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Sample records for accreting plate boundaries

  1. The memory of the accreting plate boundary and the continuity of fracture zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed aeromagnetic anomaly map of the Mesozoic seafloor-spreading lineations southwest of Bermuda reveals the dominant magnetic grain of the oceanic crust and the character of the accreting boundary at the time of crustal formation. The magnetic anomaly pattern is that of a series of elongate lobes perpendicular to the fracture zone (flowline) trends. The linear sets of magnetic anomaly peaks and troughs have narrow regions of reduced amplitude anomalies associated with the fracture zones. During the period of Mesozoic geomagnetic polarity reversals (when 1200 km of central North Atlantic seafloor formed), the Atlantic accreting boundary consisted of stationary, elongate, spreading center cells that maintained their independence even though sometimes only minor spatial offsets existed between cells. Normal oceanic crustal structure was formed in the spreading center cells, but structural anomalies and discontinuities characteristic of fracture zones were formed at their boundaries, which parallel flowlines of Mesozoic relative plate motion in the central North Atlantic. We suggest that the memory for a stationary pattern of independent spreading center cells resides in the young brittle lithosphere at the accreting boundary where the lithosphere is weakest; here, each spreading center cell independently goes through its cylce of stress buildup, stress release, and crustal accretion, after which its memory is refreshed. The temporal offset between the peaks of the accretionary activity that takes place within each cell may provide the mechanism for maintaining the independence of adjacent spreading center cells through times when no spatial offset between the cells exists.

  2. Obliquity along plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippon, Mélody; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-12-01

    Most of the plate boundaries are activated obliquely with respect to the direction of far field stresses, as roughly only 8% of the plate boundaries total length shows a very low obliquity (ranging from 0 to 10°, sub-orthogonal to the plate displacement). The obliquity along plate boundaries is controlled by (i) lateral rheological variations within the lithosphere and (ii) consistency with the global plate circuit. Indeed, plate tectonics and magmatism drive rheological changes within the lithosphere and consequently influence strain localization. Geodynamical evolution controls large-scale mantle convection and plate formation, consumption, and re-organization, thus triggering plate kinematics variations, and the adjustment and re-orientation of far field stresses. These geological processes may thus result in plate boundaries that are not perpendicular but oblique to the direction of far field stresses. This paper reviews the global patterns of obliquity along plate boundaries. Using GPlate, we provide a statistical analysis of present-day obliquity along plate boundaries. Within this framework, by comparing natural examples and geological models, we discuss deformation patterns and kinematics recorded along oblique plate boundaries.

  3. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-02-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  4. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-01-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  5. The seismotectonics of plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, J.; Brune, J. N.; Goodkind, J.; Wyatt, F.; Agnew, D. C.; Beaumont, C.

    1981-01-01

    Research on the seismotectonics of plate boundaries is summarized. Instrumental development and an observational program designed to study various aspects of the seismotectonics of southern California and the northern Gulf of California are described. A unique superconducting gravimeter was further developed and supported under this program for deployment and operation at several sites. Work on Earth tides is also discussed.

  6. Plate Boundary Observatory in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Tsai, C.

    2003-12-01

    The island of Taiwan is situated in the plate boundary zone between the Eurasian and the Philippine Sea plates. The Philippine Sea plate is subducting northwestward underneath the Eurasian plate along the Ryukyu Trench in the north, while the Eurasian plate underthrusts the Philippine Sea plate along the Manila Trench in the south. Taking advantage of the extremely high strain rate in the Taiwan area, an integrated National Science Council project, Plate Boundary Observatory in Taiwan (PBOT), was initiated following the idea of US PBO. The scientific goal of PBOT is to observe the crustal deformation on various temporal and spatial scales in the Taiwan plate boundary zone employing available state of the art techniques for measuring crustal strain. The techniques include seismology, Global Positioning System (GPS), Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), borehole strainmeter, and earthquake geology. They are complementary to each other and form a complete spectrum of measuring various periods of crustal strain. The process of crustal deformation is generally quite slow. To obtain a reliable result, we usually need to persist in the observations for several years or even decades. Thus the PBOT should be a long-term project. In the first phase of 3 years period from 2003 to 2006, we will focus on the two areas, i.e. the plate suture zone in the Longitudinal Valley area and the western Taiwan where the higher seismic hazard is expected. A five-year national program, entitled ­Program for Earthquake and Active-fault Research (PEAR)­" was initiated after the disastrous 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake (Mw 7.6). As part of the PEAR, a dense continuous GPS array consisting of 150 new and about 50 pre-existing stations will be completed in the Taiwan area by the end of 2005 through a joint effort by the Central Weather Bureau and the Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica. The 50 new stations are going to be evenly distributed around the Taiwan Island. The other

  7. Tectonics of oblique plate boundary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Brune, Sascha; Leever, Karen A.; Fernández, Carlos; Czeck, Dyanna M.

    2016-12-01

    The relative displacement between lithospheric plates normally results in obliquely deforming plate boundaries. This is simply caused by the fact that, on plate tectonics basis, irregularly shaped plate boundaries are rarely perpendicular or parallel to small-circle rotation paths, which describe plate motion on a sphere (Fig. 1a). Global current relative plate motions estimated from geological data (DeMets et al., 2010; Argus et al., 2011) and GPS measurements (e.g., Kreemer et al., 2003; Argus et al., 2010) provide insight to the prevalent degrees of obliquity on Earth's surface. Based on these global data sets, Philippon and Corti (2016), statistically show that current orthogonal boundaries (obliquity angle smaller than 10°) represent around 8% of the total boundary length whereas strike-slip boundaries (obliquity angle larger than 80°) are encountered in < 10% of the total boundary length. Therefore, around 80% of active plate boundaries present oblique relative motions. Furthermore, changes in plate kinematics leading to migration or jumps in the rotation poles necessarily cause obliquity along former pure strike-slip or convergent/divergent boundaries (Fig. 1b).

  8. Plate Interface Rheology, Mechanical Coupling and Accretion during Subduction Infancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, P.; Yamato, P.; Mathieu, S.; Prigent, C.; Guillot, S.; Plunder, A.; Dubacq, B.; Monie, P.; Chauvet, A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding subduction rheology in both space and time has been a challenge since the advent of plate tectonics. We herein focus on "subduction infancy", that is the first ~1-5 My immediately following subduction nucleation, when a newly born slab penetrates into the upper plate mantle and heats up. The only remnants of this critical yet elusive geodynamic step are thin metamorphic soles, commonly found beneath pristine, 100-1000 km long portions of oceanic lithosphere emplaced on continents (i.e., ophiolites). Through the (i) worldwide compilation of pressure-temperature conditions of metamorphic sole formation augmented by pseudosection thermodynamic modeling, (ii) calculations of the viscosity of materials along the plate interface and (iii) generic numerical thermal models, we provide a conceptual model of dynamic plate interface processes during subduction infancy (and initiation s.l.). We show in particular how major rheological switches across the subduction interface control slab penetration, and the formation of metamorphic soles. Due to the downward progression of hydration and weakening of the mantle wedge with cooling, the lower plate (basalt, sediment) and the upper plate (mantle wedge) rheologies equalize and switch over a restricted temperature-time-depth interval (e.g., at ~800°C and ~1 GPa, during 0.1-2 My, for high-temperature metamorphic sole formation). These switches result in episodes of maximum interplate mechanical coupling, thereby slicing the top of the slab and welding pieces (basalt, sediment) to the base of the mantle wedge. Similar mechanical processes likely apply for the later, deeper accretion and exhumation of high-temperature oceanic eclogites in serpentinite mélanges, or for the accretion of larger tectonic slices. This model provides constraints on the effective rheologies of the crust and mantle and general understanding, at both rock and plate scale, for accretion processes and early slab dynamics.

  9. Accretion disc boundary layers around pre-main-sequence stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godon, P.

    1996-04-01

    One-dimensional time-dependent calculations of geometrically thin accretion disc boundary layers in pre-main-sequence stars are carried out for mass-accretion rates in the range M˙ = 5×10-7 to 10-4 Msunyr-1, α = 0.005-0.3 and different inner boundary conditions on the temperature. Two kinds of solution are obtained: those with a distinct thermal boundary layer (BL) component and those without a thermal boundary layer. For M˙ up to ≍10-5Msunyr-1, and for a α > αcritic ≍ 0.04, solutions with a thermal BL are obtained. For M˙ ≍ 10-4Msunyr-1 or for α < αcritic solutions without a thermal BL are obtained. The inner boundary condition Fr = σTeff4 leads to hotter solutions and higher threshold values αcritic while the no-flux boundary condition dT/dr=0 leads to cooler solutions. For a very low mass-accretion rate (M˙ ≍ 5×10-7Msunyr-1), the temperature in the disc drops below 104K and the ionization front is adjacent to the outer edge of the hot thermal boundary layer. In the vicinity of the ionization front, the medium becomes slightly optically thin. For a very high mass accretion rate, advection of energy (ζ = Ladv/Lacc ≍ 0.1-0.2) from the boundary layer into the inner boundary becomes important, and the boundary layer luminosity is only a fraction of its expected value.

  10. ON HYDROMAGNETIC STRESSES IN ACCRETION DISK BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Pessah, Martin E.; Chan, Chi-kwan E-mail: ckch@nordita.org

    2012-05-20

    Detailed calculations of the physical structure of accretion disk boundary layers, and thus their inferred observational properties, rely on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity satisfies this assumption by construction. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. In order to shed light on physically viable mechanisms for angular momentum transport in this inner disk region, we examine the generation of hydromagnetic stresses and energy density in differentially rotating backgrounds with angular frequencies that increase outward in the shearing-sheet framework. We isolate the modes that are unrelated to the standard MRI and provide analytic solutions for the long-term evolution of the resulting shearing MHD waves. We show that, although the energy density of these waves can be amplified significantly, their associated stresses oscillate around zero, rendering them an inefficient mechanism to transport significant angular momentum (inward). These findings are consistent with the results obtained in numerical simulations of MHD accretion disk boundary layers and challenge the standard assumption of efficient angular momentum transport in the inner disk regions. This suggests that the detailed structure of turbulent MHD accretion disk boundary layers could differ appreciably from those derived within the standard framework of turbulent shear viscosity.

  11. Statistical tests of additional plate boundaries from plate motion inversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, S.; Gordon, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the F-ratio test, a standard statistical technique, to the results of relative plate motion inversions has been investigated. The method tests whether the improvement in fit of the model to the data resulting from the addition of another plate to the model is greater than that expected purely by chance. This approach appears to be useful in determining whether additional plate boundaries are justified. Previous results have been confirmed favoring separate North American and South American plates with a boundary located beween 30 N and the equator. Using Chase's global relative motion data, it is shown that in addition to separate West African and Somalian plates, separate West Indian and Australian plates, with a best-fitting boundary between 70 E and 90 E, can be resolved. These results are generally consistent with the observation that the Indian plate's internal deformation extends somewhat westward of the Ninetyeast Ridge. The relative motion pole is similar to Minster and Jordan's and predicts the NW-SE compression observed in earthquake mechanisms near the Ninetyeast Ridge.

  12. Plate boundaries and extensional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pichon, Xavier; Angelier, Jacques; Sibuet, Jean-claude

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of the lithosphere under extensional strain is different whether the surface of the lithosphere is above or below the level that would be reached by the asthenosphere in its absence. Below this level, the continuity of the old lithosphere may be rapidly broken and oceanic accretion starts. Above this level, extensive thinning of the old lithosphère occurs until the level is reached, and then the asthenospheric material may break out to the surface. The thinning probably depends on the strain rate. Two extreme cases must be distinguished. For low strain rates: the lower lithosphere may be thinned by diapiric intrusions and lithospheric sinking; the upper one is much less affected, as occurs in the African Rifts or the Rhine Graben. For high strain rates, the whole lithosphère is thinned rather uniformly, as occurs in the Aegean region and probably on many continental margins. The greatest portion of the lithosphere is extended plastically, while the upper brittle portion, about 10 km thick, is extended by normal faulting. The pattern of faulting in these widely extended areas is compared to a pack of cards resting at an angle on a plane, with each card (tilted block) making a slight angle with the preceding one. Using this simple model, we discuss the case of the Pindos basin of the Hellenides. Similar intra-continental basins 150 to 400 km wide may be created before the subsidence increases sufficiently for oceanic accretion to begin. We point out that these basins are especially susceptible to compressional failure whenever the stress system changes from extensional to compressional. Consequently, many orogens are localized along such zones of earlier extension, as shown by geological studies of the Western Alpine system.

  13. An updated digital model of plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Peter

    2003-03-01

    A global set of present plate boundaries on the Earth is presented in digital form. Most come from sources in the literature. A few boundaries are newly interpreted from topography, volcanism, and/or seismicity, taking into account relative plate velocities from magnetic anomalies, moment tensor solutions, and/or geodesy. In addition to the 14 large plates whose motion was described by the NUVEL-1A poles (Africa, Antarctica, Arabia, Australia, Caribbean, Cocos, Eurasia, India, Juan de Fuca, Nazca, North America, Pacific, Philippine Sea, South America), model PB2002 includes 38 small plates (Okhotsk, Amur, Yangtze, Okinawa, Sunda, Burma, Molucca Sea, Banda Sea, Timor, Birds Head, Maoke, Caroline, Mariana, North Bismarck, Manus, South Bismarck, Solomon Sea, Woodlark, New Hebrides, Conway Reef, Balmoral Reef, Futuna, Niuafo'ou, Tonga, Kermadec, Rivera, Galapagos, Easter, Juan Fernandez, Panama, North Andes, Altiplano, Shetland, Scotia, Sandwich, Aegean Sea, Anatolia, Somalia), for a total of 52 plates. No attempt is made to divide the Alps-Persia-Tibet mountain belt, the Philippine Islands, the Peruvian Andes, the Sierras Pampeanas, or the California-Nevada zone of dextral transtension into plates; instead, they are designated as "orogens" in which this plate model is not expected to be accurate. The cumulative-number/area distribution for this model follows a power law for plates with areas between 0.002 and 1 steradian. Departure from this scaling at the small-plate end suggests that future work is very likely to define more very small plates within the orogens. The model is presented in four digital files: a set of plate boundary segments; a set of plate outlines; a set of outlines of the orogens; and a table of characteristics of each digitization step along plate boundaries, including estimated relative velocity vector and classification into one of 7 types (continental convergence zone, continental transform fault, continental rift, oceanic spreading ridge

  14. The Rivera-Cocos Plate Boundary Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandy, W. L.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Michaud, F.; Ortega Ramírez, J.

    2013-05-01

    The nature of the boundary between the Rivera and Cocos plates has long been controversial. Early studies (predominantly earthquake studies) suggested that it was a NE oriented left lateral transform boundary. With the collection of multi-beam bathymetric data during the SEAMAT cruise of the N/O Jean Charcot in 1987 it became clear that this early proposal was not entirely correct as no clear transform morphology was observed. Shortly after the SEAMAT campaign, three main proposals emerged to explain this lack of transform morphology. The first two proposals favored the results of earthquake studies over the new multibeam data. The first proposed that the boundary is indeed a left-lateral transform boundary, you just cannot see it. In other words, it was a diffuse boundary and the resolution of the multi-beam data was not sufficient to reveal the associated deformation. The second proposal was that it was an east-west oriented, dextral transform, the proposal being based on the results of an earthquake directivity analysis. The third proposal favored the morphologic data over the earthquake data and proposed that the plate boundary was not a transform boundary, but was instead a divergent boundary, at least near the Middle America Trench in what is now called the EL Gordo Graben. Implicit in this proposal was that the earthquake activity did not reflect plate motions but rather were the result of local stresses. Since 2002, several marine geophysical campaigns have been conducted in the area of the Rivera-Cocos plate boundary with the aim of resolving this debate. During the 2002 BART and FAMEX campaigns of the N/O L'ATALANTE, multibeam bathymetric and seafloor backscatter data were collected along the boundary. During the MARTIC04 and MARTIC05 campaigns of the B/O EL PUMA dense total field magnetic surveys were conducted covering the entire plate boundary. Lastly, the multibeam coverage obtained during the BART/FAMEX campaigns was extended northward during the

  15. Turbulent boundary layer over flexible plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Parand; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2016-11-01

    This research describes the structure of a turbulent boundary layer flow with a zero pressure gradient over elastic plates. The elastic plates made of a thin aluminum sheets with thickness between 50 and 500 microns were placed on the floor of a subsonic wind tunnel and exposed to a turbulent boundary layer flow with a free stream velocity between 20m/s and 100m/s. The ceiling of the test section of the wind tunnel is adjustable so that a nearly zero pressure gradient is obtained in the test section. Hot-wire anemometry was used to measure the velocity components. Mean, fluctuating velocities and Reynolds stresses will be presented and compared with the values of a rigid plate.

  16. Viscoelastic deformation near active plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Model deformations near the active plate boundaries of Western North America using space-based geodetic measurements as constraints are discussed. The first six months of this project were spent gaining familarity with space-based measurements, accessing the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Computer, and building time independent deformation models. The initial goal was to see how well the simplest elastic models can reproduce very long base interferometry (VLBI) baseline data. From the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Service, a total of 18 VLBI baselines are available which have been surveyed on four or more occasions. These data were fed into weighted and unweighted inversions to obtain baseline closure rates. Four of the better quality lines are illustrated. The deformation model assumes that the observed baseline rates result from a combination of rigid plate tectonic motions plus a component resulting from elastic strain build up due to a failure of the plate boundary to slip at the full plate tectonic rate. The elastic deformation resulting from the locked plate boundary is meant to portray interseismic strain accumulation. During and shortly after a large interplate earthquake, these strains are largely released, and points near the fault which were previously retarded suddenly catch up to the positions predicted by rigid plate models. Researchers judge the quality of fit by the sum squares of weighted residuals, termed total variance. The observed baseline closures have a total variance of 99 (cm/y)squared. When the RM2 velocities are assumed to model the data, the total variance increases to 154 (cm/y)squared.

  17. Delivery of volatiles to terrestrial planets during accretion: Setting the stage for plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins-Tanton, L.; Tikoo, S.

    2012-04-01

    A persistent problem in planetary science is how and when plate tectonics can begin in planetary evolution. On Earth, plate tectonics is thought to be facilitated by the low-viscosity asthenosphere, which obtains its low viscosity partly through low pressure, and partly through a water content on the order of hundreds of parts per million, likely trapped in the crystal structure of nominally anhydrous silicate minerals. Subduction zones introduce water contents of that magnitude to the mantle that circulates above the sinking oceanic plate, and subduction zones are sometimes cited as the process that hydrates an originally dry planetary interior. Thus there is a chicken-and-egg problem: If a damp asthenosphere is needed for plate tectonics, but plate tectonics itself creates the damp asthenosphere, how does the process initiate? Despite the existence of a metallic (reduced) core, both the compositions of meteorites and the certainty of radial mixing during accretion suggest that the Earth and other rocky planets accreted with some non-zero water content. Tracking water partitioning between magma ocean fluids and solidifying mantle minerals suggests that the planetary interior could begin with a non-zero water content. Here we present models for the interior water content of the Earth following accretion, and hypothesize about a dynamic processes that may have sped the development of plate tectonics. On an Earth-sized planet a magma ocean would solidify to produce very dense near-surface solids that also contain the bulk of the water held in the solid state, and the bulk of the incompatible elements. During gravitationally-driven overturn shallow, dense, damp solids carry their water as they sink into the perovskite stability zone and transform the bulk of their mineralogy into perovskite. The last solids that form near the surface exceed the likely water saturation levels of perovskite and will be forced to dewater as they cross the boundary into the lower mantle

  18. Circum-arctic plate accretion - Isolating part of a pacific plate to form the nucleus of the Arctic Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churkin, M.; Trexler, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    A mosaic of large lithospheric plates rims the Arctic Ocean Basin, and foldbelts between these plates contain numerous allochthonous microplates. A new model for continental drift and microplate accretion proposes that prior to the late Mesozoic the Kula plate extended from the Pacific into the Arctic. By a process of circumpolar drift and microplate accretion, fragments of the Pacific basin, including parts of the Kula plate, were cut off and isolated in the Arctic Ocean, the Yukon-Koyukuk basin in Alaska, and the Bering Sea. ?? 1980.

  19. Global plate boundary evolution and kinematics since the late Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Maloney, Kayla T.; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon E.; Seton, Maria; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-11-01

    Many aspects of deep-time Earth System models, including mantle convection, paleoclimatology, paleobiogeography and the deep Earth carbon cycle, require high-resolution plate motion models that include the evolution of the mosaic of plate boundaries through time. We present the first continuous late Paleozoic to present-day global plate model with evolving plate boundaries, building on and extending two previously published models for the late Paleozoic (410-250 Ma) and Mesozoic-Cenozoic (230-0 Ma). We ensure continuity during the 250-230 Ma transition period between the two models, update the absolute reference frame of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic model and add a new Paleozoic reconstruction for the Baltica-derived Alexander Terrane, now accreted to western North America. This 410-0 Ma open access model provides a framework for deep-time whole Earth modelling and acts as a base for future extensions and refinement. We analyse the model in terms of the number of plates, predicted plate size distribution, plate and continental root mean square (RMS) speeds, plate velocities and trench migration through time. Overall model trends share many similarities to those for recent times, which we use as a first order benchmark against which to compare the model and identify targets for future model refinement. Except for during the period 260-160 Ma, the number of plates (16-46) and ratio of "large" plates (≥ 107.5 km2) to smaller plates ( 2.7-6.6) are fairly similar to present-day values (46 and 6.6, respectively), with lower values occurring during late Paleozoic assembly and growth of Pangea. This temporal pattern may also reflect difficulties in reconstructing small, now subducted oceanic plates further back in time, as well as whether a supercontinent is assembling or breaking up. During the 260-160 Ma timeframe the model reaches a minima in the number of plates, in contrast to what we would expect during initial Pangea breakup and thus highlighting the need for refinement

  20. Accretion/underplating, detachment and exhumation: short/long-term rheology of the subduction plate interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agard, Philippe; Angiboust, Samuel; Plunder, Alexis; Guillot, Stéphane; Yamato, Philippe; Oncken, Onno; Ruh, Jonas; Burov, Evgueni; Bonnet, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    The presence of km-scale accreted terranes/units in both ancient and present-day subduction zones attests to changes in strain localization along the plate interface, whereby these terranes/units get detached from the downgoing slab (or, in places, are eroded away from the tip of the upper plate) and either directly exhumed or accreted/underplated below the upper plate before final exhumation. The rock record (P-T-t data) indicates that, for a given subduction zone, exhumation is episodic: no more than a few My compared to the ~100 My lifetime of typical subduction zones. Not much is known, however, regarding this process and important open questions remain: what exactly is episodic (i.e., detachment from the slab and/or exhumation?), for how long and where? How is mechanical coupling impacted by the initial structure of the incoming plates (structural/lithological heterogeneities, thermo-fluid regime, geodynamic boundary conditions, etc...)? We herein present both new and literature structural and P-T-t data ranging from shallow (i.e., 15-20 km) to intermediate depths (~100 km) along the subduction interface, that span a range from long-term to short-lived events of underplating and/or exhumation, and confront them with the recent wealth of geophysical data gathered on subduction zones. Structural and petrological data indicate that the slicing of km-scale units mostly occurs at specific depths where major mechanical changes occur along the plate interface: at 30-40 km (downdip of the seismogenic zone) and 70-80 km (where mechanical coupling between the two plates resumes and where eclogites get critically dense). This suggests that switches in mechanical coupling (i.e., in the rheology of the material) are key in controlling the ability to detach pieces from the slab (and that later exhumation is rather controlled by large-scale, lithospheric-scale boundary conditions). The study of rock remnants detached from the slab and underplated during subduction infancy (i

  1. Plate tectonics beyond plate boundaries: the role of ancient structures in intraplate orogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip; Pysklywec, Russell; Stephenson, Randell

    2015-04-01

    The development of orogens that occur at a distance from plate boundaries (i.e., `intraplate' deformation) cannot be adequately explained through conventional plate tectonic theory. Intraplate deformation infers a more complex argument for lithospheric and mantle interaction than plate tectonic theory allows. As a result, the origins of intraplate orogenesis are enigmatic. One hypothesis is the amalgamation of continental material (i.e., micro-plates) leaves inherent scars on the crust and mantle lithosphere. Previous studies into continent-continent collisions identify a number of scenarios from accretionary tectonics that affect the crust and mantle (namely, the development of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, lithospheric underplating, lithospheric delamination, and lithospheric subduction). Any of these processes may weaken the lithosphere allowing episodic reactivation of faults within continental interiors. Hence, continental convergence (i.e., shortening) at a time after continental collision may cause the already weakened crust and mantle lithosphere to produce intraplate deformation. In order to better understand the processes involved in deformation away from plate boundaries, we present suites of continental shortening models (using the high-resolution thermal-mechanical modelling code SOPALE) to identify the preferred style of deformation. We model ancient structures by applying weak subduction scarring, changing the rheological conditions, and modifying the thermal structure within the lithosphere. To highlight the role of surface processes on plate and lithosphere deformation, the effect of climate-driven erosion and deposition on the tectonic structure of intraplate deformation is also addressed. We explore the relevance of the models to previously studied regions of intraplate orogenesis, including the Pyrenees in Europe, the Laramide orogen in North America, Tien Shan orogen in Central Asia, and Central Australia. The findings of the simulations with

  2. Spherical accretion: the influence of inner boundary and quasi-periodic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhang, Prasun; Sharma, Prateek; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-09-01

    Bondi accretion assumes that there is a sink of mass at the centre - which in the case of a black hole (BH) corresponds to the advection of matter across the event horizon. Other stars, such as a neutron star (NS), have surfaces and hence the infalling matter has to slow down at the surface. We study the initial value problem in which the matter distribution is uniform and at rest at t = 0. We consider different inner boundary conditions for BHs and NSs: outflow boundary condition (mimicking mass sink at the centre) valid for BHs; and reflective and steady-shock (allowing gas to cross the inner boundary at subsonic speeds) boundary conditions for NSs. We also obtain a similarity solution for cold accretion on to BHs and NSs. 1D simulations show the formation of an outward-propagating and a standing shock in NSs for reflective and steady-shock boundary conditions, respectively. Entropy is the highest at the bottom of the subsonic region for reflective boundary conditions. In 2D this profile is convectively unstable. Using steady-shock inner boundary conditions, the flow is unstable to the standing accretion shock instability in 2D, which leads to global shock oscillations and may be responsible for quasi-periodic oscillations seen in the light curves of accreting systems. For steady accretion in the quiescent state, spherical accretion rate on to an NS can be suppressed by orders of magnitude compared to that on to a BH.

  3. Vibration of thermally stressed plates with various boundary conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    By discarding Lurie's (1952) assumption of mode identity, it is shown that linear theory correctly predicts the frequency of all modes of a thermally stressed cantilever plate as well as the frequency and modes of plates with other boundary conditions. The thermal stress distribution is obtained for whatever temperature distribution and boundary conditions that may be specified. Experimental results are compared to calculated results for several different plates. Boundary conditions for the plates range from a plate with edges completely clamped to a plate with edges completely free with various other combinations of mixed and uniform edge conditions. Comparison of calculated data to experimental data shows that accurate, quantitative results can be obtained from linear theory for 'as cut' real plates for a significant range of heating when the assumption of mode identity is discarded.

  4. Study on plate silencer with general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gongmin; Zhao, Xiaochen; Zhang, Wenping; Li, Shuaijun

    2014-09-01

    A plate silencer consists of an expansion chamber with two side-branch rigid cavities covered by plates. Previous studies showed that, in a duct, the introduction of simply supported or clamped plates into an air conveying system could achieve broadband quieting from low to medium frequencies. In this study, analytical formulation is extended to the plate silencer with general boundary conditions. A set of static beam functions, which are a combination of sine series and third-order polynomial, is employed as the trial functions of the plate vibration velocity. Greens function and Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral are used to solve the sound radiation in the duct and the cavity, and then the vibration velocity of the plate is obtained. Having obtained the vibration velocity, the pressure perturbations induced by the plate oscillation and the transmission loss are found. Optimization is carried out in order to obtain the widest stopband. The transmission loss calculated by the analytical method agrees closely with the result of the finite element method simulation. Further studies with regard to the plate under several different classical boundary conditions based on the validated model show that a clamped-free plate silencer has the worst stopband. Attempts to release the boundary restriction of the plate are also made to study its effect on sound reflection. Results show that a softer end for a clamped-clamped plate silencer helps increase the optimal bandwidth, while the same treatment for simply supported plate silencer will result in performance degradation.

  5. The Plate Boundary Observatory Borehole Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasting, M.; Eakins, J.; Anderson, G.; Hodgkinson, K.; Johnson, W.; Mencin, D.; Smith, S.; Jackson, M.; Prescott, W.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the NSF-funded EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory, UNAVCO will install and operate 103 borehole seismic stations throughout the western United States. These stations continuously record three- component seismic data at 100 samples per second, using Geo-Space HS-1-LT 2-HZ geophones in a sonde developed by SONDI and Consultants (Duke University). Each seismic package is connected to an uphole Quanterra Q330 data logger and Marmot external buffer, from which UNAVCO retrieves data in real time. UNAVCO uses the Antelope software suite from Boulder Real-Time Technologies (BRTT) for all data collection and transfer, metadata generation and distribution, and monitoring of the network. The first stations were installed in summer 2005, with 19 stations installed by September 2006, and a total of 28 stations expected by December 2006. In a prime example of cooperation between the PBO and USArray components of EarthScope, the USArray Array Network Facility (ANF), operated by UC San Diego, handled data flow and network monitoring for the PBO seismic stations in the initial stages of network operations. We thank the ANF staff for their gracious assistance over the last several months. Data flow in real time from the remote stations to the UNAVCO Boulder Network Operations Center, from which UNAVCO provides station command and control; verification and distribution of metadata; and basic quality control for all data. From Boulder, data flow in real time to the IRIS DMC for final quality checks, archiving, and distribution. Historic data are available from June 2005 to the present, and are updated in real time with typical latencies of less than ten seconds. As of 1 September 2006, the PBO seismic network had returned 60 GB of raw data. Please visit http://pboweb.unavco.org for additional information on the PBO seismic network.

  6. Defining the plate boundaries in the Azores region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M. S.; Bastos, L.; Miranda, J. M.; Lourenço, N.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Noomen, R.; Simons, W.

    2006-08-01

    The Azores Archipelago occupies the boundary zone where three major tectonic plates (Eurasia, Nubia, and North America) meet to form the Azores Triple Junction. Repeat observations from six campaigns carried out between 1993 and 2001 for the TANGO network of GPS sites now allow reliable estimations of the current motions of the involved plates at millimeter-scale resolution. Analysis of these space-geodetic data demonstrates that, during the observation period, Santa Maria Island followed the average Nubian plate movement and Graciosa Island mimicked the average Eurasian plate behavior. All other GPS sites display intermediate behavior, consistent with their locations within the active inter-plate deformation area. The active deformation area is well modeled by an elastic half-space approach, with the segmentation of the Eurasian-Nubian plate boundary constrained by other geophysical data.

  7. Tectonics of the Scotia-Antarctica plate boundary constrained from seismic and seismological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civile, D.; Lodolo, E.; Vuan, A.; Loreto, M. F.

    2012-07-01

    The plate boundary between the Scotia and Antarctic plates runs along the broadly E-W trending South Scotia Ridge. It is a mainly transcurrent margin that juxtaposes thinned continental and transitional crust elements with restricted oceanic basins and deep troughs. Seismic profiles and regional-scale seismological constraints are used to define the peculiarities of the crustal structures in and around the southern Scotia Sea, and focal solutions from recent earthquakes help to understand the present-day geodynamic setting. The northern edge of the western South Scotia Ridge is marked by a sub-vertical, left-lateral master fault. Locally, a narrow wedge of accreted sediments is present at the base of the slope. This segment represents the boundary between the Scotia plate and the independent South Shetland continental block. Along the northern margin of the South Orkney microcontinent, the largest fragment of the South Scotia Ridge, an accretionary prism is present at the base of the slope, which was possibly created by the eastward drift of the South Orkney microcontinent and the consequent subduction of the transitional crust present to the north. East of the South Orkney microcontinent, the physiography and structure of the plate boundary are less constrained. Here the tectonic regime exhibits mainly strike-slip behavior with some grade of extensional component, and the plate boundary is segmented by a series of NNW-SSE trending release zones which favored the fragmentation and dispersion of the crustal blocks. Seismic data have also identified, along the north-western edge of the South Scotia Ridge, an elevated region - the Ona Platform - which can be considered, along with the Terror Rise, as the conjugate margin of the Tierra del Fuego, before the Drake Passage opening. We propose here an evolutionary sketch for the plate boundary (from the Late Oligocene to the present) encompassing the segment from the Elephant Island platform to the Herdman Bank.

  8. Locking, mass flux and topographic response at convergent plate boundaries - the Chilean case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin. Towards the short end of the time scale, deformation appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. This has fundamental implications for spatial and temporal distribution of seismic hazard. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for the forearc response.

  9. Extending Alaska's plate boundary: tectonic tremor generated by Yakutat subduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wech, Aaron G.

    2016-01-01

    The tectonics of the eastern end of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone are complicated by the inclusion of the Yakutat microplate, which is colliding into and subducting beneath continental North America at near-Pacific-plate rates. The interaction among these plates at depth is not well understood, and further east, even less is known about the plate boundary or the source of Wrangell volcanism. The drop-off in Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) seismicity could signal the end of the plate boundary, the start of aseismic subduction, or a tear in the downgoing plate. Further compounding the issue is the possible presence of the Wrangell slab, which is faintly outlined by an anemic, eastward-dipping WBZ beneath the Wrangell volcanoes. In this study, I performed a search for tectonic tremor to map slow, plate-boundary slip in south-central Alaska. I identified ∼11,000 tremor epicenters, which continue 85 km east of the inferred Pacific plate edge marked by WBZ seismicity. The tremor zone coincides with the edges of the downgoing Yakutat terrane, and tremors transition from periodic to continuous behavior as they near the aseismic Wrangell slab. I interpret tremor to mark slow, semicontinuous slip occurring at the interface between the Yakutat and North America plates. The slow slip region lengthens the megathrust interface beyond the WBZ and may provide evidence for a connection between the Yakutat slab and the aseismic Wrangell slab.

  10. The Okhotsk Plate and the Eurasia-North America plate boundary zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindle, David; Mackey, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The Eurasia-North America plate boundary zone transitions from spreading at rates of ~ 25mm/yr in the North Atlantic, to compression at rates of ~ 5mm/yr in the region of the Okhotsk plate. Because the pole of rotation between Eurasia and North America lies more or less on their mutual boundary, there is a linear change in rate along the boundary, and regions near the euler pole are subject to extremely low deformation rates. The Okhotsk - Eurasia - North America triple junction lies slightly south of the rotation pole, placing the Okhotsk plate entirely in a weakly contractional setting. Regions near the triple junction absorb 1mm/yr contraction. Further south, towards the shoreline of the Okhotsk sea, up to 5 mm/yr contraction may be absorbed within the plate. How shortening is accommodated across the boundary remains an open question. One possibility is wholesale extrusion of the entire Okhotsk plate (or possibly its northwestern corner) along two plate boundary strike slip faults (Eurasia-Okhostk and North America Okhotsk). The problem with this model is that the seismic record does not presently clearly support it, with the largest events distributed both within the plate interior and on its boundaries. This may suggest that instead, the Okhotsk plate, and particularly its north-western end, consists of a series of smaller blocks which shuffle against each other, partially accommodating extrusion, but also permitting some internal deformation and change of shape of the Okhotsk plate itself. We present analyses of the very sparse seismic record from the region, as well as geometric-kinematic, tectonic models of the possible deformation of northwest Okhotsk to try to better understand the different probabilities of how this slowly deforming plate boundary zone is behaving.

  11. Linking mantle dynamics, plate tectonics and surface processes in the active plate boundary zones of eastern New Guinea (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, S.; Moucha, R.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Hoke, G. D.; Bermudez, M. A.; Webb, L. E.; Braun, J.; Rowley, D. B.; Insel, N.; Abers, G. A.; Wallace, L. M.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Eastern New Guinea lies within the rapidly obliquely converging Australian (AUS)- Pacific (PAC) plate boundary zone and is characterized by transient plate boundaries, rapidly rotating microplates and a globally significant geoid high. As the AUS plate moved northward in the Cenozoic, its leading edge has been a zone of subduction and arc accretion. The variety of tectonic settings in this region permits assessment of the complex interplay among mantle dynamics, plate tectonics, and surface processes. Importantly, the timescale of tectonic events (e.g., subduction, (U)HP exhumation, seafloor spreading) are within the valid bounds of mantle convection models. A record of changes in bathymetry and topography are preserved in high standing mountain belts, exhumed extensional gneiss domes and core complexes, uplifted coral terraces, and marine sedimentary basins. Global seismic tomography models indicate accumulation of subducted slabs beneath eastern New Guinea at the bottom of the upper mantle (i.e., <660km depth). Some of the deeply subducted material may indeed be buoyant subducted AUS continental margin (to depths of ~250-300 km), as well as subducted continental material that has reached the point of no return (i.e., > 250-300 km). Preliminary global-scale backward advected mantle convection models, driven by density inferred from joint seismic-geodynamic tomography models, exhibit large-scale flow associated with these subducted slab remnants and predict the timing and magnitude (up to 1500 m) of dynamic topography change (both subsidence and uplift) since the Oligocene. In this talk we will explore the effects of large-scale background mantle flow and plate tectonics on the evolution of topography and bathymetry in eastern New Guinea, and discuss possible mechanisms to explain basin subsidence and surface uplift in the region.

  12. A diffuse plate boundary model for Indian Ocean tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, D. A.; Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Stein, S.; Argus, D.

    1985-01-01

    It is suggested that motion along the virtually aseismic Owen fracture zone is negligible, so that Arabia and India are contained within a single Indo-Arabian plate divided from the Australian plate by a diffuse boundary. The boundary is a zone of concentrated seismicity and deformation commonly characterized as 'intraplate'. The rotation vector of Australia relative to Indo-Arabia is consistent with the seismologically observed 2 cm/yr of left-lateral strike-slip along the Ninetyeast Ridge, north-south compression in the Central Indian Ocean, and the north-south extension near Chagos.

  13. Composite transform-convergent plate boundaries: description and discussion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, H.F.; Coleman, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    The leading edge of the overriding plate at an obliquely convergent boundary is commonly sliced by a system of strike-slip faults. This fault system is often structurally complex, and may show correspondingly uneven strain effects, with great vertical and translational shifts of the component blocks of the fault system. The stress pattern and strain effects vary along the length of the system and change through time. These margins are considered to be composite transform-convergent (CTC) plate boundaries. Examples are given of structures formed along three CTC boundaries: the Aleutian Ridge, the Solomon Islands, and the Philippines. The dynamism of the fault system along a CTC boundary can enhance vertical tectonism and basin formation. This concept provides a framework for the evaluation of petroleum resources related to basin formation, and mineral exploration related to igneous activity associated with transtensional processes. ?? 1992.

  14. Dynamic behaviour of thin composite plates for different boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprintu, Iuliana E-mail: rotaruconstantin@yahoo.com; Rotaru, Constantin E-mail: rotaruconstantin@yahoo.com

    2014-12-10

    In the context of composite materials technology, which is increasingly present in industry, this article covers a topic of great interest and theoretical and practical importance. Given the complex design of fiber-reinforced materials and their heterogeneous nature, mathematical modeling of the mechanical response under different external stresses is very difficult to address in the absence of simplifying assumptions. In most structural applications, composite structures can be idealized as beams, plates, or shells. The analysis is reduced from a three-dimensional elasticity problem to a oneor two-dimensional problem, based on certain simplifying assumptions that can be made because the structure is thin. This paper aims to validate a mathematical model illustrating how thin rectangular orthotropic plates respond to the actual load. Thus, from the theory of thin plates, new analytical solutions are proposed corresponding to orthotropic rectangular plates having different boundary conditions. The proposed analytical solutions are considered both for solving equation orthotropic rectangular plates and for modal analysis.

  15. BOLIVAR & GEODINOS: Investigations of the Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.; Working Groups, B.

    2006-12-01

    The southern Caribbean-South American plate boundary has many similarities to California's San Andreas system: 1) The CAR-SA system consists of a series of strands of active right lateral strike-slip faults extending >1000 km from the Antilles subduction zone. This system has several names and includes the El Pilar, Coche, San Sebastian, Moron, and Oca faults. 2) The CAR-SA relative velocity has been about 20 mm/yr of mostly right lateral motion since about 55 Ma, giving a total displacement on the CAR-SA plate boundary similar to that of the San Andreas system. 3) The plate boundary has about 10% convergence in western SA, with less as one moves eastward due to relative convergence between North and South America. 4) The CAR-SA system has fold and thrust belts best developed continentward of the strike-slip faults, similar to the San Andreas. 5) There is a big bend in the CAR plate boundary at approximately the same distance from the Antilles trench as the big bend in Southern California is from the Cascadia subduction zone. The tectonic origins of the CAR-SA plate boundary and the San Andreas are very different, however, despite the similarities between the systems. Rather than impingement of a ridge on a trench, the CAR-SA system is thought to have resulted from a continuous oblique collision of the southern end of a Cretaceous island arc system with the northern edge of South America. During this process the CAR island arc and the modern CAR plate overrode a proto-Caribbean plate and destroyed a Mesozoic passive margin on the northern edge of SA. BOLIVAR and GEODINOS are multi-disciplinary investigations of the lithosphere and deeper structures associated with the diffuse CAR-SA plate boundary zone. We review a number of observations regarding the plate boundary obtained or confirmed from these studies: 1) The Caribbean Large Igneous Province, being overridden by the Maracaibo block in western Venezuela, can be identified beneath Aruba and coastal Venezuela

  16. Iberian plate kinematics: A jumping plate boundary between Eurasia and Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Srivastava, S.P.; Schouten, Hans; Roest, W.R.; Klitgord, Kim D.; Kovacs, L.C.; Verhoef, J.; Macnab, R.

    1990-01-01

    THE rotation of Iberia and its relation to the formation of the Pyrenees has been difficult to decipher because of the lack of detailed sea-floor spreading data, although several models have been proposed1-7. Here we use detailed aeromagnetic measurements from the sea floor offshore of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland to show that Iberia moved as part of the African plate from late Cretaceous to mid-Eocene time, with a plate boundary extending westward from the Bay of Biscay. When motion along this boundary ceased, a boundary linking extension in the King's Trough to compression along the Pyrenees came into existence. Finally, since the late Oligocene, Iberia has been part of the Eurasian plate, with the boundary between Eurasia and Africa situated along the Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone.

  17. Swath sonar mapping of Earth's submarine plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V. L.; Celnick, M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B. F.

    2014-12-01

    The recent loss of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in an area of the Indian Ocean where less than 5% of the seafloor is mapped with depth sounding data (Smith and Marks, EOS 2014) highlights the striking lack of detailed knowledge of the topography of the seabed for much of the worlds' oceans. Advances in swath sonar mapping technology over the past 30 years have led to dramatic improvements in our capability to map the seabed. However, the oceans are vast and only an estimated 10% of the seafloor has been mapped with these systems. Furthermore, the available coverage is highly heterogeneous and focused within areas of national strategic priority and community scientific interest. The major plate boundaries that encircle the globe, most of which are located in the submarine environment, have been a significant focus of marine geoscience research since the advent of swath sonar mapping. While the location of these plate boundaries are well defined from satellite-derived bathymetry, significant regions remain unmapped at the high-resolutions provided by swath sonars and that are needed to study active volcanic and tectonic plate boundary processes. Within the plate interiors, some fossil plate boundary zones, major hotspot volcanoes, and other volcanic provinces have been the focus of dedicated research programs. Away from these major tectonic structures, swath mapping coverage is limited to sparse ocean transit lines which often reveal previously unknown deep-sea channels and other little studied sedimentary structures not resolvable in existing low-resolution global compilations, highlighting the value of these data even in the tectonically quiet plate interiors. Here, we give an overview of multibeam swath sonar mapping of the major plate boundaries of the globe as extracted from public archives. Significant quantities of swath sonar data acquired from deep-sea regions are in restricted-access international archives. Open access to more of these data sets would

  18. Repeating Earthquakes on the Queen Charlotte Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, T. W.; Bostock, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) is a major plate boundary located off the northwest coast of North America that has produced large earthquakes in 1949 (M8.1) and more recently in October, 2012 (M7.8). The 2012 event was dominated by thrusting despite the fact that plate motions at the boundary are nearly transcurrent. It is now widely believed that the plate boundary comprises the QCF (i.e., a dextral strike-slip fault) as well as an element of subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the North American Plate. Repeating earthquakes and seismic tremor have been observed in the vicinity of the QCF; providing insight into the spatial and temporal characteristics of repeating earthquakes is the goal of this research. Due to poor station coverage and data quality, traditional methods of locating earthquakes are not applicable to these events. Instead, we have implemented an algorithm to locate local (i.e., < 100 km distance to epicenter) earthquakes using a single, three-component seismogram. This algorithm relies on the P-wave polarization and, through comparison with larger local events in the Geological Survey of Canada catalogue, is shown to yield epicentral locations accurate to within 5-10 km. A total of 24 unique families of repeating earthquakes has been identified, and 4 of these families have been located with high confidence. Their epicenters locate directly on the trace of the QCF and their depths are shallow (i.e., 5-15 km), consistent with the proposed depth of the QCF. Analysis of temporal recurrence leading up to the 2012 M7.8 event reveals a non-random pattern, with an approximately 15 day periodicity. Further analysis is planned to study whether this behaviour persists after the 2012 event and to gain insight into the effects of the 2012 event on the stress field and frictional properties of the plate boundary.

  19. Boundary between stable and unstable regimes of accretion. Ordered and chaotic unstable regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinova, A. A.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new study of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable regime of accretion on to rotating magnetized stars in a set of high grid resolution three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations performed in low-viscosity discs. We find that the boundary between the stable and unstable regimes is determined almost entirely by the fastness parameter ωs = Ω⋆/ΩK(rm), where Ω⋆ is the angular velocity of the star and ΩK(rm) is the angular velocity of the Keplerian disc at the disc-magnetosphere boundary r = rm. We found that accretion is unstable if ωs ≲ 0.6. Accretion through instabilities is present in stars with different magnetospheric sizes. However, only in stars with relatively small magnetospheres, rm/R⋆ ≲ 7, do the unstable tongues produce chaotic hotspots on the stellar surface and irregular light curves. At even smaller values of the fastness parameter, ωs ≲ 0.45, multiple irregular tongues merge, forming one or two ordered unstable tongues that rotate with the angular frequency of the inner disc. This transition occurs in stars with even smaller magnetospheres, rm/R⋆ ≲ 4.2. Most of our simulations were performed at a small tilt of the dipole magnetosphere, Θ = 5°, and a small viscosity parameter α = 0.02. Test simulations at higher α values show that many more cases become unstable, and the light curves become even more irregular. Test simulations at larger tilts of the dipole Θ show that instability is present, however, accretion in two funnel streams dominates if Θ ≳ 15°. The results of these simulations can be applied to accreting magnetized stars with relatively small magnetospheres: Classical T Tauri stars, accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars, and cataclysmic variables.

  20. Inter-plate aseismic slip on the subducting plate boundaries estimated from repeating earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sequences of repeating earthquakes are caused by repeating slips of small patches surrounded by aseismic slip areas at plate boundary zones. Recently, they have been detected in many regions. In this study, I detected repeating earthquakes which occurred in Japan and the world by using seismograms observed in the Japanese seismic network, and investigated the space-time characteristics of inter-plate aseismic slip on the subducting plate boundaries. To extract repeating earthquakes, I calculate cross-correlation coefficients of band-pass filtering seismograms at each station following Igarashi [2010]. I used two data-set based on USGS catalog for about 25 years from May 1990 and JMA catalog for about 13 years from January 2002. As a result, I found many sequences of repeating earthquakes in the subducting plate boundaries of the Andaman-Sumatra-Java and Japan-Kuril-Kamchatka-Aleutian subduction zones. By applying the scaling relations among a seismic moment, recurrence interval and slip proposed by Nadeau and Johnson [1998], they indicate the space-time changes of inter-plate aseismic slips. Pairs of repeating earthquakes with the longest time interval occurred in the Solomon Islands area and the recurrence interval was about 18.5 years. The estimated slip-rate is about 46 mm/year, which correspond to about half of the relative plate motion in this area. Several sequences with fast slip-rates correspond to the post-seismic slips after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (M9.0), the 2006 Kuril earthquake (M8.3), the 2007 southern Sumatra earthquake (M8.5), and the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0). The database of global repeating earthquakes enables the comparison of the inter-plate aseismic slips of various plate boundary zones of the world. I believe that I am likely to detect more sequences by extending analysis periods in the area where they were not found in this analysis.

  1. Franciscan complex calera limestones: Accreted remnants of farallon plate oceanic plateaus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarduno, J.A.; McWilliams, M.; Debiche, M.G.; Sliter, W.V.; Blake, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Calera Limestone, part of the Franciscan Complex of northern California, may have formed in a palaeoenvironment similar to Hess and Shatsky Rises of the present north-west Pacific1. We report here new palaeomagnetic results, palaeontological data and recent plate-motion models that reinforce this assertion. The Calera Limestone may have formed on Farallon Plate plateaus, north of the Pacific-Farallon spreading centre as a counterpart to Hess or Shatsky Rises. In one model2, the plateaus were formed by hotspots close to the Farallon_Pacific ridge axis. On accretion to North America, plateau dissection in the late Cretaceous to Eocene (50-70 Myr) could explain the occurrence of large volumes of pillow basalt and exotic blocks of limestone in the Franciscan Complex. Partial subduction of the plateaus could have contributed to Laramide (70-40 Myr) compressional events3. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  2. Tectonics of the Nazca-Antarctic plate boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson-Fontana, Sandra; Larson, Roger L.; Engeln, Joseph F.; Lundgren, Paul; Stein, Seth

    1987-01-01

    A new bathymetric chart of part of the Chile transform system is constructed, based mainly on an R/V Endeavor survey from 100 deg W to its intersection with the East Ridge of the Juan Fernandez microplate. A generally continuous lineated trend can be followed through the entire region, with the transform valley being relatively narrow and well-defined from 109 deg W to approximately 104 deg 30 min W. The fracture zone then widens to the east, with at least two probable en echelon offsets to the south at 104 deg and 102 deg W. Six new strike-slip mechanisms along the Chile Transform and one normal fault mechanism near the northern end of the Chile Rise, inverted together with other plate-motion data from the eastern portion of the boundary, produce a new best-fit Euler pole for the Nazca-Antarctic plate pair, providing tighter constraints on the relative plate motions.

  3. Imprints of weak lithospheric plate boundaries in the observed geoid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrunin, Alexey G.; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Schmeling, Harro; Shahraki, Meysam

    2014-05-01

    The observed geoid is highly sensitive to both: density-viscosity variations within the Earth and lithosphere dynamics. While geoid undulations induced by the mantle dynamics is a subject of numerous studies, the effect of plate tectonics on the geoid and dynamic topography remains an open issue. In present study we investigate a joint effect of weak zones, dividing lithospheric plates, and lateral viscosity variations (LVV) in the whole mantle on the observed geoid. A new numerical technique is based on the substantially revised method introduced by Zhang and Christensen (1993) for solving the Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations in the spectral domain with strong LVV. Weak plate boundaries (WPB) are introduced based on the integrated global model of plate boundary deformations GSRM (Kreemer et al., 2003). We show that the effect of WPB on the geoid is significant and reaches -40 m to 70 m with RMS ~20 m. Maximal WPB-related anomalies are observed over large subduction zones in South America and the Southwestern Pacific in agreement with previous studies. The positive geoid anomaly in South America could be explained largely by a dynamic effect of decoupling of the Nazca and South American plates. Mid-ocean ridges are mostly characterized by negative changes of the geoid compared to the model without WPB. The amplitude of the effect depends on the viscosity contrasts across WPB until its value reaches the limit of 2.5-3 orders of magnitude. This value might be considered as the level at which plates are completely decoupled. The effect of WPB alone, exceeds the effect of LVV in the whole mantle and generally does not correlate with it. However, inclusion of LVV reduces the geoid perturbations due to WPB by about 10 m. Therefore, it is important to consider all these factors together. The geoid changes mainly result from changes of the dynamic topography, which are about -300 to +500 m. The obtained results show that including WPB may significantly improve the

  4. Finite element modeling of stress in the Nazca plate - Driving forces and plate boundary earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The state of stress within the Nazca plate due to plate driving forces and large plate boundary earthquakes has been analyzed by applying a finite element method using the wave front solution technique to models of the intraplate stress field in a single plate using a refined grid. Although only static elastic models have been explicitly calculated, certain limiting cases of an elastic plate over a viscous asthenosphere were also treated. A state of nearly east-west compression inferred from the source mechanism of thrust earthquakes in the interior of the plate requires ridge pushing forces. The net pulling force on the oceanic plate by the subducted slab has a maximum value comparable to pushing forces. The estimated horizontal deviatoric stress in intraplate regions, based on potential forces associated with the ridge, is on the order of a few hundred bars. The intraplate stress field in the region of the 1960 earthquake may change by a few tens of bars at most once the asthenosphere has relaxed, with changes on the order of one bar occurring at greater distances into the plate. The changes in the intraplate stress field are probably not noticeable unless the lithosphere is near failure.

  5. Angular Momentum Transport and Variability in Boundary Layers of Accretion Disks Driven by Global Acoustic Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2012-11-01

    Disk accretion onto a weakly magnetized central object, e.g., a star, is inevitably accompanied by the formation of a boundary layer near the surface, in which matter slows down from the highly supersonic orbital velocity of the disk to the rotational velocity of the star. We perform high-resolution two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations in the equatorial plane of an astrophysical boundary layer with the goal of exploring the dynamics of non-axisymmetric structures that form there. We generically find that the supersonic shear in the boundary layer excites non-axisymmetric quasi-stationary acoustic modes that are trapped between the surface of the star and a Lindblad resonance in the disk. These modes rotate in a prograde fashion, are stable for hundreds of orbital periods, and have a pattern speed that is less than and of the order of the rotational velocity at the inner edge of the disk. The origin of these intrinsically global modes is intimately related to the operation of a corotation amplifier in the system. Dissipation of acoustic modes in weak shocks provides a universal mechanism for angular momentum and mass transport even in purely hydrodynamic (i.e., non-magnetized) boundary layers. We discuss the possible implications of these trapped modes for explaining the variability seen in accreting compact objects.

  6. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT AND VARIABILITY IN BOUNDARY LAYERS OF ACCRETION DISKS DRIVEN BY GLOBAL ACOUSTIC MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Stone, James M.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-11-20

    Disk accretion onto a weakly magnetized central object, e.g., a star, is inevitably accompanied by the formation of a boundary layer near the surface, in which matter slows down from the highly supersonic orbital velocity of the disk to the rotational velocity of the star. We perform high-resolution two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations in the equatorial plane of an astrophysical boundary layer with the goal of exploring the dynamics of non-axisymmetric structures that form there. We generically find that the supersonic shear in the boundary layer excites non-axisymmetric quasi-stationary acoustic modes that are trapped between the surface of the star and a Lindblad resonance in the disk. These modes rotate in a prograde fashion, are stable for hundreds of orbital periods, and have a pattern speed that is less than and of the order of the rotational velocity at the inner edge of the disk. The origin of these intrinsically global modes is intimately related to the operation of a corotation amplifier in the system. Dissipation of acoustic modes in weak shocks provides a universal mechanism for angular momentum and mass transport even in purely hydrodynamic (i.e., non-magnetized) boundary layers. We discuss the possible implications of these trapped modes for explaining the variability seen in accreting compact objects.

  7. Formation of plate boundaries: The role of mantle volatilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, Tetsuzo; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2014-02-01

    In the early Earth, convection occurred with the accumulation of thick crust over a weak boundary layer downwelling into the mantle (Davies, G.F., 1992. On the emergence of plate tectonics. Geology 20, 963-966.). This would have transitioned to stagnant-lid convection as the mantle cooled (Solomatov, V.S., Moresi, L.-N., 1997. Three regimes of mantle convection with non-Newtonian viscosity and stagnant lid convection on the terrestrial planets. Geophys. Res. Lett. 24, 1907-1910.) or back to a magma ocean as the mantle heated (Sleep, N., 2000. Evolution of the mode of convection within terrestrial planets. J. Geophys. Res. 105(E7): 17563-17578). Because plate tectonics began operating on the Earth, subduction must have been initiated, thus avoiding these shifts. Based on an analogy with the continental crust subducted beneath Hindu Kush and Burma, we propose that the lithosphere was hydrated and/or carbonated by H2O-CO2 vapors released from magmas generated in upwelling plumes and subsequently volatilized during underthrusting, resulting in lubrication of the thrust above, and subduction of the lithosphere along with the overlying thick crust. Once subduction had been initiated, serpentinized forearc mantle may have formed in a wedge-shaped body above a dehydrating slab. In relict arcs, suture zones, or rifted margins, any agent that warms and dehydrates the wedge would weaken the region surrounding it, and form various types of plate boundaries depending on the operating tectonic stress. Thus, once subduction is initiated, formation of plate boundaries might be facilitated by a major fundamental process: weakening due to the release of pressurized water from the warming serpentinized forearc mantle.

  8. What drives micro-plate motion and deformation in the northeastern Caribbean plate boundary region?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, R. M. A.; Wortel, M. J. R.; van Benthem, S.

    2015-12-01

    The north Caribbean plate boundary zone is a broad deformation zone with several fault systems and tectonic blocks that move with different velocities. The indentation by the Bahamas Platform (the "Bahamas Collision") is generally invoked as a cause of this fragmentation. We propose that a second driver of deformation is the western edge of the south-dipping Puerto Rico slab moving sideways with the North America plate. This proposal derives from our recently imaged tomographic structure of the Lesser Antilles - Puerto Rico slab. The westward motion of the slab edge results in a push on the Caribbean plate further west. We refer to this second mechanism for deformation as "Slab Edge Push". The motion of the North America plate relative to the Caribbean plate causes both drivers to migrate from east to west. The Bahamas Collision and Slab Edge Push have been operating simultaneously since the Miocene. The question is the relative importance of the two mechanisms. We use mechanical finite element models that represent the two mechanisms from the Late Oligocene (30 Ma) to the Present. For the Present, both models successfully reproduce observed deformation, implying that both models are viable. Back in time the Slab Edge Push mechanism better reproduces observations. Neither mechanism successfully reproduces the observed Miocene counter-clockwise rotation of Puerto Rico. We use this rotation to tune a final model that includes fractional contributions of both mechanisms. Both mechanisms contribute equally to the motion of the Caribbean plate. We find that the Slab Edge Push was the dominant driver of deformation in the north Caribbean plate boundary zone since 30 Ma.

  9. Turbulent thermal boundary layer on a permeable flat plate

    SciTech Connect

    Vigdorovich, I. I.

    2007-06-15

    Scaling laws are established for the profiles of temperature, turbulent heat flux, rms temperature fluctuation, and wall heat transfer in the turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with transpiration. In the case of blowing, the temperature distribution represented in scaling variables outside the viscous sublayer has a universal form known from experimental data for flows over impermeable flat plates. In the case of suction, the temperature distribution is described by a one-parameter family of curves. A universal law of heat transfer having the form of a generalized Reynolds analogy provides a basis for representation of the heat flux distributions corresponding to different Reynolds numbers and transpiration velocities in terms of a function of one variable. The results are obtained without invoking any special closure hypotheses.

  10. Prototypical Concepts and Misconceptions of Plate Tectonic Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, D. F.; Patino, L. C.

    2003-12-01

    Students of geology encounter many prototypical/exemplar concepts* that include representative, but not necessarily defining, features and characteristics. This study of students' prototypical representations of plate tectonic boundaries indicates that their representations are rich sources of information about their misconceptions about plate tectonics. After lectures in plate tectonics and mountain building, 353 students in a general education geology class were asked to draw a continent-continent convergent boundary. For this study, a correct answer is defined as having the major features in correct proportions as depicted in the plate boundary diagrams on the USGS web. Fifty-two percent of the drawings were either incorrect or incomplete such that they could not be interpreted. Only 48% were readily interpretable, and of these 22% drew the boundary correctly, showing a thickening of crust where two continents collide. Thirty-three percent drew the boundary showing concave slabs of continental crust as one might imagine two pieces of firm rubber pushed together on a rigid surface and 45% depicted mountains as one might imagine inverted ice cream cones on a rigid plank. Twenty-one senior class geology majors and graduate students were given the same assignment. Forty-eight percent rendered a correct drawing, whereas 38% drew the same ice cream cone on a plank type picture that 45% of the general education students drew. In a second class of 12 geology majors, only 1 student drew a cross section of a continent-ocean boundary similar to standard representation. Four of 12 drew mountains on the top of continental crust over a subduction zone but did not draw a compensating mass within the crust or lithosphere. Prototypical drawings provide more information about students' concepts than do most multiple-choice questions. For example, sixty-two percent of theses students who drew mountains similar to foam rubber pads pushed together on a desk or ice cream cones on a

  11. Measuring Transient Signals in Plate Boundary Faults Zones with Strainmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Mencin, Dave; Phillips, David; Henderson, Brent; Gottlieb, Mike; Gallaher, Warren; Johnson, Wade; Pyatt, Chad; Van Boskirk, Elizabeth; Fox, Otina; Mattioli, Glen; Meertens, Chuck

    2014-05-01

    One of the fundamental goals the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Earthscope program was to provide a high-quality, continuous geodetic data set that would allow the scientific community to study the evolution of plate boundary zones. Of particular importance was enabling investigation of the role aseismic transient deformation plays in the release of accumulated stress. For example, to allow the comparison of the amount of strain released through Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events to that released in subduction zone earthquakes or, provide the ability to geodetically illuminate the kinematics of fault creep in strike-slip fault zones. The ability to easily integrate these measurements with compatible geophysical data sets was also an essential objective. With goals such as these in mind NSF funded the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) to record the continuous deformation field across the western US Plate Boundary. PBO, built and operated by UNAVCO, now consists of over 1100 GPS stations, 76 co-located borehole strain and seismic sites, 6 long baseline strainmeters, Depending on the scientific questions being addressed sites may also have tiltmeter, meteorological, pore pressure and meteorological instrumentation. This presentation will focus on the transient deformation signals recorded by the PBO strainmeter network. PBO strainmeters, which excel in recording signals on the order of nanostrain over hours, have provided unprecedented temporal resolution of aseismic transients such as ETS events in the Cascadia subduction zone, creep signals along the central section of the San Andreas fault system and tsunami generated strain waves. UNAVCO is responsible not only for the ongoing operation of PBO but also the generation of data products associated with each instrument type. In this presentation we will highlight some of the transient signals these instruments have captured, outline the processing steps required to extract these signals data and

  12. How transpressive is the northern Caribbean plate boundary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Leroy, S.; Meyer, B.; Mercier de Lépinay, B.; Ellouz-Zimmermann, N.; Momplaisir, R.

    2016-04-01

    Transpressive deformation at the northern Caribbean plate boundary is accommodated mostly by two major strike-slip faults, but the amount and location of accommodation of the compressional component of deformation are still debated. We collected marine geophysical data including multibeam bathymetry and multichannel seismic reflection profiles along this plate boundary around Hispaniola, in the Jamaica Passage, and in the Gulf of Gonâve. The data set allows us to image the offshore active strike-slip faults as well as the compressional structures. We confirm that the Enriquillo-Plantain-Garden Fault Zone (EPGFZ) in the Jamaica Passage has a primary strike-slip motion, as indicated by active left-lateral strike-slip-related structures, i.e., restraining bend, asymmetrical basin, en echelon pressures ridges, and horsetail splay. Based on topographic cross sections across the EPGFZ, we image a very limited compressional component, if any, for at least the western part of the Jamaica Passage. Toward the east of the Jamaica Passage, the fault trace becomes more complex, and we identify adjacent compressional structures. In the Gulf of Gonâve, distributed folding and thrust faulting of the most recent sediments indicate active pervasive compressional tectonics. Estimates of shortening in the Jamaica Passage and in the Gulf of Gonâve indicate an increase of the compressional component of deformation toward the east, which nonetheless remains very small compared to that inferred from block modeling based on GPS measurements.

  13. Stress accumulation and release at complex transform plate boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Verdonck, D.; Furlong, K.P. )

    1992-10-01

    Finite element methods are used to model the dynamics of deformation along complex transform plate boundaries, specifically the San Andreas fault system, California. Effects of mantle rheology and fault geometry on the stress buildup and release are investigated. No prior knowledge of the earthquake cycle time or amount of fault slip is assumed that the results suggest that the San Andreas fault slips at low shear stress (about 15 MPa). Although the maximum stress on the fault is 15 MPa, models with an upper mantle shear zone deforming entirely by dislocation creep accumulate stresses that exceed 100 MPa, a stress level high enough to drive localized dynamic recrystallization and a shift in dominant deformation mechanism to diffusion creep. Models in which the mantle shear zone deform locally by diffusion creep reach a dynamic steady state where lithospheric shear stresses never exceed the specified fault stress anywhere in the model and indicate that the strength of the upper mantle is an important parameter in the dynamics of plate boundary deformation. 17 refs.

  14. Features on Venus generated by plate boundary processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Dan; Ford, Peter G.; Johnson, Catherine; Parsons, Barry; Sandwell, David; Saunders, Stephen; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    Various observations suggest that there are processes on Venus that produce features similar to those associated with plate boundaries on earth. Synthetic aperture radar images of Venus, taken with a radar whose wavelength is 12.6 cm, are compared with GLORIA images of active plate boundaries, obtained with a sound source whose wavelength is 23 cm. Features similar to transform faults and to abyssal hills on slow and fast spreading ridges can be recognized within the Artemis region of Venus but are not clearly visible elsewhere. The composition of the basalts measured by the Venera 13 and 14 and the Vega 2 spacecraft corresponds to that expected from adiabatic decompression, like that which occurs beneath spreading ridges on earth. Structures that resemble trenches are widespread on Venus and show the same curvature and asymmetry as they do on earth. These observations suggest that the same simple geophysical models that have been so successfully used to understand the tectonics of earth can also be applied to Venus.

  15. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: Evolution of the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track, and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block and the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone. An east facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ˜90 to ˜87 Ma and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70-60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85-80 Ma and 55-45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ˜65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55-45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian-Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene-early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire Block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene-recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northward escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  16. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: Evolution of the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track, and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block and the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone. An east facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ~90 to ~87 Ma and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70–60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85–80 Ma and 55–45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ~65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55–45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian-Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene–early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire Block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene–recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northward escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  17. The Accretion Flow and Boundary Layer Structure in the Dwarf Nova SS Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabizadeh, Armin; Balman, Solen; Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward; Hertfelder, Marius

    2016-07-01

    We present X-ray analysis of dwarf novae SS Aur (51 ksec) using XMM-Newton Observatory archival data obtained in quiescence for a better understanding of the accretion flow structure. We find X-ray orbital modulations. We report power spectral analysis for EPIC (X-ray) and OM (UV) light curves suggesting high levels of red noise with no significant QPO or periodicities. We simultaneously fitted EPIC pn, MOS1 and MOS2 data using a model for interstellar medium absorption (tbabs) and a multi-temperature plasma emission model (cevmkl) as expected from low accretion rate quiescent dwarf novae. However, the composite model fit yields unacceptable reduced χ ^{2} values due to the existence of soft excess. The soft excess is well modeled using a blackbody model (kT˜˜24 eV) giving a better reduced χ ^{2} value over 3σ significance level. This may indicate the existence of optically thick boundary layer emission. We will discuss the origin of this excess. The best fitting model is a combination of a blackbody, a cevmkl and a power law with an interstellar absorption which yields a reduced χ ^{2} of 1.05. The fit also shows some oxygen and iron over abundances. SS Aur has a maximum thermal plasma temperature of ˜22 keV. The X-ray luminosity in the 0.1 to 50.0 keV energy band is ˜2.0×10 ^{33} ergs ^{-1}. Finally, we discuss these characteristics in the light of standard disk models and accretion flows and geometry in nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables.

  18. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Community Focused Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matykiewicz, J.; Anderson, G.; Lee, E.; Hoyt, B.; Hodgkinson, K.; Persson, E.; Wright, J.; Torrez, D.; Jackson, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, PBO will install 852 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters, as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations. UNAVCO provides access to data products from these stations, as well as general information about the PBO project, via the PBO web site (http://pboweb.unavco.org). GPS and strainmeter data products can be found using a variety of channels, including map searches, text searches, and station specific data retrieval. In addition, the PBO construction status is available via multiple mapping interfaces, including custom web based map widgets and Google Earth. Additional construction details can be accessed from PBO operational pages and station specific home pages. The current state of health for the PBO network is available with the statistical snap-shot, full map interfaces, tabular web based reports, and automatic data mining and alerts. UNAVCO is currently working to enhance the community access to this information by developing a web service framework for the discovery of data products, interfacing with operational engineers, and exposing data services to third party participants. In addition, UNAVCO, through the PBO project, provides advanced data management and monitoring systems for use by the community in operating geodetic networks in the United States and beyond. We will demonstrate these systems during the AGU meeting, and we welcome inquiries from the community at any time.

  19. Accretion of a Small Continental Fragment to a Larger Continental Plate: Mesozoic Ecuador as a Case-Study Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonne, H.

    2013-05-01

    Only a few regions on Earth are appropriate to study processes that have happened in deeper crustal levels during the accretion of a microplate to a larger continental plate. Ecuador is one of these regions where in middle Mesozoic times a small continental fragment collided with the South-American plate. Along the suture between both plates, which occurs close to the present volcanic belt of Ecuador, high-pressure (HP) metamorphic rocks developed. These rocks, which are metapelites, metabasites, and metagranitoids, record processes during the microcontinent-continent collision (Massonne and Toulkeridis, 2012, Int. Geol. Rev. 54). The pressures, determined for the HP rocks, were as high as 14 kbar at temperatures somewhat above 500°C. The HP stage was followed by slight heating at the early exhumation. Peak temperatures up to 560°C were reached at pressures ≥10 kbar. This HP metamorphism was caused by the collision of the microplate with the South-American plate resulting in crustal thickening. The ascent of the HP rocks occurred in an exhumation channel. Before the collision, an oceanic basin existed between these plates. Probably, it was narrow as eclogite bodies are lacking in the N-S trending HP belt of Ecuador. Such bodies, especially if the eclogites had experienced pressures in excess of 20 kbar, are markers of a collision of major continental plates in Phanerozoic times with originally extended oceanic basins between these plates. In a more global context, the narrow ocean between the microplate and the South American continent is assumed to have been the westernmost portion of the Neo-Tethys which had extended to completely separate the two major fragments of former Pangaea before the opening of the southern Atlantic Ocean. This opening caused the closure of the narrow Neo-Tethys segment between the colliding microplate and the South American plate. This segment was bordered by E-W trending transform faults. A fault system (La Palma - El Guayabo fault

  20. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Data Management Progress and Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Blackman, B.; Eakins, J.; Hodgkinson, K.; Matykiewicz, J.; Boler, F.; Beldyk, M.; Henderson, B.; Hoyt, B.; Lee, E.; Persson, E.; Smith, J.; Torrez, D.; Wright, J.; Jackson, M.; Meertens, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three- dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters by October 2008, as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations and one laser strainmeter through the PBO Nucleus project and 11 GPS stations installed by the USArray segment of EarthScope. As of 1 September 2007, UNAVCO had completed 680 PBO GPS stations and had upgraded 89% of the planned PBO Nucleus stations. Most of these stations return data to the UNAVCO Boulder Network Operations Center (NOC) on a daily basis, with about 40 stations returning data on an hourly basis. Overall, the combined PBO and Nucleus network has now provided almost 350 GB of raw standard rate data, which are routinely processed by the PBO GPS Analysis Centers, at Central Washington University and the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the PBO GPS Analysis Center Coordinator at MIT. These groups create a range of GPS products, including station position time series, GPS velocity vectors, and related information. As of September 2007, these centers processed data on a daily basis from about 920 stations; typical position uncertainties are under 1.5 mm horizontally and 4 mm vertically. All PBO GPS data products are archived at and available from the UNAVCO Facility, with a second archive at the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). All these products may be accessed via the PBO web page at http://pboweb.unavco.org/gps_data. As part of PBO, UNAVCO will also install and operate the largest borehole seismic and strainmeter networks in North America, as well as tiltmeters and laser strainmeters. As of September 2007, 41 PBO borehole stations

  1. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Data Management Progress and Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Eakins, J.; Hodgkinson, K.; Matykiewicz, J.; Boler, F.; Beldyk, M.; Hoyt, B.; Lee, E.; Persson, E.; Torrez, D.; Wright, J.; Jackson, M.; Prescott, W.

    2006-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 852 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters, as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations through the PBO Nucleus project. As of 1 September 2006, the PBO GPS network was halfway completed with 426 stations installed, of which 400 have returned data, and PBO handled data flow for 120 PBO Nucleus stations. Most of these stations return data to the UNAVCO Boulder Network Operations Center (NOC) on a daily basis, with 16 returning data on an hourly basis. Overall, the combined PBO and Nucleus networks had returned almost 150 GB of raw GPS data as of September 2006. These data are then processed by the PBO GPS Analysis Centers, at Central Washington University and the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the PBO GPS Analysis Center Coordinator at MIT. These groups create a range of GPS products, including station position time series, GPS velocity vectors, and related information. As of September 2006, these centers processed data on a daily basis from about 590 stations; typical position uncertainties are under 1.5 mm horizontally and 4 mm vertically. All PBO GPS data products are archived at and available from the UNAVCO Facility, with a second archive at the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). All these products may be accessed via the PBO web page at http://pboweb.unavco.org/?pageid=88. As part of PBO, UNAVCO will also install and operate the largest borehole seismic and strainmeter networks in North America, as well as tiltmeters and laser strainmeters. As of September 2006, 19 PBO borehole stations had been installed and two laser strainmeter stations

  2. Plate boundary segmentation in the northeastern Caribbean from geodetic measurements and Neogene geological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calais, Éric; Symithe, Steeve; Mercier de Lépinay, Bernard; Prépetit, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The Caribbean-North America plate boundary in the northeastern Caribbean shows a remarkable example of along-strike transition from plate boundary-normal subduction in the Lesser Antilles, oblique subduction with no strain partitioning in Puerto Rico, and oblique subduction/collision with strain partitioning further west in Hispaniola. We show that this segmentation is well marked in the interseismic strain, as measured using space geodetic data, and in the Neogene deformation regime, as derived from geological observations. Hence, interseismic segmentation, which reproduces the geological segmentation persistent over a long time interval, is inherited from the geological history and long-term properties of the plate boundary. This result is relevant to the assessment of seismic hazard at convergent plate boundaries, where geodetic measurements often show interseismic segmentation between fully-and partially-coupled plate interface regions.

  3. Thermochronology in southeast Alaska and southwest Yukon: Implications for North American Plate response to terrane accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enkelmann, Eva; Piestrzeniewicz, Adam; Falkowski, Sarah; Stübner, Konstanze; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the first comprehensive dataset of low-temperature thermochronology from 43 bedrock samples collected north of the active Yakutat-North American plate boundary. Our apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and fission-track data reveal the cooling history of the inboard Wrangellia Composite Terrane that is dominated by rapid cooling after Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous arc magmatism followed by very little cooling and exhumation until today. Deformation resulting in rock exhumation due to the collision of the Yakutat microplate is spatially very limited (20-30 km) and is concentrated mainly in the Chugach-Prince William Terrane and rocks near the Border Ranges Fault. Focused exhumation from greater depths of ca. 10 km with very high rates (>5 km/Myr) is localized at the syntaxis region, starting ca. 10 Ma and shifted south through time. The rapid exhumation rates are explained by the development of strong feedbacks between tectonically driven surface uplift and erosion, which started already before glaciation of the area. The shift in the location towards the south is a consequence of continuous readjusting between tectonics and climate, which is changing on local and global scales since the Late Miocene.

  4. Evolution of Warped Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Roles of Feeding at the Outer Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Cheng, Cheng; Qiu, Jie

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the alignment processes of spinning black holes and their surrounding warped accretion disks in a frame of two different types of feeding at the outer boundaries. We consider (1) fixed flows in which gas is continually fed with a preferred angular momentum, and (2) free flows in which there is no gas supply and the disks diffuse freely at their outer edges. As expected, we find that for the cases of fixed flows the black hole disk systems always align on timescales of several 106 yr, irrespective of the initial inclinations. If the initial inclination angles are larger than π/2, the black hole accretion transits from retrograde to prograde fashion, and the accreted mass onto the black holes during these two phases is comparable. On the other hand, for the cases of free flows, both alignments and anti-alignments can occur, depending on the initial inclinations and the ratios of the angular momentum of the disks to that of the black holes. In such cases, the disks will be consumed within timescales of 106 yr by black holes accreting at the Eddington limit. We propose that there is a close connection between the black hole spin and the lifetime for which the feeding persists, which determines the observable episodic lifetimes of active galactic nuclei. We conclude that careful inclusion of the disk feeding at the outer boundaries is crucial for modeling the evolution of the black hole spin.

  5. Overview on the Plate Boundaries Along the Western Mexican Pacific Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Bandy, W. L.; Michaud, F.; Ortega Ramírez, J.

    2013-05-01

    The cinematic of the Pacific, Rivera and Cocos oceanic plates have a significant impact on the subduction process and seismic cycles occurring along the western Mexican Pacific margin of the North American and Caribbean plates. Sections of Pacific (PAC), Rivera (RIV), Cocos (COC), North American (NAM) and Caribbean (CAB) plate boundaries along the western margin of Mexico are not well constrained. From north to south: the transform-rift system at Gulf of California has been generally considered as part of PAC-NAM plate boundary. However results of the FAMEX cruise at 2002 evidenced that Tosco-Abreojos Fault System along the western margin of Baja California Peninsula is active. Should this tectonic structure be considered as a plate boundary? At the RIV plate northern corner (including Mazatlan Basin), the scatter seismicity recorded between Tamayo FZ and the Marias Islands restricts the characterization of the plate boundary between the RIV and NAM plates. Some authors have proposed that Tamayo FZ and Marias I. Escarpment are the RIV-NAM plate boundary. Recently other authors have called that RIV-NAM boundary is a geomorphology lineament that runs from a Rivera Rise transform at 23N to the northern end of Marias I. Escarpment. Even so this concept is not sustained with seismic activity. Further this thought would imply that the oceanic lithosphere of Mazatlan Basin would form part of NAM plate. Other thoughts are either that there is a diffuse RIV-NAM plate boundary to the north of the Maria Archipelago, or Middle America Subduction Zone is gradually extending northward of the Maria Is. While the plate boundary at SE corner of the RIV plate is neither well defined morphologically nor seismically constraint, offshore Colima Coast. Some authors have proposed that this zone is a diffuse plate boundary between RIV and COC plates, result of a NE-SW shear plate motion. Other authors have proposed that the RIV-COC boundary extends E-W from the El Gordo Graben (EGG) at

  6. Inter- and intra-plate deformation at North American plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beavan, John

    1986-01-01

    Alaska tectonics and earthquake hazard studies; Southern California tectonics (block rotation); spreading near the Salton Trough; California plate motion (fault zone kinematics); and Caribbean plate motion investigations are examined.

  7. Skin friction and Reynolds stress measurements for a turbulent boundary layer following manipulation using flat plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Research has been undertaken to experimentally study the alterations in turbulent boundary-layer properties due to turbulence manipulation using thin flat plates. Plate geometry and placement within the boundary layer were selected to coincide with recent studies. Direct, local measurements of skin friction and Reynolds stresses were made within the boundary layer downstream of the manipulator devices for cases with an approach momentum thickness Reynolds number of 3700. A strong tendency for recovery of the Reynolds stresses was observed, accompanied by local skin-friction reductions of up to 15 percent. The mean velocity profile in the manipulated flow displayed the same similarity shape in the logarithmic region as a natural boundary layer, but had an enhanced wake component. The results indicate that the plate wake plays an important role in the boundary layer response to this sort of manipulation.

  8. The simulation of Lamb waves in a cracked plate using the scaled boundary finite element method.

    PubMed

    Gravenkamp, Hauke; Prager, Jens; Saputra, Albert A; Song, Chongmin

    2012-09-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method is applied to the simulation of Lamb waves for ultrasonic testing applications. With this method, the general elastodynamic problem is solved, while only the boundary of the domain under consideration has to be discretized. The reflection of the fundamental Lamb wave modes from cracks of different geometry in a steel plate is modeled. A test problem is compared with commercial finite element software, showing the efficiency and convergence of the scaled boundary finite element method. A special formulation of this method is utilized to calculate dispersion relations for plate structures. For the discretization of the boundary, higher-order elements are employed to improve the efficiency of the simulations. The simplicity of mesh generation of a cracked plate for a scaled boundary finite element analysis is illustrated.

  9. Structural acoustic control of plates with variable boundary conditions: design methodology.

    PubMed

    Sprofera, Joseph D; Cabell, Randolph H; Gibbs, Gary P; Clark, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    A method for optimizing a structural acoustic control system subject to variations in plate boundary conditions is provided. The assumed modes method is used to build a plate model with varying levels of rotational boundary stiffness to simulate the dynamics of a plate with uncertain edge conditions. A transducer placement scoring process, involving Hankel singular values, is combined with a genetic optimization routine to find spatial locations robust to boundary condition variation. Predicted frequency response characteristics are examined, and theoretically optimized results are discussed in relation to the range of boundary conditions investigated. Modeled results indicate that it is possible to minimize the impact of uncertain boundary conditions in active structural acoustic control by optimizing the placement of transducers with respect to those uncertainties.

  10. Inter- and intra-plate deformation at North American plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beavan, John; Gilbert, Lewis E.; Scholz, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A geodetic network which spans the region between San Francisco and Lake Tahoe has been measured 5 times completely with triangulation in 1880, 1922, 1929, 1943, 1963. A resurvey with the Global Positioning System (GPS) in 1991 allows the formation of 1 coseismic and 4 interseismic epochs. The data from this network provide a unique opportunity to examine the temporal and spatial evolution of the strain field associated with the 1906 San Francisco earthquake in particular and with the Pacific-North American plate boundary in general. Calculations of strain rate from the network data lead to the following conclusions. (1) There is no resolvable (greater than 0.05 microradians/yr) strain in between Sutter Buttes and the Sierra Nevada. (2) Throughout the time since the 1906 earthquake, a region extending at least as far east as the westernmost Great Valley has been undergoing deformation related to Pac:Nam interaction and the associated earthquake cycle. (3) In the time and space of overlap, our results agree with those from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) trilateration data. Both data sets indicate that strain must be accumulating to the east of Vaca. (4) The San Andreas discrepancy cannot be accommodated in the Great Valley at the 1 sigma level of our results. It is possible to absorb it in that region at the 2 sigma level. (5) Strain rate is elevated in the years following the earthquake and decays slowly with time. It is possible that the rate in the Coast Ranges increases until around 1950 and then decays. With the exception of one epoch, strain rate in the Coast Ranges is consistently fault parallel, shows no sign changes, and is consistent with monotonic strain accumulation.

  11. Simulating faults and plate boundaries with a transversely isotropic plasticity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharples, W.; Moresi, L. N.; Velic, M.; Jadamec, M. A.; May, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    In mantle convection simulations, dynamically evolving plate boundaries have, for the most part, been represented using an visco-plastic flow law. These systems develop fine-scale, localized, weak shear band structures which are reminiscent of faults but it is a significant challenge to resolve the large- and the emergent, small-scale-behavior. We address this issue of resolution by taking into account the observation that a rock element with embedded, planar, failure surfaces responds as a non-linear, transversely isotropic material with a weak orientation defined by the plane of the failure surface. This approach partly accounts for the large-scale behavior of fine-scale systems of shear bands which we are not in a position to resolve explicitly. We evaluate the capacity of this continuum approach to model plate boundaries, specifically in the context of subduction models where the plate boundary interface has often been represented as a planar discontinuity. We show that the inclusion of the transversely isotropic plasticity model for the plate boundary promotes asymmetric subduction from initiation. A realistic evolution of the plate boundary interface and associated stresses is crucial to understanding inter-plate coupling, convergent margin driven topography, and earthquakes.

  12. Effect of Pressure Gradients on Plate Response and Radiation in a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1997-01-01

    Using the model developed by the author for zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers, results are obtained for adverse and favorable pressure gradients. It is shown that when a flexible plate is located in an adverse pressure gradient area, it vibrates more than if it were in a favorable pressure gradient one. Therefore the noise generated by the plate in an adverse pressure gradient is much greater than that due to the plate in a favorable pressure gradient. The effects of Reynolds number and boundary layer thickness are also analyzed and found to have the same effect in both adverse and favorable pressure gradient cases. Increasing the Reynolds number is found to increase the loading on the plate and therefore acoustic radiation. An increase in boundary layer thickness is found to decrease the level of the high frequencies and therefore the response and radiation at these frequencies. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  13. The boundary element method in stress-state problems for an ansiotropic plate with holes

    SciTech Connect

    Neskorodev, N.M.

    1995-12-25

    We propose a method of solving the problem of the stress state of an anisotropic plate with holes of arbitrary shape. The method is based on approximating the boundary of a region by curved boundary elements. These elements are taken to be a family of semi-ellipses. To satisfy the boundary conditions we use the pointwise least-square method. Numerical experiments showed good agreement of the computations with results known earlier.

  14. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand plate-boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plate, with a transition from subduction of Pacific oceanic lithosphere beneath North Island, to oblique continental collision in South Island. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone up to 250 km wide, with displacements on individual faults up to 100s of kilometres. Active deformation must be driven by a combination of plate-boundary forces and internal buoyancy forces. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses, together with simple Airy isostasy, to determine regional crustal and mantle structure. Integration of the vertical normal stress to the base of the deforming layer yields the buoyancy stress. Horizontal gradients of this can be compared with horizontal gradients of strain rate, using the method of England & Molnar (1997), in the context of a simple thin sheet model of deformation. Thus, if deformation is that of a Newtonian fluid, then appropriate combinations of the horizontal gradients of vorticity and dilatation are related to gradients of buoyancy stress by the fluid viscosity. However, the short term geodetic deformation is strongly biased by elastic strain accumulation related to locking on the plate interface, and cannot be used to determine the plate-boundary velocity field averaged over many seismic cycles (see Lamb & Smith 2013). Therefore, I derive here a velocity field for the plate-boundary zone, which is representative of deformation over tens of thousands of years. This is based on an inversion of fault slip, strain rate azimuth and paleomagnetic data, in the context of the short term relative plate motions, solved in a network of triangles spanning the plate-boundary, using the method of Lamb (2000). A comparison of gradients of buoyancy stress with the appropriate combinations of gradients of vorticity and dilatation shows that deformation in

  15. Anisotropy from SKS splitting across the Pacific-North America plate boundary offshore southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Joseph; Kohler, Monica D.; Davis, Paul M.; Wang, Xinguo; Holt, William; Weeraratne, Dayanthie S.

    2016-10-01

    SKS arrivals from ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data from an offshore southern California deployment are analysed for shear wave splitting. The project involved 34 OBSs deployed for 12 months in a region extending up to 500 km west of the coastline into the oceanic Pacific plate. The measurement process consisted of removing the effects of anisotropy using a range of values for splitting fast directions and delay times to minimize energy along the transverse seismometer axis. Computed splitting parameters are unexpectedly similar to onland parameters, exhibiting WSW-ENE fast polarization directions and delays between 0.8 and 1.8 s, even for oceanic plate sites. This is the first SKS splitting study to extend across the entire boundary between the North America and Pacific plates, into the oceanic part of the Pacific plate. The splitting results show that the fast direction of anisotropy on the Pacific plate does not align with absolute plate motion (APM), and they extend the trend of anisotropy in southern California an additional 500 km west, well onto the oceanic Pacific plate. We model the finite strain and anisotropy within the asthenosphere associated with density-buoyancy driven mantle flow and the effects of APM. In the absence of plate motion effects, such buoyancy driven mantle flow would be NE-directed beneath the Pacific plate observations. The best-fit patterns of mantle flow are inferred from the tomography-based models that show primary influences from foundering higher-density zones associated with the history of subduction beneath North America. The new offshore SKS measurements, when combined with measurements onshore within the plate boundary zone, indicate that dramatic lateral variations in density-driven upper-mantle flow are required from offshore California into the plate boundary zone in California and western Basin and Range.

  16. Relationship between the present-day stress field and plate boundary forces in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between plate boundary forces and the observed stress field in the Pacific Northwest is established using numerical models of continental deformation. Because the orientation of the greatest horizontal principal stress throughout the Pacific Northwest differs considerably from the direction of convergence between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates, the relationship between the stress field and forces acting along the subduction zone has been unclear. To address this relationship, a two-dimensional finite element model developed by Bird [1989] is used that incorporates critical aspects of continental deformation such as a stratified rheology and interaction between thermal and mechanical components of deformation. Boundary conditions are specified in terms of either velocity or shear traction, depending on whether the computed shear stress at the plate boundary is less than or exceeds, respectively, a prescribed limit. Shear-stress limits on the subduction and transform plate boundaries are independently varied to determine the relative effect of forces along these boundaries on intraplate deformation. Results from this study indicate that the shear stress limit of both subduction and transform boundaries is low, and that the intraplate stress field is attributed, in part, to the normal component of relative plate motion along the transform boundaries. However, the models also indicate that although the subduction zone fault is weak, a minimum shear strength ( ??? 10 MPa) for the fault is necessary to explain the observed stress field. The balance among forces along the tectonic boundaries of North America results in a surprising degree of variation in the present-day stress field.

  17. Velocity Distribution in the Boundary Layer of a Submerged Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, M

    1930-01-01

    This report deals with the measurement of the velocity distribution of the air in the velocity of a plate placed parallel to the air flow. The measurements took place in a small wind tunnel where the diameter of the entrance cone is 30 cm and the length of the free jet between the entrance and exit cones is about 2.5 m. The measurements were made in the free jet where the static pressure was constant, which was essential for the method of measurement used.

  18. Unsteady boundary layers on a flat plate disturbed by periodic wakes. Part 2: Measurements of unsteady boundary layers and discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Funazaki, K.

    1996-04-01

    As the second part of the study, detailed hot-wire anemometry measurements of wake-affected boundary layers on the flat plate are made. These measurements are organized in order, first, to check the standpoint of the modeling of the wake-induced transition proposed in Part 1, and second, to observe wake-boundary layer interaction in detail from a viewpoint of direct and indirect effect of the wake passage upon turbulent spot generation within the boundary layer, as described by Walker (1993). The validity of the presumed state of the wake-affected boundary layer in the distance-time domain, which constitutes the basis of the transition model, is confirmed to great extent. However, it is also found that the criterion for the onset of the wake-induced transition adopted in Part 1 should be reconsidered. Some successful attempts are therefore made to specify the transition onset.

  19. Constraining Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene plate boundaries in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, K. J.; Williams, S.; Whittaker, J. M.; Müller, D.; Clarke, G. L.; Seton, M.; Flament, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    The southwest Pacific has undergone a complex tectonic history since the Late Cretaceous, involving multiple episodes of subduction, back-arc spreading and continental deformation. Starkly contrasting reconstructions have been proposed for this period, ranging from tectonic quiescence with no plate boundary between the Lord Howe Rise (LHR) and Pacific, to widespread subduction and back-arc spreading, and this disparity reflects sparse and ambiguous data. Placing further constraints on these reconstructions is crucial for a variety of applications, from global-scale geodynamic studies using plate circuits to basin-scale studies of paleogeographic evolution and vertical motions. Geologic and kinematic data from the southwest Pacific are reviewed to better constrain the tectonic history of the region from the Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene, including the timing and location of plate boundary activity. This facilitates better constraints on the time-dependent evolution of the southwest Pacific plate circuit so that motion between plate pairs is consistent with geologic data and known tectonic regimes. The southwest Pacific comprised three spreading ridges during this time: in the Southeast Indian Ocean, Tasman Sea and Amundsen Sea. However, at least one, and possibly two other plate boundaries also accommodated relative motions: in the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) and between the LHR and Pacific. Uncertainties in the timing and nature of plate boundaries prevent the construction of a robust reconstruction model and the implementation of a southwest Pacific plate circuit. Some previous plate models include continuous subduction east of the LHR throughout the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic, while an alternative scenario involves the absence of plate boundaries between the LHR and Pacific until 45 Ma. Geologic observations suggests that subduction initiated to the east of New Caledonia at c. 55 Ma, including dyke emplacement and metamorphism in New Caledonia, and arc

  20. The Problem With the Plate Boundary in the Sea of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Horne, A.; Sato, H.; Ishiyama, T.; Kato, N.

    2015-12-01

    The boundary between the North American and Eurasian plates in NE Asia is 'shifty.' It is sometimes drawn through the Sea of Japan, sometimes through the Hokkaido axial zone, or not at all. The boundary may or may not extend through central Japan along the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL). How to explain this uncertainty? Geodetic models suggest that NE Japan moves independently from Eurasia, but the inferred plate boundary cannot be constrained geologically or seismologically. Available published data provides other constraints. A series of destructive (M>7) intraplate earthquakes in the Japan Sea with E-thrusting focal mechanisms was thought to be evidence of nascent subduction, but the 1983 Nihonkai-Chubu (M7.7) earthquake, was shown to have occurred on the boundary between thick oceanic crust and island-arc crust of central Japan. These earthquakes appear to result from reactivation of inherited structures that formed during back-arc opening, rather than from subduction. Furthermore, seismic images show no crustal discontinuities that could be interpreted as a plate boundary. As for the ISTL, available geological and seismological evidence indicates that the southern ISTL marks a W-dipping deformation boundary related to the collision of the Izu-Bonin arc with SW Japan (15 Ma). Although indented by the collision, the geological structure/basement of SW Japan are continuous across the ISTL, making it an unlikely plate boundary. The northern ISTL has a different origin, as an E-dipping boundary fault for a Neogene rift basin. The fault has been inactive in the late Quaternary and, again, does not constitute a major geological discontinuity in the basement. Hence, the problem: geodetic models imply a plate boundary between Japan and Eurasia, but published geological and seismological evidence does not support placing it in the Japan Sea or at the ISTL. If, as studies show, almost half of the convergence between North America and Eurasia is taken up in

  1. Global isostatic geoid anomalies for plate and boundary layer models of the lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, B. H.

    1981-01-01

    Commonly used one dimensional geoid models predict that the isostatic geoid anomaly over old ocean basins for the boundary layer thermal model of the lithosphere is a factor of two greater than that for the plate model. Calculations presented, using the spherical analogues of the plate and boundary layer thermal models, show that for the actual global distribution of plate ages, one dimensional models are not accurate and a spherical, fully three dimensional treatment is necessary. The maximum difference in geoid heights predicted for the two models is only about two meters. The thermal structure of old lithosphere is unlikely to be resolvable using global geoid anomalies. Stripping the effects of plate aging and a hypothetical uniform, 35 km, isostatically-compensated continental crust from the observed geoid emphasizes that the largest-amplitude geoid anomaly is the geoid low of almost 120 m over West Antarctica, a factor of two greater than the low of 60 m over Ceylon.

  2. Receptivity of Flat-Plate Boundary Layer in a Non-Uniform Free Stream (Vorticity Normal to the Plate)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, M. N.; Ustinov, M. V.

    1997-01-01

    Work is devoted to study of free-stream vorticity normal to leading edge interaction with boundary layer over plate and resulting flow distortion influence on laminar-turbulent transition. In experiments made the wake behind the vertically stretched wire was used as a source of vortical disturbances and its effect on the boundary layer over the horizontally mounted plate with various leading edge shapes was investigated. The purpose of experiments was to check the predictions of theoretical works of M.E. Goldstein, et. al. This theory shows that small free-stream inhomogeneity interacting with leading edge produces considerable distortion of boundary layer flow. In general, results obtained confirms predictions of Goldstein's theory, i.e., the amplification of steady vortical disturbances in boundary layer caused by vortex lines stretching was observed. Experimental results fully coincide with predictions of theory for large Reynolds number, relatively sharp leading edge and small disturbances. For large enough disturbances the flow distortion caused by symmetric wake unexpectedly becomes antisymmetric in spanwise direction. If the leading edge is too blunt the maximal distortion takes place immediately at the nose and no further amplification was observed. All these conditions and results are beyond the scope of Goldstein's theory.

  3. Origin of oroclines in Paleozoic Australia: the role of inherited plate boundary irregularities and trench retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, G.; Shaanan, U.; Hoy, D.; Abdullah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleozoic Australia is made of a series of orogenic belts that include the Delamerian, Lachlan and New England orogens, as well as the poorly defined Thomson Orogen. The origin of these belts has been attributed to subduction and accretionary processes along the ~N-S-striking (present coordinates) plate boundary of Gondwana. However, recent studies show that orogenic segments are strongly contorted, thus raising questions about the geodynamic origin of eastern Australia and Paleozoic plate tectonics in general. Results from the New England Orogen revealed that oroclinal bending has occurred simultaneously with basin formation and trench retreat. Geochronological provenance studies of detrital zircon show that these basins were situated in a back-arc position, indicating that back-arc extension may have played a crucial role in oroclinal bending. In addition, geochronological data of detrital zircon show that terranes that were once considered to be exotic were actually derived from local sources. The collective geological evidence suggests that deformation and oroclinal bending were driven by subduction-related processes possibly acting on inherited irregularities in the orientation of the plate boundary. The irregular geometries were further accentuated by trench migration (retreat and advance) that led to subduction segmentation, oroclinal bending, and alternating episodes of contraction and (back-arc) extension. In search of inherited plate boundary irregularities in Paleozoic Australia, we have studied the ~E-W boundary between the Lachlan and Thomson orogens. This lithospheric-scale boundary may reflect the original geometry of the plate boundary, which might have accommodated hundreds of km of dextral offset. This boundary may be part a much larger orogenic curvature, hitherto not recognised, and the development of which may have played a fundamental role in the formation of the smaller-scale oroclines in the Lachlan and New England orogens.

  4. Analysis of a laminar boundary layer flow over a flat plate with injection or suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, S.; Babaelahi, M.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis is performed to study a laminar boundary layer flow over a porous flat plate with injection or suction imposed at the wall. The basic equations of this problem are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by means of appropriate transformations. These equations are solved analytically by the optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), and the solutions are compared with the numerical solution (NS). The effect of uniform suction/injection on the heat transfer and velocity profile is discussed. A constant surface temperature in thermal boundary conditions is used for the horizontal flat plate.

  5. Buckling Analysis of Anti-Symmetric Cross-Ply Laminated Composite Plates Under Different Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adim, B.; Daouadji, T. Hassaine; Abbes, B.

    2016-11-01

    The buckling analysis of anti-symmetric cross-ply laminated composite plates under different boundary conditions is examined by using a refined higher order exponential shear deformation theory. The theory, which has strong similarity with classical plate theory in many aspects, accounts for a quadratic variation of the transverse shear strains across the thickness and satisfies the zero traction boundary conditions on the top and bottom surfaces of the plate without using shear correction factors. The number of independent unknowns in the present theory is four, as against five in other shear deformation theories. In this investigation, the equations of motion for simply supported thick laminated rectangular plates are derived and obtained through the use of Hamilton's principle. The closed-form solutions of anti-symmetric cross-ply and angle-ply laminates are obtained using Navier solution. Numerical results for critical buckling loads anti-symmetric cross-ply laminated composite plates are presented. The validity of the present study is demonstrated by comparison with other higher-order solutions reported in the literature. It can be concluded that the proposed theory is accurate and simple in solving the buckling behaviors of anti-symmetric cross-ply laminated composite plates under different boundary conditions

  6. Crustal Structure of the Caribbean-South American Diffuse Plate Boundary: Subduction Zone Migration and Polarity Reversal Along BOLIVAR Profile 64W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. A.; Levander, A.; Magnani, M.; Zelt, C. A.; Sawyer, D. S.; Ave Lallemant, H. G.

    2005-12-01

    The BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) project is an NSF funded, collaborative seismic experiment in the southeast Caribbean region. The purpose of the project is to understand the diffuse plate boundary created by the oblique collision between the Caribbean and South American plates. Profile 64W of the BOLIVAR experiment, a 450 km-long, N-S transect onshore and offshore Venezuela located at ~64°W longitude, images the deep crustal structures formed by this collision. The active source components of profile 64W include 300 km of MCS reflection data, 33 coincident OBSs, and 344 land seismic stations which recorded 7500 offshore airgun shots and 2 explosive land shots. Results from the reflection and refraction seismic data along 64W show complex crustal structure across the entire span of the diffuse plate boundary. The onshore portion of 64W crosses the fold and thrust belt of the Serrania del Interior, which formed at ~16 Ma by collision of the Caribbean forearc with the northern South American passive margin. Underlying the Serrania del Interior is a south-vergent, remnant Lesser Antillean subduction zone. As this Lesser Antilles subduction impinged on continental crust, it caused a polarity reversal and jump offshore to the north. Convergence was initially localized in the closure and inversion of the Grenada Basin. However, subduction could not develop because of the ~20-km-thick crust of the Aves Ridge; instead, north-vergent subduction initiated further to the north, where ~12-km-thick Caribbean oceanic crust of the Venezuela Basin began to subduct beneath the Aves Ridge in the Pliocene (~4 Ma) and appears to continue subducting today. Between the remnant subduction zone and the modern one, the El Pilar and Coche dextral strike-slip faults accommodate most of the transform motion of the plate boundary. From the Serrania del Interior to the Aves Ridge, ~260 km of accreted orogenic float comprises the diffuse

  7. Laminar-Boundary-Layer Oscillations and Transition on a Flat Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-04-01

    attempted to test the stability theory by producing sinusoidal fluetuations in the, bound- ary layer near the leading edge of a flat plate in water...section with the loading edge 6 feet from the upstream end. In order to reduce vibration, the test section of this tun- nel Is supported dirpctly...Boundary Layor Since a theoretical dl the boundary layer has been VI-2D and table IV), the ac est ae a test of agreement Traverses across the bounda

  8. Lithospheric deformation in the Africa-Iberia plate boundary: Improved neotectonic modeling testing a basal-driven Alboran plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neres, M.; Carafa, M. M. C.; Fernandes, R. M. S.; Matias, L.; Duarte, J. C.; Barba, S.; Terrinha, P.

    2016-09-01

    We present an improved neotectonic numerical model of the complex NW Africa-SW Eurasia plate boundary segment that runs from west to east along the Gloria Fault up to the northern Algerian margin. We model the surface velocity field and the ongoing lithospheric deformation using the most recent version of the thin-shell code SHELLS and updated lithospheric model and fault map of the region. To check the presence versus the absence of an independently driven Alboran domain, we develop two alternative plate models: one does not include an Alboran plate; another includes it and determines the basal shear tractions necessary to drive it with known velocities. We also compare two alternative sets of Africa-Eurasia velocity boundary conditions, corresponding to geodetic and geological-scale averages of plate motion. Finally, we perform an extensive parametric study of fault friction coefficient, trench resistance, and velocities imposed in Alboran nodes. The final run comprises 5240 experiments, each scored to geodetic velocities (estimated for 250 stations and here provided), stress direction data, and seismic strain rates. The model with the least discrepancy to the data includes the Alboran plate driven by a basal WSW directed shear traction, slightly oblique to the westward direction of Alboran motion. We provide estimates of long-term strain rates and slip rates for the modeled faults, which can be useful for further hazard studies. Our results support that a mechanism additional to the Africa-Eurasia convergence is required to drive the Alboran domain, which can be related to subduction processes occurring within the mantle.

  9. Tsunamis from Tectonic Sources along Caribbean Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A. M.; Chacon, S.; Zamora, N.; Audemard, F. A.; Dondin, F. J. Y.; Clouard, V.; Løvholt, F.; Harbitz, C. B.; Vanacore, E. A.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Working Group 2 (WG2) of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and Other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (ICG/CARIBE-EWS) in charge of Tsunami Hazards Assessment, has generated a list of tsunami sources for the Caribbean region. Simulating these worst-case, most credible scenarios would provide an estimate of the resulting effects on coastal areas within the Caribbean. In the past few years, several publications have addressed this issue resulting in a collection of potential tsunami sources and scenarios. These publications come from a wide variety of sources; from government agencies to academic institutions. Although these provide the scientific community with a list of sources and scenarios, it was the interest of the WG2 to evaluate what has been proposed and develop a comprehensive list of sources, therefore leaving aside proposed scenarios. The seismo-tectonics experts of the Caribbean within the WG2 members were tasked to evaluate comprehensively which published sources are credible, worst-cases, and consider other sources that have been omitted from available reports. Among these published sources are the GEM Faulted Earth Subduction Characterization Project, and the LANTEX/Caribe Wave annual exercise publications (2009-2015). Caribbean tectonic features capable of generating tsunamis from seismic dislocation are located along the Northeastern Caribbean, the Lesser Antilles Trench, and the Panamá and Southern Caribbean Deformed Belts. The proposed sources have been evaluated based on historical and instrumental seismicity as well as geological and geophysical studies. This paper presents the sources and their justification as most-probable tsunami sources based on the context of crustal deformation due to Caribbean plate interacting with neighboring North and South America plates. Simulations of these sources is part of a subsequent phase in which effects of these tectonically induced tsunamis

  10. Historical and modern seismotectonics of the Indian plate with an emphasis on its western boundary with the Eurasian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeliga, W. M.

    The western edge of the Indian plate is a transform plate boundary similar to the San Andreas Fault in that it lies mostly on land, has a similar expected slip rate, accommodates restraining bends, and contains segments that may slip aseismically by surface creep. Tectonic models of the western edge of India must also account for the absence of significant seismic moment release in the past century along the Chaman Fault, the transform boundary between Asia and India. I discuss modern and historical data from India and Pakistan that provide new constraints on deformation within this 100--250 km wide plate boundary. Geological and plate-closure estimates suggest sinistral slip of 19--35 mm/yr since the Oligocene across the Chaman Fault system. Analysis of space-based geodetic data suggests a prevalence of shallow locking depths and an upper limit of approximately 19.5 mm/yr of sinistral motion across the Chaman Fault System south of Afghanistan. In the past century, the region between the Chaman Fault System and the Indus Plain near Quetta, Pakistan, has experienced numerous earthquakes with a larger total moment release than an equivalent length of the Himalaya in the same period, comparable to a single Mw 8:0. Of this moment release, 90% has occurred more than 70 km east of the Chaman fault. In this region, GPS data have captured slip partitioning across the plate boundary suggesting that long-term sinistral slip is shared between the Chaman and Ghazaband fault systems. Additionally, a combination of GPS and InSAR analysis of a pair of Mw 6:4 earthquakes NE of Quetta in 2008 suggests that they occurred on a parallel pair of sinistral faults, rather than the dextral mechanism suggested by their NW-SE trending fault planes. I find that "bookshelf faulting" occurs in a zone NE of Quetta that includes several previous instrumental and historical earthquakes. This geodetic view of deformation in Pakistan differs from that derived from the instrumental seismic record

  11. Seismotectonics of plate boundaries. Final report, 1 November 1973-30 June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, J.; Brune, J.N.; Goodkind, J.; Wyatt, F.; Agnew, D.C.; Beaumont, C.

    1981-06-01

    Research on the seismotectonics of plate boundaries is summarized. Instrumental development and an observational program designed to study various aspects of the seismotectonics of southern California and the northern Gulf of California are described. A unique superconducting gravimeter was further developed and supported under this program for deployment and operation at several sites. Work on Earth tides is also discussed.

  12. Post-rifting stress relaxation at the divergent plate boundary in Northeast Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foulger, G.R.; Jahn, C.-H.; Seeber, G.; Einarsson, P.; Julian, B.R.; Heki, K.

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of the elastic lithosphere with the underlying anelastic asthenosphere causes strain to propagate along the Earth's surface in a diffusion-like manner following tectonism at plate boundaries. This process transfers stress between adjacent tectonic segments and influences the temporal tectonic pattern along a plate boundary. Observations of such strain transients have been rare, and have hitherto been confined to strike-slip and underthrusting plate boundaries1. Here we report the observation of a strain transient at the divergent (spreading) plate boundary in Iceland. A Global Positioning System survey undertaken a decade after an episode of dyke intrusion accompanying several metres of crustal spreading reveals a spatially varying strain field with the expected diffusion-pulse shape and an amplitude three times greater than the 5.7 cm that would be expected from the average spreading rate2. A simple one-dimensional model with a thin elastic layer overlying a viscous layer fits the data well and yields a stress diffusivity of 1.1 ?? 0.3 m2 s-1. Combined with struc-tural information from magnetotelluric measurements, this implies a viscosity of 0.3-2 ?? 1019 Pa s - a value comparable to that derived for Iceland from post-glacial rebound23, but low compared with estimates for mantle viscosity obtained elsewhere3.

  13. Dynamics of convergent plate boundaries: Insights from subduction-related serpentinite melanges from the northern edge of the Caribbean plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Casco, A.

    2012-04-01

    Subduction-related rock complexes, many of them tectonic melanges, occur in the Central America-Caribbean-Andean belt. I review the lithology and P-T-t paths of HP rocks and offer interpretations and generalizations on the thermal estate of the subducting plate(s), the melange forming events, and the exhumation history of rock complexes formed in the northern branch of the Caribbean subduction zone (Cuba and nearby Guatemala and Dominican Republic; ca. 3000 km apart). These complexes contain high pressure rocks formed and exhumed at the convergent (Pacific-Atlantic) leading edge of the Caribbean plate during ca. 100 Ma (early Cretaceous-Oligocene), attesting for long lasting oceanic -followed by continental- subduction/accretion in the region. Lithologic data indicate a complex melange-forming process. In most cases, the HP rocks represent subducted MOR-related lithologies occurring as tectonic blocks within serpentinite-matrix melanges interpreted as exhumed fragments of the subduction channel(s). Most of these melanges, however, contain fragments of arc/forearc-related non metamorphic and metamorphic (low-P and high-P) sedimentary and igneous rocks. While the HP blocks of arc/forearc material indicate subduction erosion at depth, the interpretation of the LP and non-metamorphic blocks is not straight forward. Indeed, tectonic blocks of HP metamafic rocks are surrounded by antigorite-serpentinite which, in turn, is surrounded by a low-P, low-T (chrysotile-lizardite) serpentinite that makes much of the mélange. These relations indicate that the melanges represent, in fact, tectonic stacks of shallow low-T forearc serpentinite that incorporate tectonic blocks/slices of the subduction-channel (high-P, high-T serpentinite and HP metamafic blocks) and of the arc/forearc crust (low-P and non-metamorphic blocks). This picture is similar to that of HP continental margin-derived tectonic stacks containing exotic slices of antigoritite-serpentine melanges (with blocks of

  14. Crustal stress across the northern Arabian plate and the relationship with the plate boundary forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassminh, Rayan

    The region encompassing the collision of northern Arabia with Eurasia is a tectonically heterogeneous region of distributed deformation. The northern Arabia plate is bounded to the west by the subducting Sinai plate and the left-lateral Dead Sea transform. This complexity suggests that there are multiple competing processes that may influence regional tectonics in northern Arabia and adjacent areas. Earthquake mechanisms provide insight into crustal kinematics and stress; however, reliable determination of earthquake source parameters can be challenging in a complex geological region, such as the continental collision zone between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. The goal of this study is to investigate spatial patterns of the crustal stress in the northern Arabian plate and surrounding area. The focal mechanisms used in this study are based on (1) first-motion polarities for earthquakes recorded by Syrian earthquake center during 2000-2011, and (2) regional moment tensors from broadband seismic data, from Turkey and Iraq. First motion focal mechanisms were assigned quality classifications based on the variation of both nodal planes. Regional moment tensor analysis can be significantly influenced by seismic velocity structure; thus, we have divided the study area into regions based on tectonic units. For each region, the velocity model is described using a waveform-modeling technique prior to the regional moment tensor inversion. The resulting focal mechanisms, combined with other previously published focal mechanisms for the study area, provide a basis for stress inversion analysis. The resulting deviatoric stress tensors show the spatial distribution of the maximum horizontal stress varies from NW-SE along the Dead Sea Fault to the N-S toward the east. We interpret this to reflect the eastward change from the transform to collision processes in northern Arabia. Along the Dead Sea Fault, transposition of the sigma-1 and sigma-2 to vertical and horizontal

  15. Simulating wave-turbulence on thin elastic plates with arbitrary boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Mahadevan, L.

    2016-11-01

    The statistical characteristics of interacting waves are described by the theory of wave turbulence, with the study of deep water gravity wave turbulence serving as a paradigmatic physical example. Here we consider the elastic analog of this problem in the context of flexural waves arising from vibrations of a thin elastic plate. Such flexural waves generate the unique sounds of so-called thunder machines used in orchestras - thin metal plates that make a thunder-like sound when forcefully shaken. Wave turbulence in elastic plates is typically investigated numerically using spectral simulations with periodic boundary conditions, which are not very realistic. We will present the results of numerical simulations of the dynamics of thin elastic plates in physical space, with arbitrary shapes, boundary conditions, anisotropy and inhomogeneity, and show first results on wave turbulence beyond the conventionally studied rectangular plates. Finally, motivated by a possible method to measure ice-sheet thicknesses in the open ocean, we will further discuss the behavior of a vibrating plate when floating on an inviscid fluid.

  16. Numerical modeling of the transitional boundary layer over a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dimitry; Chorny, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    Our example is connected with fundamental research on understanding how an initially laminar boundary layer becomes turbulent. We have chosen the flow over a flat plate as a prototype for boundary-layer flows around bodies. Special attention was paid to the near-wall region in order to capture all levels of the boundary layer. In this study, the numerical software package OpenFOAM has been used in order to solve the flow field. The results were used in a comparative study with data obtained from Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The composite SGS-wall model is presently incorporated into a computer code suitable for the LES of developing flat-plate boundary layers. Presently this model is extended to the LES of the zero-pressure gradient, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. In current study the time discretization is based on a second order Crank-Nicolson/Adams-Bashforth method. LES solver using Smagorinsky and the one-equation LES turbulence models. The transition models significantly improve the prediction of the onset location compared to the fully turbulent models.LES methods appear to be the most promising new tool for the design and analysis of flow devices including transition regions of the turbulent flow.

  17. Discovering plate boundaries: Laboratory and classroom exercises using geodetic data to develop students' understanding of plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    To introduce the concept of plate boundaries, typical introductory geology exercises include students observing and plotting the location of earthquakes and volcanoes on a map to visually demarcate plate boundaries. Accompanying these exercises, students are often exposed to animations depicting the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates over time. Both of these teaching techniques are very useful for describing where the tectonics plates have been in the past, their shapes, and where the plates are now. With the integration of data from current geodetic techniques such as GPS, InSAR, LiDAR, students can learn that not only have the tectonic plates moved in the past, but they are moving, deforming, and changing shape right now. Additionally, GPS data can be visualized using time scales of days to weeks and on the scale of millimeters to centimeters per year. The familiar temporal and spatial scales of GPS data also help students understand that plate tectonics is a process that is happening in the present and can ease the transition to thinking about processes that are typically described using deep time, a very difficult concept for students to grasp. To provide a more robust learning environment, UNAVCO has been incorporating high-precision GPS data into free, place-based, data-rich learning modules for educators and students in introductory Earth science courses at secondary and undergraduate levels. These modules integrate new scientific discoveries related to crustal deformation and explore applications of GPS, LiDAR, and InSAR techniques to research. They also provide students with case studies highlighting the process of scientific discovery, providing context and meaning. Concurrent to these efforts, tools to visualize the inter-relationships of geophysical and geologic processes, structures, and measurements including high-precision GPS velocity data are an essential part of the learning materials. Among the suite of visualization tools that UNAVCO has made

  18. Coherent structures in the asymptotic suction boundary layer over a heated plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammert, Stefan; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    The asymptotic suction boundary layer over a heated plate is a good point of entry to study the dynamics of thermal boundary layers by means of dynamical systems theory. We analyze the stability of this flow in dependence on the Reynolds, Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers and identify the bifurcating secondary solutions. It turns out that in contrast to the Rayleigh-Bénard problem the base flow becomes unstable in a subcritical bifurcation. In the subcritcal range the secondary solutions are the starting point for a bifurcation cascade that creates a chaotic attractor. As in other subcritical flow, a boundary crisis bifurcation turns this attractor into a chaotic saddle causing transient chaotic motion in the subcritical range. We also calculate mean turbulent profiles and their scaling with the Rayleigh and Prandtl number. It turned out that the turbulent flow in the system is characterized by large-scale coherent structures which extend surprisingly far above the plate.

  19. Measurements of strain at plate boundaries using space based geodetic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robaudo, Stefano; Harrison, Christopher G. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have used the space based geodetic techniques of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and VLBI to study strain along subduction and transform plate boundaries and have interpreted the results using a simple elastic dislocation model. Six stations located behind island arcs were analyzed as representative of subduction zones while 13 sites located on either side of the San Andreas fault were used for the transcurrent zones. The length deformation scale was then calculated for both tectonic margins by fitting the relative strain to an exponentially decreasing function of distance from the plate boundary. Results show that space-based data for the transcurrent boundary along the San Andreas fault help to define better the deformation length scale in the area while fitting nicely the elastic half-space earth model. For subduction type bonndaries the analysis indicates that there is no single scale length which uniquely describes the deformation. This is mainly due to the difference in subduction characteristics for the different areas.

  20. Frozen-plasma boundary-layer flows over adiabatic flat plates

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dor, G.; Igra, O.

    1984-07-01

    The boundary-layer equations for a partially ionized frozen flow over a flat plate has been solved using a new approach in which the problem is reduced from a two-point boundary value problem to a Cauchy problem, thus offering a simple, stable, and relatively inexpensive solution technique. The method is applied to a strong shock-induced argon flow over an adiabatic flat plate. The dependence of the flow inside the boundary layer on the Prandtl number Pr, and Lewis number Le, and on the exponential dependence n of the density viscosity product on the temperature are explored, and it is found that while Pr and n strongly affect the obtained flow field, the influence of Le is negligibly small.

  1. Seismic evidence for sharp lithosphere-asthenosphere boundaries of oceanic plates.

    PubMed

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Kumar, Prakash; Takei, Yasuko; Shinohara, Masanao; Kanazawa, Toshihiko; Araki, Eiichiro; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi

    2009-04-24

    The mobility of the lithosphere over a weaker asthenosphere constitutes the essential element of plate tectonics, and thus the understanding of the processes at the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is fundamental to understand how our planet works. It is especially so for oceanic plates because their relatively simple creation and evolution should enable easy elucidation of the LAB. Data from borehole broadband ocean bottom seismometers show that the LAB beneath the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates is sharp and age-dependent. The observed large shear wave velocity reduction at the LAB requires a partially molten asthenosphere consisting of horizontal melt-rich layers embedded in meltless mantle, which accounts for the large viscosity contrast at the LAB that facilitates horizontal plate motions.

  2. Discovering Plate Boundaries Update: Builds Content Knowledge and Models Inquiry-based Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, D. S.; Pringle, M. S.; Henning, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    Discovering Plate Boundaries (DPB) is a jigsaw-structured classroom exercise in which students explore the fundamental datasets from which plate boundary processes were discovered. The exercise has been widely used in the past ten years as a classroom activity for students in fifth grade through high school, and for Earth Science major and general education courses in college. Perhaps more importantly, the exercise has been used extensively for professional development of in-service and pre-service K-12 science teachers, where it simultaneously builds content knowledge in plate boundary processes (including natural hazards), models an effective data-rich, inquiry-based pedagogy, and provides a set of lesson plans and materials which teachers can port directly into their own classroom (see Pringle, et al, this session for a specific example). DPB is based on 4 “specialty” data maps, 1) earthquake locations, 2) modern volcanic activity, 3) seafloor age, and 4) topography and bathymetry, plus a fifth map of (undifferentiated) plate boundary locations. The jigsaw is structured so that students are first split into one of the four “specialties,” then re-arranged into groups with each of the four specialties to describe the boundaries of a particular plate. We have taken the original DPB materials, used the latest digital data sets to update all the basic maps, and expanded the opportunities for further student and teacher learning. The earthquake maps now cover the recent period including the deadly Banda Aceh event. The topography/bathymetry map now has global coverage and uses ice-free elevations, which can, for example, extend to further inquiry about mantle viscosity and loading processes (why are significant portions of the bedrock surface of Greenland and Antarctica below sea level?). The volcanic activity map now differentiates volcano type and primary volcanic lithology, allowing a more elaborate understanding of volcanism at different plate boundaries

  3. Receptivity of flat-plate boundary layer in a non-uniform free stream (vorticity normal to the plate)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, M. N.

    1994-01-01

    Recent progress in both the linear and nonlinear aspects of stability theory has highlighted the importance of the receptivity problem. One of the most unclear aspects of receptivity study is the receptivity of boundary-layer flow normal to vortical disturbances. Some experimental and theoretical results permit the proposition that quasi-steady outer-flow vortical disturbances may trigger by-pass transition. In present work such interaction is investigated for vorticity normal to a leading edge. The interest in these types of vortical disturbances arise from theoretical work, where it was shown that small sinusoidal variations of upstream velocity along the spanwise direction can produce significant variations in the boundary-layer profile. In the experimental part of this work, such non-uniform flow was created and the laminar-turbulent transition in this flow was investigated. The experiment was carried out in a low-turbulence direct-flow wind tunnel T-361 at the Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI). The non-uniform flow was produced by laminar or turbulent wakes behind a wire placed normal to the plate upstream of the leading edge. The theoretical part of the work is devoted to studying the unstable disturbance evolution in a boundary layer with strongly non-uniform velocity profiles similar to that produced by outer-flow vorticity. Specifically, the Tollmien-Schlichting wave development in the boundary layer flow with spanwise variations of velocity is investigated.

  4. Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene plate boundaries in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Dietmar Müller, R.; Whittaker, Joanne; Flament, Nicolas; Seton, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The late Cretaceous to mid Eocene history of the southwest and southernmost Pacific has been subject to starkly contrasting interpretations, ranging from relative tectonic quiescence with the Lord Howe Rise (LHR) being part of the Pacific plate to a dynamic subduction setting. In the first scenario the Tasman Sea would have formed as a consequence of divergence between the Pacific and Australian plates, whereas in the second scenario it would have formed as a marginal basin associated with subduction. The first scenario is supported by a number of arguments, including a lack of evidence for deformation and tectonic activity in New Zealand during this period and a geodynamic modelling inference, namely that the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain can be better reproduced if the LHR is part of the Pacific plate. The second scenario is supported by regional plate kinematic models reconciling a variety of observations including back-arc basin formation and destruction through time and the history of arc-continent collisions. The primary problem with the first scenario is the use of a plate circuit that leaves relative motion between East and West Antarctica unconstrained, leading to an improbable history of periodic compression and extension. The main problem with the alternative scenario is a lack of sampled late Cretaceous volcanic arc rocks east of the LHR. We analysed available geological and geophysical data to constrain the locations of and movements along the plate boundaries in the southwest and southern Pacific from the late Cretaceous to mid Eocene, and assessed how Pacific plate motion is best quantified during this period. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that a plate boundary separated the Pacific plate from the LHR. The distribution of lower mantle slab material that is imaged by seismic tomography beneath New Zealand is best explained if subduction occurred to the east of the LHR during the entire late Cretaceous to mid Eocene period. Rocks

  5. Lower plate deformation structures along the Costa Rica erosive plate boundary - results from IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Micheuz, Peter; Krenn, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    1414 is located ~1 km seaward of the deformation front offshore the Osa Peninsula and Caño Island. Primary science goals at Site U1414 included characterization of the alteration state of the magmatic basement. Brittle structures within the incoming plate (sites U1380, U1414) are mineralized extensional fractures and shear fractures. The shear fractures mainly show a normal component of shear. Within the sedimentary sequence both types of fractures dip steeply (vertical to subvertical) and strike NNE-SSW. Deformation bands trend roughly ENE-WSW, sub-parallel to the trend of the Cocos ridge. Structures in the Cocos Ridge basalt mainly comprise mineralized veins at various orientations. A preferred orientation of strike directions was not observed. Some veins show straight boundaries, others are characterized by an irregular geometry characterized by brecciated wall rock clasts embedded within vein precipitates. The vein mineralization was analysed in detail by RAMAN spectroscopy. Precipitation conditions and fluid chemistry were analysed by fluid inclusions entrapped within vein minerals. Vein mineralizations mainly consist of carbonate (fibrous aragonite, calcite), chalcedony, and quartz. Vein mineralization is mainly characterized by zoned antitaxial growth of carbonate fibres including a suture along the central vein domains. Quartz is often characterized by fibre growth of crystals perpendicular to the vein boundaries, too. These zoned veins additinally have wall rock alteration seams consisting of clay minerals. The precipitation sequence basically indicates that fluid chemistry evolved from an CO2-rich towards a SiO2- rich fluid.

  6. Characteristic Size of Tectonic Plates: Insights from Boundary Layer Theory with Grain-damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, E.; Bercovici, D.

    2015-12-01

    The dominant degree-2 pattern of mantle convection is a commonly inferred feature from seismological observations (Dziewonski et al., 2010). This pattern is likely associated with large-scale structures like hotspot super-swells and Pacific subduction-zones. The mechanism that dictates this long-wavelength structure is currently a subject of debate. Interestingly, mantle convection models featuring temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity and Earth-like convective vigor typically predict a shorter characteristic wavelength, reflected in the spatial distribution of upwelling plumes and downwellings (Zhong et al., 2000). Plate generating physics is an additional effect that possibly governs the long-wavelength convective pattern; i.e., tectonic plates constitute the top cold thermal boundary layer, subduction of which is the most efficient component of the mantles convective heat transport. To address the effect of plate generation on convective wavelength, we combine a boundary-layer model of mantle convection (Turcotte & Oxburgh, 1967), with the grain-damage model of lithospheric shear-localization (Bercovici & Ricard, 2012). As shown by Solomatov (1995), the strongly temperature-dependent viscosity of Earth materials would render it in the stagnant lid regime of convection, much like what is observed on Venus. Grain-damage allows for self-weakening that remobilizes the lithosphere, making plate like flow possible. Such self-weakening necessarily has an effect on the length of the lithospheric boundary layer and hence convective wavelength. Our simple model thus infers a characteristic size of tectonic plates for a given convective vigor. Superposition of the long convective length-scale, dictated by the cold, stiff, yet damaged and deformable thermal boundary layer, onto the length-scale dictated by convective instability yields a range of material parameters for which the convective pattern is consistent with observations.

  7. Geological record of fluid flow and seismogenesis along an erosive subducting plate boundary.

    PubMed

    Vannucchi, Paola; Remitti, Francesca; Bettelli, Giuseppe

    2008-02-07

    Tectonic erosion of the overriding plate by the downgoing slab is believed to occur at half the Earth's subduction zones. In situ investigation of the geological processes at active erosive margins is extremely difficult owing to the deep marine environment and the net loss of forearc crust to deeper levels in the subduction zone. Until now, a fossil erosive subduction channel-the shear zone marking the plate boundary-has not been recognized in the field, so that seismic observations have provided the only information on plate boundary processes at erosive margins. Here we show that a fossil erosive margin is preserved in the Northern Apennines of Italy. It formed during the Tertiary transition from oceanic subduction to continental collision, and was preserved by the late deactivation and fossilization of the plate boundary. The outcropping erosive subduction channel is approximately 500 m thick. It is representative of the first 5 km of depth, with its deeper portions reaching approximately 150 degrees C. The fossil zone records several surprises. Two décollements were simultaneously active at the top and base of the subduction channel. Both deeper basal erosion and near-surface frontal erosion occurred. At shallow depths extension was a key deformation component within this erosive convergent plate boundary, and slip occurred without an observable fluid pressure cycle. At depths greater than about 3 km a fluid cycle is clearly shown by the development of veins and the alternation of fast (co-seismic) and slow (inter-seismic) slip. In the deepest portions of the outcropping subduction channel, extension is finally overprinted by compressional structures. In modern subduction zones the onset of seismic activity is believed to occur at approximately 150 degrees C, but in the fossil channel the onset occurred at cooler palaeo-temperatures.

  8. In-Flight Boundary-Layer Transition of a Large Flat Plate at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; Frederick, M. A.; Tracy, R. R.; Matisheck, J. R.; Vanecek, N. D.

    2012-01-01

    A flight experiment was conducted to investigate the pressure distribution, local-flow conditions, and boundary-layer transition characteristics on a large flat plate in flight at supersonic speeds up to Mach 2.00. The tests used a NASA testbed aircraft with a bottom centerline mounted test fixture. The primary objective of the test was to characterize the local flow field in preparation for future tests of a high Reynolds number natural laminar flow test article. A second objective was to determine the boundary-layer transition characteristics on the flat plate and the effectiveness of using a simplified surface coating. Boundary-layer transition was captured in both analog and digital formats using an onboard infrared imaging system. Surface pressures were measured on the surface of the flat plate. Flow field measurements near the leading edge of the test fixture revealed the local flow characteristics including downwash, sidewash, and local Mach number. Results also indicated that the simplified surface coating did not provide sufficient insulation from the metallic structure, which likely had a substantial effect on boundary-layer transition compared with that of an adiabatic surface. Cold wall conditions were predominant during the acceleration to maximum Mach number, and warm wall conditions were evident during the subsequent deceleration.

  9. In-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianjie; Shi, Dongyan; Qin, Zhengrong; Wang, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    In comparison with the out-of-plane vibrations of annular plates, far less attention has been paid to the in-plane vibrations which may also play a vital important role in affecting the sound radiation from and power flows in a built-up structure. In this investigation, a generalized Fourier series method is proposed for the in-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions along each of its edges. Regardless of the boundary conditions, the in-plane displacement fields are invariantly expressed as a new form of trigonometric series expansions with a drastically improved convergence as compared with the conventional Fourier series. All the unknown expansion coefficients are treated as the generalized coordinates and determined using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. Unlike most of the existing studies, the presented method can be readily and universally applied to a wide spectrum of in-plane vibration problems involving different boundary conditions, varying material, and geometric properties with no need of modifying the basic functions or adapting solution procedures. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of the current solution for predicting the in-plane vibration characteristics of annular plates subjected to different boundary conditions.

  10. Pacific-North America plate boundary reorganization in response to a change in relative plate motion: Offshore Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, K. M. M.; Tryon, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    The transition from subduction in Cascadia to the transform Queen Charlotte fault along western Canada is often drawn as a subduction zone, yet recent studies of GPS and earthquake data from northern Vancouver Island are not consistent with that model. In this paper we synthesize seismic reflection and gravity interpretations with microseismicity data in order to test models of (1) microplate subduction and (2) reorganization of the preexisting strike-slip plate boundary. We focus on the critical region of outer Queen Charlotte Sound and the adjacent offshore. On much of the continental shelf, several million years of subsidence above thin crust are a counterindicator for subduction. An undated episode of compression uplifted the southernmost shelf, but subsidence patterns offshore show that recent subduction is unlikely to be responsible. Previously unremarked near-vertical faults and a mix of extensional and compressional faults offshore indicate that strike-slip faulting has been a significant mode of deformation. Seismicity in the last 18 years is dominantly strike-slip and shows large amounts of moment release on the Revere-Dellwood fault and its overlap with the Queen Charlotte fault. The relative plate motion between the Pacific and North American plates rotated clockwise ˜6 Ma and appears to have triggered formation of an evolving array of structures. We suggest that the paleo-Queen Charlotte fault which had defined this continental margin retreated northward as offshore distributed shear and the newly formed Revere Dellwood fault propagated to the northwest.

  11. Hydrodynamic and thermal slip flow boundary layers over a flat plate with constant heat flux boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Abdul

    2010-03-01

    In this paper the boundary layer flow over a flat plat with slip flow and constant heat flux surface condition is studied. Because the plate surface temperature varies along the x direction, the momentum and energy equations are coupled due to the presence of the temperature gradient along the plate surface. This coupling, which is due to the presence of the thermal jump term in Maxwell slip condition, renders the momentum and energy equations non-similar. As a preliminary study, this paper ignores this coupling due to thermal jump condition so that the self-similar nature of the equations is preserved. Even this fundamental problem for the case of a constant heat flux boundary condition has remained unexplored in the literature. It was therefore chosen for study in this paper. For the hydrodynamic boundary layer, velocity and shear stress distributions are presented for a range of values of the parameter characterizing the slip flow. This slip parameter is a function of the local Reynolds number, the local Knudsen number, and the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient representing the fraction of the molecules reflected diffusively at the surface. As the slip parameter increases, the slip velocity increases and the wall shear stress decreases. These results confirm the conclusions reached in other recent studies. The energy equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution in the thermal boundary layer for a range of values for both the slip parameter as well as the fluid Prandtl number. The increase in Prandtl number and/or the slip parameter reduces the dimensionless surface temperature. The actual surface temperature at any location of x is a function of the local Knudsen number, the local Reynolds number, the momentum accommodation coefficient, Prandtl number, other flow properties, and the applied heat flux.

  12. Plate boundary forces in the vicinity of Trinidad-the-transition from transpression to transtension in the Southern Caribbean plate boundary zones

    SciTech Connect

    Algar, S.T.; Pindell, J.L. )

    1993-02-01

    Deformation in the southern Caribbean plate boundary zones as recorded in the Northern Range of Trinidad initiated in the Oligocene with northward vergent gravity sliding of Northern Range sediments due to uplift and oversteepening of the previously passive margin by the eastward migration of the Caribbean flexural forebulge. Progressive east-southeast transvergence of the Caribbean Plate with respect to South America overthrust incorporated the Northern Range sediments into the Caribbean accretionary prism, thrusting them south-southeast to produce a Middle Miocene transpressive foreland fold and thrust belt in southern Trinidad. Late Miocene deformation within Trinidad was increasingly dominated by right-lateral strike-slop (RLSS) faulting, at the expense of transpressive compressional features. Right-stepping of RLSS motion initiated the Gulf of Paria and Caroni pull-apart basins, Since Early Pliocene these basins and other areas to the north of Trinidad have undergone north-south extension in addition to east-west trending RLSS. Such extension caused the northward withdrawal of Caribbean terranes from atop of the Northern Range, Resulting in rapid isostatically induced uplift (approximately 0.5 mmyr[sup -1]). This change in deformation style may relate to a hitherto unrecognized shift in the relative motion of the eastern Caribbean Plate with respect to South America: from east-southeast-directed transpression to east-northeast-directed transtension.

  13. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmed I

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement.

  14. MHD Free Convective Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid past a Flat Vertical Plate with Newtonian Heating Boundary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed J.; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, Ahmed I.

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement. PMID:23166688

  15. Near Continuum Velocity and Temperature Coupled Compressible Boundary Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Cai, Chunpei

    2017-04-01

    The problem of a compressible gas flows over a flat plate with the velocity-slip and temperature-jump boundary conditions are being studied. The standard single- shooting method is applied to obtain the exact solutions for velocity and temperature profiles when the momentum and energy equations are weakly coupled. A double-shooting method is applied if these two equations are closely coupled. If the temperature affects the velocity directly, more significant velocity slip happens at locations closer to the plate's leading edge, and inflections on the velocity profiles appear, indicating flows may become unstable. As a consequence, the temperature-jump and velocity-slip boundary conditions may trigger earlier flow transitions from a laminar to a turbulent flow state.

  16. Control of boundary layer transition location and plate vibration in the presence of an external acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The experiment is aimed at controlling the boundary layer transition location and the plate vibration when excited by a flow and an upstream sound source. Sound has been found to affect the flow at the leading edge and the response of a flexible plate in a boundary layer. Because the sound induces early transition, the panel vibration is acoustically coupled to the turbulent boundary layer by the upstream radiation. Localized surface heating at the leading edge delays the transition location downstream of the flexible plate. The response of the plate excited by a turbulent boundary layer (without sound) shows that the plate is forced to vibrate at different frequencies and with different amplitudes as the flow velocity changes indicating that the plate is driven by the convective waves of the boundary layer. The acoustic disturbances induced by the upstream sound dominate the response of the plate when the boundary layer is either turbulent or laminar. Active vibration control was used to reduce the sound induced displacement amplitude of the plate.

  17. Geodetic observations in Iceland: divergent plate boundary influenced by a hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofeigsson, Benedikt Gunnar; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrun; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Arnadottir, Thora; Vogfjord, Kristin; Geirsson, Halldor; Einarsson, Pall; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Villemin, Thierry; Fjalar Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Roberts, Matthew; Sturkell, Erik; Lafemina, Peter C.; Bennett, Richard; Voelksen, Christof; Valsson, Gudmundur; Sigurdsson, Thorarinn

    2013-04-01

    The mid Atlantic ridge, separating the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates, is mostly buried below the Atlantic. There are, however, a few places where subaerial exposure of the mid-oceanic rift system allows geodetic observations of the deformation associated with the plate boundary. Iceland is the largest portion of the system emerged above sea level, a consequence of excessive volcanism caused by the interaction of a mantle plume with the mid-oceanic ridge. Iceland is therefore a unique site to study processes associated with divergent plate boundaries, and the effects of the plume-ridge interaction. A network of continuous GPS stations have been operating in Iceland since 1995 when the first station was installed in Reykjavik. Since then, stations have been added to the network at different points in time, with over 70 stations presently in operation. The network has been used e.g. for studies of deformation associated with the divergent plate boundary, micro-plate formation due to rift jumps, the plate-spreading deformation cycle associated with rifting episodes, strain rates and stress accumulation on transform zones connecting the ridge segments and deformation due to magmatic processes. In addition the GPS network is used in studies of the deformation associated with mass variations of Iceland's glaciers. The continuous GPS network serves as monitoring tool in Iceland, both for volcanic and seismic hazards but also as a research tool. In the recent Futurvolc project, which partly builds on EPOS, the data from the continuous GPS network along with data from the seismic network and InSAR observations, will serve as the main input in joint analyses of long and short term magma movements in volcanic regions. The establishment of the continuous GPS network in Iceland has provided an ideal tool to further increase our understanding of the geodynamic processes associated with divergent plate boundaries and plume-ridge interaction as well as establishing a

  18. Slab dragging and the recent geodynamic evolution of the western Mediterranean plate boundary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakman, Wim; Chertova, Maria V.; van den Berg, Arie P.; Thieulot, Cedric; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tortonian-Present geodynamic evolution of the plate boundary between North Africa and Iberia is characterized by first-order enigmas. This concerns, e.g., the diffuse tectonic activity of the plate boundary; the crustal thickening below the Rif; the closing of the northern Moroccan marine gateways prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis; crustal extension of the central to eastern Betics; the origin and sense of motion of the large left-lateral Trans Alboran Shear Zone (TASZ) and Eastern Betic Shear Zone (EBSZ); and lithosphere delamination of the North African continental edge. Many explanations have been given for each of these seemingly disparate tectonic features, which invariably have been addressed in the plate tectonic context of the NW-SE relative plate convergence between the major plates since the Tortonian, mostly independently from each other. Usually there is no clear role for the subducted slab underlying the region, except for presumed rollback, either to SW or to the W, depending on the type of observations that require explanation. Here we integrate the dynamic role of the slab with the NW-SE relative plate convergence by 3-D numerical modelling of the slab evolution constrained by absolute plate motions (Chertova et al., JGR,2014 & Gcubed 2014). By combining observations and predictions from seismology, geology, and geodesy, with our numerical 3-D slab-mantle dynamics modelling, we developed a new and promising geodynamic framework that provides explanations of all noted tectonic enigmas in a coherent and connected way. From the Tortonian until today, we propose that mantle-resisted slab dragging combines with the NW-SE plate convergence across the (largely) unbroken plate boundary to drive the crustal deformation of the region. Slab dragging is the lateral transport, pushing or pulling, of slab through the mantle by the absolute motion of the subducting plate (Chertova et al., Gcubed, 2014). Because the slab is connected to both the Iberian

  19. Tectonics of the Antarctic-Scotia plate boundary near Elephant and Clarence Islands, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepeis, Keith A.; Lawver, Lawrence A.

    1996-09-01

    Over 5000 km of new bathymetric data collected from near the northern Antarctic Peninsula (60°S-63.5°S latitude, 53.5°W-63°W longitude) show the morphology of an irregular segment of the Antarctic-Scotia plate boundary and nearby Shetland microplate. The irregular plate boundary is formed by an oblique intersection (>70°) of the sinistral transpressional Shackleton fracture zone (SFZ) and the sinistral transtensional South Scotia Ridge transform (SSR) near Elephant (EI) and Clarence (CI) Islands. Mapped boundaries of the Shetland microplate include the South Shetland Trench and the volcanic rift axis of Bransfield Strait marginal basin. Bathymetric data, single-channel seismic reflection profiles, and Geosat/ERS 1 free air gravity data show a southeast trending fault zone on the northeast side of a prominent ridge in the SFZ. The fault zone is defined by scarps that affect ocean floor sediments, fault-bounded subbasins, rotated sedimentary layers, angular unconformities, linear gravity trends, and transtensional followed by contractional deformation. Southeast of a termination of the SFZ ridge at the South Shetland Trench, the fault zone subdivides into segments displaying steep scarps (up to 23°) and canyons on the northeast margin of the EI platform. These features become east-west trending nearer to the western SSR. South of the islands, southwest trending extensional or transtensional fault zones disrupt the Bransfield Strait volcanic rift axis. These data suggest that (1) recent (<4 Ma) changes in the configuration of the Antarctic plate near the Antarctic Peninsula caused a segment of the SFZ transform to adjust to a more stable, rectilinear geometry with the SSR transform, and (2) diffuse transtension resulting from current Antarctic-Scotia relative motion is dissecting the Shetland microplate near EI and CI and transferring slivers of the Scotia plate onto the Antarctic plate.

  20. Unsteady Boundary-Layer Flow over Jerked Plate Moving in a Free Stream of Viscoelastic Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Ahmer; Ali, Asif; Saleem, Najma

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0 ≤ τ < ∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs. PMID:24892060

  1. The stability of a three dimensional laminar boundary layer over a swept flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, B.; Bippes, H.; Collier, F. S., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The linear stability of the laminar boundary layer on a swept flat plate with an imposed favorable pressure gradient was studied utilizing a linear stability model which accounts for streamline curvature for three-dimensional incompressible flows. Calculations were performed for a leading-edge sweep angle of 45 degrees and freestream valocity of 19 m/s. Computed disturbance amplification rates and wavelengths for stationary crossflow vortices were compared with available experimental results.

  2. The stability of a three-dimensional laminar boundary layer on a swept flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, F. S., Jr.; Mueller, B.; Bippes, H.

    1990-01-01

    The linear stability of the laminar boundary layer on a swept flat plate with an imposed favorable pressure gradient was studied utilizing a linear stability model which accounts for streamline curvature for three-dimensional incompressible flows. Calculations were performed for an effective leading-edge sweep angle of 42.5 degrees and freestream velocity of 19 m/s. Computed disturbance amplification rates for the spectrum of amplified frequencies and wavelengths for stationary crossflow vortices were compared with experimental results.

  3. A great earthquake rupture across a rapidly evolving three-plate boundary.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Kevin P; Lay, Thorne; Ammon, Charles J

    2009-04-10

    On 1 April 2007 a great, tsunamigenic earthquake (moment magnitude 8.1) ruptured the Solomon Islands subduction zone at the triple junction where the Australia and Solomon Sea-Woodlark Basin plates simultaneously underthrust the Pacific plate with different slip directions. The associated abrupt change in slip direction during the great earthquake drove convergent anelastic deformation of the upper Pacific plate, which generated localized uplift in the forearc above the subducting Simbo fault, potentially amplifying local tsunami amplitude. Elastic deformation during the seismic cycle appears to be primarily accommodated by the overriding Pacific forearc. This earthquake demonstrates the seismogenic potential of extremely young subducting oceanic lithosphere, the ability of ruptures to traverse substantial geologic boundaries, and the consequences of complex coseismic slip for uplift and tsunamigenesis.

  4. A formal derivation for the Blasius similarity solution for flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao

    2015-11-01

    The Blasius solution is a classical solution for a laminar boundary layer attached to a semi-infinite flat plate. The key of the solution strategy is to reduce the boundary layer equations, which are PDEs, to a set of ODEs, using a similarity variable transform. Conceptually, the similarity suggests that the velocity profile in each transverse cross-section appears ``self-similar''. In many classical text books and typical classroom lectures on fluid mechanics, the existence of the similarity solution is argued heuristically. The similarity variable is defined a priori so as to collapse the PDEs. It appears somewhat mystical that the PDEs can be perfectly reduced via such an approach. Here we present a rigorous derivation for the existence of a similarity solution, which naturally arises from the fact that there is no apparent streamwise length scale for a semi-infinite plate. Conversely, a similarity solution cannot exist if the plate size is finite. This derivation can be useful in fluids education, in topics including similarity, scaling arguments, and boundary layer theory.

  5. 3D geometry of the strain-field at transform plate boundaries: Implications for seismic rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, P.; Bilham, R. |

    1994-11-01

    We examine the amplitude and distribution of slip on vertical frictionless faults in the zone of concentrated shear strain that is characteristic of transform plate boundaries. We study both a 2D and a 3D approximation to this strain field. Mean displacements on ruptures within the zone of concentrated shear strain are proportional to the shear strain at failure when they are short, and are limited by plate displacements since the last major earthquake when they are long. The transition between these two behaviors occurs when the length of the dislocation approaches twice the thickness of the seismogenic crust, approximately the breadth of the zone of concentrated shear strain observed geodetically at transform plate boundaries. This result explains the observed non-linear scaling relation between seismic moment and rupture length. A geometrical consequence of the 3D model, in which the strain-field tapers downward, is that moderate earthquakes with rupture lengths similar to the thickness of the crust tend to slip more at depth than near the surface. Seismic moments estimated from surface slip in moderate earthquakes (M less than or equal to 7) will thus be underestimated. Shallow creep, if its along-strike dimension is extensive, can reduce a surface slip deficit that would otherwise develop on faults on which M less than 7 events are typical. In the absence of surface creep or other forms of off-fault deformation great earthquakes may be necessary features of transform boundaries with downward-tapering strain-fields.

  6. Effect of plate permeability on nonlinear stability of the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedin, Hâkan; Cherubini, Stefania; Bottaro, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinear stability of the asymptotic suction boundary layer is studied numerically, searching for finite-amplitude solutions that bifurcate from the laminar flow state. By changing the boundary conditions for disturbances at the plate from the classical no-slip condition to more physically sound ones, the stability characteristics of the flow may change radically, both for the linearized as well as the nonlinear problem. The wall boundary condition takes into account the permeability K ̂ of the plate; for very low permeability, it is acceptable to impose the classical boundary condition (K ̂=0 ). This leads to a Reynolds number of approximately Rec=54 400 for the onset of linearly unstable waves, and close to Reg=3200 for the emergence of nonlinear solutions [F. A. Milinazzo and P. G. Saffman, J. Fluid Mech. 160, 281 (1985), 10.1017/S0022112085003482; J. H. M. Fransson, Ph.D. thesis, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Sweden, 2003]. However, for larger values of the plate's permeability, the lower limit for the existence of linear and nonlinear solutions shifts to significantly lower Reynolds numbers. For the largest permeability studied here, the limit values of the Reynolds numbers reduce down to Rec=796 and Reg=294 . For all cases studied, the solutions bifurcate subcritically toward lower Re, and this leads to the conjecture that they may be involved in the very first stages of a transition scenario similar to the classical route of the Blasius boundary layer initiated by Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves. The stability of these nonlinear solutions is also investigated, showing a low-frequency main unstable mode whose growth rate decreases with increasing permeability and with the Reynolds number, following a power law Re-ρ, where the value of ρ depends on the permeability coefficient K ̂. The nonlinear dynamics of the flow in the vicinity of the computed finite-amplitude solutions is finally investigated by direct numerical simulations, providing a

  7. In-Flight Boundary-Layer Transition on a Large Flat Plate at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Fredericks, Michael Alan; Tracy, Richard R.; Matisheck, Jason R.; Vanecek, Neal D.

    2012-01-01

    A flight experiment was conducted to investigate the pressure distribution, local flow conditions, and boundary-layer transition characteristics on a large flat plate in flight at supersonic speeds up to Mach 2.0. The primary objective of the test was to characterize the local flow field in preparation for future tests of a high Reynolds number natural laminar flow test article. The tests used a F-15B testbed aircraft with a bottom centerline mounted test fixture. A second objective was to determine the boundary-layer transition characteristics on the flat plate and the effectiveness of using a simplified surface coating for future laminar flow flight tests employing infrared thermography. Boundary-layer transition was captured using an onboard infrared imaging system. The infrared imagery was captured in both analog and digital formats. Surface pressures were measured with electronically scanned pressure modules connected to 60 surface-mounted pressure orifices. The local flow field was measured with five 5-hole conical probes mounted near the leading edge of the test fixture. Flow field measurements revealed the local flow characteristics including downwash, sidewash, and local Mach number. Results also indicated that the simplified surface coating did not provide sufficient insulation from the metallic structure, which likely had a substantial effect on boundary-layer transition compared with that of an adiabatic surface. Cold wall conditions were predominant during the acceleration to maximum Mach number, and warm wall conditions were evident during the subsequent deceleration. The infrared imaging system was able to capture shock wave impingement on the surface of the flat plate in addition to indicating laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer transition.

  8. Extension and transtension in the plate boundary zone of the northeastern Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.C. ); Larue, D.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors propose that the Caribbean (Ca)-North American (NA) plate boundary zone (pbz) from the Puerto Rico Trench to the Venezuelan Basin from Mona Canyon east has been in left-transtension over the last 15-20 ma. A boundary-normal component of extension occurs throughout the pbz and is a principal cause of the Puerto Rico Trench. Such extension is due to WNW velocity of NA-Ca and the northward pullaway of NA from its S-dipping slab, which is below Puerto Rico. Strike slip motion may be taken up among terranes in the pbz by rigid CCW rotation and by oblique slip at their boundaries. Rotation of the largest terrane, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands (PRVI), has caused such major structures as the Muertos thrust and Anegada Passage. The model implies NA-Ca velocity estimated from Cayman transforms is more accurate than that from slip vectors from seisms in the NA slab.

  9. Plate convergence measured by GPS across the Sundaland/Philippine Sea Plate deformed boundary: the Philippines and eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, C.; Le Pichon, X.; Mazzotti, S.; Pubellier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Aurelio, M.; Walpersdorf, Andrea; Quebral, R.

    1999-11-01

    The western boundary of the Philippine Sea (PH) Plate in the Philippines and eastern Indonesia corresponds to a wide deformation zone that includes the stretched continental margin of Sundaland, the Philippine Mobile Belt (PMB), extending from Luzon to the Molucca Sea, and a mosaic of continental blocks around the PH/Australia/Sunda triple junction. The GPS GEODYSSEA data are used to decipher the present kinematics of this complex area. In the Philippines, the overall scheme is quite simple: two opposing rotations on either side of the left-lateral Philippine Fault, clockwise to the southwest and counterclockwise to the northeast, transfer 55 per cent of the PH/Sundaland convergence from the Manila Trench to the northwest to the Philippine Trench to the southeast. Further south, 80 per cent of the PH/Sunda convergence is absorbed in the double subduction system of the Molucca Sea and less than 20 per cent along both continental margins of northern Borneo. Finally, within the triple junction area between the Sundaland, PH and Australia plates, from Sulawesi to Irian Jaya, preferential subduction of the Celebes Sea induces clockwise rotation of the Sulu block, which is escaping toward the diminishing Celebes Sea oceanic space from the eastward-advancing PH Plate. To the south, we identify an undeformed Banda block that rotates counterclockwise with respect to Australia and clockwise with respect to Sundaland. The kinematics of this block can be defined and enable us to compute the rates of southward subduction of the Banda block within the Flores Trench and of eastward convergence of the Makassar Straits with the Banda block. The analysis made in this paper confirms that this deformation is compatible with the eastward motion of Sundaland with respect to Eurasia determined by the GEODYSSEA programme but is not compatible with the assumption that Sundaland belongs to Eurasia, as was often assumed prior to this study.

  10. Plate boundary deformation at the latitude of the Salton Trough - northern Gulf of California (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Along the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone, the segment including the southern San Andreas fault to Salton Trough and northern Gulf of California basins has been transtensional throughout its evolution, based on Pacific-North America displacement vectors calculated from the global plate circuit (900 × 20 km at N54°W since 20 Ma; 460 × 20 km at N48°W since 11 Ma). Nevertheless, active seismicity and focal mechanisms show a broad zone of plate boundary deformation within which the inferred stress regime varies locally (Yang & Hauksson 2013 GJI), and fault patterns in some regions suggest ongoing tectonic rotation. Similar behavior is inferred to have occurred in this zone over most of its history. Crustal structure in this region is constrained by surface geology, geophysical experiments (e.g., the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), USGS Imperial Valley 1979, PACE), and interdisciplinary marine and onland studies in Mexico (e.g., NARS-Baja, Cortes, and surveys by PEMEX). Magnetic data (e.g., EMAG-2) aids in the recognition of large-scale crustal provinces and fault boundaries in regions lacking detailed geophysical surveys. Consideration of existing constraints on crustal thickness and architecture, and fault and basin evolution suggests that to reconcile geological deformation with plate motion history, the following additional factors need to be taken into account. 1) Plate boundary displacement via interacting systems of rotating blocks, coeval with slip on steep strike slip faults, and possibly related to slip on low angle extensional faults (e.g, Axen & Fletcher 1998 IGR) may be typical prior to the onset of seafloor spreading. This fault style may have accommodated up to 150 km of plate motion in the Mexican Continental Borderland and north of the Vizcaino Peninsula, likely between 12 and 15 Ma, as well as explaining younger rotations adjacent to the Gulf of California and current deformation southwest of the Salton Sea. 2) Geophysical

  11. Modeling the Philippine Mobile Belt: Tectonic blocks in a deforming plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgana, G. A.; Hamburger, M. W.; McCaffrey, R.; Bacolcol, T. C.; Aurelio, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Philippine Mobile Belt, a seismically active, rapidly deforming plate boundary zone situated along the convergent Philippine Sea/Eurasian plate boundary, is examined using geodetic and seismological data. Oblique convergence between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian plate is accommodated by nearly orthogonal subduction along the Philippine Trench and the Manila Trench, as well as by strike-slip faulting along the Philippine Fault system. We develop a model of active plate boundary deformation in this region, using elastic block models constrained by known fault geometries, published GPS observations and focal mechanism solutions. We then present an estimate of block rotations, fault coupling, and intra-block deformation, based on the best-fit model that minimizes the misfit between observed and predicted geodetic vectors and earthquake slip vectors. Slip rates along the Philippine fault vary from ~22 - 36 mm/yr in the Central Visayas and about 10 to 40 mm/yr in Luzon, trending almost parallel to the fault trace. In northern Luzon, Philippine Fault splays accommodate transpressional strain. The Central Visayas block experiences convergence with the Sundaland block along the Negros Trench and the Mindoro-Palawan collision zone. On the eastern side of Central Visayas, sinistral strike-slip faulting occurs along the NNW-SSE-trending Philippine Fault. Mindanao Island in southern Philippines is dominated by east-verging subduction along the Cotabato Trench, and strain partitioning (strike- slip faulting with west-verging subduction) in eastern Mindanao along the southern Philippine Fault and Philippine Trench, respectively. Oblique active sinistral strike slip faults in Central and Eastern Mindanao that were hypothesized to be responsible for basin formation are obvious boundaries for tectonic blocks. Located south of Mindanao Island we define an adjoining oceanic block defined by the N-S trending complex dual subduction zone of Sangihe and Halmahera

  12. New GPS constraints on active deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulali, A.; Ouazar, D.; Tahayt, A.; King, R. W.; Vernant, P.; Reilinger, R. E.; McClusky, S.; Mourabit, T.; Davila, J. M.; Amraoui, N.

    2011-08-01

    We use velocities from 65 continuous stations and 31 survey-mode GPS sites as well as kinematic modeling to investigate present day deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary zone in the western Mediterranean region. The GPS velocity field shows southwestward motion of the central part of the Rif Mountains in northern Morocco with respect to Africa varying between 3.5 and 4.0 mm/yr, consistent with prior published results. Stations in the southwestern part of the Betic Mountains of southern Spain move west-southwest with respect to Eurasia (˜ 2-3 mm/yr). The western component of Betics motion is consistent with partial transfer of Nubia-Eurasia plate motion into the southern Betics. The southward component of Betics motion with respect to Iberia is kinematically consistent with south to southwest motion of the Rif Mountains with respect to Africa. We use block modeling, constrained by mapped surface faults and seismicity to estimate the geometry and rates of strain accumulation on plate boundary structures. Our preferred plate boundary geometry includes one block between Iberia and Africa including the SW Betics, Alboran Sea, and central Rif. This geometry provides a good fit to the observed motions, suggesting a wide transpressive boundary in the westernmost Mediterranean, with deformation mainly accommodated by the Gloria-Azores fault system to the West and the Rif-Tell lineament to the East. Block boundaries encompass aspects of earlier interpretations suggesting three main deformation styles: (i) extension along the NE-SW trending Trans-Alboran shear zone, (ii) dextral strike-slip in the Betics corresponding to a well defined E-W seismic lineament, and (iii) right lateral strike-slip motion extending West to the Azores and right-lateral motion with compression extending East along the Algerian Tell. We interpret differential motion in the Rif-Alboran-Betic system to be driven both by surface processes related the Africa-Eurasia oblique convergence and

  13. Quasi-simultaneous interaction method for solving 2D boundary layer flows over plates and airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies unsteady 2D boundary layer flows over dented plates and a NACA 0012 airfoil. An inviscid flow is assumed to exist outside the boundary layer and is solved iteratively with the boundary layer flow together with the interaction method until a matching solution is achieved. Hereto a quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied, in which the integral boundary layer equations are solved together with an interaction-law equation. The interaction-law equation is an approximation of the external flow and based on thin-airfoil theory. It is an algebraic relation between the velocity and displacement thickness. The interaction-law equation ensures that the eigenvalues of the system of equations do not have a sign change and that no singularities occur. Three numerical schemes are used to solve the boundary layer flow with the interaction method. These are: a standard scheme, a splitting method and a characteristics solver. All schemes use a finite difference discretization. The three schemes yield comparable results for the simulations carried out. The standard scheme is deviating most from the splitting and characteristics solvers. The results show that the eigenvalues remain positive, even in separation. As expected, the addition of the interaction-law equation prevents a sign change of the eigenvalues. The quasi-simultaneous interaction scheme is applicable to the three numerical schemes tested.

  14. Deleterious localized stress fields: the effects of boundaries and stiffness tailoring in anisotropic laminated plates

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The safe design of primary load-bearing structures requires accurate prediction of stresses, especially in the vicinity of geometric discontinuities where deleterious three-dimensional stress fields can be induced. Even for thin-walled structures significant through-thickness stresses arise at edges and boundaries, and this is especially precarious for laminates of advanced fibre-reinforced composites because through-thickness stresses are the predominant drivers in delamination failure. Here, we use a higher-order equivalent single-layer model derived from the Hellinger–Reissner mixed variational principle to examine boundary layer effects in laminated plates comprising constant-stiffness and variable-stiffness laminae and deforming statically in cylindrical bending. The results show that zigzag deformations, which arise due to layerwise differences in the transverse shear moduli, drive boundary layers towards clamped edges and are therefore critically important in quantifying localized stress gradients. The relative significance of the boundary layer scales with the degree of layerwise anisotropy and the thickness to characteristic length ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that the phenomenon of alternating positive and negative transverse shearing deformation through the thickness of composite laminates, previously only observed at clamped boundaries, can also occur at other locations as a result of smoothly varying the material properties over the in-plane dimensions of the laminate. PMID:27843401

  15. Transition due to streamwise streaks in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-12-01

    Transition induced by stationary streaks undergoing transient growth in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer flow is studied using numerical computations. While the possibility of strong transient growth of small-amplitude stationary perturbations in supersonic boundary layer flows has been demonstrated in previous works, its relation to laminar-turbulent transition cannot be established within the framework of linear disturbances. Therefore, this paper investigates the nonlinear evolution of initially linear optimal disturbances that evolve into finite amplitude streaks in the downstream region, and then studies the modal instability of those streaks as a likely cause for the onset of bypass transition. The nonmodal evolution of linearly optimal stationary perturbations in a supersonic, Mach 3 flat plate boundary layer is computed via the nonlinear plane-marching parabolized stability equations (PSE) for stationary perturbations, or equivalently, the perturbation form of parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. To assess the effect of the nonlinear finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane-marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by the spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of transition is estimated using an N -factor criterion based on modal amplification of the secondary instabilities of the streaks. In the absence of transient growth disturbances, first mode instabilities in a Mach 3, zero pressure gradient boundary layer reach N =10 at Rex≈107 . However, secondary instability modes of the stationary streaks undergoing transient growth are able to achieve the same N -factor at Rex<2 ×106 when the initial streak amplitude is sufficiently large. In contrast to the streak instabilities in incompressible flows, subharmonic instability modes with twice the fundamental spanwise wavelength of the streaks are found to have higher amplification ratios than the streak instabilities at fundamental

  16. Active faulting south of the Himalayan Front: Establishing a new plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeats, Robert S.; Thakur, V. C.

    2008-06-01

    New tectonic uplifts south of the Salt Range Thrust and Himalayan Front Thrust (HFT) represent an outward step of the plate boundary from the principal tectonic displacement zone into the Indo-Gangetic Plain. In Pakistan, the Lilla Anticline deforms fine-grained overbank deposits of the Jhelum River floodplain 15 km south of the Salt Range. The anticline is overpressured in Eocambrian non-marine strata. In northwest India south of Dehra Dun, the Piedmont Fault (PF) lies 15 km south of the HFT. Coalescing fans derived from the Himalaya form a piedmont (Old Piedmont Zone) 15-20 km wide east of the Yamuna River. This zone is uplifted as much as 15-20 m near the PF, and bedding is tilted 5-7° northeast. Holocene thermoluminescence-optically-stimulated luminescence dates for sediments in the Old Piedmont Zone suggest that the uplift rate might be as high as several mm/a. The Old Piedmont Zone is traced northwest 200 km and southeast another 200 km to the Nepal border. These structures, analogous to protothrusts in subduction zones, indicate that the Himalayan plate boundary is not a single structure but a series of structures across strike, including reactivated parts of the Main Boundary Thrust north of the range front, the HFT sensu stricto, and stepout structures on the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Displacement rates on all these structures must be added to determine the local India-Himalaya convergence rate.

  17. A dual reciprocity boundary element solution method for the free vibration analysis of fluid-coupled Kirchhoff plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uğurlu, B.

    2015-03-01

    A boundary element solution method is proposed for linear vibration analysis of fluid-coupled thin plates. The method is based on replacing the associated biharmonic operator with two successive harmonic operators, leading to a coupled system of boundary integral equations with simpler properties: the fundamental solution has an elementary form, and complicated singularity removal techniques can be avoided. The fluid flow due to the plate motion is taken as a potential field, and its effect on the plate dynamics is incorporated into the analysis by invoking another boundary integral solution, described over the fluid-plate interface. The body terms in the plate boundary integral equations are considered by the dual reciprocity boundary element formulation. Three different radial basis functions are employed as interpolation functions, alone and augmented with polynomial and sine expansions, to represent the body terms. The performance of the method is investigated from several perspectives by adopting plates with different shapes and/or boundary conditions; excellent approximations are obtained in general: the convergence behavior is consistent, both dry and wet frequency parameters are predicted accurately, and the mode shapes are captured even with rough models. In some of the studied problems, however, deviated results are obtained for specific modes. Furthermore, it is observed that the performance of the method depends on the implemented DRM functions, and combining radial basis functions with global expansions does not yield noticeable improvements.

  18. DSMC simulations of leading edge flat-plate boundary layer flows at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The flow over a 2D leading-edge flat plate is studied at Mach number Ma = (Uinf /√{kBTinf / m }) in the range plate boundary layer at high Mach number. Here, LT is the characteristic dimension, Uinf and Tinf are the free stream velocity and temperature, rhoinf is the free stream density, m is the molecular mass, muinf is the molecular viscosity based on the free stream temperature Tinf , and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The variation of streamwise velocity, temperature, number-density, and mean free path along the wall normal direction away from the plate surface is studied. The qualitative nature of the streamwise velocity at high Mach number is similar to those in the incompressible limit (parabolic profile). However, there are important differences. The amplitudes of the streamwise velocity increase as the Mach number increases and turned into a more flatter profile near the wall. There is significant velocity and temperature slip at the surface of the plate, and the slip increases as the Mach number is increased. It is interesting to note that for the highest Mach numbers considered here, the streamwise velocity at the wall exceeds the sound speed, and the flow is supersonic throughout the flow domain.

  19. Laminar-Boundary-Layer Oscillations and Transition on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubauer, G B; Skramstad, H K

    1948-01-01

    This is an account of an investigation in which oscillations were discovered in the laminar boundary layer along a flat plate. These oscillations were found during the course of an experiment in which transition from laminar to turbulent flow was being studied on the plate as the turbulence in the wind stream was being reduced to unusually low values by means of damping screens. The first part of the paper deals with experimental methods and apparatus, measurements of turbulence and sound, and studies of transition. A description is then given of the manner in which oscillations were discovered and how they were found to be related to transition, and then how controlled oscillations were produced and studied in detail.

  20. Plate Boundary Observatory Borehole Strainmeter Recordings Of The 29 September 2009 Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Mencin, David; Borsa, Adrian; Jackson, Mike

    2010-05-01

    On 29 September 2009 a M8.3 earthquake on the Australian-Pacific plate boundary generated a tsunami that caused widespread damage in Samoa, American Samoa, and Tonga. Peak to trough wave heights of 314 cm were recorded 250 km from the epicenter at Pago-Pago, American Samoa approximately 20 minutes after the event. NOAA's West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center predicted the tsunami would arrive at Tofino, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, at 05:12 UTC, 30 September 2009. The Plate Boundary Observatory has installed 74 borehole strainmeters along the western United States for the purpose of recording short-term strain transients associated with plate boundary deformation. Two of these strainmeters, Ucluelet and Bamfield, are located on the west coast of Vancouver Island within a few hundred meters of the shore. A third, Port Alberni, is located at the eastern end of Port Alberni Inlet, ~ 50 km inland. The Ucluelet and Bamfield strainmeters recorded signals associated with the arriving tsunami at times consistent with that recorded by tide gauges at Tofino and Bamfield, ~05:45 UTC. A much smaller signal was recorded about 24 minutes later at Port Alberni. The tsunami strain signals were below the detection level of PBO GPS on the Oregon coast and seismometers in the strainmeter boreholes. Strainmeters, or lower coast tiltmeters, could potentially, provide a reliable onshore detection of a tsunami. In this presentation we document the nature and frequency content of the tsunami signal as recorded by PBO strainmeters and compare these strain measurements against the crustal loading signature predicted by water height changes at nearby tide gauges

  1. Plate Boundary Observatory Borehole Strainmeter Recordings Of The 29 September 2009 Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, D. B.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Borsa, A. A.; Mencin, D.; van Boskirk, E.; Jackson, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    On 29 September 2009 a M8.3 earthquake on the Australian-Pacific plate boundary generated a tsunami that caused widespread damage in Samoa, American Samoa, and Tonga. Peak to trough wave heights of 314 cm were recorded 250 km from the epicenter at Pago-Pago, American Samoa approximately 20 minutes after the event. NOAA’s West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center predicted the tsunami would arrive at Tofino, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, at 05:12 UTC, 30 September 2009. Tide gauges at Tofino recorded a 7.3 cm amplitude wave arriving at 05:45 UTC. As part of the Plate Boundary Observatory, UNAVCO has installed 74 borehole tensor strainmeters along the western United States for the purpose of recording short-term strain transients associated with plate boundary deformation. Two of these strainmeters, Ucluelet and Bamfield, are located on the west coast of Vancouver Island within a few hundred meters of the Pacific shore line. A third, Port Alberni, is located at the north-east end of Port Alberni Inlet, ~ 50 km inland. The strainmeters at Ucluelet and Bamfield recorded strain signals associated with the arriving tsunami at times consistent with arrival times recorded by tide gauges at Tofino and Bamfield, ~05:45 UTC. A much smaller signal is recorded about 10 minutes later at Port Alberni. The largest strain signals were recorded at Ucluelet between 06:19 and 06:24 UTC. For this study we document the arrival times, nature and frequency content of the tsunami signal as recorded by PBO strainmeters on Vancouver Island and compare these strain measurements against the crustal loading signature predicted by water height changes at nearby tide gauges.

  2. The Northern Caribbean Plate Boundary Offshore Hispaniola: Strike-slip and Compressive Tectonic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Leroy, S. D.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Meyer, B.; Ellouz, N.

    2014-12-01

    The boundary between the Caribbean plate and the North American plate is transpressive due to the oblique collision between these two plates. The transpressive movement is partitioned and accommodated in the Hispaniola region along two left-lateral strike-slip structures surrounding a fold-and-thrust belt. New multibeam bathymetry data and multichannel seismic reflection profiles have been recently collected during the Haiti-SIS and Haiti-SIS 2 cruises, along part of the northern Caribbean plate boundary between Cuba, Jamaica and Hispaniola. From the north to the south, three types of deformations are observed. In the Windward Passage, the analysis of the data set reveals that the movement on the Oriente fault between Cuba and Hispaniola is purely left-lateral strike-slip according to the GPS measurements. In the Gonave basin, west of Hispaniola, the deformation is compressive. A series of folds is identified and moves toward the southwest. The Enriquillo-Plantain-Garden Fault (EPGF) is localized in the Jamaica Passage, between Jamaica and Hispaniola. The analysis of the data set reveals that the left-lateral EPGF recently intersects inherited basins from the eastern Cayman Trough margin. The study of the actual EPGF active trace shows that this fault moves with a pure strike-slip component, at least in its western part: the presence of a little push-up structure and a set of three en echelon folds is highlighting in the western part of the Jamaica Passage. The shortening rate in the inherited basins crossed by the EPGF increases from west to east (5.8% to 8.5%), indicating that a thrusting component is also accommodated around the EPGF.

  3. Inherited segmentation of the Iberian-African margins and tectonic reconstruction of a diffuse plate boundary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez, Manel; Torne, Montserrat; Vergés, Jaume; Casciello, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse plate-boundary regions are characterized by non-well defined contacts between tectonic plates thus making difficult their reconstruction through time. The Western Mediterranean is one of these regions, where the convergence between the African and Iberian plates since Late Cretaceous resulted in the Betic-Rif arcuate orogen, the Gulf of Cadiz imbricate wedge, and the Alboran back-arc basin. Whereas the Iberia-Africa plate boundary is well defined west to the Gorringe Bank and along the Gloria Fault, it becomes much more diffuse eastwards with seismicity spreading over both the south-Iberian and north-African margins. Gravity data, when filtered for short wavelengths, show conspicuous positive Bouguer anomalies associated with the Gorringe Bank, the Gulf of Cadiz High and the Ronda/Beni-Bousera peridotitic massifs reflecting an inherited Jurassic margin segmentation. The subsequent Alpine convergence between Africa and Iberia reactivated these domains, producing crustal-scale thrusting in the Atlantic segments and eventually subduction in the proto-Mediterranean segments. The Jurassic segmentation of the Iberia-Africa margins substantiates the double-polarity subduction model proposed for the region characterized by a change from SE-dipping polarity in the Gorringe, Gulf of Cadiz and Betic-Rif domains, to NW-dipping polarity in the proto-Algerian domain. Therefore, the Algerian and Tyrrhenian basins in the east and the Alboran basin in the west are the result of SSE-E and NW-W retreating slabs of oceanic and/or hyper-extended Tethyan domains, respectively.

  4. Architectural Blueprint for Plate Boundary Observatories based on interoperable Data Management Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschke, D. I.; Häner, R.; Schurr, B.; Oncken, O.; Wächter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Interoperable data management platforms play an increasing role in the advancement of knowledge and technology in many scientific disciplines. Through high quality services they support the establishment of efficient and innovative research environments. Well-designed research environments can facilitate the sustainable utilization, exchange, and re-use of scientific data and functionality by using standardized community models. Together with innovative 3D/4D visualization, these concepts provide added value in improving scientific knowledge-gain, even across the boundaries of disciplines. A project benefiting from the added value is the Integrated Plate boundary Observatory in Chile (IPOC). IPOC is a European-South American network to study earthquakes and deformation at the Chilean continental margin and to monitor the plate boundary system for capturing an anticipated great earthquake in a seismic gap. In contrast to conventional observatories that monitor individual signals only, IPOC captures a large range of different processes through various observation methods (e.g., seismographs, GPS, magneto-telluric sensors, creep-meter, accelerometer, InSAR). For IPOC a conceptual design has been devised that comprises an architectural blueprint for a data management platform based on common and standardized data models, protocols, and encodings as well as on an exclusive use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) including visualization components. Following the principles of event-driven service-oriented architectures, the design enables novel processes by sharing and re-using functionality and information on the basis of innovative data mining and data fusion technologies. This platform can help to improve the understanding of the physical processes underlying plate deformations as well as the natural hazards induced by them. Through the use of standards, this blueprint can not only be facilitated for other plate observing systems (e.g., the European Plate

  5. Evolution of southern Caribbean plate boundary, vicinity of Trinidad and Tobago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Paul; Burke, Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The tectonic evolution of the southeastern corner of the Caribbean is examined, using field data from the El Pilar fault zone of Trinidad and offshore seismic data. It is found that the dominant process in the region's tectonic evolution is strike-slip motion on at least five major fault systems in a 250-km wide east-west-trending plate-boundary zone extending from Grenada in the north to the Orinoco River in the south. The geological effects of this evolution over the past 30 m y are described.

  6. Dynamics of continental accretion.

    PubMed

    Moresi, L; Betts, P G; Miller, M S; Cayley, R A

    2014-04-10

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  7. Dynamics of continental accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.; Cayley, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  8. Experimental study of boundary layer transition on a heated flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, K. H.; Reshotko, E.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation to the document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were done in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate, and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for momentum thickness Reynolds number, Re(sub theta) less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length and uniform heat flux. A small dependence of turbulence results on the freestream turbulence intensity was observed.

  9. Seismicity at the convergent plate boundary offshore Crete, Greece, observed by an amphibian network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, D.; Meier, T.; Bohnhoff, M.; Harjes, H.-P.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate microseismic activity at the convergent plate boundary of the Hellenic subduction zone on- and offshore south-eastern Crete with unprecedented precision using recordings from an amphibian seismic network. The network configuration consisted of up to eight ocean bottom seismometers as well as five temporary short-period and six permanent broadband stations on Crete and surrounding islands. More than 2,500 local and regional events with magnitudes up to M L = 4.5 were recorded during the time period July 2003-June 2004. The magnitude of completeness varies between 1.5 on Crete and adjacent areas and increases to 2.5 in the vicinity of the Strabo trench 100 km south of Crete. Tests with different localization schemes and velocity models showed that the best results were obtained from a probabilistic earthquake localization using a 1-D velocity model and corresponding station corrections obtained by simultaneous inversion. Most of the seismic activity is located offshore of central and eastern Crete and interpreted to be associated with the intracrustal graben system (Ptolemy and Pliny trenches). Furthermore, a significant portion of events represents interplate seismicity along the NNE-ward dipping plate interface. The concentration of seismicity along the Ptolemy and Pliny trenches extends from shallow depths down to the plate interface and indicates active movement. We propose that both trenches form transtensional structures within the Aegean plate. The Aegean continental crust between these two trenches is interpreted as a forearc sliver as it exhibits only low microseismic activity during the observation period and little or no internal deformation. Interplate seismicity between the Aegean and African plates forms a 100-km wide zone along dip from the Strabo trench in the south to the southern shore-line of Crete in the north. The seismicity at the plate contact is randomly distributed and no indications for locked zones were observed. The plate

  10. Flowfield measurements in a separated and reattached flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.P.

    1987-03-01

    The separation and reattachment of a large-scale, two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at low subsonic speed on a flat plate has been studied experimentally. The separation bubble was 55 cm long and had a maximum bubble thickness, measured to the height of the mean dividing streamline, of 17 cm, which was twice the thickness of the inlet boundary layer. A combination of laser velocimetry, hot-wire anemometry, pneumatic probing techniques, and flow visualization were used as diagnostics. Principal findings were that an outer inviscid rotational flow was defined which essentially convected over the blockage associated with the inner, viscously dominated bubble recirculation region. A strong backflow region in which the flow moved upstream 100 percent of the time was measured near the test surface over the central 35 percent of the bubble. A laminar backflow boundary layer having pseudo-turbulent characteristics including a log-linear velocity profile was generated under the highly turbulent backflow. Velocity profile shapes in the reversed flow region matched a previously developed universal backflow profile at the upstream edge of the separation region but not in the steady backflow region downstream. A smoke flow visualization movie and hot-film measurements revealed low frequency nonperiodic flapping at reattachment. However, forward flow fraction data at reattachment and mean velocity profiles in the redeveloping boundary layer downstream of reattachment correlated with backward-facing step data when the axial dimension was scaled by the distance from the maximum bubble thickness to reattachment.

  11. Eastern segment of the Azores-Gibraltar line (central-eastern Atlantic) : An oceanic plate boundary with diffuse compressional deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, R.; Torelli, L.; Zitellini, N.; Peis, D.; Lodolo, E.

    1994-06-01

    New seismic-reflection images across the eastern segment of the Azores-Gibraltar line west of the collisional area between the African and Iberian plates have revealed a complex pattern of compressional deformation involving the Mesozoic oceanic lithosphere. The compressional deformation developed in a region of slow plate convergence and is diffused, at different lithospheric levels, across an area spanning ˜200 km from the Gorringe Ridge to the Seine Plain. The convergence between the African and Iberian plates has been active since Tertiary time, and our results indicate that no subduction zone exists across this part of the plate boundary.

  12. Divergent plate boundaries and crustal spreading on Venus: Evidence from Aphrodite Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Head, James W.

    1989-01-01

    The modes of lithospheric heat transfer and the tectonic styles may differ between Earth and Venus, depending on how the high surface temperature (700 K = 430 C), dense and opaque atmosphere (approx. 10 MPa = 100 bars), lack of water oceans, and the other known ways in which Venus differs from Earth, influence basic lithospheric processes, thermal gradient, upper mantle temperature, thermal and chemical evolution, and convection. A fundamental question is whether the lithosphere of Venus is horizontally stable, like the other terrestrial planets, or is mobile like that on Earth. The variety of characteristics, their integrated relationships, and their predictable behavior throughout Western Aphrodite Terra are similar to those features known to occur in association with the terrestrial seafloor at spreading centers and divergent plate boundaries. It is concluded that Western Aphrodite Terra represents the site of crustal spreading centers and divergent plate boundaries. The extent of similar characteristics and processes elsewhere on Venus outside of the 13,000 km long Western and Eastern Aphrodite Terra rise is unknown at the present, but their presence in other areas of the equatorial highlands, suggested from recent analysis, may be tested with forthcoming Magellan data.

  13. The behavior of a convergent plate boundary - Crustal deformation in the South Kanto district, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, C. H.; Kato, T.

    1978-01-01

    The northwesternmost part of the Sagami trough, a part of the Philippine Sea-Eurasian plate boundary, was ruptured during the great South Kanto earthquake in 1923. Very extensive and frequent geodetic measurements of crustal deformation have been made in the South Kanto district since the 1890's, and these constitute the most complete data set on crustal movements in the world. These data were reanalyzed and interpreted and according to our interpretation indicate the following sequence of events. The coseismic movements were due to oblique thrust and right lateral slip of about 8 m on a fault outcropping at the base of the Sagami trough. This was followed by postseismic deformation resulting from reversed afterslip of 20-60 cm that occurred at an exponentially decaying rate in time. The interseismic deformation is produced by steady subduction at a rate of about 1.8 cm/yr. During subduction the top 10-15 km of the plate boundary is apparently locked, while deeper parts slip aseismically at an irregular rate. No significant precursory deformation was observed. The recurrence time for 1923 type earthquakes is 200-300 years. The Boso and Miura peninsulas are broken into a series of fault-bound blocks that move semi-independently of the surrounding region. The subduction zone itself, where it is exposed on land, is shown to be a wide zone encompassing several faults that are active at different times.

  14. Mean profile of a high-Reynolds-number smooth-flat-plate turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Oweis, Ghanem F.; Winkel, Eric S.; Cutbirth, James M.; Ceccio, Steven L.; Perlin, Marc

    2010-11-01

    Although smooth-flat-plate turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) have been studied for nearly a century, measurements at Reynolds numbers typical of marine & aerospace transportation systems are scarce. Experimental results at momentum-thickness Reynolds numbers (Re) up to 150,000 from the US Navy W.B. Morgan Large Cavitation Channel using a polished 12.9-m-long flat-plate test model at water flow speeds up to 20 m/s are presented. Mean velocity profiles were measured 10.7 m from the leading edge of the model over a wall-normal range from less than one wall unit to more than twice the nominal boundary layer thickness using particle-tracking and laser-Doppler velocimetry. Static pressure and average skin-friction were measured independently. A mild favorable pressure gradient led to a flow speed increase of 2.5% over the test surface. The measurements span a factor of three in Re and were fitted to within experimental uncertainty using one set of constants and modern empirical inner- and outer-profile forms based on traditional TBL asymptotics. The fitted profiles satisfy the von-Karman momentum integral to within 1%, and show distinct differences from equivalent zero pressure gradient results. [Supported by DARPA & ONR

  15. Transpression, displacement partitioning, and exhumation in the eastern Caribbean / South American plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avé Lallemant, Hans G.

    1997-04-01

    The Caribbean/South American plate boundary zone in northeastern Venezuela is a transpressive orogenic belt consisting from north to south of a nascent subduction zone (South Caribbean deformed belt), a volcanic arc (Leeward Antilles arc), a "hinterland" with high-pressure (P)/low temperature (T) metamorphic rocks (Cordillera de la Costa belt), and a southern nonmetamorphic, foreland fold and thrust belt (Serranía del Interior). The geometry, style, and orientation of mid-Cretaceous to Tertiary synmetamorphic deformation structures (D1) in the hinterland are compatible with formation in a right-oblique subduction or collision zone in which displacement partitioning has occurred. Late Oligocene to Recent right-oblique convergence resulted in the emplacement of the arc and hinterland on the passive South American margin and the formation of the foreland fold and thrust belt (D2); the displacements between the Caribbean and South American plates are partitioned as well. Both D1 and D2 deformations are diachronous: they are older in the west and younger in the east and related to the eastward passage of the Caribbean plate with respect to South America. The ascent, decompression, and exhumation of the high-P/low-T metamorphic rocks occurred in two stages: the first in the Cretaceous by arc-parallel extension (D1) and the second in Neogene time by thrusting (D2) and subsequent erosion.

  16. Coseismic slip resolution along a plate boundary megathrust: the Nankai Trough, southwest Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sagiya, Takeshi; Thatcher, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Geodetic survey measurements are used to estimate the coseismic slip distribution in the 1944 Tonankai (Mw=8.1) and 1946 Nankaido (Mw=8.3) earthquakes and to assess quantitatively the degree to which this slip is resolved on the plate boundary megathrust. Data used include 798 angle changes from triangulation surveys, 328 leveling section differences, and 5 coseismic tidal gage offsets. Many of the nominally coseismic triangulation data span ∼50 years, nearly half the earthquake cycle, and correction for interseismic deformation using post-1950 observations is applied. Microseismicity is used to define the configuration of the plate boundary interface and approximate it with a continuous, multisegment fault model. Because the onshore geodetic data have very limited resolving power for offshore fault segments, offshore coseismic slip was constrained by Satctke's [1993] estimation based on tsunami data. The majority of the coseismic slip occurs between 15 and 25 km depth. Although resolution declines toward the trench axis, it is sufficiently good to define two distinct high-slip regions, one off southeastern Shikoku Island (11 m maximum) and the other offshore of Kii Peninsula (3 m maximum). The slip magnitude off southeastern Shikoku, coupled with the plate convergence rate, would imply an recurrence interval of about 270 years, much-longer than the average repeat time of ∼120 years for historical great earthquakes on the Nankai Trough. However, the maximum coseismic slip is sensitive to the assumed fault geometry, and slippage on trough-parallel splay faults could significantly decrease the maximum slip to about 6 m.

  17. Experimental study of boundary layer transition with elevated freestream turbulence on a heated flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Ki-Hyeon; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation to document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were acquired in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities (TI) from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for R(sub theta) is less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length. The measured laminar value of Reynolds analogy factor was as much as 53 percent higher than the Pr(sup -2/3). A small dependence of turbulent results on TI was observed. Conditional sampling performed in the transitional boundary layer indicated the existence of a near-wall drop in intermittency, pronounced at certain low intermittencies, which is consistent with the cross-sectional shape of turbulent spots observed by others. Non-turbulent intervals were observed to possess large magnitudes of near-wall unsteadiness and turbulent intervals had peak values as much as 50 percent higher than were measured at fully turbulent stations. Non-turbulent and turbulent profiles in transitional boundary layers cannot be simply treated as Blasius and fully turbulent profiles, respectively. The boundary layer spectra indicate predicted selective amplification of T-S waves for TI is approximately 0.4 percent. However, for TI is approximately 0.8 and 1.1 percent, T-S waves are localized very near the wall and do not play a dominant role in transition process.

  18. Coefficient of Variation Estimates for the Plate Boundary Fault System of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, G. P.; Scharer, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The number of high-quality paleoseismic records on major strike-slip faults of California has increased in recent years to the point that patterns in earthquake recurrence are emerging. The degree of predictability in time intervals between ground-rupturing earthquakes can be measured by the CoV (coefficient of variation). The CoV approximately normalizes for mean recurrence, and is thus useful to isolate the temporal variability of earthquake records. CoV estimates are themselves uncertain because input dates are actually probability distributions and because paleoseismic records are short and not necessarily representative samples from the underlying recurrence distribution. Radiocarbon dating uncertainty can be incorporated by sampling from event PDFs and compiling sample CoV estimates. Uncertainty due to the brevity of the site event record is larger, and neglect of it can lead to improbable estimates. Long records are now available on the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults in Southern California, and the San Andreas and Hayward faults in northern California. These faults accommodate most of the Pacific-North American relative plate motion in their respective regions. CoV estimates from sites with 8 or more events cluster around 0.63, but are as low as 0.4 for the southern Hayward fault. Sites with fewer events give similar estimates, though with lower resolution. The one prominent outlier, Burro Flats, with a CoV near 1.0, is in a region of severe fault complexity and rapid fault-normal compression. Quasi-periodic recurrence is emerging as a general property for these plate boundary faults. Some individual site records allow that, at low probabilities, recurrence could be random in time. When the ensemble is considered together, however, it is improbable that we would see the observed degree of agreement among boundary fault paleoseismic records; the more likely explanation is that quasi-periodic recurrence is a real property of the boundary fault system.

  19. Localised Plate Motion on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghail, R. C.

    1996-03-01

    The volcanic and tectonic features observed in Dali Vinculum, Parga Vinculum and Imdr Regio are concentrated at long, narrow, curvilinear zones, with relatively minor volcanism and tectonism between these zones. These zones, whilst more diffuse than terrestrial plate boundaries, nevertheless define the margins of tectonic plates. In contrast to Earth, however, it appears that venusian plates are neither created nor destroyed by lateral motion. Rather, plates are thinned and intruded at vincula plate boundaries, vertically accreted by small-scale intra-plate (planitia) volcanism and perhaps destroyed by delamination of thickened crust in tesserae and montane regions such as Thetis Regio and Ishtar Terra. The diversity in age both between and within these three areas together with the evidence for infrequent, small scale resurfacing in the planitiae are difficult to reconcile with a non-uniformitarian geological process.

  20. Hurricane Mountain Formation melange: history of Cambro-Ordovician accretion of the Boundary Mountains terrane within the northern Appalachian orthotectonic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, G.M.; Boudette, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Hurricane Mountain Formation (HMF) melange and associated ophiolitic and volcanogenic formations of Cambrian and lowermost Ordovician age bound the SE margin of the Precambrian Y (Helikian) Chain Lakes Massif in western Maine. HMF melange matrix, though weakly metamorphosed, contains a wide variety of exotic greenschist to amphibolite facies blocks as components of its polymictic assemblage, but blocks of high-grade cratonal rocks such as those of Chain Lakes or Grenville affinity are lacking. Formations of melange exposed in structural culminations of Cambrian and Ordovician rocks NE of the HMF in Maine and in the Fournier Group in New Brunswick are lithologically similar and probably tectonically correlative with the HMF; taken together, they may delineate a common pre-Middle Ordovician tectonic boundary. The authors infer that the Hurricane Mountain and St. Daniel melange belts define the SE and NW margins of the Boundary Mountains accreted terrane (BMT), which may consist of cratonal basement of Chain Lakes affinity extending from eastern Gaspe (deBroucker and St. Julien, 1985) to north-central New Hampshire. The Laurentian continental margin, underlain by Grenville basement, underplated the NW margin of this terrane, marked by the SDF suture zone, in late Cambrian to early Ordovician time, while terranes marked by Cambrian to Tremadocian (.) lithologies dissimilar to the Boundary Mountains terrane were accreted to its outboard margin penecontemporaneously. The docking of the Boundary Mountains terrane and the initiation of its peripheral melanges are equated to the Penobscottian disturbance.

  1. The roof plate boundary is a bi-directional organiser of dorsal neural tube and choroid plexus development.

    PubMed

    Broom, Emma R; Gilthorpe, Jonathan D; Butts, Thomas; Campo-Paysaa, Florent; Wingate, Richard J T

    2012-11-01

    The roof plate is a signalling centre positioned at the dorsal midline of the central nervous system and generates dorsalising morphogenic signals along the length of the neuraxis. Within cranial ventricles, the roof plate gives rise to choroid plexus, which regulates the internal environment of the developing and adult brain and spinal cord via the secretion of cerebrospinal fluid. Using the fourth ventricle as our model, we show that the organiser properties of the roof plate are determined by its boundaries with the adjacent neuroepithelium. Through a combination of in ovo transplantation, co-culture and electroporation techniques in chick embryos between embryonic days 3 and 6, we demonstrate that organiser properties are maintained by interactions between the non-neural roof plate and the neural rhombic lip. At the molecular level, this interaction is mediated by Delta-Notch signalling and upregulation of the chick homologue of Hes1: chairy2. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that cdelta1 is both necessary and sufficient for organiser function. Our results also demonstrate that while chairy2 is specifically required for the maintenance of the organiser, its ectopic expression is not sufficient to recapitulate organiser properties. Expression of atonal1 in the rhombic lip adjacent at the roof plate boundary is acutely dependent on both boundary cell interactions and Delta-Notch signalling. Correspondingly, the roof plate boundary organiser also signals to the roof plate itself to specify the expression of early choroid plexus markers. Thus, the roof plate boundary organiser signals bi-directionally to acutely coordinate the development of adjacent neural and non-neural tissues.

  2. Numerical investigation of hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer transition mechanism induced by different roughness shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunlong; Zhao, Yunfei; Xu, Dan; Chai, Zhenxia; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The roughness-induced laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition is significant for high-speed aerospace applications. The transition mechanism is closely related to the roughness shape. In this paper, high-order numerical method is used to investigate the effect of roughness shape on the flat-plate laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition. Computations are performed in both the supersonic and hypersonic regimes (free-stream Mach number from 3.37 up to 6.63) for the square, cylinder, diamond and hemisphere roughness elements. It is observed that the square and diamond roughness elements are more effective in inducing transition compared with the cylinder and hemisphere ones. The square roughness element has the longest separated region in which strong unsteadiness exists and the absolute instability is formed, thus resulting in the earliest transition. The diamond roughness element has a maximum width of the separated region leading to the widest turbulent wake region far downstream. Furthermore, transition location moves backward as the Mach number increases, which indicates that the compressibility significantly suppresses the roughness-induced boundary layer transition.

  3. Optimizing the electrode size of circular bimorph plates with different boundary conditions for maximum deflection of piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Sammoura, Firas; Smyth, Katherine; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2013-02-01

    The effect of plate electrode area on the deflection of a symmetric circular bimorph piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (pMUT) with clamped and simply supported boundary conditions was studied for the first time. Distinct plate displacement shape functions were defined for the regions underneath and outside the active electrodes. The plate shape functions were solved analytically using classic plate theory in conjunction with the external boundary conditions and the internal ones between the two regions in order to calculate the exact plate displacement under both external voltage stimulus and acoustic pressure. The model was used to study the effect of the electrode area on the overall plate deflection per unit input voltage such that the electromechanical coupling is optimized. While the center plate deflection increased monotonically with the electrode area for a simply supported plate, it followed a parabolic shape for a clamped one with a maximum deflection when the electrode radius covered 60% of the total plate radius. The simply supported plate exhibited four times the plate deflection capability of its clamped counterpart, when both are operating at their optimal electrode size. Both an experimental clamped bimorph aluminum nitride (AlN) pMUT, recently reported in the literature, and Finite Element Modeling (FEM) were used to verify the developed model. The theoretical model predicted a static displacement per unit voltage of 10.9nm/V and a resonant frequency of 196.5kHz, which were in excellent agreement with the FEM results of 10.32nm/V and 198.5kHz, respectively. The modeling data matched well with the experimental measurements and the error ranged from 2.7-22% due to process variations across the wafer. As such, the developed model can be used to design more sensitive pMUTs or extract the flexural piezoelectric coefficient using piezoelectrically actuated circular plates.

  4. EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Data in the College Classroom (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Olds, S. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is the geodetic component of the EarthScope project, designed to study the 3-D strain field across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American tectonics plates in the western United States. All PBO data are freely available to scientific and educational communities and have been incorporated into a variety of activities for college and university classrooms. UNAVCO Education and Outreach program staff have worked closely with faculty users, scientific researchers, and facility staff to create materials that are scientifically and technically accurate as well as useful to the classroom user. Availability of processed GPS data is not new to the geoscience community. However, PBO data staff have worked with education staff to deliver data that are readily accessible to educators. The UNAVCO Data for Educators webpage, incorporating an embedded Google Map with PBO GPS locations and providing current GPS time series plots and downloadable data, extends and updates the datasets available to our community. Google Earth allows the visualization GPS data with other types of datasets, e.g. LiDAR, while maintaining the self-contained and easy-to-use interface of UNAVCO’s Jules Verne Voyager map tools, which have multiple sets of geological and geophysical data. Curricular materials provide scaffolds for using EarthScope data in a variety of forms for different learning goals. Simple visualization of earthquake epicenters and locations of volcanoes can be used with velocity vectors to make simple deductions of plate boundary behaviors. Readily available time series plots provide opportunities for additional science skills, and there are web and paper-based support materials for downloading data, manipulating tables, and using plotting programs for processed GPS data. Scientists have provided contextual materials to explore the importance of these data in interpreting the structure and dynamics of the Earth. These data

  5. The structure of the Africa-Anatolia plate boundary in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Neus; Alvarez-Marrón, Joaquina; Klaeschen, Dirk

    2000-08-01

    New marine deep seismic reflection data from south of Cyprus to the Syrian coast provide images of the upper crustal structure of the Cyprean Arc indicating that the deformation is partitioned along strike-slip fault systems distributed over a wide zone, rather than forming a sharp plate boundary between African and Anatolian plates. Three major submarine strike-slip fault systems, tens of kilometers in length, are mapped, which follow bathymetric features and merge together toward the east. These structures exhibit the three-dimensional characteristics typical of strike-slip deformation zones throughout the seven pre-stack depth-migrated sections, including several sets of positive flower structures forming bathymetric ridges, and the intervening contemporaneous subbasins. Beneath the Plio-Quaternary sediments (500 m thick) that are blanketing the whole area and that reflect only the main surface traces of the fault systems, the subbasins are of varied dimensions and have rapid lateral changes in the thickness of the sedimentary fill. They include two major unconformities that have been correlated throughout the data marked by the M and K reflections. The M reflection is well imaged above varied thickness of Messinian evaporites, and the K reflection commonly appears at the base of syntectonic Tertiary age sediments. Within the eastern Cyprean Arc the K reflection corresponds to the basement-cover contact, indicating that the strike-slip tectonic scenario may have been active since the uppermost Cretaceous or lowermost Paleogene times to present. The active deformation front of the Alpine belt in the eastern Mediterranean corresponds to a strike-slip fault system that forms a 110° arc and coincides at the southern slope of the Hecateaus Rise, continuing along the Latakia Ridge to the Syrian coast. The mapped structures fit within a general kinematic framework of left-lateral transcurrent deformation that transfers slip from the subduction zone southwest of Cyprus

  6. Thermal State of the Seismogenic Plate Boundary in Southern Chile, 36 -- 46 °S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heesemann, M.; Grevemeyer, I.; Villinger, H. W.; Contreras-Reyes, E.; Scherwath, M.; Völker, D.

    2006-12-01

    According to current models of great subduction earthquakes, the area of the ruptured zone, and therefore the magnitude of the event, is controlled by the thermal structure of the plate boundary; updip and downdip limits of the seismogenic zone coincide with temperatures of 100 - 150 °C and 350 - 450°C, respectively. From this point of view, the 1960 Chile earthquake (M_W=9.5), which is the largest earthquake ever been recorded, was not only an outstanding event in respect to its magnitude. Also, the thermal structure of the young oceanic crust subducted along the ~1000 km long rupture area north of the Chile Triple Junction is remarkable, since considerable variability is caused by ocean floor ages ranging from ~0 - 30 Ma. Being part of the multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional project TIPTEQ (from The Incoming Plate to mega- Thrust EarthQuake processes), we present the correlation of lateral variations in the thermal structure of the 1960 Chile earthquake rupture area with seismic activity. Finite element method (FEM) models based on the Comsol Multiphysics code are used to estimate the thermal state of the plate boundary. To constrain the FEM models, scarce existing heat flux data were supplemented by 63 successful deployments of violin bow type heat flux probes during RV Sonne cruise 181-1b from December 2004 through January 2005. On the continental slope, additional constrains on the heat flux were derived from abundant bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) found in seismic reflection data. Geometry information and seismic activity were obtained from TIPTEQ and Subduction Processes Off-shore Chile (SPOC) local seismological networks along the rupture area. From heat flux measurements on the incoming plate, which are generally lower than expected from conductive cooling models, we inferred advective cooling by circulating fluids in the upper oceanic crust and effects of rapid sedimentation close to the trench. These processes had to be taken into account

  7. The fluid budget of a continental plate boundary fault: Quantification from the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, Catriona D.; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Niedermann, Samuel; Cox, Simon C.; Craw, Dave; Zimmer, Martin; Cooper, Matthew J.; Erzinger, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    Fluids play a key role in modifying the chemical and physical properties of fault zones, which may prime them for repeated rupture by the generation of high pore fluid pressures and precipitation of commonly weak, secondary minerals. Fluid flow paths, sources and fluxes, and the permeability evolution of fault zones throughout their seismic cycles remain poorly constrained, despite their importance to understanding fault zone behaviour. Here we use geochemical tracers of fluid-rock exchange to determine budgets for meteoric, metamorphic and mantle fluids on a major compressional tectonic plate boundary. The Alpine Fault marks the transpressional Pacific-Australian plate boundary through South Island, New Zealand and appears to fail in regular (329 ± 68 yrs) large earthquakes (Mw ∼ 8) with the most recent event in 1717 AD. Significant convergent motion has formed the Southern Alps and elevated geothermal gradients in the hangingwall, which drive crustal fluid flow. Along the Alpine Fault the Alpine Schist of the Pacific Plate is thrust over radiogenic metasedimentary rocks on the Australian plate. The absence of highly radiogenic (87Sr/86Sr > 0.7200) strontium isotope ratios of hangingwall hot springs and hydrothermal minerals formed at a range of depths in the Alpine Fault damage zone indicates that the fluid flow is restricted to the hangingwall by a cross-fault fluid flow barrier throughout the seismogenic crust. Helium isotope ratios measured in hot springs near to the Alpine Fault (0.15-0.81 RA) indicate the fault is a crustal-scale feature that acts as a conduit for fluids from the mantle. Rock-exchanged oxygen, but meteoric water-like hydrogen isotope signatures of hydrothermal veins indicate that partially rock-exchanged meteoric fluids dominate down to the top of the brittle to ductile transition zone at ∼6 km. Geochemical tracer transport modelling suggests only ∼0.02 to 0.05% of total rainfall west of the Main Divide penetrates to depth, yet this

  8. Tectonic lineaments in the cenozoic volcanics of southern Guatemala: Evidence for a broad continental plate boundary zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltuck, M.; Dixon, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    The northern Caribbean plate boundary has been undergoing left lateral strike slip motion since middle Tertiary time. The western part of the boundary occurs in a complex tectonic zone in the continental crust of Guatemala and southernmost Mexico, along the Chixoy-Polochic, Motogua and possibly Jocotan-Chamelecon faults. Prominent lineaments visible in radar imagery in the Neogene volcanic belt of southern Guatemala and western El Salvador were mapped and interpreted to suggest southwest extensions of this already broad plate boundary zone. Because these extensions can be traced beneath Quaternary volcanic cover, it is thought that this newly mapped fault zone is active and is accommodating some of the strain related to motion between the North American and Caribbean plates. Onshore exposures of the Motoqua-Polochic fault systems are characterized by abundant, tectonically emplaced ultramafic rocks. A similar mode of emplacement for these off shore ultramafics, is suggested.

  9. Seismicity and Seismic Hazard along the Western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Fontiela, João; Ferrão, Celia; Borges, José Fernando; Caldeira, Bento; Dib, Assia; Ousadou, Farida

    2016-04-01

    The seismic phenomenon is the most damaging natural hazard known in the Mediterranean area. The western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary extends from the Azores to the Mediterranean region. The oceanic part of the plate boundary is well delimited from the Azores Islands, along the Azores-Gibraltar fault to approximately 12°W (west of the Strait of Gibraltar). From 12°W to 3.5°E, including the Iberia-Nubia region and extending to the western part of Algeria, the boundary is more diffuse and forms a wider area of deformation. The boundary between the Iberia and Nubia plates is the most complex part of the margin. This region corresponds to the transition from an oceanic boundary to a continental boundary, where Iberia and Nubia collide. Although most earthquakes along this plate boundary are shallow and generally have magnitudes less than 5.5, there have been several high-magnitude events. Many devastating earthquakes, some of them tsunami-triggering, inflicted heavy loss and considerable economic damage to the region. From 1920 to present, three earthquakes with magnitudes of about 8.0 (Mw 8.2, 25 November 1941; Ms 8.0, 25 February 1969; and Mw 7.9, 26 May 1975) occurred in the oceanic region, and four earthquakes with magnitudes of about 7.0 (Mw 7.1, 8 May 1939, Santa Maria Island and Mw 7.1, January 1980, Terceira and Graciosa Islands, both in the Azores; Ms 7.1, 20 May 1931, Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone; and Mw 7.3, 10 October 1980, El Asnam, Algeria) occurred along the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary. In general, large earthquakes (M ≥7) occur within the oceanic region, with the exception of the El Asnam (Algeria) earthquakes. Some of these events caused extensive damage. The 1755 Lisbon earthquake (˜Mw 9) on the Portugal Atlantic margin, about 200 km W-SW of Cape St. Vincent, was followed by a tsunami and fires that caused the near-total destruction of Lisbon and adjacent areas. Estimates of the death toll in Lisbon alone (~70

  10. Recovering physical property information from subduction plate boundaries using 3D full-waveform seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. E.; Morgan, J. V.; Warner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of subduction margin seismogenesis has been revolutionised in the last couple of decades with the discovery that the size of the seismogenic zone may not be controlled simply by temperature and a broad spectrum of seismic behaviour exists from stick-slip to stable sliding. Laboratory and numerical experiments suggest that physical properties, particularly fluid pressure may play an important role in controlling the seismic behaviour of subduction margins. Although drilling can provide information on physical properties along subduction thrust faults at point locations at relatively shallow depths, correlations between physical properties and seismic velocity using rock physics relationships are required to resolve physical properties along the margin and down-dip. Therefore, high resolution seismic velocity models are key to recovering physical property information at subduction plate boundaries away from drill sites. 3D Full waveform inversion (FWI) is a technique pioneered by the oil industry to obtain high-resolution high-fidelity models of physical properties in the sub-surface. 3D FWI involves the inversion of low-frequency (>2 to <7 Hz), early arriving (principally transmitted) seismic data, to recover the macro (intermediate to long-wavelength) velocity structure. Although 2D FWI has been used to improve velocity models of subduction plate boundaries before, 3D FWI has not yet been attempted. 3D inversions have superior convergence and accuracy, as they sample the subsurface with multi-azimuth multiply-crossing wavefields. In this contribution we perform a suite of synthetic tests to investigate if 3D FWI could be used to better resolve physical property information along subduction margin plate boundaries using conventionally collected 3D seismic data. We base our analysis on the Muroto Basin area of the Nankai margin and investigate if the acquisition parameters and geometry of the subduction margin render 3D seismic data collected across

  11. XFEM simulation of a quenched cracked glass plate with moving convective boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Diyako; Rash Ahmadi, Samrand; Shabani, Farzin

    2016-02-01

    A moving quenched soda-lime glass plate with an initial edge crack is modeled, applying the eXtended finite-element method (XFEM) in order to investigate the stress field components and Von Mises stress around the crack. The convective heat with moving boundaries is considered in thermal formulation. The Crank-Nicolson time integration scheme is reformed and adjusted with a view to accurately solving the system of transient heat conduction matrix equations. In order to simulate the whole stages of the problem formulation, MATLAB XFEM (MXFEM) codes are written and employed. The stress distribution contours are plotted in detail and the stress fields around the crack tip are compared quantitatively. The variations of stress intensity factors (SIFs) during crack propagation are obtained through the calculation of the domain form of the interaction integral. In order to verify the procedure and display the ability of the developed formulation, the results are compared with experimental outputs from the literature.

  12. Multibeam investigation of the active North Atlantic plate boundary reorganization tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, Richard; Martinez, Fernando; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Eason, Deborah E.; Sleeper, Jonathan; Thordarson, Sigvaldi; Benediktsdóttir, Ásdís; Merkuryev, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    The previous orthogonal ridge/transform staircase geometry south of Iceland is being progressively changed to the present continuous oblique Reykjanes Ridge spreading geometry as North America-Eurasia transform faults are successively eliminated from north to south. This reorganization is commonly interpreted as a thermal phenomenon, caused by warmer Iceland plume mantle progressively interacting with the ridge, although other diachronous seafloor spreading reorganizations are thought to result from tectonic rift propagation. New marine geophysical data covering our reinterpretation of the reorganization tip near 57°N show successive transform eliminations at a propagation velocity of ∼110 km/Myr, ten times the spreading half rate, followed by abrupt reorganization slowing at the Modred transform as it was converted to a migrating non-transform offset. Neither the simple thermal model nor the simple propagating rift model appears adequate to explain the complicated plate boundary reorganization process.

  13. Abrupt thermal transition reveals hydrothermal boundary and role of seamounts within the Cocos Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A. T.; Stein, C. A.; Harris, R. N.; Wang, K.; Silver, E. A.; Pfender, M.; Hutnak, M.; Cherkaoui, A.; Bodzin, R.; Villinger, H.

    2003-06-01

    New thermal data from 18-24 Ma lithosphere on the Cocos Plate delineate contrasting subsurface thermal conditions in adjacent sections of crust. Heat flow through seafloor created at the East Pacific Rise is generally suppressed by ~70% relative to conductive lithospheric cooling models, whereas heat flow through adjacent, similarly-aged lithosphere generated at the Cocos-Nazca Spreading Center is consistent with these models. The transition between thermal regimes is remarkably abrupt, only 2-5 km wide, indicating a shallow hydrothermal origin. The transition is more closely associated with differences in the distribution of basement outcrops than with tectonic boundaries, demonstrating the importance of the former in extracting heat from the lithosphere on a regional basis.

  14. Numerical model for the generation of the ensemble of lithospheric plates and their penetration through the 660-km boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubitsyn, V. P.; Trubitsyn, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    In the kinematic theory of lithospheric plate tectonics, the position and parameters of the plates are predetermined in the initial and boundary conditions. However, in the self-consistent dynamical theory, the properties of the oceanic plates (just as the structure of the mantle convection) should automatically result from the solution of differential equations for energy, mass, and momentum transfer in viscous fluid. Here, the viscosity of the mantle material as a function of temperature, pressure, shear stress, and chemical composition should be taken from the data of laboratory experiments. The aim of this study is to reproduce the generation of the ensemble of the lithospheric plates and to trace their behavior inside the mantle by numerically solving the convection equations with minimum a priori data. The models demonstrate how the rigid lithosphere can break up into the separate plates that dive into the mantle, how the sizes and the number of the plates change during the evolution of the convection, and how the ridges and subduction zones may migrate in this case. The models also demonstrate how the plates may bend and break up when passing the depth boundary of 660 km and how the plates and plumes may affect the structure of the convection. In contrast to the models of convection without lithospheric plates or regional models, the structure of the mantle flows is for the first time calculated in the entire mantle with quite a few plates. This model shows that the mantle material is transported to the mid-oceanic ridges by asthenospheric flows induced by the subducting plates rather than by the main vertical ascending flows rising from the lower mantle.

  15. Data Access and Web Services at the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matykiewicz, J.; Anderson, G.; Henderson, D.; Hodgkinson, K.; Hoyt, B.; Lee, E.; Persson, E.; Torrez, D.; Smith, J.; Wright, J.; Jackson, M.

    2007-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) at UNAVCO, Inc., part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, PBO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, and five laser strainmeters, as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations and one previously existing laser strainmeter. UNAVCO provides access to data products from these stations, as well as general information about the PBO project, via the PBO web site (http://pboweb.unavco.org). GPS and strainmeter data products can be found using a variety of access methods, incuding map searches, text searches, and station specific data retrieval. In addition, the PBO construction status is available via multiple mapping interfaces, including custom web based map widgets and Google Earth. Additional construction details can be accessed from PBO operational pages and station specific home pages. The current state of health for the PBO network is available with the statistical snap-shot, full map interfaces, tabular web based reports, and automatic data mining and alerts. UNAVCO is currently working to enhance the community access to this information by developing a web service framework for the discovery of data products, interfacing with operational engineers, and exposing data services to third party participants. In addition, UNAVCO, through the PBO project, provides advanced data management and monitoring systems for use by the community in operating geodetic networks in the United States and beyond. We will demonstrate these systems during the AGU meeting, and we welcome inquiries from the community at any time.

  16. Tectonic activity evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic Plate boundary from mass transport deposit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Casas, David; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruano, Patricia; Maldonado, Andrés.

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution and temporal occurrence of mass transport deposits (MTDs) in the sedimentary infill of basins and submerged banks near the Scotia-Antarctic plate boundary allowed us to decode the evolution of the tectonic activity of the relevant structures in the region from the Oligocene to present day. The 1020 MTDs identified in the available data set of multichannel seismic reflection profiles in the region are subdivided according to the geographic and chronological distributions of these features. Their spatial distribution reveals a preferential location along the eastern margins of the eastern basins. This reflects local deformation due to the evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic transcurrent plate boundary and the impact of oceanic spreading along the East Scotia Ridge (ESR). The vertical distribution of the MTDs in the sedimentary record evidences intensified regional tectonic deformation from the middle Miocene to Quaternary. Intensified deformation started at about 15 Ma, when the ESR progressively replaces the West Scotia Ridge (WSR) as the main oceanic spreading center in the Scotia Sea. Coevally with the WSR demise at about 6.5 Ma, increased spreading rates of the ESR and numerous MTDs were formed. The high frequency of MTDs during the Pliocene, mainly along the western basins, is also related to greater tectonic activity due to uplift of the Shackleton Fracture Zone by tectonic inversion and extinction of the Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge and involved changes at late Pliocene. The presence of MTDs in the southern Scotia Sea basins is a relevant indicator of the interplay between sedimentary instability and regional tectonics.

  17. Recording Plate Boundary Deformation Processes Around The San Jacinto Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, K.; Mencin, D.; Borsa, A.; Fox, O.; Walls, C.; Van Boskirk, E.

    2012-04-01

    The San Jacinto Fault is one of the major faults which form the San Andreas Fault System in southern California. The fault, which lies to the west of the San Andreas, is one of the most active in the region. While strain rates are higher along the San Andreas, 23-37 mm/yr compared to 12-22 mm/yr along the San Jacinto, there have been 11 earthquakes of M6 and greater along the San Jacinto in the past 150 years while there have been none of this magnitude on the San Andreas in this region. UNAVCO has installed an array of geodetic and seismic instruments along the San Jacinto as part of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The network includes 25 GPS stations within 20 km of the surface trace with a concentration of borehole instrumentation in the Anza region where there are nine boreholes sites. Most of the borehole sites contain a GTSM21 4-component strainmeter, a Sonde-2 seismometer, a MEMS accelerometer and a pore pressure sensor. Thus, the array has the capability to capture plate boundary deformation processes with periods of milliseconds (seismic) to decades (GPS). On July 7th 2010 a M5.4 earthquake occurred on the Coyote Creek segment of the fault. The event was preceded by a M4.9 earthquake in the same area four weeks earlier and four earthquakes of M5 and greater within a 20 km radius of the epicenter in the past 50 years. In this study we will present the signals recorded by the different instrument types for the July 7th 2010 event and will compare the coseismic displacements recorded by the GPS and strainmeters with the displacement field predicted by Okada [1992]. All data recorded as part of the PBO observatory are publically available from the UNAVCO, the IRIS Data Management Center and the Northern California Earthquake Data Center.

  18. Logistical Support for the Installation of the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS and Borehole Strainmeter Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnik, C.; Austin, K.; Coyle, B.; Dittmann, T.; Feaux, K.; Friesen, B.; Johnson, W.; Mencin, D.; Pauk, B.; Walls, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three- dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters by October 2008. Such a broad network presents significant logisitical challenges, including moving supplies, equipment, and personnel around 6 million square kilometers, and this requires accurate tracking and careful planning. The PBO logistics chain includes the PBO headquarters at UNAVCO in Boulder, Colorado and five regional offices in the continental United States and Alaska, served by dozens of suppliers spread across the globe. These offices are responsible for building and maintaining sites in their region. Most equipment and supplies first arrive in Boulder, where they are tagged and entered into a UNAVCO-wide equipment database, assembled and quality checked as necessary, and sent on to the appropriate regional office. Larger items which are costly to store and ship from Boulder, such as batteries or long sections of stainless steel pipe and bar required for monuments, are shipped directly from the supplier to each region as needed. These supplies and equipment are also tracked through the ordering, delivery, installation, and maintenance cycle via Earned Value Management techniques which allow us to meet NSF and other Federal procurement rules. Early prototypes and assembly configurations aid the development of material and supply budgets. A thorough understanding of Federal procurement rules at project start up is critical as the project moves forward.

  19. Irregular earthquake recurrence patterns and slip variability on a plate-boundary Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechsler, N.; Rockwell, T. K.; Klinger, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Dead Sea fault in the Levant represents a simple, segmented plate boundary from the Gulf of Aqaba northward to the Sea of Galilee, where it changes its character into a complex plate boundary with multiple sub-parallel faults in northern Israel, Lebanon and Syria. The studied Jordan Gorge (JG) segment is the northernmost part of the simple section, before the fault becomes more complex. Seven fault-crossing buried paleo-channels, offset by the Dead Sea fault, were investigated using paleoseismic and geophysical methods. The mapped offsets capture the long-term rupture history and slip-rate behavior on the JG fault segment for the past 4000 years. The ~20 km long JG segment appears to be more active (in term of number of earthquakes) than its neighboring segments to the south and north. The rate of movement on this segment varies considerably over the studied period: the long-term slip-rate for the entire 4000 years is similar to previously observed rates (~4 mm/yr), yet over shorter time periods the rate varies from 3-8 mm/yr. Paleoseismic data on both timing and displacement indicate a high COV >1 (clustered) with displacement per event varying by nearly an order of magnitude. The rate of earthquake production does not produce a time predictable pattern over a period of 2 kyr. We postulate that the seismic behavior of the JG fault is influenced by stress interactions with its neighboring faults to the north and south. Coulomb stress modelling demonstrates that an earthquake on any neighboring fault will increase the Coulomb stress on the JG fault and thus promote rupture. We conclude that deriving on-fault slip-rates and earthquake recurrence patterns from a single site and/or over a short time period can produce misleading results. The definition of an adequately long time period to resolve slip-rate is a question that needs to be addressed and requires further work.

  20. Prediction and measurement of heat transfer rates for the shock-induced unsteady laminar boundary layer on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The unsteady laminar boundary layer induced by the flow-initiating shock wave passing over a flat plate mounted in a shock tube was theoretically and experimentally studied in terms of heat transfer rates to the plate for shock speeds ranging from 1.695 to 7.34 km/sec. The theory presented by Cook and Chapman for the shock-induced unsteady boundary layer on a plate is reviewed with emphasis on unsteady heat transfer. A method of measuring time-dependent heat-transfer rates using thin-film heat-flux gages and an associated data reduction technique are outlined in detail. Particular consideration is given to heat-flux measurement in short-duration ionized shocktube flows. Experimental unsteady plate heat transfer rates obtained in both air and nitrogen using thin-film heat-flux gages generally agree well with theoretical predictions. The experimental results indicate that the theory continues to predict the unsteady boundary layer behavior after the shock wave leaves the trailing edge of the plate even though the theory is strictly applicable only for the time interval in which the shock remains on the plate.

  1. Tsunami effects at Korean Nuclear Power Plant Sites by Plate Boundary Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sobeom; Hyun, Seung Gyu; Bae, Jae Seok; Kim, Gun Hyeong; Yoon, Sung Bum

    2015-04-01

    Great earthquakes have occurred at the Nankai Trough due to the subduction of the Philippine Sea plate beneath Honshu, Japan. The 1707 Hoei tsunami associated with the Mw 8.7 earthquake, in particular, was the largest event generated in this area. The Nankai Trough is one of the most earthquake-prone area near Japan. And the tsunami affected to Korea according to a Korean historic literature. In this study, new hypothetical plate boundary earthquakes (Mw 9.6) ruptured simultaneously from the Nankai Trough to the Ryukyu Trench (NTRT) are proposed and applied to evaluate the tsunami effects at the Nuclear Power Plant Sites in Korea. In order to make reasonable tsunami sources the asperity model is adapted. The numerical model using the modified leap-frog finite difference scheme is employed to simulate the propagation of tsunami generated at NTRT. This numerical model considering the dispersion effect and inundation of tsunami is then employed to estimate the maximum tsunami heights. Predicted results will be used to make the measures against unexpected tsunami attacks.

  2. The stability of buoyancy-driven gaseous boundary layers over inclined semi-infinite hot plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamanickam, Prabakaran; Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    The free-convective boundary-layer flow that develops over a semi-infinite inclined hot plate is known to become unstable at a finite distance from the leading edge, characterized by a critical value of the Grashof number Grδ based on the local boundary-layer thickness δ. The character of the instability depends on the inclination angle ϕ, measured from the vertical direction. For values of ϕ below a critical value ϕc the instability is characterized by the appearance of spanwise vortices, whereas for ϕ >ϕc the bifurcated flow displays Görtler-like streamwise vortices. The Boussinesq approximation, employed in previous linear stability analyses, ceases to be valid for gaseous flow when the wall-to-ambient temperature ratio θw =Tw /T∞ is not close to unity. The corresponding non-Boussinesq analysis is presented here, accounting also for the variation with temperature of the different transport properties. The base-flow profiles are used in a parallel-flow temporal stability analysis to delineate the dependence of the critical Grashof numbers Grδ on the inclination angles ϕ and on the temperature ratio θw. The analysis provides in particular the values of the crossover inclination angles ϕc (θw) .

  3. The Development of the San Andreas Plate Boundary through Northern California: Insights from GPS, Crustal Structure, and Lithospheric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, K. P.; Williams, T.; Hayes, G. P.

    2007-12-01

    The San Andreas plate boundary lengthens in the wake of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ), and over the last ca. 7-10 Ma it has developed into a localized plate boundary shear zone between the North America and Pacific plates. The pathway from a diffuse deformation swath to a few major fault related plate boundary structures reflects the interplay of thermal and deformational processes acting on the inherited structures of the Cascadia forearc. Furlong and Govers (1998) proposed the Mendocino Crustal Conveyor (MCC) model (supported by numerical modeling) that argued for temporal and spatial variations in lithospheric deformation in association with MTJ passage, which have led to the formation of the main plate boundary structures. The general concept of faults developing and eventually coalescing into a primary plate boundary structure after MTJ passage serves as the framework for most tectonic and geodetic analyses of the fault system. What has been less well understood or quantified is specifically how the fault systems form, what drives fault localization, and how does the concomitant crustal evolution play a role in the plate boundary development. The substantial augmentation of the geodetic data for northern California through a combination of campaign and most recently (through the PBO component of EarthScope) continuous GPS observations in concert with seismological analyses of crustal structure now allows us to test, calibrate, and refine the MCC model. Specifically, the (1) crustal thickening at and north of the MTJ, predicted by MCC processes, is clearly seen in the crustal velocity and GPS derived strain fields, (2) the approx, E-W extent of MCC deformation is delineated by the GPS data to occur primarily through the core of the northern Coast Ranges - consistent with the topographic and fluvial evolution of the region, (3) compatible with seismic observations, the GPS data imply that the upper crust is only a minor participant in the MCC crustal

  4. Crustal Recycling by Surface Processes Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary: From the Colorado Plateau to the Salton Trough and Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    uncertainties, the volume of sediment stored in sedimentary basins along the Gulf-Trough corridor is comparable to the volume of rock that likely was eroded from the Colorado Plateau in the past 5-6 m.y. Using the equivalent rock volume, age, and along-strike extent of these basins, the rate of crustal addition by sediment input is roughly 75-110 km3 per km strike length along the plate boundary per m.y. This is similar to rates of crustal growth by magmatic accretion at subduction-related island arcs and slow mid-ocean spreading centers. Miocene tectonic collapse of the Cordilleran orogen, followed by intensification of monsoonal flow to the Colorado Plateau at ca. 6 Ma, resulted in delayed re-routing of the Colorado River and subsequent rapid funneling of sediment into lowland basins along the plate boundary (Chapin, 2008). This catchment-to-basin conveyer belt operates at scales and volumetric rates comparable to igneous processes of crustal formation and recycling. Similar catchment systems may be expected to form in other settings where potential energy resulting from collapse of an orogenic highland combines with climate forcing related to induced changes in ocean circulation to erode and transfer crust from a stable continental interior to an active plate boundary.

  5. Water Release from Cold Serpentinized Forearc Mantle During Subduction Associated with Changes in Incoming Oceanic Plate Thermal Structure and Plate Boundary Kinematics: New Insights into Serpentinite Belts and Plate-Boundary Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Kirby, Wang, and Brocher (Earth Planets and Space, 2014) recently showed how the change in kinematics of the California margin from subduction motion to continental transform motion with the birth and growth of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) beginning at about 33 Ma BP likely led to a warming of the former forearc mantle and the release of water from serpentinized mantle by dehydration and a likely increase in fluid pressures along the SAFS. Such a mantle source of pressurized water gives insights into both the low sliding resistance for the SAFS and the mobilization and ascent of some serpentinized mantle peridotites through the crust. Thermal modeling by others has also shown that changes in the incoming plate age and subduction rate can also lead to warming of the forearc mantle during subduction. This development gives insights into the Mesozoic and Paleogene ages of emplacement of some, but not all, California serpentinites. Recent mineralogical and geochemical observations of serpentinite blocks in serpentinize mélange bodies in the San Francisco Bay Area (Uno and Kirby, 2014 AGU Meeting and Lewis and Kirby, 2015 AGU Meeting) suggest that these rocks sustained multiple stages of serpentinization that are broadly consistent with the model of Kirby et al. (2014). A new development comes from interpretation of investigations in the literature of localized late-stage silica-carbonate-water alteration of serpentinite bodies in California that this alteration occurred largely in Neogene time when the highest rates of water release from the former forearc mantle probably occurred. This presentation also suggests that the occurrence of serpentinite belts emplaced in Cenozoic time during changing plate-boundary kinematics, such as the Cenozoic closing of the Tethys Ocean bordering Eurasia by subduction and collision and arc reversal and decreasing convergence rates under the Greater Antilles and Colombia and New Guinea, may give insights into the serpentinite

  6. Temporal variations in latest Quaternary slip across the Australian-Pacific Plate Boundary, northeastern South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuepfer, Peter L. K.

    1992-06-01

    Rates of latest Quaternary slip from stream terraces and moraines displaced by faults of the Alpine shear system in NE South Island, New Zealand, vary in space and time. Detailed histories of fault slip are obtained from combining displacement data with estimates of the age of the surface from weathering characteristics. Precision in surface ages is 5-20% using rock weathering rinds and 15-50% using soil properties. The oldest surfaces examined are 15-20 ka and have right-lateral fault offsets up to 400-600 m. The main faults of the in the NE South Island (the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence, Hope, Kekerengu, and Porters Pass faults) have average latest Quaternary right-lateral slip rates of 3-10, 5-10, 7-10, 25-40, 5-7, and 3-4 mm/yr respectively. Every fault has undergone a substantial decrease in lateral slip rate in the last 3-5 kyr. Summed across the plate boundary, the average latest Quaternary slip rates are comparable to long-term rates of horizontal slip across the Australian-Pacific plate boundary (around 40 mm/yr parallel to the boundary) and rates of geodetic strain and seismic moment release over the last 50-100 years (approximately the same). However, sums of lateral fault-slip rates over the interval from 15 to 5 ka exceed the plate motions, whereas late Holocene lateral fault-slip rates are less than half the long-term average. The best explanation of these variations is slip across the plate boundary is episodic, varying over perhaps 5-kyr intervals. This implies that 15-20 kyr is the time interval necessary to average out shorter, 5-kyr episodic variations in plate boundary motions.

  7. Coexisting shortening and extension along the "Africa-Eurasia" plate boundary in southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuffaro, M.; Riguzzi, F.; Scrocca, D.; Doglioni, C.

    2009-04-01

    We performed geodetic strain rate field analyses along the "Africa (Sicily microplate)"-"Eurasia (Tyrrhenian microplate)" plate boundary in Sicily (southern Italy), using new GPS velocities from a data set spanning maximum ten years (1998-2007). Data from GPS permanent stations maintained from different institutions and the recent RING network, settled in Italy in the last five years by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, were included into the analysis. Two dimensional strain and rotation rate fields were estimated by the distance weighted approach on a regularly spaced grid (30*30km), estimating the strain using all stations, but data from each station are weighted by their distance from the grid node by a constant a=70km that specifies how the effect of a station decays with distance from the node grid interpolation. Results show that most of the shortening of the Africa-Eurasia relative motion is distributed in the northwestern side offshore Sicily, whereas the extension becomes comparable with shortening on the western border of the Capo d'Orlando basin, and grater in the northeastern side, offshore Sicily, as directly provided by GPS velocities which show a larger E-ward component of sites located in Calabria with respect to those located either in northern Sicily or in the Ustica-Aeolian islands. Moreover, where shortening and extension have mostly a similar order of magnitude, two rotation rate fields can be detected, CCW in the northwestern side of Sicily, and CW in the northeastern one respectively. Also, 2-D dilatation field records a similar pattern, with negative values (shortening) in the northwestern area of Sicily close to the Ustica island, and positive values (extension) in the northeastern and southeastern ones, respectively. Principal shortening and extension rate axes are consistent with long-term geological features: seismic reflection profiles acquired in the southern Tyrrhenian seismogenic belt show active extensional faults

  8. Geomorphic Response to Crustal Evolution of the Plate Boundary, northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Kirby, E.; Furlong, K. P.

    2009-12-01

    The Coast Ranges in northern California are located within a developing transform plate boundary (San Andreas-Maacama-Bartlett Springs strike slip faults) and experience a crustal evolution driven by the migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction. How the landscape responds to the evolution of this plate boundary, however, is uncertain. Here, we analyze channel longitudinal profiles developed throughout the Coast Ranges to investigate the link between surface and deeper-seated processes. In particular, we focus on a crustal transition zone centered around the Little Lake Valley (Willits). Using the USGS 10m DEM to extract longitudinal stream profiles, we identify knickpoints and their spatial positions, calculate channel steepnesses and concavities, and analyze the pattern of knickpoint migration to explore possible driving mechanisms for landscape evolution. Our results reveal two first-order “domains” in the Coast Ranges. West of the Maacama fault system, drainages exhibit smooth, concave-up profiles with no discernable knickpoints. Preservation of relict patches of a high-elevation, low-relief landscape along the drainage divide between these coastal streams and inland watersheds (Eel and Russian Rivers) is consistent with progressive emergence of this region from below sea level, as indicated by relict shallow marine deposits (Ohlson Ranch Formation). East of the divide, tributaries of the Russian and Eel rivers exhibit knickpoints that separate downstream reaches of high gradient from lower-gradient headwater reaches. These are interpreted to reflect a transient increase in incision rates following either 1) stream capture, or 2) local vertical movements along the Maacama fault system. An example of this is found in the region east of Little Lake Valley, drainages are beheaded along the range front fault bounding the eastern side of the valley, suggesting relatively recent west-side down displacement along this fault system. Overall, our analysis suggests

  9. Surface constraints on the temporal and spatial evolution of the Farallon-Pacific-North America plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuarrie, N.; Oskin, M.

    2009-05-01

    Extension and volcanism are two surface derived data sets used to infer mantle processes back in time. We integrate two new large GIS-based datasets to create palinspastic restorations of extension and volcanism allowing us to readdress the relationship between plate-boundary deformation, intra-plate extension and magmatism in western North America. Using ArcGIS and custom software, we retrodeformed the NAVDat (North American Volcanic Database, navdat.geongrid.org) using the western North America reconstruction of McQuarrie and Wernicke (2005). We compare this data to strain rates calculated over a 50 km-grid forward- deformed from 36 Ma to present. With the deformed grid and palinspastically restored volcanic dataset we quantitatively compare rates of magmatism and deformation and evaluate the age, location, and migration of Cenozoic volcanic arcs. A first order conclusion from this study is that magmatism, throughout the Basin and Range, is primarily driven by plate boundary effects. The plate boundary effects include subduction and rollback of the Farallon plate, creation and expansion of slab windows as the Pacific plate intercepts the North American plate and re-establishment of the ancestral Cascade arc along the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada at ˜ 15 Ma. Notable exceptions include the Yellowstone hotspot system along the northern boarder of our study area and late-stage (<8 Ma) passive, extension related asthenospheric upwelling that accompanied a thinning lithosphere along the eastern and western margins of the Basin and Range. The palinspastic reconstructions presented here highlight that the classic, high-angle, Basin and Range faulting that comprises most of the physiographic Basin and Range province commenced during a remarkably amagmatic period. These observations largely contradicts the active rifting model where magmatism triggers Basin and Range extension

  10. The International Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) in the northern Chile seismic gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, B.; Asch, A.; Sodoudi, F.; Manzanares, A.; Ritter, O.; Klotz, J.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Barrientos, S.; Villotte, J.-P.; Oncken, O.

    2009-04-01

    Fast convergence between the oceanic Nazca and the continental South American plate is accommodated by recurrent rupture of large segments of the two plates' interface. The resulting earthquakes are among the largest and, for their sizes, most frequent on Earth. Along the Chilean and southern Peruvian margin, all segments have ruptured at least once in the past 150 years for which there exist historic and/or instrumental records. The one segment that is most mature for re-rupture stretches for more than 500 km along the northernmost Chilean coast between roughly -23° and -18° latitude. It last broke in 1877 in a magnitude ~8.8 earthquake, triggering a major Tsunami. From the historical record, it has been known to have a recurrence cycle of approximately 110 years. The adjoining segments to the north and south broke rather recently in 1995 and 2001 in M>8 earthquakes and an M 7.7 earthquake encroached the southern part of the gap in 2007. The IPOC project intends to investigate this segment of the Nazca-South American plate boundary, on which a strong to devastating earthquake is expected to occur within the next years, by monitoring at a variety of time-scales deformation, seismicity, and magnetotelluric fields in the subduction zone at the closing stages of the interseismic cycle before and possibly during occurrence of a big earthquake. For that purpose, installation of long-term observatories in Northern Chile started in 2006 in a close cooperation of the Universidad de Chile (Santiago, Chile), the Universidad Catolica del Norte (Antofagasta, Chile), the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (Paris, France), and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ, Potsdam, Germany). Currently we are operating 14 modern seismological stations equipped with STS-2 broadband seismometers and accelerometers (EPI sensor). At least two more stations will be installed in the near future. To cope with the high resolution and dynamic of the sensors and data acquisition

  11. Plate tectonics and offshore boundary delimitation: Tunisia-Libya case at the International Court of Justice

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, D.J.

    1983-03-01

    Advances in the technology for exploiting resources of the oceans, particularly recovery of hydrocarbons and minerals in deep water, is benefiting a growing number of nations. At the same time, however, economic and political pressures have induced concern and there is now a much increased emphasis on jurisdiction to divide the offshore areas between the 132 coastal nations. Negotiations affect research operations at sea and, in consequence, marine scientists have been made aware of offshore problems as highlighted by the Law of the Sea Treaty (UNCLOS III) and complications arising from the legal versus scientific definitions of continental shelves and margins. The first major offshore boundary case of international scope where plate tectonics has constituted a significant argument is the one recently brought before the International Court of Justice by Libya and Tunisia concerning the delimitation of their continental shelves. Of the two parties, Libya placed the greatest emphasis on this concept as a means to determine natural prolongation of its land territory into and under the sea. Tunisia contested Libya's use of the whole of the African continental landmass as a reference unit; in Tunisia's view, considerations of geography, geomorphology, and bathymetry are at least as relevant as are those of geology. In its landmark judgment (February 1982) - which almost certainly will have far-reaching consequences in future such boundary delimitation cases - the court pronounced that It is the outcome, not the evolution in the long-distant past, which is of importance, and that it is the present-day configuration of the coasts and sea bed which are the main factors to be considered, not geology.

  12. Chlorine isotope geochemistry of Icelandic thermal fluids: Implications for geothermal system behavior at divergent plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Barnes, Jaime D.

    2016-09-01

    The chlorine isotope composition of thermal fluids from Iceland were measured in order to evaluate the source of chlorine and possible chlorine isotope fractionation in geothermal systems at divergent plate boundaries. The geothermal systems studied have a wide range of reservoir temperatures from 40 to 437 °C and in-situ pH of 6.15 to 7.15. Chlorine concentrations range from 5.2 to 171 ppm and δ37 Cl values are -0.3 to + 2.1 ‰ (n = 38). The δ37 Cl values of the thermal fluids are interpreted to reflect the source of the chlorine in the fluids. Geothermal processes such as secondary mineral formation, aqueous and vapor speciation and boiling were found to have minimal effects on the δ37 Cl values. However, further work is needed on incorporation of Cl into secondary minerals and its effect on Cl isotope fractionation. Results of isotope geochemical modeling demonstrate that the range of δ37 Cl values documented in the natural thermal fluids can be explained by leaching of the basaltic rocks by meteoric source water under geothermal conditions. Magmatic gas partitioning may also contribute to the source of Cl in some cases. The range of δ37 Cl values of the fluids result mainly from the large range of δ37 Cl values observed for Icelandic basalts, which range from -0.6 to + 1.2 ‰.

  13. Tidal calibration of Plate Boundary Observatory borehole strainmeters: Roles of vertical and shear coupling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeloffs, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    A multicomponent borehole strainmeter directly measures changes in the diameter of its cylindrical housing at several azimuths. To transform these measurements to formation strains requires a calibration matrix, which must be estimated by analyzing the installed strainmeter's response to known strains. Typically, theoretical calculations of Earth tidal strains serve as the known strains. This paper carries out such an analysis for 12 Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) borehole strainmeters, postulating that each of the strainmeters' four gauges responds ("couples") to all three horizontal components of the formation strain tensor, as well as to vertical strain. Orientation corrections are also estimated. The fourth extensometer in each PBO strainmeter provides redundant information used to reduce the chance that coupling coefficients could be misleadingly fit to inappropriate theoretical tides. Satisfactory fits between observed and theoretically calculated tides were obtained for three PBO strainmeters in California, where the calculated tides are corroborated by other instrumentation, as well as for six strainmeters in Oregon and Washington, where no other instruments have ever recorded Earth tidal strain. Several strainmeters have unexpectedly large coupling coefficients for vertical strain, which increases the strainmeter's response to atmospheric pressure. Vertical coupling diminishes, or even changes the sign of, the apparent response to areal strain caused by Earth tides or deep Earth processes because near the free surface, vertical strains are opposite in sign to areal strain. Vertical coupling does not impair the shear strain response, however. PBO borehole strainmeters can provide calibrated shear strain time series of transient strain associated with tectonic or magmatic processes.

  14. GPS Installation Progress in the Northern California Region of the Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basset, A.; Coyle, B.; Williams, T.; Mann, D.; Finn, D.; Feaux, K.

    2008-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is the geodetic component of the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Earthscope Project. The final PBO GPS network will comprise 1100 continuously operating GPS stations installed throughout the Western US and Alaska. There are 448 Stations planned for California with 231 of these in Northern California (NCA). This poster will present a progress report and highlights of GPS installations in NCA over the past year up until the end of the five year project. In the fifth year of the project (beginning 10/1/2007 and ending 10/1/2008), we installed 40 additional stations for a total of 231 stations. The stations installed include; 8 station installed at Lassen Volcanic National Park, 2 additional stations built around Mount Shasta (8 total), 3 stations built in Yosemite National Park, 2 in the Mendocino National Forest, and 2 stations in Tahoe National Forest. The higher elevations stations required modification for use in areas of high snow load and high wind. Data from these stations are available from the UNAVCO archive. In addition to the installations, there was a gradual shift of resources from installation to the operation and maintenance aspects of the growing GPS network. Telemetry priorities moved from individual stations telemetry solutions to grouped telemetry solutions to increase efficiency and reduce costs.

  15. The Baja California Borderland and the Neogene Evolution of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. M.; Eakins, B. W.

    2001-12-01

    New observational data on Neogene faulting in the borderland of Baja California places important constraints on tectonic models for the evolution of the Pacific-North American (P-NA) plate boundary and rifting in the Gulf of California. Neogene faults in the borderland range from strike slip to normal slip and accommodate integrated transtension. Most have east-facing escarpments and likely reactivate the former east-dipping accretionary complex. Numerous lines of evidence indicate that Neogene faults are still active and accomplish a significant component ( ~1-5 mm/yr) of Pacific-North American shearing. Quaternary volcanoes are found offshore and along the Pacific coastal margin, Quaternary marine terraces are warped and uplifted as high as 200 masl. Many of the offshore faults have fresh escarpments and cut Holocene sediments. Extensive arrays of Quaternary fault scarps are found throughout the coastal region and in Bahia Magdalena they are clearly associated with major faults that bound recently uplifted islands. A prominent band of seismicity follows the coast and eight earthquakes (Ms>5.0) were teleseismically recorded between 1973 and 1998. This evidence for active shearing indicates that the Baja microplate has not yet been completely transferred to the Pacific plate. The best lithologic correlation that can be used to define the total Neogene slip across the borderland faults is the offset between the Magdalena submarine fan and its Baja source terrane. The distal facies of the fan drilled during DSDP leg 63 is dominated by mudstone and siltstone that contain reworked Paleogene cocoliths derived from strata correlative with the Tepetate formation found throughout the borderland and fine-grained sandstone derived from a source terrane of granitoid basement. The Middle Miocene La Calera formation of the Cabo trough is one of many granitoid-clast syn-rift alluvial deposits that could form the continental counterpart of the submarine fan near the mouth of the

  16. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1987-01-01

    The nature and dynamics of time-dependent deformation along major seismic zones including the influence of irregularities in fault geometry on the earthquake cycle, and the processes contributing to the state of stress and rates of strain in plate interior regions were studied. The principle findings of the research are discussed.

  17. Contrasting styles of (U)HP rock exhumation along the Cenozoic Adria-Europe plate boundary (Western Alps, Calabria, Corsica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malusà, Marco G.; Faccenna, Claudio; Baldwin, Suzanne L.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Rossetti, Federico; Balestrieri, Maria Laura; Danišík, Martin; Ellero, Alessandro; Ottria, Giuseppe; Piromallo, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Since the first discovery of ultrahigh pressure (UHP) rocks 30 years ago in the Western Alps, the mechanisms for exhumation of (U)HP terranes worldwide are still debated. In the western Mediterranean, the presently accepted model of synconvergent exhumation (e.g., the channel-flow model) is in conflict with parts of the geologic record. We synthesize regional geologic data and present alternative exhumation mechanisms that consider the role of divergence within subduction zones. These mechanisms, i.e., (i) the motion of the upper plate away from the trench and (ii) the rollback of the lower plate, are discussed in detail with particular reference to the Cenozoic Adria-Europe plate boundary, and along three different transects (Western Alps, Calabria-Sardinia, and Corsica-Northern Apennines). In the Western Alps, (U)HP rocks were exhumed from the greatest depth at the rear of the accretionary wedge during motion of the upper plate away from the trench. Exhumation was extremely fast, and associated with very low geothermal gradients. In Calabria, HP rocks were exhumed from shallower depths and at lower rates during rollback of the Adriatic plate, with repeated exhumation pulses progressively younging toward the foreland. Both mechanisms were active to create boundary divergence along the Corsica-Northern Apennines transect, where European southeastward subduction was progressively replaced along strike by Adriatic northwestward subduction. The tectonic scenario depicted for the Western Alps trench during Eocene exhumation of (U)HP rocks correlates well with present-day eastern Papua New Guinea, which is presented as a modern analog of the Paleogene Adria-Europe plate boundary.

  18. Kinematics of the New Zealand plate boundary: Relative motion by GPS across networks of 1000 km and 50 km spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meertens, Charles M.; Rocken, Christian; Perin, Barbara; Walcott, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/DOSE 'Kinematics of the New Zealand Plate Boundary' experiment is a four-year cooperative Global Positioning System (GPS) experiment involving 6 universities and institutions in New Zealand and the United States. The investigation covers two scales, the first on the scale of plates (approximately 1000 km) and the second is on the scale of the plate boundary zone (approximately 50 km). In the first portion of the experiment, phase A, the objective is to make direct measurements of tectonic plate motion between the Australian and Pacific plates using GPS in order to determine the Euler vector of this plate pair. The phase A portion of this experiment was initiated in December 1992 with the first-epoch baseline measurements on the large scale network. The network will be resurveyed two years later to obtain velocities. The stations which were observed for phase A are shown and listed. Additional regional stations which will be used for this study are listed and are part of either CIGNET or other global tracking networks. The phase A portion of the experiment is primarily the responsibility of the UNAVCO investigators. Therefore, this report concentrates on phase A. The first year of NASA funding for phase A included only support for the field work. Processing and analysis will take place with the second year of funding. The second part of the experiemnt measured relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates across the pate boundary zone between Hokitika and Christchurch on the South Island of New Zealand. The extent and rate of deformation will be determined by comparisons with historical, conventional surveys and by repeated GPS measurements to be made in two years. This activity was the emphasis of the LDGO portion of the study. An ancillary experiment, phase C, concentrated on plate boundary deformation in the vicinity of Wellington and was done as part of training during the early portion of the field campaign. Details of the objectives of the

  19. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1987-01-01

    The focus of the research was in two broad areas during the most recent 6 month period: the nature and dynamics of time-dependent deformation along major seismic zones, including the influence of irregularities in fault geometry on the earthquake cycles, and the processes contributing to the state of stress and rates of strain in plate interior regions. The principal findings of the research to date are described.

  20. BOLIVAR: the Caribbean-South America plate boundary between 60W and 71W as imaged by seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, M.; Mann, P.; Clark, S. A.; Escalona, A.; Zelt, C. A.; Christeson, G. L.; Levander, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of ~6000km of marine multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected offshore Venezuela as part of the Broadband Ocean Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region project (BOLIVAR). The imaged area spans almost 12 degrees of longitude and 5 degrees of latitude and encompasses the diffuse plate boundary between South America (SA) and the SE Caribbean plate (CAR). This plate boundary has been evolving for at least the past 55My when the volcanic island arc that borders the CAR plate started colliding obliquely with the SA continent: the collision front has migrated from west to east. BOLIVAR MCS data show that the crustal architecture of the present plate boundary is dominated by the eastward motion of the Caribbean plate with respect to SA and is characterized by a complex combination of convergent and strike-slip tectonics. To the north, the reflection data image the South Caribbean Deformed Belt (SCDB) and the structures related to the thrusting of the CAR plate under the Leeward Antilles volcanic arc region. The data show that the CAR underthrusting continues as far east as the southern edge of the Aves ridge and detailed stratigraphic dating of the Venezuela basin and trench deposits suggests that the collision began in the Paleogene. The amount of shortening along the SCDB decreases toward the east, in part due to the geometry of plate motion vectors and in part as a result of the NNE escape of the Maracaibo block in western Venezuela. South of the SCDB the MCS profiles cross the Leeward Antilles island arc and Cenozoic sedimentary basins, revealing a complex history of Paleogene-Neogene multiphase extension, compression, and tectonic inversion, as well as the influence of the tectonic activity along the right-lateral El Pilar - San Sebastian fault system. East of the Bonaire basin the MCS data image the southern end of the Aves Ridge abandoned volcanic island arc and the southwestern termination of the Grenada basin

  1. From transtension to transpression along the northern Caribbean plate boundary off Cuba: implications for the Recent motion of the Caribbean plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calais, Eric; de Lepinay, Bernard Mercier

    1991-02-01

    Marine geophysical surveys using Seabeam, single-channel seismic reflection, gravimetric and magnetic measurements have been conducted along a segment of the northern Caribbean transcurrent plate boundary (SEACARIB II cruise). The data allow a better definition of the geometry and the tectonic regime of this major strike-slip area. They support the following results: (1) Along the southern Cuban margin, the Oriente fault displays a discontinuous trace, mainly composed of dextral offset, "en echelon" segments. Some pull-apart basins are located between fault segments (Cabo Cruz basin, Chivirico and Baitiquiri basins). In the Windward Passage area, the plate boundary enters into the Tortue Channel and is not connected with the subduction front off northern Hispaniola. (2) The eastern part of the Oriente Deep and the Santiago Promontory are characterised by active compressional tectonics. They form the Santiago Deformed Belt, described here for the first time. This deformed belt can be divided longitudinally into three main segments, each one characterised by a particular tectonic style. Its development is related to a transpressional mechanism along the left-lateral Oriente strike-slip fault. Our observations suggest that a tectonic and kinematic reorganisation occurred recently in this area, probably in the Late Pliocene, which may be compared with the recent geological events recorded on land in the northern Caribbean domain. The precise knowledge of both geometry and structures along the Oriente strike-slip fault south of Cuba provides new constraints for the recent kinematic evolution along the northern Caribbean transcurrent plate boundary: it leads us to infer the existence of a convergence component associated with the slip component along the Oriente transform fault.

  2. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Akutan Alaskan Volcano Tiltmeter Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauk, B. A.; Gallaher, W.; Dittmann, T.; Smith, S.

    2007-12-01

    During August of 2007, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) successfully installed four Applied Geomechanics Lily Self Leveling Borehole Tiltmeters on Akutan Volcano, in the central Aleutian islands of Alaska. All four stations were collocated with existing PBO Global Positioning Systems (GPS) stations installed on the volcano in 2005. The tiltmeters will aid researchers in detecting and measuring flank deformation associated with future magmatic intrusions of the volcano. All four of the tiltmeters were installed by PBO field crews with helicopter support provided by JL Aviation and logistical support from the Trident Seafood Corporation, the City of Akutan, and the Akutan Corporation. Lack of roads and drivable trails on the remote volcanic island required that all drilling equipment be transported to each site from the village of Akutan by slinging gear beneath the helicopter and with internal loads. Each tiltmeter hole was drilled to a depth of approximately 30 feet with a portable hydraulic/pneumatic drill rig. The hole was then cased with splined 2.75 inch PVC. The PVC casing was cemented in place with grout and the tiltmeters were installed and packed with fine grain sand to stabilize the tiltmeters inside the casing. The existing PBO NetRS GPS receivers were configured to collect the tiltmeter data through a spare receiver serial port at one sample per minute and 1 hour files. Data from the GPS receivers and tiltmeters is telemetered directly or through a repeater radio to a base station located in the village of Akutan that transmits the data using satellite based communications to connect to the internet and to the UNAVCO Facility data archive where it is made freely available to the public.

  3. The Future of the Plate Boundary Observatory in the GAGE Facility and beyond 2018

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Bendick, R. O.; Foster, J. H.; Freymueller, J. T.; La Femina, P. C.; Miller, M. M.; Rowan, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and Earthscope (GAGE) Facility, which operates the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), builds on UNAVCO's strong record of facilitating research and education in the geosciences and geodesy-related engineering fields. Precise positions and velocities for the PBO's ~1100 continuous GPS stations and other PBO data products are used to address a wide range of scientific and technical issues across North America. A large US and international community of scientists, surveyors, and civil engineers access PBO data streams, software, and other on-line resources daily. In a global society that is increasingly technology-dependent, consistently risk-averse, and often natural resource-limited, communities require geodetic research, education, and infrastructure to make informed decisions about living on a dynamic planet. The western U.S. and Alaska, where over 95% of the PBO sensor assets are located, have recorded significant geophysical events like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunami. UNAVCO community science provides first-order constraints on geophysical processes to support hazards mapping and zoning, and form the basis for earthquake and tsunami early warning applications currently under development. The future of PBO was discussed at a NSF-sponsored three-day workshop held in September 2014 in Breckenridge, CO. Over 40 invited participants and community members, including representatives from interested stakeholder groups, UNAVCO staff, and members of the PBO Working Group and Geodetic Infrastructure Advisory Committee participated in workshop, which included retrospective and prospective plenary presentations and breakout sessions focusing on specific scientific themes. We will present some of the findings of that workshop in order to continue a dialogue about policies and resources for long-term earth observing networks. How PBO fits into the recently released U.S. National Plan for Civil Earth Observations will also be

  4. GPS Installation Progress in the Northern California Region of the Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, B.; Basset, A.; Williams, T.; Mann, D.; Finn, D.; Feaux, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is the geodetic component of the NSF funded EarthScope Project. The final PBO GPS network will comprise 875 continuously operating GPS stations installed throughout the Western US and Alaska. There are 449 Stations planned for California with 232 of these in Northern California (NCA). This poster will present a progress report and highlights of GPS installations in NCA over the past year. At the end of the third year of the project (10/2007), PBO NCA installed 131 GPS stations. In the fourth year of the project we installed 64 stations for a total of 195 stations. This total comprises 80% of the along the active transform margin, 70% of the sites on volcanoes and calderas and 67% of the sites covering the extensional regime of the Basin and Range. Highlights from this year include completing reconnaissance and permitting of GPS networks around the volcanoes at Mount Shasta and Mount Lassen. Six of the eight GPS stations planned for Mount Shasta were built and at varying azimuths and distances from the crater. Mount Lassen has 9 GPS stations, 6 stations in the Lassen Volcanic National Park and 3 more on surrounding National Forest Service property. Data from these stations are available from the UNAVCO archive. We expect to complete the Northern California part of the PBO GPS network by the end of Sept 2008. In order to accomplish this goal, we are working to finalize reconnaissance and permitting activities for sites whose initial permits were rejected. There will likely be a handful of sites that we will have to relocate from their originally proposed locations in order to get a permitted location.

  5. The Plate Boundary Observatory Student Field Assistant Program in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seider, E. L.

    2007-12-01

    Each summer, UNAVCO hires students as part of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) Student Field Assistant Program. PBO, the geodetic component of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, involves the reconnaissance, permitting, installation, documentation, and maintenance of 880 permanent GPS stations in five years. During the summer 2007, nine students from around the US and Puerto Rico were hired to assist PBO engineers during the busy summer field season. From June to September, students worked closely with PBO field engineers to install and maintain permanent GPS stations in all regions of PBO, including Alaska. The PBO Student Field Assistant Program provides students with professional hands-on field experience as well as continuing education in the geosciences. It also gives students a glimpse into the increasing technologies available to the science community, the scope of geophysical research utilizing these technologies, and the field techniques necessary to complete this research. Students in the PBO Field Assistant Program are involved in all aspects of GPS support, including in-warehouse preparation and in-field installations and maintenance. Students are taught practical skills such as drilling, wiring, welding, hardware configuration, documentation, and proper field safety procedures needed to construct permanent GPS stations. These real world experiences provide the students with technical and professional skills that are not always available to them in a classroom, and will benefit them greatly in their future studies and careers. The 2007 summer field season in Southern California consisted of over 35 GPS permanent station installations. To date, the Southern California region of PBO has installed over 190 GPS stations. This poster presentation will highlight the experiences gained by the Southern California student field assistants, while supporting PBO- Southern California GPS installations in the Mohave Desert and the Inyo National Forest.

  6. EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory, Southwest Region - Communications, Challenges, and Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, R. C.; Mann, D.; Walls, C. P.; Basset, A.; Lawrence, S.; Berglund, H. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Southwest Region of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory is engaged in efforts to expand capabilities and renovate the network. These efforts include GNSS hardware modernization (in cooperation with state and local agencies), communications upgrades that improve data throughput and decrease recurring costs, co-location of prototype instruments for use in earthquake early warning, and working to ensure consistent high-quality data in the face of radio spectrum encroachment.The Global Positioning System (GPS) is but one of a growing number of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) with the potential to improve geodetic observations. In addition to strategic deployment of GNSS-capable hardware, the Southwest region is currently developing an agreement with Caltrans to augment the network with GNSS systems at about a dozen stations. The upgrades will consist of a number of Caltrans-provided GLONASS-ready receivers and project is scheduled for completion by early 2016.The Southwest Region has continued to upgrade and build new radio networks to improve dependability, monitoring, and data download rates (including transfers of high-rate data). Here, we highlight one such network near Hollister, CA, which eliminated several cellular modems and improved reliability.UNAVCO and Scripps have been working in collaboration to augment a subset of GPS stations with low-cost strong-motion sensors for use in Earthquake Early Warning systems. To date, 21 PBO stations have been upgraded with MEMS accelerometers along the San Andreas and San Jacinto Faults in Northern and Southern California, 15 of which stream data to UNAVCO in real time.As the use of the radio frequency spectrum increases, PBO faces more radio frequency interference (RFI) in our data communications networks; in addition, RFI issues are beginning to impact GNSS data collection. Here we report on a PBO site suspected of suffering from RFI and discuss briefly mitigation efforts to minimize these effects.

  7. Monitoring the northern Chile megathrust with the Integrated Plate boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, Bernd; Asch, Günter; Cailleau, Beatrice; Diaz, Guillermo Chong; Barrientos, Sergio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Oncken, Onno

    2010-05-01

    thousand aftershocks during the following week using waveform cross-correlation and the double-difference algorithm. Aftershocks reveal that rupture during this earthquake was confined to the deeper part (35 - 55 km depth) of the seismogenic coupling zone, except near the Mejillones peninsula that marks rupture termination in the south. Here earthquake activity reaches to depths of 20 km and even shallower, possibly indicating upper plate activation. The sequence also features an M 6.8 earthquake that broke the oceanic slab on an almost vertical plane at the down-dip end of the megathrust rupture. Confrontation with the aftershock distribution of the 1995 M 8.0 Antofagasta earthquake on the adjoining southern segment reveals an intriguing mirror symmetry with an axis crossing the Mejillones peninsula, emphasizing the penisula's significance as a segment boundary. Since then activity inside the remaining seismic gap to the north picked up with three earthquakes exceeding magnitude 6, maybe heralding the next great rupture.

  8. Geodetic constraints on areal changes in the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone: What controls Basin and Range extension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Hammond, William C.

    2007-10-01

    Using ˜1500 geodetic velocities we model the present-day spatial patterns of areal changes inside the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone. From this model we show that between the central Gulf of California and the Queen Charlotte Islands there is no significant net change in surface area. This zero net areal-change result allows us to relate regions of areal growth to areas of equivalent contraction elsewhere within the plate boundary zone. We find that areal growth of the Basin and Range province (BRP) and its eastern margin (˜5.2 ± 0.1 × 103 m2/yr) is balanced by areal reduction near northwestern California between 38°N and 42°N. The San Andreas fault system south of 38°N and the plate boundary zone north of ˜42°N (including the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridge systems) each have no significant net areal change. Our results suggest a kinematic relationship between extension in the BRP and contraction near the northern California Coast Ranges and Klamath Mountains. From these observations we propose that, although BRP extension may be caused by internal forces, the southernmost Cascadia subduction zone provides a “window of escape” that acts as a stress guide to BRP extension as well as northwestward Sierra Nevada motion. Such a dynamic model is consistent with independent findings that (1) the least principal horizontal stress orientations in the BRP are toward northern California, (2) extension directions in the BRP have changed orientation to track the northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction, and (3) the southernmost Cascadia subduction zone is a relatively weak plate boundary.

  9. Receptivity of Flat-Plate Boundary Layer in a Non-Uniform Free Stream (Vorticity Normal to the Plate)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, M. N.; Shumilkin, V. G.; Ustinov, M. V.; Zhigulev, S. V.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of low speed leading edge boundary layer receptivity to free-stream vorticity produced by upstream wires normal to the leading edge are discussed. Data include parametric variations in leading edge configuration and details of the incident disturbance field including single and multiple wakes. The induced disturbance amplitude increases with increases in the leading edge diameter and wake interactions. Measurements agree with the theory of M. E. Goldstein.

  10. Manipulation of an artificial large scale horse-shoe vortex by a thin plate placed in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, H.; Sassa, K.; Abe, M.; Itabashi, A.

    1987-06-01

    A horseshoe vortex was artificially induced in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer by injecting a pair of small swirling jets from a flat plate beneath. The artificial vortex grew toward the outer layer and came to have a structure almost the same as the natural coherent bulge as it flowed downstream. A thin manipulator plate was installed parallel to the flat plate and the artificial horseshoe vortex was broken. Velocity-vector plots and the shear-stress contour maps were obtained by the conditional sampling method. When the horseshoe vortex was manipulated, its coherent structure decayed rapidly, and the intensity of the induced shear stress concentrated between its two legs was reduced effectively. These results suggest the possibility of drag reduction by the large-eddy breakup method.

  11. Unsteady heat-flux measurements of second-mode instability waves in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat-flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors, and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are consistent with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was used to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  12. Breaking into the Plate: Seismic and Hydroacoustic Analysis of a 7.6 Mw Oceanic Fracture Zone Earthquake Adjacent to the Central Indian Ridge Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Chapp, E.

    2003-12-01

    Where oceanic spreading segments are offset laterally from one another, the differential motion of the plates is accommodated by strike-slip motion along ridge-perpendicular transform faults. Off-axis from the ridge-transform intersection, no differential motion is require, and the fracture zone trace is thought to be inactive except where reactivated by intra-plate stresses. On 15 July 2003, an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.6 Mw occurred near the northern Central Indian Ridge (CIR), the divergent boundary separating the Somalian plate from the Indian and Australian plates. The size of this event places it within the 99th quantile of magnitude for shallow (< 40 km depth) strike-slip events (null axis plunge >45 deg) within the global Harvard CMT catalog. The earthquake's epicenter is near 2.5 deg S, 68.33 deg E, where the CIR is marked by a series of short (<100 km long) right-stepping transforms that offset the northwest trending spreading segments (20 mm/yr). Seismic signals associated with the mainshock and its largest aftershocks were recorded well by land-based seismic networks. Regional seismic phases (Pn, Sn), as well oceanic T-waves, where also recorded at an IMS hydroacoustic station to the north of the Diego Garcia atoll. T-wave signals recorded at Diego Garcia were cross correlated to determine accurate travel time differences. These traveltime differences were used in a plane wave fitting inversion to determine the horizontal slowness components and estimate the back azimuth to the epicenter. Aftershock locations are derived using the azimuthal information and Pn-T traveltime differences. Together, the seismically- and hydroacoustically-derived epicenters show a linear band of aftershocks extending more than 200 km along the off-axis trace of a right stepping transform. We interpret these aftershock events as delineating the length of the mainshock rupture. As the well-constrain hypocenter of the mainshock lies near the western edge of this

  13. Visualization of Hypersonic Flat-Plate Boundary Layer in Shock Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinghu; Yi, Shihe; Zhi, Chen; Zhu, Yangzh; Yu, Wu

    In order to design the future aerospace vehicles, it is essential to experimentally investigate the hypersonic boundary layer [1]. Many aspects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layer and transition process are poorly understood.

  14. Abbot Ice Shelf, the Amundsen Sea Continental Margin and the Southern Boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate Seaward of West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, J. R.; Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Abbot Ice Shelf extends 450 km along the coast of West Antarctica between 103°W and 89°W and straddles the boundary between the Bellingshausen Sea continental margin, which overlies a former subduction zone, and Amundsen Sea rifted continental margin. Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity data for sub-ice bathymetry shows that the western part of the ice shelf, as well as Cosgrove Ice Shelf to the south, are underlain by a series of east-west trending rift basins. The eastern boundary of the rifted terrain coincides with the eastern boundary of rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia and the rifts formed during the early stages of this rifting. Extension in these rifts is minor as rifting quickly jumped north of Thurston Island. The southern boundary of the Cosgrove Rift is aligned with the southern boundary of a sedimentary basin under the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf to the west, also formed by Antarctica-Zealandia rifting. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5 - 1.7 with 80 -100 km of extension occurring in an area now ~250 km wide. Following this extension early in the rifting process, rifting centered to the north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf has been tectonically quiescent and has primarily been shaped though subsidence, sedimentation and the passage of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet back and forth across it. The former Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to its incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at ~62 Ma. During the latter part of its existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence between the Bellingshausen and Antarctic plates east of 102°W. Seismic reflection and gravity data show that this convergence is expressed by an area of intensely deformed sediments beneath the continental slope from 102°W to 95°W and

  15. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    During our participation in the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project under NASA contract NAS-27339 and grant NAG5-814 for the period 1982-1991, we published or submitted for publication 30 research papers and 52 abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. In addition, five M.I.T. Ph.D. students (Eric Bergman, Steven Bratt, Dan Davis, Jeanne Sauber, Anne Sheehan) were supported wholly or in part by this project during their thesis research. Highlights of our research progress during this period include the following: application of geodetic data to determine rates of strain in the Mojave block and in central California and to clarify the relation of such strain to the San Andreas fault and Pacific-North American plate motions; application of geodetic data to infer post seismic deformation associated with large earthquakes in the Imperial Valley, Hebgen Lake, Argentina, and Chile; determination of the state of stress in oceanic lithosphere from a systematic study of the centroid depths and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes; development of models for the state of stress in young oceanic regions arising from the differential cooling of the lithosphere; determination of the depth extent and rupture characteristics of oceanic transform earthquakes; improved determination of earthquake slip vectors in the Gulf of California, an important data set for the estimation of Pacific-North American plate motions; development of models for the state of stress and mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges; development of procedures to invert geoid height, residual bathymetry, and differential body wave travel time residuals for lateral variations in the characteristic temperature and bulk composition of the oceanic upper mantle; and initial GPS measurements of crustal deformation associated with the Imperial-Cerro Prieto fault system in southern California and northern Mexico. Full descriptions of the research conducted on these topics may be

  16. Unsteady boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a Casson fluid past an oscillating vertical plate with Newtonian heating.

    PubMed

    Hussanan, Abid; Zuki Salleh, Mohd; Tahar, Razman Mat; Khan, Ilyas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the heat transfer effect on the unsteady boundary layer flow of a Casson fluid past an infinite oscillating vertical plate with Newtonian heating is investigated. The governing equations are transformed to a systems of linear partial differential equations using appropriate non-dimensional variables. The resulting equations are solved analytically by using the Laplace transform method and the expressions for velocity and temperature are obtained. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and reduce to some well-known solutions for Newtonian fluids. Numerical results for velocity, temperature, skin friction and Nusselt number are shown in various graphs and discussed for embedded flow parameters. It is found that velocity decreases as Casson parameters increases and thermal boundary layer thickness increases with increasing Newtonian heating parameter.

  17. Zero Pressure Gradient Flat Plate Boundary Layer Experiments Using Synchronized PIV and a Hot Wire Anemometry Rake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutkun, M.; Johansson, P. B. V.; George, W. K.; Stanislas, M.; Foucaut, J. M.; Kostas, J.; Coudert, S.; Delville, J.

    2006-11-01

    Zero pressure gradient flat plate boundary layer experiments have been performed in the 20 meter long test section of the Laboratoire de M'ecanique de Lille, LML, wind tunnel. Measurements were carried out at Reθ=10 000 and Reθ=20 000 using synchronized PIV and a hot wire anemometry rake. The boundary layer thickness at the measurement location was about 30 cm. A hot wire rake of 143 probes was placed in the test section of the wind tunnel to provide the time history of the boundary layer. 2 stereo PIV systems in the wallnormal-spanwise (YZ) plane, and 1 stereo PIV system to record in the streamwise-wallnormal (XY) were used. One high repetition PIV system was used in streamwise-spanwise (XZ) plane. The sampling frequency of the XZ PIV system was 3000 VF/s at Reθ=20 000 and 1500 VF/s at Reθ=10 000.

  18. Unsteady Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer of a Casson Fluid past an Oscillating Vertical Plate with Newtonian Heating

    PubMed Central

    Hussanan, Abid; Zuki Salleh, Mohd; Tahar, Razman Mat; Khan, Ilyas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the heat transfer effect on the unsteady boundary layer flow of a Casson fluid past an infinite oscillating vertical plate with Newtonian heating is investigated. The governing equations are transformed to a systems of linear partial differential equations using appropriate non-dimensional variables. The resulting equations are solved analytically by using the Laplace transform method and the expressions for velocity and temperature are obtained. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and reduce to some well-known solutions for Newtonian fluids. Numerical results for velocity, temperature, skin friction and Nusselt number are shown in various graphs and discussed for embedded flow parameters. It is found that velocity decreases as Casson parameters increases and thermal boundary layer thickness increases with increasing Newtonian heating parameter. PMID:25302782

  19. The turbulent boundary layer on a porous plate: An experimental study of the heat transfer behavior with adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, B. F.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the heat transfer behavior of the near equilibrium transpired turbulent boundary layer with adverse pressure gradient has been carried out. Stanton numbers were measured by an energy balance on electrically heated plates that form the bottom wall of the wind tunnel. Two adverse pressure gradients were studied. Two types of transpiration boundary conditions were investigated. The concept of an equilibrium thermal boundary layer was introduced. It was found that Stanton number as a function of enthalpy thickness Reynolds number is essentially unaffected by adverse pressure gradient with no transpiration. Shear stress, heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number profiles were computed from mean temperature and velocity profiles. It was concluded that the turbulent Prandtl number is greater than unity in near the wall and decreases continuously to approximately 0.5 at the free stream.

  20. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory.

  1. MHD Forced Convective Laminar Boundary Layer Flow from a Convectively Heated Moving Vertical Plate with Radiation and Transpiration Effect

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, A. I. Md.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to where is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  2. Earthquake prediction on boundaries of the Arabian Plate: premonitory chains of small earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaniv, M.; Agnon, A.; Shebalin, P.

    2009-12-01

    Target, i.e. all events are aftershocks; potential foreshocks are not a part of the chain. The algorithm is catalog sensitive. The Nueiba and Paphos events were recognized by the original RTP system (Shebalin et al., 2004), and were used for the calibration of the system before the prediction-in-advance phase was initiated. The detection of the smaller 1993 Red sea event (M6.1) is unique to the modified algorithm. These events, strongest in the catalog, were preceded by “foreshocks” within their chains as shown in the table. We see indications that different types of plate boundaries have different patterns of microseismicity: transform faults may have a clearer premonitory signal than normal faults. The three chains

  3. Seismo-electromagnetic phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves da Silva, Hugo; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Biagi, Pier; Namorado Rosa, Rui; Salgueiro da Silva, Manuel; Caldeira, Bento; Heitor Reis, Artur; Borges, José Fernando; Tlemçani, Mouhaydine; Manso, Marco

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a future research plan that aims to monitor Seismo-electromagnetic (SEM) phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary (WENP). This region has a significant tectonic activity [1] combined with relatively low electromagnetic noise levels and for that reason presents the possibility to perform high quality SEM measurements. Further, it is known that low-frequency [ultra (ULF), very (VLF), and low-frequencies (LF)] electromagnetic (EM) waves produce more convincing earthquake precursors (compared to higher frequencies) because of less contamination, large skin depth, and low attenuation [2]. Thus, two SEM effects will be considered: ULF electromagnetic field emissions [3], and VLF/LF radio broadcastings [4]. With respect to the ULF measurements, as a start, three ULF sensors are planned to be installed in the South of Iberian Peninsula supported by the existing networks of seismic research stations. Subsequent development of this initial plan could result in the implementation of a lager ULF monitoring network not only in the Iberian Peninsula, but also in the rest of Europe. Possible integration in the SEGMA array is now under consideration. Another perspective is to use a portable station to track seismic events. Regarding the VLF/LF radio broadcastings, a receiver is planned to be mounted in University of Évora. Radio signals from up to 10 transmitters (in these bands) of interest to study the seismic activity in the WENP region will be monitored. Actually, the radio path from the transmitter to the receiver should cross the epicentral area, therefore two possible transmitters are the ones installed in Monaco (France) and Sicily (Italy). Furthermore, the system will integrate the INFREP network and in this context it will not be restricted to WENP region. With the development of these research plans we aim to collect novel SEM data emerging from the seismic activity in the WENP region. We expect to address the time

  4. The Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory Alaska Region an Overview of Network Operation, Maintenance and Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, M.; Boyce, E. S.; Bierma, R.; Walker, K.; Feaux, K.

    2011-12-01

    UNAVCO has now completed its third year of operation of the 138 continuous GPS stations, 12 tiltmeters and 31 communications relays that comprise the Alaska Region of the Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory. Working in Alaska has been challenging due to the extreme environmental conditions encountered and logistics difficulties. Despite these challenges we have been able to complete each summer field season with network operation at 95% or better. Throughout the last three years we have analyzed both our successes and failures to improve the quality of our network and better serve the scientific community. Additionally, we continue to evaluate and deploy new technologies to improve station reliability and add to the data set available from our stations. 2011 was a busy year for the Alaska engineering team and some highlights from last year's maintenance season include the following. This spring we completed testing and deployment of the first Inmarsat BGAN satellite terminal for data telemetry at AC60 Shemya Island. Shemya Island is at the far western end of the Aleutian Islands and is one of the most remote and difficult to access stations in the PBO AK network. Until the installation of the BGAN, this station was offline with no data telemetry for almost one year. Since the installation of the BGAN in early April 2011 dataflow has been uninterrupted. This year we also completed the first deployments of Stardot NetCamSC webcams in the PBO Network. Currently, these are installed and operational at six GPS stations in Alaska, with plans to install several more next season in Alaska. Images from these cameras can be found at the station homepages linked to from the UNAVCO website. In addition to the hard work put in by PBO engineers this year, it is important that we recognize the contributions of our partners. In particular the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the Alaska Earthquake Information Center and others who have provided us with valuable engineering assistance

  5. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Alaska Region: Highlights from the 2012 Summer Field Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, M.; Bierma, R. M.; Boyce, E. S.; Willoughby, H.; Fend, M.; Feaux, K.

    2012-12-01

    UNAVCO has now completed its fourth year of operation and maintenance of the 138 continuous GPS stations, 12 tiltmeters and 31 data communications relays that comprise the Alaska region of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The successful operation of the autonomous GPS and tiltmeter network in Alaska continues to be a challenge, because of logistics, weather, and other difficulties related to working in Alaska. PBO engineers continue to work on network enhancements to make the stations more robust, while improving overall data quality and station uptime to better serve the EarthScope science community. In the summer of 2012, PBO engineers completed maintenance activities in Alaska, which resulted in a 95% operational status for the Alaska network within PBO. PBO engineers completed a total of 87 maintenance visits in the summer of FY2012, including 62 routine maintenance and 25 unscheduled maintenance visits to GPS and data communications stations. We present a number of highlights and accomplishments from the PBO 2012 summer field season in Alaska, for example the deployment of a newly designed methanol fuel cell at AV35, a critical station that serves as the main repeater for the real time network on Unimak Island. In addition, PBO engineers also completed the installation of three Inmarsat BGAN terminals for data telemetry following successful testing at AC60 Shemya. Lastly, PBO engineers completed scheduled battery replacements at most of the PBO stations on Unimak Island, in collaboration with the USGS/Alaska Volcano Observatory. In addition to routine maintenance and planned station improvements to sites in Alaska, numerous critical repairs were made at stations on Unimak Island and elsewhere to ensure that the PBO network continues to function well and continues to meet the requirements stipulated by the NSF. We also present some of the station failures unique to Alaska, which we encountered during the course of the 2012 field season, as well

  6. GPS Installation Progress in the Southern California Region of the Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, C.; Arnitz, E.; Bick, S.; Lawrence, S.; Feaux, K.; Jackson, M.

    2005-12-01

    One of the roles the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), the geodetic component of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is the rapid deployment of permanent GPS units following large earthquakes to capture postseismic transients and any long-term viscoelastic-response . The PBO Southern California region conducted responses to three earthquakes; the M6.5 San Simeon earthquake, the M6.0 Parkfield earthquake, and the M5.6 Anza earthquake. For each event, PBO began a response within hours and developed reconnaissance, prioritization, relocation, and deployment plans at the request of the PBO Transform Site Selection Working Group. The San Simeon event initiated the beginning of the PBO GPS station construction phase when 5 stations were located, permitted, and built within 38 days of the earthquake. For the September 28th, 2004, Parkfield earthquake, the PBO Transform Site Selection Working Group elevated the priority of two planned GPS stations (P539 and P532) sited to the south of the earthquake epicenter. Reconnaissance for five sites in Parkfield began the day following the earthquake and two permits were secured within three days of the earthquake. Materials and equipment for construction were brought along with the response team and within 4 days the first monument (P539) was installed. Following the June 12 M5.6 Anza earthquake, the first station was located, permitted, and built within 4 days and the second station within 12 days. Of the 875 total PBO GPS stations, 212 proposed sites are distributed throughout the Southern California region. Currently the production status is: 59 stations built (23 short braced monuments, 36 deep drilled braced monuments), 72 permits signed, 105 permits submitted and 114 station reconnaissance reports. Year 1 and 2 production goals are on schedule and under budget. The balance of 153 stations will be built over the next 3 years from Long Valley to the Mexico border in order of priority as recommended by the PBO Transform

  7. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Current status and plans for the next five years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Feaux, K.; Meertens, C. M.; Mencin, D.; Miller, M.

    2013-12-01

    UNAVCO currently operates and maintains the NSF-funded Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), which is the geodetic facility of EarthScope. PBO was designed and built from 2003 to 2008 with $100M investment from the NSF Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (MREFC) Program. UNAVCO operated and maintained PBO under a Cooperative Agreement (CA) with NSF from 2008 to 2013 and will continue PBO O&M for the next five years as part of the new Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) Facility. PBO is largest continuous GPS and borehole geophysical network in the Americas, with 1100 continuous Global Positioning System (cGPS) sites, including several with multiple monuments, 79 boreholes, with 75 tensor strainmeters, 78 short-period, 3-component seismometers, and pore pressure sensors at 23 sites. PBO also includes 26 tiltmeters deployed at volcanoes in Alaska, Mt St Helens, and Yellowstone caldera and 6 long-baseline laser strainmeters. Surface meteorological sensors are collocated at 154 GPS sites. UNAVCO provides high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (<1 s) GPS data streams (RT-GPS) from 382 stations in PBO. UNAVCO has delivered over 62 Tb of geodetic data to the EarthScope community since its PBO's inception in 2004. Over the past year, data return for the cGPS component of PBO is 98%, well above the data return metric of 85% set by the NSF, a result of efforts to upgrade power systems and communications infrastructure. In addition, PBO has set the standard for the design, construction, and operation of other multi-hazard networks across the Americas, including COCONet in the Caribbean region and TLALOCNet in Mexico. Funding to support ongoing PBO O&M has declined from FY2012 CA levels under the new GAGE Facility. The implications for data return and data quality metrics as well as replacement of aging PBO GPS instruments with GNSS-compatible systems are as yet unknown. A process to assess the cost of specific PBO components, data rates, enhanced

  8. Plate Boundary Observatory Southwest Region Network Operations, Expansion and Communications Hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, D.; Walls, C. P.; Basset, A.; Turner, R.; Lawrence, S.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Southwest Region of the Plate Boundary Observatory manages 480 continuously operating GPS stations located principally along the transform system of the San Andreas fault, Eastern California Shear Zone and the northern Baja peninsula. In the past year, network uptime averaged 98% with greater than 99% data acquisition. In an effort to modernize the network, we have started to replace Trimble NETRS receivers with GNSS capable NETR9 receivers. Currently, we have 431 NetRS receivers deployed in the region, and 48 NetR9 receivers. In addition, 82 stations (17%) stream 1 Hz data over the VRS3Net typically with <0.5 second latency and an average completeness of >92%. Based on their typical data download rates, approximately 252 (53%) of all stations are capable of streaming 1 Hz, but have not yet been added to the real time network because of lack of resources. In the immediate aftermath of the M8.2 Chile earthquake in April 2014, high rate data downloads from the entire SW network had a success rate of 95% and 71% for 1 Hz and 5 Hz data downloads respectively. We have continued to upgrade critical radio networks, including the San Francisco Bay Area, Anza Borrego, and Santa Barbara networks. These efforts are ongoing, but they have already significantly improved data download rates and dependability. We are also converting cell modem to radio communications whenever possible for increased reliability and cost savings. In December 2013 the 13-station Edison network expansion was completed through cost recovery contracts. These stations span coastal southern California in Orange, San Diego and Los Angeles counties including a hybrid site on the Elly oil platform. The primary purpose of the stations is to aid in the seismic source characterization of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and assess the strain field associated with the Oceanside Blind Thrust and Newport Inglewood fault. The new stations fill a gap between SCIGN and PBO. Three sites have WXT520

  9. Electromagnetic imaging the of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in central California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelock, B. D.; Constable, S.; Key, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    The continental margin of central California lies adjacent to a segment of the San Andreas fault (SAF) that exhibits a transition between locked behavior south of the town of Cholame, and freely slipping (creeping) behavior north of the town of Parkfield. Recent reports of non-volcanic tremor (NVT) near the town of Cholame represent the first observation of NVT in a strike-slip environment. Dense clusters of tremor episodes located at the northern limit of the locked section of the SAF were found to originate within the ductile lower crust at depths between 15 and 30~km, and have been interpreted as evidence of high pore fluid pressure. An excess of fluids in this region is likely given its history of subduction, which transports large quantities of water into the forearc crust and mantle. We present a study that uses deep electromagnetic imaging methods to estimate the abundance and distribution of pore fluids at depths associated with non-volcanic tremor. This study extends a previously collected terrestrial profile of magnetotelluric (MT) data (Becken et al. 2008, Geophysical Journal International) into the offshore environment. We deployed 21 seafloor instruments that collected controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) and MT data in a line extending from the coast near Morro Bay, across the continental shelf, and out onto the Pacific plate. The marine MT data results in apparent resistivity and phase estimates at periods between 1~s and 20,000~s, sufficient for probing the upper 100~km of regional conductivity. A significant coast effect, marked by asymptotic behavior in the TE mode of the MT responses, is observed at the deep water sites. This necessitates accurate bathymetry modeling when inverting. The CSEM transmitter was towed by all receivers broadcasting a compact broadband binary waveform with a 0.25~Hz fundamental frequency. The controlled-source signal is observed above the noisefloor at source-receiver offsets up to 6~km, which provides constraints

  10. 2011 Operations and Maintenance Activities in the East Region of UNAVCO's Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, T.; Feaux, K.; Kasmer, D.; Jenkins, F.; Mencin, D.

    2011-12-01

    2011 marked Year 3 of Operations and Maintenance of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). In the East Region of PBO, it was a year characterized by several major projects as well as scheduled ongoing maintenance activities. The most significant major project was a USGS/ARRA funded communications upgrade in Yellowstone National Park. This upgrade consisted of bringing 8 existing PBO stations within the Yellowstone volcanic region to near real-time communications. This work will be completed on time and in collaboration with the National Park Service. The upgrade promises to provide much faster latency for invaluable data being recorded for one of the most geodetically critical regions of the current PBO network. Another significant ongoing project in the East Region has been supporting the community that continues to use PBO data. In particular, support of Kristine Larson (Univ of CO) both in installing webcams at PBO sites for monitoring snow depth as well as supporting vegetative surveys at current PBO sites. Similarly, the East Region responded promptly to the community with requests for data quality issues that are station hardware related, including replacing GPS antennae and receivers. With regards to ongoing operations and maintenance projects, reasons for site visits in 2011 were dominated by two significant situations: battery replacement and CDMA modem swaps. 83 site visits were required as part of the Operations and Maintenance strategic battery plan of 5 year battery replacements. This proved to be a considerable challenge due to the scale and geography of the scheduled replacements- the sites were spread throughout the entire network, east to west and north to south. 20 station visits were required due to a Verizon upgrade of the older Alltel network purchased by Verizon. These stations are predominantly in the Rocky Mountain region, but often times had limited access to due weather. Overall, despite record snowfalls throughout the west, state of health

  11. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Response to the 2006 Augustine Alaskan Volcanic Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauk, B.; Feaux, K.; Jackson, M.; Friesen, B.; Enders, M.; Baldwin, A.; Fournier, K.; Marzulla, A.

    2006-12-01

    During September of 2006, UNAVCO installed five permanent Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS stations on Augustine Volcano, in the lower Cook Inlet of Alaska. The installations were done at the request of the PBO Magmatic Systems committee in response to the January 11, 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano. Prior to the eruption, PBO installed five permanent GPS stations on Augustine in 2004. The five existing stations on the volcano were instrumental in detecting precursory deformation of the volcano's flanks prior to and during the eruption. During the course of the first explosive phase of the eruption, two existing PBO stations, AV03 and AV05 were subsequently destroyed by separate pyroclastic flows. The existing station AV04 was heavily damaged by a separate pyroclastic flow during the continuous phase of the eruption and was repaired during September as well. Existing stations AV01 and AV02 were not affected or damaged by the eruption and remained operating during the entire eruptive phase and subsequent debris flows. All five new stations, and maintenance on the three remaining existing stations, were completed by PBO field crews with helicopter support provided by Maritime Helicopters. Lack of roads and drivable trails on the remote volcanic island required that all equipment be transported to each site from an established base camp by slinging gear beneath the helicopter and internal loads. Each new and existing station installed on the volcano consists of a standard short braced GPS monument, two solar panels mounted to an inclined structure, and a six foot high Plaschem enclosure with two solar panels mounted to one of the inclined sides. Each Plaschem houses 24 12 volt batteries that power a Trimble NetRS GPS receiver and one or two Intuicom radios and are recharged by the solar panels. Data from each GPS receiver is telemetered directly or through a repeater radio to a base station located in the town of Homer that transmits the data over the internet

  12. The Plate Boundary Observatory Borehole Strainmeter Program: Overview of Data Analysis and Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, K.; Anderson, G.; Hasting, M.; Hoyt, B.; Jackson, M.; Lee, E.; Matykiewicz, J.; Mencin, D.; Persson, E.; Smith, S.; Torrez, D.; Wright, J.

    2006-12-01

    The PBO borehole strainmeter network is now the largest in the US with 19 strainmeters installed along the Western US Plate Boundary: 14 in the Pacific North West and 5 in Anza, Southern California. With five drilling crews operating though October 2006 the network should grow to 28 strainmeters by December 2006. The areas include Parkfield and Mt St. Helens, PBO's first strainmeter installation in a volcanic region. PBO strainmeter sites are multi-instrumented. Seismic, pore pressure, atmospheric pressure, rainfall and temperature data are measured at almost all sites. Tiltmeters will also be installed at some sites. The strainmeters record at 20-sps, 1-sps and 10-minute interval and are downloaded hourly. The 1-sps data are sent to the NCEDC and IRIS DMC within a few minutes of being retrieved from the strainmeter. The data are archived in SEED format and can be viewed and analyzed with any SEED handling software. PBO's Borehole Strainmeter Analysis Center (BSMAC) in Socorro, NM, produces processed strain data every 10 to 14 days. The data are stored in XML format giving the user the option to use PBO edits or to work with unedited data. The XML file contains time series corrections for the atmospheric pressure, the Earth tides and borehole effects. Every 3 months the data are reviewed and the borehole trends and tidal signal are re- estimated to form the best possible processed data set. PBO reviewed the quality of the data collected by the first 8 strainmeters in a workshop in January 2006. The group discussed coring, examined the borehole trends, tidal signal, and a PSD analysis of data from each strainmeter. A second workshop, focusing on data analysis and in-situ calibration, will take place in October 2006. The UNAVCO strainmeter web page (http://pboweb.unavco.org) provides links to the raw and processed data and is a source for information on data formats, links to software and instrument documentation. An XML log file for each strainmeter provides a

  13. Active Pacific North America Plate boundary tectonics as evidenced by seismicity in the oceanic lithosphere offshore Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, Egill; Kanamori, Hiroo; Stock, Joann; Cormier, Marie-Helene; Legg, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Pacific Ocean crust west of southwest North America was formed by Cenozoic seafloor spreading between the large Pacific Plate and smaller microplates. The eastern limit of this seafloor, the continent-ocean boundary, is the fossil trench along which the microplates subducted and were mostly destroyed in Miocene time. The Pacific-North America Plate boundary motion today is concentrated on continental fault systems well to the east, and this region of oceanic crust is generally thought to be within the rigid Pacific Plate. Yet, the 2012 December 14 Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred about 275 km west of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, is evidence for continued tectonism in this oceanic part of the Pacific Plate. The preferred main shock centroid depth of 20 km was located close to the bottom of the seismogenic thickness of the young oceanic lithosphere. The focal mechanism, derived from both teleseismic P-wave inversion and W-phase analysis of the main shock waveforms, and the 12 aftershocks of M ˜3-4 are consistent with normal faulting on northeast striking nodal planes, which align with surface mapped extensional tectonic trends such as volcanic features in the region. Previous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements on offshore islands in the California Continental Borderland had detected some distributed Pacific and North America relative plate motion strain that could extend into the epicentral region. The release of this lithospheric strain along existing zones of weakness is a more likely cause of this seismicity than current thermal contraction of the oceanic lithosphere or volcanism. The main shock caused weak to moderate ground shaking in the coastal zones of southern California, USA, and Baja California, Mexico, but the tsunami was negligible.

  14. Continent-continent collision at the Pacific/Australian plate boundary: Lithospheric deformation, mountain building, and subsequent scientific endeavors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D. A.; Stern, T. A.; Davey, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Continental collision occurs at strike-slip plate boundaries where transform motion and oblique convergence create processes of surficial mountain building and deformation within the deeper crust and lithospheric mantle. The Pacific/Australian transform plate boundary in South Island, New Zealand, is characterized by active oblique continent-continent collision with an associated Southern Alps orogen that exhibits both high exhumation rates and rapid strike-slip movement. Beginning in the 1990s, this system was the focus of a decade-long collaborative USA-New Zealand multi-disciplinary study to understand lithospheric structure and processes involved in this transpression. Funded primarily by the NSF Continental Dynamics program and the New Zealand Science Foundation, this project known as SIGHT (South Island Geophysical Transect) with its companion SAPSE (Southern Alps Passive Seismic Experiment) included the following disciplines that involved substantial field observation experiments: seismic reflection, explosion refraction, onshore-offshore wide-angle reflection/refraction, regional and teleseismic passive seismology, magnetotellurics, laboratory petrophysics, gravity, regional geological investigations, and rheological analyses. More than fifty scientists and students from both nations participated in the combined set of studies that have led to over forty-five journal publications, an AGU Monograph, and a dozen graduate theses. Primary results of the project indicate the Pacific-Australian strike-slip plate boundary (Alpine fault) is not vertical but is eastward dipping and rheologically weak based on diverse geophysical data. Most deformation is within the Pacific plate that hosts the Southern Alps orogen. High mantle seismic velocities vertically disposed beneath the orogen suggest Pacific and perhaps Australian mantle lithosphere contribute to a zone of plate-boundary-parallel distributed mantle shortening. The crustal root of the overlying Southern Alps

  15. Radiocarbon evidence for extensive plate-boundary rupture about 300 years ago at the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.; Atwater, B.F.; Bobrowsky, P.T.; Bradley, L.-A.; Clague, J.J.; Carver, G.A.; Darienzo, M.E.; Grant, W.C.; Krueger, H.W.; Sparks, R.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Stuiver, M.

    1995-01-01

    THE Cascadia subduction zone, a region of converging tectonic plates along the Pacific coast of North America, has a geological history of very large plate-boundary earthquakes1,2, but no such earthquakes have struck this region since Euro-American settlement about 150 years ago. Geophysical estimates of the moment magnitudes (Mw) of the largest such earthquakes range from 8 (ref. 3).to 91/2 (ref. 4). Radiocarbon dating of earthquake-killed vegetation can set upper bounds on earthquake size by constraining the length of plate boundary that ruptured in individual earthquakes. Such dating has shown that the most recent rupture, or series of ruptures, extended at least 55 km along the Washington coast within a period of a few decades about 300 years ago5. Here we report 85 new 14C ages, which suggest that this most recent rupture (or series) extended at least 900 km between southern British Columbia and northern California. By comparing the 14C ages with written records of the past 150 years, we conclude that a single magnitude 9 earthquake, or a series of lesser earthquakes, ruptured most of the length of the Cascadia subduction zone between the late 1600s and early 1800s, and probably in the early 1700s.

  16. North America-Pacific plate boundary, an elastic-plastic megashear - Evidence from very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Steven N.

    1988-01-01

    Data obtained by Mark III VLBI measurements of radio signals from permanent and mobile VLBI sites for 5.5 years of observations, starting in October 1982, were used to derive a picture of the earth crust deformation near the North America-Pacific plate boundary. The data, which included the vector positions of the VLBI sites and their rate of change, were used for comparison with a number of lithospheric deformation models based upon the concept that the motions of points near the North America-Pacific plate boundary are a linear combination of North America and Pacific velocities. The best of these models were found to fit 95 percent of the variance in 139 VLBI length and transverse velocity observations. Instantaneous shear deformation associated with plate tectonics is apparently developing in a zone 450 km wide paralleling the San Andreas Fault; some of this deformation will be recovered through elastic rebound, while the rest will be permanently set through plastic processes. Because the VLBI data have not been collected for a significant fraction of the earthquake cycle, they cannot discriminate between elastic and plastic behaviors.

  17. Interactions between vortex generators and a flat plate boundary layer. Application to the control of separated flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriez, T.; Thiria, B.; Cambonie, T.; Wesfreid, J. E.; Aider, J. L.

    Vortex generators (VG) are among the most popular actuators for flow control. more or less interact with each other depending on many parameters like the size of the VGs or the spacing between each VG (Betterton et al. (2000); Godard ' Stanislas (2006)). From a general point of view, the 3D steady (or unsteady) perturbations induced by the VG are used to modify a boundary layer in order to control some global properties of the flow like heat transfer or aerodynamic forces (Lin (2002); Duriez et al. (2008)). One of the main difficulty in using VG is the large number of parameters the experimentalist has to choose: the type of VG (mechanical or fluidic, stationary or time-dependant), the dimensions, the spacing, the location relative to the flow to be controlled. In this paper we propose a short review describing the structures of the flows produced by two different mechanical VG (trapezoidal blades and cylinders) and continuous jets in a flat-plate boundary layer. The drawback and advantages of each of them will be underlined. The way the longitudinal structures interact with a flat plate boundary layer will also be discussed. In the case of small cylinders it will be shown that one can define new physical properties that can be helpful to choose the proper parameters in the perspective of control of flow separation.

  18. Boundary layer flow and heat transfer on a moving plate in a copper-water nanofluid using Buongiorno model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Nor Ashikin Abu; Bachok, Norfifah; Arifin, Norihan Md.

    2016-06-01

    The study of the steady two dimensional boundary layer flow of a copper (Cu)-water nanofluid on a moving plate is investigated. The assumption is the plate moves in the same or opposite direction to the free stream. The nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations using a similarity variables,then a shooting technique is used to solved it numerically. The numerical results for skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number, the local Sherwood number as well as the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are obtained. The effect of nanoparticle volume fraction, Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters on heat transfer are examined. The results show that the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number increase with increasing in the Brownian motion parameter Nb and thermophoresis parameter Nt.

  19. What can we Learn From Small Non-Recoverable Strains at Plate Boundaries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. C.; Pluhar, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    Background seismicity carries often overlooked information about how the crust responds to plate motions. Integrating focal mechanisms for background seismicity with (1) geologic observations, and (2) geodetic constraints, is critical to establishing a better understanding of both the rock record and contemporary deformation. Treating the crust as a micropolar continuum it is possible to constrain not only the orientations and relative magnitudes of the principal strains but also the vorticity of crustal blocks with respect to the large-scale continuum. We show the utility of this approach with examples from the Cascadia margin and the Coso Range (within the Eastern California shear zone). In the upper crust of the Cascadia margin, seismogenic strain appears to be dominated by accommodation of motion of the Oregon forearc block. This suggests that the shallow crust is responding to long-term motion of the Oregon forearc rather than the interseismic locking of the subduction megathrust. In the area west of Mt. Rainier, this response is marked by non-zero relative vorticity in a regime of N-S shortening and crustal thickening. To date, geologic studies necessary to evaluate the significance of this vorticity have not been completed. In contrast within the Coso Range of California, seismogenic strain at Wild Horse Mesa indicates a component of relative vorticity that is broadly consistent with paleomagnetically constrained finite rotations of the ca. 3 Ma lava flows that compose the mesa. This area is centered at a right-releasing step in the Eastern California shear zone and thus is experiencing active transtension. Stratigraphic constraints have been used to suggest that significant dextral shearing in this region initiated ca. 3.5-2 Ma. The seismogenic response to transtension is depth-dependent plane strain with crustal thinning above 5 km and horizontal dextral shearing from 5-8 km. Both structural levels indicate subhorizontal E-W maximum stretching. Relative

  20. Plate Boundary Observatory Infrastructure and Data Products in Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Barbour, K.; Lee, E.

    2005-12-01

    As one of three major components of NSF's EarthScope program, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) encourages the integration of research and education. Informing various communities about the current work of PBO and the scientific discoveries related to the use of this instrumentation has contributed to the success of PBO during the first two years of the EarthScope project. UNAVCO(PBO), IRIS (USArray), and the EarthScope project office work together to integrate Education and Outreach (E&O) opportunities into a program that is greater than the sum of its parts and yet maintains the identity of each organization. Building and maintaining the PBO website, documenting and archiving activities of PBO, providing short courses for professional development of scientists using EarthScope data, and developing higher level data products with an appropriate educational framework are a few of the activities that provide both challenges and opportunities. The internet, particularly the World Wide Web, has become the primary tool for disseminating information to various audiences. The primary goals of the PBO website are to provide current information on the progress of GPS and Strainmeter facility construction; to provide access to different levels of data products; and to facilitate networking with and among scientists. Challenges for the PBO website include publishing current stories on installation projects while coordinating with field engineers on a regular basis; providing near to real time updates and maintaining quality assurance processes; and defining personnel requirements for a maintaining a dynamic website. Currently, archived photographs, web diaries, and numerous web highlights document PBO's success and provide a visual record of PBO's accomplishments and behind-the-scene activities over the last two years. The community charged PBO with increasing the number of scientists using its data. UNAVCO does this by providing short courses for professional development

  1. EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory as the Mother of Invention (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, G.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) component of EarthScope includes a network of over 1,100 permanent, continuously operating GPS stations. After 5 years of site selection, permitting, and construction, the network was completed in 2008. Having such an unprecedented number of high quality stations in western North America has enabled us to image geology in action, as it happens, such as contemporary uplift of the Sierra Nevada, and block rotation in the Walker Lane. Yet, when PBO was in its planning stages, questions were raised as to whether GPS analysis could keep up with the flood of data, while producing results with the highest achievable accuracy. The general consensus was that the challenge would be met by a combination of innovative data processing methods together with the inevitable progress in computer speed and capacity. Various innovations made by the geodetic community over the last decade have enabled massive operational processing of GPS data with high accuracy. For example, now in 2013, the Nevada Geodetic Laboratory operationally produces position time series and quality assurance data from all ~7,000 GPS geodetic stations in the world that make data publicly available. Of these stations, 4,000 have daily time series updated the next day, and 2,000 have 5-minute time series updated within 1-2 hours of real time. The RMS precision of daily positions for well-sited stations are at the level of 1-2 mm horizontal, and 3-6 mm vertical in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For 5-minute positions, the precision is at the level of 6-12 mm horizontal, and 15-30 mm vertical. Here we review some of the innovations that have made all of this possible, which were in part driven by challenges presented by EarthScope. First of all, at the data processing level, much creative effort went into making computer processing time scale linearly with the number of GPS stations. The Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique invented in 1997 has been

  2. EarthScope: Cyberinfrastructure to access Plate Boundary Observatory data products and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M.; Boler, F. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Mencin, D.; Phillips, D. A.; Snett, L.

    2013-12-01

    The wealth of data from geodetic observing systems, especially the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), presents major data management challenges. The challenges are driven by ingenious new uses of Global Positioning System (GPS) data, demands for higher-rate, lower latency data, the need for continued access and long term preservation of archival data, the expansion of data users into other science, engineering and commercial arenas, and the growth of enhanced products that expand the utility of the data. To meet these challenges, UNAVCO has established a comprehensive suite of data services encompassing sensor network data operations, data product generation (through the activities of partners at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Central Washington University, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the University of California, San Diego - UCSD), data management, access and archiving, and advanced cyberinfrastructure. PBO sensor systems include 1,100 continuously operating GPS stations, 79 borehole geophysical sites (with a combination of strainmeters, tiltmeters, seismometers, pore pressure gauges, and meteorological sensors), and 6 long baseline strainmeters. Imaging data acquired for EarthScope include large volumes of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and airborne LiDAR data. Core data products such as daily GPS position time series and derived crustal motion velocities have been augmented with real-time data streams and positions calculated every second from 367 PBO stations. Higher rate (5 Hz) data files are available for applications such as GPS seismology. Efforts are underway with UCSD to integrate GPS and accelerometers at a subset of PBO sites to increase the reliability and capability of the observations. These observations have utility for research and hazards mitigation. Ingenious methods of GPS data analysis, developed by the University of Colorado and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, measure snow depth

  3. Estimating Fault Slip Rates and Deformation at Complex Strike-Slip Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, Wayne; Murray-Moraleda, Jessica

    2010-05-01

    initiation date of offset of geomorphic markers by faulting can introduce uncertainties much larger than quoted random errors. Second: Are rate estimates obtained by more than one geodetic or geologic method? For example, agreement between GPS and InSAR slip rate estimates on the Altyn Tagh and Haiyuan faults of Tibet make the geodetic estimates more reliable. Similarly, dating of multiple offset markers of differing age across these faults supports the consistency of the geologic rate estimates. Third: Is proposed rate change mechanism consistent with examples of changes in style and rate of deformation preserved in the geologic record? For example, temporal evolution of the multi-stranded San Andreas system during the past 5-10 Ma (Powell & Weldon 1992; Graymer et al. 2002) indicates activation and deactivation of different faults within the system accompanied by consequent changes in fault slip rate and/or creation of new crustal blocks. Fourth: Is there a quantitative analysis of mechanism proposed to explain rate change? Candidate mechanisms meriting quantitative analysis include (1) changes in frictional resistance of faults and creation of new fractures due to progressive rotation of irregularly shaped blocks, (2) episodic subduction of buoyant lithosphere, and (3) changes in the plate geometry (and so the forces acting) at major continent/ocean plate boundaries (e.g. Late Cenozoic migration of Mendocino triple junction off California). In most parts of southern California—for example, north of the San Andreas Big Bend and SE of Los Angeles--our block geometry closely resembles that assumed in previous studies (McCaffrey 2005 JGR; Meade & Hager 2005 JGR; Becker et al. 2005 GJI). In these regions GPS slip rates can be reliably estimated and values for individual faults generally agree from one study to another and are also consistent with geologic estimates. However, there is no consensus on block geometry in the Transverse Ranges, Los Angeles Basin and Central

  4. Consolidation patterns during initiation and evolution of a plate-boundary decollement zone: Northern Barbados accretionary prism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.C.; Klaus, A.; Bangs, N.L.; Bekins, B.; Bucker, C.J.; Bruckmann, W.; Erickson, S.N.; Hansen, O.; Horton, T.; Ireland, P.; Major, C.O.; Moore, Gregory F.; Peacock, S.; Saito, S.; Screaton, E.J.; Shimeld, J.W.; Stauffer, P.H.; Taymaz, T.; Teas, P.A.; Tokunaga, T.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole logs from the northern Barbados accretionary prism show that the plate-boundary decollement initiates in a low-density radiolarian claystone. With continued thrusting, the decollement zone consolidates, but in a patchy manner. The logs calibrate a three-dimensional seismic reflection image of the decollement zone and indicate which portions are of low density and enriched in fluid, and which portions have consolidated. The seismic image demonstrates that an underconsolidated patch of the decollement zone connects to a fluid-rich conduit extending down the decollement surface. Fluid migration up this conduit probably supports the open pore structure in the underconsolidated patch.

  5. Scalings for unsteady natural convection boundary layers on an evenly heated plate with time-dependent heating flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wenxian; Armfield, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    It is of fundamental significance, especially with regard to application, to fully understand the flow behavior of unsteady natural convection boundary layers on a vertical plate heated by a time-dependent heat flux. Such an understanding is currently scarce. In this paper, the scaling analysis by Lin et al. [Phys. Rev. E 79, 066313 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.066313] using a simple three-region structure for the unsteady natural convection boundary layer of a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with Pr >1 under isothermal heating was substantially extended for the case when the heating is due to a time-varying sinusoidal heat flux. A series of scalings was developed for the thermal boundary thickness, the plate temperature, the viscous boundary thicknesses, and the maximum vertical velocity within the boundary layer, which are the major parameters representing the flow behavior, in terms of the governing parameters of the flow, i.e., the Rayleigh number Ra, the Prandtl number Pr, and the dimensionless natural frequency fn of the time-varying sinusoidal heat flux, at the start-up stage, at the transition time scale which represents the ending of the start-up stage and the beginning of the transitional stage of the boundary-layer development, and at the quasi-steady stage. These scalings were validated by comparison to 10 full numerical solutions of the governing equations with Ra, Pr, and fn in the ranges 106≤Ra≤109, 3≤Pr≤100, and 0.01≤fn≤0.1 and were shown in general to provide an accurate description of the flow at different development stages, except for high-Pr runs in which a further, although weak, Pr dependence is present, which cannot be accurately predicted by the current scaling analysis using the simple three-region structure, attributed to the non-boundary-layer nature of the velocity field with high-Pr fluids. Some scalings at the transition time scale and at the quasi-steady stage also produce noticeable deviations from the numerical results when

  6. Kinematics to dynamics in the New Zealand Plate boundary zone: implications for the strength of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Simon

    2015-05-01

    New Zealand straddles the boundary between the Australian and Pacific Plate. Cenozoic relative plate motion has resulted in a complex pattern of faulting and block rotation in a zone of continental lithosphere up to 250 km wide. I investigate the implications of the short-term kinematics for the strength of the deforming lithosphere. I use a compilation of seismic reflection/refraction studies and high quality receiver function analyses to determine both the regional structure of the crust, which ranges from 20 to 50 km thick, and fields of buoyancy stress (or GPE per unit volume). Deformation over thousands of years is quantified in terms of velocity and strain rate fields, based on an inversion of neotectonic fault slip and palaeomagnetic data, in the context of the short-term relative plate motions. Forces on the subduction megathrust, as well as deviatoric stresses in the behind subduction region, are calculated from simple 2-D force balances across the Hikurangi Margin, given negligible deviatoric stresses at the along-strike transition between backarc extension and compression. Average megathrust shear stresses are in the range 6-15 MPa, and average lithospheric stresses <20 MPa in the overriding plate. The regional lithospheric strength of the plate boundary zone, assuming a viscous rheology (Newtonian or power law), is determined from an inversion of the field of gradients of buoyancy stress (averaged over either the top 25 km of the crust, or 100-km-thick lithosphere) and strain rate, using the thin sheet stress balance equations, calibrated with the subduction force balance analysis. Effective viscosities for the deforming lithosphere and/or crust are in the range 0.1-5 × 1021 Pa s, with marked weakening in zones of high strain rate, and an abrupt transition to viscosities >1022 Pa s at the margins of the rigid plates. If lateral variations in effective viscosity are only due to non-Newtonian behaviour, these data indicate a bulk power law rheology, with

  7. Neotectonic map of Syria and some aspects of Late Cenozoic evolution of the northwestern boundary zone of the Arabian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukieh, M.; Trifonov, V. G.; Dodonov, A. E.; Minini, H.; Ammar, O.; Ivanova, T. P.; Zaza, T.; Yusef, A.; Al-Shara, M.; Jobaili, Y.

    2005-09-01

    The neotectonic map of Syria, 1:500,000, was compiled by the authors in 2003-2004. The map shows tectonic features formed or continued to develop during the Neogene and Quaternary in Syria and adjacent territories, including the Mediterranean realm. The neotectonic structure of the region was formed as a result of three phases of deformation. During the Early Miocene first phase, the Arabian plate moved along the Dead Sea-Jordan segments of the Levant (Dead Sea) transform fault zone, Roum fault and its continuation in the continental slope of the Mediterranean. The chain of the coastal anticlines in the "Arabian" side of the transform zone and the Lattaqie oblique (sinistral-thrust) boundary fault zone in the north were formed under the NNW-trending compression. The Lattaqie zone continued by the Cyprus arc in the west and by the Taurus (Bitlis) thrust in the east and further by the Main Thrust of the Zagros. After "quiet" (for Syria) epoch of the Middle Miocene when the Arabian plate moved to the NE, during the Late Miocene second phase of deformation, the Arabian plate moved again to the NNW along the same transform boundary. But a part of the Late Miocene plate motion (up to 20 km) resulted by shortening in the Anti-Leban-Palmyride fold-thrust belt that separated the Aleppo block from the main part of the Arabian plate. During the Pliocene-Quaternary third phase of deformation, the recent structural pattern of the Levant zone was formed in Lebanon and the northwestern Syria. At the same time, the Serghaya and smaller sinistral faults branched out the Levant zone and the system of the W-E-trending convex to the south dextral faults ruptured the Palmyrides and the stable part of the Arabian plate. The total Pliocene-Quaternary sinistral offset on the young Levant zone segments and the associated faults has reached 35-40 km, like on the Dead Sea-Jordan segments of the Levant fault zone. The faults, demonstrating the Pliocene-Quaternary activity are still active now

  8. Structure of the tsunamigenic plate boundary and low-frequency earthquakes in the southern Ryukyu Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaiho, Yuka; Nakanishi, Ayako; Fujie, Gou; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    It has been recognized that even weakly coupled subduction zones may cause large interplate earthquakes leading to destructive tsunamis. The Ryukyu Trench is one of the best fields to study this phenomenon, since various slow earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred; yet the fault structure and seismic activity there are poorly constrained. Here we present seismological evidence from marine observation for megathrust faults and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). On the basis of passive observation we find LFEs occur at 15-18 km depths along the plate interface and their distribution seems to bridge the gap between the shallow tsunamigenic zone and the deep slow slip region. This suggests that the southern Ryukyu Trench is dominated by slow earthquakes at any depths and lacks a typical locked zone. The plate interface is overlaid by a low-velocity wedge and is accompanied by polarity reversals of seismic reflections, indicating fluids exist at various depths along the plate interface.

  9. Structure of the tsunamigenic plate boundary and low-frequency earthquakes in the southern Ryukyu Trench.

    PubMed

    Arai, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaiho, Yuka; Nakanishi, Ayako; Fujie, Gou; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-07-22

    It has been recognized that even weakly coupled subduction zones may cause large interplate earthquakes leading to destructive tsunamis. The Ryukyu Trench is one of the best fields to study this phenomenon, since various slow earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred; yet the fault structure and seismic activity there are poorly constrained. Here we present seismological evidence from marine observation for megathrust faults and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). On the basis of passive observation we find LFEs occur at 15-18 km depths along the plate interface and their distribution seems to bridge the gap between the shallow tsunamigenic zone and the deep slow slip region. This suggests that the southern Ryukyu Trench is dominated by slow earthquakes at any depths and lacks a typical locked zone. The plate interface is overlaid by a low-velocity wedge and is accompanied by polarity reversals of seismic reflections, indicating fluids exist at various depths along the plate interface.

  10. Structure of the tsunamigenic plate boundary and low-frequency earthquakes in the southern Ryukyu Trench

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaiho, Yuka; Nakanishi, Ayako; Fujie, Gou; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that even weakly coupled subduction zones may cause large interplate earthquakes leading to destructive tsunamis. The Ryukyu Trench is one of the best fields to study this phenomenon, since various slow earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred; yet the fault structure and seismic activity there are poorly constrained. Here we present seismological evidence from marine observation for megathrust faults and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). On the basis of passive observation we find LFEs occur at 15–18 km depths along the plate interface and their distribution seems to bridge the gap between the shallow tsunamigenic zone and the deep slow slip region. This suggests that the southern Ryukyu Trench is dominated by slow earthquakes at any depths and lacks a typical locked zone. The plate interface is overlaid by a low-velocity wedge and is accompanied by polarity reversals of seismic reflections, indicating fluids exist at various depths along the plate interface. PMID:27447546

  11. Effects of orientation angles on film cooling over a flat plate: Boundary layer temperature distributions and adiabatic film cooling effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, I.S.; Lee, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Presented are experimental results describing the effects of orientation angle of film cooling holes on boundary layer temperature distributions and film cooling effectiveness. Film flow data were obtained from a row of five film cooling holes on a flat test plate. The inclination angle of the hole was fixed at 35 deg and four orientation angles of 0, 30, 60, and 90 deg were investigated. The velocity ratios surveyed were 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. The boundary layer temperature distributions were measured at three downstream locations using 1 {micro}m platinum wire. Detailed adiabatic film cooling effectiveness distributions were measured using thermochromic liquid crystal. Results show that the increased lateral momentum in the case of large orientation angle injection strongly affects boundary layer temperature distributions. Temperature distribution characteristics are, in general, explained in the context of the interactions between injectant and free-stream fluid and between injectants issuing from adjacent holes. The adiabatic film cooling effectiveness distributions are discussed in connection with the boundary layer temperature distributions. Spanwise-averaged effectiveness distributions and space-averaged effectiveness distributions are also presented with respect to the velocity ratios and the orientation angles.

  12. The depth of the Lithosphere-Asthenophere boundary beneath the world oldest ocean: the Ionian plate case-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piana Agostinetti, N.; Bianchi, I.; Chiarabba, C.

    2015-12-01

    The depth of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere boundary (LAB) beneath the ocean is widely accepted to increase with the age of the oceanic plate. In particular, in the first 30-50 My, the thickness of the Lithosphere increases almost linearly to about 60-70 km, for a number of models of the LAB formation. Observations from the Pacific plate generally support this hypothesis (e.g. Schmerr, 2012). However, measures of the LAB depth beneath old oceanic plates seem to indicate an almost constant depth of about 70-80 km for oceanic plate older than 50-60 Ma (e.g. Kumar and Kawakatsu, 2011), in dis-agreement with most of the earliest LAB model (e.g. half-space cooling). In this study, we present the first measurement of the LAB depth beneath a 250Myr old ocean, the Ionian plate, obtained from the analysis of teleseismic waveforms recorded at two Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) deployed on the ocean floor. From such recordings, we compute two independent data-set of S receiver function (S-RF), a widely used tool for estimating the depth of the LAB. The S-RF data sets indicate the presence of a negative S-wave velocity discontinuity (i.e. where Vs decreases with depth) at 75 +/- 10 km depth, which is interpreted as the LAB. Insights into the evolution of the oceanic LAB during subduction are obtained by comparing the LAB depth found from the analysis of the S-RF data-sets, with the LAB depth beneath the Calabrian arc, obtained from the analysis of a huge P receiver function data-set.

  13. Discovering Plate Boundaries in Data-Integrated Environments: Preservice Teachers' Conceptualization and Implementation of Scientific Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Moore, Joel; Roig, Cara E.

    2015-01-01

    Drawn from the norms and rules of their fields, scientists use variety of practices, such as asking questions and arguing based on evidence, to engage in research that will contribute to our understanding of Earth and beyond. In this study, we explore how preservice teachers' learn to teach scientific practices while teaching plate tectonic…

  14. The transition from linear to diffuse plate boundary in the Azores-Gibraltar region: results from a thin-sheet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Munt, Ivone; Fernàndez, Manel; Torne, Montse; Bird, Peter

    2001-10-01

    We use the thin-sheet plane-stress approach to study the present-day dynamic behavior of the plate boundary between Eurasia and Africa along the Azores-Gibraltar region. This plate boundary, which extends from the Azores triple junction to the Gibraltar strait, shows a tectonic regime that changes from transtension in the west to transpression in the east, with a strike-slip motion in its central segment. Seismological data reveal that the western and central segments are currently marked by a linear series of earthquakes indicating that the plate boundary is located in a narrow zone. In contrast, the eastern segment is not so well defined and deformation spreads over a much broader area. To apply the thin-sheet approach, we combined heat flow, elevation and crustal thickness data to calculate the steady-state geotherm and the total strength of the lithosphere. Several models with different fault friction coefficients and geometries at the eastern segment of the plate boundary were tested. Results are compared with the maximum compressive stress directions from the World Stress Map, and the calculated seismic strain rates and slip vectors from earthquake data. The best fitting models are consistent with the rotation pole of Argus et al. [D.F. Argus et al., J. Geophys. Res. 94 (1989) 5585-5602], and show that the rheological behavior of the plate boundary must necessarily change from the western and central segments to the eastern segment. The diffuse character of the plate boundary east of the Gorringe Bank is dominated by the transition from oceanic to continental lithosphere, the weakness of the Alboran domain, and the convergence between the African and the Eurasian plates. The displacement of the Alboran domain relative to the African plate may play a major role in stress propagation through the Iberian Peninsula and its Atlantic margin.

  15. Using GPS, tide gauge and altimetry data to constrain subduction parameters at the Vanuatu plate boundary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballu, V.; Bouin, M.; Baillard, C.; Calmant, S.; Pelletier, B.; Crawford, W. C.; Kanas, T.; Garaebiti, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Vanuatu subduction zone, Southwest Pacific, combines several features that makes it a particularly useful place to study seismic cycles. The convergence rate is high - approximately 12 cm/yr - and the seismic cycle relatively short. Measurements of interseismic motions are helped by relatively high vertical rates, the close proximity of some islands to the plate interface and the existence of very shallow seamounts on either side of the plate interface. The Vanuatu archipelago is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire: the Australian plate subducts eastward beneath the North Fiji basin, on the western border of the Pacific Plate. High topographic features on the diving plate may contribute to locking of the plates, which can play a major role in the genesis of destructive earthquakes. GPS network points were installed in the early 1990s and the geodesy network has been densified through the years, enabling us to map interseismic horizontal and vertical deformation rates throughout the archipelago. More recently, 8 continuous GPS stations were installed, along with 3 continuous seafloor pressure gauges very near to the plate interface. We show results from GPS data collected from 1996 to 2011, that we re-processed and combined into the ITRF2008 reference frame, and altimetry and seafloor pressure data from 1999 to 2010. The GPS results show that vertical deformation rates vary both across and along the archipelago. We believe that these variations result from variable distance to the plate limit and variable locking parameters. In some areas, subsidence rates are close to one centimeter per year. In the Torres islands (at the northern end of the archipelago) where villagers face recurrent coastal flooding, we showed that this flooding is due more to ground motion than to rise in the absolute sea level, even though the sea-level rise rates are locally high and the islands uplift over the long term. In the Central area of Vanuatu, we augmented the on-land network with

  16. Coulomb stress evolution in a diffuse plate boundary: 1400 years of earthquakes in eastern California and western Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Alessandro; Carena, Sara

    2016-08-01

    Diffuse plate boundaries are characterized by deformation distributed over a wide area in a complex network of active faults and by relatively low strain rates. These characteristics make it difficult to understand the spatial and temporal distribution of seismicity. The area east of the Sierra Nevada, between longitudes 121°W and 116°W, is part of a diffuse plate boundary. At least 17 major surface-rupturing earthquakes have happened here in the last 1400 years. Our purpose is to determine whether these events influence each other or whether they are randomly distributed in time and space. We model the evolution of coseismic and postseismic Coulomb failure stress changes (ΔCFS) produced by these earthquakes, and we also model interseismic stresses on the entire fault network. Our results show that 80% of the earthquake ruptures are located in areas of combined coseismic and postseismic ΔCFS ≥ 0.2 bar. This relationship is robust, as shown by the control tests that we carried out using random earthquake sequences. We also show that the Fish Lake Valley, Pyramid Lake, and Honey Lake faults have accumulated 45, 37, and 27 bars, respectively, of total ΔCFS (i.e., coseismic + postseismic + interseismic) in the last 1400 years. Such values are comparable to the average stress drop in a major earthquake, and these three faults may be therefore close to failure.

  17. New Evidences for Preserved Segmentation of the Alpine-Tethyan Domain in the Iberia-Africa Plate Boundary Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, M.; Torne, M.; Verges, J.; Buffett, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    Based on gravity analysis and previous integrated studies combining potential fields and seismic data, we demonstrate that the Iberia-Africa plate boundary region is characterized by several tectonically inverted transtensional domains inherited from the Jurassic. Gravity data, when filtered for short wavelengths, show conspicuous positive Bouguer anomalies associated with the Gorringe Bank, the Guadalquivir Bank and the Ronda/Beni-Bousera peridotitic massifs. Gravity modelling combined with seismic and geological data shows that the filtered Bouguer anomalies are compatible with relatively high-density and shallow-buried bodies, which correspond to partly serpentinized peridotitic slices with similar densities and geometries as those proved for the Gorringe Bank. The study indicates that the Alpine convergence between Africa and Iberia since Late Cretaceous times reactivated these transtensional domains, which were less deformed westwards and thus preserved their segmentation. The interpretation of these Bouguer anomalies and their distribution substantiates the double-polarity subduction model proposed for the region, and agrees with the present-day seismically diffuse character of the Iberia-Africa plate boundary.

  18. The Plate Boundary Observatory Cascadia Network: Development and Installation of a Large Scale Real-time GPS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K. E.; Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Feaux, K.; Gallaher, W. W.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Mencin, D.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), through a NSF-ARRA supplement, has enhanced the geophysical infrastructure in in the Pacific Northwest by upgrading a total of 282 Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations to allow the collection and distribution of high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (<1 s) data streams (RT-GPS). These upgraded stations supplemented the original 100 RT-GPS stations in the PBO GPS network. The addition of the new RT-GPS sites in Cascadia should spur new volcano and earthquake research opportunities in an area of great scientific interest and high geophysical hazard. Streaming RT-GPS data will enable researchers to detect and investigate strong ground motion during large geophysical events, including a possible plate-interface earthquake, which has implications for earthquake hazard mitigation. A Mw 6.9 earthquake occurred on March 10, 2014, off the coast of northern California. As a response, UNAVCO downloaded high-rate GPS data from Plate Boundary Observatory stations within 500 km of the epicenter of the event, providing a good test of network performance.In addition to the 282 stations upgraded to real-time, 22 new meteorological instruments were added to existing PBO stations. Extensive testing of BGAN satellite communications systems has been conducted to support the Cascadia RT-GPS upgrades and the installation of three BGAN satellite fail over systems along the Cascadia margin will allow for the continuation of data flow in the event of a loss of primary communications during in a large geophysical event or other interruptions in commercial cellular networks. In summary, with these additional upgrades in the Cascadia region, the PBO RT-GPS network will increase to 420 stations. Upgrades to the UNAVCO data infrastructure included evaluation and purchase of the Trimble Pivot Platform, servers, and additional hardware for archiving the high rate data, as well as testing and implementation of GLONASS and Trimble RTX positioning on the

  19. Crustal deformation evidences for viscous coupling and fragmented lithosphere at the Nubia-Iberia plate boundary (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo; González, Pablo J.; Fernández, José

    2016-04-01

    A spatially dense crustal velocity field, based on up to 15 years of GNSS observations at more than 380 sites and extensively covering the Iberian Peninsula and Northern Africa, allow us to provide new insights into two main tectonic processes currently occurring in this area. We detected a slow large-scale clockwise rotation of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to a local pole located closely to the northwestern sector of the Pyrenean mountain range (Palano et al., 2015). Although this crustal deformation pattern could suggest a rigid rotating lithosphere block, this model would predict significant shortening along the Western (off-shore Lisbon) and North Iberian margin which cannot totally ruled out but currently is not clearly observed. Conversely, we favour the interpretation that this pattern reflects the quasi-continuous straining of the ductile lithosphere in some sectors of South and Western Iberia in response to viscous coupling of the NW Nubia and Iberian plate boundary in the Gulf of Cádiz. Furthermore, the western Mediterranean basin appears fragmented into independent crustal tectonic blocks, which delimited by inherited lithospheric shear structures and trapped within the Nubia-Eurasia collision, are currently accommodating most of the plate convergence rate. Among these blocks, an (oceanic-like western) Algerian one is currently transferring a significant fraction of the Nubia-Eurasia convergence rate into the Eastern Betics (SE Iberia) and likely causing the eastward motion of the Baleares Promontory. Most of the observed crustal ground deformation can be attributed to processes driven by spatially variable lithospheric plate forces imposed along the Nubia-Eurasia convergence boundary. Nevertheless, the observed deformation field infers a very low convergence rates as observed also at the eastern side of the western Mediterranean, along the Calabro Peloritan Arc, by space geodesy (e.g. Palano, 2015). References Palano M. (2015). On the present

  20. The Plate Boundary Observatory Cascadia Network: Development and Installation of a Large Scale Real-time GPS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K. E.; Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Dittman, T.; Feaux, K.; Gallaher, W. W.; Mattioli, G. S.; Mencin, D.; Walls, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), through a NSF-ARRA supplement, has enhanced the geophysical infrastructure in in the Pacific Northwest by upgrading 232 Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations to allow the collection and distribution of high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (<1 s) data streams (RT-GPS). These upgraded stations supplemented the original 100 RT-GPS stations in the PBO GPS network. The addition of the new RT-GPS sites in the Pacific Northwest should spur new volcano and earthquake research opportunities in an area of great scientific interest and high geophysical hazard. Streaming RT-GPS data will enable researchers to detect and investigate strong ground motion during large geophysical events, including a possible plate-interface earthquake, which has implications for earthquake hazard mitigation. A total of 282 PBO stations were upgraded and added to the UNAVCO real-time GPS system, along with addition of 22 new meteorological instruments to existing PBO stations. Extensive testing of BGAN satellite communications systems has been conducted to support the Cascadia RT-GPS upgrades and the installation of three BGAN satellite fail over systems along the Cascadia margin will allow for the continuation of data flow in the event of a loss of primary communications during in a large geophysical event or other interruptions in commercial cellular networks. In summary, with these additional upgrades in the Cascadia region, the PBO RT-GPS network will increase to 420 stations. Upgrades to UNAVCO's data infrastructure included evaluation and purchase of the Trimble Pivot Platform, servers, and additional hardware for archiving the high rate data. UNAVCO staff is working closely with the UNAVCO community to develop data standards, protocols, and a science plan for the use of RT-GPS data.

  1. Magnetized accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyvaerts, J.

    This lecture reviews in simple terms the general subject of large scale magnetic field coupling to plasma flows in the vicinity of accreting compact stars. The relevant astrophysical phenomenology is summarized. Disk interaction with the magnetosphere of accreting stars is first discussed, in particular the structure of the magnetopause, its stability and plasma ejection in so-called propeller systems. The physics of accretion/ejection is then considered. Acceleration and focusing mechanisms of jets from accretion disks around compact stars or black holes and the question of the self-consistency of accretion and ejection are described. By contrast, small scale MHD turbulence in disks is not discussed, neither are accretion columns near the polar caps of neutron stars or white dwarfs. The reader is only assumed to have some basic knowledge of astrophysics and of fluid mechanics and electromagnetism.

  2. Influence of Conducting Plate Boundary Conditions on the Transverse Envelope Equations Describing Intense Ion Beam Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Bukh, B

    2003-07-23

    In typical diagnostic applications, intense ion beams are intercepted by a conducting plate associated with devices used to measure beam phase-space projections. This results in the transverse space-charge field near the plate being shorted out, rendering simple envelope models with constant space-charge strength inaccurate. Here we develop corrected envelope models based on analytical calculations to account for this effect on the space-charge term of the envelope equations, thereby removing a systematic source of error in the equations and enabling more accurate comparisons with experiment. For common intense beam parameters, we find that the correction occurs primarily in the envelope angles and that the effect can be large enough to degrade precision beam matching. Results are verified with 3D self-consistent PIC simulations based on intense beam experiments associated with driver developments for Heavy-Ion Fusion.

  3. To accrete or not accrete, that is the question

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von, Huene R.

    1986-01-01

    Along modern convergent margins tectonic processes span a spectrum from accretion to erosion. The process of accretion is generally recognized because it leaves a geologic record, whereas the process of erosion is generally hypothetical because it produces a geologic hiatus. Major conditions that determine the dominance of accretion or erosion at modern convergent margins are: 1) rate and direction of plate convergence, 2) sediment supply and type in the trench, and 3) topography of the subducting ocean floor. Most change in structure has been ascribed to plate motion, but both erosion and accretion are observed along the same convergence margin. Thus sediment supply and topography are probably of equivalent importance to plate motion because both erosion and accretion are observed under constant conditions of plate convergence. The dominance of accretion or erosion at a margin varies with the thickness of trench sediment. In a sediment flooded trench, the proportions of subducted and accreted sediment are commonly established by the position of a decollement along a weak horizon in the sediment section. Thus, the vertical variation of sediment strength and the distribution of horizontal stress are important factors. Once deformation begins, the original sediment strength is decreased by sediment remolding and where sediment thickens rapidly, increases in pore fluid pressure can be pronounced. In sediment-starved trenches, where the relief of the subducting ocean floor is not smoothed over, the front of the margin must respond to the topography subducted as well as that accreted. The hypothesized erosion by the drag of positive features against the underside of the upper plate (a high stress environment) may alternate with erosion due to the collapse of a margin front into voids such as graben (a low stress environment). ?? 1986 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  4. Shear flow beneath oceanic plates - Local nonsimilarity boundary layers for olivine rheology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, D. A.; Tovish, A.; Schubert, G.

    1978-01-01

    The principle of local similarity, which has been used to model the two-dimensional boundary layers in the oceanic upper mantle, permits calculation of the temperature, velocity, and stress fields with essentially analytic techniques. Finite difference numerical methods are hard pressed to resolve the detail required by the large variation of viscosity between the lithosphere and the asthenosphere. In this paper the local similarity approximation has been justified by quantitatively evaluating the effect of nonsimilarity due to viscous heating, nonlinear temperature- and pressure-dependent rheology, buoyancy, adiabatic cooling, etc. Nonsimilar effects produce only small modifications of the locally similar boundary layers; important geophysical observables such as surface heat flux and ocean floor topography are given to better than 10 percent by the locally similar solution. A posteriori evaluations of the terms neglected in the boundary layer simplification of the complete equations have been conducted on the locally similar temperature and velocity profiles close to the spreading ridge. The boundary layer models are valid to depths of 100 km at 3 m.y. and 10 km at 0.3 m.y.

  5. Models of the Evolution of Finite Strain at Strike-Slip Plate Boundaries and Potential Implications for Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, I.; Roy, M.

    2014-12-01

    While we are aware of the extent and distribution of strain at the surface near the Pacific-North America plate boundary at the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system in California, at depth, our understanding is poor. Recent seismic observations suggest a narrow shear zone throughout the lithosphere corresponding to the narrow plate boundary at the surface. Surrounding the SAF in California, measurements of seismic anisotropy demonstrate orientations which vary depending on the location relative to the fault. Specifically, in northern California, the orientations align along the fault in its proximity, and in the east-west direction elsewhere. We investigate how the finite-strain ellipsoid (FSE) evolves for tracers in a 3D model of the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath the SAF. The top surface of the mesh has a right-lateral strike-slip velocity boundary condition, and the bottom, a uniform asthenospheric flow velocity condition perpendicular to the strike-slip fault. We calculate the orientations of the FSE for various ratios of strike-slip to asthenospheric velocity and viscosity stratification. The two classes of models which we investigate simulate an asthenospheric channel beneath a uniform-thickness lithosphere and a variable-depth lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). In an isoviscous fluid beneath a uniform-thickness lithosphere, strain rates, and thus FSE orientations, are constant throughout the channel, dependent on the ratio of the velocities but not the viscosity. For a two-layered asthenospheric channel of a higher-viscosity layer overlying a lower-viscosity layer, FSE orientations align with the strike-slip boundary in the upper layer and the drag in the lower layer. When we emulate a lithosphere of variable thickness across the fault by increasing the viscosity of the upper layer, we observe asymmetric FSE orientations across the step in the LAB. The direction of lithospheric thickening across the strike-slip fault govern these orientations

  6. The Turbulent Boundary Layer Near the Air-Water Interface on a Surface-Piercing Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washuta, Nathan; Masnadi, Naeem; Duncan, James H.

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent fluctuations in the vicinity of the water free surface along a flat, vertically oriented surface-piercing plate are studied experimentally using a laboratory-scale experiment. In this experiment, a meter-wide stainless steel belt travels horizontally in a loop around two rollers with vertically oriented axes, which are separated by 7.5 meters. This belt device is mounted inside a large water tank with the water level set just below the top edge of the belt. The belt, rollers, and supporting frame are contained within a sheet metal box to keep the device dry except for one 6-meter-long straight test section between rollers. The belt is launched from rest with a 3- g acceleration in order to quickly reach steady state velocity. This creates a temporally evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially evolving boundary layer created along a flat-sided ship moving at the same velocity, with a length equivalent to the length of belt that has passed the measurement region since the belt motion began. Cinematic Stereo PIV measurements are performed in planes parallel to the free surface by imaging the flow from underneath the tank in order to study the modification of the boundary layer flow field due to the effects of the water free surface. The support of the Office of Naval Research under grant N000141110029 is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. A novel floor plate boundary defined by adjacent En1 and Dbx1 microdomains distinguishes midbrain dopamine and hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Navid; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2017-03-01

    The mesodiencephalic floor plate (mdFP) is the source of diverse neuron types. Yet, how this structure is compartmentalized has not been clearly elucidated. Here, we identify a novel boundary subdividing the mdFP into two microdomains, defined by engrailed 1 (En1) and developing brain homeobox 1 (Dbx1). Utilizing simultaneous dual and intersectional fate mapping, we demonstrate that this boundary is precisely formed with minimal overlap between En1 and Dbx1 microdomains, unlike many other boundaries. We show that the En1 microdomain gives rise to dopaminergic (DA) neurons, whereas the Dbx1 microdomain gives rise to subthalamic (STN), premammillary (PM) and posterior hypothalamic (PH) populations. To determine whether En1 is sufficient to induce DA neuron production beyond its normal limit, we generated a mouse strain that expresses En1 in the Dbx1 microdomain. In mutants, we observed ectopic production of DA neurons derived from the Dbx1 microdomain, at the expense of STN and PM populations. Our findings provide new insights into subdivisions in the mdFP, and will impact current strategies for the conversion of stem cells into DA neurons.

  8. "Discovering Plate Boundaries in Data-Rich Environments": Supporting Pre-service Teachers involvement in Unique Practices of Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, A. S.; Moore, J.

    2012-12-01

    plate tectonics using key scientific practices. As a result of the educational activities developed in this project, we will try help teachers to overcome their challenges and develop the pedagogical skills that novice teachers need to use to teach plate tectonics by focusing on key scientific practices with the help of previously-developed educational resources. Learning about the processes that occur at plate boundaries will help future teachers (and their students) understand natural disasters such as earthquakes and volcanoes. Furthermore, the study will have a significant, and broader, impact by 'teaching the teachers' and empowering novice teachers to overcome the challenges of reading maps and using argumentation in science classrooms.

  9. The Krafla Magmatic and Tectonic Episode of 1974-1989 at the Divergent Plate Boundary in North Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einarsson, P.; Brandsdottir, B.

    2006-12-01

    The Krafla rifting episode was a sequence of magmatic and tectonic events along the plate boundary in N- Iceland, beginning in 1974 with increased seismicity within the Krafla caldera and lasting until 1989 when inflation of the caldera stopped. The activity was confined to the Krafla volcanic system and adjacent transform zone. The volcanic system consists of a central volcano with associated rift zones that extend for about 100 km along the plate boundary, perpendicular to the plate separation vector. A localized crustal magma chamber has been identified at about 3 km depth within the caldera, both by seismic methods and geodetic location of a source of variable pressure. The chamber sits on top of a 30 km wide intrusive dome extending from the base of the crust at 19 km depth. During most of the episode, magma ascending from depth accumulated in the magma chamber. The inflation periods were punctuated by sudden deflation events lasting from several hours to 3 months when the walls of the chamber were breeched and magma was injected into the adjacent rift zones. A total of about 20 discrete rifting events were identified, each one affecting only a portion of the plate boundary. The course of events was similar in all events, beginning with subsidence and spasmodic tremor in the caldera, followed by earthquakes that migrated away from the caldera into the rift zone. Subsidence within the Krafla caldera was concurrent with rifting. Large-scale extension with surface faulting correlated with regions of intensive seismicity. The rift zone earthquakes stopped at the same time as the deflation of the caldera. Re-inflation of the caldera began immediately following each deflation and rifting event. The rate of re-inflation was highest in the beginning, but gradually diminished with time. This indicates that the pressure difference driving the magma flow to the inflating magma chamber from the reservoir feeding it is highest in the beginning, then diminishing as the

  10. Water Release from Cold Serpentinized Forearc Mantle During Subduction Associated with Changes in Incoming Oceanic Plate Thermal Structure and Plate Boundary Kinematics: New Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    Kirby, Wang, and Brocher (Earth Planets and Space, 2014) recently showed how the change in kinematics of the California margin from subduction motion to continental transform motion with the birth and growth of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) beginning at about 33 Ma BP likely led to a warming of the former forearc mantle and the release of water by serpentinite dehydration. Such discharges from serpentinized mantle increase fluid pressures along the SAFS under the Coast Ranges and this gives insights into both the low sliding resistance for the SAFS and the mobilization and ascent of some serpentinized mantle peridotites through the crust. Thermal modeling by others has also shown that changes in the incoming plate age and subduction rate can also lead to warming of the forearc mantle during subduction. This development gives insights into the Mesozoic and Paleogene ages of emplacement of some, but not all, California serpentinites. Recent mineralogical and geochemical observations of serpentinized blocks in serpentinize mélange bodies in the San Francisco Bay Area (Uno and Kirby, 2015; Lewis and Kirby, 2015, this session) suggest that these rocks sustained multiple stages of serpentinization that are broadly consistent with the model of Kirby et al. (2014). Previous studies of localized late-stage silica-carbonate-water alteration of serpentinite bodies in California by carbonated water suggest that this alteration occurred largely in Neogene time when the highest rate of water release from the former forearc mantle probably happened. I also suggest that the occurrence of serpentinite belts emplaced in Cenozoic time during changing plate-boundary kinematics, such as the Cenozoic closing of the Tethys Ocean bordering Eurasia and arc reversal and decreasing convergence rates under the Greater Antilles, may give insights into the serpentinite belts in those regions.

  11. Hypersonic Laminar Boundary Layer Velocimetry with Discrete Roughness on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Watkins, A. Neal; Jones, Stephen B.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Ivey, Christopher B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Laminar boundary layer velocity measurements are made on a 10-degree half-angle wedge in a Mach 10 flow. Two types of discrete boundary layer trips were used to perturb the boundary layer gas. The first was a 2-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylindrical trip. The second was a scaled version of the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Detailed Test Objective (DTO) trip. Both 1-mm and 2.5-mm tall BLT DTO trips were tested. Additionally, side-view and plan-view axial boundary layer velocity measurements were made in the absence of these tripping devices. The free-stream unit Reynolds numbers tested for the cylindrical trips were 1.7x10(exp 6)/m and 3.3x10(exp 6)/m. The free-stream unit Reynolds number tested for the BLT DTO trips was 1.7x10(exp 6)/m. The angle of attack was kept at approximately 5-degrees for most of the tests resulting in a Mach number of approximately 8.3. These combinations of unit Reynolds numbers and angle of attack resulted in laminar flowfields. To study the precision of the measurement technique, the angle of attack was varied during one run. Nitric-oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) was used to obtain averaged axial velocity values and associated uncertainties. These uncertainties are as low as 20 m/s. An interline, progressive scan CCD camera was used to obtain separate images of the initial reference and shifted NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond sequential acquisition of both images. The maximum planar spatial resolution achieved for the side-view velocity measurements was 0.07-mm in the wall-normal direction by 1.45-mm in the streamwise direction with a spatial depth of 0.5-mm. For the plan-view measurements, the maximum planar spatial resolution in the spanwise and streamwise directions was 0.69-mm by 1.28-mm, respectively, with a spatial depth of 0.5-mm. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) measurements are provided to compliment the velocity data and to provide further

  12. Evidence of phosphorous segregation in grain boundaries in electroless-plated Co-P thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hono, K.; Laughlin, D. E.

    1989-08-01

    Co thin films prepared by an electroless deposition technique were analyzed by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy in the transmission electron microscope. The overall composition of the deposited film was determined to be approximately Co-4.1 wt%P (Co-7.5 at%P). The spectra taken from the center of the individual grains did not show any evidence of phosphorous. However, when the electron beam was located at the triple point of grain boundaries, a phosphorous peak was detected. Thus, this establishes that the grains are essentially pure Co and that the phosphorous is significantly segregated to the grain boundaries. This may be the cause of the magnetic isolation of the grains.

  13. Isla Guadalupe, a Plate Boundary Observatory Remote GPS System: What's Next in PBO-Mexico?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Garcia, J.

    2003-12-01

    As a join project between scientific and technical personnel from Southern California Integrated GPS Network, the University NAVSTAR Consortium, Nanometrics Inc, and CICESE, we installed a VSAT remote communications on Isla Guadalupe in support of data telemetry from a cluster of GPS, meteorological and seismic instrumentation. This Mexican island located between 28\\deg53' and 29\\deg 11'N and 118\\deg 13' to 118\\deg 22'W, lies too far from the main land to allow regular radio link. The station now in operation (GUAX) is near of the early GEOMEX site (GUAD), which recent GPS survey mode result show, is fully located on the Pacific plate within the prediction (1 mm/yr N and 2 mm/yr E) of both the geophysical (NNR-NUVEL1-A) and geodetic (ITRF2000) Plate Tectonic models. Thus, GUAX serve as an important clue to accurately monitor the plate's motion, as well as a reference for studies of California Borderland deformation. During the last 5 years we have built two more sites in northern Baja California: SPMX (1998) and CORX (2000); these together with the IGS station in Ensenada (CICE established in 1995 and replaced by CIC1 in 1999), became part of SCIGN-SOPAC (http://sopac.ucsd.edu, www.scign.org). In Mexico the major organizations working with GPS are INEGI (15 sites) and UNAM (different groups: 20-25 sites). Other State Universities and agencies are increasingly using permanent GPS stations for diverse purposes. It seems that in order to achieve our commitment for PBO-Mexico we must to follow the PGGA/SCIGN/CSRC waybill.

  14. Crustal movements at a divergent plate boundary: interplay between volcano deformation, geothermal processes, and plate spreading in the Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland since 2008.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Vincent; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Ofeigsson, Benedikt G.; Sturkell, Erik; Islam, Tariqul

    2014-05-01

    Iceland is a subaerial part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, where the divergent plate boundary between the North-American and Eurasian Plates can be studied. The Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) of Iceland, comprised of several volcanic systems, is particularly well suited to study interplay between volcanoes, geothermal areas and plate spreading, as the zone is relatively simple and accommodates the full spreading of the plates (18.6 mm/yr in a direction of 105 degrees according to NUVEL-1A predictions). The most recent volcanic activity in the area was the Krafla rifting episode (1975-1984). In 2007-2008 two intrusive events were detected: one in Upptypingar and the other in Þeistareykir. Extensive crustal deformation studies have been carried out in the NVZ; we report the results of recent GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) studies focusing on Krafla, Þeistareykir and Askja volcanic systems in the NVZ. An extensive GPS survey was undertaken in 2013, with over 135 stations occupied. This data was evaluated in conjunction with data acquired since 2008, to generate a velocity field spanning this entire time period. In addition to an existing continuous GPS (cGPS) station, three cGPS stations were installed in the area in 2011-2012. The 2008-2013 GPS velocities were compared to earlier GPS results, and complementary analysis of InSAR images was undertaken. Earlier studies have shown that the Krafla caldera underwent uplift during 1984-1989, followed by subsidence. Since 1995, the maximum subsidence in Krafla has shifted from directly above the shallow magma chamber towards an array of boreholes (geothermal exploitation) in Leirbotnar. Similar subsidence has been observed around another array of boreholes in Bjarnaflag, 7 km further south. The most significant signal on the velocities calculated from campaign GPS data over the 5 year period, is plate spreading with an E-W velocity of about 12 mm/yr over a 30 km wide area. However it also shows an

  15. Transients in Pacific/North American Plate Boundary Deformation: Synthesis and Modeling of GPS and Borehole Strain Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Frey, H. V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is the Final Technical Report on research conducted between 1 June 1997 and 14 September 2001 entitled "Transients in Pacific/North American plate boundary deformation: Synthesis and modeling of GPS and borehole strain observations." As the project title implies, our effort involved a geodetic study of strain transients, i.e., temporal variations in deformation rates, that occur within plate boundary zones and their relationship to earthquakes and plate motions. Important transients occur during and following large earthquakes, and there are also strain transients not apparently associated with earthquakes. A particularly intriguing class of transients, for which there is a modest but growing list of examples, are preseismic anomalies. Such earthquake precursors, if further documented and understood, would have obvious importance for earthquake hazard mitigation. Because the timescales for these diverse transients range over at least 6 orders of magnitude (minutes to years), no single geodetic technique is optimum. We therefore undertook a systematic synthesis of Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) and borehole strainmeter data in three areas in California where there are adequate numbers of both types of instruments (or their equivalent): the San Francisco Bay region (within the Bay Area Regional Deformation network), southern California (within the Southern California Integrated GPS Network), and Parkfield (where a two-color laser system provides a proxy for continuous GPS measurements). An integral component of our study was the elucidation of the physical mechanisms by which such transients occur and propagate. We therefore initiated the development of multiple forward models, using two independent approaches. In the first, we explored the response to specified earthquake slip in viscoelastic models that incorporated failure criteria and the geometry of major faults in California. In the second approach, we examined the dynamical response of a complex

  16. A 2-D tomographic model of the Juan de Fuca plate from accretion at axial seamount to subduction at the Cascadia margin from an active source ocean bottom seismometer survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horning, G.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Han, S.; Carton, H.; Nedimović, M. R.; Keken, P. E.

    2016-08-01

    We report results from a wide-angle controlled source seismic experiment across the Juan de Fuca plate designed to investigate the evolution of the plate from accretion at the Juan de Fuca ridge to subduction at the Cascadia margin. A two-dimensional velocity model of the crust and upper mantle is derived from a joint reflection-refraction traveltime inversion. To interpret our tomography results, we first generate a plausible baseline velocity model, assuming a plate cooling model and realistic oceanic lithologies. We then use an effective medium theory to infer from our tomography results the extent of porosity, alteration, and water content that would be required to explain the departure from the baseline model. In crust of ages >1 Ma and away from propagator wakes and regions of faulting due to plate bending, we obtain estimates of upper crustal hydration of 0.5-2.1 wt % and find mostly dry lower crust and upper mantle. In sections of the crust affected by propagator wakes we find upper estimates of upper crustal, lower crustal, and upper mantle hydration of 3.1, 0.8, and 1.8 wt %, respectively. At the Cascadia deformation front, we find that the amount of water stored at uppermost mantle levels in the downgoing JdF plate is very limited (<0.3 wt %), with most of the water carried into the subduction zone being stored in the oceanic crust.

  17. Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow over a Moving Vertical Flat Plate in an External Fluid Flow with Viscous Dissipation Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bachok, Norfifah; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2013-01-01

    The steady boundary layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid over a moving vertical flat plate in an external moving fluid with viscous dissipation is theoretically investigated. Using appropriate similarity variables, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a system of ordinary (similarity) differential equations, which is then solved numerically using a Maple software. Results for the skin friction or shear stress coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the set of the similarity equations has unique solutions, dual solutions or no solutions, depending on the values of the mixed convection parameter, the velocity ratio parameter and the Eckert number. The Eckert number significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface. PMID:23577156

  18. Band gaps of lamb waves in one-dimensional piezoelectric composite plates: effect of substrate and boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xin-Ye; Liang, Bin; Chen, Qian; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2009-02-01

    We theoretically study the band structures of Lamb waves in one-dimensional phononic crystal plates consisting of piezoelectric ceramics placed periodically in epoxy with epoxy or piezoelectric ceramic substrate by the virtual plane wave expansion method. The dependences of the widths and starting frequencies of first band gaps (FBG) on the substrate's thickness, the filling fraction, and the lattice spacing are calculated for different materials of substrate under different electric boundary conditions, i.e., short circuit (SC) and open circuit (OC). The FBG width decreases gradually as the substrate's thickness increases and the FBG starting frequency increases progressively as the thickness increases on the whole. The FBG widths and starting frequencies with SC are always larger than with OC. Our research shows that it is possible to control the width and starting frequency of the FBG in the engineering according to need by choosing suitable values of the substrate's thickness, the filling fraction, and the lattice spacing.

  19. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a moving vertical flat plate in an external fluid flow with viscous dissipation effect.

    PubMed

    Bachok, Norfifah; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2013-01-01

    The steady boundary layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid over a moving vertical flat plate in an external moving fluid with viscous dissipation is theoretically investigated. Using appropriate similarity variables, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a system of ordinary (similarity) differential equations, which is then solved numerically using a Maple software. Results for the skin friction or shear stress coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the set of the similarity equations has unique solutions, dual solutions or no solutions, depending on the values of the mixed convection parameter, the velocity ratio parameter and the Eckert number. The Eckert number significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface.

  20. Double Diffusive Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Mixed Convective Slip Flow along a Radiating Moving Vertical Flat Plate with Convective Boundary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mohammad M.; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J.; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, , local Nusselt number, , and local Sherwood number are shown and explained through tables. PMID:25343360

  1. Fluctuating pressures measured beneath a high-temperature, turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate at Mach number of 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Albertson, Cindy W.

    1989-01-01

    Fluctuating pressures were measured beneath a Mach 5, turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with an array of piezoresistive sensors. The data were obtained with a digital signal acquisition system during a test run of 4 seconds. Data sampling rate was such that frequency analysis up to 62.5 kHz could be performed. To assess in situ frequency response of the sensors, a specially designed waveguide calibration system was employed to measure transfer functions of all sensors and related instrumentation. Pressure time histories were approximated well by a Gaussian prohibiting distribution. Pressure spectra were very repeatable over the array span of 76 mm. Total rms pressures ranged from 0.0017 to 0.0046 of the freestream dynamic pressure. Streamwise, space-time correlations exhibited expected decaying behavior of a turbulence generated pressure field. Average convection speed was 0.87 of freestream velocity. The trendless behavior with sensor separation indicated possible systematic errors.

  2. Imaging the plate boundary between Greenland and North America within the Kane Basin by means of geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, Axel; Schnabel, Michael; Damm, Volkmar; Piepjohn, Karsten

    2016-08-01

    The Nares Strait is a waterway separating NW Greenland and North America. The nature of the Nares Strait has been subject of discussion for decades, especially if it represents a transform fault that compensated the opening of the Baffin Bay in the Paleogene as Alfred Wegener supposed in 1912. The Kane Basin in the central part of Nares Strait provides an opportunity to cross the proposed fault. Geophysical data were acquired in 2001 and 2010, including among others multichannel and wide-angle seismic data. The eastern part of the Kane Basin is characterized by a solid platform most likely representing a continuation of the Paleoproterozoic Inglefield-Mobile-Belt (Greenland). In the western part, a sedimentary basin with northwestward tilted and eroded layers of Cretaceous age can be resolved. The transition between those two units shows the plate boundary between Greenland and North America and can be considered as a relic of the Wegener Fault.

  3. Double diffusive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convective slip flow along a radiating moving vertical flat plate with convective boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Mohammad M; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, [Formula: see text], local Nusselt number, [Formula: see text], and local Sherwood number [Formula: see text] are shown and explained through tables.

  4. Wide-angle seismic constraints on the evolution of the deep San Andreas plate boundary by Mendocino triple junction migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hole, J.A.; Beaudoin, B.C.; Henstock, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Recent wide-angle seismic observations that constrain the existence and structure of a mafic layer in the lower crust place strong constraints on the evolution of the San Andreas plate boundary system in northern and central California. Northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction and the subducted Juan de Fuca lithospheric slab creates a gap under the continent in the new strike-slip system. This gap must be filled by either asthenospheric upwelling or a northward migrating slab attached to the Pacific plate. Both processes emplace a mafic layer, either magmatic underplating or oceanic crust, beneath the California Coast Ranges. A slab of oceanic lithosphere attached to the Pacific plate is inconsistent with the seismic observation that the strike-slip faults cut through the mafic layer to the mantle, detaching the layer from the Pacific plate. The layer could only be attached to the Pacific plate if large vertical offsets and other complex structures observed beneath several strike-slip faults are original oceanic structures that are not caused by the faults. Otherwise, if oceanic slabs exist beneath California, they do not migrate north to fill the growing slab gap. The extreme heat pulse created by asthenospheric upwelling is inconsistent with several constraints from the seismic data, including a shallower depth to the slab gap than is predicted by heat flow models, seismic velocity and structure that are inconsistent with melting or metamorphism of the overlying silicic crust, and a high seismic velocity in the upper mantle. Yet either the Pacific slab model or the asthenospheric upwelling model must be correct. While the mafic material in the lower crust could have been emplaced prior to triple junction migration, the deeper slab gap must still be filled. A preexisting mafic layer does not reduce the inconsistencies of the Pacific slab model. Such material could, however, compensate for the decrease in mafic magma that would be produced if

  5. Setting appropriate boundaries: fate, patterning and competence at the neural plate border.

    PubMed

    Groves, Andrew K; LaBonne, Carole

    2014-05-01

    The neural crest and craniofacial placodes are two distinct progenitor populations that arise at the border of the vertebrate neural plate. This border region develops through a series of inductive interactions that begins before gastrulation and progressively divide embryonic ectoderm into neural and non-neural regions, followed by the emergence of neural crest and placodal progenitors. In this review, we describe how a limited repertoire of inductive signals-principally FGFs, Wnts and BMPs-set up domains of transcription factors in the border region which establish these progenitor territories by both cross-inhibitory and cross-autoregulatory interactions. The gradual assembly of different cohorts of transcription factors that results from these interactions is one mechanism to provide the competence to respond to inductive signals in different ways, ultimately generating the neural crest and cranial placodes.

  6. Hydrodynamic and hydroelastic analyses of a plate excited by the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappi, E.; Magionesi, F.; de Rosa, S.; Franco, F.

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the characterisation of wall-pressure fluctuations for surface ships is of great interest not only for military applications but also for civil marine vehicles. A ship model towed in a towing tank is used to perform pressure and structural measurements at high Reynolds numbers. This facility provides ideal flow conditions because background turbulence and noise are almost absent. Free surface effects are naturally included in the analysis, although in the particular section chosen for the present study do not have significant consequences on pressure spectra. Scaling laws for the power spectral density are identified providing the possibility to estimate pressure spectra for different flow conditions and in particular for full-scale applications. The range of validity of some theoretical models for the cross-spectral density representation is analysed by direct comparison with experimental data of wall-pressure fluctuations measured in streamwise and spanwise direction. In a second phase, an indirect validation is performed by comparing the measured vibrational response of an elastic plate inserted in the catamaran hull with that obtained numerically using, as a forcing function, the modelled pressure load. In general, marine structures are able to accept energy mainly from the sub-convective components of the pressure field because the typical bending wavenumber values are usually lower than the convective one; thus, a model that gives an accurate description of the phenomenon at low wavenumbers is needed. In this work, it is shown that the use of the Chase model for the description of the pressure field provides a satisfactory agreement between the numerical and the experimental response of the hull plate. These experimental data, although acquired at model scale, represent a significant test case also for the real ship problem.

  7. Discovering Plate Boundaries in Data-integrated Environments: Preservice Teachers' Conceptualization and Implementation of Scientific Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Moore, Joel; Roig, Cara E.

    2015-08-01

    Drawn from the norms and rules of their fields, scientists use variety of practices, such as asking questions and arguing based on evidence, to engage in research that will contribute to our understanding of Earth and beyond. In this study, we explore how preservice teachers' learn to teach scientific practices while teaching plate tectonic theory. In particular, our aim is to observe which scientific practices preservice teachers use while teaching an earth science unit, how do they integrate these practices into their lessons, and what challenges do they face during their first time teaching of an earth science content area integrated with scientific practices. The study is designed as a qualitative, exploratory case study of seven preservice teachers while they were learning to teach plate tectonic theory to a group of middle school students. The data were driven from the video records and artifacts of the preservice teachers' learning and teaching processes as well as written reflections on the teaching. Intertextual discourse analysis was used to understand what scientific practices preservice teachers choose to integrate into their teaching experience. Our results showed that preservice teachers chose to focus on four aspects of scientific practices: (1) employing historical understanding of how the theory emerged, (2) encouraging the use of evidence to build up a theory, (3) observation and interpretation of data maps, and (4) collaborative practices in making up the theory. For each of these practices, we also looked at the common challenges faced by preservice teachers by using constant comparative analysis. We observed the practices that preservice teachers decided to use and the challenges they faced, which were determined by what might have come as in their personal history as learners. Therefore, in order to strengthen preservice teachers' background, college courses should be arranged to teach important scientific ideas through scientific practices

  8. Deformations along the Caribbean - South American Plate Boundary From Nine Years Repeated GPS Observations in the CASA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, H.; Kaniuth, K.; Stuber, K.; Tremel, H.; Hernandez, J. N.; Hoyer, M.

    2002-05-01

    The first GPS observations along the Caribbean - South American plate boundary were carried out within the Central and South American Geodynamics Project (CASA UNO) in 1988. The precision of the results was quite poor due to the imperfect operation of the GPS system at that time. Since 1993 regular re-measurements of more than 20 stations in the eastern part of the network along the Bocono - El Pilar fault system in Venezuela have been performed. The paper presents the continuous deformations derived from the 1993, 1996, 1999 and 2002 complete network observations and some additional partial measurements. The long-term deformations in the order of one to two centimeters per year are now significantly confirmed and may be interpreted in the context of regional plate tectonics and geodynamics. The co-seismic displacements during the Cariaco (Sucre) 1997 earthquake are analyzed separately using detailed GPS observations in 1997. They are discussed as well as the local post-seismic deformations from 1997 to 2002.

  9. Plate Boundary Observatory Nucleus Education and Outreach: Bringing GPS and Data- Rich Activities Into College and Secondary Earth Science Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, B.; Eriksson, S. C.

    2006-05-01

    Incorporating scientific data into the curriculum provides students with insight into elements of the scientific process such as developing questions and hypotheses, understanding how data are collected, evaluating data quality and limitations, and formulating conclusions based on scientific results (Manduca et al., 2003.) UNAVCO, a geodetic consortium and co-administrator of the Plate Boundary Observatory Nucleus project, seeks to increase public appreciation and understanding of Earth deformation processes and their societal relevance through education and outreach. To that end, we are developing place-based instructional materials for college and secondary Earth science classrooms in which GPS data are used to teach students about plate tectonics. To assess the needs of our users, we conducted interviews with college geoscience faculty from a variety of institution types and focus groups with secondary Earth science teachers to solicit feedback on the types of educational materials that they would likely use in their classrooms. We are engaging members of the scientific and educational communities to develop the materials and are catering the modules to accommodate diverse groups of learners and learning styles. In addition, we have completed and scheduled several professional development opportunities on the local and national levels for college and university faculty and secondary teachers and have created a new education and outreach website. Our education programs are being assessed by an external evaluator. We will present interview and focus group results, report on the status of our education programs, and discuss upcoming UNAVCO education activities.

  10. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  11. Accretion and Subduction of Oceanic Lithosphere: 2D and 3D Seismic Studies of Off-Axis Magma Lenses at East Pacific Rise 9°37-40'N Area and Downgoing Juan de Fuca Plate at Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuoshuo

    Two thirds of the Earth's lithosphere is covered by the ocean. The oceanic lithosphere is formed at mid-ocean ridges, evolves and interacts with the overlying ocean for millions of years, and is eventually consumed at subduction zones. In this thesis, I use 2D and 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the accretionary and hydrothermal process on the ridge flank of the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 9°37-40'N and the structure of the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate at the Cascadia subduction zone offshore Oregon and Washington. Using 3D multichannel seismic (MCS) data, I image a series of off-axis magma lenses (OAML) in the middle or lower crust, 2-10 km from the ridge axis at EPR 9°37-40'N. The large OAMLs are associated with Moho travel time anomalies and local volcanic edifices above them, indicating off-axis magmatism contributes to crustal accretion though both intrusion and eruption (Chapter 1). To assess the effect of OAMLs on the upper crustal structure, I conduct 2-D travel time tomography on downward continued MCS data along two across-axis lines above a prominent OAML in our study area. I find higher upper crustal velocity in a region ~ 2 km wide above this OAML compared with the surrounding crust. I attribute these local anomalies to enhanced precipitation of alteration minerals in the pore space of upper crust associated with high-temperature off-axis hydrothermal circulation driven by the OAML (Chapter 2). At Cascadia, a young and hot end-member of the global subduction system, the state of hydration of the downgoing Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate is important to a number of subduction processes, yet is poorly known. As local zones of higher porosity and permeability, faults constitute primary conduits for seawater to enter the crust and potentially uppermost mantle. From pre-stack time migrated MCS images, I observe pervasive faulting in the sediment section up to 200 km from the deformation front. Yet faults with large throw and

  12. Oceanic terranes of S-Central America - 200 Million years of accretion history recorded on the W-edge of the Caribbean Plate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, P. O.; Flores, K.; Bandini, A.; Buchs, D.; Andjic, G.; Baumgartner-Mora, C.

    2012-04-01

    The W-edge of the Caribbean Plate is characterized by two major basement domains, separated today by a SW-NE trending diffuse fault zone located SE of the Nicoya Peninsula (Costa Rica) and possibly connecting with the Hess Escarpment. To the NW, in the area originally called "Chortis Block", oceanic island/arc basements range in age from Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous and form a complicated puzzle of geodynamic units. To the SE of this fault line, no age older than Turonian-Santonian (90-85 Ma) is known. This area only represents the trailing edge of the Caribbean Large Igensous Procince (CLIP). The Mesquito Composite Oceanic Terrane (MCOT) comprises the southern half of the "Chortis Block", classically considered as a continental fragment of N-America. The MCOT is defined by isolated outcrops of ultramafic, mafic oceanic/arc rocks, and radiolarites of Late Triassic, Jurassic and Early Cretaceous age: Rhaetian (latest Triassic) radiolarites found in the El Castillo Mélange (S-MCOT: S-Nicaragua/N- Costa Rica). They are associated with blocks of OIB-metabasalts. These rocks document the presence of a Late Triassic oceanic basement that must have been the substrate of the 174 -177 Ma old (Early/Middle Jurassic) Petit-Spot-like alkaline volcanics that intruded Early Jurassic radiolarites. These rocks form tectonic slivers in the middle Cretaceous Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex (relative autochthonous of the Santa Elena ultramafic unit, N-Costa Rica). The oldest rocks of the Nicoya Complex s. str. (NW-Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica) are Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) radiolarites, that occur as blocks magmatically engulfed in plateau-type basalts and intrusives that range in age thoughout the pre-Campanian Cretaceous (130-83 Ma). Middle and Late Jurassic metaradiolarites occur as blocks in the Siuna Serpentinite Médange (NE-Nicaragua), along with High-p, arc-related mafics. We envision an oceanic arc that collided in the latest Jurassic with the Agua Fria arc system

  13. A Sharp Cadherin-6 Gene Expression Boundary in the Developing Mouse Cortical Plate Demarcates the Future Functional Areal Border

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Youhei W.; Inoue, Yukiko U.; Asami, Junko; Hoshino, Mikio; Inoue, Takayoshi

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex can be tangentially subdivided into tens of functional areas with distinct cyto-architectures and neural circuitries; however, it remains elusive how these areal borders are genetically elaborated during development. Here we establish original bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse lines that specifically recapitulate cadherin-6 (Cdh6) mRNA expression profiles in the layer IV of the somatosensory cortex and by detailing their cortical development, we show that a sharp Cdh6 gene expression boundary is formed at a mediolateral coordinate along the cortical layer IV as early as the postnatal day 5 (P5). By further applying mouse genetics that allows rigid cell fate tracing with CreERT2 expression, it is demonstrated that the Cdh6 gene expression boundary set at around P4 eventually demarcates the areal border between the somatosensory barrel and limb field at P20. In the P6 cortical cell pellet culture system, neurons with Cdh6 expression preferentially form aggregates in a manner dependent on Ca2+ and electroporation-based Cdh6 overexpression limited to the postnatal stages perturbs area-specific cell organization in the barrel field. These results suggest that Cdh6 expression in the nascent cortical plate may serve solidification of the protomap for cortical functional areas. PMID:22875867

  14. Numerical Simulation of Inlet Bleed with Circular Holes on Plate Under Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, Wei J.; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Shih, Tom I.-P.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to investigate the shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions on a flat plate with bleed through one or more circular holes that vent into a plenum. The bleed-hole patterns considered for the study include in-line multiple holes and staggered multiple-row holes that are configured to simulate the patterns used in inlet bleed systems of high performance aircraft. The focus of the study was to examine how the bleed through multiple holes affect bleed rate and the pressure and Mach number distributions. Since the bleed performance was found sensitive to the change in bleed conditions, a computational procedure was developed to give a good turnaround computational time for parametric studies involving changes in bleed hole geometry and the structure of shock-wave/boundary-layer flowfield. The procedure includes the grid-generation methodology and the flow simulation with solutions from the Navier-Stokes equations. The computational techniques permit analysis of complex bleed systems and make possible the investigation of a broader range of design variables associated with inlet bleed operation.

  15. RADIATIVELY EFFICIENT MAGNETIZED BONDI ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Teyssier, Romain

    2012-01-10

    We have carried out a numerical study of the effect of large-scale magnetic fields on the rate of accretion from a uniform, isothermal gas onto a resistive, stationary point mass. Only mass, not magnetic flux, accretes onto the point mass. The simulations for this study avoid complications arising from boundary conditions by keeping the boundaries far from the accreting object. Our simulations leverage adaptive refinement methodology to attain high spatial fidelity close to the accreting object. Our results are particularly relevant to the problem of star formation from a magnetized molecular cloud in which thermal energy is radiated away on timescales much shorter than the dynamical timescale. Contrary to the adiabatic case, our simulations show convergence toward a finite accretion rate in the limit in which the radius of the accreting object vanishes, regardless of magnetic field strength. For very weak magnetic fields, the accretion rate first approaches the Bondi value and then drops by a factor of {approx}2 as magnetic flux builds up near the point mass. For strong magnetic fields, the steady-state accretion rate is reduced by a factor of {approx}0.2 {beta}{sup 1/2} compared to the Bondi value, where {beta} is the ratio of the gas pressure to the magnetic pressure. We give a simple expression for the accretion rate as a function of the magnetic field strength. Approximate analytic results are given in the Appendices for both time-dependent accretion in the limit of weak magnetic fields and steady-state accretion for the case of strong magnetic fields.

  16. Magmatism at the Eurasian–North American modern plate boundary: Constraints from alkaline volcanism in the Chersky Belt (Yakutia)

    PubMed Central

    Tschegg, Cornelius; Bizimis, Michael; Schneider, David; Akinin, Vyacheslav V.; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2011-01-01

    The Chersky seismic belt (NE-Russia) forms the modern plate boundary of the Eurasian−North American continental plate. The geodynamic evolution of this continent−continent setting is highly complex and remains a matter of debate, as the extent and influence of the Mid-Arctic Ocean spreading center on the North Asian continent since the Eocene remains unclear. The progression from a tensional stress regime to a modern day transpressional one in the Chersky seismic belt, makes the understanding even more complicated. The alkaline volcanism that has erupted along the Chersky range from Eocene through to the Recent can provide constraints on the geodynamic evolution of this continental boundary, however, the source and petrogenetic evolution of these volcanic rocks and their initiating mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied basanites of the central Chersky belt, which are thought to represent the first alkaline volcanic activity in the area, after initial opening of the Arctic Ocean basin. We present mineral and bulk rock geochemical data as well as Sr–Nd–Pb–Hf isotopes of the alkaline suite of rocks combined with new precise K–Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating, and discuss an integrated tectono-magmatic model for the Chersky belt. Our findings show that the basanites were generated from a homogeneous asthenospheric mantle reservoir with an EM-1 isotopic flavor, under relatively ‘dry’ conditions at segregation depths around 110 km and temperatures of ~ 1500 °C. Trace element and isotope systematics combined with mantle potential temperature estimates offer no confirmation of magmatism related to subduction or plume activity. Mineral geochemical and petrographical observations together with bulk geochemical evidence indicate a rapid ascent of melts and high cooling rates after emplacement in the continental crust. Our preferred model is that volcanism was triggered by extension and thinning of the lithosphere combined with adiabatic upwelling of the

  17. Magmatism at the Eurasian-North American modern plate boundary: Constraints from alkaline volcanism in the Chersky Belt (Yakutia).

    PubMed

    Tschegg, Cornelius; Bizimis, Michael; Schneider, David; Akinin, Vyacheslav V; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2011-07-01

    The Chersky seismic belt (NE-Russia) forms the modern plate boundary of the Eurasian-North American continental plate. The geodynamic evolution of this continent-continent setting is highly complex and remains a matter of debate, as the extent and influence of the Mid-Arctic Ocean spreading center on the North Asian continent since the Eocene remains unclear. The progression from a tensional stress regime to a modern day transpressional one in the Chersky seismic belt, makes the understanding even more complicated. The alkaline volcanism that has erupted along the Chersky range from Eocene through to the Recent can provide constraints on the geodynamic evolution of this continental boundary, however, the source and petrogenetic evolution of these volcanic rocks and their initiating mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied basanites of the central Chersky belt, which are thought to represent the first alkaline volcanic activity in the area, after initial opening of the Arctic Ocean basin. We present mineral and bulk rock geochemical data as well as Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes of the alkaline suite of rocks combined with new precise K-Ar and (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating, and discuss an integrated tectono-magmatic model for the Chersky belt. Our findings show that the basanites were generated from a homogeneous asthenospheric mantle reservoir with an EM-1 isotopic flavor, under relatively 'dry' conditions at segregation depths around 110 km and temperatures of ~ 1500 °C. Trace element and isotope systematics combined with mantle potential temperature estimates offer no confirmation of magmatism related to subduction or plume activity. Mineral geochemical and petrographical observations together with bulk geochemical evidence indicate a rapid ascent of melts and high cooling rates after emplacement in the continental crust. Our preferred model is that volcanism was triggered by extension and thinning of the lithosphere combined with adiabatic upwelling of the underlying

  18. Late Cenozoic tectonics of the Middle Atlas Mountains, Morocco: Continental deformation in the diffuse western Mediterranean plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Francisco Gustavo

    -Eurasian plate convergence since the Early Miocene. The diffuse plate boundary comprises large, relatively rigid crustal blocks (Moroccan Meseta, High Plateau, and Saharan Platform) bounded by narrow deformable zones (the Atlas). In this context, the Middle Atlas can be interpreted as an accommodation zone resulting from differential movements between two large crustal blocks impinging on stable Africa. The Atlas Mountains exemplify the possible structural influence of inherited crustal weaknesses in a diffuse plate boundary such as the western Mediterranean region.

  19. Interaction between central volcanoes and fissure swarms along divergent plate boundaries: an example from Askja Volcano, Northern Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Ruch, Joel; Acocella, Valerio; Urbani, Stefano; Thordarson, Thor

    2016-04-01

    Central volcanoes located along divergent plate boundaries are typically part of a larger volcanic system that consists of a central edifice and a fissure swarm through which magma propagates and spreads plates apart. Regional normal faults and graben structures develop within the volcanic system, also dissecting portions of the central volcano with ring-faults faults and eruptive fissures related to the caldera structure. Both the fissure swarm and the caldera structure influence the pathway of the ascending magma, however, the influences of the structures on magma propagation and vice versa are not well defined and understood. Here we aim to understand the relationship between the activity of the central volcano structures (e.g. caldera ring faults, radial dykes and cone sheets) and those of the fissure swarm (e.g. regional normal faults, regional dikes). We focus on Askja volcano, located in the Northern Volcanic Zone of Iceland. It is comprised of three nested calderas, largely filled in with subaerial basaltic lava flows and surrounded by a massive hyaloclastite mountain on the Eastern side. Formation of the youngest, the Öskjuvatn caldera, was initiated during the 1874-1876 rifting episode on the Askja system. This major event was followed by several localized radial and circumferential magmatic intrusions taking place along the new-formed caldera ring fault, as well as intruding in the fissure swarm related to the regional tectonics. In order to characterize the influence of the caldera structure on the regional tectonics, we analysed the structural framework of the caldera and direct surroundings using remote sensing (optical imagery and high resolution DEM from TanDEM-X data). Then we made detailed field measurements (500 data) by analysing azimuth, dip, and opening of eruptive fissures, dikes, faults and extension fractures. Both remote sensing and field measurements have been then integrated producing a detailed structural map of Askja. Our results show

  20. Numerical Study of Three-dimensional Spatial Instability of a Supersonic Flat Plate Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, A.; Krishnan, R.

    1989-01-01

    The behavior of spatially growing three-dimensional waves in a supersonic boundary layer was studied numerically by solving the complete Navier-Stokes equations. Satisfactory comparison with linear parallel and non-parallel stability theories, and experiment are obtained when a small amplitude inflow disturbance is used. The three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a finite difference method which is fourth-order and second-order accurate in the convection and viscous terms respectively, and second-order accurate in time. Spanwise periodicity is assumed. The inflow disturbance is composed of eigenfunctions from linear stability theory. By increasing the amplitude of the inflow disturbance, nonlinear effects in the form of a relaxation type oscillation of the time signal of rho(u) are observed.

  1. Effects of Periodic Unsteady Wake Flow and Pressure Gradient on Boundary Layer Transition Along the Concave Surface of a Curved Plate. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; Radke, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Boundary layer transition and development on a turbomachinery blade is subjected to highly periodic unsteady turbulent flow, pressure gradient in longitudinal as well as lateral direction, and surface curvature. To study the effects of periodic unsteady wakes on the concave surface of a turbine blade, a curved plate was utilized. On the concave surface of this plate, detailed experimental investigations were carried out under zero and negative pressure gradient. The measurements were performed in an unsteady flow research facility using a rotating cascade of rods positioned upstream of the curved plate. Boundary layer measurements using a hot-wire probe were analyzed by the ensemble-averaging technique. The results presented in the temporal-spatial domain display the transition and further development of the boundary layer, specifically the ensemble-averaged velocity and turbulence intensity. As the results show, the turbulent patches generated by the wakes have different leading and trailing edge velocities and merge with the boundary layer resulting in a strong deformation and generation of a high turbulence intensity core. After the turbulent patch has totally penetrated into the boundary layer, pronounced becalmed regions were formed behind the turbulent patch and were extended far beyond the point they would occur in the corresponding undisturbed steady boundary layer.

  2. Direct numerical simulation methods of hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer in thermally perfect gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, WenLi; Cao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature effects alter the physical and transport properties of air such as vibrational excitation in a thermally perfect gas, and this factor should be considered in order to compute the flow field correctly. Herein, for the thermally perfect gas, a simple method of direct numerical simulation on flat-plat boundary layer is put forward, using the equivalent specific heat ratio instead of constant specific heat ratio in the N-S equations and flux splitting form of a calorically perfect gas. The results calculated by the new method are consistent with that by solving the N-S equations of a thermally perfect gas directly. The mean flow has the similarity, and consistent to the corresponding Blasius solution, which confirms that satisfactory results can be obtained basing on the Blasius solution as the mean flow directly in stability analysis. The amplitude growth curve of small disturbance is introduced at the inlet by using direct numerical simulation, which is consistent with that obtained by linear stability theory. It verified that the equation established and the simulation method is correct.

  3. Evolution of the Walker Lane: An Incipient Transform Fault and Future Pacific-North America Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulds, J. E.; Henry, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    -ward migration of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ). The northern WL is the least developed part of the WL-ECSZ, with right slip decreasing from ~25 km to zero to the NW. Here, en echelon left-stepping dextral faults are analogous to Riedel shears developed above a through-going shear zone at depth. Coeval extension and dextral shear have induced slight counterclockwise rotations, which may ultimately rotate Riedel shears toward the main shear zone at depth, facilitate hard linkage between Riedel shears, and produce a through-going strike-slip fault. The WL-ECSZ now terminates near the south end of the Cascade arc near the latitude of the MTJ, suggesting that the SAF and WL-ECSZ are migrating N-ward at similar rates. With continued N-ward migration, the MTJ will collide with the NW-propagating WL off southern Oregon in ~8 Ma. The plate boundary will then likely jump inland to the WL-ECSZ. The current setting is one stage in the progressive dismembering of an Andean type margin through lateral growth and inland stepping of a transform fault. This process is fragmenting the continental margin and transferring slices of North America to the Pacific plate. Evolving transform faults may therefore be important in generating far-traveled exotic terranes.

  4. The Mw 8.8, 1906 Colombia-Ecuador Subduction Earthquake: Seismic Structure and Thermal Regime of the Plate Boundary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collot, J.; Marcaillou, B.; Agudelo, W.; Ribodetti, A.; D'Acremont, E.

    2007-05-01

    The North Ecuador-SW Colombia active margin underwent four great subduction earthquakes in 1906 (Mw8.8), 1942(Mw7.8), 1958 (Mw7.7) and 1979(Mw8.2). The resulting seismotectonic segmentation of the margin may be a consequence of variable mass transfer, remarkable down-going plate basement relief, and margin transverse and along strike crustal faults. The margin basement consists of accreted oceanic terranes, and is underthrust by the northern flank of the19-km thick Carnegie Ridge, and 7-km-thick and structurally complex, Miocene Malpelo- Yaquina-Buenaventura spreading-transform system of the northern Nazca plate. The oceanic crust is covered by turbidite that strongly vary in thickness along the trench. South of 1°30'N, the oceanic crust shows N35- 75° and N120° faults and lineaments, and a N-trending chain of small seamounts, which delineate en-échelon, small pounded trench basins containing up to 500 m of turbidites. The steep adjacent inner trench slope is devoid of an accretionary wedge, but shows evidences for slope instabilities and mass wasting deposits. A 1-km thick subduction channel that is continuous with the hemipelagic cover of the oceanic crust is imaged landward, over a 30-km distance from the trench. This region shows evidence for thinning of the margin basement by seamount subduction, and correlates with the hypocenter of the 1942 subduction earthquake. North of 1°30'N, an up-to 4-km-thick deep-sea turbidite system has developed in the Colombia trench. The turbidite system is fed by the major Esmeraldas and Patia-Mira canyons and rivers, and dammed to the South by the Galera seamounts. This thick trenchfill appears to be dominantly subducting beneath an erosional margin basement between 1°30'N and 2°30'N, thus forming a km-thick subduction channel that is modulated by the subduction of a buried, large horst and graben structure. This region of thick sediment and rough oceanic crust subduction coincides with the hypocenters of the1958 and1979

  5. Structural Evolution of the India-Arabia Plate Boundary from Miocene to Present-Day (NW Indian Ocean) and Comparison with the Dead Sea Fault (Eastern Mediterranean Sea).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Chamot Rooke, N.; Fournier, M.; Delescluse, M.; Ben Avraham, Z.; Ten Brink, U. S.

    2014-12-01

    Arabia is bounded by the Dead Sea Transform (DST) to the west and by the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ) to the east. These present-day major strike-slip fault systems activated during the Plio-Pleistocene, which contrasts with the age of inception of strike-slip motion, assumed to begin around 13-18 Ma for the DST and around 20 Ma at the edge of the Owen-Murray Ridge (OMR) for the India-Arabia plate boundary. This discrepancy between the age of the active strike-slip systems and the age of inception of strike-slip motion raises the question of the kinematic driver for the transition between successive generations of strike-slip faults. Using a recent mutibeam and seismic dataset crossing the OFZ and the OMR, we provide a new geodynamic framework for the Miocene to present-day structural evolution of the India-Arabia plate boundary, and highlight some similarities with the structural evolution of the DST. We first document a Late Miocene episode of uplift of the OMR uplift along the Miocene India-Arabia plate boundary. The onset of this uplift is coeval with a plate reorganization event marked by the onset of intra-plate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean. The OFZ emplaced around 3 Ma, with major pull-apart basins opening (20°N Basin, Dalrymple Trough) dated at 2.4 Ma by far-field correlation with ODP Sites. The opening of pull-apart basins is coeval with the last structural reorganization of the Makran accretionnary wedge, marked by the regional M-unconformity, and with a major intensification of the Indian monsoon. A Late Miocene episode of folding is also recognized at the Lebanon ranges prior to the onset of the present-day DST, which occurred in the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene. The similarities between the geological history of the India-Arabia plate boundary and the DST in the Late Miocene and the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene suggest that both plate boundaries recorded the same kinematic changes. Late Miocene (i.e. Tortonian) deformation is widely

  6. The northern Caribbean plate boundary in the Jamaica Passage: Structure and seismic stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Leroy, S.; Mercier de Lépinay, B.; Meyer, B.; Ellouz-Zimmermann, N.; Momplaisir, R.

    2016-04-01

    Multibeam bathymetry data and multichannel seismic reflection profiles have been collected at the end of 2012 along the Enriquillo-Plantain-Garden Fault Zone (EPGFZ) in the Jamaica Passage, between Jamaica and Hispaniola. Analysis of the data set reveals the tectonic evolution and the stratigraphic complexity of the northern Caribbean boundary. Stratigraphic correlations with previous marine and on land studies are proposed to place the identified seismic sequences in their regional tectonic history. Two distinct crustal domains are interpreted. Typical stratigraphic sequences for the rifted blocks of the Eastern Cayman Trough margin are identified in five basins of the Jamaica Passage, highlighting the eastward limit of the Cayman Trough margin. These inherited basins are deformed and folded during a first phase of compression that could correspond to the regional tectonic rearrangement recorded in the early Miocene (about 20 Ma). A distinct crustal domain that we propose to relate to the Carib Beds (Caribbean typical reflectors A″, B″ and V) is identified in the southern part of the Jamaica Passage, indicating that the Caribbean Large Igneous Province could extend up to the extreme northeast part of the Lower Nicaragua Rise. The left-lateral EPGFZ currently cuts across two pre-existing basins, the Morant and Matley basins. During the activity of the EPGFZ, these basins are deformed and folded indicating a second phase of compression. In contrast, the Navassa basin, located in the middle of the Jamaica Passage, results from the strike-slip motion of the EPGFZ and is interpreted as an asymmetrical basin bordered by the EPGFZ only on its northern side.

  7. Integration of the Plate Boundary Observatory and Existing GPS Networks in Southern California: A Multi Use Geodetic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, C.; Blume, F.; Meertens, C.; Arnitz, E.; Lawrence, S.; Miller, S.; Bradley, W.; Jackson, M.; Feaux, K.

    2007-12-01

    The ultra-stable GPS monument design developed by Southern California Geodetic Network (SCIGN) in the late 1990s demonstrates sub-millimeter errors on long time series where there are a high percentage of observations and low multipath. Following SCIGN, other networks such as PANGA and BARGEN have adopted the monument design for both deep drilled braced monuments (DDBM = 5 legs grouted 10.7 meters into bedrock/stratigraphy) and short drilled braced monuments (SDBM = 4 legs epoxied 2 meters into bedrock). A Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS station consists of a "SCIGN" style monument and state of the art NetRS receiver and IP based communications. Between the years 2003-2008 875 permanent PBO GPS stations are being built throughout the United States. Concomitant with construction of the PBO the majority of pre-existing GPS stations that meet stability specifications are being upgraded with Trimble NetRS and IP based communications to PBO standards under the EarthScope PBO Nucleus project. In 2008, with completed construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory, more than 1100 GPS stations will share common design specifications and have identical receivers with common communications making it the most homogenous geodetic network in the World. Of the 875 total Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations, 211 proposed sites are distributed throughout the Southern California region. As of August 2007 the production status is: 174 stations built (81 short braced monuments, 93 deep drilled braced monuments), 181 permits signed, 211 permits submitted and 211 station reconnaissance reports. The balance of 37 stations (19 SDBM and 18 DDBM) will be built over the next year from Long Valley to the Mexico border in order of priority as recommended by the PBO Transform, Extension and Magmatic working groups. Fifteen second data is archived for each station and 1 Hz as well as 5 Hz data is buffered to be triggered for download in the event of an earthquake. Communications

  8. Present-Day Kinematics of the Central Mediterranean Plate Boundary Region from Large GPS Network Analysis Using the Ambizap Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anastasio, E.; D'Agostino, N.; Avallone, A.; Blewitt, G.

    2008-12-01

    The large, recent increase of continuous GPS (CGPS) stations in the Central Mediterranean plate boundary zone offers the opportunity to study in detail the present-day kinematics of this actively deforming region. CGPS data from scientific and commercial networks in the Italian region is now available from more than 350 stations, including more than 130 from the RING network deployed by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. The RING stations all have high quality GPS monuments and are co- located with broadband or very broadband seismometers and strong motion sensors. The analysis presented here also uses far-field data to provide reference frame control, bringing the total to over 580 CGPS stations. GPS ambiguity resolution of such a large amount of data presents a serious challenge in terms of processing time. Many scientific GPS data processing software packages address this problem by dividing the network into several clusters. In contrast, this analysis uses the new Ambizap GPS processing algorithm (Blewitt, 2008) to obtain unique, self-consistent daily ambiguity-fixed solutions for the entire network. Ambizap allows for a rapid and multiple reanalysis of large regional networks such the one presented in this work. Tests show that Ambizap reproduces solutions from time-prohibitive full-network ambiguity resolution to much less than 1 mm. Single station GPS data are first processed with the GIPSY-OASIS II software by the precise point positioning (PPP) strategy (Zumberge et al., 1997) using JPL products from ftp://sideshow.jpl.nasa.gov. Integer ambiguity resolution is then applied using Ambizap. The resulting daily solutions are aligned to the ITRF2005 reference frame. Then, using the CATS software (Williams, 2007), time series are cleaned to remove outliers and are analyzed for their noise properties, linear velocities, periodic signals and antenna jumps. Stable plate reference frames are realized by minimizing the horizontal velocities at more

  9. Effects of Mach Number, Leading-Edge Bluntness, and Sweep on Boundary-Layer Transition on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jillie, Don W.; Hopkins, Edward J.

    1961-01-01

    The effects of leading-edge bluntness and sweep on boundary-layer transition on flat plate models were investigated at Mach numbers of 2.00, 2.50, 3.00, and 4.00. The effect of sweep on transition was also determined on a flat plate model equipped with an elliptical nose at a Mach number of 0.27. Models used for the supersonic investigation had leading-edge radii varying from 0.0005 to 0.040 inch. The free-stream unit Reynolds number was held constant at 15 million per foot for the supersonic tests and the angle of attack was 0 deg. Surface flow conditions were determined by visual observation and recorded photographically. The sublimation technique was used to indicate transition, and the fluorescent-oil technique was used to indicate flow separation. Measured Mach number and sweep effects on transition are compared with those predicted from shock-loss considerations as described in NACA Rep. 1312. For the models with the blunter leading edges, the transition Reynolds number (based on free-stream flow conditions) was approximately doubled by an increase in Mach number from 2.50 to 4.00; and nearly the same result was predicted from shock-loss considerations. At all super- sonic Mach numbers, increases in sweep reduced the transition Reynolds number and the amount of reduction increased with increases in bluntness. The shock-loss method considerably underestimated- the sweep effects, possibly because of the existence of crossflow instability associated with swept wings. At a Mach number of 0.27, no reduction in the transition Reynolds number with sweep was measured (as would be expected with no shock loss) until the sweep angle was attained where crossflow instability appeared.

  10. Completion of the Southern California Plate Boundary Observatory GPS Network and Implementation of the Low Latency Salton Trough Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, C.; Miller, S.; Lawrence, S.; Wilson, B.; Jackson, M.; Feaux, K.

    2008-12-01

    Between 2003-2008 875 permanent PBO GPS stations have been built throughout the United States. Concomitant with construction of the PBO the majority of pre-existing GPS stations that meet stability specifications have been upgraded with Trimble NetRS and IP based communications to PBO standards under the EarthScope PBO Nucleus project. In October 2008, with completed construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory, more than 1100 GPS stations now share common design specifications and have identical receivers with common communications making it the most homogeneous geodetic network in the World. Of the 875 total Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations, 216 sites are distributed throughout the Southern California region. 102 of the sites are built as SDBM, 111 DDBM, and 3 as strainmeter GPS hybrids. Fifteen second data is archived for each station and 1 Hz and 5 Hz data is buffered to be triggered for download in the event of an earthquake. Additionally, 125 of the existing former-SCIGN GPS stations have been integrated into the SoCal region of PBO, of which 25 have real-time data streams. The Salton Trough Radio Network (STRN) comprises of 20 stations equipped with Ethernet bridge Intuicom EB6+ (900 MHz) radios to transmit a high rate low latency data stream from each permanent GPS site. The high-rate low latency UStream data will be available to researchers who are developing prototype earthquake early warning systems in Southern California. A goal of the STRN is to make the data available rapidly enough for GPS-derived coseismic and dynamic displacements to be integrated into early warning system earthquake models. The improved earthquake models will better assist emergency response. UStream data will also aid surveyors who wish to use PBO GPS stations as permanent, high-quality base stations in real- time kinematic surveys. Requests for streaming data access at available GPS sites and latency statistics are located at http://pboweb.unavco.org/?pageid=107

  11. A plate boundary earthquake record from a wetland adjacent to the Alpine fault in New Zealand refines hazard estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, U. A.; Clark, K. J.; Howarth, J. D.; Biasi, G. P.; Langridge, R. M.; Villamor, P.; Berryman, K. R.; Vandergoes, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    Discovery and investigation of millennial-scale geological records of past large earthquakes improve understanding of earthquake frequency, recurrence behaviour, and likelihood of future rupture of major active faults. Here we present a ∼2000 year-long, seven-event earthquake record from John O'Groats wetland adjacent to the Alpine fault in New Zealand, one of the most active strike-slip faults in the world. We linked this record with the 7000 year-long, 22-event earthquake record from Hokuri Creek (20 km along strike to the north) to refine estimates of earthquake frequency and recurrence behaviour for the South Westland section of the plate boundary fault. Eight cores from John O'Groats wetland revealed a sequence that alternated between organic-dominated and clastic-dominated sediment packages. Transitions from a thick organic unit to a thick clastic unit that were sharp, involved a significant change in depositional environment, and were basin-wide, were interpreted as evidence of past surface-rupturing earthquakes. Radiocarbon dates of short-lived organic fractions either side of these transitions were modelled to provide estimates for earthquake ages. Of the seven events recognised at the John O'Groats site, three post-date the most recent event at Hokuri Creek, two match events at Hokuri Creek, and two events at John O'Groats occurred in a long interval during which the Hokuri Creek site may not have been recording earthquakes clearly. The preferred John O'Groats-Hokuri Creek earthquake record consists of 27 events since ∼6000 BC for which we calculate a mean recurrence interval of 291 ± 23 years, shorter than previously estimated for the South Westland section of the fault and shorter than the current interseismic period. The revised 50-year conditional probability of a surface-rupturing earthquake on this fault section is 29%. The coefficient of variation is estimated at 0.41. We suggest the low recurrence variability is likely to be a feature of

  12. Seismicity of the diffusive Iberian/African plate boundary at the eastern terminus of the Azores-Gibraltar Transform fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, D.; Grevemeyer, I.; Matias, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    The plate boundary at the eastern terminus of the Azores-Gibraltar transform fault between Africa and Iberia is poorly defined. The deformation in the area is forced by the slow NW-SE convergence of 4 mm/yr between the oceanic domains of Iberia/Eurasia and Africa and is accommodated over a 200 km broad tectonically-active deformation zone. The region, however, is also characterized by large earthquakes, such as the 1969 Mw=7.9 Horseshoe event and the November 1, 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake with an estimated magnitude of Mw~8.5. The exact location of the source of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake is still unknown. Recent work may suggest that the event occurred in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault, an oblique thrust fault. However, estimates of tsunami arrival times suggested a source near the Gorringe Bank, a ~180 km-long and ~70 km-wide ridge that has a relieve of ~5000 m. Deep Sea Drilling (DSDP) and rock samples indicated that the bank is mainly composed of serpentinized peridotites with gabbroic intrusions, perhaps being created by overthrusting of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain onto the Tagus Abyssal Plain in NW direction. Further, the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain is marked by the presence of compressive structures with a roughly NE-SW orientation and E-W trending, segmented, crustal-scale, strike slip faults that extend from the Gorringe Bank to the Gibraltar Arc in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz, which were called "South West Iberian Margin" or SWIM faults. The fault system may mark a developing Eurasia-Africa plate boundary. Two local seismic networks were operated in the area. First, a network of 14 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) was operated between April and October 2012 in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault between 10°W to 11°W, and 35°50'N to 36°10'N. From October 2013 to March 2014 a second network of 15 OBS monitored seismicity at the Gorringe Bank. Both networks benefitted from seismic stations operated in Portugal. The first network provided in the order of

  13. Seismicity and seismotectonics of the diffusive Iberian/African plate boundary: Horseshoe Abyssal Plain and Gorringe Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Lange, Dietrich; Matias, Luis

    2014-05-01

    In the area to the west of the Gibraltar Arc the plate boundary between Africa and Iberia is poorly defined. The deformation in the area is forced by the slow NW-SE convergence of 4 mm/yr between the oceanic domains of Iberia/Eurasia and Africa and is accommodated over a 200 km broad tectonically-active deformation zone. The region, however, is also characterized by large earthquakes and tsunamis, such as the 1969 Mw=7.9 Horseshoe Abyssal Plain earthquake and the November 1, 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake with an estimated magnitude of Mw~8.5. The exact location of the source of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake is still unknown. Recent work may suggest that the event occurred in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault, an oblique thrust fault. However, estimates of tsunami arrival times suggested a source near the Gorringe Bank, a ~180 km-long and ~70 km-wide ridge that has a relieve of ~5000 m. Deep Sea Drilling (DSDP) and rock samples indicated that the bank is mainly composed of serpentinized peridotites with gabbroic intrusions, perhaps being created by overthrusting of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain onto the Tagus Abyssal Plain in NW direction. Further, the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain is marked by the presence of compressive structures with a roughly NE-SW orientation and E-W trending, segmented, crustal-scale, strike slip faults that extend from the Gorringe Bank to the Gibraltar Arc in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz, which were called "South West Iberian Margin" or SWIM faults. The fault system may mark a developing Eurasia-Africa plate boundary. Two local seismic networks were operated in the area. First, a network of 14 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) was operated between April and October 2012 in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault between 10°W to 11°W, and 35°50'N to 36°10'N. From October 2013 to March 2014 a second network of 15 OBS monitored seismicity at the Gorringe Bank. Both networks benefitted from seismic stations operated in Portugal. The first network provided in

  14. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground

  15. Chemical and isotopic evidence of gas-influenced flow at a transform plate boundary: Monterey Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, J.B.; Orange, D.L.; Lorenson, T.D.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic compositions of pore fluids document upward flow through communities of vesicomyid clams in Monterey Bay, California. Within the clam communities, the sulfate reduction zone is only 10 cm thick, and Ca and Mg concentrations decrease to values as low as 2.2 mM and 34.5 mM, respectively, at depths less than 30 cm below the sediment-water interface. Less than 5 m outside the communities, the base of the sulfate reduction zone is deeper than the greatest penetration of the cores (-30 cm), and Ca and Mg exhibit only minor changes from seawater values. The sediment exhibits no significant variation in grain size, mineralogy, organic carbon, nitrogen, or carbonate content throughout the region. The composition of pore fluid within clam communities results from upward flow of altered fluid rather than different diagenetic reactions within and outside the communities. Isotopically light dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), with ??13C values ranging from -3.2 to -54.1???, could reflect carbon sources from either oxidized thermogenic methane and/or a mixture of oxidized microbial methane and solid organic carbon. The C1/(C2+C3) ratios (ranging from 34 to 1142) and the hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of methane (??D values of -109 to -156???; ??13C values of -30.6 to -86.6???) suggest that methane is primarily microbial but that a minor component could be thermally generated. Any thermogenic methane would have migrated from great depths, possibly >2 km. The presence of methane is likely to contribute to fluid flow by reducing the density of the fluids. Past fluid migration and venting are reflected by widespread carbonate mineralization at the sediment-water interface. This mineralization and the geographic distribution and proportions of microbial and thermogenic methane suggest that vent sites migrate when permeability is reduced during carbonate cementation. These results demonstrate that along with convergent and divergent plate boundaries

  16. Relocating Seismicity on the Arctic Plate Boundary Using Teleseismic and Regional Phases and a Bayesian Multiple Event Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.; Dahl-Jensen, Trine; Kværna, Tormod; Larsen, Tine B.; Paulsen, Berit; Voss, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The tectonophysics of plate boundaries are illuminated by the pattern of seismicity - and the ability to locate seismic events accurately depends upon the number and quality of observations, the distribution of recording stations, and how well the traveltimes of seismic phases are modelled. The boundary between the Eurasian and North American plates between 70 and 84 degrees North hosts large seismic events which are well recorded teleseismically and many more events at far lower magnitudes that are well recorded only at regional distances. Existing seismic bulletins have considerable spread and bias resulting from limited station coverage and deficiencies in the velocity models applied; this is particularly acute for the lower magnitude events which may only be constrained by a small number of Pn and Sn arrivals. Over the past 15 years, there has been a significant improvement in the seismic network in the Arctic - a difficult region to instrument due to the harsh climate, a sparsity of quiet and accessible sites, and the expense and difficult logistics of deploying and maintaining stations. New deployments and upgrades to stations on Greenland, Svalbard, and the islands Jan Mayen, Hopen, and Bjørnøya have resulted in a sparse but stable regional seismic network which results in events down to magnitudes below 3 generating high quality Pn and Sn signals on multiple stations. A catalog of over 1000 events in the region since 1998 has been generated using many new phase readings on stations on both sides of the spreading ridge in addition to teleseismic P phases. The Bayesloc program, a Bayesian hierarchical multiple event location algorithm, has been used to relocate the full set of events iteratively and this has resulted in a significant reduction in the spread in hypocenter estimates for both large and small events. Whereas single event location algorithms minimize the vector of time residuals on an event-by-event basis, Bayesloc favours the hypocenters which

  17. The Seismic source parameters of the 1991 Costa Rica aftershock sequence: Evidence for a transcurrent plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Guangwei; Beck, Susan L.; Wallace, Terry C.

    1993-09-01

    deformation zone exists in central Costa Rica and is characterized by left-lateral strike-slip motion. This diffuse, transcurrent deformation zone coincides with several geologic and geophysical features, and perhaps is a result of the slower subduction rate of the buoyant Cocos Ridge, than its adjacent segments along the Middle America Trench (MAT). The diffuse transcurrent boundary may intersect with the North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB) near Limon, Costa Rica, and is very likely a plate boundary for the proposed Panama block.

  18. Accretionary margin of north-western Hispaniola: morphology, structure and development of part of the northern Caribbean plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Austin, James A.; Scanlon, K.M.; Terence, Edgar N.; Parson, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Broad-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) images and single- and multi-channel seismic reflection profiles demonstrate that the margin of north-western Hispaniola has experienced compression as a consequence of oblique North American-Caribbean plate convergence. Two principal morphological or structural types of accretionary wedges are observed along this margin. The first type is characterized by a gently sloping (???4??) sea floor and generally margin-parallel linear sets of sea-floor ridges that gradually deepen towards the flat Hispaniola Basin floor to the north. The ridges are caused by an internal structure consisting of broad anticlines bounded by thrust faults that dip southwards beneath Hispaniola. Anticlines form at the base of the slope and are eventually sheared and underthrust beneath the slope. In contrast, the second type of accretionary wedge exhibits a steeper (???6-16??) sea-floor slope characterized by local slumping and a more abrupt morphological transition to the adjacent basin. The internal structure appears chaotic on seismic reflection profiles and probably consists of tight folds and closely spaced faults. We suggest that changes in sea-floor declivity and internal structure may result from variations in the dip or frictional resistance of the de??collement, or possibly from changes in the cohesive strength of the wedge sediments. The observed pattern of thickening of Hispaniola Basin turbidites towards the insular margin suggests differential southwards tilting of the Hispaniola Basin strata, probably in response to North America-Caribbean plate interactions since the Early Tertiary. Based upon indirect age control from adjacent parts of the northern caribbean plate boundary, we infer a Late Eocene to Early Miocene episode of transcurrent motion (i.e. little or no tilting), an Early Miocene to Late Pliocene period of oblique convergence (i.e. increased tilt) during which the accretionary wedge began to be constructed, and a Late Pliocene to

  19. Jet-boundary and Plan-form Corrections for Partial-Span Models with Reflection-Plane, End-Plate, or No End-Plate in a Closed Circular Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivells, James C; Deters, Owen J

    1946-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the jet-boundary and plan-form corrections necessary for application to test data for a partial-span model with a reflection plane, an end plate, or no end plate in a closed circular wind tunnel. Examples are worked out for a partial-span model with each of the three end conditions in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel and the corrections are applied to measured values of lift, drag, pitching-moment, rolling-moment, and yawing-moment coefficients.

  20. Coda Q and its Frequency Dependence in the Eastern Himalayan and Indo-Burman Plate Boundary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Kumar, A.

    2015-12-01

    We use broadband waveform data for 305 local earthquakes from the Eastern Himalayan and Indo-Burman plate boundary systems, to model the seismic attenuation in NE India. We measure the decay in amplitude of coda waves at discreet frequencies (between 1 and 12Hz) to evaluate the quality factor (Qc) as a function of frequency. We combine these measurements to evaluate the frequency dependence of Qc of the form Qc(f)=Qof η, where Qo is the quality factor at 1Hz and η is the frequency dependence. Computed Qo values range from 80-360 and η ranges from 0.85-1.45. To study the lateral variation in Qo and η, we regionalise the Qc by combining all source-receiver measurements using a back-projection algorithm. For a single back scatter model, the coda waves sample an elliptical area with the epicenter and receiver at the two foci. We parameterize the region using square grids. The algorithm calculates the overlap in area and distributes Qc in the sampled grids using the average Qc as the boundary value. This is done in an iterative manner, by minimising the misfit between the observed and computed Qc within each grid. This process is repeated for all frequencies and η is computed for each grid by combining Qc for all frequencies. Our results reveal strong variation in Qo and η across NE India. The highest Qo are in the Bengal Basin (210-280) and the Indo-Burman subduction zone (300-360). The Shillong Plateau and Mikir Hills have intermediate Qo (~160) and the lowest Qo (~80) is observed in the Naga fold thrust belt. This variation in Qo demarcates the boundary between the continental crust beneath the Shillong Plateau and Mikir Hills and the transitional to oceanic crust beneath the Bengal Basin and Indo-Burman subduction zone. Thick pile of sedimentary strata in the Naga fold thrust belt results in the low Qo. Frequency dependence (η) of Qc across NE India is observed to be very high, with regions of high Qo being associated with relatively higher η.

  1. Progressive migration of slab break-off along the southern Tyrrhenian plate boundary: Constraints for the present day kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarabba, Claudio; Palano, Mimmo

    2017-04-01

    The Ionian subduction in the central Mediterranean, just 200 km wide, is one of the narrowest in the world. Its evolution has involved a progressive disruption of the subducting slab, contemporaneous to the retreat and step-wise opening of back-arc basins. In this study, we analyse velocity anomalies of the upper mantle, together with the most comprehensive set of earthquake locations and kinematic indicators available for Italy, to reconstruct the geodynamics and tectonic evolution of the Ionian subduction system. Along the Sicilian boundary, we identify an eastward migration of the slab edge with detachment of the Ionian oceanic lithosphere. We hypothesize that the progressive detachment of the slab took place along lithospheric transform faults of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. Among the main active kinematic elements of the Ionian accretionary wedge, we suggest that a ∼400-km-long and highly segmented shear zone formed by the Aeolian-Tindari-Letojanni fault system and the Ionian fault represents the surface expression of such a lithospheric tearing. The present day convergence between the Eurasian and African plates is accommodated both at the frontal thrust of the flexed Hyblean margin in southern Sicily and offshore along the Tyrrhenian Sea. Lithospheric bending favors the wedging of the mantle underneath northern Sicily, while magmatic fluids are channeled along slab tears.

  2. Serpentinization Rates at Slow-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges: From Sample Scale to Plate-Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, M.; Rouméjon, S.

    2015-12-01

    About 25% of the crust formed at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges includes a component of tectonically exhumed and partially serpentinized mantle-derived peridotites. Exhumation occurs along large offset normal faults (detachment faults). In this presentation we outline a conceptual and testable model for serpentinization at slow-spreading ridges, based on petrological observations of samples of variably serpentinized peridotites from the Mid Atlantic and Southwest Indian ridges, on tectonic and geophysical data and on current interpretations of plate-boundary processes at slow spreading ridges. Serpentinization at mid-ocean ridges is a heterogeneous and multistage process occurring along fractures, in the footwall of axial detachments. The initial and most pervasive stage of serpentinization results in the typical serpentine mesh texture. We propose that it occurs when hydrothermal fluids reach extensively microfractured fresh peridotite. Subsequent stages of serpentinization appear to involve higher fluid-rock ratio along larger fractures and veins that are spaced by at least a few decimeters. Experimental data indicate that each stage of serpentinization identified in a given sample may have occurred at very high rates relative to the rates of tectonic exhumation. However, serpentinization (initial and later stages) may be a protracted process at the km-scale, associated with complex fracturation of the detachment's footwall due to combined tectonic and reaction-induced stresses. We outline possible consequences of this conceptual model in terms of crustal structure, hydrogen production and of the relations between serpentinization and black smoker-type hydrothermal circulation at slow-spreading ridges.

  3. Seismic heating signatures in the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone: evidence from a preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Dekkers, Mark J.; Zhang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Frictional heating during earthquake rupture reveals important information on earthquake mechanisms and energy dissipation. The amount of annealing varies widely and is, as yet, poorly constrained. Here we use magnetic susceptibility versus temperature measurements during cycling to increasingly elevated temperatures to constrain the maximum temperature a slip zone has experienced. The case study comprises sheared clay cored from the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone (décollement), which accommodated the large slip of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The décollement was cored during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST). Heating signatures with estimated maximum temperatures ranging from ˜300 to over 500 °C are determined close to the multiple slip surfaces within the décollement. Since it is impossible to tie a specific slip surface to a certain earthquake, thermal evidence for the cumulative effect of several earthquakes is unveiled. This as yet preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer' would be a useful tool to detect seismic heating along faults that experienced medium temperature rise, a range which is difficult to assess with other approaches.

  4. The effect of elastic boundary conditions on the dynamic response of rectangular plates. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Terry K.

    1988-01-01

    Natural frequencies and forced steady-state harmonic response for the vibration of uniform rectangular plates with edges elastically restrained against rotation and transverse translation are addressed. A single mode Rayleigh-Ritz solution is derived using functions that describe the normal modes of vibration of a beam whose ends are elastically restrained. The finite element solution is obtained for comparison. MACSYMA symbolic manipulation system is implemented as an aid to the mathematical rigor of the Ritz approach, and NASTRAN finite element code is used to model the mechanical system. Comparisons are made to published results and the solutions of this study are found to give lower frequencies for some values of boundary restraint. Steady-state harmonic amplitudes of displacement and acceleration are found to agree favorably for the two solutions. Low predictions of steady-state strain from NASTRAN result in some cases when compared to the Ritz values. Finally, a subjective assessment is made about the merit of using MACSYMA and NASTRAN.

  5. New c. 270 kyr strike-slip and uplift rates for the southern Alpine Fault and implications for the New Zealand plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, N. C.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Beu, A. G.; Murray-Wallace, C. V.; Hayward, B. W.; Mildenhall, D. C.; Lee, D. E.

    2014-07-01

    Along 100 km of the Alpine Fault, major valleys and glacial deposits can be matched across an 8000 m dextral offset. We use paleontologic and stratigraphic age constraints to date c. 270 ka marine sediments uplifted to 600 m elevation and overlying c. 270 ka glacial deposits related to the 8000 m dextral offset. These constraints yield a fault-proximal Australian plate uplift rate of 2.6 (-0.5/+0.4) mm/yr and an Alpine Fault dextral slip rate of 29.6 (-2.5/+4.5) mm/yr. Our rates resolve an apparent along-strike drop in strike-slip rate and instead support a relatively constant along-strike dextral slip rate of ˜28 mm/yr (˜80% of current Australian-Pacific plate boundary motion). We argue that the rate of dextral slip on the southern Alpine Fault has been relatively constant over the last ≥3.5 myr, and that ductile fault processes may rate-limit the fault from accommodating a progressively higher percentage of plate boundary motion through time (i.e., the fault reached maturity long ago). The spatiotemporally constant strike-slip rate of the southern Alpine Fault and a previously published paleoseismic record of near-regular earthquake recurrence both characterize the Alpine Fault as a mature plate boundary fault zone that behaves in a constant way with behavior predictable over timescales of thousands and hundreds of thousands of years.

  6. Accretion of southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Paleomagnetic data from southern Alaska indicate that the Wrangellia and Peninsular terranes collided with central Alaska probably by 65 Ma ago and certainly no later than 55 Ma ago. The accretion of these terranes to the mainland was followed by the arrival of the Ghost Rocks volcanic assemblage at the southern margin of Kodiak Island. Poleward movement of these terranes can be explained by rapid motion of the Kula oceanic plate, mainly from 85 to 43 Ma ago, according to recent reconstructions derived from the hot-spot reference frame. After accretion, much of southwestern Alaska underwent a counterclockwise rotation of about 50 ?? as indicated by paleomagnetic poles from volcanic rocks of Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary age. Compression between North America and Asia during opening of the North Atlantic (68-44 Ma ago) may account for the rotation. ?? 1987.

  7. Post-glacial (<20 ka) Dextral Slip Rate of the Offshore Alpine Fault: Implications for Deformation in the Pacific-Australia Plate Boundary Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    Geological displacement rates for major plate boundary strike-slip faults have seldom been determined with precision from the marine environment. In this study of the southern Alpine Fault, high-precision fault structure and slip rates are identified using multibeam bathymetric data and dated samples from the Fiordland continental margin. These rates are derived from dextral displacements of relict, but well- preserved, glacial geomorphology (moraines and outwash fans), interpreted to be aged 17 (+2, -1) calendar ka. The weighted mean slip rate is 27.2 (-3.0, +1.8) mm/yr on the shelf between Milford and George sounds, increasing southward to 31.4 (-3.5, +2.1) mm/yr between Caswell and Doubtful sounds, with uncertainties at the 95% confidence level. These offshore rates are higher than those from an adjacent 80 km length section of the fault on land in south Westland, and are in good agreement with GPS data. The southern slip rates represent some of the highest strike-slip rates on Earth, and ~ 90% of the total plate motion in southern New Zealand. The southward increase in strike-slip rate on the Alpine Fault occurs despite a southward reduction in Pacific-Australian relative plate motion rate, and despite the prediction of southward decreasing plate-parallel motion and southward increasing normal convergence. The Fiordland region is thus an excellent example of geological strain being highly partitioned within an obliquely-convergent plate boundary zone.

  8. An analysis of the relaxation of laminar boundary layer on a flat plate after passage of an interface with application to expansion-tube flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    The relaxation of the accelerating-gas boundary layer to the test-gas boundary layer over a flat plate in an expansion tube is analyzed. Several combinations of test gas and acceleration gas are considered. The problem is treated in two conically similar limits: (1) when the time lag between the arrival of the shock and the interface at the leading edge of the plate is very large, and (2) when this lag is negligible. The time-dependent laminar-boundary-layer equations of a binary mixture of perfect gases are taken as the flow-governing equations. This coupled set of differential equations, written in terms of the Lam-Crocco variables, has been solved by a line-relaxation finite-difference techniques. The results presented include the Stanton number and the local skin-friction coefficient as functions of shock Mach number and the nondimensional distance-time variable. The results indicate that more than 95 percent of the test-gas boundary layer exists over a length, measured from the leading edge of the plate, equal to about three-tenths of the distance traversed by the interface in the free stream.

  9. The October 28, 2012 Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii underthrusting earthquake and tsunami: Slip partitioning along the Queen Charlotte Fault transpressional plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Thorne; Ye, Lingling; Kanamori, Hiroo; Yamazaki, Yoshiki; Cheung, Kwok Fai; Kwong, Kevin; Koper, Keith D.

    2013-08-01

    The Pacific/North American plate boundary is undergoing predominantly right-lateral strike-slip motion along the Queen Charlotte and Fairweather transform faults. The Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) hosted the largest historical earthquake in Canada, the 1949 MS 8.1 strike-slip earthquake, which ruptured from offshore northern Haida Gwaii several hundred kilometers northwestward. On January 5, 2013 an Mw 7.5 strike-slip faulting event occurred near the northern end of the 1949 rupture zone. Along central and southern Haida Gwaii the relative plate motion has ∼20% oblique convergence across the left-stepping plate boundary. There had been uncertainty in how the compressional component of plate motion is accommodated. The October 28, 2012 Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii earthquake involved slightly (∼20°) oblique thrust faulting on a shallow (∼18.5°) northeast-dipping fault plane with strike (∼320°) parallel to the QCF, consistent with prior inferences of Pacific Plate underthrusting beneath Haida Gwaii. The rupture extended to shallow depth offshore of Moresby Island beneath a 25-30 km wide terrace of sediments that has accumulated in a wedge seaward of the QCF. The shallow thrusting caused seafloor uplift that generated substantial localized tsunami run-up and a modest far-field tsunami that spread across the northern Pacific, prompting a tsunami warning, beach closure, and coastal evacuation in Hawaii, although ultimately tide gauges showed less than 0.8 m of water level increase. The mainshock rupture appears to have spread with a ∼2.3 km/s rupture velocity over a length of ∼150 km, with slip averaging 3.3 m concentrated beneath the sedimentary wedge. The event was followed by a substantial aftershock sequence, in which almost all of the larger events involve distributed intraplate normal faulting extending ∼50 km oceanward from the QCF. The highly oblique slip partitioning in southern Haida Gwaii is distinctive in that the local plate boundary-parallel motion on

  10. Using high-resolution aeromagnetic survey to map tectonic elements of plate boundaries: An example from the Dead Sea Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Zoubi, A. S.; ten Brink, U. S.; Rybakov, M.; Rotstein, Y.

    2004-12-01

    The Dead Sea Fault (DSF) is a transform plate boundary between the African and the Arabian plates. The 200-km-long DSF segment between the Gulf of Aqaba/Elat and the Dead Sea, which has the morphology of a rift valley, shows little seismic activity, and its surface trace is only intermittently visible. High-resolution magnetic data were collected in October 2003 aboard a Jordanian military helicopter flying at an altitude of 100 m over the southern 120-km-long section of this fault segment. The survey was part of a US-AID Middle Eastern Regional Cooperation project between Jordanian, Israeli, Palestinian, and American scientists. Data were collected along rift-perpendicular lines spaced 300 m apart, requiring frequent crossings between Israeli and Jordanian air spaces. The data were gridded at 75 m interval following resolution tests, reduced to pole, and incorporated into a GIS together with elevation, geology, and gravity maps to facilitate interpretation. The main findings of the magnetic survey are the absence of magnetic anomalies crossing the rift valley, and the presence of a rift-parallel regional lineament corresponding to the active trace of the DSF. The lineament extends NNE as an almost continuous trace from Elat, Israel, to the eastern side of the valley 5 km north of Rahmeh. Jordan. Another fault trace located 2-3 km to the west may overlap and continue NNE through Gebel A-Risha, and into the central Arava/Araba valley, where it is visible on the surface. Alternatively, the two traces may be connected. If an offset between the two traces exists, it may be small enough to allow an earthquake rupture to propagate across the offset, and generate an earthquake with a moment magnitude of up to 7.5. Traces of buried faults in the central Arava/Araba valley that were previously active in the DSF system, are visible as abrupt terminations of an area of short wavelength magnetic anomalies. These anomalies probably represent shallow subsurface magmatic

  11. Modulation of mantle plumes and heat flow at the core mantle boundary by plate-scale flow: results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.; Jellinek, A. Mark; Richards, Mark A.; Manga, Michael

    2004-09-01

    We report results from analog laboratory experiments, in which a large-scale flow is imposed upon natural convection from a hot boundary layer at the base of a large tank of corn syrup. The experiments show that the subdivision of the convective flow into four regions provides a reasonable conceptual framework for interpreting the effects of large-scale flow on plumes. Region I includes the area of the hot thermal boundary layer (TBL) that is thinned by the large-scale flow, thereby suppressing plumes. Region II encompasses the critically unstable boundary layer where plumes form. Region III is the area above the boundary layer that is devoid of plumes. Region IV comprises the area of hot upwelling and plume conduits. Quantitative analysis of our experiments results in a scaling law for heat flux from the hot boundary and for the spatial extent of plume suppression. When applied to the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB), our results suggest that large-scale mantle flow, due to sinking lithospheric plates, can locally thin the TBL and suppress plume formation over large fractions of the CMB. Approximately 30% of heat flow from the core may be due to increased heat flux from plate-scale flow. Furthermore, CMB heat flux is non-uniformly distributed along the CMB, with large areas where heat flux is increased on average by a factor of 2. As a consequence, the convective flow pattern in the outer core may be affected by CMB heat-flux heterogeneity and sensitive to changes in plate-scale mantle flow. Because of plume suppression and 'focusing' of hot mantle from the CMB into zones of upwelling flow, plume conduits (hotspots) are expected to be spatially associated with lower-mantle regions of low seismic velocities, inferred as hot upwelling mantle flow.

  12. Character of the Caribbean-Gônave-North America plate boundaries in the upper mantle based on shear-wave splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benford, B.; Tikoff, B.; DeMets, C.

    2012-12-01

    We present new shear-wave splitting measurements of SKS, SKKS, PKS, and sSKS phases from eight stations in the northern Caribbean. Prior to this work, shear-wave splitting analysis of the northern Caribbean boundary was only evaluated at a station in Puerto Rico. Stations that lie within several tens of kilometers of microplate boundaries have mean fast polarization directions parallel to the boundary and have delay times greater than 1 s. Stations more than several tens of kilometers away from microplate boundaries show no evidence for an anisotropic upper mantle. Stations in Cuba and Jamaica have fast axes oriented ˜100° with delay times of ˜1.5 s, indicating that the east-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults that define the north and south boundaries of the Gônave microplate continue into the upper mantle. A station located in Antigua, where the North America plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate, has a high degree of splitting with the fast axis parallel to the trench. Based on our results, the deformation related to the presence of microplates in the northern Caribbean extends into the upper mantle.

  13. Investigating crustal deformation associated with the North America-Pacific plate boundary in southern California with GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinler, Joshua C.

    The three largest earthquakes in the last 25 years in southern California occurred on faults located adjacent to the southern San Andreas fault, with the M7.3 1992 Landers and M7.1 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes occurring in the eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) in the Mojave Desert, and the M7.2 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake occurring along the Laguna Salada fault in northern Baja California, Mexico. The locations of these events near to but not along the southern San Andreas fault (SSAF) is unusual in that the last major event on the SSAF occurred more than 300 years ago, with an estimated recurrence interval of 215 +/- 25 years. The focus of this dissertation is to address the present-day deformation field along the North America-Pacific plate boundary in southern California and northern Baja California, through the analysis of GPS data, and elastic block and viscoelastic earthquake models to determine fault slip rates and rheological properties of the lithosphere in the plate boundary zone. We accomplish this in three separate studies. The first study looks at how strain is partitioned northwards along-strike from the southern San Andreas fault near the Salton Sea. We find that estimates for slip-rates on the southern San Andreas decrease from ~23 mm/yr in the south to ~8 mm/yr as the fault passes through San Gorgonio Pass to the northwest, while ~13-18 mm/yr of slip is partitioned onto NW-SE trending faults of the ECSZ where the Landers and Hector Mine earthquakes occurred. This speaks directly to San Andreas earthquake hazards, as a reduction in the slip rate would require greater time between events to build up enough slip deficit in order to generate a large magnitude earthquake. The second study focuses on inferring the rheological structure beneath the Salton Trough region. This is accomplished through analysis of postseismic deformation observed using a set of the GPS data collected before and after the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. By

  14. Plane elasto-plastic analysis of v-notched plate under bending by boundary integral equation method. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rzasnicki, W.

    1973-01-01

    A method of solution is presented, which, when applied to the elasto-plastic analysis of plates having a v-notch on one edge and subjected to pure bending, will produce stress and strain fields in much greater detail than presently available. Application of the boundary integral equation method results in two coupled Fredholm-type integral equations, subject to prescribed boundary conditions. These equations are replaced by a system of simultaneous algebraic equations and solved by a successive approximation method employing Prandtl-Reuss incremental plasticity relations. The method is first applied to number of elasto-static problems and the results compared with available solutions. Good agreement is obtained in all cases. The elasto-plastic analysis provides detailed stress and strain distributions for several cases of plates with various notch angles and notch depths. A strain hardening material is assumed and both plane strain and plane stress conditions are considered.

  15. Nonlinear radiation heat transfer effects in the natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter.

  16. Nonlinear Radiation Heat Transfer Effects in the Natural Convective Boundary Layer Flow of Nanofluid Past a Vertical Plate: A Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Meraj; Mushtaq, Ammar; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter. PMID:25251242

  17. The Ionian and Alfeo-Etna fault zones: New segments of an evolving plate boundary in the central Mediterranean Sea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, A.; Torelli, L.; Artoni, A.; Carlini, M.; Faccenna, C.; Ferranti, L.; Gasperini, L.; Govers, R.; Klaeschen, D.; Monaco, C.; Neri, G.; Nijholt, N.; Orecchio, B.; Wortel, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Calabrian Arc is a narrow subduction-rollback system resulting from Africa/Eurasia plate convergence. While crustal shortening is taken up in the accretionary wedge, transtensive deformation accounts for margin segmentation along transverse lithospheric faults. One of these structures is the NNW-SSE transtensive fault system connecting the Alfeo seamount and the Etna volcano (Alfeo-Etna Fault, AEF). A second, NW-SE crustal discontinuity, the Ionian Fault (IF), separates two lobes of the CA subduction complex (Western and Eastern Lobes) and impinges on the Sicilian coasts south of the Messina Straits. Analysis of multichannel seismic reflection profiles shows that: 1) the IF and the AEF are transfer crustal tectonic features bounding a complex deformation zone, which produces the downthrown of the Western lobe along a set of transtensive fault strands; 2) during Pleistocene times, transtensive faulting reactivated structural boundaries inherited from the Mesozoic Tethyan domain which acted as thrust faults during the Messinian and Pliocene; and 3) the IF and the AEF, and locally the Malta escarpment, accommodate a recent tectonic event coeval and possibly linked to the Mt. Etna formation. Regional geodynamic models show that, whereas AEF and IF are neighboring fault systems, their individual roles are different. Faulting primarily resulting from the ESE retreat of the Ionian slab is expressed in the northwestern part of the IF. The AEF, on the other hand, is part of the overall dextral shear deformation, resulting from differences in Africa-Eurasia motion between the western and eastern sectors of the Tyrrhenian margin of northern Sicily, and accommodating diverging motions in the adjacent compartments, which results in rifting processes within the Western Lobe of the Calabrian Arc accretionary wedge. As such, it is primarily associated with Africa-Eurasia relative motion.

  18. Carbonate-rich melt infiltration in peridotite xenoliths from the Eurasian-North American modern plate boundary (Chersky Range, Yakutia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschegg, Cornelius; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Akinin, Vyacheslav V.; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    A suite of mainly spinel peridotite and subordinate pyroxenite xenoliths and megacrysts were studied in detail, enabling us to characterize upper mantle conditions and processes beneath the modern North American-Eurasian continental plate boundary. The samples were collected from 37-Ma-old basanites cropping out in the Main Collision Belt of the Chersky Range, Yakutia Republic (Russian Far East). The spinel lherzolites reflect a mantle sequence, equilibrated at temperatures of 890-1,025 °C at pressures of 1.1-2 GPa, with melt extraction estimated to be around 2-6 %. The spinel harzburgites are characterized by lower P-T equilibration conditions and estimated melt extraction up to 12 %. Minor cryptic metasomatic processes are recorded in the clinopyroxene trace elements, revealing that percolating hydrous fluid-rich melts and basaltic melts affected the peridotites. One of the lherzolites preserves a unique melt droplet with primary dolomite in perfect phase contact with Na-rich aluminosilicate glass and sodalite. On the basis of the well-constrained P-T frame of the xenolith suite, as well as the rigorously documented melt extraction and metasomatic history of this upper mantle section, we discuss how a carbonated silicate melt infiltrated the lherzolite at depth and differentiated into an immiscible carbonate and silicate liquid shortly before the xenolith was transported to the surface by the host basalt. Decreasing temperatures triggered crystallization of primary dolomite from the carbonate melt fraction and sodalite as well as quenched glass from the Na-rich aluminosilicate melt fraction. Rapid entrainment and transport to the Earth's surface prevented decarbonatization processes as well as reaction phenomena with the host lherzolite, preserving this exceptional snapshot of upper mantle carbonatization and liquid immiscibility.

  19. Slip rate and earthquake recurrence along the central Septentrional fault, North American-Caribbean plate boundary, Dominican Republic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Mann, P.; Pena, L.R.; Burr, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Septentrional fault zone (SFZ) is the major North American-Caribbean, strike-slip, plate boundary fault at the longitude of eastern Hispaniola. The SFZ traverses the densely populated Cibao Valley of the Dominican Republic, forming a prominent scarp in alluvium. Our studies at four sites along the central SFZ are aimed at quantifying the late Quaternary behavior of this structure to better understand the seismic hazard it represents for the northeastern Caribbean. Our investigations of excavations at sites near Rio Cenovi show that the most recent ground-rupturing earthquake along this fault in the north central Dominican Republic occurred between A.D. 1040 and A.D. 1230, and involved a minimum of ???4 m of left-lateral slip and 2.3 m of normal dip slip at that site. Our studies of offset stream terraces at two locations, Rio Juan Lopez and Rio Licey, provide late Holocene slip rate estimates of 6-9 mm/yr and a maximum of 11-12 mm/yr, respectively, across the Septentrional fault. Combining these results gives a best estimate of 6-12 mm/yr for the slip rate across the SFZ. Three excavations, two near Tenares and one at the Rio Licey site, yielded evidence for the occurrence of earlier prehistoric earthquakes. Dates of strata associated with the penultimate event suggest that it occurred post-A.D. 30, giving a recurrence interval of 800-1200 years. These studies indicate that the SFZ has likely accumulated elastic strain sufficient to generate a major earthquake during the more than 800 years since it last slipped and should be considered likely to produce a destructive future earthquake.

  20. PBO H2O: Monitoring the Terrestrial Water Cycle with reflected GPS signals recorded by the Plate Boundary Observatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, E. E.; Fairfax, E. J.; Chew, C. C.; Larson, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Data from NSF's EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), and similar GPS networks worldwide, can be used to monitor the terrestrial water cycle. GPS satellites transmit L-band microwave signals, which are strongly influenced by water at the surface of the Earth. GPS signals take two different paths: (1) the "direct" signal travels from the satellite to the antenna; (2) the "reflected" signal interacts with the Earth's surface before travelling to the antenna. The direct signal is used by geophysicists to measure the position of the antenna. By analyzing these GPS data over multiple years, the motion of the site can be estimated. The effects of reflected signals are generally ignored by geophysicists because they are small. This is not happenstance, as significant effort has been made to design and deploy a GPS antenna that suppresses ground reflections. Our group has developed a remote sensing technique to retrieve terrestrial water cycle variables from GPS data. We extract the water cycle products from signal strength data that measures the interference between the direct and reflected GPS signals. The sensing footprint is intermediate in scale between in situ observations and most remote sensing measurements. Snow depth, snow water equivalent (SWE), near surface soil moisture, and an index of vegetation water content are currently estimated from nearly 500 PBO sites. These PBO H2O products are updated daily and are available online (http://xenon.colorado.edu/portal/index.php). Validation studies show that retrieved products are of sufficient quality to be used in a variety of applications. The root mean square error (RMSE) of GPS-based SWE is 2 cm, based on a comparison to snow survey data at nearly 20 GPS sites. The RMSE of near surface volumetric soil moisture is < 0.04 cm3 cm-3, sufficient for validation of SMAP soil moisture and similar products.

  1. Rapid Kinematic and Tectonic Variations Along the 1400-km-long Australia-Woodlark Plate Boundary Zone, Papua New Guinea and Woodlark Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Taylor, F. W.; Gahagan, L.; Watson, L.

    2004-12-01

    Previous GPS studies have shown the wide variability in present-day plate motions across the highly arcuate, 1400-km-long Australia-Woodlark plate boundary extending from Papua New Guinea to the Solomon Islands. GPS-determined motions range from orthogonal oceanic spreading in the Woodlark basin, to continental transtension in the 2.5-km-high core complex area of easternmost Papua New Guinea, to continental strike-slip and transpression in 4-km-high mountains of the Papuan Peninsula. We use imagery, earthquake focal mechanisms, coral reef uplift data, and structural mapping studies to establish the along-strike continuity of the active plate boundary fault. Systematic angular changes in the direction of the plate vector along this continuous fault explain its varied tectonic geomorphology, Holocene uplift history, and geologic structure. We use a series of plate reconstructions to illustrate the longer term, Cenozoic evolution of this boundary including: its formation as an arcuate, N- and NE-dipping ophiolitic suture zone during Paleogene time, the progressive "unzippering" of this thrust over the past 6 Ma along a N- and NE-dipping, low-angle normal fault in easternmost Papua New Guinea, and its "zippering" or continued shortening on the suture thrust in the Owen Stanley Ranges of the Papuan Peninsula. Over the 1400-km-length of the fault, the length of segments of oceanic spreading, transtension, and transpression is 250-500 km; the time period separating one tectonic style from the succeeding style encroaching from the east is several million years. This systematic spatial and temporal superposition of tectonic styles, leads to complex - but predictable - along-strike variations in geologic history.

  2. Late 18th to early 19th century sea-level history and inter-seismic behavior along the western Myanmar plate boundary belt recorded by coral microatolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sze-Chieh; Shyu, J. Bruce H.

    2016-04-01

    Along the western Myanmar plate boundary belt, the Indian-Australian plate is subducting obliquely beneath the Burma micro-plate at a rate of about 23 mm/yr. Although information about the 1762 Arakan earthquake, the only major historical event occurred along this plate boundary belt, has been delineated recently from uplifted coastal features, constraints on the inter-seismic behavior of this belt is still very limited, due to the lack of high resolution instrumental records in the area. Therefore, we utilized coral microatolls to analyze relative sea level history, in order to obtain potential information of land-level change along the western coast of Myanmar. Our sample was collected from northwestern Ramree Island, approximately 80 km away from the trench. Previous studies suggest that the coral was uplifted and killed during a local earthquake event in 1848, and recorded relative sea level history of ~80 years prior to that event. Since the highest level of survival (HLS) of coral microatolls is constrained within a few centimeters of the lowest tide level of the area, the patterns of annual growth bands of the coral microatoll in x-radiograph provide us yearly record of relative sea level, and we used U-Th dating technique to constrain the age of the coral. Our results show that this coral microatoll may have recorded the inter-seismic subsidence of northwestern Ramree Island, punctuated by several climatic events that produced die-down records of the coral growth bands. We hope the data obtained from this coral microatoll, combined with previously reported information of the area, will enable us to further understand the seismic behavior of this major plate boundary belt.

  3. Plate-Tectonic Analysis of Shallow Seismicity: Apparent Boundary Width, beta-Value, Corner Magnitude, Coupled Lithosphere Thickness, and Coupling in 7 Tectonic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, P.; Kagan, Y. Y.

    2003-12-01

    A new plate model [Bird, 2003, G3, 10.1029/2001GC000252] is used to analyze the mean seismicities of 7 types of plate boundary (CRB continental rift boundary, CTF continental transform fault, CCB continental convergent boundary, OSR oceanic spreading ridge, OTF oceanic transform fault, OCB oceanic convergent boundary, SUB subduction zone). We compare the plate-like (non-orogen) regions of model PB2002 with the CMT catalog to select apparent boundary half-widths, and then assign 95% of shallow earthquakes to one of these settings. A tapered Gutenberg-Richter model of the frequency/moment relation is fit to the subcatalog for each setting by maximum-likelihood. Best-fitting β values range from 0.53 to 0.92, but all 95%-confidence ranges are consistent with a common value of 0.61-0.66. To better determine some corner magnitudes we expand the subcatalogs by: (1) inclusion of orogens; and (2) inclusion of years 1900-1975 from the catalog of Pacheco and Sykes [1992]. Combining both earthquake statistics and the plate-tectonic constraint on moment rate, corner magnitudes include: CRB 7.64-.26+.76, CTF 8.01-.21+.45, CCB 8.46-.39+.21, OCB 8.04-.22+.52, and SUB 9.58-.46+.48. Coupled lithosphere thicknesses are found to be: CRB 3.0-1.4+7.0 km; CTF 8.6-4.1+11 km; CCB 18-11+? km; OSR 0.13-0.09+.13 km for normal-faulting and 0.40-.21+? km for strike-slip; OTF 12-7.1+?, 1.6-0.5+1.4, and 1.5-0.6+1.2 km at low, medium, and high velocities; OCB 3.8-2.3+13.7 km, and SUB 18.0-10.8+? km. Generally high coupling of subduction and continental plate boundaries suggests that here all seismic gaps are dangerous unless proven to be creeping. Generally low coupling within oceanic lithosphere suggests a different model of isolated seismic asperities surrounded by large seismic gaps which may be permanent.

  4. Geologic observations of the northern boundary of the Caribbean plate across central America as seen by Seasat and SIR-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebillard, P.; Dixon, T.; Farr, T.

    1982-01-01

    The radar data analyzed here extend from the Amatique Bay (Golfo de Honduras) in the northeast to the Pacific Ocean (Puenta Remedios) in the southwest. Space Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) data-take 18 overlaps the principal part of the Seasat mosaic. SIR-A data make possible more observations over the Central American Cordillera, where strong layover limited the amount of information obtained by Seasat. The radar coverage delineates the principal strike-slip faults of the region (Cuilco-Chixoy-Polochic, Motagua and Jocotan), which have acted as the Caribbean-Americas plate boundary. It also demarcates volcanic terranes related to subduction of the Cocos Plate under the Caribbean Plate. Within pumice fields of the Tertiary volcanic belt, the use of two Seasat look directions (rev 759 and rev 1211), in conjunction with SIR-A data, makes possible some rock discrimination.

  5. Hydrodynamic and thermal slip effect on double-diffusive free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate in the moving free stream.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waqar A; Uddin, Md Jashim; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    The effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip boundary conditions on the double-diffusive free convective flow of a nanofluid along a semi-infinite flat solid vertical plate are investigated numerically. It is assumed that free stream is moving. The governing boundary layer equations are non-dimensionalized and transformed into a system of nonlinear, coupled similarity equations. The effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, solute and nanofluid concentration as well as on the reduced Nusselt number, reduced Sherwood number and the reduced nanoparticle Sherwood number are investigated and presented graphically. To the best of our knowledge, the effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip boundary conditions have not been investigated yet. It is found that the reduced local Nusselt, local solute and the local nanofluid Sherwood numbers increase with hydrodynamic slip and decrease with thermal slip parameters.

  6. Hydrodynamic and Thermal Slip Effect on Double-Diffusive Free Convective Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid Past a Flat Vertical Plate in the Moving Free Stream

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Waqar A.; Uddin, Md Jashim; Ismail, A. I. Md.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip boundary conditions on the double-diffusive free convective flow of a nanofluid along a semi-infinite flat solid vertical plate are investigated numerically. It is assumed that free stream is moving. The governing boundary layer equations are non-dimensionalized and transformed into a system of nonlinear, coupled similarity equations. The effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, solute and nanofluid concentration as well as on the reduced Nusselt number, reduced Sherwood number and the reduced nanoparticle Sherwood number are investigated and presented graphically. To the best of our knowledge, the effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip boundary conditions have not been investigated yet. It is found that the reduced local Nusselt, local solute and the local nanofluid Sherwood numbers increase with hydrodynamic slip and decrease with thermal slip parameters. PMID:23533566

  7. Using EarthScope Construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory to Provide Locally Based Experiential Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M.; Eriksson, S.; Barbour, K.; Venator, S.; Mencin, D.; Prescott, W.

    2006-12-01

    EarthScope is an NSF-funded, national science initiative to explore the structure and evolution of the North American continent and to understand the physical processes controlling earthquakes and volcanoes. This large-scale experiment provides locally based opportunities for education and outreach which engage students at various levels and the public. UNAVCO is responsible for the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) component of EarthScope. PBO includes the installation and operations and maintenance of large networks of Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), strainmeter, seismometer, and tiltmeter instruments and the acquisition of satellite radar imagery, all of which will be used to measure and map the smallest movements across faults, the magma movement inside active volcanoes and the very wide areas of deformation associated with plate tectonic motion. UNAVCO, through its own education and outreach activities and in collaboration with the EarthScope E&O Program, uses the PBO construction activities to increase the understanding and public appreciation of geodynamics, earth deformation processes, and their relevance to society. These include programs for public outreach via various media, events associated with local installations, a program to employ students in the construction of PBO, and development of curricular materials by use in local schools associated with the EarthScope geographic areas of focus. PBO provides information to the media to serve the needs of various groups and localities, including interpretive centers at national parks and forests, such as Mt. St. Helens. UNAVCO staff contributed to a television special with the Spanish language network Univision Aquí y Ahora program focused on the San Andreas Fault and volcanoes in Alaska. PBO participated in an Education Day at the Pathfinder Ranch Science and Outdoor Education School in Mountain Center, California. Pathfinder Ranch hosts two of the eight EarthScope borehole strainmeters in the Anza

  8. Constraints on fault slip rates of the southern California plate boundary from GPS velocity and stress inversions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, T.W.; Hardebeck, J.L.; Anderson, G.

    2005-01-01

    We use Global Positioning System (GPS) velocities and stress orientations inferred from seismicity to invert for the distribution of slip on faults in the southern California plate-boundary region. Of particular interest is how long-term slip rates are partitioned between the Indio segment of the San Andreas fault (SAF), the San Jacinto fault (SJF) and the San Bernardino segment of the SAE We use two new sets of constraints to address this problem. The first is geodetic velocities from the Southern California Earthquake Center's (SCEC) Crustal Motion Map (version 3 by Shen et al.), which includes significantly more data than previous models. The second is a regional model of stress-field orientations at seismogenic depths, as determined from earthquake focal mechanisms. While GPS data have been used in similar studies before, this is the first application of stress-field observations to this problem. We construct a simplified model of the southern California fault system, and estimate the interseismic surface velocities using a backslip approach with purely elastic strain accumulation, following Meade et al. In addition, we model the stress orientations at seismogenic depths, assuming that crustal stress results from the loading of active faults. The geodetically derived stressing rates are found to be aligned with the stress orientations from seismicity. We therefore proceed to invert simultaneously GPS and stress observations for slip rates of the faults in our network. We find that the regional patterns of crustal deformation as imaged by both data sets can be explained by our model, and that joint inversions lead to better constrained slip rates. In our preferred model, the SJF accommodates ???15 mm yr-1 and the Indio segment of the SAF ???23 mm yr-1 of right-lateral motion, accompanied by a low slip rate on the San Bernardino segment of the SAF 'Anomalous' fault segments such as around the 1992 Mw = 7.3 Landers surface rupture can be detected. There, observed

  9. Seismic Tomography of the Southern California Plate Boundary Region from Noise-Based Rayleigh and Love Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zigone, Dimitri; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Campillo, Michel; Roux, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    We use cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise between pairs of 158 broadband and short-period sensors to investigate velocity structure over the top 5-10 km of the crust in the Southern California plate boundary region around the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ). From the 9-component correlation tensors associated with all station pairs we derive dispersion curves of Rayleigh and Love wave group velocities. The dispersion results are inverted first for Rayleigh and Love waves group velocity maps on a 1.5 × 1.5 km2 grid that includes portions of the SJFZ, the San Andreas Fault (SAF), and the Elsinore fault. We then invert these maps to 3D shear wave velocities in the top ~7 km of the crust. The distributions of the Rayleigh and Love group velocities exhibit 2θ azimuthal anisotropy with fast directions parallel to the main faults and rotations in complex areas. The reconstructed 3D shear velocity model reveals complex shallow structures correlated with the main geological units, and strong velocity contrasts across various fault sections along with low-velocity damage zones and basins. The SJFZ is marked by a clear velocity contrast with higher V s values on the NE block for the section SE of the San Jacinto basin and a reversed contrast across the section between the San Jacinto basin and the SAF. Velocity contrasts are also observed along the southern parts on the SAF and the Elsinore fault, with a faster southwest block in both cases. The region around the Salton Trough is associated with a significant low-velocity zone. Strong velocity reductions following flower-shape with depth are observed extensively around both the SJFZ and the SAF, and are especially prominent in areas of geometrical complexity. In particular, the area between the SJFZ and the SAF is associated with an extensive low-velocity zone correlated with diffuse seismicity at depth, and a similar pattern including correlation with deep diffuse seismicity is observed on a smaller scale in the

  10. Nature and distribution of geological domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia and regional geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Sallarès, Valentí; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Bartolome, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    We present a new classification of geological domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia, together with a regional geodynamic reconstruction spanning from the Mesozoic extension to the Neogene-to-present-day convergence. It is based on seismic velocity and density models along two regional wide-angle seismic transects, one running NW-SE from the Horseshoe to the Seine abyssal plains, and the other running N-S from S Portugal to the Seine Abyssal Plain, combined with previously available information. The seismic velocity and density structure at the Seine Abyssal Plain and the internal Gulf of Cadiz indicates the presence of a highly heterogeneous oceanic crust, similar to that described in ultra-slow spreading centers, whereas in the Horseshoe and Tagus abyssal plains, the basement structure resembles that of exhumed mantle sections identified in the Northern Atlantic margin. The integration of all this new information allows defining the presence of three oceanic domains offshore SW Iberia: (1) the Seine Abyssal Plain domain, generated during the first stages of slow seafloor spreading in the NE Central Atlantic (Early Jurassic); (2) the Gulf of Cadiz domain, made of oceanic crust generated in the Alpine-Tethys spreading system between Iberia and Africa, which was coeval with the formation of the Seine Abyssal Plain domain and lasted up to the North Atlantic continental break-up (Late Jurassic); and (3) the Gorringe Bank domain, mainly made of rocks exhumed from the mantle with little synchronous magmatism, which formed during the first stages of North Atlantic opening. Our models suggest that the Seine Abyssal Plain and Gulf of Cadiz domains are separated by the Lineament South strike-slip fault, whereas the Gulf of Cadiz and Gorringe Bank domains appear to be limited by a deep thrust fault located at the center of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain. The formation and evolution of these three domains during the Mesozoic is key to understand the sequence

  11. Mars plate tectonics (1) :An Earth prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, S.; Dohm, J.; Baker, V.

    2001-12-01

    We hypothesize the existence of plate tectonism during the embryonic development of Mars, which resulted in the proposed Tharsis superplume (GSA, 2001). Similar to the major influence of superplume on the history of the Earth, we envision the Tharsis superplume to have dominated the geological and climatological history of Mars. Early Noachian plate tectonism is collectively explained by an array of prominent structures and features revealed through Viking-based geological investigations and through the recently acquired high-resolution topographic, imaginary, and geophysical coverage of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. These include: (1) highland-lowland boundary, (2) the Thaumasia highlands mountain range, (3) circular domes among distinct structures of similar trends (e.g., southwest margin of the Thaumasia highland mountain range), interpreted to be andesitic domes associated with subduction zone magma, (e.g., silicic-rich provenances that source andesitic materials to northern plains), and (4) geophysical anomalies such as those identified in the northern plain and regions located to the east-southeast of Hellas basin, interpreted to be the dead spreading centers and probably accreted terrains, respectively. Martian plate tectonism is thought to have continued after the core was frozen, resulting in the death of dynamo, because Mars potential temperature of mantle is expected to be higher than 1500° C, if 34% S-bearing Fe-Ni alloy core was consolidated. In this case, no magnetic stripes would remain in the northern lowland, whereas the proposed southern highland supercontinent that formed during the dynamo would have yielded strong magnetic signatures. For examples EW-trending narrow units with strong remanent magnetism in the southern highland may be accreted oceanic lithosphere. Moreover, the Archean hydrothermal system deposits located along the mid-oceanic ridges on the Earth suggest that the large amounts of carbonate and sulfate are expected to have

  12. Upper boundaries of the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates near the triple junction off the Boso Peninsula deduced from ocean-bottom seismic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Aki; Sugioka, Hiroko; Obana, Koichiro; Hino, Ryota; Suetsugu, Daisuke; Nakahigashi, Kazuo; Shinohara, Masanao; Nakano, Masaru; Yamamoto, Yojiro

    2017-02-01

    We determined hypocenter distributions and focal mechanisms of earthquakes off the Boso Peninsula, Japan, based on seafloor observations using ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs). From OBS data, we detected and located earthquakes that were closer to the trenches than had previously been reported. The determined focal depths of relocated hypocenters were systematically shallower than those in the Japan Meteorological Agency catalog determined from land-based data. The hypocenter distribution was separated into two groups: one associated with the Pacific plate (PAC) and the other with the North American and/or Philippine Sea plates (PHS). For the former group, both the focal depths and mechanisms of low-angle thrust-faulting earthquakes were consistent with the geometry of the PAC determined by previous studies. Among the latter group, we selected low-angle thrust-faulting earthquakes with a slip direction parallel to the direction of PHS subduction or with a dip direction parallel to the PHS to delineate the upper boundary of the PHS. The depth of the plate upper boundary off the Boso Peninsula was found to be approximately 6 km shallower than previously reported estimates.

  13. Deformation during terrane accretion in the Saint Elias orogen, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruhn, R.L.; Pavlis, T.L.; Plafker, G.; Serpa, L.

    2004-01-01

    The Saint Elias orogen of southern Alaska and adjacent Canada is a complex belt of mountains formed by collision and accretion of the Yakutat terrane into the transition zone from transform faulting to subduction in the northeast Pacific. The orogen is an active analog for tectonic processes that formed much of the North American Cordillera, and is also an important site to study (1) the relationships between climate and tectonics, and (2) structures that generate large- to great-magnitude earthquakes. The Yakutat terrane is a fragment of the North American plate margin that is partly subducted beneath and partly accreted to the continental margin of southern Alaska. Interaction between the Yakutat terrane and the North American and Pacific plates causes significant differences in the style of deformation within the terrane. Deformation in the eastern part of the terrane is caused by strike-slip faulting along the Fairweather transform fault and by reverse faulting beneath the coastal mountains, but there is little deformation immediately offshore. The central part of the orogen is marked by thrusting of the Yakutat terrane beneath the North American plate along the Chugach-Saint Elias fault and development of a wide, thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belt. Strike-slip faulting in this segment may he localized in the hanging wall of the Chugach-Saint Elias fault, or dissipated by thrust faulting beneath a north-northeast-trending belt of active deformation that cuts obliquely across the eastern end of the fold-and-thrust belt. Superimposed folds with complex shapes and plunging hinge lines accommodate horizontal shortening and extension in the western part of the orogen, where the sedimentary cover of the Yakutat terrane is accreted into the upper plate of the Aleutian subduction zone. These three structural segments are separated by transverse tectonic boundaries that cut across the Yakutat terrane and also coincide with the courses of piedmont glaciers that flow from

  14. The effect of small streamwise velocity distortion on the boundary layer flow over a thin flat plate with application to boundary layer stability theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.; Cowley, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers show how an initially linear spanwise disturbance in the free stream velocity field is amplified by leading edge bluntness effects and ultimately leads to a small amplitude but linear spanwise motion far downstream from the edge. This spanwise motion is imposed on the boundary layer flow and ultimately causes an order-one change in its profile shape. The modified profiles are highly unstable and can support Tollmein-Schlichting wave growth well upstream of the theoretical lower branch of the neutral stability curve for a Blasius boundary layer.

  15. The effect of small streamwise velocity distortion on the boundary layer flow over a thin flat plate with application to boundary layer stability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Leib, S. J.; Cowley, S. J.

    1990-12-01

    Researchers show how an initially linear spanwise disturbance in the free stream velocity field is amplified by leading edge bluntness effects and ultimately leads to a small amplitude but linear spanwise motion far downstream from the edge. This spanwise motion is imposed on the boundary layer flow and ultimately causes an order-one change in its profile shape. The modified profiles are highly unstable and can support Tollmein-Schlichting wave growth well upstream of the theoretical lower branch of the neutral stability curve for a Blasius boundary layer.

  16. Effects of Ice Accretion on Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to support the development of a new ice accretion model by improving our physical understanding of the ice accretion process through experimental measurements. The focus was on the effect of the initial ice roughness (smooth/rough boundary) on the accretion process. This includes understanding the boundary-layer development over the roughness and especially its effect on the heat transfer which is fundamental to the ice accretion process. The research focused on acquiring the experimental data needed to formulate a new ice accretion physical model. Research was conducted to analyze boundary-layer data taken on a NACA 0012 airfoil with roughness to simulate the smooth/rough boundary. The effect of isolated roughness on boundary-layer transition was studied experimentally to determine if the classical critical roughness Reynolds number criteria could be applied to transition in the airfoil leading-edge area. The effect of simulated smooth/rough boundary roughness on convective heat transfer was studied to complete the study. During the course of this research the effect of free-stream wind tunnel turbulence on the boundary layer was measured. Since this quantity was not well known, research to accurately measure the wind tunnel turbulence in an icing cloud was undertaken. Preliminary results were attained and the final data were acquired, reduced and presented under a subsequent grant.

  17. The 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake: Joint occurrence of tectonic stress-driven and lithostatic stress-driven slips along the plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Y.; Hori, T.; Kodaira, S.

    2011-12-01

    The across-arc rupture process of the Tohoku-Oki Earthquake through its hypocenter has following characteristics. (1)Both the inner and outer wedges were ruptured. Slip in the outer wedge (˜40 m) was significantly greater than slip in the inner wedge (˜20 m) (Lay et al., 2011). (2)Rupture occurred initially in the inner wedge and then extended into the outer wedge all the way along the plate boundary to its updip end (Ide et al., 2011; Fujiwara et al., 2011). (3)A number of aftershocks include normal faulting in the inner and outer wedges and return slips in the inner wedge (Asano et al., 2011; Ide et al., 2011). Recent across-arc seismic surveys have revealed the following: (A)The boundary between the seismically active inner and inactive outer wedges is structurally well-defined as the plate bending point, across which the dip of plate interface changes sharply (Ito et al., 2005; Fujie et al., 2006). (B)The outer wedge at relatively shallow depths is dominated by normal faults except near its updip toe, suggesting that the outer wedge is not horizontally compressed over a time scale of the earthquake cycle (Nakamura et al., 2011). We develop a simple spring-block model of the earthquake cycle consistent with all of the above features, supported partially by the elastic taper theory of outer wedge (Hu and Wang, 2006). In our model, slip along the plate boundary cannot easily climb over its bending point around which slip direction changes by about 10 degree. While slip occurs repeatedly in the inner wedge, the outer wedge remains contacted with the underlying plate even if basal friction is low enough to support only the outer wedge in an extensionally critical state (Wang and Hu, 2006). In fact, dominance of normal faults in the outer ridge seems to favor its relatively low basal friction. Repeated slips in the inner wedge and little slip in the outer wedge accumulate stress near the plate bending point. The accumulated stress is eventually released by slip

  18. Three-Dimensional Thermal Boundary Layer Corrections for Circular Heat Flux Gauges Mounted in a Flat Plate with a Surface Temperature Discontinuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.; Haddad, G. F.; Chen, R.-H.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed in an effort to determine thermal boundary layer correction factors for circular convective heat flux gauges (such as Schmidt-Boelter and plug type)mounted flush in a flat plate subjected to a stepwise surface temperature discontinuity. Turbulent flow solutions with temperature-dependent properties are obtained for a free stream Reynolds number of 1E6, and freestream Mach numbers of 2 and 4. The effect of gauge diameter and the plate surface temperature have been investigated. The 3-D CFD results for the heat flux correction factors are compared to quasi-21) results deduced from constant property integral solutions and also 2-D CFD analysis with both constant and variable properties. The role of three-dimensionality and of property variations on the heat flux correction factors has been demonstrated.

  19. 3-D simulation of temporal change in tectonic deformation pattern and evolution of the plate boundary around the Kanto Region of Japan due to the collision of the Izu-Bonin Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashima, A.; Sato, T.; Ito, T.; Miyauchi, T.; Furuya, H.; Tsumura, N.; Kameo, K.; Yamamoto, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Kanto region of Japan is in a highly complex tectonic setting with four plates interacting with each other: beneath Kanto, situated on the Eurasian and North American plates, the Philippine sea plate subducts and the Pacific plate further descends beneath the North American and Philippine sea plates, forming the unique trench-trench-trench triple junction on the earth. In addition, the Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) arc on the Philippine sea plate is colliding with the Japan islands, which is considered to be a significant effect on the tectonics of Kanto. To reveal the present crustal structure and the present internal stress fields in such a complex tectonic setting, it is essential to comprehend them through the long-term tectonic evolution process. In this study, we estimate the temporal change in tectonic deformation pattern along with the geometry of the plate boundary around Kanto by numerical simulation with a kinematic plate subduction model based on the elastic dislocation theory. This model is based on the idea that mechanical interaction between plates can rationally be represented by the increase of the displacement discontinuity (dislocation) across plate interfaces. Given the 3-D geometry of plate interfaces, the distribution of slip rate vectors for simple plate subduction can be obtained directly from relative plate velocities. In collision zones, the plate with arc crust cannot easily descend because of its buoyancy. This can be represented by giving slip-rate deficit. When crustal deformation occurs, it also causes change in geometry of the plate boundary itself. This geometry change sensitively affects mechanical interaction at the plate boundary. Then the renewed plate-to-plete interaction alters crustal deformation rates. This feedback system has a large effect on collision zones. Indeed, the plate boundary around the Izu peninsula, the northernmost end of the Izu-Bonin arc, intends landward as large as 100 km. Iterating this effect sequentially

  20. Abbot Ice Shelf, structure of the Amundsen Sea continental margin and the southern boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate seaward of West Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, James R; Tinto, Kirsty J; Bell, Robin E

    2015-01-01

    Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity over the Abbot Ice Shelf in West Antarctica for subice bathymetry defines an extensional terrain made up of east-west trending rift basins formed during the early stages of Antarctica/Zealandia rifting. Extension is minor, as rifting jumped north of Thurston Island early in the rifting process. The Amundsen Sea Embayment continental shelf west of the rifted terrain is underlain by a deeper, more extensive sedimentary basin also formed during rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia. A well-defined boundary zone separates the mildly extended Abbot extensional terrain from the deeper Amundsen Embayment shelf basin. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5–1.7 with 80–100 km of extension occurring across an area now 250 km wide. Following this extension, rifting centered north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf appears to have been tectonically quiescent and shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and the advance and retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at about 62 Ma. During the latter part of its independent existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence across the north-south trending Bellingshausen Gravity Anomaly structure at 94°W and compressive deformation on the continental slope between 94°W and 102°W. Farther west, the relative motion was extensional along an east-west trending zone occupied by the Marie Byrd Seamounts. Key Points: Abbot Ice Shelf is underlain by E-W rift basins created at ∼90 Ma Amundsen shelf shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and passage of the ice sheet Bellingshausen plate boundary is located near the base of continental slope and rise PMID:26709352

  1. The radiolarian evidence for the accretion of the Fu-saki Formation with the inferred oceanic plate stratigraphy: A case of weakly-metamorphosed accretionary complex in Ishigaki Jima, southern Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    The island of Ishigaki Jima, located in the western part of the southern Ryukyu Arc, Japan, is underlain by a basement comprising the Tumuru and Fu-saki formations. The former is a pelitic glaucophane schist with a metamorphic age of 220-190 Ma, and the latter is a weakly metamorphosed accretionary complex, composed mainly of chert, mudstone and sandstone with minor amounts of limestone and mafic rocks. The Fu-saki Formation was weakly metamorphosed at ∼140 Ma. Latest Carboniferous-Early Jurassic microfossils have been obtained from the limestones, cherts and siliceous mudstones of this formation, but no fossils have been collected from the phyllitic mudstones. The radiolarian fauna of the phyllitic mudstones described herein indicates a late Pliensbachian-early Toarcian (Early Jurassic) age. This result, when combined with existing data, enables the reconstruction of an oceanic plate stratigraphy, showing a succession of (in ascending order) Upper Carboniferous-Triassic cherts, Sinemurian-lower Pliensbachian siliceous mudstones and upper Pliensbachian-lower Toarcian phyllitic mudstones and sandstones. The radiolarians from the phyllitic mudstones are important in constraining the timing of the accretion of the Fu-saki Formation to the base of the Tumuru Formation.

  2. Double-diffusive mixed convection boundary layer flow from a vertical flat plate embedded in a porous medium filled by a nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Mohd Hafizi Mat; Ishak, Anuar

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of mass suction on double diffusive mixed convection boundary layer flow from a vertical flat plate embedded in a porous medium filled by a nanofluid using Buongiorno's model. The appropriate similarity transformation is used to reduce the partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equation, which is then solved numerically using a shooting method. The effects of mass suction parameter on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics are presented and discussed.

  3. Fusuline biotic turnover across the Guadalupian Lopingian (Middle Upper Permian) boundary in mid-oceanic carbonate buildups: Biostratigraphy of accreted limestone in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Ayano; Isozaki, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    Two sections in Upper Middle to Lower Upper Permian shallow-water limestones at Kamura and Akasaka in southwest Japan were analyzed for detailed lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy. Both sections represent ancient seamount-capping carbonate buildups developed on a basaltic basement in a mid-oceanic environment. The occurrence of abundant Tethyan fusulines allows the recognition of well-defined biostratigraphic zonation in both sections and their mutual correlation. The Upper Guadalupian (Middle Permian) Lepidolina/ Yabeina Zone is overlain conformably by the Lower Lopingian (Upper Permian) Codonofusiella- Reichelina Zone with a 13 m-thick transitional interval barren of index taxa. The Guadalupian-Lopingian (G-L) boundary is marked by the First Appearance Datum (FAD) of the Lopingian Codonofusiella- Reichelina assemblage in both sections. This study recognizes for the first time the G-L boundary horizon in a mid-oceanic shallow-water environment. In addition, the shallow-water carbonates in the study sections record the extinction of the Middle Permian large-sized fusuline family Verbeekinidae at the G-L boundary in mid-Panthalassa, as well as in shallow-water Tethyan shelf areas, demonstrating positively that the G-L boundary mass extinction occurred on a global scale. The abrupt elimination of large-shelled fusulines, followed by the domination of small-shelled fusulines may indicate that environmental stress occurred at the end of Guadalupian. The dying-out of symbiotic algae may have caused the selective extinction of the large-shelled fusulines.

  4. Introducing tectonically and thermo-mechanically realistic lithosphere in the models of plume head -lithosphere interactions (PLI) including intra-continental plate boundaries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou-Frottier, L.; Burov, E.; Cloetingh, S.

    2007-12-01

    Plume-Lithosphere Interactions (PLI) in continets have complex topographic and magmatic signatures and are often identified near boundaries between younger plates (e.g., orogenic) and older stable plates (e.g., cratons), which represent important geometrical, thermal and rheological barriers that interact with the emplacement of the plume head (e.g., Archean West Africa, East Africa, Pannonian - Carpathian system). The observable PLI signatures are conditioned by plume dynamics but also by complex rheology and structure of continental lithosphere. We address this problem by considering a new free-surface thermo-mechanical numerical model of PLI with two stratified elasto-viscous-plastic (EVP) continental plates of contrasting age, thickness and structure. The results show that: (1) surface deformation is poly-harmonic and contains smaller wavelengths (50-500 km) than that associated with the plume head (>1000 km). (2) below intra-plate boundaries, plume head flattening is asymmetric, it is blocked from one side by the cold vertical boundary of the older plate, which leads to mechanical decoupling of crust from mantle lithosphere, and to localized faulting at the cratonic margin; (2) the return flow from the plume head results in sub-vertical down-thrusting (delamination) of the lithosphere at the margin, producing sharp vertical cold boundary down to the 400 km depth; (3) plume head flattening and migration towards the younger plate results in concurrent surface extension above the centre of the plume and in compression (pushing), down-thrusting and magmatic events at the cratonic margin (down-thrusting is also produced at the opposite border of the younger plate); these processes may result in continental growth at the "craton side"; (4) topographic signatures of PLI show basin-scale uplifts and subsidences preferentially located at cratonic margins. Negative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the lithosphere above the plume head provide a mechanism for crustal

  5. Reconstruction of ocean plate stratigraphy in the Gwna Group, NW Wales: Implications for the subduction-accretion process of a latest Proterozoic trench-forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hisashi; Okada, Yoshihiro; Fujisaki, Wataru; Suzuki, Kazue; Sato, Tomohiko; Sawaki, Yusuke; Sakata, Shuhei; Yamamoto, Shinji; Hirata, Takafumi; Maruyama, Shigenori; Windley, Brian F.

    2015-11-01

    The Gwna Group in Anglesey island and Lleyn peninsula, Wales consists of a latest Proterozoic volcano-sedimentary trench mélange, which has a complicated accretionary structure, and is poorly constrained by isotopic ages. The mélange contains oceanic-trench rocks including pillow basalts, cherts, mudstones and sandstones, which have not previously been interpreted as ocean plate stratigraphy (OPS). We reconstructed imbricated OPS at 5 localities in the coastal Lleyn peninsula. In order to constrain the depositional U-Pb age of the upper clastic sediments, detrital zircons, separated from 9 clastic sediments, were analyzed with a Nu AttoM single-collector inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. The ages indicate that there are two Gwna Groups (maximum depositional ages of: 1 at 608-601 Ma, and 2 at 564-539 Ma) that were deposited between the late Neoproterozoic and the Middle Cambrian contemporaneously with dated calc-alkaline arc magmatism and regional metamorphism in the Anglesey-Lleyn complex. The age spectra of the detrital zircons show a prominent peak at ca. 650-600 Ma, and several Proterozoic and Archean ages. To account for the older ages, we integrated our new isotopic data with published radiometric and fossil ages, and conclude that the clastic sediments at the top of the OPS were deposited in a trench on the western active margin of Avalonia when it was close to the Amazonian craton, and that the Gwna Group OPS began to be incorporated into an accretionary wedge in an active subduction zone in the latest Proterozoic.

  6. Numerical Study of Non-Newtonian Boundary Layer Flow of Jeffreys Fluid Past a Vertical Porous Plate in a Non-Darcy Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra Prasad, V.; Gaffar, S. Abdul; Keshava Reddy, E.; Bég, O. Anwar

    2014-07-01

    Polymeric enrobing flows are important in industrial manufacturing technology and process systems. Such flows are non-Newtonian. Motivated by such applications, in this article we investigate the nonlinear steady state boundary layer flow, heat, and mass transfer of an incompressible Jefferys non-Newtonian fluid past a vertical porous plate in a non-Darcy porous medium. The transformed conservation equations are solved numerically subject to physically appropriate boundary conditions using a versatile, implicit, Keller-box finite-difference technique. The numerical code is validated with previous studies. The influence of a number of emerging non-dimensional parameters, namely Deborah number (De), Darcy number (Da), Prandtl number (Pr), ratio of relaxation to retardation times (λ), Schmidt number (Sc), Forchheimer parameter (Λ), and dimensionless tangential coordinate (ξ) on velocity, temperature, and concentration evolution in the boundary layer regime are examined in detail. Furthermore, the effects of these parameters on surface heat transfer rate, mass transfer rate, and local skin friction are also investigated. It is found that the boundary layer flow is decelerated with increasing De and Forchheimer parameter, whereas temperature and concentration are elevated. Increasing λ and Da enhances the velocity but reduces the temperature and concentration. The heat transfer rate and mass transfer rates are found to be depressed with increasing De and enhanced with increasing λ. Local skin friction is found to be decreased with a rise in De, whereas it is elevated with increasing λ. An increasing Sc decreases the velocity and concentration but increases temperature.

  7. Upper mantle deformation in the western US determined from seismic anisotropy; 2: Western North American plate boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Ozalaybey, S.; Savage, M.K. . Seismological Lab.); Silver, P.G. )

    1993-04-01

    The western margin of the North American plate includes subduction, transform faulting and a migrating triple junction. The authors have measured polarization azimuths ([phi]) and delay-times ([delta]t) of split shear waves. Stations located close to the northern end of the San Andreas fault, near the San Francisco Bay area yielded well-constrained but azimuthally varying splitting parameters. These can be explained by a model consisting of two anisotropic layers: an upper layer with fast direction parallel to the strike of the San Andreas fault and a lower layer with E-W fast direction. Both layers have average delay-times of 1[+-]0.3 s. The authors have found that an east-west fast feature is also present beneath stations in the Sierra-Nevada, the Mojave Desert and the Los Angeles area. These latter measurements do not require more than one layer. The E-W fast layer diminishes near the southern edge of the Gorda plate. The authors interpret their measurements as caused by single or double layers of homogeneously, transversely anisotropic material with horizontal symmetry axes due to strain-induced preferred orientation of olivine in the upper mantle. They suggest that the fault-parallel fast layer is the result of finite strain associated with the transform plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates. The deeper layer with E-W fast direction can not be associated with known surface tectonic features. One possible mechanisms for this E-W fast feature is that it may be related to the passage of the trailing edge of the Farallon plate as the slab migrated northward beneath central California. The shear associated with the different motion between the slab and the asthenosphere may cause mineral alignment leading to shear-wave splitting.

  8. The Diffuse Plate boundary of Nubia and Iberia in the Western Mediterranean: Crustal deformation evidence for viscous coupling and fragmented lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo; González, Pablo J.; Fernández, José

    2015-11-01

    A spatially dense GNSS-based crustal velocity field for the Iberian Peninsula and Northern Africa allows us to provide new insights into two main tectonic processes currently occurring in this area. In particular, we provide, for the first time, clear evidence for a large-scale clockwise rotation of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to stable Eurasia (Euler pole component: N42.612°, W1.833°, clockwise rotation rate of 0.07 deg/Myr). We favor the interpretation that this pattern reflects the quasi-continuous straining of the ductile lithosphere in some sectors of South and Western Iberia in response to viscous coupling of the NW Nubia and Iberian plate boundary in the Gulf of Cádiz. We furnish evidence for a fragmentation of the western Mediterranean basin into independent crustal tectonic blocks, which are delimited by inherited lithospheric shear structures. Among these blocks, an (oceanic-like western) Algerian one is currently transferring a significant fraction of the Nubia-Eurasia convergence rate into the Eastern Betics (SE Iberia) and likely causing the eastward motion of the Baleares Promontory. These processes can be mainly explained by spatially variable lithospheric plate forces imposed along the Nubia-Eurasia convergence boundary.

  9. Large vertical motions and basin evolution in the Outer Continental Borderland off Southern California associated with plate boundary development and continental rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, C.; Sorlien, C. C.; Schindler, C. S.; De Hoogh, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Continental Borderland offshore southern California occupies a strategic position along the continental margin. It was the locus of ~75% of Pacific-North America displacement history, it helped accommodate the large-scale (>90°) tectonic rotation of the Western Transverse Ranges province, and is still accommodating potentially 20% of PAC-NAM plate motion today. As such, it represents an ideal natural laboratory to investigate plate boundary evolution and basin development associated with transform initiation, oblique continental rifting, transrotation and transpression. We have been using newly released grids of high-quality industry multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data, combined with multibeam bathymetry and offshore well data to map and construct digital 3D fault surfaces and stratigraphic reference horizons over large parts of the Outer Continental Borderland. These 3D surfaces of structure and stratigraphy can be used to better understand and evaluate regional patterns of uplift, subsidence, fault interaction and other aspects of plate boundary deformation. In the northern Outer Borderland, mapping in Santa Cruz basin, and across both Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz-Catalina ridges reveals a pattern of interacting high-and low-angle faults, fault reactivation, basin subsidence, folding, and basin inversion. Subsidence since early-Miocene time is significant (up to 4 km) and is much larger than predicted by simple thermal cooling models of continental rifting. This requires additional tectonic components to drive this regional subsidence and subsequent basin inversion. Farther south, a more en echelon pattern of ridges and basins suggests a distributed component of right-lateral shear also contributed to much of the modern Borderland seafloor topography, including major Borderland basins. Vertical motions of uplift and subsidence can be estimated from a prominent early-Miocene unconformity that likely represents a regional, paleo-horizontal, near

  10. Effect of inherited structures on strike-slip plate boundaries: insight from analogue modelling of the central Levant Fracture System, Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalayini, Ramadan; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Homberg, Catherine; Nader, Fadi

    2015-04-01

    Analogue sandbox modeling is a tool to simulate deformation style and structural evolution of sedimentary basins. The initial goal is to test what is the effect of inherited and crustal structures on the propagation, evolution, and final geometry of major strike-slip faults at the boundary between two tectonic plates. For this purpose, we have undertaken a series of analogue models to validate and reproduce the structures of the Levant Fracture System, a major NNE-SSW sinistral strike-slip fault forming the boundary between the Arabian and African plates. Onshore observations and recent high quality 3D seismic data in the Levant Basin offshore Lebanon demonstrated that Mesozoic ENE striking normal faults were reactivated into dextral strike-slip faults during the Late Miocene till present day activity of the plate boundary which shows a major restraining bend in Lebanon with a ~ 30°clockwise rotation in its trend. Experimental parameters consisted of a silicone layer at the base simulating the ductile crust, overlain by intercalated quartz sand and glass sand layers. Pre-existing structures were simulated by creating a graben in the silicone below the sand at an oblique (>60°) angle to the main throughgoing strike-slip fault. The latter contains a small stepover at depth to create transpression during sinistral strike-slip movement and consequently result in mountain building similarly to modern day Lebanon. Strike-slip movement and compression were regulated by steady-speed computer-controlled engines and the model was scanned using a CT-scanner continuously while deforming to have a final 4D model of the system. Results showed that existing normal faults were reactivated into dextral strike-slip faults as the sinistral movement between the two plates accumulated. Notably, the resulting restraining bend is asymmetric and segmented into two different compartments with differing geometries. One compartment shows a box fold anticline, while the second shows an

  11. Distribution and mechanism of Neogene to present-day vertical axis rotations, Pacific-Australian Plate Boundary Zone, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy A.; Roberts, Andrew P.

    1997-01-01

    Remarkably little knowledge exists about mechanisms of vertical axis rotation in continental crust. Steeply dipping basement rocks in South Island, New Zealand, provide an opportunity to map the distribution of rotations across the Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone, and to delineate boundaries of rotated blocks in unusual detail. We synthesize new structural data with new and existing paleomagnetic data, with geodetic data, and with patterns of Neogene-Quaternary faulting in the strike-slip Marlborough fault system. For the past 20 m.y., vertical axis rotations have been hinged about two crustal-scale boundaries near the east coast. The NE hinge accommodated ˜50° of early-middle Miocene clockwise rotation, which caused deformation of the eastern ends of the Alpine-Wairau and Clarence strike-slip faults. The SW hinge has accommodated a further 30°-50° of finite clockwise rotation since ˜4 Ma and deflects active fault traces. The locus of rotation has shifted southwestward astride a subduction margin that is lengthening in that direction. Rotating rocks are pinned to the south against a locked collision zone where the continental Chatham Rise impinges against the margin. Slip on inland strike-slip faults is transformed seaward across a zone of fault termination into rigid body rotation of a large continental block that has been thrust eastward over the downgoing subducted slab of the Pacific plate. The rotation mechanism is a "migrating hinge," which resembles a flexed telephone book. Strike-slip faults are translated through a brecciated hinge region that does not coincide with a fixed material line in the rock.

  12. A revised estimate of Pacific-North America motion and implications for Western North America plate boundary zone tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Stein, Seth; Argus, Donald F.

    1987-01-01

    Marine magnetic profiles from the Gulf of Californa are studied in order to revise the estimate of Pacific-North America motion. It is found that since 3 Ma spreading has averaged 48 mm/yr, consistent with a new global plate motion model derived without any data. The present data suggest that strike-slip motion on faults west of the San Andreas is less than previously thought, reducing the San Andreas discrepancy with geodetic, seismological, and other geologic observations.

  13. Changes in Student Knowledge and Views of Geohazards, Societal Risks, and Monitoring at Active Plate Boundaries Using a Data-Rich Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkin, P. A.; Goodell, L. P.; Teasdale, R.

    2015-12-01

    The "Living on the Edge: Building Resilient Societies on Active Plate Margins" curriculum consists of six data-rich activities, each intended for a 50-minute class, in which students assess risk at active plate boundaries due to earthquakes and volcanoes. Developed as part of the InTeGrate NSF STEP Center the peer-reviewed, publically available materials (http://serc.carleton.edu/104296) have been used at several institutions in diverse classroom settings including small laboratory sections, large lecture courses, medium-sized upper division courses and professional development programs for middle and high school teachers. Pre- and post-instruction surveys measured content knowledge and geoscience literacy, self-efficacy in using geologic data to assess hazards and risk, and attitudes towards the value of monitoring plate margins. The activities have overall positive effects on knowledge of geohazard concepts. Views about the value of scientific practice also became more positive: 74% of students indicated they "agree" or "strongly agree" that monitoring geologic activity has value to them personally (even if they don't live on an active plate margin) and 94% indicated that such monitoring is valuable to society. Most became more confident in evaluating geologic hazard and risk (>60% of students self-described increased confidence by one or more Likert levels). Student knowledge of both the types and limits of data in forecasting geological hazards and their effects also improved. However, attitudes toward sustainability and geoscience careers did not change. Learning and attitudinal improvements are true for all classroom types, but the degree of change varies with class size and the amount of time spent on activities. Learning data and instructor feedback suggest that interactive classroom activities that use real-world data to address societally relevant issues increase student learning and enhance students' ability to synthesize scientific information.

  14. Tsujal Marine Survey: Crustal Characterization of the Rivera Plate-Jalisco Block Boundary and its Implications for Seismic and Tsunami Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome, R.; Danobeitia, J.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Cameselle, A. L.; Estrada, F.; Prada, M.; Bandy, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    During the spring of 2014, a team of Spanish and Mexican scientists explored the western margin of Mexico in the frame of the TSUJAL project. The two main objectives were to characterize the nature and structure of the lithosphere and to identify potential sources triggering earthquakes and tsunamis at the contact between Rivera plate-Jalisco block with the North American Plate. With these purposes a set of marine geophysical data were acquired aboard the RRS James Cook. This work is focus in the southern part of the TSUJAL survey, where we obtain seismic images from the oceanic domain up to the continental shelf. Thus, more than 800 km of MCS data, divided in 7 profiles, have been acquired with a 6km long streamer and using an air-gun sources ranging from 5800 c.i. to 3540 c.i. Furthermore, a wide-angle seismic profile of 190 km length was recorded in 16 OBS deployed perpendicular to the coast of Manzanillo. Gravity and magnetic, multibeam bathymetry and sub-bottom profiler data were recorded simultaneously with seismic data in the offshore area. Preliminary stacked MCS seismic sections reveal the crustal structure in the different domains of the Mexican margin. The contact between the Rivera and NA Plates is observed as a strong reflection at 6 s two way travel time (TWTT), in a parallel offshore profile (TS01), south of Manzanillo. This contact is also identified in a perpendicular profile, TS02, along a section of more than 100 km in length crossing the Rivera transform zone, and the plate boundary between Cocos and Rivera Plates. Northwards, offshore Pto. Vallarta, the MCS data reveals high amplitude reflections at around 7-8.5 s TWTT, roughly 2.5-3.5 s TWTT below the seafloor, that conspicuously define the subduction plane (TS06b). These strong reflections which we interpret as the Moho discontinuity define the starting bending of subduction of Rivera Plate. Another clear pattern observed within the first second of the MCS data shows evidences of a bottom

  15. Exhumation History of an Oblique Plate Boundary: Investigating Kaikoura Mountain-building within the Marlborough Fault System, NE South Island New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, C.; Duvall, A. R.; Flowers, R. M.; Tucker, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Kaikoura Mountains stand high as topographic anomalies in the oblique Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone known as the Marlborough Fault System (MFS), NE South Island New Zealand. The base of both the Inland and Seaward Kaikoura Ranges are bound on the SE by major, steeply NW-dipping, right lateral, active strike-slips (Clarence and Hope faults of the MFS, respectively). Previous geologic mapping, observations of predominantly horizontal fault slip at the surface from GPS and offset Quaternary deposits, and uplift of marine terraces, provide evidence for shortening and mountain-building via distributed deformation off of the main MFS strike-slip faults. However, quantitative estimates of the magnitude and spatial patterns of exhumation and of the timing of mountain-building in the Kaikouras are needed to understand more fully the nature of oblique deformation in the MFS. We present new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages from opposite sides of the Hope and Clarence faults, spanning over 2 km of relief within the Kaikoura Mountains to identify spatial and temporal changes in exhumation rates in relation to the adjacent faults. Young (~3 Ma) apatite He ages and rapid (potentially > 1 mm/yr) exhumation rates from opposite sides of the faults are consistent with previously mentioned evidence of recent, regional, distributed deformation off of the main MFS faults. Moreover, early Miocene zircon He ages imply that parts of this region experienced an earlier phase of fault-related exhumation. Large changes in zircon He ages across the faults from ~20 Ma to > 100 Ma support hypotheses that portions of the Marlborough Faults may be re-activated, early Miocene thrusts. The zircon data are also consistent with the hypothesis of an early Miocene initiation of the oblique Pacific-Australian plate boundary in this region. Evidence for this comes from a change in sedimentation during this time from fine marine sediments to coarse, terrigenous conglomerates. Observing more

  16. Paleomagnetic records of core samples of the plate-boundary thrust drilled during the IODP Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, T.; Yang, T.; Ujiie, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Chester, F. M.; Moore, J. C.; Rowe, C. D.; Regalla, C.; Remitti, F.; Kameda, J.; Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Bose, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Toy, V. G.

    2013-12-01

    IODP Expedition 343, Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST), drilled across the plate-boundary décollement zone near the Japan Trench where large slip occurred during the March 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. We conducted paleomagnetic measurements of the core sample retrieved from the highly-deformed sediments comprising the plate-boundary décollement zone. Whole-round samples for structural analyses from five depth intervals of the core (0-12 cm, 12-30 cm, 43-48 cm, 48-58 cm, and 87.5-105 cm), were trimmed into oriented slabs with typical dimensions of 3x3x5 cm that are now being used to make petrographic sections for microstructural and chemical study. The remainder of the core sample was split into working and archive halves. We measured remanent magnetization of 16 trimmed slabs and the archive half of the core sample. The slabs were subjected to natural remanent magnetization (NRM) measurements in 0.5-1 cm intervals and progressive alternating field demagnetization (AFD) up to 80 mT with a 2G755 pass-through superconducting rock magnetometer at Kochi University. The archive half of the core sample was subjected to NRM measurement and AFD up to 20 mT with a 2G760 superconducting rock magnetometer installed on R/V Chikyu. Typically, two or three paleomagnetic components were isolated during the AFD of slab samples up to 80 mT. One ';soft' component was demagnetized below 20-30 mT, and another ';hard' component was not demagnetized even with AFD in 80 mT. A third component may be separated during AFD at the intermediate demagnetizing field, and may overlap the soft and hard components. The multiple slab samples cut from an identical whole-round sample have generally consistent paleomagnetic direction of the hard component. Contrastingly, the direction of the soft component is less consistent between adjacent slabs, and even varies within a single slab. The direction variation of the soft component possibly reflects the cm-scale strain and rotation of the

  17. Physical analysis and second-order modelling of an unsteady turbulent flow - The oscillating boundary layer on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha Minh, H.; Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.; Spalart, P.; Vandromme, D. D.

    1989-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer under a freestream whose velocity varies sinusoidally in time around a zero mean is computed using two second order turbulence closure models. The time or phase dependent behavior of the Reynolds stresses are analyzed and results are compared to those of a previous SPALART-BALDWIN direct simulation. Comparisons show that the second order modeling is quite satisfactory for almost all phase angles, except in the relaminarization period where the computations lead to a relatively high wall shear stress.

  18. Distribution of the Pacific/North America motion in the Queen Charlotte Islands-S. Alaska plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotti, Stéphane; Hyndman, Roy D.; Flück, Paul; Smith, Alex J.; Schmidt, Michael

    2003-07-01

    We present GPS data that constrain the distribution of the relative Pacific/North America motion across the Queen Charlotte Islands-Alaska Panhandle margin (NW North America). Velocities from a network of 22 campaign and permanent sites indicate that the Pacific/North America transpressive motion is mostly accommodated along the locked Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault. A significant portion (6-7 mm/yr) of the relative plate motion is taken up by distributed dextral shear across a ~200 km wide region of the margin. Two models have been proposed to describe how the Pacific/North America convergence is accommodated off the Queen Charlotte Islands: Internal shortening vs. underthrusting of the Pacific plate. Although the GPS data cannot discriminate between the models, they provide strong constraints on the convergence distribution. The significant non-transient motion of GPS sites along the central British Columbia-southern Alaska margin has implications for seismic hazard and tectonic evolution models of the Canadian Cordillera.

  19. Terrestrial Planets Accreted Dry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarede, F.; Blichert-Toft, J.

    2007-12-01

    Plate tectonics shaped the Earth, whereas the Moon is a dry and inactive desert. Mars probably came to rest within the first billion years of its history, and Venus, although internally very active, has a dry inferno for its surface. The strong gravity field of a large planet allows for an enormous amount of gravitational energy to be released, causing the outer part of the planetary body to melt (magma ocean), helps retain water on the planet, and increases the pressure gradient. The weak gravity field and anhydrous conditions prevailing on the Moon stabilized, on top of its magma ocean, a thick buoyant plagioclase lithosphere, which insulated the molten interior. On Earth, the buoyant hydrous phases (serpentines) produced by reactions between the terrestrial magma ocean and the wet impactors received from the outer Solar System isolated the magma and kept it molten for some few tens of million years. The elemental distributions and the range of condensation temperatures show that the planets from the inner Solar System accreted dry. The interior of planets that lost up to 95% of their K cannot contain much water. Foundering of their wet surface material softened the terrestrial mantle and set the scene for the onset of plate tectonics. This very same process may have removed all the water from the surface of Venus 500 My ago and added enough water to its mantle to make its internal dynamics very strong and keep the surface very young. Because of a radius smaller than that of the Earth, not enough water could be drawn into the Martian mantle before it was lost to space and Martian plate tectonics never began. The radius of a planet therefore is the key parameter controlling most of its evolutional features.

  20. Accretion Processes in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Martínez-País, Ignacio; Shahbaz, Tariq; Casares Velázquez, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    List of contributors; List of participants; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1. Accretion disks Henk Spruit; 2. The evolution of binary systems Philipp Podsiadlowski; 3. Accretion onto white dwarfs Brian Warner; 4. Accretion in X-ray binary systems Robert I. Hynes; 5. X-ray binary populations in galaxies Giuseppina Fabbiano; 6. Observational characteristics of accretion onto black holes I Chris Done; 7. Observational characteristics of accretion onto black holes II Rob Fender; 8. Computing black hole accretion John F. Hawley; Appendix: Piazzi Smyth, the Cape of Good Hope, Tenerife and the siting of large telescopes Brian Warner.

  1. Enigma of earthquakes at ridge-transform-fault plate boundaries - Distribution of non-double couple parameter of Harvard CMT solutions. [Centroid Moment Tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi )

    1991-06-01

    The distribution of the non-double couple parameter of shallow earthquakes reported in the Harvard CMT catalogue shows systematic characteristics depending on the epicentral locations and types of fault mechanisms. The authors suggest that they can be explained by the presence of subevents with different double couple mechanisms in a single rupture sequence. The earthquakes at the ridge-transform-fault plate boundaries show a particularly interesting pattern. It is suggested that two types of faulting expected in the area (i.e., normal faults at ridges and strike slip faults at transform-faults) tend to occur almost simultaneously, although this hypothesis needs to be delineated by careful analyses using bodywave waveforms.

  2. Deformed Neogene basins, active faulting and topography in Westland: Distributed crustal mobility west of the Alpine Fault transpressive plate boundary (South Island, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisetti, Francesca; Sibson, Richard H.; Hamling, Ian

    2016-12-01

    Tectonic activity in the South Island of New Zealand is dominated by the Alpine Fault component of the Australia-Pacific plate boundary. West of the Alpine Fault deformation is recorded by Paleogene-Neogene basins coeval with the evolution of the right-lateral/transpressive plate margin. Initial tectonic setting was controlled by N-S normal faults developed during Late Cretaceous and Eocene-early Miocene rifting. Following inception of the Alpine Fault (c. 25 Ma) reverse reactivation of the normal faults controlled tectonic segmentation that became apparent in the cover sequences at c. 22 Ma. Based on restored transects tied to stratigraphic sections, seismic lines and wells, we reconstruct the vertical mobility of the Top Basement Unconformity west of Alpine Fault. From c. 37-35 Ma to 22 Ma subsidence was controlled by extensional faulting. After 22 Ma the region was affected by differential subsidence, resulting from eastward crustal flexure towards the Alpine Fault boundary and/or components of transtension. Transition from subsidence to uplift started at c. 17 Ma within a belt of basement pop-ups, separated by subsiding basins localised in the common footwall of oppositely-dipping reverse faults. From 17 to 7-3 Ma reverse fault reactivation and uplift migrated to the WSW. Persistent reverse reactivation of the inherited faults in the present stress field is reflected by the close match between tectonic block segmentation and topography filtered at a wavelength of 25 km, i.e. at a scale comparable to crustal thickness in the region. However, topography filtered at wavelength of 75 km shows marked contrasts between the elevated Tasman Ranges region relative to regions to the south. Variations in thickness and rigidity of the Australian lithosphere possibly control N-S longitudinal changes, consistent with our estimates of increase in linear shortening from the Tasman Ranges to the regions located west of the Alpine Fault bend.

  3. Abbot Ice Shelf, structure of the Amundsen Sea continental margin and the southern boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate seaward of West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, James R.; Tinto, Kirsty J.; Bell, Robin E.

    2015-05-01

    Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity over the Abbot Ice Shelf in West Antarctica for subice bathymetry defines an extensional terrain made up of east-west trending rift basins formed during the early stages of Antarctica/Zealandia rifting. Extension is minor, as rifting jumped north of Thurston Island early in the rifting process. The Amundsen Sea Embayment continental shelf west of the rifted terrain is underlain by a deeper, more extensive sedimentary basin also formed during rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia. A well-defined boundary zone separates the mildly extended Abbot extensional terrain from the deeper Amundsen Embayment shelf basin. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5-1.7 with 80-100 km of extension occurring across an area now 250 km wide. Following this extension, rifting centered north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf appears to have been tectonically quiescent and shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and the advance and retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at about 62 Ma. During the latter part of its independent existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence across the north-south trending Bellingshausen Gravity Anomaly structure at 94°W and compressive deformation on the continental slope between 94°W and 102°W. Farther west, the relative motion was extensional along an east-west trending zone occupied by the Marie Byrd Seamounts. The copyright line for this article was changed on 5 JUN 2015 after original online publication.

  4. Modeled Temperatures and Fluid Source Distributions for the Mexico Subduction Zone: Effects of Hydrothermal Cooling and Implications for Plate Boundary Seismic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M. R.; Spinelli, G. A.; Wada, I.

    2014-12-01

    In subduction zones, spatial variations in pore fluid pressure are hypothesized to control the distribution and nature of slip behavior (e.g., "normal" earthquakes, slow slip events, non-volcanic tremor, very low frequency earthquakes) on the plate boundary fault. A primary control on the pore fluid pressure distribution in subduction zones is the distribution of fluid release from hydrous minerals in the subducting sediment and rock. The distributions of these diagenetic and metamorphic fluid sources are controlled by the pressure-temperature paths that the subducting material follows. Thus, constraining subduction zone thermal structure is required to inform conceptual models of seismic behavior. Here, we present results of thermal models for the Mexico subduction zone, a system that has received recent attention due to observations of slow-slip events and non-volcanic tremor. We model temperatures in five margin-perpendicular transects from 96 ˚W to 104 ˚W. In each transect, we examine the potential thermal effects of vigorous fluid circulation in a high permeability aquifer within the basaltic basement of the oceanic crust. In the transect at 100˚W, hydrothermal circulation cools the subducting material by up to 140 ˚C, shifting peak slab dehydration landward by ~100 km relative to previous estimates from models that do not include the effects of fluid circulation. The age of the subducting plate in the trench increases from ~3 Ma at 104 ˚W to ~18 Ma at 96 ˚W; hydrothermal circulation redistributes the most heat (and cools the system the most) where the subducting plate is youngest. For systems with <20 Ma subducting lithosphere, hydrothermal circulation in oceanic crust should be considered in estimating subduction zone temperatures and fluid source distributions.

  5. Evolution of the Adria-Europe plate boundary in the northern Dinarides: from continent-continent collision to back-arc extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaszewski, Kamil; Frank, Wolfgang; Fügenschuh, Bernhard; Kounov, Alexandre; Krenn, Erwin; Schaltegger, Urs; Schmid, Stefan M.

    2010-05-01

    The Sava Zone of the northern Dinarides in Former Yugoslavia is part of the Cenozoic Adria-Europe plate boundary. Late Cretaceous subduction of remnants of Meliata-Vardar oceanic lithosphere led to the formation of a suture, across which upper-plate European units were juxtaposed with Adria-derived units of the Dinarides. Late Cretaceous siliciclastic sediments were incorporated into an accretionary wedge that evolved during the initial stages of continent-continent collision. Structurally deeper parts of the exposed accretionary wedge underwent amphibolitegrade metamorphism. Grt-Pl-Ms-Bt thermobarometry and multi-phase equilibria indicate temperatures between 550 and 630°C and pressures between 5 and 7 kbar for this event. Peak-metamorphic conditions were reached at around 65 Ma. Relatively slow cooling from peak-metamorphic conditions throughout most of the Paleogene was possibly induced by hangingwall erosion in conjunction with southwest-directed propagation of thrusting in the Dinarides. Accelerated cooling took place in Miocene times, when the Sava Zone underwent substantial extension that led to the exhumation of the metamorphosed units along a low-angle detachment. 40Ar/39Ar sericite and zircon and apatite fission track ages from the footwall allow bracketing the timing of this extensional unroofing between 25 and 14 Ma. Footwall exhumation started under greenschist-facies conditions and was associated with top-N tectonic transport, indicating exhumation from below European-plate units. Extensional unroofing clearly postdates the emplacement of a 27 Ma old granitoid that also underwent solid-state deformation under greenschistfacies conditions. This extensional phase is hence clearly linked to the Miocene evolution of the Pannonian basin, which represents a back-arc basin formed due to Neogene subduction roll-back in the Carpathians.

  6. Abbot Ice Shelf, structure of the Amundsen Sea continental margin and the southern boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate seaward of West Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Cochran, James R; Tinto, Kirsty J; Bell, Robin E

    2015-05-01

    Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity over the Abbot Ice Shelf in West Antarctica for subice bathymetry defines an extensional terrain made up of east-west trending rift basins formed during the early stages of Antarctica/Zealandia rifting. Extension is minor, as rifting jumped north of Thurston Island early in the rifting process. The Amundsen Sea Embayment continental shelf west of the rifted terrain is underlain by a deeper, more extensive sedimentary basin also formed during rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia. A well-defined boundary zone separates the mildly extended Abbot extensional terrain from the deeper Amundsen Embayment shelf basin. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5-1.7 with 80-100 km of extension occurring across an area now 250 km wide. Following this extension, rifting centered north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf appears to have been tectonically quiescent and shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and the advance and retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at about 62 Ma. During the latter part of its independent existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence across the north-south trending Bellingshausen Gravity Anomaly structure at 94°W and compressive deformation on the continental slope between 94°W and 102°W. Farther west, the relative motion was extensional along an east-west trending zone occupied by the Marie Byrd Seamounts.

  7. Continental accretion: From oceanic plateaus to allochthonous terranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Nur, A.; Jones, D.; Cox, A.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the regions of the anomalously high sea-floor topography in today's oceans may be modern allochthonous terranes moving with their oceanic plates. Fated to collide with and be accreted to adjacent continents, they may create complex volcanism, cut off and trap oceanic crust, and cause orogenic deformation. The accretion of plateaus during subduction of oceanic plates may be responsible for mountain building comparable to that produced by the collision of continents. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of K-type and H-type transitions to turbulence in a low Mach number flat plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Hamman, Curtis; Moin, Parviz

    2011-11-01

    Transition to turbulence via spatially evolving secondary instabilities in compressible, zero-pressure-gradient flat plate boundary layers is numerically simulated for both the Klebanoff K-type and Herbert H-type disturbances. The objective of this work is to evaluate the universality of the breakdown process between different routes through transition in wall-bounded shear flows. Each localized linear disturbance is amplified through weak non-linear instability that grows into lambda-vortices and then hairpin-shaped eddies with harmonic wavelength, which become less organized in the late-transitional regime once a fully populated spanwise turbulent energy spectrum is established. For the H-type transition, the computational domain extends from Rex =105 , where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and a pair of oblique waves, to fully turbulent stage at Rex = 10 . 6 ×105 . The computational domain for the K-type transition extends to Rex = 9 . 6 ×105 . The computational algorithm employs fourth-order central differences with non-reflective numerical sponges along the external boundaries. For each case, the Mach number is 0.2. Supported by the PSAAP program of DoE, ANL and LLNL.

  9. Refined Views of Strike-slip Fault Zones, Seismicity, and State of Stress Associated With the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, E.; Nicholson, C.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Shearer, P. M.; Sandwell, D. T.; Yang, W.

    2013-12-01

    The mostly strike-slip plate boundary in southern California is expressed as a system of late Quaternary faults or principal slip zones (PSZs), with numerous adjacent smaller slip surfaces. It is complex, even after large cumulative displacements, and consists of major fault systems with multi-stranded, non-planar fault geometry, including some in close proximity to each other. There are also secondary cross faults and low-angle detachments that interact with the PSZs accommodating main plate boundary motion. The loading of plate-tectonic strain causes the largest earthquakes along PSZs, moderate-sized events in their immediate vicinity, and small earthquakes across the whole region. We apply relocated earthquake and refined focal mechanism (1981-2013) catalogs, as well as other geophysical datasets to provide refined views of the 3D fault geometry of these active fault systems. To determine properties of individual fault zones, we measure the Euclidian distance from every hypocenter to the nearest PSZ. In addition, we assign crustal geophysical parameters such as heat flow value and shear or dilatation strain rates to each epicenter. We investigate seismogenic thickness and fault zone width as well as earthquake source processes. We find that the seismicity rate is a function of location, with the rate dying off exponentially with distance from the PSZ. About 80% of small earthquakes are located within 5 km of a PSZ. For small earthquakes, stress drops increase in size with distance away from the PSZs. The magnitude distribution near the PSZs suggests that large earthquakes are more common close to PSZs, and they are more likely to occur at greater depth than small earthquakes. In contrast, small quakes can occur at any geographical location. An optimal combination of heat flow and strain rate is required to concentrate the strain along rheologically weak fault zones, which accommodate the crustal deformation processes, causing seismicity. The regional trend of

  10. Non-parallel stability of a flat-plate boundary layer using the complete Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, H.; Konzelmann, U.

    1990-12-01

    Non-parallel effects which are due to the growing boundary layer are investigated by direct numerical integration of the complete Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flows. The problem formulation is spatial, i.e. disturbances may grow or decay in the downstream direction as in the physical experiments. In the past various non-parallel theories were published that differ considerably from each other in both approach and interpretation of the results. In this paper a detailed comparison of the Navier-Stokes calculation with the various non-parallel theories is provided. It is shown that the good agreement of some of the theories with experiments is fortuitous and that the difference between experiments and theories concerning the branch I neutral location cannot be explained by non-parallel effects.

  11. Thermochronology of mid-Cretaceous dioritic granulites adjacent "Big Bend" in Australia-Pacific plate boundary, northern South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, M.; Seward, D.; Heizler, M. T.; Palin, J. M.; Toy, V. G.; Tulloch, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Western Fiordland Orthogneiss (WFO), situated south-east of the Australian-Pacific plate boundary (Alpine Fault), southern South Island, New Zealand is the largest suite of plutonic rocks intruded into the Pacific margin of Gondwana during the final stages of arc plutonism preceding break-up of the supercontinent in the Late Cretaceous. Dextral motion of c. 480 km along the Alpine Fault during the Cenozoic has offset originally contiguous Pacific Gondwana margin rocks in northern and southern South Island. The Glenroy Complex in northern South Island, west of the Alpine Fault is dominated by two-pyroxene+hornblende granulite facies monzodioritic gneisses. U-Pb zircon geochronological and geochemical data indicate the Glenroy Complex was emplaced between 128-122 Ma and is a correlative of the WFO. The Glenroy Complex forms the lower-most block bounded by an east-dipping set of imbricate thrusts that developed during the late Cenozoic to the west of the largest S-shaped restraining bend ("Big Bend") in the Alpine Fault. New 40Ar/39Ar and fission-track thermochronological data, combined with previous geological field-mapping, demonstrate that the Glenroy Complex cooled rapidly (c. 30° C/Ma) after emplacement and granulite facies metamorphism (c. 850°C) at c. 120 Ma, through c. 550 °C by c. 110-100 Ma. The average cooling rate during the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic was relatively slow, and initial exposure in the late Early Miocene (c. 16 Ma) was followed by reburial to c. 3-4 km (c. 80-100 °C) before final exhumation post-Pliocene. This thermal history is similar to the WFO, which cooled rapidly through c. 350 °C during mid-Cretaceous continental extension, followed by slow cooling during the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic until development of the Australian-Pacific boundary through New Zealand facilitated rapid, exhumation-related cooling from c. 240 °C at c. 20 Ma and final exhumation post-10 Ma (Davids, 1999). However, the Glenroy Complex cooled at a faster

  12. Diffuse Pacific-North American plate boundary: 1000 km of dextral shear inferred from modeling geodetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Thatcher, W.

    2011-01-01

    Geodetic measurements tell us that the eastern part of the Basin and Range Province expands in an east-west direction relative to stable North America, whereas the western part of the province moves to the northwest. We develop three-dimensional finite element representations of the western United States lithosphere in an effort to understand the global positioning system (GPS) signal. The models are constrained by known bounding-block velocities and topography, and Basin and Range Province deformation is represented by simple plastic (thermal creep) rheology. We show that active Basin and Range spreading by gravity collapse is expected to have a strong southward component that does not match the GPS signal. We can reconcile the gravitational component of displacement with observed velocity vectors if the Pacific plate applies northwest-directed shear stress to the Basin and Range via the Sierra Nevada block. This effect reaches at least 1000 km east of the San Andreas fault in our models. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  13. A New Estimate for Total Offset on the Southern San Andreas Fault: Implications for Cumulative Plate Boundary Shear in the Northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darin, M. H.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a consistent and balanced tectonic reconstruction for the late Cenozoic San Andreas fault (SAF) in southern California has been hindered for decades by incompatible estimates of total dextral offset based on different geologic cross-fault markers. The older estimate of 240-270 km is based on offset fluvial conglomerates of the middle Miocene Mint Canyon and Caliente Formations west of the SAF from their presumed source area in the northern Chocolate Mountains NE of the SAF (Ehlig et al., 1975; Ehlert, 2003). The second widely cited offset marker is a distinctive Triassic megaporphyritic monzogranite that has been offset 160 ± 10 km between Liebre Mountain west of the SAF and the San Bernadino Mountains (Matti and Morton, 1993). In this analysis we use existing paleocurrent data and late Miocene clockwise rotation in the eastern Transverse Ranges (ETR) to re-assess the orientation of the piercing line used in the 240 km-correlation, and present a palinspastic reconstruction that satisfies all existing geologic constraints. Our reconstruction of the Mint Canyon piercing line reduces the original estimate of 240-270 km to 195 ± 15 km of cumulative right-lateral slip on the southern SAF (sensu stricto), which is consistent with other published estimates of 185 ± 20 km based on correlative basement terranes in the Salton Trough region. Our estimate of ~195 km is consistent with the lower estimate of ~160 km on the Mojave segment because transform-parallel extension along the southwestern boundary of the ETR during transrotation produces ~25-40 km of displacement that does not affect offset markers of the Liebre/San Bernadino correlation located northwest of the ETR rotating domain. Reconciliation of these disparate estimates places an important new constraint on the total plate boundary shear that is likely accommodated in the adjacent northern Gulf of California. Global plate circuit models require ~650 km of cumulative Pacific-North America (PAC

  14. Geodetic Constraints on the Rigidity and Eastern Boundary of the Sierra Nevada Micro-Plate, from Mohawk Valley to Southern Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, C. W.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Sierra Nevada - Great Valley (SNGV) micro-plate has long been recognized as a tectonically rigid, though mobile, entity within the Pacific - North America plate boundary zone. The motion of the SNGV relative to stable North America (and the Colorado Plateau) provides the kinematic boundary condition for, and perhaps drives, the deformation in the Basin and Range Province (BRP) and Walker Lane. In the north the motion of the SNGV is aligned with the Mohawk Valley fault zone, which could have a slip rate of over a few mm/yr. The crest of the Sierras marks the SNGV’s eastern edge, but the obliquity between orientation of this boundary and the block’s motion implies an expected increase in rangefront-normal extension from the northern to southern Walker Lane. We use new GPS data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and our own semi-continuous MAGNET network to revisit the following questions: 1) Do the data still support rigidity of the SNGV?; 2) How far east does the rigidity extend and how does this relate to SNGV lithology?; 3) How does the direction of SNGV motion relate to the strike of its eastern margin and observed strain partitioning (and its along strike variation) in the Walker Lane?; and 4) How is SNGV-BRP motion accommodated between the Walker Lane and the Cascadia forearc? We analyze data from all the available continuous GPS sites in the greater SNGV region, including new data from PBO, as well as data from MAGNET. All data are processed with the GIPSY-OASIS II precise point positioning software using recently reprocessed orbits from JPL's IGS Analysis Center. The processing includes satellite and station antenna calibrations and all data have the phase ambiguities fixed using the Ambizap algorithm. Positions are estimated in our custom-made North America reference frame in which continental-scale common-mode errors are removed. Velocities and uncertainties are estimated using the CATS software in which we assuming an error model

  15. Revisit of Criteria and Evidence for the Tectonic Erosion vs Accretion in East Asian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, G.; Hamahashi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary and erosive margins provide tectonic end-members in subduction zone and how these tectonic processes might be recorded and recognizable in ancient subduction complexes remains a challenging issue. Tectonic erosion includes sediment subduction and basal erosion along the plate boundary megathrust and drags down the crust of the upper plate into the mantle. Geologic evidence for the erosion is commonly based on lost geological tectono-stratigraphic data, i.e. gaps in the record and indirect phenomena such as subsidence of the forearc slopes. A topographically rough surface such as seamount has been suggested to work like an erosive saw carving the upper plate. Another mechanism of basal erosion has been suggested to be hydrofracturing of upper plate materials due to dehydration-induced fluid pressures, resulting in entrainment of upper plate materials into the basal décollement. Considering the interaction between the ~30 km thick crust of the upper plate and subducting oceanic plate, a subduction dip angle of ~15°, and convergent rate of ~10 cm/year, at least ~1 Ma of continuous basal erosion is necessary to induce clear subsidence of the forearc because the width of plate interface between the upper crustal and subducting plates is about 115 km (30/cos15°). In several examples of subduction zones, for example the Japan Trench and the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica, the subsidence of a few thousand metres of the forearc, combined with a lack of accretionary prism over a period of several million years, suggest that the erosive condition needs to be maintained for several to tens of million years.Such age gaps in the accretionary complex, however, do not automatically imply that tectonic erosion has taken place, as other interpretations such as no accretion, cessation of subduction, and/or later tectonic modification, are also possible. Recent drilling in the forearc of the Nankai Trough suggests that the accretion was ceased between ~12 Ma to

  16. On the use of kriging for enhanced data reconstruction in a separated transitional flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunes, Hasan; Rist, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    Kriging method for data reconstruction and spatial enhancement of stereo-particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) data for a transitional boundary layer with a laminar separation bubble is investigated. Particularly, the effect of various variogram models and their parameters are studied in detail. In addition, we show that missing data clusters, or black zones, which often occur in PIV measurements, can be estimated using kriging provided the data are well correlated. An important issue in PIV measurements is that built-in PIV data processing software might have problems to detect or to correct spurious erroneous vectors called "outliers." It is shown that these outliers can be eliminated or greatly alleviated using kriging. λ2 isosurface and stream traces show that noisy vortical structures are eliminated but the main coherent structures are well preserved and smoothed, thus procedures for the detection and tracking of vortex core lines can be effectively applied on kriged data. Analytical test data for a more quantitative evaluation of the performance of kriging are given in the Appendices.

  17. Effect of two-scale roughness on boundary layer transition over a heated flat plate: Part 1 -- Surface heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pinson, M.W.; Wang, T.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate surface heat transfer and boundary layer development associated with flow over a flat test surface covered with two roughness scales. Two-scale roughness was used because in-service aeroengines commonly display larger roughness concentrated at the leading edge with smaller roughness distributed downstream. The first scale, covering up to the first 5 cm of the test surface, was in the form of a sandpaper strip, an aluminum strip, or a cylinder. The second roughness scale covered the remainder of the test surface (2 m) in the form of sandpaper or a smooth surface. In Part 1, the surface heat transfer results are examined. Even though the roughness scales were hydraulically smooth, they induced significantly earlier transition onset, with the two-dimensional roughness causing earlier transition than three-dimensional roughness. All of the rough/smooth cases unexpectedly triggered earlier transition than rough/rough cases. This indicated that the scale of the step-change at the joint between two roughness scales was predominant over the downstream roughness on inducing early transition. Reducing the overall height of the step change was shown to have a greater effect on transition than the specific geometry of the roughness scale.

  18. Dynamics of Continental Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to swallow buoyant exotic crust. Accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North and South American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. Both the modern and ancient examples are characterised by episodic switches between extension and shortening associated with transitions from collision of exotic crust and subduction related rollback. We present three-dimensional dynamic models that show for the first time how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back arc region. The complexity of the morphology and evolution of the system are driven by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonal to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, but infer that this is a global phenomena throughout Earth's evolution.

  19. m-Accretive extensions of a sectorial operator

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinskii, Yu M; Popov, A B

    2013-08-31

    A description of all the maximal accretive extensions and their resolvents is given for a densely defined closed sectorial operator in terms of abstract boundary conditions. These results are applied to parametrize all the m-accretive extensions of a symmetric operator in a planar model of one-centre point interaction. Bibliography: 40 titles.

  20. Testing for an Absence of Regional Shortening (or Extension) Across the Caribbean - South American Plate Boundary Zone (PBZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altimira, A.; Bird, D.

    2005-12-01

    Rotations among North American (NOAM), African, South American (SOAM) and Caribbean (CARIB) Plates for the past 60 My indicate dominant right-lateral transform motion and perhaps either shortening or extension across the CARIB-SOAM PBZ. Our testable model indicates that: From 60-45 Ma SOAM moved southward ca.200 km with respect to NOAM as CARIB squeezed into the Atlantic forcing the Yucatan and Grenada basins to open. Since 45 Ma CARIB has moved only east carrying fragments of the Caribbean Great Arc that had struck the west coast of SOAM at ca.70 Ma and shearing the passive margin of SOAM in a ca.250 km wide right-lateral transform PBZ between the thick continental lithosphere of SOAM and the thick oceanic plateau lithosphere of CARIB. Pull-aparts in the PBZ include the Falcon, Cariaco and Gulf of Paria basins and flower structure thrust belts include, the Serrania del Interior, Villa de Cura, Araya-Paria peninsula and the Northern Range of Trinidad. These thrust belts generated the loads that formed the East Venezuelan 150 km wide foreland basin. This model requires that: (1) all igneous and high P/T metamorphic ages in the thrust belts of Venezuela were acquired at or before ca. 70 Ma when the Great Arc of the Caribbean struck the west coast of SOAM; (2) Younger igneous ages in the northern part of the PBZ represent fragments of the southern end of the Lesser Antillean arc dragged into the PBZ as the arc slid by; and (3) Deformation in the PBZ began no earlier than the local time of passage of the southern end of the Lesser Antillean arc except in the Gulf of Paria region where halokinesis began earlier. Collision of the Panama arc (ca.7Ma) caused shortening on the west coast of SOAM and 70 km of northward escape of the triangular Maracaibo prism bounded by the Bocono and Santa Marta strike-slip faults and by a deep lithospheric-scale thrust. Restoring the Maracaibo prism aligns the Cuisa and Oca faults with the CARIB-SOAM east-west trending PBZ.

  1. Kinematic History and Tectonic Evolution of the Amerasian Basin: Investigating Palaeo-Plate Boundaries around the Chukchi Borderlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, K.; Coakley, B.; Stone, D.; Wallace, W.

    2007-12-01

    The multi-stage opening of the Arctic Ocean's Amerasian Basin is only partially understood due to the difficulty of utilizing traditional marine geologic and geophysical techniques in ice-covered waters. While the kinematic development of the Eurasian Basin is well-understood to be the northernmost extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the history of the morphologically complex Amerasian Basin may be due to multiple events, significantly complicating interpretation of its history. Any detailed model for the opening of the Amerasian Basin must both incorporate structures that accommodate spreading as well as explain the tectonic mechanisms that drove basin development. Cretaceous-age tholeiitic flood basalts and associated radiating dike swarms of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP), found along the basin margin, provide a tectonic mechanism and geometry to substantiate sound reconstruction. Detailed models need also consider pre-existing zones of weakness such as the deformation front of the Devonian Caledonides, which may underlie Barents Shelf sediments (Gee and Bogolepova, 2003). Reactivation of these ancient structural trends along this suture zone may explain the motion of Mendeleev Ridge as it rifted from Lomonosov Ridge and created the rectangular pull-apart basin between them. We propose a revised plate model for the development of the Amerasian Basin. A Cretaceous magmatic source localized under the Alpha Ridge accompanied the onset of rifting. This generated the HALIP radiating dike swarms and tholeiitic flood basalts found on the DeLong Islands, Svalbard, Franz Joseph Land, Greenland, Sverdrup Basin and, possibly, the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges. New bathymetric and sub-bottom profiling data also suggests the existence of igneous dikes on Chukchi Cap. The subsequent development of a triple junction resulted in dilational opening of the Canada Basin. Spreading was accommodated by the migration of the southern edges of the northeastern Siberian

  2. The San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region, California: Structure and kinematics of a Young plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, R.C.; Zoback, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data delineate offset and/or truncated magnetic rock bodies of the Franciscan Complex that define the location and structure of, and total offset across, the San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region. Two distinctive magnetic anomalies caused by ultramafic rocks and metabasalts east of, and truncated at, the San Andreas fault have clear counterparts west of the fault that indicate a total right-lateral offset of only 22 km on the Peninsula segment, the active strand that ruptured in 1906. The location of the Peninsula segment is well defined magnetically on the northern peninsula where it goes offshore, and can be traced along strike an additional ~6 km to the northwest. Just offshore from Lake Merced, the inferred fault trace steps right (northeast) 3 km onto a nearly parallel strand that can be traced magnetically northwest more than 20 km as the linear northeast edge of a magnetic block bounded by the San Andreas fault, the Pilarcitos fault, and the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault zone. This right-stepping strand, the Golden Gate segment, joins the eastern mapped trace of the San Andreas fault at Bolinas Lagoon and projects back onshore to the southeast near Lake Merced. Inversion of detailed gravity data on the San Francisco Peninsula reveals a 3 km wide basin situated between the two strands of the San Andreas fault, floored by Franciscan basement and filled with Plio-Quaternary sedimentary deposits of the Merced and Colma formations. The basin, ~1 km deep at the coast, narrows and becomes thinner to the southeast along the fault over a distance of ~12 km. The length, width, and location of the basin between the two strands are consistent with a pull-apart basin formed behind the right step in the right-lateral strike-slip San Andreas fault system and currently moving southeast with the North American plate. Slight nonparallelism of the two strands bounding the basin (implying a small component of convergence

  3. New Insights into Strain Accumulation and Release in the Central and Northern Walker Lane, Pacific-North American Plate Boundary, California and Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Jayne M.

    The Walker Lane is a 100 km-wide distributed zone of complex transtensional faulting that flanks the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada. Up to 25% of the total Pacific-North American relative right-lateral plate boundary deformation is accommodated east of the Sierra Nevada, primarily in the Walker Lane. The results of three studies in the Central and Northern Walker Lane offer new insights into how constantly accumulating plate boundary shear strain is released on faults in the Walker Lane and regional earthquake hazards. This research is based on the collection and analysis of new of geologic and geodetic datasets. Two studies are located in the Central Walker Lane, where plate boundary deformation is accommodated on northwest trending right-lateral faults, east-northeast trending left-lateral faults, and north trending normal faults. In this region, a prominent set of left-stepping, en-echelon, normal fault-bounded basins between Walker Lake and Lake Tahoe fill a gap in Walker Lane strike slip faults. Determining how these basins accommodate shear strain is a primary goal of this research. Paleoseismic and neotectonic observations from the Wassuk Range fault zone in the Walker Lake basin record evidence for at least 3 Holocene surface rupturing earthquakes and Holocene/late Pleistocene vertical slip rates between 0.4-0.7 mm/yr on the normal fault, but record no evidence of right-lateral slip along the rangefront fault. A complementary study presents new GPS velocity data that measures present-day deformation across the Central Walker Lane and infers fault slip and block rotation rates using an elastic block model. The model results show a clear partitioning between distinct zones of strain accommodation characterized by (1) right-lateral translation of blocks on northwest trending faults, (2) left-lateral slip and clockwise block rotations between east and northeast trending faults, and (3) right-lateral oblique normal slip with minor clockwise block rotations

  4. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  5. Multi-dimensional structure of accreting young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geroux, C.; Baraffe, I.; Viallet, M.; Goffrey, T.; Pratt, J.; Constantino, T.; Folini, D.; Popov, M. V.; Walder, R.

    2016-04-01

    This work is the first attempt to describe the multi-dimensional structure of accreting young stars based on fully compressible time implicit multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations. One major motivation is to analyse the validity of accretion treatment used in previous 1D stellar evolution studies. We analyse the effect of accretion on the structure of a realistic stellar model of the young Sun. Our work is inspired by the numerical work of Kley & Lin (1996, ApJ, 461, 933) devoted to the structure of the boundary layer in accretion disks, which provides the outer boundary conditions for our simulations. We analyse the redistribution of accreted material with a range of values of specific entropy relative to the bulk specific entropy of the material in the accreting object's convective envelope. Low specific entropy accreted material characterises the so-called cold accretion process, whereas high specific entropy is relevant to hot accretion. A primary goal is to understand whether and how accreted energy deposited onto a stellar surface is redistributed in the interior. This study focusses on the high accretion rates characteristic of FU Ori systems. We find that the highest entropy cases produce a distinctive behaviour in the mass redistribution, rms velocities, and enthalpy flux in the convective envelope. This change in behaviour is characterised by the formation of a hot layer on the surface of the accreting object, which tends to suppress convection in the envelope. We analyse the long-term effect of such a hot buffer zone on the structure and evolution of the accreting object with 1D stellar evolution calculations. We study the relevance of the assumption of redistribution of accreted energy into the stellar interior used in the literature. We compare results obtained with the latter treatment and those obtained with a more physical accretion boundary condition based on the formation of a hot surface layer suggested by present multi

  6. Holocene subsidence at the transition between strike-slip and subduction on the Pacific-Australian plate boundary, Marlborough Sounds, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Bruce W.; Grenfell, Hugh R.; Sabaa, Ashwaq T.; Kay, Jon; Daymond-King, Rhiannon; Cochran, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    This paper provides the first solid evidence in support of a century-old hypothesis that the mountainous Marlborough Sounds region in central New Zealand is subsiding. More recent hypotheses suggest that this may be a result of southward migration of a slab of subducted Pacific Plate causing flexural downwarping of the overlying crust in the vicinity of the transition between subduction and strike-slip on the Pacific-Australian plate boundary. The proxy evidence for gradual Holocene subsidence comes from micropaleontological study of seven intertidal sediment cores from the inner Marlborough Sounds (at Havelock, Mahau Sound and Shakespeare Bay). Quantitative estimates (using Modern Analogue Technique) of former tidal elevations based on fossil foraminiferal faunas provide evidence of tectonic (not compaction-related) subsidence in all cores. Estimates of subsidence rates for individual cores vary within the range 0.2-2.4 m ka -1. The wide variation within subsidence rate estimates are related to a combination of the accuracy limits of radiocarbon dates, elevation estimates, and particularly our poor knowledge of the New Zealand Holocene sea-level curve. The most consistent subsidence rate at all three sites for the mid-late Holocene (last 6-7 ka) is ˜0.7-0.8 m ka -1. This rate is consistent with the average subsidence rate in the adjacent 4-km thick Wanganui sedimentary basin for the last 5 myr. Subsidence is inferred to have migrated southwards from the Wanganui Basin to impinge on the inner Marlborough Sounds in just the last 100-200 ka.

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in creep rate along the El Pilar fault at the Caribbean-South American plate boundary (Venezuela), from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse Beltran, Léa.; Pathier, Erwan; Jouanne, François; Vassallo, Riccardo; Reinoza, Carlos; Audemard, Franck; Doin, Marie Pierre; Volat, Matthieu

    2016-11-01

    In eastern Venezuela, the Caribbean-South American plate boundary follows the El Pilar fault system. Previous studies based on three GPS campaigns (2003-2005-2013) demonstrated that the El Pilar fault accommodates the whole relative displacement between the two tectonic plates (20 mm/yr) and proposed that 50-60% of the slip is aseismic. In order to quantify the possible variations of the aseismic creep in time and space, we conducted an interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series analysis, using the (NSBAS) New Small BAseline Subset method, on 18 images from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS-1) satellite spanning the 2007-2011 period. During this 3.5 year period, InSAR observations show that aseismic slip decreases eastward along the fault: the creep rate of the western segment reaches 25.3 ± 9.4 mm/yr on average, compared to 13.4 ± 6.9 mm/yr on average for the eastern segment. This is interpreted, through slip distribution models, as being related to coupled and uncoupled areas between the surface and 20 km in depth. InSAR observations also show significant temporal creep rate variations (accelerations) during the considered time span along the western segment. The transient behavior of the creep is not consistent with typical postseismic afterslip following the 1997 Ms 6.8 earthquake. The creep is thus interpreted as persistent aseismic slip during an interseismic period, which has a pulse- or transient-like behavior.

  8. The ancestral cascades arc: Cenozoic evolution of the central Sierra Nevada (California) and the birth of the new plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busby, C.J.; Hagan, J.C.; Putirka, K.; Pluhar, C.J.; Gans, P.B.; Wagner, D.L.; Rood, D.; DeOreo, S.B.; Skilling, I.

    2008-01-01

    We integrate new stratigraphic, structural, geochemical, geochronological, and magnetostratigraphic data on Cenozoic volcanic rocks in the central Sierra Nevada to arrive at closely inter-related new models for: (1) the paleogeography of the ancestral Cascades arc, (2) the stratigraphic record of uplift events in the Sierra Nevada, (3) the tectonic controls on volcanic styles and compositions in the arc, and (4) the birth of a new plate margin. Previous workers have assumed that the ancestral Cascades arc consisted of stratovolcanoes, similar to the modern Cascades arc, but we suggest that the arc was composed largely of numerous, very small centers, where magmas frequently leaked up strands of the Sierran frontal fault zone. These small centers erupted to produce andesite lava domes that collapsed to produce block-and-ash flows, which were reworked into paleocanyons as volcanic debris flows and streamflow deposits. Where intrusions rose up through water-saturated paleocanyon fill, they formed peperite complexes that were commonly destabilized to form debris flows. Paleocanyons that were cut into Cretaceous bedrock and filled with Oligocene to late Miocene strata not only provide a stratigraphic record of the ancestral Cascades arc volcanism, but also deep unconformities within them record tectonic events. Preliminary correlation of newly mapped unconformities and new geochronological, magnetostratigraphic, and structural data allow us to propose three episodes of Cenozoic uplift that may correspond to (1) early Miocene onset of arc magmatism (ca. 15 Ma), (2) middle Miocene onset of Basin and Range faulting (ca. 10 Ma), and (3) late Miocene arrival of the triple junction (ca. 6 Ma), perhaps coinciding with a second episode of rapid extension on the range front. Oligocene ignimbrites, which erupted from calderas in central Nevada and filled Sierran paleocanyons, were deeply eroded during the early Miocene uplift event. The middle Miocene event is recorded by growth

  9. Partial accretion regime of accreting millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eksi, Kazim

    2016-07-01

    The inner parts of the disks around neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries may become geometrically thick due to inhibition of accretion at the disk mid-plane when the central object is rotating rapidly. In such a case matter inflowing through the disk may keep accreting onto the poles of the neutron star from the parts of the disk away from the disk mid-plane while the matter is propelled at the disk mid-plane. An important ingredient of the evolution of millisecond pulsars is then the fraction of the inflowing matter that can accrete onto the poles in the fast rotation regime depending on the fastness parameter. This ``soft'' propeller regime may be associated with the rapid decay stage observed in the light curves of several accreting millisecond pulsars. To date only a few studies considered the partial accretion regime. By using geometrical arguments we improve the existing studies and test the model by reproducing the lightcurves of millisecond X-ray pulsars via time dependent simulations of disk evolution. We also present analytical solutions that represent disks with partial accretion.

  10. Imaging the Structure of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary using Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) Data and Wavelet Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanquini, A.; Cheung, K.; Gudmundsdottir, M. H.; Moon, S.; Lin, N.; Shelef, E.; Hilley, G. E.; Prentice, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Since the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, geologists have noted that the topography of active fault zones is significantly modified by repeated fault ruptures over geologic time. Here, we present an analysis of fault zone topography generated by high-resolution Airborne Laser Swath Mapping (ALSM) data collected by the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM). The digital elevation models (DEMs) generated from the ALSM data reveal the location, orientation, and curvature of scarps associated with active, plate-boundary faults. In particular, we have examined topographic data from the B4 and Northern California data sets, as well as data from faults within the Eastern California Shear Zone. We used a wavelet-based convolution scheme, based on topographic forms modified from the profile scarp-diffusion model of Hanks et al. (1984), extended to encompass along-strike features. We applied this filtering methodology to digital topography along fault zones to estimate the best-fitting height, orientation, morphologic age, and associated Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of scarps found within these datasets. These results will be available to the community via a GIS web portal so that other workers can mine these data to understand patterns of fault-zone structure observed along the plate-bounding fault zones. To evaluate the utility of this methodology for identifying and characterizing fault scarps within the topographic swaths, we present sample results from the Calaveras fault, part of the San Andreas fault system in northern California. We found that along this fault, the filtering algorithm correctly identifies scarps characterized by ground surveys, previous analysis of aerial photography, and/or field mapping. However, some mapped fault traces with low SNR values because of their subtle morphologic expression are not identified by the algorithm. Similarly, some fluvial scarps that trend in a similar orientation to the overall fault zone are erroneously

  11. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence.

  12. A new algorithm for three-dimensional joint inversion of body wave and surface wave data and its application to the Southern California plate boundary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongjian; Zhang, Haijiang; Yao, Huajian; Allam, Amir; Zigone, Dimitri; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Thurber, Clifford; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for joint inversion of body wave and surface wave data to get better 3-D P wave (Vp) and S wave (Vs) velocity models by taking advantage of the complementary strengths of each data set. Our joint inversion algorithm uses a one-step inversion of surface wave traveltime measurements at different periods for 3-D Vs and Vp models without constructing the intermediate phase or group velocity maps. This allows a more straightforward modeling of surface wave traveltime data with the body wave arrival times. We take into consideration the sensitivity of surface wave data with respect to Vp in addition to its large sensitivity to Vs, which means both models are constrained by two different data types. The method is applied to determine 3-D crustal Vp and Vs models using body wave and Rayleigh wave data in the Southern California plate boundary region, which has previously been studied with both double-difference tomography method using body wave arrival times and ambient noise tomography method with Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity dispersion measurements. Our approach creates self-consistent and unique models with no prominent gaps, with Rayleigh wave data resolving shallow and large-scale features and body wave data constraining relatively deeper structures where their ray coverage is good. The velocity model from the joint inversion is consistent with local geological structures and produces better fits to observed seismic waveforms than the current Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) model.

  13. Comparison of Deep Drill Braced Monument (DDBM) and Borehole Strainmeter (BSM) Wellhead GPS antenna mounts: a Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) case study from Dinsmore, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. B.; Austin, K. E.; Borsa, A. A.; Feaux, K.; Jackson, M. E.; Johnson, W.; Mencin, D.

    2010-12-01

    With the 2009 installation of GPS station P793 in Dinsmore, CA, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) created a unique opportunity to directly compare a traditional deep drill braced GPS monument (DDBM) with a borehole strainmeter (BSM) wellhead GPS monument. PBO installed a GPS antenna to the wellhead of BSM B935 to perform a direct comparison to DDBM P327 in an attempt to determine stability and long-term behavior of both. The two adjacent stations share power and communications and are roughly 20 meters apart. The steel BSM casing is cemented ~520ft in meta-sandstone & shale, while the DDBM is anchored ~30ft deep in alluvial river gravels. Both stations are located inside a rural auto wrecking yard, which has potential sources of fixed noise in the form of multipath reflections off large metal objects. Preliminary analysis indicates consistent measurements in the North-South component, and a ~3.3 mm difference in the East-West component that has been detected between the two stations over a 450-day period (~2.7 mm/yr). The analysis utilizes standard PBO data products and differences time series data from each station in the SNARF 1.0 and IGS 2005 reference frames. We estimate the time dependent seasonal variations observed at each station and compare with available temperature and precipitation data to attempt to identify the cause of differential movement between the monuments.

  14. The Campaign GPS Component of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO): New Tools, New Strategies and New Opportunities to Support EarthScope Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. A.; Greenberg, J.; Sklar, J.; Meertens, C. M.; Andreatta, V.; Feaux, K.

    2004-12-01

    The UNAVCO Facility is charged with implementing the campaign GPS component of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) to support EarthScope investigators through a pool of approximately one hundred mobile GPS systems. In contrast to the PBO continuous GPS network, the PBO campaign systems are designed for temporary deployments with periods ranging from several minutes to several months per site. This allows researchers to conduct spatially and temporally focused investigations into a wide range of phenomena, including volcano monitoring, post-seismic deformation monitoring, and ground control for airborne LIDAR surveys. A standard PBO campaign system consists of a Topcon GB-1000 dual-frequency GPS receiver, a Topcon PG-A1 compact GPS antenna, an 18 Ah battery, cabling, a portable and waterproof Pelican case enclosure, and a Tech 2000 GPS antenna mast or tripod and tribrach. Available ancillary equipment includes solar panels, additional batteries, enclosures and mounting hardware. Communications equipment such as radio modems and cellular modems are also available to allow remote data retrieval during longer term deployments. We present an overview of the PBO campaign equipment available to investigators, technical specifications of the system, examples of current and planned EarthScope research projects utilizing the campaign equipment, and a hands-on demonstration of a PBO campaign system.

  15. Plate tectonic models derived from multiple data sources: Examples from the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Peter; Masterton, Sheona; Eue, Dorothea

    2013-04-01

    Plate tectonic reconstructions are a useful tool in the modern exploration industry. A variety of interpretative applications and data sets require robust plate models; specific examples include the rotation of well data to their past locations, analysis of palaeogeographic environments and predictions of properties such as heat flux through time. As plate tectonic reconstructions become more widely used they become more ambitious, pushing further back in time and including older stratigraphic units, often with increasingly complex tectonic histories. Geological data becomes increasingly sparse for these older units, leading to more subjective choices when creating plate models. In our global plate tectonic model we collate data from numerous sources, including geological structure mapping, interpretation and analysis of potential field data and depth to basement maps, palaeomagnetism and geological relationships from published literature. The plate model is strongly interlinked with on-going global studies at Getech, such as palaeoenvironment mapping, palaeotopography and palaeoclimate; direct feedback from these studies is used to refine and test tectonic solutions both within a regional and global framework. Our global plate model is currently undergoing major improvements extending it back to the start of the Permian (300 Ma). This includes updates to oceanic structures and ocean-continent boundaries to better constrain the internal boundaries and fit of the Pangaea supercontinent. The update also includes Permian-Triassic modelling of South East Asia and China, improvements in Kazakhstan, Central Asia and the North American Cordillera and a re-evaluation of our existing Arctic tectonics. These regions also contain feedback from Jurassic palaeoenvironment mapping to improve the current tectonic reconstructions. We present the multi-disciplinary approach to plate modelling with particular focus on North America and the Arctic. Numerous and often conflicting

  16. Accretion, Outflows, and Winds of Magnetized Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Marina M.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2015-10-01

    Many types of stars have strong magnetic fields that can dynamically influence the flow of circumstellar matter. In stars with accretion disks, the stellar magnetic field can truncate the inner disk and determine the paths that matter can take to flow onto the star. These paths are different in stars with different magnetospheres and periods of rotation. External field lines of the magnetosphere may inflate and produce favorable conditions for outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary. Outflows can be particularly strong in the propeller regime, wherein a star rotates more rapidly than the inner disk. Outflows may also form at the disk-magnetosphere boundary of slowly rotating stars, if the magnetosphere is compressed by the accreting matter. In isolated, strongly magnetized stars, the magnetic field can influence formation and/or propagation of stellar wind outflows. Winds from low-mass, solar-type stars may be either thermally or magnetically driven, while winds from massive, luminous O and B type stars are radiatively driven. In all of these cases, the magnetic field influences matter flow from the stars and determines many observational properties. In this chapter we review recent studies of accretion, outflows, and winds of magnetized stars with a focus on three main topics: (1) accretion onto magnetized stars; (2) outflows from the disk-magnetosphere boundary; and (3) winds from isolated massive magnetized stars. We show results obtained from global magnetohydrodynamic simulations and, in a number of cases compare global simulations with observations.

  17. Zonal detached eddy simulation (ZDES) of a spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer over the Reynolds number range 3 150 ⩽ Reθ ⩽ 14 000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Sébastien; Renard, Nicolas; Laraufie, Romain; Sagaut, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    A Wall-Modeled Large Eddy Simulation (WMLES) of a spatially developing zero-pressure gradient smooth flat plate turbulent boundary layer is performed by means of the third mode of the Zonal Detached Eddy Simulation technique. The outer layer is resolved by a Large Eddy Simulation whereas the wall is modeled by a RANS simulation zone, with a RANS/LES interface prescribed at a fixed location. A revisited cost assessment of the Direct Numerical Simulation of high Reynolds numbers (Reθ ⩾ 10 000) wall-bounded flows emphasizes how moderate the cost of the WMLES approach is compared to methods resolving the near-wall dynamics. This makes possible the simulation over a wide Reynolds number range 3 150 ⩽ Reθ ⩽ 14 000, leaving quite enough space for very large scale motions to develop. For a better skin friction prediction, it is shown that the RANS/LES interface should be high enough in the boundary layer and at a location scaling in boundary layer thickness units (e.g., 0.1δ) rather than in wall units. Velocity spectra are compared to experimental data. The outer layer is well resolved, except near the RANS/LES interface where the very simple and robust passive boundary treatment might be improved by a more specific treatment. Besides, the inner RANS zone also contains large scale fluctuations down to the wall. It is shown that these fluctuations fit better to the experimental data for the same interface location that provides a better skin friction prediction. Numerical tests suggest that the observed very large scale motions may appear in an autonomous way, independently from the near-wall dynamics. It still has to be determined whether the observed structures have a physical or a numerical origin. In order to assess how the large scale motions contribute to skin friction, the Reynolds shear stress contribution is studied as suggested by the FIK identity [K. Fukagata, K. Iwamoto, and N. Kasagi, "Contribution of Reynolds stress distribution to the skin friction

  18. Lithospheric dynamics near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    The progress report on research conducted between 15 Mar. - 14 Sep. 1992 is presented. The focus of the research during the first grant year has been on several problems broadly related to the nature and dynamics of time-dependent deformation and stress along major seismic zones, with an emphasis on western North America but with additional work on seismic zones in oceanic lithosphere as well. The principal findings of our research to date are described in the accompanying papers and abstract. Topics covered include: (1) Global Positioning System measurements of deformations associated with the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake: evidence for conjugate faulting; (2) Global Positioning System measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California: 1986-1989; (3) present-day crustal deformation in the Salton Trough, southern California; (4) oceanic transform earthquakes with unusual mechanisms or locations: relation to fault geometry and state of stress in the lithosphere; and (5) crustal strain and the 1992 Mojave Desert earthquakes.

  19. Lu-Hf garnet geochronology applied to plate boundary zones: Insights from the (U)HP terrane exhumed within the Woodlark Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirakparvar, N. A.; Baldwin, S. L.; Vervoort, J. D.

    2011-09-01

    High-pressure and ultra high-pressure (U)HP metamorphic rocks occur in many of the world's major orogenic belts, suggesting that subduction of continental lithosphere is a geologically important process. Despite the widespread occurrence of these rocks, relatively little is known about the timescales associated with (U)HP metamorphism. This is because most (U)HP terranes are tectonically overprinted and juxtaposed against rocks with a different history. An exception to this are the Late Miocene (U)HP metamorphic rocks found in active metamorphic core complexes (MCC) in the Woodlark Rift of southeastern Papua New Guinea. This region provides a rare opportunity to study the garnet Lu-Hf isotopic record of (U)HP metamorphism in a terrane that is not tectonically overprinted. In order to constrain the timing of garnet growth relative to the history of (U)HP metamorphism and the evolution of the Woodlark Rift, Lu-Hf ages were determined, in conjunction with measurements of Lu and major element zoning, for garnets from three metamorphic rocks. Garnets from the three samples yielded different ages that, instead of recording the spatial and temporal evolution associated with a single metamorphic event, provide information on the timing of three separate plate boundary events. The youngest Lu-Hf age determined was 7.1 ± 0.7 Ma for garnets in a Late Miocene coesite eclogite. The age is interpreted to record the time when a garnet-bearing partial melt of the mantle crystallized within subducted continental lithosphere at (U)HP conditions. The young Lu-Hf age from the coesite eclogite is in contrast to a 68 ± 3.6 Ma Lu-Hf age obtained on large (1-2 cm) garnet porphyroblasts, from within the Pleistocene amphibolite facies shear zone carapace bounding exposures of (U)HP rocks in the D'Entrecasteaux Islands. This older age records the growth of garnet in response to continental subduction and ophiolite obduction in the region north and east of Australia during late Mesozoic

  20. Structural and Tectonic Map Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Northern Gulf of California, Sonora Desert and Valle de Mexicali, Mexico, from Seismic Reflection Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Escobar, M.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Martin Barajas, A.; Pacheco-Romero, M.; Arregui-Estrada, S.; Gallardo-Mata, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, C.; Chanes-Martinez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) carried on an intense exploration program in the northern Gulf of California, the Sonora Desert and the southern part of the Mexicali Valley. This program was supported by a seismic reflection field operation. The collected seismic data was 2D, with travel time of 6 s recording, in 48 channels, and the source energy was: dynamite, vibroseis and air guns. Since 2007 to present time, the existing seismic data has been re-processing and ire-interpreting as part of a collaboration project between the PEMEX's Subdirección de Exploración (PEMEX) and CICESE. The study area is located along a large portion of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Gulf of California and the Southern part of the Salton Trough tectonic province (Mexicali Valley). We present the result of the processes reflection seismic lines. Many of the previous reported known faults were identify along with the first time described located within the study region. We identified regions with different degree of tectonic activity. In structural map it can see the location of many of these known active faults and their associated seismic activity, as well as other structures with no associated seismicity. Where some faults are mist placed they were deleted or relocated based on new information. We included historical seismicity for the region. We present six reflection lines that cross the aftershocks zone of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010 (Mw7.2). The epicenter of this earthquake and most of the aftershocks are located in a region where pervious to this earthquake no major earthquakes are been reported. A major result of this study is to demonstrate that there are many buried faults that increase the seismic hazard.

  1. Geometry of the Arabia-Somalia Plate Boundary into Afar: Preliminary Results from the Seismic Profile Across the Asal Rift (Djibouti)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergne, J.; Doubre, C.; Mohamed, K.; Tiberi, C.; Leroy, S.; Maggi, A.

    2010-12-01

    In the Afar Depression, the Asal-Ghoubbet Rift in Djibouti is a young segment on land at the propagating tip of the Aden Ridge. This segment represents an ideal laboratory to observe the mechanisms of extension and the structural evolutions involved, from the continental break-up to the first stage of oceanic spreading. However, we lack first order information about the crustal and upper mantle structure in this region, which for example prevent detailed numerical modeling of the deformations observed at the surface from GPS or InSAR. Moreover the current permanent network is not well suited to precisely constrain the ratio of seismic/aseismic deformation and to characterize the active deformation and the rifting dynamics. Since November 2009 we have maintained a temporary network of 25 seismic stations deployed along a 150 km-long profile. Because we expect rapid variations of the lithospheric structure across the 10 km-wide central part of the rift, we gradually decreased the inter-stations spacing to less than 1 km in the middle section of the profile. In order to obtain a continuous image of the plate boundary, from the topographic surface to the upper mantle, several techniques and methods will be applied: P and S wave receiver functions, tomographies based on body waves, surface waves and seismic noise correlation, anisotropy, and finally a gravity-seismic joint inversion. We present some preliminary results deduced from the receiver functions applied to the data acquired during the first months of the experiment. We migrate several sets of receiver functions computed in various frequency bands to resolve both mantle interfaces and fine scale structures within the thin crust in the center of the rift. These first images confirm a rapid variation of the Moho depth on both sides of the rift and a very complex lithospheric structure in the central section with several low velocity zones within the top 50km that might correspond to magma lenses.

  2. Seismic and gravity constraints on the nature of the basement in the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary: New insights for the geodynamic evolution of the SW Iberian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Sallarès, Valentí; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Bartolome, Rafael; Dañobeitia, Juan José; Zitellini, Nevio

    2014-01-01

    We present a new classification of geological domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia, together with a regional geodynamic reconstruction spanning from the Mesozoic extension to the Neogene-to-present-day convergence. It is based on seismic velocity and density models along a new transect running from the Horseshoe to the Seine abyssal plains, which is combined with previously available geophysical models from the region. The basement velocity structure at the Seine Abyssal Plain indicates the presence of a highly heterogeneous, thin oceanic crust with local high-velocity anomalies possibly representing zones related to the presence of ultramafic rocks. The integration of this model with previous ones reveals the presence of three oceanic domains offshore SW Iberia: (1) the Seine Abyssal Plain domain, generated during the first stages of slow seafloor spreading in the NE Central Atlantic (Early Jurassic); (2) the Gulf of Cadiz domain, made of oceanic crust generated in the Alpine-Tethys spreading system between Iberia and Africa, which was coeval with the formation of the Seine Abyssal Plain domain and lasted up to the North Atlantic continental breakup (Late Jurassic); and (3) the Gorringe Bank domain, made of exhumed mantle rocks, which formed during the first stages of North Atlantic opening. Our models suggest that the Seine Abyssal Plain and Gulf of Cadiz domains are separated by the Lineament South strike-slip fault, whereas the Gulf of Cadiz and Gorringe Bank domains appear to be limited by a deep thrust fault located at the center of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain.

  3. Plate electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Using a Cray T3D supercomputer and a simple assumption about the physical character of Earth's mantle, a pair of researchers from the University of California at Berkeley have built a computer model that may help explain why the planet's tectonic plates look the way they do.In creating a three-dimensional numerical simulation of convection in the Earth's interior, UC researchers Hans-Peter Bunge and Mark Richards simplified their model to account for just one major physical effect: that the viscosity of the mantle increases with depth. Reviewing some recent—but not yet widely accepted—seismic data, Bunge and Richards assumed for the sake of the model that the viscosity of the mantle increases by a factor of 30 from the lithosphere to the core-mantle boundary. Relying on that assumption, the pair ran the model for nearly three weeks on a supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory and found that the simulation produced an effect similar to what we see on the surface of Earth. The model produced a surface paralleling the actual width of plates and the geometry of the plate boundaries.

  4. Joint optimization of elastic parameters and velocity boundary conditions for the estimation of plate rigidity using geodetic data: Application to Southern Californi