries with larger maximum separations tend to be sparser, with fewer planets, especially interior to 1 AU. Likewise, when the binary periastron exceeds 10 AU, terrestrial planets can form over essentially the entire range of orbits allowed for single stars with Jupiter-like planets, although fewer terrestrial planets tend to form within high eccentricity binary systems. As the binary periastron decreases, the radial extent of the terrestrial planet systems is reduced accordingly. When the periastron is 5 AU, the formation of Earth-like planets near 1 AU is compromised.

  7. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Chambers, John; Duncan, Martin J.; Adams, Fred

    2003-01-01

    Most stars reside in multiple star systems; however, virtually all models of planetary growth have assumed an isolated single star. Numerical simulations of the collapse of molecular cloud cores to form binary stars suggest that disks will form within such systems. Observations indirectly suggest disk material around one or both components within young binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such circumstellar disks, they can remain in stable orbits within the binary star systems for eons. We are simulating the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets within binary star systems, using a new, ultrafast, symplectic integrator that we have developed for this purpose. We show that the late stages of terrestrial planet formation can indeed take place in a wide variety of binary systems and we have begun to delineate the range of parameter space for which this statement is true. Results of our initial simulations of planetary growth around each star in the alpha Centauri system and other 'wide' binary systems, as well as around both stars in very close binary systems, will be presented.

  8. Interpreting the radio/X-ray correlation of black hole X-ray binaries based on the accretion-jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Two types of correlations between the radio and X-ray luminosities (LR and LX) have been found in black hole X-ray binaries. For some sources, they follow the `original' type of correlation which is described by a single power law. Later it was found that some other sources follow a different correlation consisting of three power-law branches, with each branch having different power-law indexes. In this work, we explain these two types of correlation under the coupled accretion-jet model. We attribute the difference between these two types of sources to the different value of viscosity parameter α. One possible reason for different α is the different configuration of magnetic field in the accretion material coming from the companion stars. For the `single power-law' sources, their α is high; so their accretion is always in the mode of advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) for the whole range of X-ray luminosity. For those `hybrid power-law' sources, the value of α is small so their accretion mode changes from an ADAF to a luminous hot accretion flow, and eventually to two-phase accretion as the accretion rate increases. Because the dependence of radiative efficiency on the mass accretion rate is different for these three accretion modes, different power-law indexes in the LR-LX correlation are expected. Constraints on the ratio of the mass-loss rate into the jet and the mass accretion rate in the accretion flow are obtained, which can be tested in future by radiative magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of jet formation.

  9. Orbital Parameters for a Pre-Main Sequence Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnath, Nicole; Prato, L.; Wasserman, L.

    2011-01-01

    The young system VSB 111 was originally classified as a single-lined spectroscopic binary in the star forming region of NGC 2264. Using the Keck II telescope we measured radial velocities for both the primary and secondary components in the infrared. By combining these data with previous visible light observations of the primary star, we derived the period, eccentricity, and other orbital parameters, as well as the mass ratio of the system. With additional information gained from further observations, for example the inclination derived from the angularly resolved orbit, we will eventually obtain the individual stellar masses, necessary to help to calibrate models of young star evolution. Furthermore, by compiling dozens or even hundreds of mass ratios for young binaries we can use mass ratio distributions to improve our understanding of binary star formation. No infrared excess or any other indication of a circumstellar disk is in evidence for VSB 111, indicating that either the accretion rate has dropped to an undetectable value or that this system has aged enough that its disk has dissipated, if originally present. Given the approximately 900 day period of this system, and its relatively high eccentricity, 0.8, the action of the companion could have been responsible for early dissipation of any disk material.

  10. Stability of multiplanet systems in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.; Gallina, G.

    2016-10-01

    Context. When exploring the stability of multiplanet systems in binaries, two parameters are normally exploited: the critical semimajor axis ac computed by Holman & Wiegert (1999, AJ, 117, 621) within which planets are stable against the binary perturbations, and the Hill stability limit Δ determining the minimum separation beyond which two planets will avoid mutual close encounters. Both these parameters are derived in different contexts, i.e. Δ is usually adopted for computing the stability limit of two planets around a single star while ac is computed for a single planet in a binary system. Aims: Our aim is to test whether these two parameters can be safely applied in multiplanet systems in binaries or if their predictions fail for particular binary orbital configurations. Methods: We have used the frequency map analysis (FMA) to measure the diffusion of orbits in the phase space as an indicator of chaotic behaviour. Results: First we revisited the reliability of the empirical formula computing ac in the case of single planets in binaries and we find that, in some cases, it underestimates by 10-20% the real outer limit of stability and it does not account for planets trapped in resonance with the companion star well beyond ac. For two-planet systems, the value of Δ is close to that computed for planets around single stars, but the level of chaoticity close to it substantially increases for smaller semimajor axes and higher eccentricities of the binary orbit. In these configurations ac also begins to be unreliable and non-linear secular resonances with the stellar companion lead to chaotic behaviour well within ac, even for single planet systems. For two planet systems, the superposition of mean motion resonances, either mutual or with the binary companion, and non-linear secular resonances may lead to chaotic behaviour in all cases. We have developed a parametric semi-empirical formula determining the minimum value of the binary semimajor axis, for a given

  11. MID-INFRARED VARIABILITY OF THE BINARY SYSTEM CS Cha

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, Erick; Espaillat, Catherine; D'Alessio, Paola; Calvet, Nuria

    2012-03-10

    CS Cha is a binary system surrounded by a circumbinary disk. We construct a model for the inner disk regions and compare the resulting synthetic spectral energy distribution (SED) with Infrared Spectrograph spectra of CS Cha taken at two different epochs. For our model, we adopt a non-axisymmetric mass distribution from results of published numerical simulations of the interaction between a circumbinary disk and a binary system, where each star is surrounded by a disk. In particular, we approximate the streams of mass from which the inner circumstellar disks accrete from the circumbinary disk. This structure is due to the gravitational interaction of the stars with the disk, in which an array of disks and streams is formed in an inner hole. We calculate the temperature distribution of the optically thin dust in these inner regions considering the variable impinging radiation from both stars and use the observations to estimate the mass variations in the streams. We find that the SEDs for both epochs can be explained with emission from an optically thick inner edge of the circumbinary disk and from the optically thin streams that connect the circumbinary disk with the two smaller circumstellar disks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the emission from the optically thin material in the hole, suggested by the theory, is tested against observations of a binary system.

  12. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems.

    PubMed

    Postnov, Konstantin A; Yungelson, Lev R

    2014-01-01

    We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs), neutron stars (NSs), and black holes (BHs). Mergings of compact-star binaries are expected to be the most important sources for forthcoming gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy. In the first part of the review, we discuss observational manifestations of close binaries with NS and/or BH components and their merger rate, crucial points in the formation and evolution of compact stars in binary systems, including the treatment of the natal kicks, which NSs and BHs acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution, which are most relevant to the merging rates of NS-NS, NS-BH and BH-BH binaries. The second part of the review is devoted mainly to the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations, including their role as progenitors of cosmologically-important thermonuclear SN Ia. We also consider AM CVn-stars, which are thought to be the best verification binary GW sources for future low-frequency GW space interferometers.

  13. WOBBLING AND PRECESSING JETS FROM WARPED DISKS IN BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikhnezami, Somayeh; Fendt, Christian E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2015-12-01

    We present results of the first ever three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the accretion–ejection structure. We investigate the 3D evolution of jets launched symmetrically from single stars but also jets from warped disks in binary systems. We have applied various model setups and tested them by simulating a stable and bipolar symmetric 3D structure from a single star–disk–jet system. Our reference simulation maintains a good axial symmetry and also a bipolar symmetry for more than 500 rotations of the inner disk, confirming the quality of our model setup. We have then implemented a 3D gravitational potential (Roche potential) due by a companion star and run a variety of simulations with different binary separations and mass ratios. These simulations show typical 3D deviations from axial symmetry, such as jet bending outside the Roche lobe or spiral arms forming in the accretion disk. In order to find indications of precession effects, we have also run an exemplary parameter setup, essentially governed by a small binary separation of only ≃200 inner disk radii. This simulation shows a strong indication that we observe the onset of a jet precession caused by the wobbling of the jet-launching disk. We estimate the opening angle of the precession cone defined by the lateral motion of the jet axis to be about 4° after about 5000 dynamical time steps.

  14. Mass flow in close binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    The manner of mass flow in close binary systems is examined with a special view to the role of the so-called critical Roche (or Jacobian) lobe, taking into consideration relevant physical conditions such as radiation pressure that may affect the restricted three-body problem treatment. The mass does not necessarily flow from component one to component two through the L1 point to form a gaseous ring surrounding the latter. These considerations are applied to X-ray binaries with early-type optical components, such as Cyg X-1 (HDE 226868) and 3U 1700 - 37 (HD 153919). In the two bright close binary systems Beta Lyr and UW CMa, which are believed to be undergoing dynamic mass transfer, recent Copernicus observations show that the gas giving rise to the prominent ultraviolet emission lines surrounds the entire binary system rather than merely component two. Implications of these observations are also discussed.

  15. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  16. Planetary nebula progenitors that swallow binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    I propose that some irregular messy planetary nebulae (PNe) owe their morphologies to triple-stellar evolution where tight binary systems evolve inside and/or on the outskirts of the envelope of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In some cases, the tight binary system can survive, in others, it is destroyed. The tight binary system might break up with one star leaving the system. In an alternative evolution, one of the stars of the broken-up tight binary system falls towards the AGB envelope with low specific angular momentum, and drowns in the envelope. In a different type of destruction process, the drag inside the AGB envelope causes the tight binary system to merge. This releases gravitational energy within the AGB envelope, leading to a very asymmetrical envelope ejection, with an irregular and messy PN as a descendant. The evolution of the triple-stellar system can be in a full common envelope evolution or in a grazing envelope evolution. Both before and after destruction (if destruction takes place), the system might launch pairs of opposite jets. One pronounced signature of triple-stellar evolution might be a large departure from axisymmetrical morphology of the descendant PN. I estimate that about one in eight non-spherical PNe is shaped by one of these triple-stellar evolutionary routes.

  17. Detailed Mid- and Far- Ultraviolet Model Spectra for Accretion Disks in Cataclysmic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Richard A.; Hubeny, Ivan

    1998-01-01

    We present a large grid of computed far- and mid-ultraviolet spectra (850-2000 A) of the integrated light from steady-state accretion disks in luminous cataclysmic variables. The spectra are tabulated at 0.25 A intervals with an adopted FWHM resolution of 1.0 A, so they are suitable for use with observed spectra from a variety of modern space-borne observatories. Twenty-six different combinations of white dwarf mass M(sub wd) and mass accretion rate dot-m are considered, and spectra are presented for six different disk inclinations i. The disk models are computed self-consistently in the plane-parallel approximation, assuming LTE and vertical hydrostatic equilibrium, by solving simultaneously the radiative transfer, hydrostatic equilibrium, and energy balance equations. Irradiation from external sources is neglected. Local spectra of disk annuli are computed taking into account line transitions from elements 1-28 (H through Ni). Limb darkening as well as Doppler broadening and blending of lines are taken into account in computing the integrated disk spectra. The radiative properties of the models are discussed, including the dependence of ultraviolet fluxes and colors on M(sub wd), dot-m, and i. The appearance of the disk spectra is illustrated, with regard to changes in the same three parameters. Finally, possible future improvements to the present models and spectra are discussed.

  18. Near-Infrared Observations of Compact Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khargharia, Juthika

    Low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) are a subset of compact binary systems in which a main-sequence or slightly evolved star fills its Roche lobe and donates mass to a neutron star or a black hole (BH) via an accretion disk. Robust estimates of compact object masses in these systems are required to enhance our current understanding of the physics of compact object formation, accretion disks and jets. Compact object masses are typically determined at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths when the system is in quiescence and the donor star is the dominant source of flux. Previous studies have assumed that any non-stellar contribution at these wavelengths is minimal. However, this assumption is rarely true. By performing NIR spectroscopy, we determined the fractional donor star contribution to the NIR flux and the compact object masses in two LMXBs: V404 Cyg and Cen X-4. In our analysis, it was assumed that the light curve morphology remains consistent throughout quiescence. It has now been shown in several systems that veiling measurements from non-stellar sources are meaningful only if acquired contemporaneously with light curve measurements. We accounted for this in the measurement of the BH mass in the LMXB, XTE J1118+480. LMXBs are also considered to be the most likely candidates responsible for the formation of milli-second pulsars (MSP). Here, I present the unique case of PSR J1903+0327 that challenges this currently accepted theory of MSP formation and is a potential candidate for testing General Relativity. Observations in the NIR come with their own set of challenges. NIR detector arrays used in these observations generally have high dark current and readout noise. In an effort to lower the read noise in NICFPS at APO, we present a study done on the Hawaii-1RG engineering grade chip that served as a test bed for reducing the read noise in NICFPS.

  19. Black holes in stellar-mass binary systems: expiating original spin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Andrew; Nixon, Chris

    2016-10-01

    We investigate systematically whether accreting black hole systems are likely to reach global alignment of the black hole spin and its accretion disc with the binary plane. In low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), there is only a modest tendency to reach such global alignment, and it is difficult to achieve fully: except for special initial conditions, we expect misalignment of the spin and orbital planes by ˜1 rad for most of the LMXB lifetime. The same is expected in high-mass X-ray binaries. A fairly close approach to global alignment is likely in most stellar-mass ultraluminous X-ray binary systems (ULXs) where the companion star fills its Roche lobe and transfers mass on a thermal or nuclear time-scale to a black hole of lower mass. These systems are unlikely to show orbital eclipses, as their emission cones are close to the hole's spin axis. This offers a potential observational test, as models for ULXs invoking intermediate-mass black holes do predict eclipses for ensembles of ≳ 10 systems. Recent observational work shows that eclipses are either absent or extremely rare in ULXs, supporting the picture that most ULXs are stellar-mass binaries with companion stars more massive than the accretor.

  20. A numerical investigation of wind accretion in persistent Supergiant X-ray Binaries I - Structure of the flow at the orbital scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mellah, I.; Casse, F.

    2017-01-01

    Classical Supergiant X-ray Binaries host a neutron star orbiting a supergiant OB star and display persistent X-ray luminosities of 1035 to 1037 erg· s-1. The stellar wind from the massive companion is believed to be the main source of matter accreted by the compact object. With this first paper, we introduce a ballistic model to evaluate the influence of the orbital effects on the structure of the accelerating winds which participate to the accretion process. Thanks to the parametrization we retained and the numerical pipeline we designed, we can investigate the supersonic flow and the subsequent observables as a function of a reduced set of characteristic numbers and scales. We show that the shape of the permanent flow is entirely determined by the mass ratio, the filling factor, the Eddington factor and the α-force multiplier which drives the stellar wind acceleration. Provided scales such as the orbital period are known, we can trace back the observables to evaluate the mass accretion rates, the accretion mechanism, the shearing of the inflow and the stellar parameters. We discuss the likelihood of wind-formed accretion discs around the accretors in each case and confront our model to three persistent Supergiant X-ray Binaries (Vela X-1, IGR J18027-2016, XTE J1855-026).

  1. Stacking Analysis of Binary Systems with HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbois, Chad; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Detecting binary systems at TeV energies is an important problem because only a handful of such systems are currently known. The nature of such systems is typically thought to be composed of a compact object and a massive star. The TeV emission from these systems does not obviously correspond to emission in GeV or X-ray, where many binary systems have previously been found. This study focuses on a stacking method to detect TeV emission from LS 5039, a known TeV binary, to test its efficacy in HAWC data. Stacking is a widely employed method for increasing signal to noise ratio in optical astronomy, but has never been attempted previously with HAWC. HAWC is an ideal instrument to search for TeV binaries, because of its wide field of view and high uptime. Applying this method to the entire sky may allow HAWC to detect binary sources of very short or very long periods not sensitive to current analyses. NSF, DOE, Los Alamos, Michigan Tech, CONACyt, UNAM, BUAP.

  2. Pulsed accretion in a variable protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Flaherty, Kevin; Balog, Zoltan; Gutermuth, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Periodic increases in luminosity arising from variable accretion rates have been predicted for some pre-main-sequence close binary stars as they grow from circumbinary disks. The phenomenon is known as pulsed accretion and can affect the orbital evolution and mass distribution of young binaries, as well as the potential for planet formation. Accretion variability is a common feature of young stars, with a large range of amplitudes and timescales as measured from multi-epoch observations at optical and infrared wavelengths. Periodic variations consistent with pulsed accretion have been seen in only a few young binaries via optical accretion tracers, albeit intermittently with accretion luminosity variations ranging from zero to 50 per cent from orbit to orbit. Here we report that the infrared luminosity of a young protostar (of age about 105 years) increases by a factor of ten in roughly one week every 25.34 days. We attribute this to pulsed accretion associated with an unseen binary companion. The strength and regularity of this accretion signal is surprising; it may be related to the very young age of the system, which is a factor of ten younger than the other pulsed accretors previously studied.

  3. Pulsed accretion in a variable protostar.

    PubMed

    Muzerolle, James; Furlan, Elise; Flaherty, Kevin; Balog, Zoltan; Gutermuth, Robert

    2013-01-17

    Periodic increases in luminosity arising from variable accretion rates have been predicted for some pre-main-sequence close binary stars as they grow from circumbinary disks. The phenomenon is known as pulsed accretion and can affect the orbital evolution and mass distribution of young binaries, as well as the potential for planet formation. Accretion variability is a common feature of young stars, with a large range of amplitudes and timescales as measured from multi-epoch observations at optical and infrared wavelengths. Periodic variations consistent with pulsed accretion have been seen in only a few young binaries via optical accretion tracers, albeit intermittently with accretion luminosity variations ranging from zero to 50 per cent from orbit to orbit. Here we report that the infrared luminosity of a young protostar (of age about 10(5) years) increases by a factor of ten in roughly one week every 25.34 days. We attribute this to pulsed accretion associated with an unseen binary companion. The strength and regularity of this accretion signal is surprising; it may be related to the very young age of the system, which is a factor of ten younger than the other pulsed accretors previously studied.

  4. Outflows Driven by a Potential Proto-Brown Dwarf Binary System IRAS 16253-2429

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Tien-Hao; Lai, Shih-Ping; Belloche, Arnaud; Wyrowski, Friedrich

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the molecular outflows driven by a potential proto-brown dwarf candidate IRAS 16253-2429 (hereafter IRAS 16253) with CO (2—1) using SMA and IRAM 30m telescope and CO (6—5) using APEX. Our SMA observations suggest that IRAS 16253 is hosting a binary system. The low mass of its envelope suggests that the central objects may eventually accrete only ~0.14 Msun of material (assuming the star formation efficiency is at most 0.3), which makes IRAS 16253 a potential proto brown dwarf binary system since the maximum mass of a brown dwarf is 0.08 Msun; one or two brown dwarfs may form depending on the current mass of the protostars and the future accretion process. The Position-Velocity diagrams of the outflows show sinusoidal structures which may be related to the outflow wiggling from the binary rotation. This allowed us to estimate the orbital period of the binary system. On the basis of Kepler's third law, we suggest that IRAS 16253 is very likely to contain at least one proto brown dwarf if the binary separation is less than ~0.5 arcsec. The large-scale outflows are further mapped with IRAM 30m telescope and APEX Champ+. We found that CO (6—5) traces high-excited gas around the precessing H2 jets and CO (2—1) likely probes the cold swept-up gas or entrained gas with cone-like structure.

  5. Hunting for continuous gravitational waves from unknown neutron stars in binary systems in Advanced LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Evan; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Non-axisymmetric, rapidly rotating neutron stars are predicted to emit quasi-monochromatic gravitational waves. Accretion from a companion star may drive asymmetries of the neutron star causing it to emit gravitational waves, perhaps even after accretion has subsided. Searching for unknown sources in binary systems is a significant computational challenge. In this talk, I will describe a search method, called TwoSpect, that has been developed to search for unknown sources in binary systems; show results from the TwoSpect search of initial LIGO/Virgo data; describe recent improvements to TwoSpect and other semi-coherent methods; and provide an outlook on TwoSpect searches in the advanced detector era.

  6. Magnetic reconnection process in accretion disk systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piovezan, P.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.

    2009-08-01

    At the present study, we investigate the role of magnetic reconnection in three different astrophysical systems, namely young stellar objects (YSO's), microquasars, and active galactic nuclei (AGN's). In the case of microquasars and AGN's, violent reconnection episodes between the magnetic field lines of the inner disk region (which are established by a turbulent dynamo) and those anchored into the black hole are able to heat the coronal/disk gas and accelerate particles to relativistic velocities through a diffusive first-order Fermi-like process within the reconnection site that will produce relativistic blobs. The heating of the coronal/disk gas is able to produce a steep X-ray spectrum with a luminosity that is consistent with the observations and we argue that it is being produced mainly at the foot of the reconnection zone, while the Fermi-like acceleration process within the reconnection site results a power-law electron distribution with N(E) ∝ E-α, with α=5/2, and a corresponding synchrotron radio power-law spectrum with a spectral index that is compatible with that observed during the radio flares in microquasars (Sν ∝ ν-0.75). The scaling laws that we derive for AGN's indicate that the same mechanism may be occurring there. Finally, in the case of the YSO's, a similar magnetic configuration can be reached. The amount of magnetic energy that can be extracted from the inner disk region can heat the coronal gas to temperatures of the order of 10^8 K and could explain the observed X-ray flaring emission.

  7. Tidal evolution in close binary systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopal, Z.

    1972-01-01

    Mathematical outline of the theory of tidal evolution in close binary systems of secularly constant total momentum. Following a general outline of the problem the basic expressions for the energy and momenta of close binaries consisting of components of arbitrary internal structure are established, and the maximum and minimum values of the energy (kinetic and potential) which such systems can attain for a given amount of total momentum are investigated. These results are compared with the actual facts encountered in binaries with components whose internal structure (and, therefore, rotational momenta) are known from evidence furnished by the observed rates of apsidal advance. The results show that all such systems whether of detached or semidetached type - disclose that more than 99% of their total momenta are stored in the orbital momentum. The sum of the rotational momenta of the constituent components amounts to less than 1% of the total -a situation characteristic of a state close to the minimum energy for given total momentum.

  8. Pebble Accretion and the Diversity of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.

    2016-07-01

    This paper examines the standard model of planet formation, including pebble accretion, using numerical simulations. Planetary embryos that are large enough to become giant planets do not form beyond the ice line within a typical disk lifetime unless icy pebbles stick at higher speeds than in experiments using rocky pebbles. Systems like the solar system (small inner planets and giant outer planets) can form if icy pebbles are stickier than rocky pebbles, and if the planetesimal formation efficiency increases with pebble size, which prevents the formation of massive terrestrial planets. Growth beyond the ice line is dominated by pebble accretion. Most growth occurs early, when the surface density of the pebbles is high due to inward drift of the pebbles from the outer disk. Growth is much slower after the outer disk is depleted. The outcome is sensitive to the disk radius and turbulence level, which control the lifetime and maximum size of pebbles. The outcome is sensitive to the size of the largest planetesimals because there is a threshold mass for the onset of pebble accretion. The planetesimal formation rate is unimportant, provided that some large planetesimals form while the pebbles remain abundant. Two outcomes are seen, depending on whether pebble accretion begins while the pebbles are still abundant. Either multiple gas-giant planets form beyond the ice line, small planets form close to the star, and a Kuiper-belt-like disk of bodies is scattered outward by the giant planets; or no giants form and the bodies remain an Earth-mass or smaller.

  9. The evolution of ultrashort period binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, L. A.; Rappaport, S. A.; Joss, P. C.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion is presented concerning the results of detailed evolutionary calculations in which a very low mass and hydrogen-depleted semiattached binary star containing a collapsed object can reach an exceptionally short orbital period while sustaining a relatively high mass transfer rate. The observed properties of such systems can be understood under the assumption that they contain moderately to severely hydrogen-defficient secondary stars that are neither fully degenerate nor burning He. It is noted that for extremely hydrogen-depleted stars, the assumption of chemical homogeneity becomes untenable. Attention is given to the binary systems 4U 1626-67, 4U 1916-05, and G61-29.

  10. X-ray orbital modulation of a white dwarf accreting from an L dwarf. The system SDSS J121209.31+013627.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, B.; de Martino, D.; Casewell, S. L.; Wynn, G. A.; Roy, M.

    2017-01-01

    In an XMM-Newton observation of the binary SDSS J121209.31+013627.7, consisting of a white dwarf and an L dwarf, we detect X-ray orbital modulation as proof of accretion from the substellar companion onto the magnetic white dwarf. We constrain the system geometry (inclination as well as magnetic and pole-cap angle) through modelling of the X-ray light curve, and we derive a mass accretion rate of 3.2 × 10-14M⊙/ yr from the X-ray luminosity ( 3 × 1029 erg/s). From X-ray studies of L dwarfs, a possible wind driven from a hypothesized corona on the substellar donor is orders of magnitude too weak to explain the observed accretion rate, while the radius of the L dwarf is comparable to its Roche lobe (0.1 R⊙), making Roche-lobe overflow the likely accretion mechanism in this system.

  11. Gravitational wave background from binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2011-10-15

    Basic aspects of the background of gravitational waves and its mathematical characterization are reviewed. The spectral energy density parameter {Omega}(f), commonly used as a quantifier of the background, is derived for an ensemble of many identical sources emitting at different times and locations. For such an ensemble, {Omega}(f) is generalized to account for the duration of the signals and of the observation, so that one can distinguish the resolvable and unresolvable parts of the background. The unresolvable part, often called confusion noise or stochastic background, is made by signals that cannot be either individually identified or subtracted out of the data. To account for the resolvability of the background, the overlap function is introduced. This function is a generalization of the duty cycle, which has been commonly used in the literature, in some cases leading to incorrect results. The spectra produced by binary systems (stellar binaries and massive black hole binaries) are presented over the frequencies of all existing and planned detectors. A semi-analytical formula for {Omega}(f) is derived in the case of stellar binaries (containing white dwarfs, neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes). Besides a realistic expectation of the level of background, upper and lower limits are given, to account for the uncertainties in some astrophysical parameters such as binary coalescence rates. One interesting result concerns all current and planned ground-based detectors (including the Einstein Telescope). In their frequency range, the background of binaries is resolvable and only sporadically present. In other words, there is no stochastic background of binaries for ground-based detectors.

  12. System mass constraints for the accreting millisecond pulsar XTE J1814-338 using Bowen fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Steeghs, D.; Casares, J.; Charles, P. A.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Marsh, T. R.; Hynes, R. I.; O'Brien, K.

    2017-04-01

    We present phase-resolved spectroscopy of the millisecond X-ray pulsar XTE J1814-338 obtained during its 2003 outburst. The spectra are dominated by high-excitation emission lines of He II λ4686, Hβ, and the Bowen blend C III/N III 4630-50 Å. We exploit the proven Bowen fluorescence technique to establish a complete set of dynamical system parameter constraints using bootstrap Doppler tomography, a first for an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar binary. The reconstructed Doppler map of the N III λ4640 Bowen transition exhibits a statistically significant (>4σ) spot feature at the expected position of the companion star. If this feature is driven by irradiation of the surface of the Roche lobe filling companion, we derive a strict lower limit to the true radial velocity semi-amplitude K2. Combining our donor constraint with the well-constrained orbit of the neutron star leads to a determination of the binary mass ratio: q = 0.123^{+0.012}_{-0.010}. The component masses are not tightly constrained given our lack of knowledge of the binary inclination. We cannot rule out a canonical neutron star mass of 1.4 M⊙ (1.1 M⊙ < M1 < 3.1 M⊙; 95 per cent). The 68/95 per cent confidence limits of M2 are consistent with the companion being a significantly bloated, M-type main-sequence star. Our findings, combined with results from studies of the quiescent optical counterpart of XTE J1814-338, suggest the presence of a rotation-powered millisecond pulsar in XTE J1814-338 during an X-ray quiescent state. The companion mass is typical of the so-called redback pulsar binary systems (M2 ∼ 0.2 M⊙).

  13. Pebble Accretion and the Diversity of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, John E.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how planetary systems form and why they exhibit great diversity are key questions in planetary science. Recently, several studies of planet formation have focussed on a mechanism called ``pebble accretion''. Here, mm-to-m size particles in a protoplanetary disk are strongly affected by both gas drag and gravity during an encounter with a growing planet. This can substantially increase the capture probability, speeding up planetary growth, and providing a possible solution to the long-standing problem of how gas-giant planets form within the short lifetimes of protoplanetary disks (Lambrechts and Johansen 2012 Astron Astrophys 544, A32). It has also been suggested that pebble accretion can explain the profound difference between the rocky inner planets and the gas-rich outer planets of the Solar System (Morbidelli et al. 2015 Icarus 258, 418). Here I will present new simulations of planet formation in an evolving protoplanetary disk, spanning both the regions in which rocky and gaseous planets are likely to form. The simulations cover the runaway, oligarchic and gas-accretion phases of planetary growth, and include approximate models for pebble growth and the formation of asteroid sized planetesimals from pebbles. Planetary growth rates in these models are sensitive to the poorly-constrained properties of pebbles in a protoplanetary disk, and also the properties of the gaseous disk itself, especially the strength of turbulence. Different disk and pebble properties lead to a wide range of outcomes, including some cases resembling the Solar System, and may explain the observed diversity of extrasolar planetary systems.

  14. Binary optics at Hughes Danbury Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logue, James; Power, Michael

    1993-01-01

    An overview of binary optics development at Hughes Danbury Optical Systems is presented. Design software used for mask design is presented. A brief discussion of fabrication follows. Two examples of actual projects are used to highlight the discussion: (1) a large aspheric lens; and (2) a set of grating and lenslet arrays.

  15. Transit Timing Variations In Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansone, Eric; Haghighipour, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the effect of a stellar companion on the transit timing variations (TTV) of a planetary system. The purpose of our study is to determine the ranges of the orbital elements of a secondary star for which the amplitude of a currently existing TTV is enhanced. We chose the system of Kepler 9 as this system represents the first planetary system detected by the transit timing variation method, and studied its TTVs by considering a hypothetical secondary star in this system. By varying the mass, semi-major axis, and eccentricity of the fictitious binary companion, we tested the stability of the known planets Kepler-9c and Kepler-9b and identified the region of the parameter-space for which the binary planetary system would be stable. We calculated TTVs for the two planets of the system for different values of the orbital elements of the secondary star and calculated its difference with the system's already existing TTVs. Results of our study indicate that the effect of the binary companion is significant only when the secondary star is in a highly eccentric orbit and/or the planets of the system are within the range of Super-Earth or terrestrial sizes. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation in the form of a Research Experience for Undergraduates program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

  16. Formation of Binaries from Triple Systems

    PubMed Central

    Szebehely, Victor

    1972-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of three masses moving under their mutual gravitational attraction in a plane is investigated by a systematic series of numerical experiments. It is shown that in 73% of the cases, a triple system disintegrates in less than 150 time units (corresponding to about 150 crossing times), and a binary is formed with the third star that escapes at hyperbolic velocity. The average time for disintegration is of the order of 109 years for triple stellar systems, as well as for triple galaxies. The statistics of the escaping masses show that the escaping mass is usually, but not always, the smallest in the system. A simple equation, giving the balance between the negative energy stored in the binary and the positive energy necessary for escape, explains the results qualitatively. PMID:16591978

  17. CALCULATING THE HABITABLE ZONE OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS. II. P-TYPE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2013-11-10

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology for calculating the circumbinary habitable zone (HZ) in planet-hosting P-type binary star systems. We present a general formalism for determining the contribution of each star of the binary to the total flux received at the top of the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and use the Sun's HZ to calculate the inner and outer boundaries of the HZ around a binary star system. We apply our calculations to the Kepler's currently known circumbinary planetary systems and show the combined stellar flux that determines the boundaries of their HZs. We also show that the HZ in P-type systems is dynamic and, depending on the luminosity of the binary stars, their spectral types, and the binary eccentricity, its boundaries vary as the stars of the binary undergo their orbital motion. We present the details of our calculations and discuss the implications of the results.

  18. Compact Objects In Binary Systems: Formation and Evolution of X-ray Binaries and Tides in Double White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, Francesca

    Binary star systems hosting black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs are unique laboratories for investigating both extreme physical conditions, and stellar and binary evolution. Black holes and neutron stars are observed in X-ray binaries, where mass accretion from a stellar companion renders them X-ray bright. Although instruments like Chandra have revolutionized the field of X-ray binaries, our theoretical understanding of their origin and formation lags behind. Progress can be made by unravelling the evolutionary history of observed systems. As part of my thesis work, I have developed an analysis method that uses detailed stellar models and all the observational constraints of a system to reconstruct its evolutionary path. This analysis models the orbital evolution from compact-object formation to the present time, the binary orbital dynamics due to explosive mass loss and a possible kick at core collapse, and the evolution from the progenitor's Zero Age Main Sequence to compact-object formation. This method led to a theoretical model for M33 X-7, one of the most massive X-ray binaries known and originally marked as an evolutionary challenge. Compact objects are also expected gravitational wave (GW) sources. In particular, double white dwarfs are both guaranteed GW sources and observed electromagnetically. Although known systems show evidence of tidal deformation and a successful GW astronomy requires realistic models of the sources, detached double white dwarfs are generally approximated to point masses. For the first time, I used realistic models to study tidally-driven periastron precession in eccentric binaries. I demonstrated that its imprint on the GW signal yields constrains on the components' masses and that the source would be misclassified if tides are neglected. Beyond this adiabatic precession, tidal dissipation creates a sink of orbital angular momentum. Its efficiency is strongest when tides are dynamic and excite the components' free

  19. Pulsars in binary systems: probing binary stellar evolution and general relativity.

    PubMed

    Stairs, Ingrid H

    2004-04-23

    Radio pulsars in binary orbits often have short millisecond spin periods as a result of mass transfer from their companion stars. They therefore act as very precise, stable, moving clocks that allow us to investigate a large set of otherwise inaccessible astrophysical problems. The orbital parameters derived from high-precision binary pulsar timing provide constraints on binary evolution, characteristics of the binary pulsar population, and the masses of neutron stars with different mass-transfer histories. These binary systems also test gravitational theories, setting strong limits on deviations from general relativity. Surveys for new pulsars yield new binary systems that increase our understanding of all these fields and may open up whole new areas of physics, as most spectacularly evidenced by the recent discovery of an extremely relativistic double-pulsar system.

  20. Stellivore extraterrestrials? Binary stars as living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Clément

    2016-11-01

    We lack signs of extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) despite decades of observation in the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Could evidence be buried in existing data? To recognize ETI, we first propose criteria discerning life from non-life based on thermodynamics and living systems theory. Then we extrapolate civilizational development to both external and internal growth. Taken together, these two trends lead to an argument that some existing binary stars might actually be ETI. Since these hypothetical beings feed actively on stars, we call them "stellivores". I present an independent thermodynamic argument for their existence, with a metabolic interpretation of interacting binary stars. The jury is still out, but the hypothesis is empirically testable with existing astrophysical data.

  1. 2MASS 22344161+4041387AB: A WIDE, YOUNG, ACCRETING, LOW-MASS BINARY IN THE LkH{alpha}233 GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Allers, K. N.; Liu, Michael C.; Cushing, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Mathews, Geoffrey S.; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Reid, I. Neill; Cruz, Kelle L.; Vacca, W. D.

    2009-05-20

    We report the discovery of a young, 0.''16 binary, 2M2234+4041AB, found as the result of a Keck laser guide star adaptive optics imaging survey of young field ultracool dwarfs. Spatially resolved near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy indicate that the luminosity and temperature ratios of the system are near unity. From optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, we determine a composite spectral type of M6 for the system. Gravity-sensitive spectral features in the spectra of 2M2234+4041AB are best matched to those of young objects ({approx}1 Myr old). A comparison of the T {sub eff} and age of 2M2234+4041AB to evolutionary models indicates that the mass of each component is 0.10{sup +0.075} {sub -0.04} M {sub sun}. Emission lines of H{alpha} in the composite optical spectrum of the system and Br{gamma} in spatially resolved near-IR spectra of the two components indicate that the system is actively accreting. Both components of the system have IR excesses, indicating that they both harbor circumstellar disks. Though 2M2234+4041AB was originally identified as a young field dwarf, it lies 1.'5 from the well-studied Herbig Ae/Be star, LkH{alpha}233. The distance to LkH{alpha}233 is typically assumed to be 880 pc. It is unlikely that 2M2234+4041AB could be this distant, as it would then be more luminous than any known Taurus objects of similar spectral type. We re-evaluate the distance to the LkH{alpha}233 group and find a value of 325{sup +72} {sub -50} pc, based on the Hipparcos distance to a nearby B3-type group member (HD 213976). 2M2234+4041AB is the first low-mass star to be potentially associated with the LkH{alpha}233 group. At a distance of 325 pc, its projected physical separation is 51 AU, making it one of the growing number of wide, low-mass binaries found in young star-forming regions.

  2. A state change in the missing link binary pulsar system PSR J1023+0038

    SciTech Connect

    Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G.; Archibald, A. M.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Bogdanov, S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Patruno, A.; Tendulkar, S.; Hill, A. B.; Glanzman, T.

    2014-07-20

    We present radio and γ-ray observations, which, along with concurrent X-ray observations, reveal that the binary millisecond pulsar (MSP)/low-mass X-ray binary transition system PSR J1023+0038 has undergone a transformation in state. Whereas until recently the system harbored a bright millisecond radio pulsar, the radio pulsations at frequencies between 300 to 5000 MHz have now become undetectable. Concurrent with this radio disappearance, the γ-ray flux of the system has quintupled. We conclude that, though the radio pulsar is currently not detectable, the pulsar mechanism is still active and the pulsar wind, as well as a newly formed accretion disk, are together providing the necessary conditions to create the γ-ray increase. This system is the first example of a compact, low-mass binary which has shown significant state changes accompanied by large changes in γ-ray flux; it will continue to provide an exceptional test bed for better understanding the formation of MSPs as well as accretion onto neutron stars in general.

  3. Magnetized accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyvaerts, J.

    This lecture reviews in simple terms the general subject of large scale magnetic field coupling to plasma flows in the vicinity of accreting compact stars. The relevant astrophysical phenomenology is summarized. Disk interaction with the magnetosphere of accreting stars is first discussed, in particular the structure of the magnetopause, its stability and plasma ejection in so-called propeller systems. The physics of accretion/ejection is then considered. Acceleration and focusing mechanisms of jets from accretion disks around compact stars or black holes and the question of the self-consistency of accretion and ejection are described. By contrast, small scale MHD turbulence in disks is not discussed, neither are accretion columns near the polar caps of neutron stars or white dwarfs. The reader is only assumed to have some basic knowledge of astrophysics and of fluid mechanics and electromagnetism.

  4. The Ruinous Influence of Close Binary Companions on Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam L.; Ireland, Michael; Mann, Andrew; Huber, Daniel; Dupuy, Trent J.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of solar-type stars are found in binary systems, and the dynamical influence of binary companions is expected to profoundly influence planetary systems. However, the difficulty of identifying planets in binary systems has left the magnitude of this effect uncertain; despite numerous theoretical hurdles to their formation and survival, at least some binary systems clearly host planets. We present high-resolution imaging of nearly 500 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) obtained using adaptive-optics imaging and nonredundant aperture-mask interferometry on the Keck II telescope. We super-resolve some binary systems to projected separations of under 5 AU, showing that planets might form in these dynamically active environments. However, the full distribution of projected separations for our planet-host sample more broadly reveals a deep paucity of binary companions at solar-system scales. When the binary population is parametrized with a semimajor axis cutoff a cut and a suppression factor inside that cutoff S bin, we find with correlated uncertainties that inside acut = 47 +59/-23 AU, the planet occurrence rate in binary systems is only Sbin = 0.34 +0.14/-0.15 times that of wider binaries or single stars. Our results demonstrate that a fifth of all solar-type stars in the Milky Way are disallowed from hosting planetary systems due to the influence of a binary companion.

  5. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. I. Phase-dependent Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Observations reveal that mass-transferring binary systems may have non-zero orbital eccentricities. The time evolution of the orbital semimajor axis and eccentricity of mass-transferring eccentric binary systems is an important part of binary evolution theory and has been widely studied. However, various different approaches to and assumptions on the subject have made the literature difficult to comprehend and comparisons between different orbital element time evolution equations not easy to make. Consequently, no self-consistent treatment of this phase has ever been included in binary population synthesis codes. In this paper, we present a general formalism to derive the time evolution equations of the binary orbital elements, treating mass loss and mass transfer as perturbations of the general two-body problem. We present the self-consistent form of the perturbing acceleration and phase-dependent time evolution equations for the orbital elements under different mass loss/transfer processes. First, we study the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. Then, we proceed with non-isotropic ejection and accretion in a conservative as well as a non-conservative manner for both point masses and extended bodies. We compare the derived equations with similar work in the literature and explain the existing discrepancies.

  6. New spectroscopic binary companions of giant stars and updated metallicity distribution for binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, P.; Jones, M. I.; Vanzi, L.; Soto, M. G.; Vos, J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Drass, H.; Jenkins, J. S.; Olivares, F.; Mennickent, R. E.; Vučković, M.; Rojo, P.; Melo, C. H. F.

    2016-10-01

    We report the discovery of 24 spectroscopic binary companions to giant stars. We fully constrain the orbital solution for 6 of these systems. We cannot unambiguously derive the orbital elements for the remaining stars because the phase coverage is incomplete. Of these stars, 6 present radial velocity trends that are compatible with long-period brown dwarf companions. The orbital solutions of the 24 binary systems indicate that these giant binary systems have a wide range in orbital periods, eccentricities, and companion masses. For the binaries with restricted orbital solutions, we find a range of orbital periods of between ~97-1600 days and eccentricities of between ~0.1-0.4. In addition, we studied the metallicity distribution of single and binary giant stars. We computed the metallicity of a total of 395 evolved stars, 59 of wich are in binary systems. We find a flat distribution for these binary stars and therefore conclude that stellar binary systems, and potentially brown dwarfs, have a different formation mechanism than planets. This result is confirmed by recent works showing that extrasolar planets orbiting giants are more frequent around metal-rich stars. Finally, we investigate the eccentricity as a function of the orbital period. We analyzed a total of 130 spectroscopic binaries, including those presented here and systems from the literature. We find that most of the binary stars with periods ≲30 days have circular orbits, while at longer orbital periods we observe a wide spread in their eccentricities. Based on observations collected at La Silla - Paranal Observatory under programs IDs IDs 085.C-0557, 087.C.0476, 089.C-0524, 090.C-0345, 096.A-9020 and through the Chilean Telescope Time under programs IDs CN2012A-73, CN2012B-47, CN2013A-111, CN2013B-51, CN2014A-52 and CN2015A-48.

  7. A High-mass Protobinary System with Spatially Resolved Circumstellar Accretion Disks and Circumbinary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, S.; Kluska, J.; Kreplin, A.; Bate, M.; Harries, T. J.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Hone, E.; Monnier, J. D.; Weigelt, G.; Anugu, A.; de Wit, W. J.; Wittkowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    High-mass multiples might form via fragmentation of self-gravitational disks or alternative scenarios such as disk-assisted capture. However, only a few observational constraints exist on the architecture and disk structure of high-mass protobinaries and their accretion properties. Here, we report the discovery of a close (57.9 ± 0.2 mas = 170 au) high-mass protobinary, IRAS17216-3801, where our VLTI/GRAVITY+AMBER near-infrared interferometry allows us to image the circumstellar disks around the individual components with ∼3 mas resolution. We estimate the component masses to ∼20 and ∼18 M⊙ and find that the radial intensity profiles can be reproduced with an irradiated disk model, where the inner regions are excavated of dust, likely tracing the dust sublimation region in these disks. The circumstellar disks are strongly misaligned with respect to the binary separation vector, which indicates that the tidal forces did not have time to realign the disks, pointing toward a young dynamical age of the system. We constrain the distribution of the Brγ and CO-emitting gas using VLTI/GRAVITY spectro-interferometry and VLT/CRIRES spectro-astrometry and find that the secondary is accreting at a higher rate than the primary. VLT/NACO imaging shows L‧-band emission on (3–4)× larger scales than the binary separation, matching the expected dynamical truncation radius for the circumbinary disk. The IRAS17216-3801 system is ∼3× more massive and ∼5× more compact than other high-mass multiplies imaged at infrared wavelength and the first high-mass protobinary system where circumstellar and circumbinary dust disks could be spatially resolved. This opens exciting new opportunities for studying star–disk interactions and the role of multiplicity in high-mass star formation. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory under program IDs 60.A-9174(A), 089.C-0819(A,C), 089.C-0959(D,E), 094.C-0153(A), 096.C-0652(A).

  8. Evolution of close binary systems: Observational aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavec, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Detached close binary systems define the main sequence band satisfactorily, but very little is known about the masses of giants and supergiants. High dispersion international ultraviolet explorer satellite observations promise an improvement, since blue companions are now frequently found to late type supergiants. Mu Sagittaril and in particular Xi Aurigae are discussed in more detail. The barium star abundance anomaly appears to be due to mass transfer in interacting systems. The symbiotic stars are another type of binary systems containing late type giants; several possible models for the hotter star and for the type of interaction are discussed. The W Serpentis stars appear to be Algols in the rapid phase of mass transfer, but a possible link relating them to the symbiotics is also indicated. Evidence of hot circumstellar plasmas has now been found in several ordinary Algols; there may exist a smooth transition between very quiescent Algols and the W Serpentis stars. Beta Lyrae is discussed in the light of new spectrophotometric results.

  9. Modifying two-body relaxation in N-body systems by gas accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Nathan; Sills, Alison; Böker, Torsten

    2013-08-01

    We consider the effects that accretion from the interstellar medium on to the particles of an N-body system has on the rate of two-body relaxation. To this end, we derive an accretion-modified relaxation time by adapting Spitzer's two-component model to include the damping effects of accretion. We consider several different mass- dependences and efficiency factors for the accretion rate, as well as different mass ratios for the two components of the model. The net effect of accretion is to accelerate mass segregation by increasing the average mass bar{m}, since the relaxation time is inversely proportional to bar{m}. Under the assumption that the accretion rate increases with the accretor mass, there are two additional effects that accelerate mass segregation. First, accretion acts to increase the range of any initial mass spectrum, quickly driving the heaviest members to even higher masses. Secondly, accretion acts to reduce the velocities of the accretors due to conservation of momentum, and it is the heaviest members that are affected the most. Using our two-component model, we quantify these effects as a function of the accretion rate, the total cluster mass and the component masses. We conclude by discussing the implications of our results for the dynamical evolution of primordial globular clusters, primarily in the context of black holes formed from the most massive stellar progenitors.

  10. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  11. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in an X-Ray Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its ~5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (~7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-Kα line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (~60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (gsim 1012 G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (1033-1035 erg s-1), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a ~1013 G NS, this scheme can explain the ~5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (~1016 G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (~50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfvén shell for a ~1013 G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  12. Critical condition for the propeller effect in systems with magnetized neutron stars accreting from geometrically thin accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertan, Unal

    2016-07-01

    The inner disk radius around a magnetized neutron star in the spin-down phase is usually assumed to be close to the radius at which the viscous and magnetic stresses are balanced. With different assumptions, this radius is estimated to be very close the Alfven radius. Furthermore, it is commonly assumed that the propeller mechanism can expel the matter from the system when this radius is found to be greater than the co-rotation radius. In the present work, we have shown with simple analytical calculations from the first principles that a steady-state propeller mechanism cannot be established at the radius where the viscous and the magnetic torques are balanced. We have found that a steady-state propeller phase can be built up with an inner disk radius that is at least ~10 - 30 times smaller than the Alfven radius depending on the current mass-flow rate of the disk, the field strength and the rotational period of the source. This result also indicates that the critical accretion rate for the accretion-propeller transition is orders of magnitude smaller than the rate found by equating the Alfven and the co-rotation radii. Our results are consistent with the properties of recently discovered transitional millisecond pulsars which show transitions between the rotational powered radio pulsar and the accretion powered X-ray pulsar states.

  13. Radio emission from RS CVn binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Doiron, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The RS CVn binary stellar systems UX Ari, HR 1099, AR Lac, HR 5110, II Peg, lambda And, and SZ Psc were investigated by use of radio interferometry during the period from July 1982 through August 1983. Interferometry took two forms: Very Large Array (VLA) observations and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). The VLA observations determined the characteristic polarization and flux behavior of the centimeter wavelength radio emission. The observed spectral index was near zero during quiescent periods, rising to between 0.5 and 1.0 during active periods. No net linear polarization is observed to a limit of 1.7%. This is expected since the Faraday depth of thermal electrons deduced from x-ray observations is approx. 10/sup 5/. Circular polarization is observed to be less than 20% at all frequencies often with a helicity reversal between 1.6 GHz and 5 GHz. The VLBI observations have shown that the brightness temperatures are often T/sub B/ approx.> 10/sup 10/ /sup 0/K and size sources smaller than or comparable to the overall size of the binary system. These data are consistent with incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons which are optically thick to their own radiation at 1.6 GHz and optically thin at 5 GHz and above. The spectral behavior suggests that the radio emission is due to a power-law distribution of electrons.

  14. AM CVn Stars: Structure and Evolution of Ultra-Short Period Interacting Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froning, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This is the final report of a FUSE program to study the physics of accretion and outflows in ultra-compact, helium dominated, disk-accreting binaries. With FUSE, we observed the AM CVn binary V803 Cen, which is one of only two AM CVn systems observed by FUSE to date. V803 Cen is a short-period interacting binary in which a hydrogen-deficient white dwarf transfers mass to another white dwarf via a hot, steady-state accretion disk. Unlike other cataclysmic variables (CVs), AM CVn stars have undergone double common envelope evolution (one for each white dwarf in the binary) and so probe an alternate route of evolution in binary stars. Our goals in this project were to investigate how the structure of the accretion disk and the link between the disk and wind outflows are affected by the absence of hydrogen in the system and by the compact size of the binary and the accretion disk.

  15. A detached binary system BK Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demircan, Osman; Kaya, Yalcin; Tufekcioglu, Zeki

    1994-12-01

    The UBV photometry of the detached F-type eclipsing binary BK Pegasi is presented. The light curve solution by a simple spherical model assumption suggests that a slightly hotter, larger and more luminous primary was eclipsed during the primary minimum. Combined with the radial velocity curves in Popper (1983), it was used to determine anew the system's parameters. The age and the metal abundance of the system were estimated as (3.3 +/- 0.2) x 109 yr and z = 0.028 +/- 0.003 from a comparison with the new grids of stellar models and the isochrones by Schaller et al. (1993). The distance of the system was estimated as 290 pc.

  16. Accretion disks in Algols: Progenitors and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rensbergen, W.; De Greve, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Context. There are only a few Algols with measured accretion disk parameters. These measurements provide additional constraints for tracing the origin of individual systems, narrowing down the initial parameter space. Aims: We investigate the origin and evolution of six Algol systems with accretion disks to find the initial parameters and evolutionary constraints for them. Methods: With a modified binary evolution code, series of close binary evolution are calculated to obtain the best match for observed individual systems. Results: Initial parameters for six Algol systems with accretion disks were determined matching both the present system parameters and the observed disk characteristics. Conclusions: When Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) starts during core hydrogen burning of the donor, the disk lifetime was found to be short. The disk luminosity is comparable to the luminosity of the gainer during a large fraction of the disk lifetime.

  17. Conjugating binary systems for spacecraft thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, Philomena G.; Dean, William G.; Sisk, Lori A.; Karu, Zain S.

    1989-01-01

    The materials search was directed to liquid pairs which can form hydrogen bonds of just the right strength, i.e., strong enough to give a high heat of mixing, but weak enough to enable phase change to occur. The cursory studies performed in the area of additive effects indicate that Conjugating Binary (CB) performance can probably be fine-tuned by this means. The Fluid Loop Test Systems (FLTS) tests of candidate CBs indicate that the systems Triethylamine (TEA)/water and propionaldehyde/water show close to the ideal, reversible behavior, at least initially. The Quick Screening Tests QSTs and FLTS tests, however, both suffer from rather severe static due either to inadequate stirring or temperature control. Thus it is not possible to adequately evaluate less than ideal CB performers. Less than ideal performers, it should be noted, may have features that make them better practical CBs than ideal performers. Improvement of the evaluation instrumentation is thus indicated.

  18. Potential cooling of an accretion-heated neutron star crust in the low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, A. S.; Wijnands, R.; Degenaar, N.; Ootes, L. S.; Page, D.; Altamirano, D.; Cackett, E. M.; Deller, A. T.; Gusinskaia, N.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Homan, J.; Linares, M.; Miller, J. M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.

    2017-01-01

    We have monitored the transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 1RXS J180408.9-342058 in quiescence after its ˜4.5 month outburst in 2015. The source has been observed using Swift and XMM-Newton. Its X-ray spectra were dominated by a thermal component. The thermal evolution showed a gradual X-ray luminosity decay from ˜18 × 1032 to ˜4 × 1032 (D/5.8 kpc)2 erg s-1 between ˜8 to ˜379 days in quiescence and the inferred neutron star surface temperature (for an observer at infinity; using a neutron star atmosphere model) decreased from ˜100 to ˜71 eV. This can be interpreted as cooling of an accretion heated neutron star crust. Modeling the observed temperature curve (using NSCOOL) indicated that the source required ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon of shallow heating in addition to the standard deep crustal heating to explain its thermal evolution. Alternatively, the decay could also be modelled without the presence of deep crustal heating, only having a shallow heat source (again ˜1.9 MeV per accreted nucleon was required). However, the XMM-Newton data statistically required an additional power-law component. This component contributed ˜30 per cent of the total unabsorbed flux in 0.5 - 10 keV energy range. The physical origin of this component is unknown. One possibility is that it arises from low-level accretion. The presence of this component in the spectrum complicates our cooling crust interpretation because it might indicate that the smooth luminosity and temperature decay curves we observed may not be due to crust cooling but due to some other process.

  19. Planetary system disruption by Galactic perturbations to wide binary stars.

    PubMed

    Kaib, Nathan A; Raymond, Sean N; Duncan, Martin

    2013-01-17

    Nearly half the exoplanets found within binary star systems reside in very wide binaries with average stellar separations greater than 1,000 astronomical units (one astronomical unit (AU) being the Earth-Sun distance), yet the influence of such distant binary companions on planetary evolution remains largely unstudied. Unlike their tighter counterparts, the stellar orbits of wide binaries continually change under the influence of the Milky Way's tidal field and impulses from other passing stars. Here we report numerical simulations demonstrating that the variable nature of wide binary star orbits dramatically reshapes the planetary systems they host, typically billions of years after formation. Contrary to previous understanding, wide binary companions may often strongly perturb planetary systems, triggering planetary ejections and increasing the orbital eccentricities of surviving planets. Although hitherto not recognized, orbits of giant exoplanets within wide binaries are statistically more eccentric than those around isolated stars. Both eccentricity distributions are well reproduced when we assume that isolated stars and wide binaries host similar planetary systems whose outermost giant planets are scattered beyond about 10 AU from their parent stars by early internal instabilities. Consequently, our results suggest that although wide binaries eventually remove the most distant planets from many planetary systems, most isolated giant exoplanet systems harbour additional distant, still undetected planets.

  20. CALCULATING THE HABITABLE ZONE OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS. I. S-TYPE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltenegger, Lisa; Haghighipour, Nader

    2013-11-10

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology for calculating the boundaries of the habitable zone (HZ) of planet-hosting S-type binary star systems. Our approach is general and takes into account the contribution of both stars to the location and extent of the binary HZ with different stellar spectral types. We have studied how the binary eccentricity and stellar energy distribution affect the extent of the HZ. Results indicate that in binaries where the combination of mass-ratio and orbital eccentricity allows planet formation around a star of the system to proceed successfully, the effect of a less luminous secondary on the location of the primary's HZ is generally negligible. However, when the secondary is more luminous, it can influence the extent of the HZ. We present the details of the derivations of our methodology and discuss its application to the binary HZ around the primary and secondary main-sequence stars of an FF, MM, and FM binary, as well as two known planet-hosting binaries α Cen AB and HD 196886.

  1. Rethinking Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg

    Accretion discs are staples of astrophysics. Tapping into the gravitational potential energy of the accreting material, these discs are highly efficient machines that produce copious radiation and extreme outflows. While interesting in their own right, accretion discs also act as tools to study black holes and directly influence the properties of the Universe. Black hole X-ray binaries are fantastic natural laboratories for studying accretion disc physics and black hole phenomena. Among many of the curious behaviors exhibited by these systems are black hole state transitions -- complicated cycles of dramatic brightening and dimming. Using X-ray observations with high temporal cadence, we show that the evolution of the accretion disc spectrum during black hole state transitions can be described by a variable disc atmospheric structure without invoking a radially truncated disc geometry. The accretion disc spectrum can be a powerful diagnostic for measuring black hole spin if the effects of the disc atmosphere on the emergent spectrum are well-understood; however, properties of the disc atmosphere are largely unconstrained. Using statistical methods, we decompose this black hole spin measurement technique and show that modest uncertainties regarding the disc atmosphere can lead to erroneous spin measurements. The vertical structure of the disc is difficult to constrain due to our ignorance of the contribution to hydrostatic balance by magnetic fields, which are fundamental to the accretion process. Observations of black hole X-ray binaries and the accretion environments near supermassive black holes provide mounting evidence for strong magnetization. Performing numerical simulations of accretion discs in the shearing box approximation, we impose a net vertical magnetic flux that allows us to effectively control the level of disc magnetization. We study how dynamo activity and the properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability depend on the

  2. Sco X-1 in LIGO: directed searches for continuous gravitational waves from neutron stars in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadors, Grant; Goetz, Evan; Riles, Keith

    2014-03-01

    Scorpius X-1 and similar low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems with neutron stars contain favorable conditions for the emission of continuous gravitational waves (GW). Companion star accretion is believed to recycle the neutron star, spinning it up to high rotational speeds. That accretion could also induce non-axisymmetries in the neutron star, leading to detectable GW emission. Advanced LIGO and other 2nd-generation interferometric observatories will permit searches for such gravitational waves using new algorithms, including the TwoSpect program, which was developed originally for all-sky binary searches. In this presentation we discuss an implementation of TwoSpect using fine templates in parameter space at the initial stage and optimized to search for LMXBs, such as Sco X-1, where some of the orbital parameters are known. Results from simulations will be shown.

  3. N-Body Integrators for Planets in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, John E.

    The discovery of planets orbiting in binary star systems represents an exciting new field of astrophysics. The stability of planetary orbits in binary systems can only be addressed analytically in special cases, so most researchers have studied stability using long-term N-body integrations of test particles, examining binary systems with a range of masses and orbits (e.g. Wiegert and Holman 1997; Haghighipour and Wiegert 1999; Haghighipour 2006). This has led to a good understanding of the likely regions of stability and instability in binary systems. Integrators can also been used to study the more complex problem of several finite-mass planets orbiting in a binary system, where interactions between the planets are significant. However, at the time of writing, this problem has been explored in less detail than the test-particle case, and we still lack a general theory for the stability of these systems.

  4. Search for A-F Spectral type pulsating components in Algol-type eclipsing binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-L.; Lee, J. W.; Kwon, S.-G.; Youn, J.-H.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Kim, C.

    2003-07-01

    We present the results of a systematic search for pulsating components in Algol-type eclipsing binary systems. A total number of 14 eclipsing binaries with A-F spectral type primary components were observed for 22 nights. We confirmed small-amplitude oscillating features of a recently detected pulsator TW Dra, which has a pulsating period of 0.053 day and a semi-amplitude of about 5 mmag in B-passband. We discovered new pulsating components in two eclipsing binaries of RX Hya and AB Per. The primary component of RX Hya is pulsating with a dominant period of 0.052 day and a semi-amplitude of about 7 mmag. AB Per has also a pulsating component with a period of 0.196 day and a semi-amplitude of about 10 mmag in B-passband. We suggest that these two new pulsators are members of the newly introduced group of mass-accreting pulsating stars in semi-detached Algol-type eclipsing binary systems. Table 4 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/405/231

  5. The Evolution of Compact Binary Star Systems.

    PubMed

    Postnov, Konstantin A; Yungelson, Lev R

    2006-01-01

    We review the formation and evolution of compact binary stars consisting of white dwarfs (WDs), neutron stars (NSs), and black holes (BHs). Binary NSs and BHs are thought to be the primary astrophysical sources of gravitational waves (GWs) within the frequency band of ground-based detectors, while compact binaries of WDs are important sources of GWs at lower frequencies to be covered by space interferometers (LISA). Major uncertainties in the current understanding of properties of NSs and BHs most relevant to the GW studies are discussed, including the treatment of the natal kicks which compact stellar remnants acquire during the core collapse of massive stars and the common envelope phase of binary evolution. We discuss the coalescence rates of binary NSs and BHs and prospects for their detections, the formation and evolution of binary WDs and their observational manifestations. Special attention is given to AM CVn-stars - compact binaries in which the Roche lobe is filled by another WD or a low-mass partially degenerate helium-star, as these stars are thought to be the best LISA verification binary GW sources.

  6. Asteroid Systems: Binaries, Triples, and Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J.-L.; Pravec, P.; Taylor, P.; Carry, B.; Jacobson, S.

    In the past decade, the number of known binary near-Earth asteroids has more than quadrupled and the number of known large main-belt asteroids with satellites has doubled. Half a dozen triple asteroids have been discovered, and the previously unrecognized populations of asteroid pairs and small main-belt binaries have been identified. The current observational evidence confirms that small (≲20 km) binaries form by rotational fission and establishes that the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect powers the spin-up process. A unifying paradigm based on rotational fission and post-fission dynamics can explain the formation of small binaries, triples, and pairs. Large (>~20 km) binaries with small satellites are most likely created during large collisions.

  7. NONLINEAR TIDES IN CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Nevin N.; Arras, Phil; Quataert, Eliot; Burkart, Josh

    2012-06-01

    We study the excitation and damping of tides in close binary systems, accounting for the leading-order nonlinear corrections to linear tidal theory. These nonlinear corrections include two distinct physical effects: three-mode nonlinear interactions, i.e., the redistribution of energy among stellar modes of oscillation, and nonlinear excitation of stellar normal modes by the time-varying gravitational potential of the companion. This paper, the first in a series, presents the formalism for studying nonlinear tides and studies the nonlinear stability of the linear tidal flow. Although the formalism we present is applicable to binaries containing stars, planets, and/or compact objects, we focus on non-rotating solar-type stars with stellar or planetary companions. Our primary results include the following: (1) The linear tidal solution almost universally used in studies of binary evolution is unstable over much of the parameter space in which it is employed. More specifically, resonantly excited internal gravity waves in solar-type stars are nonlinearly unstable to parametric resonance for companion masses M' {approx}> 10-100 M{sub Circled-Plus} at orbital periods P Almost-Equal-To 1-10 days. The nearly static 'equilibrium' tidal distortion is, however, stable to parametric resonance except for solar binaries with P {approx}< 2-5 days. (2) For companion masses larger than a few Jupiter masses, the dynamical tide causes short length scale waves to grow so rapidly that they must be treated as traveling waves, rather than standing waves. (3) We show that the global three-wave treatment of parametric instability typically used in the astrophysics literature does not yield the fastest-growing daughter modes or instability threshold in many cases. We find a form of parametric instability in which a single parent wave excites a very large number of daughter waves (N Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 3}[P/10 days] for a solar-type star) and drives them as a single coherent unit with

  8. XZ And a semidetached asynchronous binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoori, Davood

    2016-05-01

    In this work the light curves (LCs) solutions along with the radial velocity curve of the semidetached binary systemXZ And are presented using the PHOEBE program(ver 0.31a). Absolute parameters of the stellar components were then determined, enabling us to discuss structure and evolutionary status of the system. The analysis indicates that the primary is a non-synchronous (i.e., F1 = 3.50 ± 0.01) Main Sequence (MS) star and the secondary is a bit more evolved, and fills its Roche critical surface. In addition, times of minima data (" O - C curve") were analyzed. Apart from an almost parabolic variation in the general trend of O - C data, which was attributed to a mass transfer from the secondary with the rate ˙2 = (9.52 ± 0.41) × 10-10 M ⊙ yr-1; two cyclic variations with mean periods of 34.8 ± 2.4 and 23.3 ± 3.0 yr, modulating the orbital period, were found, which were attributed to a third body orbiting around the system, and magnetic activity cycle effect, respectively.

  9. UHE particle production in close binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillas, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Cygnus X-3 appears to generate so much power in the form of charged particles of up to approx 10 to the 17th power eV that the galaxy may need approx 1 such source on average to maintain its flux of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Accreting gas must supply the energy, and in a surprisingly ordered form, if it is correct to use a Vest-rand-Eichler model for radiation of gammas, modified by the introduction of an accretion wake. Certain relationships between 10 to the 12th power eV and 10 to the 15th power gamma rays are expected.

  10. Orbital Evolution of Mass-transferring Eccentric Binary Systems. II. Secular Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosopoulou, Fani; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-07-01

    Finite eccentricities in mass-transferring eccentric binary systems can be explained by taking into account the mass loss and mass transfer processes that often occur in these systems. These processes can be treated as perturbations of the general two-body problem. The time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity derived from perturbative methods are generally phase-dependent. The osculating semimajor axis and eccentricity change over the orbital timescale and are not easy to implement in binary evolution codes like MESA. However, the secular orbital element evolution equations can be simplified by averaging over the rapidly varying true anomalies. In this paper, we derive the secular time-evolution equations for the semimajor axis and the eccentricity for various mass loss/transfer processes using either the adiabatic approximation or the assumption of delta-function mass loss/transfer at periastron. We begin with the cases of isotropic and anisotropic wind mass loss. We continue with conservative and non-conservative non-isotropic mass ejection/accretion (including Roche-Lobe-Overflow) for both point-masses and extended bodies. We conclude with the case of phase-dependent mass accretion. Comparison of the derived equations with similar work in the literature is included and an explanation of the existing discrepancies is provided.

  11. A New Comptonization Model for Weakly Magnetized, Accreting Neutron Stars in Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinelli, Ruben; Titarchuk, Lev; Paizis, Ada; Frontera, Filippo

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a new model for the X-ray spectral fitting package XSPEC that takes into account the effects of both thermal and dynamical (i.e., bulk) Comptonization. The model consists of two components: one is the direct blackbody-like emission due to seed photons that are not subjected to effective Compton scattering, while the other is a convolution of the Green's function of the energy operator with a blackbody-like seed photon spectrum. When combined thermal and bulk effects are considered, the analytical form of the Green's function may be obtained as a solution of the diffusion equation describing Comptonization. Using data from the BeppoSAX, INTEGRAL, and RXTE satellites, we test our model on the spectra of a sample of six bright neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries with low magnetic fields, covering three different spectral states. Particular attention is given to the transient power-law-like hard X-ray (gtrsim30 keV) tails, which we interpret in the framework of the bulk motion Comptonization process. We show that the values of the best-fit δ-parameter, which represents the importance of bulk with respect to thermal Comptonization, can be physically meaningful and can at least qualitatively describe the physical conditions of the environment in the innermost part of the system. Moreover, we show that in fitting the thermal Comptonization spectra to the X-ray spectra of these systems, the best-fit parameters of our model are in excellent agreement with those from compTT, a broadly used and well-established XSPEC model.

  12. Towards a Fundamental Understanding of Short Period Eclipsing Binary Systems Using Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prsa, Andrej

    -to-primary light ratio regime of ~1-2% for the circumbinary host system Kepler-16. Semi-detached binaries are ideal targets to study the dynamical processes such as mass flow and accretion, and the associated thermal processes such as intensity variation due to distortion of the lobe-filling component and material inflow collisions with accretion disks. Overcontact binaries are very abundant, yet their evolution and radiative properties are poorly understood and conflicting theories exist to explain their population frequency and structure. In addition, we will measure eclipse timing variations for all program binaries that attest to the presence of perturbing third bodies (stellar and substellar!) or dynamical interaction between the components. By a dedicated, detailed, manual modeling of these sets of targets, we will be able to use Kepler's ultra-high precision photometry to a rewarding scientific end. Thanks to the unprecedented quality of Kepler data, this will be a highly focused effort that maximizes the scientific yield and the reliability of the results. Our team has ample experience dealing with Kepler data (PI Prsa serves as chair of the Eclipsing Binary Working Group in the Kepler Science Team), spectroscopic follow-up (Co-Is Mahadevan and Bender both have experience with radial velocity instrumentation and large spectroscopic surveys), and eclipsing binary modeling (PI Prsa and Co-I Devinney both have a long record of theoretical and computational development of modeling tools). The bulk of funding we are requesting is for two postdoctoral research fellows to conduct this work at 0.5 FTE/year each, for the total of 2 years.

  13. Formation and Evolution of Binary Systems Containing Collapsed Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Saul; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This research includes theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of five types of interacting binary systems. Our main focus has been on developing a number of comprehensive population synthesis codes to study the following types of binary systems: (i) cataclysmic variables (#3, #8, #12, #15), (ii) low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (#13, #20, #21), (iii) high-mass X-ray binaries (#14, #17, #22), (iv) recycled binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters (#5, #10, #ll), and (v) planetary nebulae which form in interacting binaries (#6, #9). The numbers in parentheses refer to papers published or in preparation that are listed in this paper. These codes take a new unified approach to population synthesis studies. The first step involves a Monte Carlo selection of the primordial binaries, including the constituent masses, and orbital separations and eccentricities. Next, a variety of analytic methods are used to evolve the primary star to the point where either a dynamical episode of mass transfer to the secondary occurs (the common envelope phase), or the system evolves down an alternate path. If the residual core of the primary is greater than 2.5 solar mass, it will evolve to Fe core collapse and the production of a neutron star and a supernova explosion. In the case of systems involving neutron stars, a kick velocity is chosen randomly from an appropriate distribution and added to the orbital dynamics which determine the state of the binary system after the supernova explosion. In the third step, all binaries which commence stable mass transfer from the donor star (the original secondary in the binary system) to the compact object, are followed with a detailed binary evolution code. Finally, we include all the relevant dynamics of the binary system. For example, in the case of LMXBs, the binary system, with its recoil velocity from the supernova explosion, is followed in time through its path in the Galactic potential. For our globular cluster

  14. Black holes in binary stellar systems and galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2014-04-01

    In the last 40 years, following pioneering papers by Ya B Zeldovich and E E Salpeter, in which a powerful energy release from nonspherical accretion of matter onto a black hole (BH) was predicted, many observational studies of black holes in the Universe have been carried out. To date, the masses of several dozen stellar-mass black holes (M_BH = (4{-}20) M_\\odot) in X-ray binary systems and of several hundred supermassive black holes (M_BH = (10^{6}{-}10^{10}) M_\\odot) in galactic nuclei have been measured. The estimated radii of these massive and compact objects do not exceed several gravitational radii. For about ten stellar-mass black holes and several dozen supermassive black holes, the values of the dimensionless angular momentum a_* have been estimated, which, in agreement with theoretical predictions, do not exceed the limiting value a_* = 0.998. A new field of astrophysics, so-called black hole demography, which studies the birth and growth of black holes and their evolutionary connection to other objects in the Universe, namely stars, galaxies, etc., is rapidly developing. In addition to supermassive black holes, massive stellar clusters are observed in galactic nuclei, and their evolution is distinct from that of supermassive black holes. The evolutionary relations between supermassive black holes in galactic centers and spheroidal stellar components (bulges) of galaxies, as well as dark-matter galactic haloes are brought out. The launch into Earth's orbit of the space radio interferometer RadioAstron opened up the real possibility of finally proving that numerous discovered massive and highly compact objects with properties very similar to those of black holes make up real black holes in the sense of Albert Einstein's General Relativity. Similar proofs of the existence of black holes in the Universe can be obtained by intercontinental radio interferometry at short wavelengths \\lambda \\lesssim 1 mm (the international program, Event Horizon Telescope).

  15. The effect of accretion on the measurement of neutron star mass and radius in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutanen, Juri; Nättilä, Joonas; Kajava, Jari J. E.; Latvala, Outi-Marja; Galloway, Duncan K.; Kuulkers, Erik; Suleimanov, Valery F.

    2014-08-01

    Spectral measurements of thermonuclear (type I) X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries have been used to measure neutron star (NS) masses and radii. A number of systematic issues affect such measurements and have raised concerns as to the robustness of the methods. We present analysis of the X-ray emission from bursts observed from 4U 1608-52 at various persistent fluxes. We find a strong dependence of the burst properties on the flux and spectral hardness of the persistent emission before burst. Bursts occurring during the low accretion rate (hard) state exhibit evolution of the blackbody normalization consistent with the theoretical predictions of NS atmosphere models. However, bursts occurring during the high accretion rate (soft) state show roughly constant normalization, which is inconsistent with the NS atmosphere models and therefore these bursts cannot be easily used to determine NS parameters. We analyse the hard-state burst to put the lower limit on the NS radius R in 4U 1608-52 of 12 km (for masses 1.0-2.4 M⊙). We constrain R to be between 13 and 16 km for masses 1.2-1.6 M⊙. The best agreement with the theoretical NS mass-radius relations is achieved for source distances in the range 3.1-3.7 kpc. We expect that the radius limit will be 10 per cent lower if spectral models including rapid rotation are used instead.

  16. DETECTION OF LOW-MASS-RATIO STELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gullikson, Kevin; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    O- and B-type stars are often found in binary systems, but the low binary mass-ratio regime is relatively unexplored due to observational difficulties. Binary systems with low mass ratios may have formed through fragmentation of the circumstellar disk rather than molecular cloud core fragmentation. We describe a new technique sensitive to G- and K-type companions to early B stars, a mass ratio of roughly 0.1, using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra. We apply this technique to a sample of archived VLT/CRIRES observations of nearby B stars in the CO bandhead near 2300 nm. While there are no unambiguous binary detections in our sample, we identify HIP 92855 and HIP 26713 as binary candidates warranting follow-up observations. We use our non-detections to determine upper limits to the frequency of FGK stars orbiting early B-type primaries.

  17. STAR HOPPERS: PLANET INSTABILITY AND CAPTURE IN EVOLVING BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Perets, Hagai B.

    2012-07-01

    Many planets are observed in stellar binary systems, and their frequency may be comparable to that of planetary systems around single stars. Binary stellar evolution in such systems influences the dynamical evolution of the resident planets. Here, we study the evolution of a single planet orbiting one star in an evolving binary system. We find that stellar evolution can trigger dynamical instabilities that drive planets into chaotic orbits. This instability leads to planet-star collisions, exchange of the planet between the binary stars ('star hoppers'), and ejection of the planet from the system. The means by which planets can be recaptured is similar to the pull-down capture mechanism for irregular solar system satellites. Because planets often suffer close encounters with the primary on the asymptotic giant branch, captures during a collision with the stellar envelope are also possible for more massive planets. Such capture could populate the habitable zone around white dwarfs.

  18. An Approach to Detect and Mitigate Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation sector. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. This work focuses on developing an accurate and reliable algorithm for detecting the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor of a generic 40,000 lbf thrust class engine. The algorithm uses only the two shaft speed sensors and works regardless of engine age, operating condition, and power level. In a 10,000-case Monte Carlo simulation, the detection approach was found to have excellent capability at determining ice accretion from sensor noise with detection occurring when ice blocks an average of 6.8 percent of the low pressure compressor area. Finally, an initial study highlights a potential mitigation strategy that uses the existing engine actuators to raise the temperature in the low pressure compressor in an effort to reduce the rate at which ice accretes.

  19. An Approach to Detect and Mitigate Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation sector. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. This work focuses on developing an accurate and reliable algorithm for detecting the accretion of ice in the low pressure compressor of a generic 40,000 lbf thrust class engine. The algorithm uses only the two shaft speed sensors and works regardless of engine age, operating condition, and power level. In a 10,000-case Monte Carlo simulation, the detection approach was found to have excellent capability at determining ice accretion from sensor noise with detection occurring when ice blocks an average of 6.8% of the low pressure compressor area. Finally, an initial study highlights a potential mitigation strategy that uses the existing engine actuators to raise the temperature in the low pressure compressor in an effort to reduce the rate at which ice accretes.

  20. KOI-3278: a self-lensing binary star system.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Ethan; Agol, Eric

    2014-04-18

    Over 40% of Sun-like stars are bound in binary or multistar systems. Stellar remnants in edge-on binary systems can gravitationally magnify their companions, as predicted 40 years ago. By using data from the Kepler spacecraft, we report the detection of such a "self-lensing" system, in which a 5-hour pulse of 0.1% amplitude occurs every orbital period. The white dwarf stellar remnant and its Sun-like companion orbit one another every 88.18 days, a long period for a white dwarf-eclipsing binary. By modeling the pulse as gravitational magnification (microlensing) along with Kepler's laws and stellar models, we constrain the mass of the white dwarf to be ~63% of the mass of our Sun. Further study of this system, and any others discovered like it, will help to constrain the physics of white dwarfs and binary star evolution.

  1. The Eclipsing Binary Pulsar PSR B1718-19: a Clean RS CVN System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    1996-07-01

    We request WFPC2 observations of the eclipsing binary pulsarPSR B1718-19. This slowly-rotating pulsar lies in thedirection of the globular cluster NGC 6342, and defiesstandard binary pulsar formation models in which the pulsar is``spun-up'' via mass accretion. Furthermore, the observedeclipses cannot be explained with standard models. Thispulsar's unusual properties can be explained elegantly if itscompanion is an active, non-degenerate star like thoseobserved in RS CVn systems, but in this case, subject only togravity. Following Keck observations of the field, we proposeHST observations of PSR B1718-19 to detect and studyvariability in the companion, in order to answer the followingquestions. 1- Are the eclipses seen in PSR B1718-19 indeed aresult of RS CVn-type activity in the companion, and what isthe evolutionary history of the binary? 2- Is the activity inRS CVn systems purely a tidal effect? 3- How are mass loss,rotation, and surface activity related in RS CVn stars? 4- IsPSR B1718-19 in NGC 6342?

  2. Probing X-ray burst - accretion disk interaction in low mass X-ray binaries through kilohertz quasiperiodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peille, P.; Olive, J.-F.; Barret, D.

    2014-07-01

    The intense radiation flux of Type I X-ray bursts is expected to interact with the accretion flow around neutron stars. High frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (kHz QPOs), observed at frequencies matching orbital frequencies at tens of gravitational radii, offer a unique probe of the innermost disk regions. In this paper, we follow the lower kHz QPOs, in response to Type I X-ray bursts, in two prototypical QPO sources, namely 4U 1636-536 and 4U 1608-522, as observed by the Proportional Counter Array of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We have selected a sample of 15 bursts for which the kHz QPO frequency can be tracked on timescales commensurable with the burst durations (tens of seconds). We find evidence that the QPOs are affected for over ~200 s during one exceptionally long burst and ~100 s during two others (although at a less significant level), while the burst emission has already decayed to a level that would enable the pre-burst QPO to be detected. On the other hand, for most of our burst-kHz QPO sample, we show that the QPO is detected as soon as the statistics allow and in the best cases, we are able to set an upper limit of ~20 s on the recovery time of the QPO. This diversity of behavior cannot be related to differences in burst peak luminosity. We discuss these results in the framework of recent findings that accretion onto the neutron star may be enhanced during Type I X-ray bursts. The subsequent disk depletion could explain the disappearance of the QPO for ~100 s, as possibly observed in two events. However, alternative scenarios would have to be invoked for explaining the short recovery timescales inferred from most bursts. Heating of the innermost disk regions would be a possibility, although we cannot exclude that the burst does not affect the QPO emission at all. Clearly the combination of fast timing and spectral information of Type I X-ray bursts holds great potential in the study of the dynamics of the inner accretion flow around neutron

  3. Challenges in forming the solar system's giant planet cores via pebble accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Kretke, K. A.; Levison, H. F.

    2014-12-01

    Though ∼10 M {sub ⊕} mass rocky/icy cores are commonly held as a prerequisite for the formation of gas giants, theoretical models still struggle to explain how these embryos can form within the lifetimes of gaseous circumstellar disks. In recent years, aerodynamic-aided accretion of 'pebbles', objects ranging from centimeters to meters in size, has been suggested as a potential solution to this long-standing problem. While pebble accretion has been demonstrated to be extremely effective in local simulations that look at the detailed behavior of these pebbles in the vicinity of a single planetary embryo, to date there have been no global simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of pebble accretion in a more complicated, multi-planet environment. Therefore, we have incorporated the aerodynamic-aided accretion physics into LIPAD, a Lagrangian code that can follow the collisional/accretional/dynamical evolution of a protoplanetary system, to investigate how pebble accretion manifests itself in the larger planet formation picture. We find that under generic circumstances, pebble accretion naturally leads to an 'oligarchic' type of growth in which a large number of planetesimals grow to similar-sized planets. In particular, our simulations tend to form hundreds of Mars- and Earth-mass objects between 4 and 10 AU. While merging of some oligarchs may grow massive enough to form giant planet cores, leftover oligarchs lead to planetary systems that cannot be consistent with our own solar system. We investigate various ideas presented in the literature (including evaporation fronts and planet traps) and find that none easily overcome this tendency toward oligarchic growth.

  4. Challenges in Forming the Solar System's Giant Planet Cores via Pebble Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretke, K. A.; Levison, H. F.

    2014-12-01

    Though ~10 M ⊕ mass rocky/icy cores are commonly held as a prerequisite for the formation of gas giants, theoretical models still struggle to explain how these embryos can form within the lifetimes of gaseous circumstellar disks. In recent years, aerodynamic-aided accretion of "pebbles," objects ranging from centimeters to meters in size, has been suggested as a potential solution to this long-standing problem. While pebble accretion has been demonstrated to be extremely effective in local simulations that look at the detailed behavior of these pebbles in the vicinity of a single planetary embryo, to date there have been no global simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of pebble accretion in a more complicated, multi-planet environment. Therefore, we have incorporated the aerodynamic-aided accretion physics into LIPAD, a Lagrangian code that can follow the collisional/accretional/dynamical evolution of a protoplanetary system, to investigate how pebble accretion manifests itself in the larger planet formation picture. We find that under generic circumstances, pebble accretion naturally leads to an "oligarchic" type of growth in which a large number of planetesimals grow to similar-sized planets. In particular, our simulations tend to form hundreds of Mars- and Earth-mass objects between 4 and 10 AU. While merging of some oligarchs may grow massive enough to form giant planet cores, leftover oligarchs lead to planetary systems that cannot be consistent with our own solar system. We investigate various ideas presented in the literature (including evaporation fronts and planet traps) and find that none easily overcome this tendency toward oligarchic growth.

  5. Binary Star Systems and Extrasolar Planets: The PHASES Search for Planets in Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muterspaugh, M. W.; PTI: Palomar Testbed Interferometer Collaboration; PHASES Team

    2005-12-01

    A new observing method has been developed to perform very high precision differential astrometry on bright binary stars with separations in the range of 0.1-1.0 arcseconds. Typical measurement precisions over an hour of integration are on the order of 10 micro-arcseconds, enabling one to look for perturbations to the Keplerian orbit that would indicate the presence of additional components to the system. This is used as the basis for a new program to find extrasolar planets. The Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) is a search for giant planets orbiting either star in 50 binary systems. The goal of this search is to detect or rule out planets in the systems observed and thus place limits on any enhancements of planet formation in binaries. It is also used to measure fundamental properties of the stars comprising the binary, such as masses and distances, useful for constraining stellar models at the 10-3 level. This work is funded in part by a Michelson Graduate Fellowship, the California Institute of Technology Astronomy Department, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNG05GJ58G issued through the Terrestrial Planet Finder Foundation Science Program.

  6. KIC 7177553: A QUADRUPLE SYSTEM OF TWO CLOSE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, H.; Borkovits, T.; Rappaport, S. A.; Ngo, H.; Mawet, D.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Forgács-Dajka, E. E-mail: borko@electra.bajaobs.hu E-mail: hngo@caltech.edu E-mail: szilard.csizmadia@dlr.de

    2016-03-01

    KIC 7177553 was observed by the Kepler satellite to be an eclipsing eccentric binary star system with an 18-day orbital period. Recently, an eclipse timing study of the Kepler binaries has revealed eclipse timing variations (ETVs) in this object with an amplitude of ∼100 s and an outer period of 529 days. The implied mass of the third body is that of a super-Jupiter, but below the mass of a brown dwarf. We therefore embarked on a radial velocity (RV) study of this binary to determine its system configuration and to check the hypothesis that it hosts a giant planet. From the RV measurements, it became immediately obvious that the same Kepler target contains another eccentric binary, this one with a 16.5-day orbital period. Direct imaging using adaptive optics reveals that the two binaries are separated by 0.″4 (∼167 AU) and have nearly the same magnitude (to within 2%). The close angular proximity of the two binaries and very similar γ velocities strongly suggest that KIC 7177553 is one of the rare SB4 systems consisting of two eccentric binaries where at least one system is eclipsing. Both systems consist of slowly rotating, nonevolved, solar-like stars of comparable masses. From the orbital separation and the small difference in γ velocity, we infer that the period of the outer orbit most likely lies in the range of 1000–3000 yr. New images taken over the next few years, as well as the high-precision astrometry of the Gaia satellite mission, will allow us to set much narrower constraints on the system geometry. Finally, we note that the observed ETVs in the Kepler data cannot be produced by the second binary. Further spectroscopic observations on a longer timescale will be required to prove the existence of the massive planet.

  7. Search for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and accretion-related parameters in the ensemble of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çatmabacak, Önder; Erkut, M. Hakan; Catmabacak, Onur; Duran, Sivan

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of neutron star sources in the ensemble of low-mass X-ray binaries shows no evidence for a correlation between kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies and X-ray luminosity. Sources differing by orders of magnitude in luminosity can exhibit similar range of QPO frequencies. We study the possibility for the existence of a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and accretion related parameters. The parameters such as the mass accretion rate and the size of the boundary region in the innermost disk are expected to be related to X-ray luminosity. Using the up-to-date data of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, we search for a possible correlation between lower kHz QPO frequencies and mass accretion rate through the mass and radius values predicted by different equations of state for the neutron star. The range of mass accretion rate for each source can be estimated if the accretion luminosity is assumed to be represented well by the X-ray luminosity of the source. Although we find no correlation between mass accretion rate and QPO frequencies, the source distribution seems to be in accordance with a correlation between kHz QPO frequencies and the parameter combining the neutron star magnetic field and the mas accretion rate. The model function we employ to descibe the correlation is able to account for the scattering of individual sources around a simple power law. The correlation argues disk-magnetosphere interaction as the origin of these millisecond oscillations.

  8. Milankovitch cycles of terrestrial planets in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, Duncan

    2016-12-01

    The habitability of planets in binary star systems depends not only on the radiation environment created by the two stars, but also on the perturbations to planetary orbits and rotation produced by the gravitational field of the binary and neighbouring planets. Habitable planets in binaries may therefore experience significant perturbations in orbit and spin. The direct effects of orbital resonances and secular evolution on the climate of binary planets remain largely unconsidered. We present latitudinal energy balance modelling of exoplanet climates with direct coupling to an N-Body integrator and an obliquity evolution model. This allows us to simultaneously investigate the thermal and dynamical evolution of planets orbiting binary stars, and discover gravito-climatic oscillations on dynamical and secular time-scales. We investigate the Kepler-47 and Alpha Centauri systems as archetypes of P- and S-type binary systems, respectively. In the first case, Earth-like planets would experience rapid Milankovitch cycles (of order 1000 yr) in eccentricity, obliquity and precession, inducing temperature oscillations of similar periods (modulated by other planets in the system). These secular temperature variations have amplitudes similar to those induced on the much shorter time-scale of the binary period. In the Alpha Centauri system, the influence of the secondary produces eccentricity variations on 15 000 yr time-scales. This produces climate oscillations of similar strength to the variation on the orbital time-scale of the binary. Phase drifts between eccentricity and obliquity oscillations creates further cycles that are of order 100 000 yr in duration, which are further modulated by neighbouring planets.

  9. The Evolutionary Outcomes of Expansive Binary Asteroid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jay W.

    2016-10-01

    Singly synchronous binary asteroid systems have several evolutionary end-states, which depend heavily on the BYORP effect. In the case of expansive BYORP, the binary system could evolve to become a wide asynchronous binary system (Jacobson, et al 2014), or the system could expand far enough to become disrupted to form a heliocentric pair (Vokrouhlicky et al 2008). Cuk et al (2011) found that upon expanding the secondary will quickly become asynchronous, and will end up re-establishing synchronous rotation with the opposite attitude, causing the binary orbit to subsequently contract. The distinction between these outcomes depends on whether the secondary asteroid stays synchronized, which keeps the BYORP effect active and the orbit expanding. As the orbit expands, the secondary libratation will expand, and the libration will also causes large variations in the binary orbit due to the elongation of the secondary. If the eccentricity and libration are bound to small enough values the system can expand significantly. This work discusses the stability of the libration and orbital motion as a binary expands from a wide variety of simulation runs with various parameters. We investigate how the strength of tides and BYORP change the stability of the librational motion; an important factor is the speed of BYORP expansion as slower expansion allows tides to have a more stabilizing effect. We also investigate the effect of heliocentric orbit semimajor axis and eccentricity. We find that resonances between the coupled orbit-libration frequencies and the heliocentric orbit cause instability in the binary orbit eccentricity which produces a strong preference for wide binary production, especially amongst retrograde binary systems. This instability also becomes stronger with large heliocentric eccentricities. Prograde binaries are more stable and can possible grow to become asteroid pairs. We find that even in the presence of tides, reestablishment of synchronous spin into a

  10. Orbital Architectures of Planet-Hosting Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Trent; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Kraus, Adam; Isaacson, Howard T.; Mann, Andrew; Ireland, Michael; Howard, Andrew; Huber, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    We present the first results from our Keck AO astrometric monitoring of Kepler planet-hosting binary systems. Observational biases in exoplanet discovery have long left the frequency, properties, and provenance of planets in most binary systems largely unconstrained. Recent results from our ongoing survey of a volume-limited sample of Kepler planet hosts indicate that binary companions at solar-system scales of 20-100 AU suppress the occurrence of planetary systems at a rate of 30-100%. However, some planetary systems do survive in binaries, and determining these systems' orbital architectures is key to understanding why. As a demonstration of this new approach to testing ideas of planet formation, we present a detailed analysis of the triple star system Kepler-444 (HIP 94931) that hosts five Ganymede- to Mars-sized planets. By combining our high-precision astrometry with radial velocities from HIRES and computational dynamical modeling, we discover an unexpected orbital architecture for this multi-planet, triple-star system. Finally, we preview results from our full statistical sample, such as tests of coplanarity between binary and planet orbits in single versus multi-planet systems.

  11. Daily multiwavelength Swift monitoring of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Cen X-4: evidence for accretion and reprocessing during quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; Cackett, E. M.; Brown, E. F.; D'Angelo, C.; Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Reynolds, M.; Wijnands, R.

    2013-12-01

    We conducted the first long-term (60 d), multiwavelength (optical, ultraviolet, UV, and X-ray) simultaneous monitoring of Cen X-4 with daily Swift observations from 2012 June to August, with the goal of understanding variability in the low-mass X-ray binary Cen X-4 during quiescence. We found Cen X-4 to be highly variable in all energy bands on time-scales from days to months, with the strongest quiescent variability a factor of 22 drop in the X-ray count rate in only 4 d. The X-ray, UV and optical (V band) emission are correlated on time-scales down to less than 110 s. The shape of the correlation is a power law with index γ about 0.2-0.6. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a hydrogen neutron star (NS) atmosphere (kT = 59-80 eV) and a power law (with spectral index Γ = 1.4-2.0), with the spectral shape remaining constant as the flux varies. Both components vary in tandem, with each responsible for about 50 per cent of the total X-ray flux, implying that they are physically linked. We conclude that the X-rays are likely generated by matter accreting down to the NS surface. Moreover, based on the short time-scale of the correlation, we also unambiguously demonstrate that the UV emission cannot be due to either thermal emission from the stream impact point, or a standard optically thick, geometrically thin disc. The spectral energy distribution shows a small UV emitting region, too hot to arise from the accretion disc, that we identified as a hotspot on the companion star. Therefore, the UV emission is most likely produced by reprocessing from the companion star, indeed the vertical size of the disc is small and can only reprocess a marginal fraction of the X-ray emission. We also found the accretion disc in quiescence to likely be UV faint, with a minimal contribution to the whole UV flux.

  12. Symbiotic X-ray binaries systems in the galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranov, A. G.; Postnov, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of symbiotic X-ray binaries in the Galaxy is studied by the population synthesis method. We show that allowance for the nonstationarity of the regime of quasi-spherical subsonic accretion from the stellar wind of a giant onto slowly rotating neutron stars in these sources allows their observed positions on the neutron star spin period-X-ray luminosity diagramto be described in a wide range of stellar wind parameters. The derived distributions of sources in orbital periods, neutron star spin periods, and X-ray luminosities can be used to analyze the observations of Galactic sources in the range of luminosities ˜1032-1036 erg s-1 in the planned SRG/eROSITA all-sky survey.

  13. A quintuple star system containing two eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, S.; Lehmann, H.; Kalomeni, B.; Borkovits, T.; Latham, D.; Bieryla, A.; Ngo, H.; Mawet, D.; Howell, S.; Horch, E.; Jacobs, T. L.; LaCourse, D.; Sódor, Á.; Vanderburg, A.; Pavlovski, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a quintuple star system that contains two eclipsing binaries. The unusual architecture includes two stellar images separated by 11 arcsec on the sky: EPIC 212651213 and EPIC 212651234. The more easterly image (212651213) actually hosts both eclipsing binaries which are resolved within that image at 0.09 arcsec, while the westerly image (212651234) appears to be single in adaptive optics (AO), speckle imaging, and radial velocity (RV) studies. The `A' binary is circular with a 5.1-d period, while the `B' binary is eccentric with a 13.1-d period. The γ velocities of the A and B binaries are different by ˜10 km s-1. That, coupled with their resolved projected separation of 0.09 arcsec, indicates that the orbital period and separation of the `C' binary (consisting of A orbiting B) are ≃65 yr and ≃25 au, respectively, under the simplifying assumption of a circular orbit. Motion within the C orbit should be discernible via future RV, AO, and speckle imaging studies within a couple of years. The C system (i.e. 212651213) has an RV and proper motion that differ from that of 212651234 by only ˜1.4 km s-1 and ˜3 mas yr-1. This set of similar space velocities in three dimensions strongly implies that these two objects are also physically bound, making this at least a quintuple star system.

  14. SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE STUDY OF THE BLACK HOLE BINARY MAXI J1659–152: VARIABILITY FROM A TWO COMPONENT ACCRETION FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Kalamkar, M.; Klis, M. van der; Heil, L.; Homan, J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an energy dependent X-ray variability study of the 2010 outburst of the black hole X-ray binary MAXI J1659–152 with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The broadband noise components and the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) observed in the power spectra show a strong and varied energy dependence. Combining Swift XRT data with data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, we report, for the first time, an rms spectrum (fractional rms amplitude as a function of energy) of these components in the 0.5–30 keV energy range. We find that the strength of the low-frequency component (<0.1 Hz) decreases with energy, contrary to the higher frequency components (>0.1 Hz) whose strengths increase with energy. In the context of the propagating fluctuations model for X-ray variability, we suggest that the low-frequency component originates in the accretion disk (which dominates emission below ∼2 keV) and the higher frequency components are formed in the hot flow (which dominates emission above ∼2 keV). As the properties of the QPO suggest that it may have a different driving mechanism, we investigate the Lense–Thirring precession of the hot flow as a candidate model. We also report on the QPO coherence evolution for the first time in the energy band below 2 keV. While there are strong indications that the QPO is less coherent at energies below 2 keV than above 2 keV, the coherence increases with intensity similar to what is observed at energies above 2 keV in other black hole X-ray binaries.

  15. The Structures of X-ray Binary Systems V801 Ara and Cyg X-3 from Doppler Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Kaley; Dil Vrtilek, Saeqa; Peris, Charith; Koljonen, Karri; McCollough, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of two X-ray binary systems, V801 Ara and Cyg X-3. We observed V801 Ara in the optical in 2014 with IMACS on the Magellan/Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory and Cyg X-3 in the near-infrared in 2015 with GNIRS on the Gemini North telescope. Both spectra contain strong emission features that are suitable for tomography, allowing us to map the systems in velocity space. Our tomograms show continuous emission of H_alpha and H_beta from V801 Ara’s accretion disk. The center of the accretion disk does not coincide with the neutron star’s estimated center of mass (estimated using K1 = 102 km s-1 and K2 = 360 km s-1 from Casares et al. 2006, MNRAS, 373, 1235), possibly indicating eccentricity in the disk. The tomograms also do not show a hot spot where the accretion stream hits the disk, implying a low accretion rate. Due to insufficient orbital phase coverage in our GNIRS observations, we are unable to produce significant tomograms of Cyg X-3.

  16. Kronos: A Multiwavelength Observatory for Mapping Accretion-Driven Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Bradley M.; Polidan, Ronald S.; Robinson, Edward L.

    2002-01-01

    Kronos is a multiwavelength observatory proposed as a NASA Medium Explorer. Kronos is designed to make use of the natural variability of accreting sources to create microarcsecond-resolution maps of the environments of supermassive black holes in active galaxies and stella-size black holes in binary systems and to characterize accretion processes in Galactic compact binaries. Kronos will obtain broad energy range spectroscopic data with co-aligned X-ray, ultraviolet, and optical spectrometers. The high-Earth orbit of Kronos enables well-sampled, high time-resolution observations, critical for the innovative and sophisticated methods that are used to understand the accretion flows, mass outflows, jets, and other phenomena found in accreting sources. By utilizing reverberation mapping analysis techniques, Kronos produces advanced high-resolution maps of unprecedented resolution of the extreme environment in the inner cores of active galaxies. Similarly, Doppler tomography and eclipse mapping techniques characterize and map Galactic binary systems, revealing the details of the physics of accretion processes in black hole, neutron star, and white dwarf binary systems. The Kronos instrument complement, sensitivity, and orbital environment make it suitable to aggressively address time variable phenomena in a wide range of astronomical objects from nearby flare stars to distant galaxies.

  17. Building a laboratory foundation for interpreting spectral emission from x-ray binary and black hole accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    Emission from accretion powered objects accounts for a large fraction of all photons in the universe and is a powerful diagnostic for their behavior and structure. Quantitative interpretation of spectrum emission from these objects requires a spectral synthesis model for photoionized plasma, since the ionizing luminosity is so large that photon driven atomic processes dominate over collisions. This is a quandary because laboratory experiments capable of testing the spectral emission models are non-existent. The models must predict the photoionized charge state distribution, the photon emission processes, and the radiation transport influence on the observed emission. We have used a decade of research at the Z facility to achieve the first simultaneous measurements of emission and absorption from photoionized plasmas. The extraordinary spectra are reproducible to within +/-2% and the E/dE 500 spectral resolution has enabled unprecedented tests of atomic structure calculations. The absorption spectra enable determination of plasma density, temperature, and charge state distribution. The emission spectra then enable tests of spectral emission models. The emission has been measured from plasmas with varying size to elucidate the radiation transport effects. This combination of measurements will provide strong constraints on models used in astrophysics. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Plastic Deformation of Accreted Planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadish, J.

    2005-08-01

    The early stages of planetesimal growth follow an accretion model (Weidenschilling, Icarus 2000), which influences the intrinsic strength of a body and may control how its shape evolves after growth. In previous work we have determined the stress field of an accreted planetesimal accounting for possible variation in the object's spin as it accretes (Kadish et al., IJSS In Press) At the end of growth, these objects are subject to transport mechanisms that can distribute them throughout the solar system. As they are transported these objects can be spun-up by tidal forces (Scheeres et al, Icarus 2000), YORP (Bottke et al., Asteroids III 2002), and collisions (Binzel et al., Asteroids II 1989). Such an increase of spin will cause perturbations to the initial stress field and may lead to failure. We are able to show analytically that failure is initiated on the object's surface and a plastic zone propagates inward as the object's spin is increased. If we model an accreted body as a conglomeration of rocks similar to a gravel or sand, the deformation in the region of failure is characterized using a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion with negligible cohesion and zero hardening(e.g. Holsapple, Icarus 2001). Such a response is highly non-linear and must be solved using finite elements and iterative methods (Simo and Hughes, Computational Inelasticity 1998). Using the commercial finite element code ABAQUS, we present the shape deformation resulting from an elasto-plastic analysis of a spinning, self-gravitating accreted sphere that is spun-up after growth is complete. The methodology can be extended to model plastic deformation due to local failure for more complex planetesimal shapes, such as for the asteroid Kleopatra. This work has implications for the evolution of planetesimal shapes, the creation of binary and contact binary asteroids, and for the maximum spin rate of small planetary bodies.

  19. Accretion disk coronae in high-luminosity systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen D.; Castor, John I.; Klein, Richard I.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of self-consistent models of Compton-heated accretion disk coronae. The models are calculated using a new method for computing monochromatic radiative transfer n two dimensions. The method splits the radiation into direct and scattered components. The direct radiation is computed by calculating the optical depth along rays, while transfer of the scattered radiation is approximated by flux-limited diffusion. The resulting code agrees with more accurate treatments to within 50%, and is highly efficient, making it practical for use in large hydrodynamic simulations. The coronal models are used to confirm the results of earlier work, and to extend it to higher luminosities. In contrast to earlier work, which found the outer disks to be shadowed by the inner corona at high luminosities, we find our results to form an almost continuous extension of the models at lower luminosities. This is due to the presence of multiply scattered radiation, which acts to partially offset the loss of direct radiation from the central source. Although the analytic methods derived at lower luminosities cannot be used to derive the coronal structure for L/L(sub Edd) approx. greater than 0.1, the results of the models are amenable to semiempirical fits. We also discuss possible observational consequences of the results for coronal veiling and line fluorescence from the disk.

  20. A cold neutron star in the transient low-mass X-ray binary HETE J1900.1-2455 after 10 yr of active accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Ootes, L. S.; Reynolds, M. T.; Wijnands, R.; Page, D.

    2017-02-01

    The neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and intermittent millisecond X-ray pulsar HETE J1900.1-2455 returned to quiescence in late 2015, after a prolonged accretion outburst of ≃10 yr. Using a Chandra observation taken ≃180 d into quiescence, we detect the source at a luminosity of ≃4.5 × 1031 (D/4.7 kpc)2 erg s-1 (0.5-10 keV). The X-ray spectrum can be described by a neutron star atmosphere model with a temperature of ≃54 eV for an observer at infinity. We perform thermal evolution calculations based on the 2016 quiescent data and a ≲98 eV temperature upper limit inferred from a Swift observation taken during an unusually brief (≲2 weeks) quiescent episode in 2007. We find no evidence in the present data that the thermal properties of the crust, such as the heating rate and thermal conductivity, are different than those of non-pulsating neutron stars. Finding this neutron star so cold after its long outburst imposes interesting constraints on the heat capacity of the stellar core; these become even stronger if further cooling were to occur.

  1. Measuring the stellar wind parameters in IGR J17544-2619 and Vela X-1 constrains the accretion physics in supergiant fast X-ray transient and classical supergiant X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez-García, A.; Shenar, T.; Torrejón, J. M.; Oskinova, L.; Martínez-Núñez, S.; Hamann, W.-R.; Rodes-Roca, J. J.; González-Galán, A.; Alonso-Santiago, J.; González-Fernández, C.; Bernabeu, G.; Sander, A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) and supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are two types of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that present similar donors but, at the same time, show very different behavior in the X-rays. The reason for this dichotomy of wind-fed HMXBs is still a matter of debate. Among the several explanations that have been proposed, some of them invoke specific stellar wind properties of the donor stars. Only dedicated empiric analysis of the donors' stellar wind can provide the required information to accomplish an adequate test of these theories. However, such analyses are scarce. Aims: To close this gap, we perform a comparative analysis of the optical companion in two important systems: IGR J17544-2619 (SFXT) and Vela X-1 (SGXB). We analyze the spectra of each star in detail and derive their stellar and wind properties. As a next step, we compare the wind parameters, giving us an excellent chance of recognizing key differences between donor winds in SFXTs and SGXBs. Methods: We use archival infrared, optical and ultraviolet observations, and analyze them with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code. We derive the physical properties of the stars and their stellar winds, accounting for the influence of X-rays on the stellar winds. Results: We find that the stellar parameters derived from the analysis generally agree well with the spectral types of the two donors: O9I (IGR J17544-2619) and B0.5Iae (Vela X-1). The distance to the sources have been revised and also agree well with the estimations already available in the literature. In IGR J17544-2619 we are able to narrow the uncertainty to d = 3.0 ± 0.2 kpc. From the stellar radius of the donor and its X-ray behavior, the eccentricity of IGR J17544-2619 is constrained to e< 0.25. The derived chemical abundances point to certain mixing during the lifetime of the donors. An important difference between the stellar winds of the

  2. Relating binary-star planetary systems to central configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri

    2016-11-01

    Binary-star exoplanetary systems are now known to be common, for both wide and close binaries. However, their orbital evolution is generally unsolvable. Special cases of the N-body problem which are in fact completely solvable include dynamical architectures known as central configurations. Here, I utilize recent advances in our knowledge of central configurations to assess the plausibility of linking them to coplanar exoplanetary binary systems. By simply restricting constituent masses to be within stellar or substellar ranges characteristic of planetary systems, I find that (i) this constraint reduces by over 90 per cent the phase space in which central configurations may occur, (ii) both equal-mass and unequal-mass binary stars admit central configurations, (iii) these configurations effectively represent different geometrical extensions of the Sun-Jupiter-Trojan-like architecture, (iv) deviations from these geometries are no greater than 10°, and (v) the deviation increases as the substellar masses increase. This study may help restrict future stability analyses to architectures which resemble exoplanetary systems, and might hint at where observers may discover dust, asteroids and/or planets in binary-star systems.

  3. The formation and evolution of eccentric binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Philip

    2014-09-01

    Observations are revealing a host of post-mass-transfer binary systems in significantly eccentric orbits, most notably Barium stars [1] and subdwarf-B + main-sequence systems [2]. Their formation is very puzzling in light of the fact that tidal forces efficiently circularise the orbit. Using our state-of-the-art binary stellar evolution code BINSTAR [3], we explore the formation and evolution of eccentric binary systems within the framework of the osculating orbital theory. This scheme describes, in a physically realistic manner, the perturbing forces acting on the orbit arising from mass transfer [4]. Results are presented, showing the impact of wind losses and Roche lobe overflow on the orbital separation and eccentricity for a range of initial stellar and binary parameters. As an interesting case study, we also discuss a promising formation channel for the eccentric white dwarf + main-sequence binary IP Eri [5], which invokes a tidally enhanced wind-loss mechanism. Our approach reproduces the observed system parameters remarkably well [6]. [1] Jorissen A., 1999, IAU Symposium, 191, 437 [2] Vos et al., 2013, A&A, 559, 54 [3] Siess L. et al., 2012, A&A, 550, 100 [4] Hadjidemetriou J., 1969, Ap&SS, 3, 330 [5] Merle et al., 2014, A&A, in press (arXiv:1405.4669) [6] Siess L., Davis P. J., Jorissen A., 2014, A&A, 565, A57

  4. Constraining the orbits of young binary systems with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Natasha; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Akeson, Rachel L.

    2017-01-01

    Measuring the orbits of young binary systems can provide the stars' individual stellar masses as well as insight into the dynamical effects they should have on each others' protoplanetary disks. As a byproduct of our ALMA observations of disks in young binary systems, we are able to measure precise relative separations of binaries with separations of 0.22--0.35 arcsec (~ 30--50 AU at the distance of the Taurus star-forming region). Most of these systems were first resolved in the early 1990s, so our epoch 2015 observations add an additional point in the orbit that is 20--25 years after the discovery epoch. While this coverage does not yet yield a definitive orbit, the extended coverage allows improved constraints on the binary orbital parameters. We present updated orbital constraints on a number of young binary systems, including XZ Tau, GH Tau, GN Tau, IS Tau, V955 Tau, and JH 112.This work makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00150.S. and ADS/JAO.ALMA#2013.1.00105.S. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA) and NINS (Japan), together with NRC (Canada) and NSC and ASIAA (Taiwan), in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The Joint ALMA Observatory is operated by ESO, AUI/NRAO and NAOJ. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  5. Theoretical Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    2003-01-01

    Among the newly discovered classes of X-ray sources which have attracted wide attention are close binary systems in which mass is transferred via Roche lobe overflow from a low mass donor star to its neutron star companion. Many of these sources exhibit intense bursts of X-ray radiation as well as periodic and quasi-periodic phenomena. Intensive analysis of these sources as a class has provided insight into the accretion process in binary star systems and into the magnetic field, rotational, and nuclear evolution of the underlying neutron star. In this proposal we have focused on theoretical studies of the hydrodynamical and nuclear processes that take place on the surface of accreting neutron stars in these systems. The investigation of these processes is critical for providing an understanding of a number of outstanding problems related to their transient behavior and evolution.

  6. Orbital Architectures of Planet-Hosting Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Trent J.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from our Keck AO astrometric monitoring of Kepler Prime Mission planet-hosting binary systems. Observational biases in exoplanet discovery have long left the frequency, properties, and provenance of planets in most binary systems largely unconstrained. Recent results from our ongoing survey of a volume-limited sample of Kepler planet hosts indicate that binary companions at solar-system scales of 20-100 AU suppress the occurrence of planetary systems at a rate of 30-100%. However, some planetary systems do survive in binaries, and determining these systems' orbital architectures is key to understanding why. As a demonstration of this new approach to testing ideas of planet formation, we present a detailed analysis of the triple star system Kepler-444 (HIP 94931) that hosts five Ganymede- to Mars-sized planets. By combining our high-precision astrometry with radial velocities from HIRES we discover a highly eccentric stellar orbit that would have made this a seemingly hostile site for planet formation. This either points to an extremely robust and efficient planet formation mechanism or a rare case of favorable initial conditions. Such broader implications will be addressed by determining orbital architectures for our larger statistical sample of Kepler planet-hosting systems that have stellar companions on solar system scales.

  7. Obtaining gravitational waves from inspiral binary systems using LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antelis, Javier M.; Moreno, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the astrophysical events GW150926 and GW151226 has experimentally confirmed the existence of gravitational waves (GW) and has demonstrated the existence of binary stellar-mass black hole systems. This finding marks the beginning of a new era that will reveal unexpected features of our universe. This work presents a basic insight to the fundamental theory of GW emitted by inspiral binary systems and describes the scientific and technological efforts developed to measure these waves using the interferometer-based detector called LIGO. Subsequently, the work presents a comprehensive data analysis methodology based on the matched filter algorithm, which aims to recovery GW signals emitted by inspiral binary systems of astrophysical sources. This algorithm was evaluated with freely available LIGO data containing injected GW waveforms. Results of the experiments performed to assess detection accuracy showed the recovery of 85% of the injected GW.

  8. Can emission line profiles from perturbed accretion disks mimic those from the broad line region of a black hole in a supermassive binary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Stephanie Meghan; Eracleous, Michael; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Boroson, Todd A.; Halpern, Jules P.

    2016-01-01

    Both observations and simulations from the last decade suggest a link between the evolution of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes. An important ingredient in these evolutionary models is galactic interaction and mergers. Consequently, we expect to see dual active galactic nuclei at the early stages of an interaction and close, bound binary black holes after the parent galaxies have merged. While binary active galactic nuclei have been detected at large separations, it has proven difficult to detect close, bound binaries. Our team has been carrying out an observing campaign to find binary black holes with sub-parsec separations. Thus, we have been studying a sample of 88 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey whose broad Hβ lines are offset from their nominal wavelength by a few thousand km/s. These offsets suggest orbital motion of one of the black holes and the gas that is bound to it. In this work, we play devil's advocate by exploring an alternative interpretation of the broad emission lines. We ask whether lines formed in a perturbed, non-axisymmetric disks can have profiles similar to those observed. Two categories of non-axisymmetric disks are explored - one with a prominent spiral arm and one that is elliptical. To make the model as general as possible, the radial emissivity of the disk was allowed to have a broken power-law profile. For certain combinations of model parameters, these models can match the observed profile shapes. A subset of these model parameters can mimic the sinusoidal procession of the peak velocity we would expect to see in a binary system on an observable time scale. However, the predominate, observed statistical trend between the Pearson Skewness and the peak position is not reproduced; instead, other trends are predicted by the models that we do not observe.

  9. Electrical Resistivity of Ten Selected Binary Alloy Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    alloys --* Aluminum Alloys --*Copper alloys --*Gold alloys --*Nickel Alloys --*Silver alloys --*Iron alloys --*Palladium alloys ... aluminum -magnesium, and copper-zinc) are given for 27 compositions: 0 (pure element).* For aluminum -copper, aluninu.-eagnes tur, end copper-zinc alloy ...available data and infor- mation. The ten binary alloy systems selected are the systems of aluminum - copper, aluminum -magnesium, copper-gold,

  10. Freddi: Fast Rise Exponential Decay accretion Disk model Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanchev, K. L.; Lipunova, G. V.

    2016-10-01

    Freddi (Fast Rise Exponential Decay: accretion Disk model Implementation) solves 1-D evolution equations of the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk. It simulates fast rise exponential decay (FRED) light curves of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The basic equation of the viscous evolution relates the surface density and viscous stresses and is of diffusion type; evolution of the accretion rate can be found on solving the equation. The distribution of viscous stresses defines the emission from the source. The standard model for the accretion disk is implied; the inner boundary of the disk is at the ISCO or can be explicitely set. The boundary conditions in the disk are the zero stress at the inner boundary and the zero accretion rate at the outer boundary. The conditions are suitable during the outbursts in X-ray binary transients with black holes. In a binary system, the accretion disk is radially confined. In Freddi, the outer radius of the disk can be set explicitely or calculated as the position of the tidal truncation radius.

  11. THE QUASI-ROCHE LOBE OVERFLOW STATE IN THE EVOLUTION OF CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS CONTAINING A RADIO PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate-mass-donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These nonstandard ingredients deeply modify the mass-transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long-standing mass-transfer episodes, models including these effects suffer a number of cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer, the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when they are detached they behave as binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have radii slightly smaller than their Roche lobes. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for an orbital period as well as donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as ''redbacks''. Thus, redback companions should be quasi-RLOF stars. We show that the characteristics of the redback system PSR J1723-2837 are accounted for by these models. In each mass-transfer cycle these systems should switch from LMXB to binary radio pulsar states with a timescale of approximately one million years. However, there is recent and fast growing evidence of systems switching on far shorter, human timescales. This should be related to instabilities in the accretion disk surrounding the neutron star and/or radio ejection, still to be included in the model having the quasi-RLOF state as a general condition.

  12. Analyzing Age-Rotation-Activity Relationships in Wide Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton Clarke, Riley; Davenport, James R. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of flare activity among equal mass wide binary pairs using a combination of value-added data sets from the NASA Kepler mission. Wide binary twins form from the same molecular cloud and are therefore coeval, making them ideal benchmarks for stellar evolution and formation studies. This implies that their magnetic activity should decay at the same rate, causing a similar decrease in flare activity over time. The first data set is the list of known wide binary candidates in the Kepler field, and contains pairs of stars that have similar proper motions. We then crossmatch these systems with data on relative flare luminosity for ~200,000 stars in the original Kepler field, provided by an automated flare-finding algorithm. This combined data set allows us to compare flare activity, mass, and pair separation between stars in binary pairs. We preliminarily find that the flare rates for these stars do not show strong correlation, indicating either a large intrinsic scatter in the flare rate as these stars age, or that the formation mechanism of wide binaries somehow affects their dynamo evolution. As a goal for future development of this work, we hope to compare flare rates with gyrochronology in these key systems.

  13. Temperature and brightness distribution in the components of binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, S. K.

    1993-03-01

    From the theoretical model of a binary system for gravity darkening (Barman 1991), the temperature and brightness distributions along the surface of the components have been calculated using the third and fourth orders of the ratio (r/R) in the tidal potentials created by the secondary components, where r is radial distance and R the distance between the centers of gravities of the binary stars. Results of both distributions have been presented in seven figures. On analyzing the results, it has been suggested that if the expansion technique be used to calculate the combined potentials and related matters e.g. the temperature and brightness distributions of a binary system, one should at least consider the fourth order of the ratio (r/R).

  14. Radiation reaction in binary systems in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, Daniel John

    1997-09-01

    This thesis is concerned with current problems in, and historical aspects of, the problem of radiation reaction in stellar binary systems in general relativity. Part I addresses current issues in the orbital evolution due to gravitational radiation damping of compact binaries. A particular focus is on the inspiral of small bodies orbiting large black holes, employing a perturbation formalism. In addition, the merger, at the end of the insprial, of comparable mass compact binaries, such as neutron star binaries is also discussed. The emphasis of Part I is on providing detailed descriptions of sources and signals with a view to optimising signal analysis in gravitational wave detectors, whether ground- or space- based interferometers, or resonant mass detectors. Part II of the thesis examines the historical controversies surrounding the problem of gravitational waves, and gravitational radiation damping in stellar binaries. In particular, it focuses on debates in the mid 20th-century on whether binary star systems would really exhibit this type of damping and emit gravitational waves, and on the 'quadrupole formula controversy' of the 1970s and 1980s, on the question whether the standard formular describing energy loss due to emission of gravitational waves was correctly derived for such systems. The study shed light on the role of analogy in science, especially where its use is controversial, on the importance of style in physics and on the problem of identity in science, as the use of history as a rhetorical device in controversial debate is examined. The concept of the Theoretician's Regress is introduced to explain the difficulty encountered by relativists in closing debate in this controversy, which persisted in one forms or another for several decades.

  15. On the Habitability of Planets in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Eggl, S.; Gyergyovits, M.

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of more and more extra-solar planets in and around binary star systems cause questions concerning the determination of the classical habitable zone (HZ). We present calculations of the radiative and gravitational perturbations of two stars on a terrestrial planet moving in the HZ in different binary - planet configurations. Two types of planetary motion will be considered, i.e. S-type motion (or circumprimary motion) where the planet orbits one star only and P-type (or circumbinary motion) where the binary revolves inside the planet's orbit. It was found that the HZ in S-type configurations tend to be gravitationally dominated, the radiative input due to the second star is negligible compared to its dynamical influence causing secular changes in the eccentricity of the planets. This alters the amount of incident radiation significantly. In P-type configurations the radiation estimates can be determined on shorter time-scales. The radiation amplitude depends on the eccentricity of the binary in both configurations. Finally we present time independent analytical estimates about the habitability of a terrestrial planet in the HZ of a binary star system as shown by Eggl et al.(2012). This work was financed by the Austrian Science Fonds (FWF) P22603-N16 and AS11608-N16 and S.Eggl was financed by the University of Vienna (Forschungsstipendium 2012). Ref.: Eggl, S., Pilat-Lohinger, E., Gerogakarakos, N., Gyergyovits, M. and Funk, B., "Habitable Zones in S-Type Binary Star Systems", ApJ, submitted.

  16. The radial dependence of pebble accretion rates: A source of diversity in planetary systems. I. Analytical formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, S.; Guillot, T.; Morbidelli, A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The classical planetesimal accretion scenario for the formation of planets has recently evolved with the idea that pebbles, centimeter- to meter-sized icy grains migrating in protoplanetary disks, can control planetesimal and/or planetary growth. Aims: We investigate how pebble accretion depends on disk properties and affects the formation of planetary systems. Methods: We construct analytical models of pebble accretion onto planetary embryos that consistently account for the mass and orbital evolution of the pebble flow and reflect disk structure. Results: We derive simple formulas for pebble accretion rates in the so-called settling regime for planetary embryos that are more than 100 km in size. For relatively smaller embryos or in outer disk regions, the accretion mode is three-dimensional (3D), meaning that the thickness of the pebble flow must be taken into account, and resulting in an accretion rate that is independent of the embryo mass. For larger embryos or in inner regions, the accretion is in a two-dimensional (2D) mode, i.e., the pebble disk may be considered infinitely thin. We show that the radial dependence of the pebble accretion rate is different (even the sign of the power-law exponent changes) for different disk conditions such as the disk heating source (viscous heating or stellar irradiation), drag law (Stokes or Epstein, and weak or strong coupling), and in the 2D or 3D accretion modes. We also discuss the effect of the sublimation and destruction of icy pebbles inside the snow line. Conclusions: Pebble accretion easily produces a large diversity of planetary systems. In other words, to infer the results of planet formation through pebble accretion correctly, detailed prescriptions of disk evolution and pebble growth, sublimation, destruction and migration are required.

  17. Partial accretion regime of accreting millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eksi, Kazim

    2016-07-01

    The inner parts of the disks around neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries may become geometrically thick due to inhibition of accretion at the disk mid-plane when the central object is rotating rapidly. In such a case matter inflowing through the disk may keep accreting onto the poles of the neutron star from the parts of the disk away from the disk mid-plane while the matter is propelled at the disk mid-plane. An important ingredient of the evolution of millisecond pulsars is then the fraction of the inflowing matter that can accrete onto the poles in the fast rotation regime depending on the fastness parameter. This ``soft'' propeller regime may be associated with the rapid decay stage observed in the light curves of several accreting millisecond pulsars. To date only a few studies considered the partial accretion regime. By using geometrical arguments we improve the existing studies and test the model by reproducing the lightcurves of millisecond X-ray pulsars via time dependent simulations of disk evolution. We also present analytical solutions that represent disks with partial accretion.

  18. THE QUIESCENT X-RAY PROPERTIES OF THE ACCRETING MILLISECOND X-RAY PULSAR AND ECLIPSING BINARY SWIFT J1749.4-2807

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Patruno, A.; Wijnands, R.

    2012-09-10

    Swift J1749.4-2807 is a transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary that contains an accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar spinning at 518 Hz. It is the first of its kind that displays X-ray eclipses, which holds significant promise to precisely constrain the mass of the neutron star. We report on a {approx_equal} 105 ks long XMM-Newton observation performed when Swift J1749.4-2807 was in quiescence. We detect the source at a 0.5-10 keV luminosity of {approx_equal}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33}(D/6.7 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup -1}. The X-ray light curve displays three eclipses that are consistent in orbital phase and duration with the ephemeris derived during outburst. Unlike most quiescent neutron stars, the X-ray spectrum can be adequately described with a simple power law, while a pure-hydrogen atmosphere model does not fit the data. We place an upper limit on the 0.01-100 keV thermal luminosity of the cooling neutron star of {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} and constrain its temperature to be {approx}< 0.1 keV (for an observer at infinity). Timing analysis does not reveal evidence for X-ray pulsations near the known spin frequency of the neutron star or its first overtone with a fractional rms of {approx}< 34% and {approx}< 28%, respectively. We discuss the implications of our findings for dynamical mass measurements, the thermal state of the neutron star, and the origin of the quiescent X-ray emission.

  19. Detection of the Impact of Ice Crystal Accretion in an Aircraft Engine Compression System During Dynamic Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Simon, Donald L.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The accretion of ice in the compression system of commercial gas turbine engines operating in high ice water content conditions is a safety issue being studied by the aviation community. While most of the research focuses on the underlying physics of ice accretion and the meteorological conditions in which accretion can occur, a systems-level perspective on the topic lends itself to potential near-term operational improvements. Here a detection algorithm is developed which has the capability to detect the impact of ice accretion in the Low Pressure Compressor of an aircraft engine during steady flight as well as during changes in altitude. Unfortunately, the algorithm as implemented was not able to distinguish throttle changes from ice accretion and thus more work remains to be done.

  20. Supernovae in Binary Systems: An Application of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitalas, R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents the supernova explosion in a binary system as an application of classical mechanics. This presentation is intended to illustrate the power of the equivalent one-body problem and provide undergraduate students with a variety of insights into elementary classical mechanics. (HM)

  1. A statistical study of close binary systems: testing evolutionary models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leão, I. C.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2003-08-01

    The evolution of stars in close binary systems differs from that of their single counterparts essentially in two main aspects: (i) the rotation of each component is directly affected by tidal interactions, which determine the evolution of orbital parameters and rotations of the system, and (ii) the evolutionary tracks of the stars run in considerably different ways when the mass transfer process begins, which occurs when the primary evolves sufficiently and reaches its Roche limit. The present work brings a confrontation between observational data, including orbital parameters, rotation and age, and theoretical predictions obtained from detailed models of binary systems evolution. For this study we have selected a sample of binary systems, mostly with a F-, G- or K-type primary component, with orbital parameters and rotational velocity available in the literature. For the theoretical predictions we have used stellar evolutionary models by Claret 1998 (A&AS 131, 395) and Schaller et al. 1992 (A&AS 96, 269) combined with models of binary orbital parameters evolution by Zahn 1977 (A&A 57, 383) and Zahn 1978 (A&A 67, 162). The preliminary results point for a good agreement between the observed orbital eccentricity, orbital and rotational periods and the predicted values as a function of stellar age. In addition, we present an analysis of the relationship between Vrot/Vk (where Vrot and Vk are, respectively, the rotational and keplerian velocities) and the stellar fractional radius, to rediscuss the synchronization process between rotation and orbital motions.

  2. A new open cluster binary system in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Clariá, J. J.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    We have obtained CCD UBVI_{KC} photometry for the open clusters (OCs) Hogg 12 and NGC 3590. Based on photometric and morphological criteria, as well as on the stellar density in the region, our evidence is sufficient to consider them a new open cluster binary system candidate.

  3. Early solar system. Early accretion of water in the inner solar system from a carbonaceous chondrite-like source.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Adam R; Nielsen, Sune G; Marschall, Horst R; McCubbin, Francis M; Monteleone, Brian D

    2014-10-31

    Determining the origin of water and the timing of its accretion within the inner solar system is important for understanding the dynamics of planet formation. The timing of water accretion to the inner solar system also has implications for how and when life emerged on Earth. We report in situ measurements of the hydrogen isotopic composition of the mineral apatite in eucrite meteorites, whose parent body is the main-belt asteroid 4 Vesta. These measurements sample one of the oldest hydrogen reservoirs in the solar system and show that Vesta contains the same hydrogen isotopic composition as that of carbonaceous chondrites. Taking into account the old ages of eucrite meteorites and their similarity to Earth's isotopic ratios of hydrogen, carbon, and nitrogen, we demonstrate that these volatiles could have been added early to Earth, rather than gained during a late accretion event.

  4. Binary system parameters and the hibernation model of cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Livio, M.; Shara, M.M.

    1987-08-01

    The hibernation model, in which nova systems spend most of the time between eruptions in a state of low mass transfer rate, is examined. The binary systems more likely to undergo hibernation are determined. The predictions of the hibernation scenario are shown to be consistent with available observational data. It is shown how the hibernation scenario provides links between classical novae, dwarf novae, and novalike variables, all of which represent different stages in the cyclic evolution of the same systems. 72 references.

  5. VX Her: Eclipsing Binary System or Single Variable Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Kathleen; Castelaz, Michael; Henson, Gary; Boghozian, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    VX Her is a pulsating variable star with a period of .4556504 days. It is believed to be part of an eclipsing binary system (Fitch et al. 1966). This hypothesis originated from Fitch seeing VX Her's minimum point on its light curve reaching a 0.7 magnitude fainter than normal and remaining that way for nearly two hours. If VX Her were indeed a binary system, I would expect to see similar results with a fainter minimum and a broader, more horizontal dip. Having reduced and analyzed images from the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy Observatory in Chile and Kitt Peak, as well as images from a 0.15m reflector at East Tennessee State University, I found that VX Her has the standard light curve of the prototype variable star, RR Lyrae. Using photometry, I found no differing features in its light curve to suggest that it is indeed a binary system. However, more observations are needed in case VX Her is a wide binary.

  6. A candidate sub-parsec supermassive binary black hole system.

    PubMed

    Boroson, Todd A; Lauer, Tod R

    2009-03-05

    The role of mergers in producing galaxies, together with the finding that most large galaxies harbour black holes in their nuclei, implies that binary supermassive black hole systems should be common. Here we report that the quasar SDSS J153636.22+044127.0 is a plausible example of such a system. This quasar shows two broad-line emission systems, separated in velocity by 3,500 km s(-1). A third system of unresolved absorption lines has an intermediate velocity. These characteristics are unique among known quasars. We interpret this object as a binary system of two black holes, having masses of 10(7.3) and 10(8.9) solar masses separated by approximately 0.1 parsec with an orbital period of approximately 100 years.

  7. Evolution of Planetesimals Accreted in the Early Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Thomas, P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to point out that the origins and abundances of short-lived nu-clides in the early solar system had important conse-quences for "icy planetesimals". It is believed that these planetesimals, composed of ice and rock, were once very abundant in the early, outer solar system. Today, spacecraft can visit remnants of that popula-tion and measure their properties. Cassini's flyby of Saturn's satellite Phoebe may have been the first visit to an object related to this population.

  8. UNDERSTANDING THE EVOLUTION OF CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS WITH RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the evolution of close binary systems (CBSs) formed by a neutron star (behaving as a radio pulsar) and a normal donor star, which evolve either to a helium white dwarf (HeWD) or to ultra-short orbital period systems. We consider X-ray irradiation feedback and evaporation due to radio pulsar irradiation. We show that irradiation feedback leads to cyclic mass transfer episodes, allowing CBSs to be observed in between episodes as binary radio pulsars under conditions in which standard, non-irradiated models predict the occurrence of a low-mass X-ray binary. This behavior accounts for the existence of a family of eclipsing binary systems known as redbacks. We predict that redback companions should almost fill their Roche lobe, as observed in PSR J1723-2837. This state is also possible for systems evolving with larger orbital periods. Therefore, binary radio pulsars with companion star masses usually interpreted as larger than expected to produce HeWDs may also result in such quasi-Roche lobe overflow states, rather than hosting a carbon-oxygen WD. We found that CBSs with initial orbital periods of P{sub i} < 1 day evolve into redbacks. Some of them produce low-mass HeWDs, and a subgroup with shorter P{sub i} becomes black widows (BWs). Thus, BWs descend from redbacks, although not all redbacks evolve into BWs. There is mounting observational evidence favoring BW pulsars to be very massive (≳ 2 M {sub ☉}). As they should be redback descendants, redback pulsars should also be very massive, since most of the mass is transferred before this stage.

  9. Accretion of planetary matter and the lithium problem in the 16 Cygni stellar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, Morgan; Richard, Olivier; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2015-12-01

    Context. The 16 Cygni system is composed of two solar analogues with similar masses and ages. A red dwarf is in orbit around 16 Cygni A, and 16 Cygni B hosts a giant planet. The abundances of heavy elements are similar in the two stars, but lithium is much more depleted in 16 Cygni B than in 16 Cygni A, by a factor of at least 4.7. Aims: The interest of studying the 16 Cygni system is that the two star have the same age and the same initial composition. The differences currently observed must be due to their different evolution, related to the fact that one of them hosts a planet while the other does not. Methods: We computed models of the two stars that precisely fit the observed seismic frequencies. We used the Toulouse Geneva Evolution Code (TGEC), which includes complete atomic diffusion (including radiative accelerations). We compared the predicted surface abundances with the spectroscopic observations and confirm that another mixing process is needed. We then included the effect of accretion-induced fingering convection. Results: The accretion of planetary matter does not change the metal abundances but leads to lithium destruction, which depends upon the accreted mass. A fraction of the Earth's mass is enough to explain the lithium surface abundances of 16 Cygni B. We also checked the beryllium abundances. Conclusions: In the case of accretion of heavy matter onto stellar surfaces, the accreted heavy elements do not remain in the outer convective zones, but are mixed downwards by fingering convection induced by the unstable μ-gradient. Depending on the accreted mass, this mixing process may transport lithium down to its nuclear destruction layers and lead to an extra lithium depletion at the surface. A fraction of the Earth's mass is enough to explain a lithium ratio of 4.7 in the 16 Cygni system. In this case beryllium is not destroyed. Such a process may be frequent in planet-hosting stars and should be studied in other cases in the future.

  10. Binary Black Hole Mergers from Planet-like Migrations.

    PubMed

    Gould; Rix

    2000-03-20

    If supermassive black holes (BHs) are generically present in galaxy centers, and if galaxies are built up through hierarchical merging, BH binaries are at least temporary features of most galactic bulges. Observations suggest, however, that binary BHs are rare, pointing toward a binary lifetime far shorter than the Hubble time. We show that, almost regardless of the detailed mechanism, all stellar dynamical processes are too slow in reducing the orbital separation once orbital velocities in the binary exceed the virial velocity of the system. We propose that a massive gas disk surrounding a BH binary can effect its merger rapidly, in a scenario analogous to the orbital decay of super-Jovian planets due to a proto-planetary disk. As in the case of planets, gas accretion onto the secondary (here a supermassive BH) is integrally connected with its inward migration. Such accretion would give rise to quasar activity. BH binary mergers could therefore be responsible for many or most quasars.

  11. Determination of the Period of Binary Asteroid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lust, Nathaniel B.; Britt, D. T.

    2008-09-01

    In the study of asteroids, binary pairs offer a unique window of study. By observing these systems and determining the period of the secondary, it is possible to determine system mass (e.g. Pravec and Hahn 1997; Ryan et al., 2004). With mass and volume, properties such as bulk density and porosity can be derived. At the University of Central Florida we have begun a binary asteroid hunt, in conjunction with the Prague consortium, in order to identify new binary candidates and to better constrain data on known pairs. All of the observations are collected on campus using a 0.5meter f/8.1 Ritchey-Chretien telescope with a SBIG STL-6303E detector. For our first test target we observed the known binary asteroid 107 Camila over a period of six days for approximately six to eight hours a night. The data is then processed using an open source python algorithm developed by Nate Lust. The data is read in, reduced, and compared to a standard star. Once the light curve was generated we make use of the CLEAN algorithm, originally developed by Hogbom (1974), to extract meaningful periods from the light curve.

  12. A nonlinear investigation of corrugation instabilities in magnetic accretion shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Scott

    2011-05-01

    Accretion shock waves are present in many important astrophysical systems and have been a focus of research for decades. These investigations provide a large body of understanding as to the nature, characteristics, and evolutionary behaviors of accretion shock waves over a wide range of conditions. However, largely absent are investigations into the properties of accretion shock waves in the presence of strong magnetic fields. In such cases these strong magnetic fields can significantly alter the stability behaviors and evolution of the accretion shock wave through the production and propagation of magnetic waves as well as magnetically constrained advection. With strong magnetic fields likely found in a number of accretion shock systems, such as compact binary and protostellar systems, a better understanding of the behaviors of magnetic accretion shock waves is needed. A new magnetohydrodynamics simulation tool, IMOGEN, was developed to carry out an investigation of instabilities in strong, slow magnetic accretion shocks by modelling their long-term, nonlinear evolution. IMOGEN implements a relaxed, second-order, total variation diminishing, monotonic upwind scheme for conservation laws and incorporates a staggered-grid constrained transport scheme for magnetic advection. Through the simulated evolution of magnetic accretion shocks over a wide range of initial conditions, it has been shown, for sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, that magnetic accretion shocks are generally susceptible to corrugation instabilities, which arise in the presence of perturbations of the initial shock front. As these corrugation instabilities grow, they manifestas magnetic wave propagation in the upstream region of the accretion column, which propagate away from the accretion shock front, and as density columns, or fingers, that grow into the higher density downstream flow, defined and constrained by current loops created during the early evolution of the instability.

  13. On the formation of compact planetary systems via concurrent core accretion and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Gavin A. L.; Nelson, Richard P.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of planet formation N-body simulations based on a comprehensive physical model that includes planetary mass growth through mutual embryo collisions and planetesimal/boulder accretion, viscous disc evolution, planetary migration and gas accretion on to planetary cores. The main aim of this study is to determine which set of model parameters leads to the formation of planetary systems that are similar to the compact low-mass multiplanet systems that have been discovered by radial velocity surveys and the Kepler mission. We vary the initial disc mass, solids-to-gas ratio and the sizes of the boulders/planetesimals, and for a restricted volume of the parameter space we find that compact systems containing terrestrial planets, super-Earths and Neptune-like bodies arise as natural outcomes of the simulations. Disc models with low values of the solids-to-gas ratio can only form short-period super-Earths and Neptunes when small planetesimals/boulders provide the main source of accretion, since the mobility of these bodies is required to overcome the local isolation masses for growing embryos. The existence of short-period super-Earths around low-metallicity stars provides strong evidence that small, mobile bodies (planetesimals, boulders or pebbles) played a central role in the formation of the observed planets.

  14. Tidal resonances in binary star systems. II - Slowly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. E.

    1988-12-01

    The potential energy of tidal interactions in a binary system with rotating components is formulated as a perturbation Hamiltonian which self-consistently couples the dynamics of the rotating stars' oscillations and orbital motion. The action-angle formalism used to discuss tidal resonances in the nonrotating case (Alexander, 1987) is extended to rotating stars. The behavior of a two-mode system and the procedure for treating an arbitrary number of modes are discussed.

  15. Colliding stellar winds in O-type close binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gies, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the stellar wind properties of O-type close binary systems is presented. The main objective of this program was to search for colliding winds in four systems, AO Cas, iota Ori, Plaskett's star, and 29 UW CMa, through an examination of high dispersion UV spectra from IUE and optical spectra of the H alpha and He I lambda 6678 emission lines.

  16. THE LIGHT CURVE OF THE WEAKLY ACCRETING T TAURI BINARY KH 15D FROM 2005-2010: INSIGHTS INTO THE NATURE OF ITS PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, William; LeDuc, Katherine; Hamilton, Catrina M.; Winn, Joshua N.; Ibrahimov, Mansur; Mundt, Reinhard; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.

    2010-12-15

    Photometry of the unique pre-main-sequence binary system KH 15D is presented, spanning the years 2005-2010. This system has exhibited photometric variations and eclipses over the last {approx}50 years that are attributed to the effect of a precessing circumbinary disk. Advancement of the occulting edge across the projection on the sky of the binary orbit has continued and the photospheres of both stars are now completely obscured at all times. The system has thus transitioned to a state in which it should be visible only by scattered light, and yet it continues to show a periodic variation on the orbital cycle with an amplitude exceeding 2 mag. This variation, which depends only on the binary phase and not on the height of either star above or below the occulting edge, has likely been present in the data since at least 1995. It can, by itself, account for the 'shoulders' on the light curve prior to ingress and following egress, obviating to some degree the need for components of extant models such as a scattering halo around star A or forward scattering from a fuzzy disk edge. However, the spectroscopic evidence for some direct or forward scattered light from star A even when it was several stellar radii below the occulting edge shows that these components can probably not be fully removed, and raises the possibility that the occulting edge is currently more opaque than it was a decade ago, when the spectra were obtained. A plausible source for the variable scattering component is reflected light from the far side of a warped occulting disk. We have detected color changes in V - I of several tenths of a magnitude to both the blue and red that occur during times of minima. These may indicate the presence of a third source of light (faint star) within the system or a change in the reflectance properties of the disk as the portion being illuminated varies with the orbital motion of the stars. The data support a picture of the circumbinary disk as a geometrically thin

  17. Dynamical mass transfer in cataclysmic binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Lamb, D. Q.

    1987-01-01

    When a binary comes into contact and mass transfer begins, orbital angular momentum is stored in the accretion disk until the disk couples tidally to the binary system. Taam and McDermott (1987) have suggested that this leads to unstable dynamical mass transfer in many cataclysmic variables in which mass transfer would otherwise be stable, and that it explains the gap between 2 and 3 h in the orbital period distribution of these systems. Here the consequences of this hypothesis for the evolution of cataclysmic binaries are explored. It is found that systems coming into contact longward of the period gap undergo one or more episodes of dynamical mass transfer.

  18. THE ACCRETION OF DWARF GALAXIES AND THEIR GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, Craig E.; Ashman, Keith M. E-mail: ashmank@umkc.ed

    2010-12-10

    The question of where the low-metallicity globular clusters in early-type galaxies came from has profound implications for the formation of those galaxies. Our work supports the idea that the metal-poor globular cluster systems of giant early-type galaxies formed in dwarf galaxies that have been subsumed by the giants. To support this hypothesis, two linear relations, one involving globular cluster metallicity versus host galaxy luminosity and one involving metallicity versus velocity dispersion were studied. Tentatively, these relations show that the bright ellipticals do not obey the same trend as the dwarfs, suggesting that the low-metallicity globular clusters did not form within their parent bright ellipticals.

  19. Percolation of binary disk systems: Modeling and theory

    DOE PAGES

    Meeks, Kelsey; Tencer, John; Pantoya, Michelle L.

    2017-01-12

    The dispersion and connectivity of particles with a high degree of polydispersity is relevant to problems involving composite material properties and reaction decomposition prediction and has been the subject of much study in the literature. This paper utilizes Monte Carlo models to predict percolation thresholds for a two-dimensional systems containing disks of two different radii. Monte Carlo simulations and spanning probability are used to extend prior models into regions of higher polydispersity than those previously considered. A correlation to predict the percolation threshold for binary disk systems is proposed based on the extended dataset presented in this work and comparedmore » to previously published correlations. Finally, a set of boundary conditions necessary for a good fit is presented, and a condition for maximizing percolation threshold for binary disk systems is suggested.« less

  20. Percolation of binary disk systems: Modeling and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Kelsey; Tencer, John; Pantoya, Michelle L.

    2017-01-01

    The dispersion and connectivity of particles with a high degree of polydispersity is relevant to problems involving composite material properties and reaction decomposition prediction and has been the subject of much study in the literature. This work utilizes Monte Carlo models to predict percolation thresholds for a two-dimensional systems containing disks of two different radii. Monte Carlo simulations and spanning probability are used to extend prior models into regions of higher polydispersity than those previously considered. A correlation to predict the percolation threshold for binary disk systems is proposed based on the extended dataset presented in this work and compared to previously published correlations. A set of boundary conditions necessary for a good fit is presented, and a condition for maximizing percolation threshold for binary disk systems is suggested.

  1. The evolution of highly compact binary stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Joss, P. C.; Webbink, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    A new theoretical treatment of the evolution of highly compact binary systems is presented. The evolution is calculated until almost the entire mass of the secondary has been transferred to the primary or lost from the system. It is assumed that gravitational radiation from the system is the cause of mass transfer. It is found that the structure of the mass-losing star can be approximated by an n = 3/2 polytrope, and as a result a relatively large number of different cases can be explored and some general conclusions drawn. An explanation is found for the existence of a cutoff in the orbital period distribution among the cataclysmic variables and light is shed upon the possible generic relationships among cataclysmic variables, the low-mass X-ray binaries, and the spectrally soft transient X-ray sources.

  2. Segregation of Fluidized Binary Hard-Sphere Systems Under Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul

    We have derived an analytic expression for the contact value of the local density of binary hard-sphere systems under gravity. We have obtained the crossover conditions for the Brazil-nut type segregation of binary hard-sphere mixtures and binary hard-sphere chain mixtures from the segregation criterion, where the segregation occurs when the density (or the pressure) of the small spheres at the bottom is higher than that of the large spheres, or vice versa. For the binary hard-sphere chain mixtures, the crossover condition for the segregation depends on the number of monomers composed of hard-sphere chains as well as the mass and the diameter of each species. The fundamental-measure theories (FMTs) and local density approximation (LDA) are employed to examine the crossover condition for the segregation of the gravity-induced hard-sphere mixtures. The calculated results show that the LDA does not explain the density oscillation near the bottom, whereas the modified fundamental-measure theory (MFMT) compares with molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. A Type System for Certified Binaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Pfenning 1999; Crary et al. 1999; Walker 2000; Crary and Weirich 2000; Trifonov et al. 2000] has produced many specialized, increasingly complex type systems...definitions subsume and generalize earlier systems for intensional type analysis [Harper and Morrisett 1995; Crary and Weirich 1999; Trifonov et al. 2000]. We...generalize the Typerec operator used in intensional type analysis [Harper and Morrisett 1995; Crary and Weirich 1999; Trifonov et al. 2000]. Figure 2 gives a

  4. Periodic orbits of planets in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyatzis, G.

    2017-03-01

    Periodic solutions of the three body problem are very important for understanding its dynamics either in a theoretical framework or in various applications in celestial mechanics. In this paper we discuss the computation and continuation of periodic orbits for planetary systems. The study is restricted to coplanar motion. Starting from known results of two-planet systems around single stars, we perform continuation of solutions with respect to the mass and approach periodic orbits of single planets in two-star systems. Also, families of periodic solutions can be computed for fixed masses of the primaries. When they are linearly stable, we can conclude about the existence of phase space domains of long-term orbital stability.

  5. Clump Accretion in Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Eve; Raymer, E.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients (SFXTs) are a subclass of High-Mass X-Ray Binaries that consist of a neutron star and OB supergiant donor star. These systems display short, bright x-ray flares lasting a few minutes to a few hours with luminosities reaching 1036 erg/s, several orders of magnitude larger than the quiescent luminosities of 1032 erg/s. The clumpy wind hypothesis has been proposed as a possible mechanism for these transient flares; in this model, a portion of the stellar wind from the donor star forms into clumps and is accreted onto the neutron star, inducing flares. We use high-resolution 3D hydrodynamic simulations to test the clumpy wind hypothesis, tracking the mass and angular momentum accretion rates to infer properties of the resulting x-ray flare and secular evolution of the neutron star rotation. Our results are significantly different from the predictions of Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion (HLA) theory, which assume steady, laminar, axisymmetric flow. For example, an off-axis clump initiated with an impact parameter greater than the clump radius (for which HLA predicts no effect) produces a small spike in mass accretion and induces a long period of disk-like flow that dramatically reduces the accretion rate below the steady HLA value. The result is a brief, weak flare with a net decrease in total accreted mass compared with steady wind accretion accompanied by a substantial accretion of angular momentum.

  6. Tenoxicam-kollicoat IR binary systems: physicochemical and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Tenoxicam (TNX) binary systems in Kollicoat IR (KL) matrix were prepared in different drug: polymer ratios using kneading and spray-drying method. The prepared binary systems were characterized for drug dissolution rate, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), IR spectroscopy and x-ray diffractometry. The results showed that the drug dissolution rate was remarkably enhanced by incorporating it in the KL matrix either by kneading or spray-drying, and the dissolution rate was increased by decreasing the drug weight ratio. The DSc and x-ray studies revealed the presence of TNX in less crystalline or amorphous state in its-KL binary systems. Moreover, the spray-dried TNX-KL system in 1:4 ratio, that exhibited the faster dissolution rate, was formulated in oral disintegrating tablets (ODTs). The data indicated that a fast disintegration and higher drug dissolution rate was achieved in case of the ODTs containing the spray-dried form compared to the ODTS containing untreated drug or the commercial tablet (Epicotil). Also, the drug exhibited significantly (p < 0.01) faster onset of the anti-inflammatory analgesic activities in case of the ODTs containing the spray-dried form, that was superior to that observed with both the commercial tablet product and the ODTS containing untreated drug.

  7. Applicability of Dynamic Facilitation Theory to Binary Hard Disk Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Masaharu; Keys, Aaron S.; Chandler, David; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2016-09-01

    We numerically investigate the applicability of dynamic facilitation (DF) theory for glass-forming binary hard disk systems where supercompression is controlled by pressure. By using novel efficient algorithms for hard disks, we are able to generate equilibrium supercompressed states in an additive nonequimolar binary mixture, where microcrystallization and size segregation do not emerge at high average packing fractions. Above an onset pressure where collective heterogeneous relaxation sets in, we find that relaxation times are well described by a "parabolic law" with pressure. We identify excitations, or soft spots, that give rise to structural relaxation and find that they are spatially localized, their average concentration decays exponentially with pressure, and their associated energy scale is logarithmic in the excitation size. These observations are consistent with the predictions of DF generalized to systems controlled by pressure rather than temperature.

  8. Applicability of Dynamic Facilitation Theory to Binary Hard Disk Systems.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Masaharu; Keys, Aaron S; Chandler, David; Garrahan, Juan P

    2016-09-30

    We numerically investigate the applicability of dynamic facilitation (DF) theory for glass-forming binary hard disk systems where supercompression is controlled by pressure. By using novel efficient algorithms for hard disks, we are able to generate equilibrium supercompressed states in an additive nonequimolar binary mixture, where microcrystallization and size segregation do not emerge at high average packing fractions. Above an onset pressure where collective heterogeneous relaxation sets in, we find that relaxation times are well described by a "parabolic law" with pressure. We identify excitations, or soft spots, that give rise to structural relaxation and find that they are spatially localized, their average concentration decays exponentially with pressure, and their associated energy scale is logarithmic in the excitation size. These observations are consistent with the predictions of DF generalized to systems controlled by pressure rather than temperature.

  9. THE EFFECT OF CORONAL RADIATION ON A RESIDUAL INNER DISK IN THE LOW/HARD SPECTRAL STATE OF BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. F.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: r-taam@northwestern.edu

    2011-01-01

    Thermal conduction between a cool accretion disk and a hot inner corona can result in either evaporation of the disk or condensation of the hot corona. At low mass accretion rates, evaporation dominates and can completely remove the inner disk. At higher mass accretion rates, condensation becomes more efficient in the very inner regions, so that part of the mass accretes via a weak (initially formed) inner disk which is separated from the outer disk by a fully evaporated region at mid radii. At still higher mass accretion rates, condensation dominates everywhere, so there is a continuous cool disk extending to the innermost stable circular orbit. We extend these calculations by including the effect of irradiation by the hot corona on the disk structure. The flux which is not reflected is reprocessed in the disk, adding to the intrinsic thermal emission from gravitational energy release. This increases the seed photons for Compton cooling of the hot corona, enhancing condensation of the hot flow, and reinforcing the residual inner disk rather than evaporating it. Our calculations confirm that a residual inner disk can coexist with a hard, coronally dominated spectrum over the range of 0.006< m-dot <0.016 (for {alpha} = 0.2). This provides an explanation for the weak thermal component seen recently in the low/hard state of black hole X-ray binary systems.

  10. HEARTBEAT STARS: SPECTROSCOPIC ORBITAL SOLUTIONS FOR SIX ECCENTRIC BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Smullen, Rachel A.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.

    2015-08-01

    We present multi-epoch spectroscopy of “heartbeat stars,” eccentric binaries with dynamic tidal distortions and tidally induced pulsations originally discovered with the Kepler satellite. Optical spectra of six known heartbeat stars using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory 2.3 m telescope allow measurement of stellar effective temperatures and radial velocities from which we determine orbital parameters including the periods, eccentricities, approximate mass ratios, and component masses. These spectroscopic solutions confirm that the stars are members of eccentric binary systems with eccentricities e > 0.34 and periods P = 7–20 days, strengthening conclusions from prior works that utilized purely photometric methods. Heartbeat stars in this sample have A- or F-type primary components. Constraints on orbital inclinations indicate that four of the six systems have minimum mass ratios q = 0.3–0.5, implying that most secondaries are probable M dwarfs or earlier. One system is an eclipsing, double-lined spectroscopic binary with roughly equal-mass mid-A components (q = 0.95), while another shows double-lined behavior only near periastron, indicating that the F0V primary has a G1V secondary (q = 0.65). This work constitutes the first measurements of the masses of secondaries in a statistical sample of heartbeat stars. The good agreement between our spectroscopic orbital elements and those derived using a photometric model support the idea that photometric data are sufficient to derive reliable orbital parameters for heartbeat stars.

  11. Eclipse timing variations to detect exoplanets in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Bazso, Akos; Zechner, Renate

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to study the circumstances favorable to detect planets in S- or P-Type orbits in close binary star systems by the help of eclipse timing variations (ETVs). A planet in S-Type motion orbits one of the two stars while a planet in P-Type Motion orbits both stars. One can detect ETV signals with the help of former (CoRoT and Kepler) and future space missions Plato, Tess and Cheops). To determine the probability of the detection of such ETV signals with ground based and space telescopes we investigated the dynamics of close binary star systems (stars separated by 0.5 to 3 AU). Therefore we did numerical simulations by using the full three-body problem as dynamical model. The stability and the ETVs are investigated by computing ETV maps for different masses of the secondary star and the exoplanet (Earth, Neptune and Jupiter mass). In addition we changed the planets eccentricity. We can conclude that many ETV amplitudes are large enough to detect planets in S- or P-Type orbits in binary star systems.

  12. Simulating binary inspirals in a corotating spherical coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Travis Marshall

    The gravitational waves produced by the inspiral and merger of two black holes are expected to be the first detected by the newly constructed gravitational wave observatories. Accurate theoretical models that describe the generation and shape of these gravitational waves need to be constructed. These theoretical waveforms will aid in the detection of astrophysical wave sources, and will allow us to test general relativity in the strong field regime. Numerical relativity is the leading candidate for constructing accurate waveforms, and in this thesis we develop methods to help advance the field. In particular we use a corotating spherical coordinate system to simulate the evolution of a compact binary system as it produces gravitational radiation. We combine this method with both the Weak Radiation Reaction and Hydro-without- Hydro approximations to produce stable dynamical evolutions. We also utilize Nordström's conformally flat theory of gravitation as a relativistic laboratory during the development process. Additionally we perform semi-analytic calculations to determine the approximate way in which binaries decay in Nordström's theory. We find an excellent agreement between our semi-analytic calculations and the orbital evolutions produced by the code, and thus conclude that these methods form a solid basis for simulating binary inspirals and the gravitational waves they produce in general relativity.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Binary Systems with Matter Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah

    2011-04-01

    With the advent of gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and LISA, a revolution in astronomy and relativistic astrophysics is about to begin. Compact objects---black holes (BHs), neutron stars (NSs), and white dwarfs (WDs)---in binary systems are among the most promising sources of gravitational radiation detectable by these interferometers. In addition, merging compact object binaries with matter companions may also emit a detectable electromagnetic counterpart, leading to an exciting possibility: a simultaneous detection of both gravitational and electromagnetic radiation. Such a detection could lead to breakthroughs in our understanding of matter under extreme conditions, as there are currently many competing ideas about how this matter should behave. Determining the correct one will require careful modeling of the gravitational and electromagnetic waves these systems emit through the late- inspiral, merger, and post-merger stages. During these stages, the effects of high-velocity, strong-field gravitation become paramount, and accurate modeling requires large-scale, fully general relativistic simulations. I will review some of the latest results from fully general relativistic simulations of compact object binaries with matter companions, including NSNSs, BHNSs, and WDNSs. These simulations examine the effects of mass ratio, BH spin, equations of state, and magnetic fields on the gravitational waveforms and possible electromagnetic counterparts. Future work will focus on producing longer gravitational waveforms, incorporating more physics, and inventing new algorithms to efficiently handle the disparate length and timescales.

  14. Particle simulation for accretion sheets in narrow double stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, F.; Herold, H.; Ruder, H.

    1988-11-01

    Development and behavior of accretion sheets in double stars systems are studied by particle simulation calculations. Numerical analysis considers the following parameters in the binary system: primary and secondary components, path period of the system, and mass flow rates. Mass behavior is described by Roche-potential. The particle motion equation in the double star system is solved by the Leap-Frog procedure. Velocity friction simulation is obtained by viscous interaction considerations.

  15. Resonance Overlap Is Responsible for Ejecting Planets in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudryk, Lawrence R.; Wu, Yanqin

    2006-03-01

    A planet orbiting around a star in a binary system experiences both secular and resonant perturbations from the companion star. It may be dislodged from its host star if it is simultaneously affected by two or more resonances. We find that overlap between subresonances lying within mean-motion resonances (mostly of the j:1 type) can account for the boundary of orbital stability within binary systems first observed in numerical studies (e.g., Holman & Wiegert). Strong secular forcing from the companion displaces the centroids of different subresonances, producing large regions of resonance overlap. Planets lying within these overlapping regions experience chaotic diffusion, which in most cases leads to their eventual ejection. The overlap region extends to shorter period orbits as either the companion's mass or its eccentricity increase, with boundaries largely agreeing with those obtained by Holman & Wiegert. Furthermore, we find the following two results: First, at a given binary mass ratio, the instability boundary as a function of eccentricity appears jagged, with jutting peninsulas and deep inlets corresponding to islands of instability and stability, respectively; as a result, the largest stable orbit could be reduced from the Holman & Wiegert values by as much as 20%. Second, very high-order resonances (e.g., 50:3) do not significantly modify the instability boundary; these weak resonances, while producing slow chaotic diffusion that may be missed by finite-duration numerical integrations, do not contribute markedly to planet instability. We present some numerical evidence for the first result. More extensive experiments are called for to confirm these conclusions. For the special case of circular binaries, we are intrigued to find that the Hill criterion (based on the critical Jacobi integral) yields an instability boundary that is very similar to that obtained by resonance overlap arguments, making the former both a necessary and a sufficient condition for

  16. PLANET FORMATION IN CIRCUMBINARY CONFIGURATIONS: TURBULENCE INHIBITS PLANETESIMAL ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Meschiari, Stefano

    2012-12-10

    The existence of planets born in environments highly perturbed by a stellar companion represents a major challenge to the paradigm of planet formation. In numerical simulations, the presence of a close binary companion stirs up the relative velocity between planetesimals, which is fundamental in determining the balance between accretion and erosion. However, the recent discovery of circumbinary planets by Kepler establishes that planet formation in binary systems is clearly viable. We perform N-body simulations of planetesimals embedded in a protoplanetary disk, where planetesimal phasing is frustrated by the presence of stochastic torques, modeling the expected perturbations of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability. We examine perturbation amplitudes relevant to dead zones in the midplane (conducive to planet formation in single stars), and find that planetesimal accretion can be inhibited even in the outer disk (4-10 AU) far from the central binary, a location previously thought to be a plausible starting point for the formation of circumbinary planets.

  17. The frequency of accretion disks around single stars: Chamaeleon I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daemgen, Sebastian; Elliot Meyer, R.; Jayawardhana, Ray; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.

    2016-02-01

    Context. It is well known that stellar companions can influence the evolution of a protoplanetary disk. Nevertheless, previous disk surveys did not - and could not - consistently exclude binaries from their samples. Aims: We present a study dedicated to investigating the frequency of ongoing disk accretion around single stars in a star-forming region. Methods: We obtained near-infrared spectroscopy of 54 low-mass stars selected from a high-angular resolution survey in the 2-3 Myr-old Chamaeleon I region to determine the presence of Brackett-γ emission, taking the residual chance of undetected multiplicity into account, which we estimate to be on the order of 30%. The result is compared with previous surveys of the same feature in binary stars of the same region to provide a robust estimate of the difference between the accretor fractions of single stars and individual components of binary systems. Results: We find Brγ emission among 39.5+ 14.0-9.9% of single stars, which is a significantly higher fraction than for binary stars in Chamaeleon I. In particular, close binary systems with separations <100 AU show emission in only 6.5+ 16.5-3.0% of the cases according to the same analysis. The emitter frequency of wider binaries appears consistent with the single star value. Interpreting Brγ emission as a sign of ongoing accretion and correcting for sensitivity bias, we infer an accretor fraction of single stars of Facc = 47.8+ 14.0-9.9%. This is slightly higher but consistent with previous estimates that do not clearly exclude binaries from their samples. Conclusions: Through our robust and consistent analysis, we confirm that the fraction of young single stars harboring accretion disks is much larger than that of close binaries at the same age. Our findings have important implications for the timescales of disk evolution and planet formation.

  18. Ultra high energy gamma rays, cosmic rays and neutrinos from accreting degenerate stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brecher, K.; Chanmugam, G.

    1985-01-01

    Super-Eddington accretion for a recently proposed unipolar induction model of cosmic ray acceleration in accreting binary star systems containing magnetic white dwarfs or neutron stars is considered. For sufficiently high accretion rates and low magnetic fields, the model can account for: (1) acceleration of cosmic ray nuclei up to energies of 10 to the 19th power eV; (2) production of more or less normal solar cosmic ray composition; (3) the bulk of cosmic rays observed with energies above 1 TeV, and probably even down to somewhat lower energies as well; and (4) possibly the observed antiproton cosmic ray flux. It can also account for the high ultra high energy (UHE) gamma ray flux observed from several accreting binary systems (including Cygnus X-3), while allowing the possibility of an even higher neutrino flux from these sources, with L sub nu/L sub gamma is approximately 100.

  19. Social stars: Modeling the interactive lives of stars in dense clusters and binary systems in the era of time domain astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Morgan Elowe

    This thesis uses computational modeling to study of phases of dramatic interaction that intersperse stellar lifetimes. In galactic centers stars trace dangerously wandering orbits dictated by the combined gravitational force of a central, supermassive black hole and all of the surrounding stars. In binary systems, stars' evolution -- which causes their radii to increase substantially -- can bring initially non-interacting systems into contact. Moments of strong stellar interaction transform stars, their subsequent evolution, and the stellar environments they inhabit. In tidal disruption events, a star is partially or completely destroyed as tidal forces from a supermassive black hole overwhelm the star's self gravity. A portion of the stellar debris falls back to the black hole powering a luminous flare as it accretes. This thesis studies the relative event rates and properties of tidal disruption events for stars across the stellar evolutionary spectrum. Tidal disruptions of giant stars occur with high specific frequency; these objects' extended envelopes make them vulnerable to disruption. More-compact white dwarf stars are tidally disrupted relatively rarely. Their transients are also of very different duration and luminosity. Giant star disruptions power accretion flares with timescales of tens to hundreds of years; white dwarf disruption flares take hours to days. White dwarf tidal interactions can additionally trigger thermonuclear burning and lead to transients with signatures similar to type I supernovae. In binary star systems, a phase of hydrodynamic interaction called a common envelope episode occurs when one star evolves to swallow its companion. Dragged by the surrounding gas, the companion star spirals through the envelope to tighter orbits. This thesis studies accretion and flow morphologies during this phase. Density gradients across the gravitationally-focussed material lead to a strong angular momentum barrier to accretion during common envelope

  20. SIGNS OF ACCRETION IN THE ABUNDANCE PATTERNS OF THE COMPONENTS OF THE RS CVn-TYPE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR LX PERSEI

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Young-Woon; Yushchenko, Alexander V.; Hong, Kyeongsoo; Guinan, Edward F.; Gopka, Vira F. E-mail: yua@sejong.ac.kr

    2013-06-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of LX Per carried out using the Korean Bohyunsan Observatory Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) with spectral resolving power R = 80, 000. The spectrograph was attached to the 1.8 m telescope. The fit of synthetic spectra to the observed spectrum of the system allowed us to find the component parameters and the abundances of chemical elements in the atmospheres of the components. The strong Ca II H and K emissions are confirmed; we also found emission lines in the Ca II reversals' triplet absorptions at the wavelengths of 8498, 8542, and 8662 A in the spectrum of the cooler component of LX Per. A unique photometric solution using the distorted light curves of three different epochs was made. The spot model light curves were fitted to the 1981, 1982, and 1983 observations successfully by adjusting only spot parameters. We could infer that the variation of spot location and size was the main reason for the changing shape of light curves. The main feature of the abundance patterns of both components was the apparent deficiency of heavy (Z > 30) elements. Only elements with strong lines, namely Y and Ba, were detected. Correlations of relative abundances of chemical elements with condensation temperatures and second ionization potentials of these elements, which can be explained by the accretion of dust and gas, were found.

  1. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A. E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk

    2013-04-20

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  2. Analytic orbit propagation of planets in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos

    2015-08-01

    We present an analytical framework that accurately describes the motion of co-planar planets in binary star systems on orbital as well as secular timescales. The method builds upon analytic solutions of the differential equations governing the behavior of the system's perturbed Laplace-Runge-Lenz vectors. Multiple time-scale analysis is used to derive the short period evolutions of the system, while octupole secular theory is applied to describe its long term behavior. A post Newtonian correction on the stellar orbit is included for circumbinary planets. Our model is tested against results from numerical integrations of the full equations of motion. An application to circumbinary planetary systems discovered by NASA's Kepler satellite reveals that the formation history of the systems Kepler-34 and Kepler-413 has most likely been different from the one of Kepler-16, Kepler-35, Kepler-38 and Kepler-64, as the former systems are not compatible with the assumption of almost circular initial planetary orbits.

  3. A Candidate Binary Black Hole System at z=1.175

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Robert S.; Stern, D.; Madsen, K. K.; Harrison, F. A.; Cushing, M. C.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Griffith, R. L.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Lagattuta, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss properties of the X-ray source CXOXBJ142607.6+353351 (CXOJ1426+35) which shows double rest-frame optical/UV emission lines, separated spatially by 0.68 arcseconds and in velocity-space by 700 km/s. Emission line ratios in both systems indicate ionization by an AGN continuum, and the double-peaked profile resembles the optical spectrum of many candidate binary AGN. However, other physical processes involving complex gas kinematics may produce the double peaks. To better understand the source, we have also acquired near infrared (NIR) adaptive optics (AO) imaging and NIR slit spectroscopy and have analyzed available archival data. The AO image reveals only a single nucleus, implying that either there is only a single AGN present, or the second AGN is highly obscured. Interestingly, significant obscuration is consistent with the high level of extinction inferred from the X-ray data. CXOJ1426+35 may also represent the case of two narrow line regions (NLRs) present as the result of a recent merger, with each illuminated by a single AGN, or NLR clouds driven by an outflow from an accretion disk. Furthermore, that the source is radio-quiet argues strongly against any sort of jet-cloud interaction. Developing a clear understanding of the physical process producing the complex emission line profiles seen in CXOJ1426+35 and other sources is important to both the search for dual/binary SMBHs and the study of quasar/AGN emission line regions.

  4. THE AGE AND STELLAR PARAMETERS OF THE PROCYON BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, James; Arnett, David; Fontaine, Gilles; Young, Patrick A.; Williams, Kurtis A. E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.edu E-mail: pyoung.3@asu.edu

    2013-05-20

    The Procyon AB binary system (orbital period 40.838 yr, a newly refined determination) is near and bright enough that the component radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities are very well determined, although more than one possible solution to the masses has limited the claimed accuracy. Preliminary mass determinations for each component are available from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, supported by ground-based astrometry and an excellent Hipparcos parallax; we use these for our preferred solution for the binary system. Other values for the masses are also considered. We have employed the TYCHO stellar evolution code to match the radius and luminosity of the F5 IV-V primary star to determine the system's most likely age as 1.87 {+-} 0.13 Gyr. Since prior studies of Procyon A found its abundance indistinguishable from solar, the solar composition of Asplund, Grevesse, and Sauval (Z = 0.014) is assumed for the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram fitting. An unsuccessful attempt to fit using the older solar abundance scale of Grevesse and Sauval (Z = 0.019) is also reported. For Procyon B, 11 new sequences for the cooling of non-DA white dwarfs have been calculated to investigate the dependences of the cooling age on (1) the mass, (2) core composition, (3) helium layer mass, and (4) heavy-element opacities in the helium envelope. Our calculations indicate a cooling age of 1.19 {+-} 0.11 Gyr, which implies that the progenitor mass of Procyon B was 2.59{sub -0.26}{sup +0.44} M{sub Sun }. In a plot of initial versus final mass of white dwarfs in astrometric binaries or star clusters (all with age determinations), the Procyon B final mass lies several {sigma} below a straight line fit.

  5. The Age and Stellar Parameters of the Procyon Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, James; Fontaine, Gilles; Young, Patrick A.; Williams, Kurtis A.; Arnett, David

    2013-05-01

    The Procyon AB binary system (orbital period 40.838 yr, a newly refined determination) is near and bright enough that the component radii, effective temperatures, and luminosities are very well determined, although more than one possible solution to the masses has limited the claimed accuracy. Preliminary mass determinations for each component are available from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, supported by ground-based astrometry and an excellent Hipparcos parallax; we use these for our preferred solution for the binary system. Other values for the masses are also considered. We have employed the TYCHO stellar evolution code to match the radius and luminosity of the F5 IV-V primary star to determine the system's most likely age as 1.87 ± 0.13 Gyr. Since prior studies of Procyon A found its abundance indistinguishable from solar, the solar composition of Asplund, Grevesse, and Sauval (Z = 0.014) is assumed for the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram fitting. An unsuccessful attempt to fit using the older solar abundance scale of Grevesse & Sauval (Z = 0.019) is also reported. For Procyon B, 11 new sequences for the cooling of non-DA white dwarfs have been calculated to investigate the dependences of the cooling age on (1) the mass, (2) core composition, (3) helium layer mass, and (4) heavy-element opacities in the helium envelope. Our calculations indicate a cooling age of 1.19 ± 0.11 Gyr, which implies that the progenitor mass of Procyon B was 2.59_{-0.26}^{+0.44} M ⊙. In a plot of initial versus final mass of white dwarfs in astrometric binaries or star clusters (all with age determinations), the Procyon B final mass lies several σ below a straight line fit.

  6. New systemic radial velocities of suspected RR Lyrae binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, E.; Barnes, T. G.; Kolenberg, K.

    2016-05-01

    Among the tens of thousands of known RR Lyrae stars there are only a handful that show indications of possible binarity. The question why this is the case is still unsolved, and has recently sparked several studies dedicated to the search for additional RR Lyraes in binary systems. Such systems are particularly valuable because they might allow to constrain the stellar mass. Most of the recent studies, however, are based on photometry by finding a light time effect in the timings of maximum light. This approach is a very promising and successful one, but it has a major drawback: by itself, it cannot serve as a definite proof of binarity, because other phenomena such as the Blazhko effect or intrinsic period changes could lead to similar results. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements, on the other hand, can serve as definite proof of binarity. We have therefore started a project to study spectroscopically RR Lyrae stars that are suspected to be binaries. We have obtained radial velocity (RV) curves with the 2.1m telescope at McDonald observatory. From these we derive systemic RVs which we will compare to previous measurements in order to find changes induced by orbital motions. We also construct templates of the RV curves that can facilitate future studies. We also observed the most promising RR Lyrae binary candidate, TU UMa, as no recent spectroscopic measurements were available. We present a densely covered pulsational RV curve, which will be used to test the predictions of the orbit models that are based on the O - C variations.

  7. Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion from a Planar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion have informed predictions about the evolution of wind-driven accretion systems for over two decades. These simulations frequently exhibit dramatic nonlinear behavior such as the flip-flop instability and the formation of transient accretion disks. During disk accretion, the mass accretion rate is suppressed and angular momentum accretion occurs at quasi-Keplerian rates. These results have been used to interpret neutron star accretion from the equatorially enhanced wind of a Be star in Be/X-ray Binaries. We employ large-scale hydrodynamic simulations to investigate whether the flip-flop instability is possible in three dimensions or is simply a consequence of the restrictions on a 2D flow. We do not observe the flip-flop instability in 3D for any values of the wind scale height or density. Moreover, the angular momentum vector of the accreting gas is typically found to be in the plane of the disk wind rather than perpendicular to it as one might expect based on the results of 2D planar simulations. We measure large-scale asymmetries about the plane of the disk wind that arise due to rotational flow near the accretor. Gas is driven above and below the plane, where it interacts with the bow shock and results in a time-varying shock structure. Winds with scale heights of 0.25 Ra enter locked rotation modes that remain stable for the duration of our computational runs. During this phase, the mass accretion rate is suppressed by up to two orders of magnitude below the analytical prediction and angular momentum accretion occurs at sub-Keplerian values.

  8. Study of the sailboat stable region for binaries systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfair, Rafael; Vieira Neto, Ernesto; Villa Espinoza, Omar Jose; Francisco Lins Leal Pinheiro, Tiago

    2016-10-01

    Before the visit of the New Horizons mission, Giuliatti Winter et al. (2013) through numerical simulations analysed the Pluto-Charon system looking for possible stable regions. Among their results it was found a peculiar stable region located at a = (0.5d, 0.7d) and e = (0.2, 0.9), being a, d and e the values of semimajor axis, Pluto-Charon's distance and the eccentricity, respectively. In this work we explore in details the variation of the size and shape of this region for different binaries systems, considering several parameters for the massive bodies and initial conditions of the test particles. We first created hypothetical systems with different mass ratio (μ) and then we numerically integrated the orbit of test particles for a time span of 104 orbital periods of the binary. Our results show that the existence of the sailboat is limited to μ=(0.05, 0.27) and small changes in the eccentricity of the secondary body are enough to decrease substantially the extend of the stable region. However, the sailboat is robust to changes in the inclination of the particles and the region exists even for retrograde orbits. We also found a larger extend of the sailboat for intervals of pericentre ω around 0° and 180°, but the size of the interval varies with the mass ratio of system.

  9. Early accretion of protoplanets inferred from a reduced inner solar system (26)Al inventory.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Martin; Connelly, James N; Glad, Aslaug C; Mikouchi, Takashi; Bizzarro, Martin

    2015-06-15

    The mechanisms and timescales of accretion of 10-1000 km sized planetesimals, the building blocks of planets, are not yet well understood. With planetesimal melting predominantly driven by the decay of the short-lived radionuclide (26)Al ((26)Al→(26)Mg; t1/2 = 0.73 Ma), its initial abundance determines the permissible timeframe of planetesimal-scale melting and its subsequent cooling history. Currently, precise knowledge about the initial (26)Al abundance [((26)Al/(27)Al)0] exists only for the oldest known solids, calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) - the so-called canonical value. We have determined the (26)Al/(27)Al of three angrite meteorites, D'Orbigny, Sahara 99555 and NWA 1670, at their time of crystallization, which corresponds to (3.98 ± 0.15)×10(-7), (3.64 ± 0.18)×10(-7), and (5.92 ± 0.59)×10(-7), respectively. Combined with a newly determined absolute U-corrected Pb-Pb age for NWA 1670 of 4564.39 ± 0.24 Ma and published U-corrected Pb-Pb ages for the other two angrites, this allows us to calculate an initial ((26)Al/(27)Al)0 of [Formula: see text] for the angrite parent body (APB) precursor material at the time of CAI formation, a value four times lower than the accepted canonical value of 5.25 × 10(-5). Based on their similar (54)Cr/(52)Cr ratios, most inner solar system materials likely accreted from material containing a similar (26)Al/(27)Al ratio as the APB precursor at the time of CAI formation. To satisfy the abundant evidence for widespread planetesimal differentiation, the subcanonical (26)Al budget requires that differentiated planetesimals, and hence protoplanets, accreted rapidly within 0.25 ± 0.15 Ma of the formation of canonical CAIs.

  10. Early accretion of protoplanets inferred from a reduced inner solar system 26Al inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Martin; Connelly, James N.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Mikouchi, Takashi; Bizzarro, Martin

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms and timescales of accretion of 10-1000 km sized planetesimals, the building blocks of planets, are not yet well understood. With planetesimal melting predominantly driven by the decay of the short-lived radionuclide 26Al (26Al→26Mg; t1/2 = 0.73 Ma), its initial abundance determines the permissible timeframe of planetesimal-scale melting and its subsequent cooling history. Currently, precise knowledge about the initial 26Al abundance [(26Al/27Al)0] exists only for the oldest known solids, calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) - the so-called canonical value. We have determined the 26Al/27Al of three angrite meteorites, D'Orbigny, Sahara 99555 and NWA 1670, at their time of crystallization, which corresponds to (3.98 ± 0.15) ×10-7, (3.64 ± 0.18) ×10-7, and (5.92 ± 0.59) ×10-7, respectively. Combined with a newly determined absolute U-corrected Pb-Pb age for NWA 1670 of 4564.39 ± 0.24 Ma and published U-corrected Pb-Pb ages for the other two angrites, this allows us to calculate an initial (26Al/27Al)0 of (1.33-0.18+0.21) ×10-5 for the angrite parent body (APB) precursor material at the time of CAI formation, a value four times lower than the accepted canonical value of 5.25 ×10-5. Based on their similar 54Cr/52Cr ratios, most inner solar system materials likely accreted from material containing a similar 26Al/27Al ratio as the APB precursor at the time of CAI formation. To satisfy the abundant evidence for widespread planetesimal differentiation, the subcanonical 26Al budget requires that differentiated planetesimals, and hence protoplanets, accreted rapidly within 0.25 ± 0.15 Ma of the formation of canonical CAIs.

  11. Modeling the Effects of Ice Accretion on the Low Pressure Compressor and the Overall Turbofan Engine System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Wright, William B.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study is on utilizing a mean line compressor flow analysis code coupled to an engine system thermodynamic code, to estimate the effects of ice accretion on the low pressure compressor, and quantifying its effects on the engine system throughout a notional flight trajectory. In this paper a temperature range in which engine icing would occur was assumed. This provided a mechanism to locate potential component icing sites and allow the computational tools to add blockages due to ice accretion in a parametric fashion. Ultimately the location and level of blockage due to icing would be provided by an ice accretion code. To proceed, an engine system modeling code and a mean line compressor flow analysis code were utilized to calculate the flow conditions in the fan-core and low pressure compressor and to identify potential locations within the compressor where ice may accrete. In this study, an "additional blockage" due to the accretion of ice on the metal surfaces, has been added to the baseline aerodynamic blockage due to boundary layer, as well as the blade metal blockage. Once the potential locations of ice accretion are identified, the levels of additional blockage due to accretion were parametrically varied to estimate the effects on the low pressure compressor blade row performance operating within the engine system environment. This study includes detailed analysis of compressor and engine performance during cruise and descent operating conditions at several altitudes within the notional flight trajectory. The purpose of this effort is to develop the computer codes to provide a predictive capability to forecast the onset of engine icing events, such that they could ultimately help in the avoidance of these events.

  12. Ultra-Short-Period Binary Systems in the OGLE Fields Toward the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soszyński, I.; Stępień, K.; Pilecki, B.; Mróz, P.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Skowron, J.; Pawlak, M.

    2015-03-01

    We present a sample of 242 ultra-short-period (Porb<0.22 d) eclipsing and ellipsoidal binary stars identified in the OGLE fields toward the Galactic bulge. Based on the light curve morphology, we divide the sample into candidates for contact binaries and non-contact binaries. In the latter group we distinguish binary systems consisting of a cool main-sequence star and a B-type subdwarf (HW Vir stars) and candidates for cataclysmic variables, including five eclipsing dwarf novae. One of the detected eclipsing binary systems - OGLE-BLG-ECL-000066 - with the orbital period below 0.1 d, likely consists of M dwarfs in a nearly contact configuration. If confirmed, this would be the shortest-period M-dwarf binary system currently known. We discuss possible evolutionary mechanisms that could lead to the orbital period below 0.1 d in an M-dwarf binary.

  13. ALIGNMENT OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARY ORBITS AND SPINS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M. Coleman; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies of accretion onto supermassive black hole binaries suggest that much, perhaps most, of the matter eventually accretes onto one hole or the other. If so, then for binaries whose inspiral from {approx}1 pc to {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -2} pc is driven by interaction with external gas, both the binary orbital axis and the individual black hole spins can be reoriented by angular momentum exchange with this gas. Here we show that, unless the binary mass ratio is far from unity, the spins of the individual holes align with the binary orbital axis in a time {approx}few-100 times shorter than the binary orbital axis aligns with the angular momentum direction of the incoming circumbinary gas; the spin of the secondary aligns more rapidly than that of the primary by a factor {approx}(m{sub 1}/m{sub 2}){sup 1/2} > 1. Thus the binary acts as a stabilizing agent, so that for gas-driven systems, the black hole spins are highly likely to be aligned (or counteraligned if retrograde accretion is common) with each other and with the binary orbital axis. This alignment can significantly reduce the recoil speed resulting from subsequent black hole merger.

  14. Alignment of Supermassive Black Hole Binary Orbits and Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Krolik, Julian H.

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies of accretion onto supermassive black hole binaries suggest that much, perhaps most, of the matter eventually accretes onto one hole or the other. If so, then for binaries whose inspiral from ~1 pc to ~10-3-10-2 pc is driven by interaction with external gas, both the binary orbital axis and the individual black hole spins can be reoriented by angular momentum exchange with this gas. Here we show that, unless the binary mass ratio is far from unity, the spins of the individual holes align with the binary orbital axis in a time ~few-100 times shorter than the binary orbital axis aligns with the angular momentum direction of the incoming circumbinary gas; the spin of the secondary aligns more rapidly than that of the primary by a factor ~(m 1/m 2)1/2 > 1. Thus the binary acts as a stabilizing agent, so that for gas-driven systems, the black hole spins are highly likely to be aligned (or counteraligned if retrograde accretion is common) with each other and with the binary orbital axis. This alignment can significantly reduce the recoil speed resulting from subsequent black hole merger.

  15. The role of magnetic reconnection on jet/accretion disk systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Piovezan, P. P.; Kadowaki, L. H. S.

    2010-07-01

    Context. It was proposed earlier that the relativistic ejections observed in microquasars could be produced by violent magnetic reconnection episodes at the inner disk coronal region (de Gouveia Dal Pino & Lazarian 2005). Aims: Here we revisit this model, which employs a standard accretion disk description and fast magnetic reconnection theory, and discuss the role of magnetic reconnection and associated heating and particle acceleration in different jet/disk accretion systems, namely young stellar objects (YSOs), microquasars, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Methods: In microquasars and AGNs, violent reconnection episodes between the magnetic field lines of the inner disk region and those that are anchored in the black hole are able to heat the coronal/disk gas and accelerate the plasma to relativistic velocities through a diffusive first-order Fermi-like process within the reconnection site that will produce intermittent relativistic ejections or plasmons. Results: The resulting power-law electron distribution is compatible with the synchrotron radio spectrum observed during the outbursts of these sources. A diagram of the magnetic energy rate released by violent reconnection as a function of the black hole (BH) mass spanning 109 orders of magnitude shows that the magnetic reconnection power is more than sufficient to explain the observed radio luminosities of the outbursts from microquasars to low luminous AGNs. In addition, the magnetic reconnection events cause the heating of the coronal gas, which can be conducted back to the disk to enhance its thermal soft X-ray emission as observed during outbursts in microquasars. The decay of the hard X-ray emission right after a radio flare could also be explained in this model due to the escape of relativistic electrons with the evolving jet outburst. In the case of YSOs a similar magnetic configuration can be reached that could possibly produce observed X-ray flares in some sources and provide the heating at the

  16. A spectrophotometric study of the Algol binary system RX Geminorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobias, Jan J.; Plavec, Mirek J.

    1987-01-01

    IUE low-dispersion spectra and optical ITS scans of the semidetached Algol-type binary system RX Gem have been obtained. The spectral type of the primary component was determined to be A0, with good accuracy. Since the primary eclipse is only partial, the spectral type of the cooler component has been determined with less accuracy as K2 (+ or - 2). The system is only slightly reddened: its color excess is E(B-V) = 0.04 + or - 0.01 mag. Two models of the system are considered, depending on the luminosity class of the hotter star. Optically, the system is a Be star, since it displays Balmer line emission, visible most clearly during the primary eclipse. The ultraviolet spectrum observed near mideclipse does not display the expected 'W Serpentis-type' emission lines. Probably the main reason is that the primary eclipse is only partial.

  17. THE DISSIMILAR CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF THE PLANET-HOSTING STARS OF THE XO-2 BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez, I.; Khanal, S.; Aleo, P.; Sobotka, A.; Lambert, D. L.; Liu, F.; Casagrande, L.; Yong, D.; Asplund, M.; Meléndez, J.

    2015-07-20

    Using high-quality spectra of the twin stars in the XO-2 binary system, we have detected significant differences in the chemical composition of their photospheres. The differences correlate strongly with the elements’ dust condensation temperature. In XO-2N, volatiles are enhanced by about 0.015 dex and refractories are overabundant by up to 0.090 dex. On average, our error bar in relative abundance is 0.012 dex. We present an early metal-depletion scenario in which the formation of the gas giant planets known to exist around these stars are responsible for a 0.015 dex offset in the abundances of all elements while 20 M{sub ⨁} of non-detected rocky objects that formed around XO-2S explain the additional refractory-element difference. An alternative explanation involves the late accretion of at least 20 M{sub ⨁} of planet-like material by XO-2N, allegedly as a result of the migration of the hot Jupiter detected around that star. Dust cleansing by a nearby hot star as well as age or Galactic birthplace effects can be ruled out as valid explanations for this phenomenon.

  18. The Earth-Moon system as a typical binary in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, S.

    2014-07-01

    In recent years new arguments in favor of the formation of solid planetesimals by contraction of rarefied preplanetesimals (RPPs) have been found. It is often considered that masses of some RPPs can correspond to masses of solid bodies of diameter about 1000 km. [1] showed that in the vortices launched by the Rossby wave instability in the borders of the dead zone, the solids quickly achieve critical densities and undergo gravitational collapse into protoplanetary embryos in the mass range 0.1-0.6M_E (where M_E is the mass of the Earth). [2] and [3] supposed that transneptunian binaries were formed from RPPs. It was shown in [2] that the angular momenta acquired at collisions of RPPs moving in circular heliocentric orbits could have the same values as the angular momenta of discovered transneptunian and asteroid binaries. [4] obtained that the angular momenta used in [3] as initial data in calculations of the contraction of RPPs leading to formation of transneptunian binaries could be acquired at collisions of two RPPs moving in circular heliocentric orbits. I supposed that the fraction of RPPs collided with other RPPs during their contraction can be about the fraction of small bodies of diameter d>100 km with satellites (among all such small bodies), i.e., it can be about 0.3 for objects formed in the transneptunian belt. The model of collisions of RPPs explains negative angular momenta of some observed binaries, as about 20 percent of collisions of RPPs moving in circular heliocentric orbits lead to retrograde rotation. Note that if all RPPs got their angular momenta at their formation without mutual collisions, then the angular momenta of small bodies without satellites and those with satellites could be similar (but actually they differ considerably). Most of rarefied preasteroids could turn into solid asteroids before they collided with other preasteroids. Some present asteroids can be debris of larger solid bodies, and the formation of many binaries with

  19. High-energy Emissions from the Pulsar/Be Binary System PSR J2032+4127/MT91 213

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, J.; Tam, P. H. T.; Ng, C. W.; Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.; Hui, C. Y.; Cheng, K. S.

    2017-02-01

    PSR J2032+4127 is a radio-loud gamma-ray-emitting pulsar; it is orbiting around a high-mass Be type star with a very long orbital period of 25–50 years, and is approaching periastron, which will occur in late 2017/early 2018. This system comprises a young pulsar and a Be type star, which is similar to the so-called gamma-ray binary PSR B1259–63/LS2883. It is expected therefore that PSR J2032+4127 shows an enhancement of high-energy emission caused by the interaction between the pulsar wind and Be wind/disk around periastron. Ho et al. recently reported a rapid increase in the X-ray flux from this system. In this paper, we also confirm a rapid increase in the X-ray flux along the orbit, while the GeV flux shows no significant change. We discuss the high-energy emissions from the shock caused by the pulsar wind and stellar wind interaction and examine the properties of the pulsar wind in this binary system. We argue that the rate of increase of the X-ray flux observed by Swift indicates (1) a variation of the momentum ratio of the two-wind interaction region along the orbit, or (2) an evolution of the magnetization parameter of the pulsar wind with the radial distance from the pulsar. We also discuss the pulsar wind/Be disk interaction at the periastron passage, and propose the possibility of formation of an accretion disk around the pulsar. We model high-energy emissions through the inverse-Compton scattering process of the cold-relativistic pulsar wind off soft photons from the accretion disk.

  20. EVIDENCE FOR AN ACCRETION ORIGIN FOR THE OUTER HALO GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, A. D.; Huxor, A. P.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Irwin, M. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; McConnachie, A. W.; Ibata, R. A.; Lewis, G. F.

    2010-07-01

    We use a sample of newly discovered globular clusters from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS) in combination with previously cataloged objects to map the spatial distribution of globular clusters in the M31 halo. At projected radii beyond {approx}30 kpc, where large coherent stellar streams are readily distinguished in the field, there is a striking correlation between these features and the positions of the globular clusters. Adopting a simple Monte Carlo approach, we test the significance of this association by computing the probability that it could be due to the chance alignment of globular clusters smoothly distributed in the M31 halo. We find that the likelihood of this possibility is low, below 1%, and conclude that the observed spatial coincidence between globular clusters and multiple tidal debris streams in the outer halo of M31 reflects a genuine physical association. Our results imply that the majority of the remote globular cluster system of M31 has been assembled as a consequence of the accretion of cluster-bearing satellite galaxies. This constitutes the most direct evidence to date that the outer halo globular cluster populations in some galaxies are largely accreted.

  1. Thermodynamic modeling of the Ge-La binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Miao; Li, Chang-rong; Du, Zhen-min; Guo, Cui-ping; Niu, Chun-ju

    2012-08-01

    The Ge-La binary system was critically assessed by means of the calculation of phase diagram (CALPHAD) technique. The associate model was used for the liquid phase containing the constituent species Ge, La, Ge3La5, and Ge1.7La. The terminal solid solution diamond-(Ge) with a small solubility of La was described using the substitutional model, in which the excess Gibbs energy was formulated with the Redlich-Kister equation. The compounds with homogeneity ranges, α(Ge1.7La), β(Ge1.7La), and (GeLa), were modeled using two sublattices as α(Ge,La)1.7La, β(Ge,La)1.7La, and (Ge,La)(Ge,La), respectively. The intermediate phases with no solubility ranges, Ge4La5, Ge3La4, Ge3La5, and GeLa3, were treated as stoichiometric compounds. The three allotropic modifications of La, dhcp-La, fcc-La, and bcc-La, were kept as pure element phases since no solubility of Ge in La was reported. A set of self-consistent thermodynamic parameters of the Ge-La binary system was obtained. The calculation results agree well with the available experimental data from literatures.

  2. PHASES: A Search for Planets in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Benjamin; Muterpspaugh, M.; Konacki, M.; Kulkarni, S.; Shao, M.; Colavita, M.; Burke, B.

    2006-12-01

    For the past three years we have used the Palomar Testbed Interferometer to undertake an astrometric search for planets in binary stellar systems. By using phase referencing and long-baseline near-IR interferometry we are able to obtain an astrometric precision of approximately 20 micro-arcseconds between pairs of stars with separations in the range 0.1-1 arcsecond. We have followed 40 systems intensively and to date have over 800 astrometric measurements. We will present results from the first comprehensive analysis of this data set, including strong limits on the occurrence of planets in our target systems. The PHASES program serves as an excellent precursor to the type of program we expect to undertake with the Space Interferometry Mission PlanetQuest.

  3. The Habitable Zone of the Binary System Kepler-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Sarah; Cuntz, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    We report on the current results and envisioned future work from our study of the binary star system Kepler-16, which consists of a K-type main-sequence star and an M dwarf as well as a circumbinary Saturnian planet, Kepler-16b. We focus on the calculation of the location and extent of the habitable zone while considering several criteria for both the inner and outer boundaries previously given in the literature. In particular, we investigate the impact of the two stellar components (especially Kepler-16A) as well as of the system’s binarity regarding the provision of circumbinary habitability. Another aspect of our work consists in a careful assessment of how the extent of the system’s habitable zone is impacted by the relative uncertainties of the stellar and system parameters. Finally, we comment on the likelihood of habitable objects in the system by taking into account both radiative criteria and the need of orbital stability.

  4. THE ELM SURVEY. V. MERGING MASSIVE WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.; Allende Prieto, Carlos E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: alexg@nhn.ou.edu

    2013-05-20

    We present the discovery of 17 low-mass white dwarfs (WDs) in short-period (P {<=} 1 day) binaries. Our sample includes four objects with remarkable log g {approx_equal} 5 surface gravities and orbital solutions that require them to be double degenerate binaries. All of the lowest surface gravity WDs have metal lines in their spectra implying long gravitational settling times or ongoing accretion. Notably, six of the WDs in our sample have binary merger times <10 Gyr. Four have {approx}>0.9 M{sub Sun} companions. If the companions are massive WDs, these four binaries will evolve into stable mass transfer AM CVn systems and possibly explode as underluminous supernovae. If the companions are neutron stars, then these may be millisecond pulsar binaries. These discoveries increase the number of detached, double degenerate binaries in the ELM Survey to 54; 31 of these binaries will merge within a Hubble time.

  5. Accretion onto neutron stars with the presence of a double layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A. C.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Elsner, R. F.; Darbro, W.; Sutherland, P. G.

    1987-01-01

    It is known, from laboratory experiments, that double layers will form in plasmas, usually in the presence of an electric current. It is argued that a double layer may be present in the accretion column of a neutron star in a binary system. It is suggested that the double layer may be the predominant deceleration mechanism for the accreting ions, especially for sources with X-ray luminosities of less than about 10 to the 37th erg/s. Previous models have involved either a collisionless shock or an assumed gradual deceleration of the accreting ions to thermalize the energy of the infalling matter.

  6. Accretion onto neutron stars with the presence of a double layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A. C.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Elsner, R. F.; Darbro, W.; Sutherland, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    It is known from laboratory experiments that double layers can form in plasmas, usually in the presence of an electric current. It is argued that a double layer may be present in the accretion column of a neutron star in a binary system. It is suggested that the double layer may be the predominant deceleration mechanism for the accreting ions, especially for sources with X-ray luminosities of less than about 10 to the 37th erg/s. Previous models have involved either a collisionless shock or an assumed gradual deceleration of the accreting ions to thermalize the energy of the infalling matter.

  7. HIGH FILL-OUT, EXTREME MASS RATIO OVERCONTACT BINARY SYSTEMS. X. THE NEWLY DISCOVERED BINARY XY LEONIS MINORIS

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Liu, L.; Zhu, L.-Y.; He, J.-J.; Bernasconi, L. E-mail: yygcn@163.com

    2011-05-15

    The newly discovered short-period close binary star, XY LMi, has been monitored photometrically since 2006. Its light curves are typical EW-type light curves and show complete eclipses with durations of about 80 minutes. Photometric solutions were determined through an analysis of the complete B, V, R, and I light curves using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. XY LMi is a high fill-out, extreme mass ratio overcontact binary system with a mass ratio of q = 0.148 and a fill-out factor of f = 74.1%, suggesting that it is in the late evolutionary stage of late-type tidal-locked binary stars. As observed in other overcontact binary stars, evidence for the presence of two dark spots on both components is given. Based on our 19 epochs of eclipse times, we found that the orbital period of the overcontact binary is decreasing continuously at a rate of dP/dt = -1.67 x 10{sup -7} days yr{sup -1}, which may be caused by mass transfer from the primary to the secondary and/or angular momentum loss via magnetic stellar wind. The decrease of the orbital period may result in the increase of the fill-out, and finally, it will evolve into a single rapid-rotation star when the fluid surface reaches the outer critical Roche lobe.

  8. Planetary Nebulae that Cannot Be Explained by Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Ealeal; Soker, Noam

    2017-03-01

    We examine the images of hundreds of planetary nebulae (PNe) and find that for about one in six PNe the morphology is too “messy” to be accounted for by models of stellar binary interaction. We speculate that interacting triple stellar systems shaped these PNe. In this preliminary study, we qualitatively classify PNe by one of four categories. (1) PNe that show no need for a tertiary star to account for their morphology. (2) PNe whose structure possesses a pronounced departure from axial-symmetry and/or mirror-symmetry. We classify these, according to our speculation, as “having a triple stellar progenitor.” (3) PNe whose morphology possesses departure from axial-symmetry and/or mirror-symmetry, but not as pronounced as in the previous class, and are classified as “likely shaped by triple stellar system.” (4) PNe with minor departure from axial-symmetry and/or mirror-symmetry that could have been also caused by an eccentric binary system or the interstellar medium. These are classified as “maybe shaped by a triple stellar system.” Given a weight η t = 1, η l = 0.67, and η m = 0.33 to classes 2, 3, and 4, respectively, we find that according to our assumption about 13%–21% of PNe have been shaped by triple stellar systems. Although in some evolutionary scenarios not all three stars survive the evolution, we encourage the search for a triple stellar systems at the center of some PNe.

  9. The Black-Hole Accretion Disk in NGC 4258: One of Nature's Most Beautiful Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. M.

    2008-08-01

    In this talk I will summarize some of the work that the CfA group has done to study the structure of the water masers in the accretion disk of NGC 4258. A series of 18 epochs of VLBA data taken from 1997.3 to 2000.8 were used for this study. The vertical distribution of maser features in the systemic group was found to be Gaussian, as expected for hydrostatic equilibrium, with a σ-width of 5.1 microarcsec (μas). If the disk is in hydrostatic equilibrium, its temperature is about 600 K. The systemic features exhibit a small, but persistent, gradient in acceleration versus impact parameter. This characteristic may indicate the presence of a spiral density wave rotating at sub-Keplerian speed. A more precise understanding of the dynamical properties of the disk is expected to lead to a more refined estimate of the distance to the galaxy.

  10. Neutron-star–black-hole binaries produced by binary-driven hypernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; ...

    2015-12-04

    Here, binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso ≳1052 erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed “ultrastripped” binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compactmore » binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.« less

  11. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-04

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  12. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso≳1052 erg ), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  13. Neutron-star–black-hole binaries produced by binary-driven hypernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2015-12-04

    Here, binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso ≳1052 erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed “ultrastripped” binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  14. Thermal expansion of solid solutions in apatite binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazev, Alexander V.; Bulanov, Evgeny N. Korokin, Vitaly Zh.

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Thermal dependencies of volume thermal expansion parameter for with thermal expansion diagrams for Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F{sub x}Cl{sub 1−x}. - Highlights: • Solid solutions in three apatitic binary systems were investigated via HT-XRD. • Thermal expansion coefficients of solid solutions in the systems were calculated. • Features of the thermal deformation of the apatites were described. • Termoroentgenography is a sensitive method for the investigation of isomorphism. - Abstract: High-temperature insitu X-ray diffraction was used to investigate isomorphism and the thermal expansion of apatite-structured compounds in three binary systems in the entire temperature range of the existence of its hexagonal modifications. Most of the studied compounds are highly expandable (α{sub l} > 8 × 10{sup 6} (K{sup −1})). In Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F–Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl system, volume thermal expansion coefficient is independence from the composition at 573 K. In Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl–Pb{sub 5}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl, the compound with equimolar ratio of substituted atoms has constant volume thermal expansion coefficient in temperature range 298–973 K. Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl–Pb{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl system is characterized by the most thermal sensitive composition, in which there is an equal ratio of isomorphic substituted atoms.

  15. Winds and accretion in delta Sagittae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Joel A.; Hartkopf, William I.; McAlister, Harold A.; Mason, Brian D.

    1995-04-01

    The ten-year binary delta Sge (M2 Ib-II+B9.5 V) is a zeta Aur binary containing an abnormally cool component. Combining our analysis of the system as a visual binary with Batten's radial-velocity solution leads to the following properties: i = 40 deg, a = 51 mas = 8.83 A.U. = 1893 solar radius, hence d = 173 pc; MB = 2.9 solar mass and MM = 3.8 solar mass; and RB = 2.6 solar radius and RM = 152 solar radius. This interpretation of the orbit places the M supergiant on the asymptotic giant branch. We have collected ultraviolet spectra throughout the star's 1980-90 orbit, concentrated around the conjuction of 1990. The wind of the M giant appears in these as narrow shell lines of singly ionized metals, chiefly Fe II, with P-Cyg profiles at many phases, which show the slow variation in strength expected for the orbit but no pronounced atmospheric eclipse. The terminal velocity of the wind is 16-18 km/s, and its excitation temperature is approximately 10,000 K. Most of the broadening of the wind lines is caused by differential expansion of the atmosphere, with (unmeasurably) low turbulent velocities. Nontheless, the mass loss rate (1.1 +/- 0.4 X 10 -8 solar mas/yr) is almost the same as found previously by Reimers and Schroder for very different assumptions about the velocity structure. Also seen in the spectrum throughout the orbit are the effects of a variable, high-speed wind as well as evidence for accretion onto the B9.5 star. This high-speed wind absorbs in species of all ionization stages observed, e. g., C II, Mg II, Al III, SI IV, C IV, and has a terminaal velocity in the range 200-450 km/s. We presume this wind originates at the B dwarf, not the M supergiant, and speculate that it comes from an accretion disk, as suggested by recent models of magnetically moderated accretion. Evidence for accretion is redshifted absorption in the same transitions formed in the high-speed wind, as well as broad emission lines of singly ionized metals. This emission seems to be

  16. Be discs in binary systems - I. Coplanar orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoglou, Despina; Carciofi, Alex C.; Vieira, Rodrigo G.; Cyr, Isabelle H.; Jones, Carol E.; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Rivinius, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Be stars are surrounded by outflowing circumstellar matter structured in the form of decretion discs. They are often members of binary systems, where it is expected that the decretion disc interacts both radiatively and gravitationally with the companion. In this work we study how various orbital (period, mass ratio and eccentricity) and disc (viscosity) parameters affect the disc structure in coplanar binaries. The main effects of the secondary on the disc are its truncation and the accumulation of material inwards of truncation. We find two limiting cases with respect to the effects of eccentricity: in circular or nearly circular prograde orbits, the disc maintains a rotating, constant in shape, configuration, which is locked to the orbital phase. The disc structure appears smaller in size, more elongated and more massive for small viscosity parameter, small orbital separation and/or high mass ratio. In highly eccentric orbits, the effects are more complex, with the disc structure strongly dependent on the orbital phase. We also studied the effects of binarity in the disc continuum emission. Since the infrared and radio SED are sensitive to the disc size and density slope, the truncation and matter accumulation result in considerable modifications in the emergent spectrum. We conclude that binarity can serve as an explanation for the variability exhibited in observations of Be stars, and that our model can be used to detect invisible companions.

  17. Can neutron stars have auroras ? : electromagnetic coupling process between neutron star and magnetized accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, T.; Iwakiri, W. B.; Enoto, T.; Wada, T.; Tao, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the binary neutron star system, angular momentum transfer from accretion disk to a star is essential process for spin-up/down of stars. The angular momentum transfer has been well formulated for the accretion disk strongly magnetized by the neutron star [e.g., Ghosh and Lamb, 1978, 1979a, b]. However, the electromagnetic (EM) coupling between the neutron star and accretion disk has not been self-consistently solved in the previous studies although the magnetic field lines from the star are strongly tied with the accretion disk. In this study, we applied the planet-magnetosphere coupling process established for Jupiter [Hill, 1979] to the binary neutron star system. Angular momentum distribution is solved based on the torque balance between the neutron star's surface and accretion disk coupled by the magnetic field tensions. We found the EM coupling can transfer significantly larger fraction of the angular momentum from the magnetized accretion disk to the star than the unmagnetized case. The resultant spin-up rate is estimated to ~10^-14 [sec/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters, which is comparable with or larger than the other common spin-down/up processes: e.g., the magnetic dipole radiation spin-down. The Joule heating energy dissipated in the EM coupling is estimated to be up to ~10^36 [erg/sec] for the nominal binary system parameters. The release is comparable to that of gravitation energy directly caused by the matters accreting onto the neutron star. This suggests the EM coupling at the neutron star can accompany the observable radiation as auroras with a similar manner to those at the rotating planetary magnetospheres like Jupiter, Saturn, and other gas giants.

  18. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water and the three constituent binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Nakamichi, Mikiyoshi; Kojima, Kazuo . Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

    1993-07-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for methanol + ethanol + water and its three constituent binary systems methanol + ethanol, ethanol + water, and methanol + water were measured at 101.3 kPa using a liquid-vapor ebullition-type equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system methanol + ethanol + water was predicted by means of the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  19. Applications of Indirect Imaging Techniques in X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlaftis, E. T.

    A review is given on aspects of indirect imaging techniques in X-ray binaries which are used as diagnostics tools for probing the X-ray dominated accretion disc physics. These techniques utilize observed properties such as the emission line profile variability, the time delays between simultaneous optical/X-ray light curves, the light curves of eclipsing systems and the pulsed emission from the compact object in order to reconstruct the accretion disc's line emissivity (Doppler tomography), the irradiated disc and heated secondary (echo mapping), the outer disc structure (modified eclipse mapping) and the accreting regions onto the compact object, respectively.

  20. 2007 Mutual events within the binary system of (22) Kalliope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descamps, P.; Marchis, F.; Pollock, J.; Berthier, J.; Birlan, M.; Vachier, F.; Colas, F.

    2008-11-01

    In 2007, the asteroid Kalliope will reach one of its annual equinoxes. As a consequence, its small satellite Linus orbiting in the equatorial plane will undergo a season of mutual eclipses and occultations very similar to the one that the Galilean satellites undergo every 6 years. This paper is aimed at preparing a campaign of observations of these mutual events occurring from February to May 2007. This opportunity occurs only under favorable geometric conditions when the Sun and/or the Earth are close to the orbital plane of the system. This is the first international campaign devoted to the observation of photometric events within an asynchronous asteroidal binary system. We took advantage of a reliable orbit solution of Linus to predict a series of 24 mutual eclipses and 12 mutual occultations observable in the spring of 2007. Thanks to the brightness of Kalliope ( mv≃11), these observations are easy to perform even with a small telescope. Anomalous attenuation events could be observed lasting for about 1-3 h with amplitude up to 0.09 mag. The attenuations are of two distinct types that can clearly be identified as primary and secondary eclipses similar to those that have been previously observed in other minor planet binary systems [Pravec, P., Scheirich, P., Kusnirák, P., Sarounová, L., Mottola, S., Hahn, G., Brown, P., Esquerdo, G., Kaiser, N., Krzeminski, Z., Pray, D.P., Warner, B.D., Harris, A.W., Nolan, M.C., Howell, E.S., Benner, L.A.M., Margot, J.-L., Galád, A., Holliday, W., Hicks, M.D., Krugly, Yu.N., Tholen, D., Whiteley, R., Marchis, F., Degraff, D.R., Grauer, A., Larson, S., Velichko, F.P., Cooney, W.R., Stephens, R., Zhu, J., Kirsch, K., Dyvig, R., Snyder, L., Reddy, V., Moore, S., Gajdos, S., Világi, J., Masi, G., Higgins, D., Funkhouser, G., Knight, B., Slivan, S., Behrend, R., Grenon, M., Burki, G., Roy, R., Demeautis, C., Matter, D., Waelchli, N., Revaz, Y., Klotz, A., Rieugné, M., Thierry, P., Cotrez, V., Brunetto, L., Kober, G., 2006

  1. UV observations of x ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1990-01-01

    IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) has observed both high and low mass x ray binaries throughout its life. The UV spectra of high mass systems reveal the nature of the massive companion star and the effects of the x ray illumination of the stellar wind. In loss mass systems, the x ray illuminated disk or companion star dominates the UV light. System parameters and the characteristics of the accretion disk can be inferred.

  2. Mergers of accreting stellar-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, H.; Umemura, M.; Gouda, N.

    2016-11-01

    We present post-Newtonian N-body simulations on mergers of accreting stellar-mass black holes (BHs), where such general relativistic effects as the pericentre shift and gravitational wave (GW) emission are taken into consideration. The attention is concentrated on the effects of the dynamical friction and the Hoyle-Lyttleton mass accretion by ambient gas. We consider a system composed of 10 BHs with initial mass of 30 M⊙. As a result, we show that mergers of accreting stellar-mass BHs are classified into four types: a gas drag-driven, an interplay-driven, a three-body-driven, or an accretion-driven merger. We find that BH mergers proceed before significant mass accretion, even if the accretion rate is ˜10 Eddington accretion rate, and then all BHs can merge into one heavy BH. Using the simulation results for a wide range of parameters, we derive a critical accretion rate (dot{m}_c), below which the BH growth is promoted faster by mergers. Also, it is found that the effect of the recoil by the GW emission can reduce dot{m}_c especially in gas number density higher than 108 cm-3, and enhance the escape probability of merged BHs. Very recently, a gravitational wave event, GW150914, as a result of the merger of a ˜30 M⊙ BH binary has been detected. Based on the present simulations, the BH merger in GW150914 is likely to be driven by three-body encounters accompanied by a few M⊙ of gas accretion, in high-density environments like dense interstellar clouds or galactic nuclei.

  3. The Impact of Stellar Multiplicity on Planetary Systems. I. The Ruinous Influence of Close Binary Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Adam L.; Ireland, Michael J.; Huber, Daniel; Mann, Andrew W.; Dupuy, Trent J.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamical influence of binary companions is expected to profoundly influence planetary systems. However, the difficulty of identifying planets in binary systems has left the magnitude of this effect uncertain; despite numerous theoretical hurdles to their formation and survival, at least some binary systems clearly host planets. We present high-resolution imaging of 382 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) obtained using adaptive-optics imaging and nonredundant aperture-mask interferometry on the Keck II telescope. Among the full sample of 506 candidate binary companions to KOIs, we super-resolve some binary systems to projected separations of <5 au, showing that planets might form in these dynamically active environments. However, the full distribution of projected separations for our planet-host sample more broadly reveals a deep paucity of binary companions at solar-system scales. For a field binary population, we should have found 58 binary companions with projected separation ρ < 50 au and mass ratio q > 0.4 we instead only found 23 companions (a 4.6σ deficit), many of which must be wider pairs that are only close in projection. When the binary population is parametrized with a semimajor axis cutoff a cut and a suppression factor inside that cutoff S bin, we find with correlated uncertainties that inside {a}{cut}={47}-23+59 au, the planet occurrence rate in binary systems is only {S}{bin}={0.34}-0.15+0.14 times that of wider binaries or single stars. Our results demonstrate that a fifth of all solar-type stars in the Milky Way are disallowed from hosting planetary systems due to the influence of a binary companion.

  4. Active states and structure transformations in accreting white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneva, Daniela; Kaygorodov, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Active states in white dwarfs are usually associated with light curve's effects that concern to the bursts, flickering or flare-up occurrences. It is common that a gas-dynamics source exists for each of these processes there. We consider the white dwarf binary stars with accretion disc around the primary. We suggest a flow transformation modeling of the mechanisms that are responsible for ability to cause some flow instability and bring the white dwarfs system to the outburst's development. The processes that cause the accretion rate to sufficiently increase are discussed. Then the transition from a quiescent to an active state is realized. We analyze a quasi-periodic variability in the luminosity of white dwarf binary stars systems. The results are supported with an observational data.

  5. The binary system containing the classical Cepheid T Mon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Lyons, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    Several new results are presented for the binary system containing the 27(sup d) classical Cepheid T Mon. New radial velocities for the Cepheid have been obtained, which confirm the decreasing orbital motion at the current epoch. The spectral type of the companion (B9.8 V) has been determined from an International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) low resolution spectrum. An IUE high resolution spectrum has been measured to search for the velocity of the companion. A velocity signal at +36 km/s on JD 2,446,105.21 has been tentatively identified as the velocity of the companion, but confirmation of this velocity would be very valuable. Results based on this tentative identification of the velocity are that the companion does not have a high projected rotation velocity, that the companion is unlikely to be a short period binary, and that the gamma velocity of the system is between 20 and 36 km/s. The luminosity and temperature of both the Cepheid and the companion are well determined from the satellite and ground-based observations and the Cepheid PLC relation. However, the companion is above the ZAMS in the H-R diagram, which is inconsistent with the large luminosity difference between the two stars. High rotation for the companion (viewed pole-on) is a possible explanation. The lower limit to the mass function (from the lower limits to the orbital period and amplitude) requires a very high eccentricity for the system for reasonable estimates for the masses of the two stars.

  6. X-Ray and Optical Observations of the Unique Binary System HD 49798/RX J0648.0-4418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, S.; La Palombara, N.; Tiengo, A.; Pizzolato, F.; Esposito, P.; Woudt, P. A.; Israel, G. L.; Stella, L.

    2011-08-01

    We report the results of XMM-Newton observations of HD 49798/RX J0648.0-4418, the only known X-ray binary consisting of a hot sub-dwarf and a white dwarf. The white dwarf rotates very rapidly (P = 13.2 s) and has a dynamically measured mass of 1.28 ± 0.05 M sun. Its X-ray emission consists of a strongly pulsed, soft component, well fit by a blackbody with kT BB ~ 40 eV, accounting for most of the luminosity, and a fainter hard power-law component (photon index ~1.6). A luminosity of ~1032 erg s-1 is produced by accretion onto the white dwarf of the helium-rich matter from the wind of the companion, which is one of the few hot sub-dwarfs showing evidence of mass loss. A search for optical pulsations at the South African Astronomical Observatory 1.9 m telescope gave negative results. X-rays were also detected during the white dwarf eclipse. This emission, with luminosity 2 × 1030 erg s-1, can be attributed to HD 49798 and represents the first detection of a hot sub-dwarf star in the X-ray band. HD 49798/RX J0648.0-4418 is a post-common-envelope binary which most likely originated from a pair of stars with masses ~8-10 M sun. After the current He-burning phase, HD 49798 will expand and reach the Roche lobe, causing a higher accretion rate onto the white dwarf which can reach the Chandrasekhar limit. Considering the fast spin of the white dwarf, this could lead to the formation of a millisecond pulsar. Alternatively, this system could be a Type Ia supernova progenitor with the appealing characteristic of a short time delay, being the descendent of relatively massive stars.

  7. Early accretion of protoplanets inferred from a reduced inner solar system 26Al inventory

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Martin; Connelly, James N.; Glad, Aslaug C.; Mikouchi, Takashi; Bizzarro, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms and timescales of accretion of 10–1000 km sized planetesimals, the building blocks of planets, are not yet well understood. With planetesimal melting predominantly driven by the decay of the short-lived radionuclide 26Al (26Al→26Mg; t1/2 = 0.73 Ma), its initial abundance determines the permissible timeframe of planetesimal-scale melting and its subsequent cooling history. Currently, precise knowledge about the initial 26Al abundance [(26Al/27Al)0] exists only for the oldest known solids, calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) – the so-called canonical value. We have determined the 26Al/27Al of three angrite meteorites, D’Orbigny, Sahara 99555 and NWA 1670, at their time of crystallization, which corresponds to (3.98 ± 0.15)×10−7, (3.64 ± 0.18)×10−7, and (5.92 ± 0.59)×10−7, respectively. Combined with a newly determined absolute U-corrected Pb–Pb age for NWA 1670 of 4564.39 ± 0.24 Ma and published U-corrected Pb–Pb ages for the other two angrites, this allows us to calculate an initial (26Al/27Al)0 of (1.33−0.18+0.21)×10−5 for the angrite parent body (APB) precursor material at the time of CAI formation, a value four times lower than the accepted canonical value of 5.25 × 10−5. Based on their similar 54Cr/52Cr ratios, most inner solar system materials likely accreted from material containing a similar 26Al/27Al ratio as the APB precursor at the time of CAI formation. To satisfy the abundant evidence for widespread planetesimal differentiation, the subcanonical 26Al budget requires that differentiated planetesimals, and hence protoplanets, accreted rapidly within 0.25 ± 0.15 Ma of the formation of canonical CAIs. PMID:27429474

  8. Be/X-Ray Pulsar Binary Science with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in astronomical sources. Accretion powered pulsars are a good test bed for accretion disk physics, because unlike for other objects, the spin of the neutron star is directly observable allowing us to see the effects of angular momentum transfer onto the pulsar. The combination of a sensitive wide-field monitor and the large area detector on LOFT will enable new detailed studies of accretion powered pulsars which I will review. RXTE observations have shown an unusually high number of Be/X-ray pulsar binaries in the SMC. Unlike binaries in the Milky Way, these systems are all at the same distance, allowing detailed population studies using the sensitive LOFT WFM, potentially providing connections to star formation episodes. For Galactic accreting pulsar systems, LOFT will allow measurement of spectral variations within individual pulses, mapping the accretion column in detail for the first time. LOFT will also provide better constraints on magnetic fields in accreting pulsars, allowing measurements of cyclotron features, observations of transitions into the centrifugal inhibition regime, and monitoring of spin-up rate vs flux correlations. Coordinated multi-wavelength observations are crucial to extracting the best science from LOFT from these and numerous other objects.

  9. Despinning and Tidally Driven Tectonics in the Pluto-Charon Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, A. C.; Collins, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    scale shorter than solar system history, Pluto must have an ocean or an extremely high interior temperature post-impact. It seems likely that enough heat would have been deposited in the interior of the Pluto from a combination of tidal, accretional, and radiogenic heat to create an ocean and/or separate ice from rock. A fully differentiated Pluto with an interior ocean and thick ice shell can readily deform in response to tides raised on it by Charon, creating stresses of 350 MPa, sufficient to overcome the yield stress of ice. At the same time, stresses as high as 250 MPa could be induced on Charon as it evolves outward from Pluto. Observations of Pluto and Charon's tectonic features by New Horizons will shed light on the early dynamical and thermal history of the Pluto-Charon system. Our understanding of the evolution of Pluto and Charon can inform future studies of the dynamical evolution of binary planetary systems. This work is supported by NASA OPR NNX12AL22G. References: Canup, R. M. Science v. 307, 546-550 (2005); Canup, R. M. Astron. J. 141, 35 (2011); Dobrovolskis, A. R., S. J. Peale, and A. W. Harris, in Pluto and Charon, J. A. Burns and M. S. Matthews, eds., p. 159-190 (1997).

  10. Viscosity mixing rules for binary systems containing one ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohammed; Altamash, Tausif; Salavera, Daniel; Coronas, Alberto; Rebelo, Luis P N; Canongia Lopes, Jose N

    2013-06-24

    In this work the applicability of four of the most commonly used viscosity mixing rules to [ionic liquid (IL)+molecular solvent (MS)] systems is assessed. More than one hundred (IL+MS) binary mixtures were selected from the literature to test the viscosity mixing rules proposed by 1) Hind (Hi), 2) Grunberg and Nissan (G-N), 3) Herric (He) and 4) Katti and Chaudhri (K-C). The analyses were performed by estimating the average (absolute or relative) deviations, AADs and ARDs, between the available experimental data and the predicted ideal mixture viscosity values obtained by means of each rule. The interaction terms corresponding to the adjustable parameters inherent to each rule were also calculated and their trends discussed.

  11. Binary system of unequal counterrotating Kerr-Newman sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Munguia, I.

    2015-02-01

    Stationary axisymmetric binary systems of unequal counterrotating Kerr-Newman sources with a massless strut in between are studied. By means of the choice of a suitable parametrization, the axis conditions and the absence of individual magnetic charges are fulfilled; thus, the entire metric reduces to a six-parametric asymptotically flat exact solution. Later on, with the purpose to describe interacting black holes, the analytic functional form of the horizon half-length parameter σk is obtained explicitly in terms of physical Komar parameters: mass Mk, electric charge Qk, angular momentum Jk, and coordinate distance R , where the seven physical parameters satisfy a simple algebraic relation. Finally, in the limit of extreme black holes, the full metric is derived in a closed analytical form, and a study on the absence or appearance of naked singularities off the axis is presented.

  12. Five New Low-Mass Eclipsing Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey L.; López-Morales, M.; Shaw, J. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present the discovery of five new low-mass eclipsing binaries with masses between 0.54 and 0.95 M⊙, their photometric light curves, and preliminary models. This is part of a continuing campaign to increase the available data on these interesting systems. Once radial-velocity curves are completed, physical parameters will be determined with an error of less than 2-3%, thus allowing for a rigorous examination of stellar models in the lower-main sequence. Our initial analysis seems to support the current findings that low-mass stars have greater radii than models predict, most likely due to the presence of strong magnetic fields. This work is funded by a partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF AST-0552798) Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) and the Department of Defense (DoD) ASSURE (Awards to Stimulate and Support Undergraduate Research Experiences) programs.

  13. Second derivative in the model of classical binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubekerov, M. K.; Gostev, N. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    We have obtained an analytical expression for the second derivatives of the light curve with respect to geometric parameters in the model of eclipsing classical binary systems. These expressions are essentially efficient algorithm to calculate the numerical values of these second derivatives for all physical values of geometric parameters. Knowledge of the values of second derivatives of the light curve at some point provides additional information about asymptotical behaviour of the function near this point and can significantly improve the search for the best-fitting light curve through the use of second-order optimization method. We write the expression for the second derivatives in a form which is most compact and uniform for all values of the geometric parameters and so make it easy to write a computer program to calculate the values of these derivatives.

  14. Hybridizing Gravitationl Waveforms of Inspiralling Binary Neutron Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, Torrey; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves are ripples in space and time and were predicted to be produced by astrophysical systems such as binary neutron stars by Albert Einstein. These are key targets for Laser Interferometer and Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), which uses template waveforms to find weak signals. The simplified template models are known to break down at high frequency, so I wrote code that constructs hybrid waveforms from numerical simulations to accurately cover a large range of frequencies. These hybrid waveforms use Post Newtonian template models at low frequencies and numerical data from simulations at high frequencies. They are constructed by reading in existing Post Newtonian models with the same masses as simulated stars, reading in the numerical data from simulations, and finding the ideal frequency and alignment to ``stitch'' these waveforms together.

  15. Analytical estimates of secular frequencies for binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazsó, Á.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.

    2017-03-01

    Binary and multiple star systems are extreme environments for the formation and long-term presence of extrasolar planets. Circumstellar planets are subject to gravitational perturbations from the distant companion star, and this interaction leads to a long-period precession of their orbits. We investigate analytical models that allow to quantify these perturbations and calculate the secular precession frequency in the dynamical model of the restricted three-body problem. These models are applied to test cases and we discuss some of their shortcomings. In addition, we introduce a modified Laplace-Lagrange model which allows to obtain better frequency estimates than the traditional model for large eccentricities of the perturber. We then generalize this model to any number of perturbers, and present an application to the four-body problem.

  16. A millisecond pulsar in an extremely wide binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Tauris, T. M.; Wevers, T.; Jonker, P. G.; Lentati, L.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Desvignes, G.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Cognard, I.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K. J.; Liu, K.; Lyne, A. G.; McKee, J.; Osłowski, S.; Perrodin, D.; Sanidas, S.; Shaifullah, G.; Smits, R.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on 22 yr of radio timing observations of the millisecond pulsar J1024-0719 by the telescopes participating in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). These observations reveal a significant second derivative of the pulsar spin frequency and confirm the discrepancy between the parallax and Shklovskii distances that has been reported earlier. We also present optical astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy of 2MASS J10243869-0719190. We find that it is a low-metallicity main-sequence star (K7V spectral type, [M/H] = -1.0, Teff = 4050 ± 50 K) and that its position, proper motion and distance are consistent with those of PSR J1024-0719. We conclude that PSR J1024-0719 and 2MASS J10243869-0719190 form a common proper motion pair and are gravitationally bound. The gravitational interaction between the main-sequence star and the pulsar accounts for the spin frequency derivatives, which in turn resolves the distance discrepancy. Our observations suggest that the pulsar and main-sequence star are in an extremely wide (Pb > 200 yr) orbit. Combining the radial velocity of the companion and proper motion of the pulsar, we find that the binary system has a high spatial velocity of 384 ± 45 km s-1 with respect to the local standard of rest and has a Galactic orbit consistent with halo objects. Since the observed main-sequence companion star cannot have recycled the pulsar to millisecond spin periods, an exotic formation scenario is required. We demonstrate that this extremely wide-orbit binary could have evolved from a triple system that underwent an asymmetric supernova explosion, though find that significant fine-tuning during the explosion is required. Finally, we discuss the implications of the long period orbit on the timing stability of PSR J1024-0719 in light of its inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.

  17. Modeling mergers of known galactic systems of binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feo, Alessandra; De Pietri, Roberto; Maione, Francesco; Löffler, Frank

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of the merger of six different known galactic systems of binary neutron stars (BNS) of unequal mass with a mass ratio between 0.75 and 0.99. Specifically, these systems are J1756-2251, J0737-3039A, J1906  +  0746, B1534  +  12, J0453  +  1559 and B1913  +  16. We follow the dynamics of the merger from the late stage of the inspiral process up to  ∼20ms after the system has merged, either to form a hyper-massive neutron star (NS) or a rotating black hole (BH), using a semi-realistic equation of state (EOS), namely the seven-segment piece-wise polytropic SLy with a thermal component. For the most extreme of these systems (q  =  0.75, J0453  +  1559), we also investigate the effects of different EOSs: APR4, H4, and MS1. Our numerical simulations are performed using only publicly available open source code such as, the Einstein toolkit code deployed for the dynamical evolution and the LORENE code for the generation of the initial models. We show results on the gravitational wave signals, spectrogram and frequencies of the BNS after the merger and the BH properties in the two cases in which the system collapses within the simulated time.

  18. Dynamical Study of the Exoplanet Host Binary System HD 106515

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rica, F. M.; Barrena, R.; Henríquez, J. A.; Pérez, F. M.; Vargas, P.

    2017-01-01

    HD 106515 AB (STF1619 AB) is a high common proper motion and common radial velocity binary star system composed of two G-type bright stars located at 35 pc and separated by about 7 arcsec. This system was observed by the Hipparcos satellite with a precision in distance and proper motion of 3 and 2%, respectively. The system includes a circumprimary planet of nearly 10 Jupiter masses and a semimajor axis of 4.59 AU, discovered using the radial velocity method. The observational arc of 21° shows a small curvature that evidences HD 106515 AB is a gravitationally bound system. This work determines the dynamical parameters for this system which reinforce the bound status of both stellar components. We determine orbital solutions from instantaneous position and velocity vectors. In addition, we provide a very preliminary orbital solution and a distribution of the orbital parameters, obtained from the line of sight (z). Our results show that HD 106515 AB presents an orbital period of about 4 800 years, a semimajor axis of 345 AU and an eccentricity of about 0.42. Finally, we use an N-body numerical code to perform simulations and reproduce the longer term octupole perturbations on the inner orbit.

  19. Magnetospheric accretion in EX Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Peter; Kospal, Agnes; Bouvier, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    We propose to observe EX Lup, the prototype of the EXor class of young eruptive stars, in order to understand how the accretion process works in the quiescent system. Here, we request 2.6 hours of telescope time on Spitzer, to carry out a mid-infrared photometric monitoring, which we will supplement with simultaneous ground-based optical and near-infrared data. The multi-wavelength light curves will allow us to reliably separate the effects of fluctuating accretion rate from the rotation of the star. By analyzing the variations of the accretion rate we will determine whether EX Lup accretes through a few stable accretion columns or several short-lived random accretion streams. With this campaign, EX Lup will become one of the T Tauri systems where the accretion process is best understood.

  20. Self-organization in a system of binary strings with spatial interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzhaf, W.; Dittrich, P.; Eller, B.

    1999-01-01

    We consider an artificial reaction system whose components are binary strings. Upon encounter, two binary strings produce a third string which competes for storage space with the originators. String types or species can only survive when produced in sufficient numbers. Spatial interactions through introduction of a topology and rules for distance-dependent reactions are discussed. We observe various kinds of survival strategies of binary strings.

  1. Satellite capture mechanism in a sun-planet-binary four-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shengping; Li, Miao

    2017-02-01

    This paper studies the binary disruption problem and asteroid capture mechanism in a sun-planet-binary four-body system. Firstly, the binary disruption condition is studied and the result shows that the binary is always disrupted at the perigee of their orbit instantaneously. Secondly, an analytic expression to describe the energy exchange between the binary is derived based on the `instantaneous disruption' hypothesis. The analytic result is validated through numerical integration. We obtain the energy exchange in encounters simultaneously by the analytic expression and numerical integration. The maximum deviation of these two results is always less than 25 % and the mean deviation is about 8.69 %. The analytic expression can give us an intuitive description of the energy exchange between the binary. It indicates that the energy change depends on the hyperbolic shape of the binary orbit with respect to the planet, the masses of planet and the primary member of the binary, the binary phase at perigee. We can illustrate the capture/escape processes and give the capture/escape region of the binary clearly by numerical simulation. We analyze the influence of some critical factors to the capture region finally.

  2. Modelling of Be Disks in Binary Systems Using the Hydrodynamic Code PLUTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, I. H.; Panoglou, D.; Jones, C. E.; Carciofi, A. C.

    2016-11-01

    The study of the gas structure and dynamics of Be star disks is critical to our understanding of the Be star phenomenon. The central star is the major force driving the evolution of these disks, however other external forces may also affect the formation of the disk, for example, the gravitational torque produced in a close binary system. We are interested in understanding the gravitational effects of a low-mass binary companion on the formation and growth of a disk in a close binary system. To study these effects, we used the grid-based hydrodynamic code PLUTO. Because this code has not been used to study such systems before, we compared our simulations against codes used in previous work on binary systems. We were able to simulate the formation of a disk in both an isolated and binary system. Our current results suggest that PLUTO is in fact a well suited tool to study the dynamics of Be disks.

  3. Influence of rotation on BN separation in binary particle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Wang, Shuang; Xie, Ziang; Huang, Yuming; Tong, Lige; Zhang, Peikun; Yin, Shaowu; Liu, Chuanping; Wang, Li

    2013-06-01

    Granular particles systems under vertical vibration exhibit Brazilian Nut separation (BN), Reversed BN (RBN) separation or transitional phases at different vibrating conditions. In the present work, we investigate the influence of rotation on the BN separation of a binary granular particle system by changing rotational speed. 13X molecular sieve particles with diameter 6.00 mm and 0.60 mm are used. Vibration frequency f is 30 Hz and dimensionless acceleration Γ is 1.52 or 1.75, in which the particle system mainly exhibits BN separation tendency. Rotational speed ω varies from 0 to 150rpm, while the upper surface of the particle system maintains flat. We took the pictures of the particles distribution and measured the particles mass layer by layer to obtain the 3-D distribution of the particles. The results show that rotation enhances the BN separation tendency at slow rotational speed. The BN separation becomes strongest when ω is approximately 50rpm, then the BN separation tendency reduces as ω continues to increase. A butterfly pattern appears in the middle particles layer under the simultaneous stimulations of vibration and rotation.

  4. Optical Studies of model binary miscibility gap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Witherow, W. K.; Facemire, B. R.; Nishioka, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    In order to develop a better understanding of separation processes in binary miscibility gap metal alloys, model transparent fluid systems were studied. The system selected was diethylene glycol-ethyl salicylate which has convenient working temperatures (288 to 350 K), low toxicity, and is relatively easy to purify. The system is well characterized with respect to its phase diagram, density, surface and interfacial tensions, viscosity and other pertinent physical properties. Studies of migration of the dispersed phase in a thermal gradient were performed using conventional photomicroscopy. Velocities of the droplets of the dispersed phase were measured and compared to calculated rates which included both Stokes and thermal components. A holographic microscopy system was used to study growth, coalescence, and particle motions. Sequential holograms allowed determination of particle size distribution changes with respect to time and temperature. Holographic microscopy is capable of recording particle densities up to 10 to the 7th power particles/cu cm and is able to resolve particles of the order of 2 to 3 microns in diameter throughout the entire volume of the test cell. The reconstructed hologram produces a wavefront that is identical to the original wavefront as it existed when the hologram was made. The reconstructed wavefront is analyzed using a variety of conventional optical methods.

  5. Orbital Parameters for Two Young Spectroscopic Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnath, Nicole; Prato, L. A.; Wasserman, L. H.; Torres, G.; Mathieu, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    Orbital parameters for two young, low-mass, pre-main sequence binary systems are described. Originally, VSB 111 and VSB 126 had parameters reported based on single-lined spectroscopic solutions. High-resolution, infrared spectra were obtained with the Keck II telescope on Mauna Kea and used to identify the lines of the secondary stars, yielding double-lined orbital solutions that include the systems' mass ratios. VSB 126 has a period of 12.9247±0.0001 days, an eccentricity of 0.184±0.015, and a mass ratio of 0.27±0.01. VSB 111 has a period of 901.3062±1.1792 days, an eccentricity of 0.791±0.008, and a mass ratio of 0.60±0.06. The two systems are located in the ~3 Myr old star forming region NGC 2264, at a distance of ~800 pc. We compare the cluster age and dynamical properties of the stars in these systems with the masses and ages predicted by models of pre-main sequence evolution. Partial support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1009136 (to LP).

  6. Modelling the cross-spectral variability of the black hole binary MAXI J1659-152 with propagating accretion rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapisarda, S.; Ingram, A.; Kalamkar, M.; van der Klis, M.

    2016-11-01

    The power spectrum of the X-ray fluctuations of accreting black holes often consists of two broad humps. We quantitatively investigate the hypothesis that the lower frequency hump originates from variability in a truncated thin accretion disc, propagating into a large scaleheight inner hot flow which, in turn, itself is the origin of the higher frequency hump. We extend the propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations model PROPFLUC to accommodate double-hump power spectra in this way. Furthermore, we extend the model to predict the cross-spectrum between two energy bands in addition to their power spectra, allowing us to constrain the model using the observed time lags, which in the model result from both propagation of fluctuations from the disc to the hot flow, and inside the hot flow. We jointly fit soft and hard power spectrum, and the cross-spectrum between the two bands using this model for five Swift X-ray Telescope observations of MAXI J1659-152. The new double-hump model provides a better fit to the data than the old single-hump model for most of our observations. The data show only a small phase lag associated with the low-frequency hump. We demonstrate quantitatively that this is consistent with the model. We compare the truncation radius measured from our fits with that measured purely by spectral fitting and find agreement within a factor of two. This analysis encompasses the first joint fits of stellar-mass black hole cross-spectra and power spectra with a single self-consistent physical model.

  7. Orbital coplanarity in solar-type binary systems: Implications for planetary system formation and detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Alan

    1994-01-01

    The equatorial inclinations of solar-type stars within visual binary systems are computed by combining v sin i measurements with rotational period information, or with expected rotational velocities based upon the age of the star in question. These inclinations are then compared with the orbital inclinations of the systems to test the alignment between the equatorial and orbital planes, and how the tendency for or against coplanarity varies as a function of parameters such as spectral type, separation, eccentricity, etc. The results are extended to planetary systems in order to determine the appropriateness of basing planetary search strategies upon a parent star's equatorial inclination, and to address issues in planetary system formation and evolution, including the stability of planetary orbits within binary systems. During the course of this project new or improved v sin i measurements are made for over 30 solar-type stars within binary systems, and (for the purposes of the study) tentative orbits are computed for thirteen long-period systems. The results suggest that approximate coplanarity between the equatorial and orbital planes exists solar-type binary systems with separations less than 30-40 AU. The coplanarity tendency, as well as this 'critical separation,' is not significantly affected by most of the other parameters studied. The one significant exception occurs with hierarchical multiple systems, where noncoplanarity may exist at relatively small separations. If it is assumed that planetary distances in our solar system are typical, the results suggest there is no reason to expect planets to orbit in planes significantly different from that of the parent star's equator, in turn suggesting that planetary formation models and search strategies dependent upon this assumption are valid from this standpoint. The results also suggest that noncoplanarity between the components of a binary system is not a significant issue in addressing the stability of

  8. COULD SXP 1062 BE AN ACCRETING MAGNETAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Lei; Li Xiangdong

    2012-10-01

    In this work we explore the possible evolutionary track of the neutron star in the newly discovered Be/X-ray binary SXP 1062, which is believed to be the first X-ray pulsar associated with a supernova remnant. Although no cyclotron feature has been detected to indicate the strength of the neutron star's magnetic field, we show that it may be {approx}> 10{sup 14} G. If so, SXP 1062 may belong to the accreting magnetars in binary systems. We attempt to reconcile the short age and long spin period of the pulsar taking account of different initial parameters and spin-down mechanisms of the neutron star. Our calculated results show that to spin down to a period {approx}1000 s within 10-40 kyr requires efficient propeller mechanisms. In particular, the model for angular momentum loss under energy conservation seems to be ruled out.

  9. Could SXP 1062 be an Accreting Magnetar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lei; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2012-10-01

    In this work we explore the possible evolutionary track of the neutron star in the newly discovered Be/X-ray binary SXP 1062, which is believed to be the first X-ray pulsar associated with a supernova remnant. Although no cyclotron feature has been detected to indicate the strength of the neutron star's magnetic field, we show that it may be >~ 1014 G. If so, SXP 1062 may belong to the accreting magnetars in binary systems. We attempt to reconcile the short age and long spin period of the pulsar taking account of different initial parameters and spin-down mechanisms of the neutron star. Our calculated results show that to spin down to a period ~1000 s within 10-40 kyr requires efficient propeller mechanisms. In particular, the model for angular momentum loss under energy conservation seems to be ruled out.

  10. Third post-Newtonian gravitational waveforms for compact binary systems in general orbits: Instantaneous terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Chandra Kant; Arun, K. G.; Iyer, Bala R.

    2015-04-01

    We compute the instantaneous contributions to the spherical harmonic modes of gravitational waveforms from compact binary systems in general orbits up to the third post-Newtonian (PN) order. We further extend these results for compact binaries in quasielliptical orbits using the 3PN quasi-Keplerian representation of the conserved dynamics of compact binaries in eccentric orbits. Using the multipolar post-Minkowskian formalism, starting from the different mass and current-type multipole moments, we compute the spin-weighted spherical harmonic decomposition of the instantaneous part of the gravitational waveform. These are terms which are functions of the retarded time and do not depend on the history of the binary evolution. Together with the hereditary part, which depends on the binary's dynamical history, these waveforms form the basis for construction of accurate templates for the detection of gravitational wave signals from binaries moving in quasielliptical orbits.

  11. EARTH, MOON, SUN, AND CV ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M. M.

    2009-11-01

    Net tidal torque by the secondary on a misaligned accretion disk, like the net tidal torque by the Moon and the Sun on the equatorial bulge of the spinning and tilted Earth, is suggested by others to be a source to retrograde precession in non-magnetic, accreting cataclysmic variable (CV) dwarf novae (DN) systems that show negative superhumps in their light curves. We investigate this idea in this work. We generate a generic theoretical expression for retrograde precession in spinning disks that are misaligned with the orbital plane. Our generic theoretical expression matches that which describes the retrograde precession of Earths' equinoxes. By making appropriate assumptions, we reduce our generic theoretical expression to those generated by others, or to those used by others, to describe retrograde precession in protostellar, protoplanetary, X-ray binary, non-magnetic CV DN, quasar, and black hole systems. We find that spinning, tilted CV DN systems cannot be described by a precessing ring or by a precessing rigid disk. We find that differential rotation and effects on the disk by the accretion stream must be addressed. Our analysis indicates that the best description of a retrogradely precessing spinning, tilted, CV DN accretion disk is a differentially rotating, tilted disk with an attached rotating, tilted ring located near the innermost disk annuli. In agreement with the observations and numerical simulations by others, we find that our numerically simulated CV DN accretion disks retrogradely precess as a unit. Our final, reduced expression for retrograde precession agrees well with our numerical simulation results and with selective observational systems that seem to have main-sequence secondaries. Our results suggest that a major source to retrograde precession is tidal torques like that by the Moon and the Sun on the Earth. In addition, these tidal torques should be common to a variety of systems where one member is spinning and tilted, regardless if

  12. Phase equilibria in the neodymium–cadmium binary system

    PubMed Central

    Skołyszewska-Kühberger, Barbara; Reichmann, Thomas L.; Ipser, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The equilibrium phase diagram of the neodymium–cadmium system has been established by thermal, metallographic and X-ray analysis based on a study of 70 alloys. The system contains three congruently melting intermetallic compounds, i.e. NdCd (1040 °C), NdCd2 (995 °C), Nd11Cd45 (855 °C), and four incongruently melting compounds NdCd3 (860 °C), Nd13Cd58 (740 °C), NdCd6 (655 °C) and NdCd11 (520 °C). Four eutectic reactions are found in this binary system, i.e. at ∼25 at.% Cd and 770 °C, at 58 at.% Cd and 955 °C, at 79 at.% Cd and 850 °C, and very close to pure Cd at 318 °C, as well as one eutectoid reaction at ∼15 at.% Cd and 500 °C. The solid solubility of Nd in Cd is negligible. Dilatometric curves were recorded for three Nd–Cd compositions up to 4 at.% Cd, to accurately determine phase transitions between the solid solutions of Cd in the low- and high-temperature modification of Nd. PMID:25197164

  13. Phase equilibria in the neodymium-cadmium binary system.

    PubMed

    Skołyszewska-Kühberger, Barbara; Reichmann, Thomas L; Ipser, Herbert

    2014-09-05

    The equilibrium phase diagram of the neodymium-cadmium system has been established by thermal, metallographic and X-ray analysis based on a study of 70 alloys. The system contains three congruently melting intermetallic compounds, i.e. NdCd (1040 °C), NdCd2 (995 °C), Nd11Cd45 (855 °C), and four incongruently melting compounds NdCd3 (860 °C), Nd13Cd58 (740 °C), NdCd6 (655 °C) and NdCd11 (520 °C). Four eutectic reactions are found in this binary system, i.e. at ∼25 at.% Cd and 770 °C, at 58 at.% Cd and 955 °C, at 79 at.% Cd and 850 °C, and very close to pure Cd at 318 °C, as well as one eutectoid reaction at ∼15 at.% Cd and 500 °C. The solid solubility of Nd in Cd is negligible. Dilatometric curves were recorded for three Nd-Cd compositions up to 4 at.% Cd, to accurately determine phase transitions between the solid solutions of Cd in the low- and high-temperature modification of Nd.

  14. Creation of an anti-imaging system using binary optics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haifeng; Lin, Jian; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Yang; Gu, Min; Urbach, H. P.; Gan, Fuxi; Zhuang, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    We present a concealing method in which an anti-point spread function (APSF) is generated using binary optics, which produces a large-scale dark area in the focal region that can hide any object located within it. This result is achieved by generating two identical PSFs of opposite signs, one consisting of positive electromagnetic waves from the zero-phase region of the binary optical element and the other consisting of negative electromagnetic waves from the pi-phase region of the binary optical element. PMID:27620068

  15. Hunting the Huntsmen: Compact Pulsar Binaries with Giant Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swihart, Samuel; Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Sand, David J.; Cheung, Chi C.; Johnson, Tyrel J.

    2017-01-01

    Our group has been pursuing follow-up observations of unassociated Fermi-LAT γ-ray sources in an effort to identify new Milky Way compact binaries. Some of our recent observations include the preliminary discovery of a long-period (~8.1d), γ-ray bright binary with a heavy (~1.9 M) neutron star (NS) primary and giant secondary (~0.5 M) that shows some unusual variability characteristics in multiple wavelengths. Evolutionary models of compact binaries indicate that this system is likely in the late phases of typical millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary formation in the Galactic field, phases which up until now have been unobserved. This system also appears remarkably similar to the recently discovered NS binary 1FGL J1417.7-4407 (Strader et al. 2015), which showed optical, X-ray, and γ-ray signatures consistent with transitional MSPs in their disk state. Despite this evidence, 1FGL J1417.7-4407 was simultaneously found to host a radio MSP, implying accreting material is not reaching the pulsar surface and further bringing into question how and when these systems switch on or off as radio MSPs. The confirmation of a second long-period γ-ray bright binary system with a massive NS primary and giant secondary would show that the rich phenomenology that can be observed when an accretion disk is present remains unclear, and facilitates a discussion on whether such systems constitute a distinct class of compact binaries.

  16. Binary random systematic erasure code for RAID system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Pengguo; Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Liang; Yuan, Dezhai

    2017-03-01

    As the increasing expansion of data scale, storage systems grow in size and complexity, the requirements for systems scalability and methodologies to recover simultaneous disk and sector failures are inevitable. To ensure high reliability and flexible scalability, erasure codes with high fault tolerance and flexibility are required. In this pa per, we present a class of erasure codes satisfied the previous requirements, which referred as Binary Random Systematic erasure code, called BRS code for short. BRS code constructs its generator matrix based on random matrix, whose elements are in Galois Field GF (2), and takes the advantage of exclusive-or (XOR) operations to make it work much fast. It is designed as a systematic code to facilitate the store and recovery. Moreover, δ random redundancies make the probability of successfully decoding controllable. Our evaluations and experiments show that BRS code is flexible on parameters and fault tolerance setting, and has high computing efficiency on encoding and decoding speeds, what is more, when the code length is long enough, BRS code is approximately MDS, thus make it have nearly optimal storage efficiency.

  17. Evolution of the symbiotic binary system AG Dranconis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikolajewska, Joanna; Kenyon, Scott J; Mikolajewski, Maciej; Garcia, Michael R.; Polidan, Ronald S.

    1995-01-01

    We present an analysis of new and archival photometric and spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic star AG Draconis. This binary has undergone several 1 - 3 mag optical and ultraviolet eruptions during the past 15 years. Our combination of optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data allow a more complete analysis of this system than in previous papers. AG Dra is composed of a K-type bright giant M(sub g) approximately 1.5 solar mass) and a hot, compact star M(sub h approximatelly 0.4 - 0.6 solar mass) embedded in a dense, low metallicity nebula. The hot component undergoes occasional thermonuclear runaways that produce 2 - 3 mag optical/ultraviolet eruptions. During these eruptions, the hot component develops a low velocity wind that quenches x-ray emission from the underlying hot white dwarf. The photoionized nebula changes its volume by a factor of 5 throughout an eruptin cycle. The K bright giant occults low ionization emission lines during superior conjunctions at all outburst phases but does not occult high ionization lines in outburst (and perhaps quiescence). This geometry and the component masses suggest a system inclination of i approximately 30 deg - 45 deg.

  18. SUZAKU AND BeppoSAX X-RAY SPECTRA OF THE PERSISTENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON-STAR BINARY 4U 1705-44

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Dacheng; Remillard, Ronald A.; Homan, Jeroen

    2010-08-20

    We present an analysis of the broadband spectra of 4U 1705-44 obtained with Suzaku in 2006-2008 and by BeppoSAX in 2000. The source exhibits two distinct states: the hard state shows emission from 1 to 150 keV, while the soft state is mostly confined to be <40 keV. We model soft-state continuum spectra with two thermal components, one of which is a multicolor accretion disk and the other is a single-temperature blackbody (BB) to describe the boundary layer, with additional weak Comptonization represented by either a simple power law or the SIMPL model by Steiner et al. The hard-state continuum spectra are modeled by a single-temperature BB for the boundary layer plus strong Comptonization, modeled by a cutoff power law. While we are unable to draw firm conclusions about the physical properties of the disk in the hard state, the accretion disk in the soft state appears to approximately follow L {proportional_to} T {sup 3.2}. The deviation from L {proportional_to} T{sup 4}, as expected from a constant inner disk radius, might be caused by a luminosity-dependent spectral hardening factor and/or real changes of the inner disk radius in some part of the soft state. The boundary layer apparent emission area is roughly constant from the hard to the soft states, with a value of about 1/11 of the neutron star surface. The magnetic field on the surface of the neutron star in 4U 1705-44 is estimated to be less than about 1.9 x 10{sup 8} G, assuming that the disk is truncated by the innermost stable circular orbit or by the neutron star surface. Broad relativistic Fe lines are detected in most spectra and are modeled with the diskline model. The strength of the Fe lines is found to correlate well with the boundary layer emission in the soft state. In the hard state, the Fe lines are probably due to illumination of the accretion disk by the strong Comptonization emission.

  19. Life and light: exotic photosynthesis in binary and multiple-star systems.

    PubMed

    O'Malley-James, J T; Raven, J A; Cockell, C S; Greaves, J S

    2012-02-01

    The potential for Earth-like planets within binary/multiple-star systems to host photosynthetic life was evaluated by modeling the levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) such planets receive. Combinations of M and G stars in (i) close-binary systems; (ii) wide-binary systems, and (iii) three-star systems were investigated, and a range of stable radiation environments were found to be possible. These environmental conditions allow for the possibility of familiar, but also more exotic, forms of photosynthetic life, such as IR photosynthesizers and organisms that are specialized for specific spectral niches.

  20. MILLIONS OF MULTIPLES: DETECTING AND CHARACTERIZING CLOSE-SEPARATION BINARY SYSTEMS IN SYNOPTIC SKY SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Terziev, Emil; Law, Nicholas M.; Arcavi, Iair; Baranec, Christoph; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Riddle, Reed; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Chorida, Pravin; Das, H. K.; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Kraus, Adam L.; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran O.; Sullivan, Mark

    2013-06-01

    The direct detection of binary systems in wide-field surveys is limited by the size of the stars' point-spread functions (PSFs). A search for elongated objects can find closer companions, but is limited by the precision to which the PSF shape can be calibrated for individual stars. Based on a technique from weak-lensing analysis, we have developed the BinaryFinder algorithm to search for close binaries by using precision measurements of PSF ellipticity across wide-field survey images. We show that the algorithm is capable of reliably detecting binary systems down to Almost-Equal-To 1/5 of the seeing limit, and can directly measure the systems' position angles, separations, and contrast ratios. To verify the algorithm's performance we evaluated 100,000 objects in Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) wide-field-survey data for signs of binarity, and then used the Robo-AO robotic laser adaptive optics system to verify the parameters of 44 high-confidence targets. We show that BinaryFinder correctly predicts the presence of close companions with a <11% false-positive rate, measures the detected binaries' position angles within 1 Degree-Sign to 4 Degree-Sign (depending on signal-to-noise ratio and separation), and separations within 25%, and weakly constrains their contrast ratios. When applied to the full PTF data set, we estimate that BinaryFinder will discover and characterize {approx}450,000 physically associated binary systems with separations <2 arcsec and magnitudes brighter than m{sub R} = 18. New wide-field synoptic surveys with high sensitivity and sub-arcsecond angular resolution, such as LSST, will allow BinaryFinder to reliably detect millions of very faint binary systems with separations as small as 0.1 arcsec.

  1. Millions of Multiples: Detecting and Characterizing Close-separation Binary Systems in Synoptic Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terziev, Emil; Law, Nicholas M.; Arcavi, Iair; Baranec, Christoph; Bloom, Joshua S.; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P.; Chorida, Pravin; Das, H. K.; Dekany, Richard G.; Kraus, Adam L.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran O.; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Riddle, Reed; Sullivan, Mark; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.

    2013-06-01

    The direct detection of binary systems in wide-field surveys is limited by the size of the stars' point-spread functions (PSFs). A search for elongated objects can find closer companions, but is limited by the precision to which the PSF shape can be calibrated for individual stars. Based on a technique from weak-lensing analysis, we have developed the BinaryFinder algorithm to search for close binaries by using precision measurements of PSF ellipticity across wide-field survey images. We show that the algorithm is capable of reliably detecting binary systems down to ≈1/5 of the seeing limit, and can directly measure the systems' position angles, separations, and contrast ratios. To verify the algorithm's performance we evaluated 100,000 objects in Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) wide-field-survey data for signs of binarity, and then used the Robo-AO robotic laser adaptive optics system to verify the parameters of 44 high-confidence targets. We show that BinaryFinder correctly predicts the presence of close companions with a <11% false-positive rate, measures the detected binaries' position angles within 1° to 4° (depending on signal-to-noise ratio and separation), and separations within 25%, and weakly constrains their contrast ratios. When applied to the full PTF data set, we estimate that BinaryFinder will discover and characterize ~450,000 physically associated binary systems with separations <2 arcsec and magnitudes brighter than mR = 18. New wide-field synoptic surveys with high sensitivity and sub-arcsecond angular resolution, such as LSST, will allow BinaryFinder to reliably detect millions of very faint binary systems with separations as small as 0.1 arcsec.

  2. Indoor Astronomy: A Model Eclipsing Binary Star System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomer, Raymond H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a two-hour physics laboratory experiment modeling the phenomena of eclipsing binary stars developed by the Air Force Academy as part of a week-long laboratory-oriented experience for visiting high school students. (BT)

  3. Accreting white dwarf models for type 1 supernovae. 1: Presupernova evolution and triggering mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.

    1981-01-01

    As a plausible explosion model for a Type I supernova, the evolution of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs accreting helium in binary systems was investigated from the onset of accretion up to the point at which a thermonuclear explosion occurs. The relationship between the conditions in the binary system and the triggering mechanism for the supernova explosion is discussed, especially for the cases with relatively slow accretion rate. It is found that the growth of a helium zone on the carbon-oxygen core leads to a supernova explosion which is triggered either by the off-center helium detonation for slow and intermediate accretion rates or by the carbon deflagration for slow and rapid accretion rates. Both helium detonation and carbon deflagration are possible for the case of slow accretion, since in this case the initial mass of the white dwarf is an important parameter for determining the mode of ignition. Finally, various modes of building up the helium zone on the white dwarf, namely, direct transfer of helium from the companion star and the various types and strength of the hydrogen shell flashes are discussed in some detail.

  4. The dynamical importance of binary systems in young massive star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Li, Chengyuan; Geller, Aaron M.

    2017-03-01

    Characterization of the binary fractions in star clusters is of fundamental importance for many fields in astrophysics. Observations indicate that the majority of stars are found in binary systems, while most stars with masses greater than 0.5M ⊙ are formed in star clusters. In addition, since binaries are on average more massive than single stars, in resolved star clusters these systems are thought to be good tracers of (dynamical) mass segregation. Over time, dynamical evolution through two-body relaxation will cause the most massive objects to migrate to the cluster center, while the relatively lower-mass objects remain in or migrate to orbits at greater radii. This process will globally dominate a cluster's stellar distribution. However, close encounters involving binary systems may disrupt `soft' binaries. This process will occur more frequently in a cluster's central, dense region than in its periphery, which may mask the effects of mass segregation. Using high resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations, combined with sophisticated N-body simulations, we investigate the radial distributions of the main-sequence binary fractions in massive young Large Magellanic Cloud star clusters. We show that binary disruption may play an important role on very short timescales, depending on the environmental conditions in the cluster cores. This may lead to radial binary fractions that initially decline in the cluster centers, which is contrary to the effects expected from dynamical mass segregation.

  5. Magnetised winds in single and binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Colin

    2016-07-01

    Stellar winds are fundamentally important for the stellar magnetic activity evolution and for the immediate environment surrounding their host stars. Ionised winds travel at hundreds of km/s, impacting planets and clearing out large regions around the stars called astropheres. Winds influence planets in many ways: for example, by compressing the magnetosphere and picking up atmospheric particles, they can cause significant erosion of a planetary atmosphere. By removing angular momentum, winds cause the rotation rates of stars to decrease as they age. This causes the star's magnetic dynamo to decay, leading to a significant decay in the star's levels of X-ray and extreme ultraviolet emission. Despite their importance, little is currently known about the winds of other Sun-like stars. Their small mass fluxes have meant that no direct detections have so far been possible. What is currently known has either been learned indirectly or through analogies with the solar wind. In this talk, I will review what is known about the properties and evolution of the winds of other Sun-like stars. I will also review wind dynamics in binary star systems, where the winds from both stars impact each other, leading to shocks and compression regions.

  6. DISCOVERY OF A BINARY SYSTEM IN IRAM 04191+1522

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou

    2012-03-10

    We present high angular resolution observations of the Class 0 protostar IRAM 04191+1522 using the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA 1.3 mm continuum images reveal within IRAM 04191+1522 two distinct sources with an angular separation of 7.''8 {+-} 0.''2. The two continuum sources are located in the southeast-northwest direction, with total gas masses of {approx}0.011 M{sub Sun} and {approx}0.005 M{sub Sun }, respectively. The southeastern source, associated with an infrared source seen in the Spitzer images, is the well-known Class 0 protostar with a bolometric luminosity of {approx}0.08 L{sub Sun }. The newly discovered northwestern continuum source is not visible in the Spitzer images at wavelengths from 3.6 to 70 {mu}m and has an extremely low bolometric luminosity (<0.03 L{sub Sun }). Complementary IRAM N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) data that probe the dense gas in the common envelope suggest that the two sources were formed through the rotational fragmentation of an elongated dense core. Furthermore, comparisons between IRAM 04191+1522 and other protostars suggest that most cores with binary systems formed therein have ratios of rotational energy to gravitational energy {beta}{sub rot} > 1%. This is consistent with theoretical simulations and indicates that the level of rotational energy in a dense core plays an important role in the fragmentation process.

  7. The shortest period detached binary white dwarf system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, S. J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Andrews, J.; Kleinman, S. J.; Winget, K. I.; Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    We identify SDSS J010657.39-100003.3 (hereafter J0106-1000) as the shortest period detached binary white dwarf (WD) system currently known. We targeted J0106-1000 as part of our radial velocity programme to search for companions around known extremely low-mass (ELM; ˜0.2 M⊙) WDs using the 6.5-m Multiple Mirror Telescope. We detect peak-to-peak radial velocity variations of 740 km s-1 with an orbital period of 39.1 min. The mass function and optical photometry rule out a main-sequence star companion. Follow-up high-speed photometric observations obtained at the McDonald 2.1-m telescope reveal ellipsoidal variations from the distorted primary but no eclipses. This is the first example of a tidally distorted WD. Modelling the light curve, we constrain the inclination angle of the system to be 67°± 13°. J0106-1000 contains a pair of WDs (0.17 M⊙ primary + 0.43 M⊙ invisible secondary) at a separation of 0.32 R⊙. The two WDs will merge in 37 Myr and most likely form a core He-burning single subdwarf star. J0106-1000 is the shortest time-scale merger system currently known. The gravitational wave strain from J0106-1000 is at the detection limit of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). However, accurate ephemeris and orbital period measurements may enable LISA to detect J0106-1000 above the Galactic background noise. Based on observations obtained at the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  8. Doubled-lined eclipsing binary system KIC~2306740 with pulsating component discovered from Kepler space photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, Kadri

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed study of KIC 2306740, an eccentric double-lined eclipsing binary system with a pulsating component.Archive Kepler satellite data were combined with newly obtained spectroscopic data with 4.2\\,m William Herschel Telescope(WHT). This allowed us to determine rather precise orbital and physical parameters of this long period, slightly eccentric, pulsating binary system. Duplicity effects are extracted from the light curve in order to estimate pulsation frequencies from the residuals.We modelled the detached binary system assuming non-conservative evolution models with the Cambridge STARS(TWIN) code.

  9. The Effects of Common Envelope and Tidal Evolution On the Properties of X-ray Binaries, CVs and SN Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Maxwell C.; Di Stefano, R.

    2011-09-01

    Population synthesis studies provide an excellent testbed for determining the consequences and significance of certain binary processes that lead to accretion onto a compact object. We investigated the recent observational constraints of the common envelope (CE) efficiency parameter with particular regard to the dependence on the mass ratio of the binary. In our population synthesis calculations, we also implemented binary tidal interactions prior to Roche lobe overflow, such as tidal capture of and spin up by the companion, synchronization, and enhanced equatorial mass loss of the giant that can significantly alter the evolution of the system. Finally, we analyzed these binary interactions in the context of nuclear burning on white dwarfs, accreting X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, progenitors of Type Ia supernovae, and other high energy binary phenomena.

  10. Cancer-specific binary expression system activated in mice by bacteriophage HK022 Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Amer; Spector, Itay; Sogolovsky-Bard, Ilana; Gritsenko, Natalia; Rask, Lene; Mainbakh, Yuli; Zilberstein, Yael; Yagil, Ezra; Kolot, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems based on site-specific recombination have been used for tumor specific transcription targeting of suicide genes in animal models. In these binary systems a site specific recombinase or integrase that is expressed from a tumor specific promoter drives tumor specific expression of a cytotoxic gene. In the present study we developed a new cancer specific binary expression system activated by the Integrase (Int) of the lambdoid phage HK022. We demonstrate the validity of this system by the specific expression of a luciferase (luc) reporter in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells and in a lung cancer mouse model. Due to the absence viral vectors and of cytotoxicity the Int based binary system offers advantages over previously described counterparts and may therefore be developed into a safer cancer cell killing system. PMID:27117628

  11. Investigating Exoplanet Orbital Evolution Around Binary Star Systems with Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahoma, Walid A.

    2016-12-01

    A planet revolving around binary star system is a familiar system. Studies of these systems are important because they provide precise knowledge of planet formation and orbit evolution. In this study, a method to determine the evolution of an exoplanet revolving around a binary star system using different rates of stellar mass loss will be introduced. Using a hierarchical triple body system, in which the outer body can be moved with the center of mass of the inner binary star as a two-body problem, the long period evolution of the exoplanet orbit is determined depending on a Hamiltonian formulation. The model is simulated by numerical integrations of the Hamiltonian equations for the system over a long time. As a conclusion, the behavior of the planet orbital elements is quite affected by the rate of the mass loss from the accompanying binary star.

  12. SIM Lite Detection of Habitable Planets in P-Type Binary-Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Xiaopei; Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    Close binary stars like spectroscopic binaries create a completely different environment than single stars for the evolution of a protoplanetary disk. Dynamical interactions between one star and protoplanets in such systems provide more challenges for theorists to model giant planet migration and formation of multiple planets. For habitable planets the majority of host stars are in binary star systems. So far only a small amount of Jupiter-size planets have been discovered in binary stars, whose minimum separations are 20 AU and the median value is about 1000 AU (because of difficulties in radial velocity measurements). The SIM Lite mission, a space-based astrometric observatory, has a unique capability to detect habitable planets in binary star systems. This work analyzed responses of the optical system to the field stop for companion stars and demonstrated that SIM Lite can observe exoplanets in visual binaries with small angular separations. In particular we investigated the issues for the search for terrestrial planets in P-type binary-planetary systems, where the planets move around both stars in a relatively distant orbit.

  13. STATE TRANSITIONS IN LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Charles K.; Frank, Juhan

    2009-10-10

    We investigate the model of disk/coronal accretion into a black hole. We show that the inner regions of an accretion disk in X-ray binaries can transform from a cool standard disk to an advection-dominated flow through the known properties of Coulomb interaction in a two-temperature plasma, viscous heating, radiative processes, and thermal conduction. A hot, diffuse corona covering the disk is powered by accretion, but it exchanges mass with the underlying cold disk. If the accretion rate in the system is low enough, we show that the corona evaporates the disk away, leaving an advective flow to continue toward the hole. In the soft/hard transition commonly seen in X-ray binaries, we show that this advective flow can recondense back onto the underlying disk if the change in the system's accretion rate is slow enough due to thermal conduction. Unabsorbed spectra are produced to test against observations as well as prediction of the location of truncation radii of the accretion disk.

  14. Modeling and Detection of Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Simon, Donald L.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The accretion of ice particles in the core of commercial aircraft engines has been an ongoing aviation safety challenge. While no accidents have resulted from this phenomenon to date, numerous engine power loss events ranging from uneventful recoveries to forced landings have been recorded. As a first step to enabling mitigation strategies during ice accretion, a detection scheme must be developed that is capable of being implemented on board modern engines. In this paper, a simple detection scheme is developed and tested using a realistic engine simulation with approximate ice accretion models based on data from a compressor design tool. These accretion models are implemented as modified Low Pressure Compressor maps and have the capability to shift engine performance based on a specified level of ice blockage. Based on results from this model, it is possible to detect the accretion of ice in the engine core by observing shifts in the typical sensed engine outputs. Results are presented in which, for a 0.1 percent false positive rate, a true positive detection rate of 98 percent is achieved.

  15. A pebbles accretion model with chemistry and implications for the Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the chemical composition of the Solar system's giant planets atmospheres using a physical formation model with chemistry. The model incorporate disc evolution, pebbles and gas accretion, type I and II migration, simplified disc photoevaporation and Solar system chemical measurements. We track the chemical compositions of the formed giant planets and compare them to the observed values. Two categories of models are studied: with and without disc chemical enrichment via photoevaporation (PE). Predictions for the oxygen and nitrogen abundances, core masses and total amount of heavy elements for the planets are made for each case. We find that in the case without disc PE, both Jupiter and Saturn will have a small residual core and comparable total amounts of heavy elements in the envelopes. We predict oxygen abundances enrichments in the same order as carbon, phosphorus and sulfur for both planets. Cometary nitrogen abundances does not allow us to easily reproduce Jupiter's nitrogen observations. In the case with disc PE, less core erosion is needed to reproduce the chemical composition of the atmospheres, so both planets will end up with possibly more massive residual cores and higher total mass of heavy elements. It is also significantly easier to reproduce Jupiter's nitrogen abundance. No single disc was found to form both Jupiter and Saturn with all their constraints in the case without photoevaporation. No model was able to fit the constraints on Uranus and Neptune, hinting towards a more complicated formation mechanism for these planets. The predictions of these models should be compared to the upcoming Juno measurements to better understand the origins of the Solar system giant planets.

  16. Binary Plutinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith S.

    2015-08-01

    The Pluto-Charon binary was the first trans-neptunian binary to be identified in 1978. Pluto-Charon is a true binary with both components orbiting a barycenter located between them. The Pluto system is also the first, and to date only, known binary with a satellite system consisting of four small satellites in near-resonant orbits around the common center of mass. Seven other Plutinos, objects in 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune, have orbital companions including 2004 KB19 reported here for the first time. Compared to the Cold Classical population, the Plutinos differ in the frequency of binaries, the relative sizes of the components, and their inclination distribution. These differences point to distinct dynamical histories and binary formation processes encountered by Plutinos.

  17. Evolution of Intermediate and Low Mass Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleton, P P

    2005-10-25

    There are a number of binaries, fairly wide and with one or even two evolved giant components, that do not agree very well with conventional stellar evolution: the secondaries are substantially larger (oversized) than they should be because their masses are quite low compared with the primaries. I discuss the possibility that these binaries are former triples, in which a merger has occurred fairly recently in a short-period binary sub-component. Some mergers are expected, and may follow a phase of contact evolution. I suggest that in contact there is substantial transfer of luminosity between the components due to differential rotation, of the character observed by helioseismology in the Sun's surface convection zone.

  18. Hi Observations of the Supermassive Binary Black Hole System in 0402+379

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-20

    Printed in the U.S.A. H i OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERMASSIVE BINARY BLACK HOLE SYSTEM IN 0402+379 C. Rodriguez1, G. B. Taylor1,5, R. T. Zavala2, Y. M...April 30 ABSTRACT We have recently discovered a supermassive binary black hole system with a projected separation between the two black holes of 7.3 pc in...the radio galaxy 0402+379 (Rodriguez et al. 2006). This is the most compact supermassive binary black hole pair yet imaged by more than two orders of

  19. The Physics of Wind-Fed Accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Liedahl, D A; Akiyama, S; Plewa, T

    2008-05-27

    We provide a brief review of the physical processes behind the radiative driving of the winds of OB stars and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton capture and accretion of a fraction of the stellar wind by a compact object, typically a neutron star, in detached high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In addition, we describe a program to develop global models of the radiatively-driven photoionized winds and accretion flows of HMXBs, with particular attention to the prototypical system Vela X-1. The models combine XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC emission models appropriate to X-ray photoionized plasmas, improved models of the radiative driving of photoionized winds, FLASH time-dependent adaptive-mesh hydrodynamics calculations, and Monte Carlo radiation transport. We present two- and three-dimensional maps of the density, temperature, velocity, ionization parameter, and emissivity distributions of representative X-ray emission lines, as well as synthetic global Monte Carlo X-ray spectra. Such models help to better constrain the properties of the winds of HMXBs, which bear on such fundamental questions as the long-term evolution of these binaries and the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium.

  20. Long-Term Properties of Accretion Discs in X-ray Binaries. 1; The Variable Third Period in SMC X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, P. A.; Clarkson, W. I.; Coe, M. J.; Laycock, S.; Tout, M.; Wilson, C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Long term X-ray monitoring data from the RXTE All Sky Monitor (ASM) reveal that the third (superorbital) period in SMC X-1 is not constant but varies between 40-60 days. A dynamic power spectrum analysis indicates that the third period has been present continuously throughout the five years of ASM observations. This period changed smoothly from 60 days to 45 days and then returned to its former value, on a timescale of approximately 1600 days. During the nearly 4 years of overlap between the CGRO & RXTE missions, the simultaneous BATSE hard X-ray data confirm this variation in SMC X-1. Sources of systematic error and possible artefacts are investigated and found to be incapable of reproducing the results reported here. Our disco cry of such an instability in the superorbital period of SMC X-1 is interpreted in the context of recent theoretical studies of warped, precessing accretion discs. We find that the behaviour of SMC X-1 is consistent with a radiation - driven warping model.

  1. Titration of selected bases in benzene-acetonitrile binary solvent system.

    PubMed

    Amirjahed, K; al-Khamis, K I

    1980-10-01

    The benzene-acetonitrile binary solvent system was used in the determination of the half-neutralization potentials (hnp) of selected bases varying widely in basicity (pKb). The solvent mixtures had specific dielectric constants (Dm). The hnp values of the bases determined in a solvent of a specific Dm value were related to the corresponding pKb values. The slopes of these linear relationships were related to Dm values. A certain mixture of the binary solvent system was selected, and successful differentiating titration of various base mixtures was demonstrated in this medium. The delta hnp/delta pK versus Dm data for acids were compared with those of bases in the benzene-acetonitrile binary solvent system. The resulting data on bases were compared with previously published data on acids, and the present report describes the behavior of acids and bases in the entire composition spectrum of the benzene-acetonitrile binary solvent system.

  2. Calculation of Liquid-Solid Interfacial Free Energy in Pb-Cu Binary Immiscible System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-shan; Zhou, Sheng-gang; Cao, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Based on the solid-liquid interfacial free energy theory of the complex Warren binary & pseudo-binary system and through the simplification of it by taking Pb-Cu binary system as an example, the physical model for it in binary immiscible system can be obtained. Next, its thermodynamic formula is derived to obtain a theoretical formula that only contains two parameters, and comparisons are made with regard to γSL calculated values and experimental values of MPE (multiphase equilibrium method) under several kinds of temperatures. As manifested in the outcomes, the improved physical model and theoretical formula will become not only easy to understand but also simple for calculation (the calculated value of γSL depends on two parameters, i.e. temperature and percentage composition of Cu atom). It can be treated as the foundation of application for the γSL calculation of liquid-solid interfacial free energy in other immiscible systems.

  3. Chandra resolves the T Tauri binary system RW Aur

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Güdel, Manuel E-mail: manuel.guedel@univie.ac.at

    2014-06-20

    RW Aur is a multiple T Tauri system consisting of an early-K type primary (A) and a K5 companion (B) at a separation of 1.''4. RW Aur A drives a bipolar optical jet that is well characterized optically. We present results of a sensitive Chandra observation whose primary objective was to search for evidence of soft extended X-ray emission along the jet, as has been seen for a few other nearby T Tauri stars. The binary is clearly resolved by Chandra and both stars are detected as X-ray sources. The X-ray spectra of both stars reveal evidence for cool and hot plasma. Surprisingly, the X-ray luminosity of the less-massive secondary is at least twice that of the primary and is variable. The disparity is attributed to the primary whose X-ray luminosity is at the low end of the range for classical T Tauri stars of similar mass based on established correlations. Deconvolved soft-band images show evidence for slight outward elongation of the source structure of RW Aur A along the blueshifted jet axis inside the central arcsecond. In addition, a faint X-ray emission peak is present on the redshifted axis at an offset of 1.''2 ± 0.''2 from the star. Deprojected jet speeds determined from previous optical studies are too low to explain this faint emission peak as shock-heated jet plasma. Thus, unless flow speeds in the redshifted jet have been underestimated, other mechanisms such as magnetic jet heating may be involved.

  4. Dynamical Masses of Accreting White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pala, A. F.; Gänsckie, B. T.

    2017-03-01

    The mass retention efficiency is a key question in both the theoretical and observational study of accreting white dwarfs in interacting binaries, with important implications for their potential as progenitors for type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Canonical wisdom is that classical nova eruptions erode the white dwarf mass, and consequently, cataclysmic variables (CVs) have been excluded from the SN Ia progenitor discussion. However the average mass of white dwarfs in CVs is substantially higher (≃ 0.83 M⊙) than that of single white dwarfs (≃ 0.64 M ⊙), in stark contrast to expectations based on current classical nova models. This finding is based on a sample of ≃ 30 CV white dwarfs with accurate mass measurements, most of them in eclipsing systems. Given the fundamental importance of the mass evolution of accreting white dwarfs, it is necessary to enlarge this sample and to diversify the methods used for measuring masses. We have begun a systematic study of 27 CVs to almost double the number of CV white dwarfs with an accurate mass measurement. Using VLT/X-shooter phase-resolved observations, we can measure the white dwarf masses to a few percent, and will be able to answer the question whether accreting CV white dwarfs grow in mass.

  5. EVERY INTERACTING DOUBLE WHITE DWARF BINARY MAY MERGE

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Ken J.

    2015-05-20

    Interacting double white dwarf (WD) binaries can give rise to a wide variety of astrophysical outcomes ranging from faint thermonuclear and Type Ia supernovae to the formation of neutron stars and stably accreting AM Canum Venaticorum systems. One key factor affecting the final outcome is whether mass transfer remains dynamically stable or instead diverges, leading to the tidal disruption of the donor and the merger of the binary. It is typically thought that for low ratios of the donor mass to the accretor mass, mass transfer remains stable, especially if accretion occurs via a disk. In this Letter, we examine low mass ratio double WD binaries and find that the initial phase of hydrogen-rich mass transfer leads to a classical nova-like outburst on the accretor. Dynamical friction within the expanding nova shell shrinks the orbit and causes the mass transfer rate to increase dramatically above the accretor's Eddington limit, possibly resulting in a binary merger. If the binary survives the first hydrogen-rich nova outbursts, dynamical friction within the subsequent helium-powered nova shells pushes the system even more strongly toward merger. While further calculations are necessary to confirm this outcome for the entire range of binaries previously thought to be dynamically stable, it appears likely that most, if not all, interacting double WD binaries will merge during the course of their evolution.

  6. Every Interacting Double White Dwarf Binary May Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ken J.

    2015-05-01

    Interacting double white dwarf (WD) binaries can give rise to a wide variety of astrophysical outcomes ranging from faint thermonuclear and Type Ia supernovae to the formation of neutron stars and stably accreting AM Canum Venaticorum systems. One key factor affecting the final outcome is whether mass transfer remains dynamically stable or instead diverges, leading to the tidal disruption of the donor and the merger of the binary. It is typically thought that for low ratios of the donor mass to the accretor mass, mass transfer remains stable, especially if accretion occurs via a disk. In this Letter, we examine low mass ratio double WD binaries and find that the initial phase of hydrogen-rich mass transfer leads to a classical nova-like outburst on the accretor. Dynamical friction within the expanding nova shell shrinks the orbit and causes the mass transfer rate to increase dramatically above the accretor's Eddington limit, possibly resulting in a binary merger. If the binary survives the first hydrogen-rich nova outbursts, dynamical friction within the subsequent helium-powered nova shells pushes the system even more strongly toward merger. While further calculations are necessary to confirm this outcome for the entire range of binaries previously thought to be dynamically stable, it appears likely that most, if not all, interacting double WD binaries will merge during the course of their evolution.

  7. Formation of the widest binary stars from dynamical unfolding of triple systems.

    PubMed

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo

    2012-12-13

    The formation of very wide binary systems, such as the α Centauri system with Proxima (also known as α Centauri C) separated from α Centauri (which itself is a close binary A/B) by 15,000 astronomical units (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), challenges current theories of star formation, because their separation can exceed the typical size of a collapsing cloud core. Various hypotheses have been proposed to overcome this problem, including the suggestion that ultrawide binaries result from the dissolution of a star cluster--when a cluster star gravitationally captures another, distant, cluster star. Recent observations have shown that very wide binaries are frequently members of triple systems and that close binaries often have a distant third companion. Here we report N-body simulations of the dynamical evolution of newborn triple systems still embedded in their nascent cloud cores that match observations of very wide systems. We find that although the triple systems are born very compact--and therefore initially are more protected against disruption by passing stars--they can develop extreme hierarchical architectures on timescales of millions of years as one component is dynamically scattered into a very distant orbit. The energy of ejection comes from shrinking the orbits of the other two stars, often making them look from a distance like a single star. Such loosely bound triple systems will therefore appear to be very wide binaries.

  8. MECHANISM OF OUTFLOWS IN ACCRETION SYSTEM: ADVECTIVE COOLING CANNOT BALANCE VISCOUS HEATING?

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei-Min

    2015-01-20

    Based on the no-outflow assumption, we investigate steady-state, axisymmetric, optically thin accretion flows in spherical coordinates. By comparing the vertically integrated advective cooling rate with the viscous heating rate, we find that the former is generally less than 30% of the latter, which indicates that the advective cooling itself cannot balance the viscous heating. As a consequence, for radiatively inefficient flows with low accretion rates such as M-dot ≲10{sup −3} M-dot {sub Edd}, where M-dot {sub Edd} is the Eddington accretion rate, the viscous heating rate will be larger than the sum of the advective cooling rate and the radiative cooling one. Thus, no thermal equilibrium can be established under the no-outflow assumption. We therefore argue that in such cases outflows ought to occur and take away more than 70% of the thermal energy generated by viscous dissipation. Similarly, for optically thick flows with extremely large accretion rates such as M-dot ≳10 M-dot {sub Edd}, outflows should also occur owing to the limited advection and the low efficiency of radiative cooling. Our results may help to understand the mechanism of outflows found in observations and numerical simulations.

  9. THE KOZAI–LIDOV MECHANISM IN HYDRODYNAMICAL DISKS. II. EFFECTS OF BINARY AND DISK PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions, binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.

  10. The Kozai-Lidov mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. II. Effects of binary and disk parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. (2014b) showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions, binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.

  11. Accretion Onto Magnetic Degenerate Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Juhan

    2000-01-01

    While the original objectives of this research program included the study of radiative processes in cataclysmic variables and the evolution of neutron star magnetic fields, the scope of the reported research expanded to other related topics as this project developed. This final report therefore describes the results of our research in the following areas: 1) Irradiation-driven mass transfer cycles in cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binaries; 2) Propeller effect and magnetic field decay in isolated old neutron stars; 3) Decay of surface magnetic fields in accreting neutron stars and pulsars; 4) Finite-Difference Hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in binary stars.

  12. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  13. Physical Structure of Four Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, Scott J. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Disk accretion powers many astronomical objects, including pre-main sequence stars, interacting binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, models developed to explain the behavior of disks and their surroundings - boundary layers, jets, and winds - lack much predictive power, because the physical mechanism driving disk evolution - the viscosity - is not understood. Observations of many types of accreting systems are needed to constrain the basic physics of disks and provide input for improved models. Symbiotic stars are an attractive laboratory for studying physical phenomena associated with disk accretion. These long period binaries (P(sub orb) approx. 2-3 yr) contain an evolved red giant star, a hot companion, and an ionized nebula. The secondary star usually is a white dwarf accreting material from the wind of its red giant companion. A good example of this type of symbiotic is BF Cygni: our analysis shows that disk accretion powers the nuclear burning shell of the hot white dwarf and also manages to eject material perpendicular to the orbital plane (Mikolajewska, Kenyon, and Mikolajewski 1989). The hot components in other symbiotic binaries appear powered by tidal overflow from a very evolved red giant companion. We recently completed a study of CI Cygni and demonstrated that the accreting secondary is a solar-type main sequence star, rather than a white dwarf (Kenyon et aL 1991). This project continued our study of symbiotic binary systems. Our general plan was to combine archival ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry with high quality optical radial velocity observations to determine the variation of line and continuum sources as functions of orbital phase. We were very successful in generating orbital solutions and phasing UV+optical spectra for five systems: AG Dra, V443 Her, RW Hya, AG Peg, and AX Per. Summaries of our main results for these systems appear below. A second goal of our project was to consider general models for the

  14. Planets in Wide Binaries from Kepler: Ages, Stability and Evolution of Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, Kolby L.; West, Andrew A.; Janes, Kenneth; Dhital, Saurav

    2014-06-01

    Using the Kepler Input Catalog and the fourth U.S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog, we have identified 1509 common proper motion (CPM) binaries in the Kepler field of view, of which a small subset host planet candidates, or Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). We have verified the fidelity of the CPM pairs using a Galactic model and follow-up astrometric observations. We present 73 KOIs distributed over 58 CPM pairs and highlight the first wide binary system (separation > 1000 AU) where both stellar components host at least one KOI. Because our binary sample was initially targeted for a gyrochronology analysis, we also present measurements of stellar rotation periods and preliminary estimates of stellar (and planetary) ages. We use these extrapolated planetary ages to investigate longterm planet stability in wide binaries and test potential formation and evolution scenarios of these dynamically complex systems.

  15. New Magnetically Uniaxial Phases in the Samarium, Iron Binary System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Raj

    1995-01-01

    For the first time, films magnets of binary rm Sm_5Fe_{17}, and SmFe_{12}, magnetically uniaxial phases have been sputter synthesized without any addition of a phase stabilizing third element. Perpendicular to the film plane, the room temperature saturation magnetization for highly (002) aligned film samples of SmFe_ {12} phase were measured to be 14.3 +/- 0.5 kG and the estimated anisotropy field was 130 +/- 10 kOe. X-ray diffraction studies, hysterisis loop measurements, composition measurements, and projection of moment calculations allowed to identify the SmFe_{12} phase as ThMn_{12} type tetragonal structure with a = 8.438 +/- 0.006 A, and c = 4.805 +/- 0.006 A. Film samples of this phase were synthesized by depositing the material on preheated substrates. For rm Sm_5Fe_{17} phase, the material was first deposited in amorphous form and subsequently crystallized. rm Sm_5Fe_{17 } film samples were synthesized with record high room temperature coercivity of 14.1 kOe for the two element Sm, Fe system. On nitriding rm Sm _2Fe_{17}, profound changes in magnetic properties have occurred, room temperature inplane coercivity rose from 0.75 kOe to 23 kOe. The rm Sm_2Fe_{17}N_ {x} compound retained its parent structure with the cell volume increase of ~7%. The room temperature coercivity as a function of the Sm concentration reached a maximum value of ~23 kOe at a slightly richer than stoichiometric Sm composition. High anisotropy (002) textured film samples of rm Pr(Fe_{12-y-z},Co_{y},Mo _{z})N_{x}, where y = 0-2.5, and z = 0.4-1.0 compounds were synthesized with so far the highest coercivity of 9.4 kOe. X-ray diffraction data showed that the ThMn_{12} type tetragonal structure was retained with a saturation increase in the cell volume over the first 15 minutes of nitriding time at 750 K. The coercivity reached a maximum for nitriding time of 25 minutes of nitriding time. For rm Pr_{1.04}Fe_{10.36 }Co_{1.16}Mo_{0.44}N _{x} sample measured at 293 K, perpendicular to the

  16. The Discovery of a Second Luminous Low Mass X-Ray Binary System in the Globular Cluster M15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Angelini, Lorella

    2001-01-01

    Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory we have discovered a second bright X-ray source in the globular cluster M15 that is 2.7" to the west of AC211, the previously known low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) in this system. Prior to the 0.5" imaging capability of Chandra this second source could not have been resolved from AC211. The luminosity and spectrum of this new source, which we call M15-X2, are consistent with it also being a LMXB system. This is the first time that two LMXBs have been seen to be simultaneously active in a globular cluster. The new source, M15-X2, is coincident with a 18th U magnitude very blue star. The discovery of a second LMXB in M15 clears up a long standing puzzle where the X-ray and optical properties of AC211 appear consistent with the central source being hidden behind an accretion disk corona, and yet also showed a luminous X-ray burst suggesting the neutron star is directly visible. This discovery suggests instead that the X-ray burst did not come from AC211, but rather from the newly discovered X-ray source. We discuss the implications of this discovery for X-ray observations of globular clusters in nearby galaxies.

  17. Solid/liquid interfacial free energies in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nason, D.; Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a semiquantitative technique for predicting the segregation characteristics of smooth interfaces between binary solid and liquid solutions in terms of readily available thermodynamic parameters of the bulk solutions. A lattice-liquid interfacial model and a pair-bonded regular solution model are employed in the treatment with an accommodation for liquid interfacial entropy. The method is used to calculate the interfacial segregation and the free energy of segregation for solid-liquid interfaces between binary solutions for the (111) boundary of fcc crystals. The zone of compositional transition across the interface is shown to be on the order of a few atomic layers in width, being moderately narrower for ideal solutions. The free energy of the segregated interface depends primarily upon the solid composition and the heats of fusion of the component atoms, the composition difference of the solutions, and the difference of the heats of mixing of the solutions.

  18. Habitability in Binary Systems: The Role of UV Reduction and Magnetic Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Joni; Mason, P. A.; Zuluaga, J. I.; Cuartas, P. A.; Bustamonte, S.

    2013-06-01

    The number of planets found in binary systems is growing rapidly and the discovery of many more planets in binary systems appears inevitable. We use the newly refined and more restrictive, single star habitable zone (HZ) models of Kopparapu et al. (2013) and include planetary magnetic protection calculations in order to investigate binary star habitability. Here we present results on circumstellar or S-type planets, which are planets orbiting a single star member of a binary. P-type planets, on the other hand, orbit the center of mass of the binary. Stable planetary orbits exist in HZs for both types of binaries as long as the semi-major axis of the planet is either greater than (P-type) or less than (S-type) a few times the semi-major axis of the binary. We define two types of S-type binaries for this investigation. The SA-type is a circumstellar planet orbiting the binary’s primary star. In this case, the limits of habitability are dominated by the primary being only slightly affected by the presence of the lower mass companion. Thus, the SA-type planets have habitability characteristics, including magnetic protection, similar to single stars of the same type. The SB-type is a circumstellar planet orbiting the secondary star in a wide binary. An SB-type planet needs to orbit slightly outside the secondary’s single star HZ and remain within the primary’s single star HZ at all times. We explore the parameter space for which this is possible. We have found that planets lying in the combined HZ of SB binaries can be magnetically protected against the effects of stellar winds from both primary and secondary stars in a limited number of cases. We conclude that habitable conditions exist for a subset of SA-type, and a smaller subset of SB-type binaries. However, circumbinary planets (P-types) provide the most intriguing possibilities for the existence of complex life due to the effect of synchronization of binaries with periods in the 20-30 day range which allows

  19. LMXB X-ray Transients: Revealing Basic Accretion Parameters in Non-stationary Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenfei; Yan, Zhen; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Wenda

    2014-08-01

    X-ray observations of low mass X-ray binaries(LMXBs), especially those black hole transient systems, have been very important in shaping up our understanding of black hole accretion and testing accretion theory in a broad range of accretion regimes. We show strong evidence for non-stationary accretion regimes in the X-ray observations of spectral states and multi-wavelength observations of disk-jet coupling in more than 100 outbursts of 36 black hole and neutron star transients in the past decade or so. The occurrence of spectral state transitions and the peak episodic jet power during the rising phase of transient outbursts are found correlated with rate-of-increase of the X-ray luminosity, indicating the rate-of-change of the mass accretion rate, in addition to the mass accretion rate, must be considered when interpreting observations of spectral state transitions and disk-jet coupling in these X-ray transients. This is supported by observations since the increase of the mass accretion rate due to its rate-of-change on the observational time scale of interest is significant during outbursts.

  20. MODELING THE ACCRETION STRUCTURE OF AU Mon

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Miller, Brendan P.; Richards, Mercedes T.; Budaj, Jan; Peters, Geraldine J. E-mail: mbrendan@umich.edu E-mail: budaj@ta3.sk

    2012-12-01

    AU Mon is a long-period (11.113 days) Algol-type binary system with a persistent accretion disk that is apparent as double-peaked H{alpha} emission. We present previously unpublished optical spectra of AU Mon which were obtained over 20 years from 1991-2011 with dense orbital phase coverage. We utilize these data, along with archival UV spectra, to model the temperature and structure of the accretion disk and the gas stream. Synthetic spectral profiles for lines including H{alpha}, H{beta}, and the Al III and Si IV doublets were computed with the Shellspec program. The best match between the model spectra and the observations is obtained for an accretion disk of inner/outer radius 5.1/23 R {sub Sun }, thickness of 5.2 R {sub Sun }, density of 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} g cm{sup -3}, and maximum temperature of 14,000 K, along with a gas stream at a temperature of {approx}8000 K transferring {approx}2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We show H{alpha} Doppler tomograms of the velocity structure of the gas, constructed from difference profiles calculated through sequentially subtracting contributions from the stars and accretion structures. The tomograms provide independent support for the Shellspec modeling, while also illustrating that residual emission at sub-Keplerian velocities persists even after subtracting the disk and stream emission. Spectral variability in the H{alpha} profile beyond that expected from either the orbital or the long-period cycle is present on both multi-week and multi-year timescales, and may reflect quasi-random changes in the mass transfer rate or the disk structure. Finally, a transient UV spectral absorption feature may be modeled as an occasional outflow launched from the vicinity of the disk-stream interaction region.

  1. High Resolution Imaging of Very Low Mass Spectral Binaries: Three Resolved Systems and Detection of Orbital Motion in an L/T Transition Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Burgasser, Adam J.

    2015-11-01

    We present high resolution Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics imaging of 43 late-M, L and T dwarf systems with Keck/NIRC2. These include 17 spectral binary candidates, systems whose spectra suggest the presence of a T dwarf secondary. We resolve three systems: 2MASS J1341-3052, SDSS J1511+0607 and SDSS J2052-1609 the first two are resolved for the first time. All three have projected separations <8 AU and estimated periods of 14-80 years. We also report a preliminary orbit determination for SDSS J2052-1609 based on six epochs of resolved astrometry between 2005 and 2010. Among the 14 unresolved spectral binaries, 5 systems were confirmed binaries but remained unresolved, implying a minimum binary fraction of {47}-11+12% for this sample. Our inability to resolve most of the spectral binaries, including the confirmed binaries, supports the hypothesis that a large fraction of very low mass systems have relatively small separations and are missed with direct imaging. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  2. Highly siderophile element constraints on accretion and differentiation of the Earth-Moon system.

    PubMed

    Day, James M D; Pearson, D Graham; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2007-01-12

    A new combined rhenium-osmium- and platinum-group element data set for basalts from the Moon establishes that the basalts have uniformly low abundances of highly siderophile elements. The data set indicates a lunar mantle with long-term, chondritic, highly siderophile element ratios, but with absolute abundances that are over 20 times lower than those in Earth's mantle. The results are consistent with silicate-metal equilibrium during a giant impact and core formation in both bodies, followed by post-core-formation late accretion that replenished their mantles with highly siderophile elements. The lunar mantle experienced late accretion that was similar in composition to that of Earth but volumetrically less than (approximately 0.02% lunar mass) and terminated earlier than for Earth.

  3. Formation and Evolution of Planets in and Around Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighipour, N.

    2015-07-01

    The discovery of planets in and around binary stars (also known as circumprimary and circumbinary planets) has opened a new chapter in the studies of the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. Computational simulations indicate that in binaries with separations smaller than ˜50 au, the perturbation of the secondary star can have profound effects on the dynamics of solid bodies around the primary, prohibiting their collisions to result in coalescence and growth to larger objects. However, several circumprimary planets are known to exist in binaries with separations of ˜20 au raising questions about how these planets formed and acquired their final orbital architecture. Also, a survey of the currently known circumbinary planets (CBPs) points to several interesting characteristics of these bodies. The detection of multiple transits in these systems points to the (almost) co-planarity of the planet-binary orbits, giving strong support to the idea that these planets formed in circumbinary protoplanetary disks. The proximity of some of these planets to the boundary of orbital instability around the binary suggests an evolutionary scenario in which planets form at large distances and either migrate to their present orbits, or are scattered to their current locations. Surprisingly, all currently known CBPs are Neptune-sized or smaller, and no CBP seems to exist around very short-period binaries. These specific characteristics of binary-planetary systems have raised many questions regarding the formation, dynamical evolution, and orbital architecture of these objects. I will review the current state of research on the formation of planets in and around binary stars, and discuss the new developments on the understanding of their dynamical evolution.

  4. The Planet in the HR 7162 Binary System Discovered by PHASES Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, B. F.; Konacki, M.; Burke, B. F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Boss, A. P.; O'Connell, J.; Fekel, F. C.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The now-completed Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) used phase-referenced long-baseline interferometry to monitor 51 binary systems with 35 micro-arcsecond measurement precision, resulting in the high-confidence detection of a planet in the HR 7162 system. The 1.5 Jupiter mass planet is in a 2 AU orbit around one of the stars, whereas the binary itself has a separation of only 19 AU. Despite the close stellar companion, this configuration is expected to be stable, based on dynamic simulations. In the context of our solar system, this is analogous to a Jovian planet just outside of Mars' orbit, with a second star at the distance of Uranus. If this configuration were present during the period of planet formation, the complex gravitational environment created by the stars would seem to disrupt planet formation mechanisms that require long times to complete (thousands of years or more). While it is possible the arrangement resulted from the planet being formed in another environment (a single star or wider binary) after which the system reached its current state via dynamic interactions (star-planet exchange with a binary, or the binary orbit shrinking by interacting with a passing star), the frequency of such interactions is very low. Because the PHASES search only had the sensitivity to rule out Jovian mass companions in 11 of our 51 systems, yet one such system was found, the result indicates either extreme luck or that there is a high frequency of 20 AU binaries hosting planets. The latter interpretation is supported by previous detections of planets in 5-6 additional 20 AU binaries in other surveys (though with less control over the statistics for determining frequency of occurrence). Thus, there is observational support suggesting that a mechanism for rapid Jovian planet formation occurs in nature.

  5. ANALYSIS OF THE MOTION OF AN EXTRASOLAR PLANET IN A BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Plávalová, Eva; Solovaya, Nina A. E-mail: solov@sai.msu.ru

    2013-11-01

    More than 10% of extra-solar planets (EPs) orbit in a binary or multiple stellar system. We investigated the motion of planets revolving in binary systems in the case of the three-body problem. We carried out an analysis of the motion of an EP revolving in a binary system with the following conditions: (1) a planet in a binary system revolves around one of the components (parent star); (2) the distance between the star's components is greater than that between the parent star and the orbiting planet (ratio of the semi-major axes is a small parameter); and (3) the mass of the planet is smaller than the mass of the stars, but is not negligible. The Hamiltonian of the system without short periodic terms was used. We expanded the Hamiltonian in terms of the Legendre polynomial and truncated after the second-order term, depending on only one angular variable. In this case, the solution of the system was obtained and the qualitative analysis of the motion was produced. We have applied this theory to real EPs and compared to the numerical integration. Analyses of the possible regions of motion are presented. It is shown that stable and unstable motions of EPs are possible. We applied our calculations to two binary systems hosting an EP and calculated the possible values for their unknown orbital elements.

  6. Recurring flares from supermassive black hole binaries: implications for tidal disruption candidates and OJ 287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu L.

    2013-09-01

    I discuss the possibility that accreting supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries with sub-parsec separations produce periodically recurring luminous outbursts that interrupt periods of relative quiescence. This hypothesis is motivated by two characteristics found generically in simulations of binaries embedded in prograde accretion discs: (i) the formation of a central, low-density cavity around the binary and (ii) the leakage of gas into this cavity, occurring once per orbit via discrete streams on nearly radial trajectories. The first feature would reduce the emergent optical/UV flux of the system relative to active galactic nuclei powered by a single SMBH, while the second can trigger quasi-periodic fluctuations in luminosity. I argue that the quasi-periodic accretion signature may be much more dramatic than previously thought, because the infalling gas streams can strongly shock-heat via self-collision and tidal compression, thereby enhancing viscous accretion. Any optically thick gas that is circularized about either SMBH can accrete before the next pair of streams is deposited, fuelling transient, luminous flares that recur every orbit. Due to the diminished flux in between accretion episodes, such cavity-accretion flares could plausibly be mistaken for the tidal disruptions of stars in quiescent nuclei. The flares could be distinguished from tidal disruption events if their quasi-periodic recurrence is observed, or if they are produced by very massive (≳109 M⊙) SMBHs that cannot disrupt solar-type stars. They may be discovered serendipitously in surveys such as LSST or eROSITA. I present a heuristic toy model as a proof of concept for the production of cavity-accretion flares, and generate mock light curves and spectra. I also apply the model to the active galaxy OJ 287, whose production of quasi-periodic pairs of optical flares has long fuelled speculation that it hosts an SMBH binary.

  7. Metallicity dependence of Type Ib/c and IIb supernova progenitors in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Chul

    Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) are characterized by the lack of prominent hydrogen lines in thespectra, implying that their progenitors have lost most of their hydrogen envelopes by the time of the iron corecollapse. Binary interactions provide an important evolutionary chanel for SNe Ib/c, and recent observations indicatethat the inferred ejecta masses of SNe Ibc are more consistent with the prediction of the binary scenario than that ofthe single star scenario that invokes mass loss as the key evolutionary factor for SNe Ib/c progenitors. So far,theoretical predictions on the detailed properties of SNe Ib/c progenitors in binary systems have been made mostlywith models using solar metallicity. However, unlike the single star scenario, where SNe Ib/c are expected only forsufficiently high metallicity, hydrogen-deficent SN progenitors can be produced via binary interactions at anymetallicity. In this talk, I will discuss theoretical predictions on the metallicity dependence of the SNe Ib/c progenitorstructure, based on evolutionary models of massive binary stars. Sepefically, I will address how the ejecta masses ofSNe Ib and Ic and the ratio of SN Ib/c to SN IIb as well as SN Ib to SN Ic would systematically change as a function ofmetallicity, and which new types of SNe are expected in binary systems at low metallicity.

  8. Metallicity dependence of Type Ib/c and IIb supernova progenitors in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-CHul

    2015-08-01

    Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) are characterized by the lack of prominent hydrogen lines in the spectra, implying that their progenitors have lost most of their hydrogen envelopes by the time of the iron core collapse. Binary interactions provide an important evolutionary chanel for SNe Ib/c, and recent observations indicate that the inferred ejecta masses of SNe Ibc are more consistent with the prediction of the binary scenario than that of the single star scenario that invokes mass loss as the key evolutionary factor for SNe Ib/c progenitors. So far, theoretical predictions on the detailed properties of SNe Ib/c progenitors in binary systems have been made mostly with models using solar metallicity. However, unlike the single star scenario, where SNe Ib/c are expected only for sufficiently high metallicity, hydrogen-deficent SN progenitors can be produced via binary interactions at any metallicity. In this talk, I will discuss theoretical predictions on the metallicity dependence of the SNe Ib/c progenitor structure, based on evolutionary models of massive binary stars. Sepefically, I will address how the ejecta masses of SNe Ib and Ic and the ratio of SN Ib/c to SN IIb as well as SN Ib to SN Ic would systematically change as a function of metallicity, and which new types of SNe are expected in binary systems at low metallicity.

  9. Using Model Point Spread Functions to Identifying Binary Brown Dwarf Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Kyle; Stephens, Denise C.; Lunsford, Leanne T.

    2017-01-01

    A Brown Dwarf (BD) is a celestial object that is not massive enough to undergo hydrogen fusion in its core. BDs can form in pairs called binaries. Due to the great distances between Earth and these BDs, they act as point sources of light and the angular separation between binary BDs can be small enough to appear as a single, unresolved object in images, according to Rayleigh Criterion. It is not currently possible to resolve some of these objects into separate light sources. Stephens and Noll (2006) developed a method that used model point spread functions (PSFs) to identify binary Trans-Neptunian Objects, we will use this method to identify binary BD systems in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. This method works by comparing model PSFs of single and binary sources to the observed PSFs. We also use a method to compare model spectral data for single and binary fits to determine the best parameter values for each component of the system. We describe these methods, its challenges and other possible uses in this poster.

  10. THE OCCURRENCE OF WIDE-ORBIT PLANETS IN BINARY STAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.

    2014-08-20

    The occurrence of planets in binary star systems has been investigated via a variety of techniques that sample a wide range of semi-major axes, but with a preponderance of such results applicable to planets with semi-major axes less than a few astronomical units. We utilize a new method—the presence or absence of heavy elements in the atmospheres of white dwarf stars—to elucidate the frequency in main sequence binary star systems of planets with semi-major axes greater than a few astronomical units. We consider only binaries where a putative planetary system orbits one member (no circumbinary planets). For main sequence binaries where the primary star is of spectral type A or F, data in the published literature suggests that the existence of a secondary star with a semi-major axis less than about 1000 AU suppresses the formation and/or long-term stability of an extended planetary system around the primary. For these spectral types and initial semi-major axis ≥1000 AU, extended planetary systems appear to be as common around stars in binary systems as they are around single stars.

  11. The low-mass X-ray binary LMC X-2

    SciTech Connect

    Crampton, D.; Hutchings, J.B.; Cowley, A.P.; Schmidtke, P.C.; Thompson, I.B. Arizona State Univ., Tempe Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-06-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric observations of LMC X-2 reveal the source to be an X-ray binary with a relatively long orbital period, probably 12.5 days. It appears to be a partially eclipsing system. It is one of a small subclass of low-mass X-ray binaries with longer orbital periods and higher X-ray luminosity than average, which contain a compact object accreting material from an evolving giant companion. 26 refs.

  12. THE PHASES DIFFERENTIAL ASTROMETRY DATA ARCHIVE. V. CANDIDATE SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS TO BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M.; Hartkopf, William I.; Boss, Alan P.; Williamson, M. E-mail: blane@draper.co

    2010-12-15

    The Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems monitored 51 subarcsecond binary systems to evaluate whether tertiary companions as small as Jovian planets orbited either the primary or secondary stars, perturbing their otherwise smooth Keplerian motions. Six binaries are presented that show evidence of substellar companions orbiting either the primary or secondary star. Of these six systems, the likelihoods of two of the detected perturbations to represent real objects are considered to be 'high confidence', while the remaining four systems are less certain and will require continued observations for confirmation.

  13. Coordinated X-Ray, Ultraviolet, Optical, and Radio Observations of the PSR J1023+0038 System in a Low-mass X-Ray Binary State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Archibald, Anne M.; Bassa, Cees; Deller, Adam T.; Halpern, Jules P.; Heald, George; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Janssen, Gemma H.; Lyne, Andrew G.; Moldón, Javier; Paragi, Zsolt; Patruno, Alessandro; Perera, Benetge B. P.; Stappers, Ben W.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; D'Angelo, Caroline R.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2015-06-01

    The PSR J1023+0038 binary system hosts a neutron star and a low-mass, main-sequence-like star. It switches on year timescales between states as an eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). We present a multi-wavelength observational campaign of PSR J1023+0038 in its most recent LMXB state. Two long XMM-Newton observations reveal that the system spends ˜70% of the time in a ≈3 × 1033 erg s-1 X-ray luminosity mode, which, as shown in Archibald et al., exhibits coherent X-ray pulsations. This emission is interspersed with frequent lower flux mode intervals with ≈ 5× {10}32 erg s-1 and sporadic flares reaching up to ≈1034 erg s-1, with neither mode showing significant X-ray pulsations. The switches between the three flux modes occur on timescales of order 10 s. In the UV and optical, we observe occasional intense flares coincident with those observed in X-rays. Our radio timing observations reveal no pulsations at the pulsar period during any of the three X-ray modes, presumably due to complete quenching of the radio emission mechanism by the accretion flow. Radio imaging detects highly variable, flat-spectrum continuum radiation from PSR J1023+0038, consistent with an origin in a weak jet-like outflow. Our concurrent X-ray and radio continuum data sets do not exhibit any correlated behavior. The observational evidence we present bears qualitative resemblance to the behavior predicted by some existing “propeller” and “trapped” disk accretion models although none can account for key aspects of the rich phenomenology of this system.

  14. Characterizing Accreting White Dwarf Pulsators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkody, Paula; Mukadam, Anjum

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the population, mass distribution, and evolution of accreting white dwarfs impacts the entire realm of binary interaction, including the creation of Type Ia supernovae. We are concentrating on accreting white dwarf pulsators, as the pulsation properties allow us a view of how the accretion affects the interior of the star. Our ground- based photometry on 11 accreting pulsators with corresponding temperatures from HST UV spectra suggest a broad instability strip in the range of 10500 to 16000K. Additionally, tracking a post-outburst heated white dwarf as it cools and crosses the blue edge and resumes pulsation provides an independent method to locate the empirical instability strip. Determining a post-outburst cooling curve yields an estimate of the amount of heating and the accreted mass during the outburst. We request additional photometry of 2 objects that present unique properties: GW Lib which has not yet returned to its pre-outburst pulsation spectrum after 6 yrs, and EQ Lyn which returned to its pre- outburst pulsation after 3 yrs but is now turning on and off without ongoing outbursts. Following the pulsation spectrum changes over stretches of several nights in a row will provide specific knowledge of the stability of the observed modes.

  15. Classical Accreting Pulsars with NICER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Soft excesses are very common center dot Lx > 1038 erg/s - reprocessing by optically thick material at the inner edge of the accretion disk center dot Lx < 1036 erg/s - photoionized or collisionally heated diffuse gas or thermal emission from the NS surface center dot Lx 1037 erg/s - either or both types of emission center dot NICER observations of soft excesses in bright X-ray pulsars combined with reflection modeling will constrain the ionization state, metalicity and dynamics of the inner edge of the magnetically truncated accretion disk Reflection models of an accretion disk for a hard power law - Strong soft excess below 3 keV from hot X-ray heated disk - For weakly ionized case: strong recombination lines - Are we seeing changes in the disk ionization in 4U1626-26? 13 years of weekly monitoring with RXTE PCA center dot Revealed an unexpectedly large population of Be/X-ray binaries compared to the Milky Way center dot Plotted luminosities are typical of "normal" outbursts (once per orbit) center dot The SMC provides an excellent opportunity to study a homogenous population of HMXBs with low interstellar absorption for accretion disk studies. Monitoring with NICER will enable studies of accretion disk physics in X-ray pulsars center dot The SMC provides a potential homogeneous low-absorption population for this study center dot NICER monitoring and TOO observations will also provide measurements of spinfrequencies, QPOs, pulsed fluxes, and energy spectra.

  16. New developments in studies of compact X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1987-01-01

    Several recent developments, both observational and theoretical, on the study of X-ray binaries and the compact objects they contain are discussed. The recent discovery of the first binary periods for the globular cluster X-ray sources has stimulated a new model for their origin. As a variant of the 'standard' tidal capture origin model, this predicts an enhanced number of neutron stars in globular clusters. Long term timing studies of X-ray binaries may be consistent with many of these systems, primarily X-ray burst sources, being in fact hierarchical triple systems. Finally, the radio studies of Cyg X-3 and other X-ray binaries suggest that nonthermal processes are as important, energetically, as accretion processes in these systems.

  17. NSVS4484038, A contact binary system at the short-period cutoff

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. B.; Deng, L. C.; Wang, K.; Yan, Z. Z.; Tian, J. F.; Peng, Y. J.; Pan, Y.; Luo, Z. Q.; Sun, J. J.; Liu, Q. L.; Xin, H. Q.; Zhou, Q.

    2014-09-01

    We present a photometric study of the short-period eclipsing binary NSVS4484038. Time-series CCD photometry of the star in the B and V band was carried out. An orbital period of 0.218551 days was determined for the eclipsing binary and a revised linear ephemeris was given. The first photometric solution of the binary system was detected through light-curve synthesis using the Wilson-Devinney method. It reveals an overcontact configuration for the system with a filling-out factor of about 10%. The mass ratio was determined to be 2.74 with an inclination of 72.°1. The less massive secondary component is found to have a higher surface temperature than the primary by about 90 K, indicating that NSVS4484038 could be a contact system of W subtype. The star is then identified to be a new member of W UMa systems at the short-period cutoff. Comparisons with known contact binaries at the short-period cutoff, the properties, and the evolutionary status of the binary system are discussed.

  18. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in a binary organic nanoparticle system and its application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Xu, Xinjun; Wang, Jinshan; Li, Lidong

    2015-04-22

    Fluorescent organic nanoparticles have a much better photostability than molecule-based probes. Here, we report a simple strategy to detect chemicals and biomolecules by a binary nanoparticle system based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO, energy donor) and poly [2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV, energy acceptor) are utilized to prepare the binary nanoparticle system through a reprecipitation method. Since the FRET process is strongly distance-dependent, a change in the interparticle distance between the two kinds of nanoparticles after introduction of analytes will alter the FRET efficiency. The response of the binary nanoparticle system to cationic polyelectrolytes was investigated by monitoring the FRET efficiency from PFO to MEH-PPV nanoparticles and the fluorescence color of the nanoparticle solutions. Furthermore, the cationic polyelectrolyte pretreated binary nanoparticle system can be used to detect DNA by desorption of nanoparticles from the polyelectrolyte's chains and the detection concentration can go down to 10(-14) M. Thus, the binary nanoparticle system shows great promise for applications in chemical sensing or biosensing.

  19. Communication: radial distribution functions in a two-dimensional binary colloidal hard sphere system.

    PubMed

    Thorneywork, Alice L; Roth, Roland; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Dullens, Roel P A

    2014-04-28

    Two-dimensional hard disks are a fundamentally important many-body model system in classical statistical mechanics. Despite their significance, a comprehensive experimental data set for two-dimensional single component and binary hard disks is lacking. Here, we present a direct comparison between the full set of radial distribution functions and the contact values of a two-dimensional binary colloidal hard sphere model system and those calculated using fundamental measure theory. We find excellent quantitative agreement between our experimental data and theoretical predictions for both single component and binary hard disk systems. Our results provide a unique and fully quantitative mapping between experiments and theory, which is crucial in establishing the fundamental link between structure and dynamics in simple liquids and glass forming systems.

  20. A New Deep, Hard X-ray Survey of M31: Monitoring Black Hole and Neutron Star Accretion States in the X-ray Binary Population of Our Nearest Neighbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Lehmer, Bret; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; Venters, Tonia M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Eracleous, Michael; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pooley, David A.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray binaries (XRBs) trace old and new stellar populations in galaxies, and thus star formation history and star formation rate. X-ray emission from XRBs may be responsible for significant amounts of heating of the early Intergalactic Medium at Cosmic Dawn and may also play a significant role in reionization. Until recently, the hard emission from these populations could only be studied for XRBs in our own galaxy, where it is often difficult to measure accurate distances and thus luminosities. The launch of NuSTAR, the first focusing hard X-ray observatory, has allowed us to resolve the brightest XRBs (down to LX ~ few times 1038 erg/s) in galaxies like NGC 253, M83, and M82 up to 4 Mpc away. To reach much lower X-ray luminosities that are more typical of XRBs in the Milky Way (LX <~ 1037 erg/s), we have observed M31 in 3 NuSTAR fields, up to 5 visits apiece for more than 1 Ms total exposure, mostly within the footprint of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) Survey. Our monitoring campaign reveals over 40 accreting black holes and neutron stars -- distinguished from each other by their spectral shape in the hard band -- some of which undergo state changes over the month-long timescales captured by our legacy survey to date. We also discuss implications for this updated understanding of XRB populations on early-Universe measurements in, e.g., the 7 Ms Chandra Deep Field survey.

  1. Studies of the Origin of High-frequency Quasi-periodic Oscillations of Mass-accreting Black Holes in X-Ray Binaries with Next-generation X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshtipour, Banafsheh; Hoormann, Janie K.; Krawczynski, Henric

    2016-08-01

    Observations with RXTE (Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer) revealed the presence of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) of the X-ray flux from several accreting stellar-mass black holes. HFQPOs (and their counterparts at lower frequencies) may allow us to study general relativity in the regime of strong gravity. However, the observational evidence today does not yet allow us to distinguish between different HFQPO models. In this paper we use a general-relativistic ray-tracing code to investigate X-ray timing spectroscopy and polarization properties of HFQPOs in the orbiting Hotspot model. We study observational signatures for the particular case of the 166 Hz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the galactic binary GRS 1915+105. We conclude with a discussion of the observability of spectral signatures with a timing-spectroscopy experiment such as the LOFT (Large Observatory for X-ray Timing) and polarization signatures with space-borne X-ray polarimeters such as IXPE (Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer), PolSTAR (Polarization Spectroscopic Telescope Array), PRAXyS(Polarimetry of Relativistic X-ray Sources), or XIPE (X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer). A mission with high count rate such as LOFT would make it possible to get a QPO phase for each photon, enabling the study of the QPO-phase-resolved spectral shape and the correlation between this and the flux level. Owing to the short periods of the HFQPOs, first-generation X-ray polarimeters would not be able to assign a QPO phase to each photon. The study of QPO-phase-resolved polarization energy spectra would thus require simultaneous observations with a first-generation X-ray polarimeter and a LOFT-type mission.

  2. You’re Cut Off: HD and MHD Simulations of Truncated Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-01-01

    Truncated accretion disks are commonly invoked to explain the spectro-temporal variability from accreting black holes in both small systems, i.e. state transitions in galactic black hole binaries (GBHBs), and large systems, i.e. low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). In the canonical truncated disk model of moderately low accretion rate systems, gas in the inner region of the accretion disk occupies a hot, radiatively inefficient phase, which leads to a geometrically thick disk, while the gas in the outer region occupies a cooler, radiatively efficient phase that resides in the standard geometrically thin disk. Observationally, there is strong empirical evidence to support this phenomenological model, but a detailed understanding of the disk behavior is lacking. We present well-resolved hydrodynamic (HD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical models that use a toy cooling prescription to produce the first sustained truncated accretion disks. Using these simulations, we study the dynamics, angular momentum transport, and energetics of a truncated disk in the two different regimes. We compare the behaviors of the HD and MHD disks and emphasize the need to incorporate a full MHD treatment in any discussion of truncated accretion disk evolution.

  3. Observational Investigations on Contact Binaries in Multiple-star Systems and Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.

    2013-01-01

    The W UMa-type contact binaries are strongly interacting systems whose components both fill their critical Roche lobes and share a convective common envelope. The models of contact binaries are bottlenecked due to too many uncertain parameters. In the 1960s and 1970s, the common convective envelope model was accepted after several fierce controversies. And then, the thermal relaxation oscillation (TRO) model, the discontinuity model, and the angular momentum loss (AML) model appeared. However, in the past forty years, there lacked remarkable advance. The coexistence of many unknown parameters blocks the theoretical development of contact binaries. A study on the contact binaries in multiple star systems and star clusters, which could provide lots of information for their formation and evolution, may be a potential growing point for understanding these objects. More and more evidence shows that many of contact binaries are located in multiple star systems and star clusters. In this thesis, we observed and analyzed contact binaries in the forementioned systems. The observational and theoretical studies for contact binary are also summarized briefly. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Three contact binaries V1128 Tau, GZ And, VW Boo which possess visual companions show periodic oscillations. The period ranges from 16.7 years to 46.5 years. These oscillations probably come from the orbital movement of a close third body. (2) Four contact binaries GSC 02393-00680, V396 Mon, FU Dra, SS Ari which do not have visual companions also present periodic oscillations. Whether they are real members of multiple star systems needs further investigations. These oscillations probably result from the orbital movement of a close M-type companion. (3) The periods of three contact binaries EQ Cep, ER Cep and V371 Cep in the old open cluster NGC 188 show a long-term increase. There is a cyclic period oscillation in ER Cep, with a period of 5.4 years. We find that the total mass of

  4. A Multi-wavelength Study of the Close M-dwarf Eclipsing Binary System BX Tri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdelwitz, V.; Czesla, S.; Robrade, J.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first detailed X-ray study of the close dMe binary system BX Tri, whose optical variation has been continously monitored in the frame of the DWARF project (Pribulla et al.(2012)). We observed BX Tri with XMM-Newton for two full orbital periods and confirm that the system is an ultra-active M-dwarf binary showing frequent flares and an X-ray luminosity close to the saturation limit. The strong magnetic activity could have influenced the angular momentum evolution of the system via magnetic braking.

  5. Searching for Solar System Wide Binaries with Pan-STARRS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Protopapas, P.; Tholen, D. J.

    2007-10-01

    Roughly 60% of the observing time of the Pan-STARRS-1 (PS1) telescope will be dedicated to a "3pi steradian" survey with an observing cadence that is designed for the detection of near-Earth asteroids and slow-moving solar system bodies. Over this course of its 3.5 year cience mission, this unprecedented survey will discover nearly every asteroid, Trojan, Centaur, long-period comet, short-period comet, and trans-neptunian object (TNO) brighter than magnitude R=23. This census will be used to address a large number of questions regarding the physical and dynamical properties of the various small body populations of the solar system. Roughly 1-2% of TNOs are wide binaries with companions at separations greater than 1 arcsec and brightness differences less than 2 magnitudes (Kern & Elliot 2006; Noll et al 2007). These can be readily detected by PS1; we will carry out such a search with PS1 data. To do so, we will modify the Pan-STARRS Moving Object Processing System (MOPS) such that it will associate the components of resolved or marginally resolved binaries, link such pairs of detections obtained at different epochs, and the estimate the relative orbit of the binary. We will also determine the efficiency with which such binaries are detected as a function of the binary's relative orbit and the relative magnitudes of the components. Based on an estimated 7000 TNOs that PS1 will discover, we anticipate finding 70-140 wide binaries. The PS1 data, 60 epochs over three years, is naturally suited to determining the orbits of these objects. Our search will accurately determine the binary fraction for a variety of subclasses of TNOs.

  6. Transient Fe Emission features in AGN: A new diagnostic of Accreting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, T. J.; Reeves, J. R.; George, I. M.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2004-08-01

    Chandra and XMM data have revealed narrow and highly redshifted Fe K emission lines in a handful of AGN. Rapid flux variability and energy shifts of the lines have lead to speculations for their origin ranging from hotspots on the accretion disk to emission from decelerating ejected blobs of gas traveling close to the escape velocity. Whichever scenario proves true, these lines are invaluable in tracing gas close to the black hole, and arguably less subject to the ambiguities which have plagued interpretation of broad `disk lines'. I review observations of such lines to date and discuss progress possible with current and future instrumentation.

  7. Chandra Characterization of X-Ray Emission in the Young F-Star Binary System HD 113766

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, C. M.; Christian, D. J.; Wolk, S. J.; Günther, H. M.; Chen, C. H.; Grady, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    Using Chandra, we have obtained imaging X-ray spectroscopy of the 10–16 Myr old F-star binary HD 113766. We individually resolve the 1.″4 separation binary components for the first time in the X-ray and find a total 0.3–2.0 keV luminosity of 2.2 × 1029 erg s‑1, consistent with previous RASS estimates. We find emission from the easternmost, infrared-bright, dusty member HD 113766A to be only ∼10% that of the western, infrared-faint member HD 113766B. There is no evidence for a 3rd late-type stellar or substellar member of HD 113766 with Lx > 6 × 1025 erg s‑1 within 2‧ of the binary pair. The ratio of the two stars’ X-ray luminosity is consistent with their assignments as F2V and F6V by Pecaut et al. The emission is soft for both stars, kTApec = 0.30–0.50 keV, suggesting X-rays produced by stellar rotation and/or convection in young dynamos, but not accretion or outflow shocks, which we rule out. A possible 2.8 ± 0.15 (2σ) hr modulation in the HD 113766B X-ray emission is seen, but at very low confidence and of unknown provenance. Stellar wind drag models corresponding to Lx ∼ 2 × 1029 erg s‑1 argue for a 1 mm dust particle lifetime around HD 113766B of only ∼90,0000 years, suggesting that dust around HD 113766B is quickly removed, whereas 1 mm sized dust around HD 113766A can survive for >1.5 × 106 years. At 1028–1029 erg s‑1 X-ray luminosity, astrobiologically important effects, like dust warming and X-ray photolytic organic synthesis, are likely for any circumstellar material in the HD 113766 systems.

  8. Modeling microstructure evolution of binary systems subjected to irradiation and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Shchokotova, Olga M.; Lysenko, Irina O.; Kharchenko, Vasyl O.

    2015-07-01

    We study a change in mechanical properties of binary systems subjected to irradiation influence described by ballistic flux of atomic mixing having regular and stochastic contributions. By using numerical modeling based on the phase field approach we study dynamics of deformation fields in a previously irradiated system and in the binary system deformed during irradiation. An influence of both deterministic and stochastic components of ballistic flux onto both yield strength and ultimate strength is studied. We have found that degradation of mechanical properties relates to the formation of percolating clusters of shear bands. Considering a hardening coefficient we analyze stages of plastic deformation of both initially irradiated alloy and alloy subjected to sustained irradiation. Stability of binary alloy under mechanical loading in the form of shear strain with a constant rate and cyclic deformation is discussed.

  9. Realization of a Binary-Outcome Projection Measurement of a Three-Level Superconducting Quantum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerger, Markus; Macha, Pascal; Hamann, Andrés Rosario; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Juliusson, Kristinn; Fedorov, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    Binary-outcome measurements allow one to determine whether a multilevel quantum system is in a certain state while preserving quantum coherence between all orthogonal states. In this paper, we explore different regimes of the dispersive readout of a three-level superconducting quantum system coupled to a microwave cavity in order to implement binary-outcome measurements. By designing identical cavity-frequency shifts for the first and second excited states of the system, we realize strong projective binary-outcome measurements onto its ground state with a fidelity of 94.3%. Complemented with standard microwave control and low-noise parametric amplification, this scheme enables the quantum nondemolition detection of leakage errors and can be used to create sets of compatible measurements to reveal the contextual nature of superconducting circuits.

  10. Towards Bayesian Machine Learning for Estimating Parameters of Accretion Disk Models for SPH Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Amit; Montgomery, Michele; Wiegand, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Accretion disks are ubiquitous in Active Galactic Nuclei, in protostellar systems forming protoplanets, and in close binary star systems such as X-ray binaries, Cataclysmic Variables, and Algols, for example. Observations such as disk tilt are found in all of these different accreting system types, suggesting a common physics must be present. To understand the common connections between these different system types, which can help us understand their unique evolutions, we need to better understand the physics of accretion. For example, viscosity is typically a constant value in the disk of a system that is in a specific state such as a quiescent state. However, viscosity can't be constant throughout the disk, especially at the boundaries. To learn more about viscosity and other common parameters in these disk, we use Bayesian Inference and Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to make predictions of events to come in the numerical simulations of these accreting disks. In this work, we present our techniques and initial findings.

  11. DC CIRCUIT POWERED BY ORBITAL MOTION: MAGNETIC INTERACTIONS IN COMPACT OBJECT BINARIES AND EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Dong

    2012-09-20

    The unipolar induction DC circuit model, originally developed by Goldreich and Lynden-Bell for the Jupiter-Io system, has been applied to different types of binary systems in recent years. We show that there exists an upper limit to the magnetic interaction torque and energy dissipation rate in such a model. This arises because when the resistance of the circuit is too small, the large current flow severely twists the magnetic flux tube connecting the two binary components, leading to the breakdown of the circuit. Applying this limit, we find that in coalescing neutron star binaries, magnetic interactions produce negligible correction to the phase evolution of the gravitational waveform, even for magnetar-like field strengths. However, energy dissipation in the binary magnetosphere may still give rise to electromagnetic radiation prior to the final merger. For ultracompact white dwarf binaries, we find that unipolar induction does not provide adequate energy dissipation to explain the observed X-ray luminosities of several sources. For exoplanetary systems containing close-in Jupiters or super-Earths, the magnetic torque and energy dissipation induced by the orbital motion are negligible, except possibly during the early T Tauri phase, when the stellar magnetic field is stronger than 10{sup 3} G.

  12. Terrestrial planet formation surrounding close binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-11-01

    Most stars reside in binary/multiple star systems; however, previous models of planet formation have studied growth of bodies orbiting an isolated single star. Disk material has been observed around both components of some young close binary star systems. Additionally, it has been shown that if planets form at the right places within such disks, they can remain dynamically stable for very long times. Herein, we numerically simulate the late stages of terrestrial planet growth in circumbinary disks around 'close' binary star systems with stellar separations 0.05 AU⩽a⩽0.4 AU and binary eccentricities 0⩽e⩽0.8. In each simulation, the sum of the masses of the two stars is 1 M, and giant planets are included. The initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet formation within our Solar System by Chambers [Chambers, J.E., 2001. Icarus 152, 205-224], and around each individual component of the α Centauri AB binary star system by Quintana et al. [Quintana, E.V., Lissauer, J.J., Chambers, J.E., Duncan, M.J., 2002. Astrophys. J. 576, 982-996]. Multiple simulations are performed for each binary star system under study, and our results are statistically compared to a set of planet formation simulations in the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn system that begin with essentially the same initial disk of protoplanets. The planetary systems formed around binaries with apastron distances Q≡a(1+e)≲0.2 AU are very similar to those around single stars, whereas those with larger maximum separations tend to be sparcer, with fewer planets, especially interior to 1 AU. We also provide formulae that can be used to scale results of planetary accretion simulations to various systems with different total stellar mass, disk sizes, and planetesimal masses and densities.

  13. BIPOLAR JETS PRODUCED BY A SPECTROSCOPIC BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Mundt, Reinhard; Hamilton, Catrina M.; Herbst, William; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Winn, Joshua N.

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence that the spectroscopically identified bipolar jets of the pre-main sequence binary KH 15D (P = 48.4 d, {epsilon}{approx} 0.6, periastron separation {approx}18 R{sub A} , M{sub A} = 0.6 M {sub sun}, M{sub B} = 0.7 M {sub sun}) are a common product of the whole binary system, rather than being launched from either star individually. They may be launched from the innermost part of the circumbinary disk (CBD) or may result from the merging of two outflows driven by the individual stars. This evidence is based on high-resolution H{alpha} and [O I]{lambda}6300 line profiles obtained during eclipse phases of this nearly edge-on system. The occultation of star A (the only currently visible star) by the disk strongly suppresses the stellar H{alpha} and continuum emission and allows one to study the faint redshifted and blueshifted emission components of the bipolar jets. The strongest evidence for jet production by the whole binary system comes from the observed radial velocity symmetry of the two jet components relative to the systemic velocity of the binary in combination with current accretion models from the CBD onto a binary system.

  14. X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Walter H. G.; van Paradijs, Jan; van den Heuvel, Edward Peter Jacobus

    1997-01-01

    Preface; 1. The properties of X-ray binaries, N. E. White, F. Nagase and A. N. Parmar; 2. Optical and ultraviolet observations of X-ray binaries J. van Paradijs and J. E. McClintock; 3. Black-hole binaries Y. Tanaka and W. H. G. Lewin; 4. X-ray bursts Walter H. G. Lewin, Jan Van Paradijs and Ronald E. Taam; 5. Millisecond pulsars D. Bhattacharya; 6. Rapid aperiodic variability in binaries M. van der Klis; 7. Radio properties of X-ray binaries R. M. Hjellming and X. Han; 8. Cataclysmic variable stars France Anne-Dominic Córdova; 9. Normal galaxies and their X-ray binary populations G. Fabbiano; 10. Accretion in close binaries Andrew King; 11. Formation and evolution of neutron stars and black holes in binaries F. Verbunt and E. P. J. van den Heuvel; 12. The magnetic fields of neutron stars and their evolution D. Bhattacharya and G. Srinivasan; 13. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts K. Hurley; 14. A catalogue of X-ray binaries Jan van Paradijs; 15. A compilation of cataclysmic binaries with known or suspected orbital periods Hans Ritter and Ulrich Kolb; References; Index.

  15. Solubilization and quantification of lycopene in aqueous media in the form of cyclodextrin binary systems.

    PubMed

    Vertzoni, Maria; Kartezini, Theodora; Reppas, Christos; Archontaki, Helen; Valsami, Georgia

    2006-02-17

    An optimized kneading method for the preparation of lycopene-cyclodextrin binary systems was developed leading to solubilization of lycopene in water and 5% (w/v) dextrose solution. Lycopene quantification in the prepared binary systems was performed by a developed spectrometric method that followed a successful single-step extraction with dichloromethane. Storage stability characteristics of the binary systems were studied at 4 degrees C in solution and at -20 degrees C in the lyophilized products. Lycopene content was monitored at lambda(max)=482 nm, the limit of detection was 0.41 microg/ml and relative standard deviation was less than 3.1%. The results obtained with the spectrometric method were confirmed by a HPLC method. In the presence of cyclodextrins, lycopene concentration in water was 8.0+/-1.0, 27.1+/-3.2 and 16.0+/-2.2 microg/ml for beta-CD, HP-beta-CD and Me-beta-CD, respectively. In 5% (w/v) aqueous dextrose solutions the corresponding values were 16.0+/-1.8, 48.0+/-5.1 and 4.0+/-0.5 microg/ml, respectively. At 4 degrees C, storage stability of lycopene-cyclodextrin binary systems in water or 5% (w/v) aqueous dextrose solutions, was limited (t(1/2)=1-4 days). Addition of the antioxidant sodium metabisulfite increased the stability of lycopene-HP-beta-CD binary system in water. At -20 degrees C, the lyophilized lycopene-cyclodextrin binary systems were stable for at least 2 weeks.

  16. Recognition of binary x-ray systems utilizing the doppler effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, B. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of recognizing the duality of a single class of X-ray systems utilizing the Doppler effect is studied. The procedure is based on the presence of a period which coincides with the orbital period at the intensity of the radiation in a fixed energy interval of the X-ray component of a binary system.

  17. The Gibbs Energy Basis and Construction of Boiling Point Diagrams in Binary Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Norman O.

    2004-01-01

    An illustration of how excess Gibbs energies of the components in binary systems can be used to construct boiling point diagrams is given. The underlying causes of the various types of behavior of the systems in terms of intermolecular forces and the method of calculating the coexisting liquid and vapor compositions in boiling point diagrams with…

  18. THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF THE MILKY WAY: ACCRETION IN A COSMOLOGICAL CONTEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the significance of a planar arrangement in the spatial distribution of the Milky Way (MW) globular clusters (GCs). We find that, when separated on the basis of horizontal branch morphology and metallicity, the outermost canonical young halo (YH) GC sample (at galactocentric radii in excess of 10 kpc) exhibits an anisotropic distribution that may be equated to a plane (24 {+-} 4) kpc thick (rms) and inclined at 8 Degree-Sign {+-} 5 Degree-Sign to the polar axis of the MW disk. To quantify the significance of this plane we determine the fraction of times that an isotropic distribution replicates the observed distribution in Monte Carlo trials. The plane is found to remain significant at the >95% level outside a galactocentric radius of 10 kpc, inside this radius the spatial distribution is apparently isotropic. In contrast, the spatial distribution of the old halo sample outside 10 kpc is well matched by an isotropic distribution. The plane described by the outer YH GCs is indistinguishable in orientation from that presented by the satellite galaxies of the MW. Simulations have shown that the planar arrangement of satellites can arise as filaments of the surrounding large-scale structure feed into the MW's potential. We therefore propose that our results are direct observational evidence for the accreted origin of the outer YH GC population. This conclusion confirms numerous lines of evidence that have similarly indicated an accreted origin for this set of clusters from the inferred cluster properties.

  19. On radial oscillations in viscous accretion discs surrounding neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Xingming; Taam, Ronald E.

    1992-01-01

    Radial oscillations resulting from axisymmetric perturbations in viscous accretion disks surrounding neutron stars in X-ray binary systems have been investigated. Within the framework of the alpha-viscosity model a series of hydrodynamic calculations demonstrates that the oscillations are global for alpha of about 1. On the other hand, for alpha of 0.4 or less, the oscillations are local and confined to the disk boundaries. If viscous stresses acting in the radial direction are included, however, it is found that the disk can be stabilized. The application of such instabilities in accretion disks, without reference to the boundary layer region between the neutron star (or magnetosphere) and the inner edge of the disk, to the phenomenology of quasi-periodic oscillations is brought into question.

  20. MAXI/GSC detection of a possible X-ray flare from an dMe binary system YY Gem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Kanetou, S.; Tsuboi, Y.; Sasaki, R.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Kimura, M.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Arimoto, M.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Ohtsuki, H.; Tsunemi, H.; Imatani, R.; Negoro, H.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Itoh, D.; Yamaoka, K.; Morii, M.

    2015-09-01

    MAXI/GSC observed a possible X-ray flare from a dMe binary system YY Gem. The MAXI/GSC nova alert system triggered on the flare-like event from the position consistent with the active binary system YY Gem during a scan transit at 01:29:00 UT on September 24th 2015.

  1. Numerical calculations of mass transfer flow in semi-detached binary systems. [of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. A.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The details of the mass transfer flow near the inner Lagrangian point in a semidetached binary system are numerically calculated. A polytropic equation of state with n = 3/2 is used. The dependence of the mass transfer rate on the degree to which the star overfills its Roche lobe is calculated, and good agreement with previous analytic estimates is found. The variation of mass transfer rate which occurs if the binary system has a small eccentricity is calculated and is used to cast doubt on the model for superhumps in dwarf novae proposed by Papaloizou and Pringle (1979).

  2. Southern RS CVn systems - Candidate list. [spectral catalog of variable binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, E. J.; Stencel, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A list of 43 candidate RS CVn binary systems in the far southern hemisphere of the sky (south of -40 deg declination) is presented. The candidate systems were selected from the first two volumes of the Michigan Spectral Catalog (1975, 1978), which provides MK classifications for southern HD stars and identifies any unusual characteristics noted for individual stellar spectra. The selection criteria used were: (1) the occurrence of Ca II H and K emission; (2) known or suspected binary nature; (3) regular light variations of zero to one magnitude; and (4) spectral type between F0 and K2 and luminosity less than bright giant (II).

  3. Who Discovered the Binary System and Arithmetic? Did Leibniz Plagiarize Caramuel?

    PubMed

    Ares, J; Lara, J; Lizcano, D; Martínez, M A

    2017-03-09

    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) is the self-proclaimed inventor of the binary system and is considered as such by most historians of mathematics and/or mathematicians. Really though, we owe the groundwork of today's computing not to Leibniz but to the Englishman Thomas Harriot and the Spaniard Juan Caramuel de Lobkowitz (1606-1682), whom Leibniz plagiarized. This plagiarism has been identified on the basis of several facts: Caramuel's work on the binary system is earlier than Leibniz's, Leibniz was acquainted-both directly and indirectly-with Caramuel's work and Leibniz had a natural tendency to plagiarize scientific works.

  4. Shocks in the low angular momentum accretion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suková, Petra; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2015-04-01

    We address the variability of low luminous galactic nuclei including the Sgr A* or other transient accreting systems, e.g. the black hole X-ray binaries, such as GX 339-4 or IGR J17091. These sources exhibit bright X-ray flares and quasi-periodical oscillations and are theoretically interpreted as the quasi-spherical accretion flows, formed instead of or around Keplerianaccretion disks. In low angular momentum flows the existence of shocks for some range of leading parameters (energy, angular momentum and adiabatic constant of the gas) was studied semi-analytically. The possible hysteresis effect, caused by the fact that the evolution of the flow and the formation of the shock depends on its own history, was discovered. The presence of the shock in the accreted material is important for the observable properties of the out-coming radiation. In the shocked region the gas is dense and hot, thus much more luminous than in the other case. We study the appearance of standing shocks in low angular momentum gas accreting onto a black hole with numerical hydrodynamicalsimulations, using the ZEUS code with Paczynski-Wiitapseudo-Newtonian potential.

  5. Restablished Accretion in Post-outburst Classical Novae Revealed by X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernanz, Margarita; Ferri, Carlo; Sala, Glòria

    2009-05-01

    Classical novae are explosions on accreting white dwarfs (hereinafter WDs) in cataclysmic variables (hereinafter CVs) a hydrogen thermonuclear runaway on top of the WD is responsible for the outburst. X-rays provide a unique way to study the turn-off of H-burning, because super soft X-rays reveal the hot WD photosphere, but also to understand how accretion is established again in the binary system. Observations with XMM-Newton of some post-outburst novae have revealed such a process, but a coverage up to larger energies -as Simbol-X will provide- is fundamental to well understand the characteristics of the binary system and of the nova ejecta. We present a brief summary of our results up to now and prospects for the Simbol-X mission.

  6. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, J.; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    Adopting the hypothesis of accretion-induced magnetic field decay in neutron stars, the consequent evolution of a neutron star's spin and magnetic field are calculated. The results are consistent with observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Thermomagnetic effects could provide a possible physical mechanism for such accretion-induced field decay.

  7. a High-Resolution Study of the Active Binary System V824 ARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Stephen

    2001-09-01

    We propose to observe the active G5+K0 dwarf binary system V824 Ara (HD 155555), a very young (zero-age main-sequence or pre-main sequence) system with a 1.68 day orbital period, using the Chandra ACIS-S/HETG instrument. V824 Ara is a synchronized binary similar in age to the prototype young single K dwarf AB Dor. We will study the X-ray spectrum, both integrated over the whole exposure and as a function of orbital/rotational phase and overall emission level. We will use these spectra to infer the coronal temperature structure or DEM, and elemental abundances. We will compare these coronal properties to those of evolved active binaries (e.g., AR Lac), and also to those of AB Dor and similar young stars, to see if there are discernible differences due to binarity and evolutionary stage.

  8. From Accretion to Explosion and Beyond: Transforming White Dwarfs to Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne; Harris, R.

    2010-03-01

    White dwarfs accreting at high rates can grow in mass, exhibiting episodes of supersoft-source activity. Some can achieve the Chandrasekhar mass and will either become Type Ia supernovae or else will collapse, becoming neutron stars. We consider white dwarfs with giant donors, computing the rates of both supernovae and collapses. For the collapses, we follow each system to the end of accretion. Some of these systems will appear as ultraluminous x-ray sources and some will go on to become low-mass black holes. This scenario should be fairly common in young stellar populations and links a wide range of astrophysical phenomena. Indeed, it is a veritable cornucopia for the high-energy astrophysicist, offering accreting white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes, Type Ia supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, supersoft sources, ultraluminous sources, and neutron star and black hole binaries in globular clusters.

  9. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS: A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF PROTOSTELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xuepeng; Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M.; Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L.; Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Lee, Chin-Fei; Foster, Jonathan B.; Pineda, Jaime E. E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu

    2013-05-10

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.''5, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 AU to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64 {+-} 0.08 and 0.91 {+-} 0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I young stellar objects, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among main-sequence stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high-order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50 {+-} 0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I young stellar objects (0.31 {+-} 0.07) and main-sequence stars ({<=}0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary/multiple systems shows a general trend in which CSF increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67% {+-} 8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation, based on this work and

  10. Plasma physics of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concepts and phenomena that are needed to understand X- and gamma-ray sources are discussed. The capture of material from the wind or from the atmosphere or envelope of a binary companion star is described and the resulting types of accretion flows discussed. The reasons for the formation of a magnetosphere around the neutron star are explained. The qualitative features of the magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars are then described and compared with the qualitative features of the geomagnetosphere. The conditions for stable flow and for angular and linear momentum conservation are explained in the context of accretion by magnetic neutron stars and applied to obtain rough estimates of the scale of the magnetosphere. Accretion from Keplerian disks is then considered in some detail. The radial structure of geometrically thin disk flows, the interaction of disk flows with the neutron star magnetosphere, and models of steady accretion from Keplerian disks are described. Accretion torques and the resulting changes in the spin frequencies of rotating neutron stars are considered. The predicted behavior is then compared with observations of accretion-powered pulsars. Magnetospheric processes that may accelerate particles to very high energies, producing GeV and, perhaps, TeV gamma-rays are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms that decelerate and eventually stop accreting plasma at the surfaces of strongly magnetic neutron stars are described.

  11. On the effects of tidal interaction on thin accretion disks: An analytic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dgani, R.; Livio, M.; Regev, O.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate tidal effects on two-dimensional thin accretion disks in binary systems. We apply a perturbation expansion to obtain an analytic solution of the tidally induced waves. We obtain spiral waves that are stronger at the inner parts of the disks, in addition to a local disturbance which scales like the strength of the local tidal force. Our results agree with recent calculations of the linear response of the disk to tidal interaction.

  12. The accretion disk and ionized absorber of the 9.7 hr dipping black hole binary MAXI J1305–704

    SciTech Connect

    Shidatsu, M.; Ueda, Y.; Hori, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Nakahira, S.; Matsuoka, M.; Done, C.; Morihana, K.; Sugizaki, M.; Mihara, T.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Kawai, N.; Yamaoka, K.; Ebisawa, K.; Nagayama, T.; Matsunaga, N.

    2013-12-10

    We report the results from X-ray studies of the newly discovered black hole candidate MAXI J1305–704 based on Suzaku and Swift observations in the low/hard and high/soft states, respectively. The long Suzaku observation shows two types of clear absorption dips, both of which recur on a dip interval of 9.74 ± 0.04 hr, which we identify with the orbital period. There is also partially ionized absorption in the nondip (persistent) emission in both the high/soft state and, very unusually, the low/hard state. However, this absorption (in both states) has substantially lower ionization than that seen in other high inclination systems, where the material forms a homogeneous disk wind. Here instead the absorption is most likely associated with clumpy, compact structures associated with the dipping material, which we see uniquely in this source likely because we view it at a very large inclination angle. A large inclination angle is also favored, together with a low black hole mass, to explain the high disk temperature seen in the fairly low luminosity high/soft state, as Doppler boosting enhances the disk temperature at high inclination. The disk radius inferred from these data is significantly smaller than that of the soft component seen in the low/hard state, supporting models where the disk is truncated at low luminosities. We find, however, that the lack of variability power on timescales of ∼50 s in the Suzaku low/hard state data is difficult to explain, even with a low-mass black hole.

  13. A pebbles accretion model with chemistry and implications for the solar system in the lights of Juno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad

    2016-10-01

    The chemical compositions of the solar system giant planets are a major source of informations on their origins. Since the measurements by the Galileo probe, multiple models have been put forward to try and explain the noble gases enrichment in Jupiter. The most discussed among these are its formation in the outer cold nebula and its formation in a partially photoevaporated disk. In this work I couple a pebbles accretion model to the disk's chemistry and photoevaporation in order to make predictions from both scenarios and compare them to the upcoming Juno measurements. The model include pebbles and gas accretion, type I and II migration, photoevaporation and chemical measurements from meteorites, comets and disks. Population synthesis simulations are used to explore the models free parameters (planets initial conditions), where then the results are narrowed down using the planets chemical, dynamical and core mass costraints. We end up with a population that fits all of the constrains. These are then used to predict the oxygen abundance and core mass in Jupiter, to be compared to results of Juno. Same calculations are also done for Saturn and Neptune for comparison. I will present the results from these simulations as well as the predictions from all of the different models.Ali-Dib, M. (2016ab, submitted to MNRAS)

  14. CHARACTERIZING THE STELLAR PHOTOSPHERES AND NEAR-INFRARED EXCESSES IN ACCRETING T TAURI SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L.; Espaillat, C.; Hernandez, J.; Luhman, K. L.; D'Alessio, P.; Sargent, B. E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu E-mail: hernandj@cida.ve E-mail: p.dalessio@astrosmo.unam.mx

    2013-05-20

    Using NASA Infrared Telescope Facility SpeX data from 0.8 to 4.5 {mu}m, we determine self-consistently the stellar properties and excess emission above the photosphere for a sample of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) in the Taurus molecular cloud with varying degrees of accretion. This process uses a combination of techniques from the recent literature as well as observations of weak-line T Tauri stars to account for the differences in surface gravity and chromospheric activity between the T Tauri stars and dwarfs, which are typically used as photospheric templates for CTTS. Our improved veiling and extinction estimates for our targets allow us to extract flux-calibrated spectra of the excess in the near-infrared. We find that we are able to produce an acceptable parametric fit to the near-infrared excesses using a combination of up to three blackbodies. In half of our sample, two blackbodies at temperatures of 8000 K and 1600 K suffice. These temperatures and the corresponding solid angles are consistent with emission from the accretion shock on the stellar surface and the inner dust sublimation rim of the disk, respectively. In contrast, the other half requires three blackbodies at 8000, 1800, and 800 K, to describe the excess. We interpret the combined two cooler blackbodies as the dust sublimation wall with either a contribution from the disk surface beyond the wall or curvature of the wall itself, neither of which should have single-temperature blackbody emission. In these fits, we find no evidence of a contribution from optically thick gas inside the inner dust rim.

  15. Improving enzymatic production of diglycerides by engineering binary ionic liquid medium system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zheng; Kahveci, Derya; Ozçelik, Beraat; Xu, Xuebing

    2009-10-01

    The tunable property of ionic liquids (ILs) offers tremendous opportunity to rethink the strategy of current efforts to resolve technical challenges that occurred in many production approaches. To establish an efficient glycerolysis approach for enzymatic production of diglycerides (DG), this work reported a novel concept to improve DG yield by applying a binary IL system that consisted of one IL with better DG production selectivity and another IL being able to achieve higher conversion of triglycerides (TG). The candidates for combination were determined by individually examining lipase-catalyzed glycerolysis in different ILs, as a result, promising ones are divided into two groups based on their reaction specificities. The effects of parametric variables were then preliminarily evaluated, following a further investigation of the reaction performance in different binary IL systems from cross-group combinations. The combination of TOMA.Tf(2)N/Ammoeng 102 was employed for optimization by Response Surface Methodology. Eighty to eighty-five percent (mol%) of oil conversion and up to 90% (mol%) of total DG yield (73%, wt%) were obtained, which are markedly higher than those previously reported. This work demonstrated the practical feasibility to couple the technical advantage (high TG conversion and high DG production selective in this work) of individual ILs into a binary system to over-perform the reaction. It is believed that binary IL system could be also applicable to other enzymatic reaction systems for establishment of more efficient reaction protocols.

  16. Spiral Waves in Accretion Discs - Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffin, H. M. J.

    Spirals shocks have been widely studied in the context of galactic dynamics and protostellar discs. They may however also play an important role in some classes of close binary stars, and more particularly in cataclysmic variables. In this paper, we review the physics of spirals waves in accretion discs, present the results of numerical simulations and consider whether theory can be reconcilied with observations.

  17. Quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting magnetic white dwarfs. II. The asset of numerical modelling for interpreting observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busschaert, C.; Falize, É.; Michaut, C.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Mouchet, M.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Magnetic cataclysmic variables are close binary systems containing a strongly magnetized white dwarf that accretes matter coming from an M-dwarf companion. The high magnetic field strength leads to the formation of an accretion column instead of an accretion disk. High-energy radiation coming from those objects is emitted from the column close to the white dwarf photosphere at the impact region. Its properties depend on the characteristics of the white dwarf and an accurate accretion column model allows the properties of the binary system to be inferred, such as the white dwarf mass, its magnetic field, and the accretion rate. Aims: We study the temporal and spectral behaviour of the accretion region and use the tools we developed to accurately connect the simulation results to the X-ray and optical astronomical observations. Methods: The radiation hydrodynamics code Hades was adapted to simulate this specific accretion phenomena. Classical approaches were used to model the radiative losses of the two main radiative processes: bremsstrahlung and cyclotron. Synthetic light curves and X-ray spectra were extracted from numerical simulations. A fast Fourier analysis was performed on the simulated light curves. The oscillation frequencies and amplitudes in the X-ray and optical domains are studied to compare those numerical results to observational ones. Different dimensional formulae were developed to complete the numerical evaluations. Results: The complete characterization of the emitting region is described for the two main radiative regimes: when only the bremsstrahlung losses and when both cyclotron and bremsstrahlung losses are considered. The effect of the non-linear cooling instability regime on the accretion column behaviour is analysed. Variation in luminosity on short timescales (~1 s quasi-periodic oscillations) is an expected consequence of this specific dynamic. The importance of secondary shock instability on the quasi-periodic oscillation

  18. Orbital parameters and variability of the emission spectrum for the massive binary system 103 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    Based on high-resolution spectra taken near the He I 6678 Å line for the massive binary system 103 Tau, we have detected a weak absorption component belonging to the binary's secondary component. We have measured the radial velocities of both components, improved the previously known orbital parameters, and determined the new ones. The binary has an orbital period P orb = 58.305d, an orbital eccentricity e = 0.277, a radial velocity semi-amplitude of the bright component K A = 44.8 km s-1, and a component mass ratio M A / M B = 1.77. The absence of photometric variability and the estimates of physical parameters for the primary component suggest that the binary most likely has a considerable inclination of the orbital plane to the observer, i ≈ 50°-60°. In this case, the secondary component is probably a normal dwarf of spectral type B5-B8. Based on the spectra taken near the H α line, we have studied the variability of the emission profile. It is shown to be formed in the Roche lobe of the secondary component, but no traces of active mass exchange in the binary have been detected.

  19. Near-Infrared Polarimetry of the GG Tauri A Binary System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itoh, Yoichi; Oasa, Yumiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Abe, Lyu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ishii, Miki; Iye, Masanori; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; McElwain, Michael W.; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    A high angular resolution near-infrared image that shows the intensity of polarization for the GG Tau A binary system was obtained with the Subaru Telescope. The image shows a circumbinary disk scattering the light from the central binary. The azimuthal profile of the intensity of polarization for the circumbinary disk is roughly reproduced by a simple disk model with the Henyey-Greenstein phase function and the Rayleigh function, indicating there are small dust grains at the surface of the disk. Combined with a previous observation of the circumbinary disk, our image indicates that the gap structure in the circumbinary disk orbits counterclockwise, but material in the disk orbits clockwise. We propose that there is a shadow caused by material located between the central binary and the circumbinary disk. The separations and position angles of the stellar components of the binary in the past 20 yr are consistent with the binary orbit with a = 33.4 AU and e = 0.34.

  20. Accretion in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, G.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's F ring is the solar system's principal natural laboratory for direct observation of accretion and disruption processes. The ring resides in the Roche zone, where tidal disruption competes with self-gravity, which allows us to observe the lifecycle of moonlets. Just as nearby moons create structure at the B ring edge (Esposito et al. 2012) and the Keeler gap (Murray 2007), the F ring "shepherding" moons Prometheus and Pandora stir up ring material and create observably changing structures on timescales of days to decades. In fact, Beurle et al (2010) show that Prometheus makes it possible for "distended, yet gravitationally coherent clumps" to form in the F ring, and Barbara and Esposito (2002) predicted a population of ~1 km bodies in the ring. In addition to the observations over the last three decades, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Seventeen of those 27 features are associated with clumps of ring material. Two features are opaque in occultation, which makes them candidates for solid objects, which we refer to as Moonlets. The 15 other features partially block stellar signal for 22 m to just over 3.7 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. Upon visual inspection of the occultation profile, these features resemble Icicles, thus we will refer to them as such here. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals that Icicles are likely transient clumps, while Moonlets are possible solid objects. Optical depth is an indicator of clumping because more-densely aggregated material blocks more light; therefore, it is natural to imagine moonlets as later evolutionary stage of icicle, when looser clumps of material compact to form a feature that appears

  1. Evolution of Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in Merging Galaxies and Evidence for Potential Sub-parsec Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, Robert Scott; Galaxy Evolution Survey, Arkansas; Lacy, C. H. S.; Kennefick, D.; Kennefick, J.; Seigar, M.

    2010-01-01

    As a result of galactic mergers, a significant number of supermassive black holes are expected to be in binary systems and at various stages in their orbital evolution. During galactic mergers, matter in the form of gas and stars is available for the black holes to accrete, providing fuel for black hole growth and a potential mechanism for the onset of a quasar phase. To better understand how supermassive black holes and their active phases evolve over time, the Arkansas Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) team is studying binary black hole systems at a range of separations, r. We have examined the scarce number of binary systems (10,000 > r > 1,000 pc) to infer information about their individual masses, the amount of gas and dust in the nuclear regions, the accretion rates of the individual nuclei, and the estimated timescale for dynamical friction to reduce the black holes’ separation to parsec scales. We have compared these results to those from theoretical calculations. Furthermore, we have visually examined the spectra of SDSS quasars for "unusual” double-peaked emitters looking for evidence of binary orbital motion at separations of < 1 pc. If found, such close binaries will have measurable orbital periods and will provide important information about the environments of quasars in the final stages of a merger. In addition, they will be excellent sources for gravitational wave emission for future space-based detectors such as LISA.

  2. Compact object mergers: observations of supermassive binary black holes and stellar tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komossa, S.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    The capture and disruption of stars by supermassive black holes (SMBHs), and the formation and coalescence of binaries, are inevitable consequences of the presence of SMBHs at the cores of galaxies. Pairs of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and binary SMBHs are important stages in the evolution of galaxy mergers, and an intense search for these systems is currently ongoing. In the early and advanced stages of galaxy merging, observations of the triggering of accretion onto one or both BHs inform us about feedback processes and BH growth. Identification of the compact binary SMBHs at parsec and sub-parsec scales provides us with important constraints on the interaction processes that govern the shrinkage of the binary beyond the ``final parsec''. Coalescing binary SMBHs are among the most powerful sources of gravitational waves (GWs) in the universe. Stellar tidal disruption events (TDEs) appear as luminous, transient, accretion flares when part of the stellar material is accreted by the SMBH. About 30 events have been identified by multi-wavelength observations by now, and they will be detected in the thousands in future ground-based or space-based transient surveys. The study of TDEs provides us with a variety of new astrophysical tools and applications, related to fundamental physics or astrophysics. Here, we provide a review of the current status of observations of SMBH pairs and binaries, and TDEs, and discuss astrophysical implications.

  3. Interstellar medium perturbations on transport-dominated debris discs in binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.

    2012-04-01

    I explore the dynamics of small dust particles in transport-dominated circumstellar debris discs in binary star systems. In these tenuous discs the effects of mutual collisions are negligible and their morphology is determined by Poynting-Robertson drag and, possibly, by the strong perturbations induced by the interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM) flux of neutral atoms. The force due to the ISM flux can significantly affect the dynamical behaviour of the dust grains, causing a fast inward drift and a large periodic oscillation of both eccentricity and inclination. If the disc is around a star in a binary system, the gravity of the companion star competes with the ISM force and the dynamics is complex. The balance between the two forces depends strongly on the binary semimajor axis aB and eccentricity eB. In a scenario with an ISM flux similar to that observed in the Solar system neighbourhood, the binary secular perturbations, assuming a mass ratio of 0.5, dominate over the ISM force when aB < 600 au and eB= 0.2. This occurs when the dust disc is generated by a parent body ring encompassed between 50 and 60 aufrom the primary star. For a larger binary eccentricity eB= 0.6, the limit moves to aB < 700 au. Within these values of aB, the time-scale of the binary secular perturbations is much shorter than the period of the ISM-induced orbital variations, and the disc shape and density distribution are dominated by the companion gravity. It appears slightly eccentric and, if the binary is coplanar with the disc, only a limited warping due to the ISM perturbations is observed. In this scenario, the strong ISM perturbations, which may significantly affect debris discs around single stars embedded in strong ISM winds, are almost completely silenced. For larger semimajor axes, the scenario is reversed with the ISM perturbations ruling the dynamics of the dust. The disc develops a large clump oriented at 90° with respect to the direction of the ISM flux and it

  4. The Effect of Micro-lensing in Eclipsing Binary-star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Kelsey L.; Rowe, J.; Hansen, B.

    2013-04-01

    Using photometric observations from the Kepler Space Telescope of eclipsing binary star systems where one component is a white dwarf we have investigated the strength of the micro-lensing effect. We have examined the stellar binary KOI-81 from the Kepler mission. KOI-81 is composed of a white dwarf and a A-type main-sequence star in a 24 day circular orbit and have found that micro-lensing is detectable. We use our lightcurve models to measure the strength of the micro-lensing signal and refine the radius of the eclipsing white dwarf.

  5. Roche Potential with Luminous Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun; Hanamoto, Keishi

    2002-12-01

    The radiative environments of an interacting binary, which contains a luminous accretion disk, are investigated. The disk radiation field has no effect in the direction of the orbital plane, while it significantly affects in the polar direction. As the disk luminosity increases, the Roche potential around the compact star becomes hollow in the polar direction. It further crashes toward the pole, and a cone of avoidance appears at the normalized luminosity Γd ≡ Ld/LE = 0.5, where Ld is the disk luminosity and LE the Eddington luminosity of the compact star. The disk corona, the wind-fed accretion flow, and the common envelope suffer a remarkable influence by the luminous disk in active binaries. Of these, the wind-fed accretion is briefly discussed.

  6. Close PMS Binaries Evolution - Hints for Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez De Castro, Ana; Bisikalo, Dmitry; Sytov, Alexey; Ustamujic, Sabina

    2016-07-01

    In close PMS systems, accretion disks can either take up or release angular momentum and the details of evolution depend on the mass ratio between the two stars and on the orbit eccentricity (Artymowicz & Lubow, 1994; Bate & Bonnell, 1997; Hanawa et al., 2010, de Val Borro et al., 2011, Shi et al., 2012). Highly eccentric orbits favour the formation of spiral waves within the inner disk that do channel the flow as the accreting gas streams onto each star. In this framework, PMS binaries represent a special kind of interacting binaries where the circumbinary disk mediates in the star-star interaction as a continuous supply of angular momentum (and matter) to the system. The most general configuration consists of a circumbinary disk with inner radius about three times the semimajor axis and a variable distribution of matter within the hole. Circumstellar structures similar to disks are occasionally formed around the stars chanelling the accretion flow. The ultraviolet radiation generated by the stars and the accretion shocks can be used to map the distribution of matter in the hole and the CS environment (Gómez de Castro et al. 2016). In this contribution we describe monitoring strategies to map the variable distribution of CS matter in these systems and its extension to the study of exoplanetary systems hosting hot Jupiters.

  7. The evolution of highly compact binary stellar systems in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.; Meiksin, A.; Joss, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    A highly compact binary represents a system which is composed of a collapsed object (degenerate dwarf, neutron star, or black hole) in orbit with a low-mass (equal to or less than 0.5 solar mass) secondary star. Matter may be transferred from the secondary to the collapsed star due to the decay of the orbit resulting from the emission of gravitational radiation. The present investigation has the objective to study quantitatively the evolution of highly compact binaries in globular cluster cores, subject to the interplay of gravitational radiation and collisions with field stars. The investigation is exploratory in nature. The numerical methods employed are based on the techniques developed by Rappaport et al. (1982). It is found that occasional close encounters with field stars strongly dominate the evolution of highly compact binaries in dense globular cluster cores. Attention is given to the applicability of the findings to observations of X-ray sources and cataclysmic variables.

  8. LONG-ORBITAL-PERIOD PREPOLARS CONTAINING EARLY K-TYPE DONOR STARS. BOTTLENECK ACCRETION MECHANISM IN ACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tovmassian, G.; González–Buitrago, D.; Zharikov, S.; Reichart, D. E.; Haislip, J. B.; Ivarsen, K. M.; LaCluyze, A. P.; Moore, J. P.; Miroshnichenko, A. S. E-mail: dgonzalez@astro.unam.mx

    2016-03-01

    We studied two objects identified as cataclysmic variables (CVs) with periods exceeding the natural boundary for Roche-lobe-filling zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) secondary stars. We present observational results for V1082 Sgr with a 20.82 hr orbital period, an object that shows a low luminosity state when its flux is totally dominated by a chromospherically active K star with no signs of ongoing accretion. Frequent accretion shutoffs, together with characteristics of emission lines in a high state, indicate that this binary system is probably detached, and the accretion of matter on the magnetic white dwarf takes place through stellar wind from the active donor star via coupled magnetic fields. Its observational characteristics are surprisingly similar to V479 And, a 14.5 hr binary system. They both have early K-type stars as donor stars. We argue that, similar to the shorter-period prepolars containing M dwarfs, these are detached binaries with strong magnetic components. Their magnetic fields are coupled, allowing enhanced stellar wind from the K star to be captured and channeled through the bottleneck connecting the two stars onto the white dwarf’s magnetic pole, mimicking a magnetic CV. Hence, they become interactive binaries before they reach contact. This will help to explain an unexpected lack of systems possessing white dwarfs with strong magnetic fields among detached white+red dwarf systems.

  9. A massive binary black-hole system in OJ 287 and a test of general relativity.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, M J; Lehto, H J; Nilsson, K; Heidt, J; Takalo, L O; Sillanpää, A; Villforth, C; Kidger, M; Poyner, G; Pursimo, T; Zola, S; Wu, J-H; Zhou, X; Sadakane, K; Drozdz, M; Koziel, D; Marchev, D; Ogloza, W; Porowski, C; Siwak, M; Stachowski, G; Winiarski, M; Hentunen, V-P; Nissinen, M; Liakos, A; Dogru, S

    2008-04-17

    Tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity have mostly been carried out in weak gravitational fields where the space-time curvature effects are first-order deviations from Newton's theory. Binary pulsars provide a means of probing the strong gravitational field around a neutron star, but strong-field effects may be best tested in systems containing black holes. Here we report such a test in a close binary system of two candidate black holes in the quasar OJ 287. This quasar shows quasi-periodic optical outbursts at 12-year intervals, with two outburst peaks per interval. The latest outburst occurred in September 2007, within a day of the time predicted by the binary black-hole model and general relativity. The observations confirm the binary nature of the system and also provide evidence for the loss of orbital energy in agreement (within 10 per cent) with the emission of gravitational waves from the system. In the absence of gravitational wave emission the outburst would have happened 20 days later.

  10. Activity-Based Introduction to the Binary System: Nim Game Winning Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaninsky, A.

    2007-01-01

    The paper's aim is to demonstrate the utility of the well-known Nim game when it is used as a tool in teaching the binary system. A way to increase student comprehension, it also forms a basis for student projects and extracur