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Sample records for accretion flow models

  1. Angular momentum, accretion, and radial flows in chemodynamical models of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulli, G.; Fraternali, F.

    2016-09-01

    Gas accretion and radial flows are key ingredients of the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies. They are also tightly linked to each other (accretion drives radial flows due to angular momentum conservation) and should therefore be modeled simultaneously. We summarize an algorithm that can be used to consistently compute accretion profiles, radial flows, and abundance gradients under quite general conditions, and we describe illustrative applications to the Milky Way. We find that gas-phase abundance gradients strongly depend on the angular momentum of the accreting material and, in the outer regions, they are significantly affected by the choice of boundary conditions.

  2. Rotating Bondi Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu; Han, Du-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of accretion flow onto a black hole are determined by the physical condition of gas at large radius. When the gas has no angular momentum and is polytropic, the accretion flow becomes the classic Bondi flow. The mass accretion rate in such case is an eigenvalue and uniquely determined by the density and the temperature of the surrounding gas for a given black hole mass. When the gas has angular momentum above some critical value, the angular momentum of the gas should be removed by viscosity to reach the black hole horizon. We study, within the slim disk approximation, rotating polytropic accretion flow with alpha viscosity as an an extension of the Bondi flow. The characteristics of the accretion flow are now determined by the temperature, density, and angular momentum of the gas at the outer boundary. We explore the effects of the viscosity parameter and the outer boundary radius on the physical characteristic of the flow, especially on the mass accretion rate, and compare the result with previous works of Park (2009) and Narayan & Fabian (2011).

  3. Modeling the Accretion Flow Onset in the Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus of NGC3115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Wong, K.; Irwin, J.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The superb angular resolution of the Chandra satellite allows us to probe accretion flows in AGNs on scales comparable to the radius of the black hole (BH) gravitational influence (the "Bondi radius"). X-ray emission from the onset region of the accretion flow has recently been seen in a 1Ms X-ray visionary project (XVP) observation of NGC3115. I discuss the theoretical modeling of those data with the inflow-outflow solution of gas dynamics. The BH is fed by stellar winds, most of which outflow from the region, while a small fraction settles into a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF). The galactic potential, line cooling, and small-scale feedback via conduction all influence the behavior of the gas. The X-ray emission of modeled tenuous gas is computed based on ATOMDB 2.0. The set of radius-dependent hot plasma X-ray spectra is combined with contributions from unresolved point sources to fit the observations. A good joint fit to the observed radius-dependent spectra is readily found for a realistic model which includes all relevant physics. All projection effects are self-consistently taken into account in the radiation modeling. The observations combined with theoretical modeling illuminate the intricate process of AGN feeding at low luminosity, help to constraint the accretion rate and the BH mass, and provide useful insights into feeding of more powerful AGNs. The accretion rate in models with small-scale feedback is found to be much lower compared to the accretion rate in a simplistic Bondi model. Our model was previously successfully applied to Sgr A* and will be applied to a variety of other sources in the near future.

  4. MRI channel flows in vertically stratified models of accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik N.; Fromang, Sebastien; Gressel, Oliver

    2010-08-01

    Simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in `unstratified' shearing boxes exhibit powerful coherent flows, whereby the fluid vertically splits into countermoving planar jets or `channels'. Channel flows correspond to certain axisymmetric linear MRI modes, and their preponderance follows from the remarkable fact that they are approximate non-linear solutions of the MHD equations in the limit of weak magnetic fields. We show in this paper, analytically and with one-dimensional numerical simulations, that this property is also shared by certain axisymmetric MRI modes in vertically stratified shearing boxes. These channel flows rapidly capture significant amounts of magnetic and kinetic energy, and thus are vulnerable to secondary shear instabilities. We examine these parasites in the vertically stratified context, and estimate the maximum amplitudes that channels attain before they are destroyed. These estimates suggest that a dominant channel flow will usually drive the disc's magnetic field to thermal strengths. The prominence of these flows and their destruction place enormous demands on simulations, but channels in their initial stages also offer a useful check on numerical codes. These benchmarks are especially valuable given the increasing interest in the saturation of the stratified MRI. Lastly, we speculate on the potential connection between `run-away' channel flows and outburst behaviour in protostellar and dwarf nova discs.

  5. MODELING THE STAR-FORMING UNIVERSE AT z = 2: IMPACT OF COLD ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Khochfar, Sadegh; Silk, Joseph

    2009-07-20

    We present results of a semianalytic model (SAM) that includes cold accretion and a porosity-based prescription for star formation. We can recover the puzzling observational results of low V/{sigma} seen in various massive disk or disk-like galaxies, if we allow 18% of the accretion energy from cold flows to drive turbulence in gaseous disks at z = 2. The increase of gas mass through cold flows is by itself not sufficient to increase the star formation rate sufficiently to recover the number density of M-dot{sub *}>120 M{sub odot} yr{sup -1} galaxies in our model. In addition, it is necessary to increase the star formation efficiency. This can be achieved naturally in the porosity model, where star formation efficiency scales {proportional_to}{sigma}, which scales as cloud velocity dispersion. As cold accretion is the main driver for gas velocity dispersion in our model, star formation efficiency parallels cold accretion rates and allows fast conversion into stars. At z {approx} 2, we find a space density 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3} in star-forming galaxies with M-dot{sub *}>120 M{sub odot} yr{sup -1}, in better agreement than earlier estimates from SAMs. However, the fundamental relation between M-dot{sub *} and M {sub *} is still offset from the observed relation, indicating the need for possibly more efficient star formation at high-z perhaps associated with a role for active galactic nucleus (AGN) triggering.

  6. TCAF model in XSPEC : An efficient tool to understand accretion flow dynamics around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Dipak; Sarathi Pal, Partha; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Mondal, Santanu; Jana, Arghajit; Chatterjee, Debjit; Molla, Aslam Ali

    2016-07-01

    It has been more than two decades of the classic work by Chakrabarti and his collaborators on the two component advective flow (TCAF) model. Recently we successfully been able to include it in HEASARC's spectral analysis software package XSPEC as an additive local model to fit energy spectra from black hole candidates (BHCs) and obtain physical accretion flow parameters, such as, two component (Keplerian disk and sub-Keplerian halo) accretion rates, shock (location, i.e., the size of the Compton cloud, and the compression ratio) parameters. Evolutions of spectral and timing properties are transparent from the TCAF model fitted/derived physical parameters. Reason of different spectral states and their transitions during an outburst of a transient BHC are also clear. One can also predict frequency of the dominating quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from TCAF model fitted shock parameters and even predict most preferable mass range of an unknown BHC from TCAF fits. To our knowledge this gives us the most physical tool to investigate the accretion flow dynamics around black hole candidates.

  7. Accretion flows govern black hole jet properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koljonen, K.; Russell, D.; Fernández Ontiveros, J.; Miller-Jones, J.; Russell, T.; Curran, P.; Soria, R.; Markoff, S.; van der Horst, A.; Casella, P.

    2015-07-01

    The process of jet formation in accreting black holes, and the conditions under which it occurs is currently hotly debated, with competing models predicting the jet power to be governed by black hole spin, the magnetic field strength, the location of the jet base, the mass accretion rate and/or the properties of the inner accretion flow. We present new results that show empirical correlations between the accretion flow properties and the spectral energy distribution of the jets launched from accreting black holes. The X-ray power law is directly related to the particle energy distribution in the hot accretion flow. We find that the photon index of this power law correlates with the characteristic break frequency in the jet spectrum emitted near the jet base, and the jet luminosity up to the break frequency. The observed correlations can be explained by the energy distribution of electrons in the hot accretion flow being subsequently channeled into the jet. These correlations represent a new inflow--outflow connection in accreting black holes, and demonstrate that the spectral properties of the jet rely most critically on the conditions in the inner accretion flow, rather than other parameters such as the black hole mass or spin.

  8. Magnetic cataclysmic variable accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, A. J.; Butters, O. W.; Parker, T. L.; Wynn, G. A.

    2007-08-01

    We have used a magnetic accretion model to investigate the accretion flows of magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs) throughout a range of parameter space. The results of our numerical simulations demonstrate that broadly four types of flow are possible: discs, streams, rings and propellers. We show that the equilibrium spin periods in asynchronous mCVs, for a given orbital period and magnetic moment, occur where the flow changes from a type characterised by spin-up (i.e. disc or stream) to one characterised by spin-down (i.e. propeller or ring). `Triple points' occur in the plane of spin-to-orbital period ratio versus magnetic moment, at which stream-disc-propeller flows or stream-ring-propeller flows can co-exist. The first of these is identified as corresponding to when the corotation radius is equal to the circularisation radius, and the second as where the corotation radius is equal to the distance from white dwarf to the L1 point. If mCVs are accreting at their equilibrium spin rates, then for a mass ratio of 0.5, those with Pspin/Porb <~ 0.10 will be disc-like, those with 0.10 <~ Pspin/Porb <~ 0.55 will be stream-like, and those with Pspin/Porb ~ 0.55 will be ring-like. In each case, some material is also lost from the binary in order to maintain angular momentum balance. The spin to orbital period ratio at which the systems transition between these flow types decreases as the mass ratio of the stellar components increases, and vice versa.

  9. A two-fluid model for particle acceleration and dynamics in black-hole accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jason P.

    Hot, tenuous Advection-Dominated Accretion Flows (ADAFs) are ideal sites for the Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles at standing shock waves in the accretion disk. Previous work has demonstrated that the shock-acceleration process can be efficient enough to power the observed, strong outflows in radio-loud active galaxies such as M87. However, the dynamical effect (back-reaction) on the flow, due to the pressure of the relativistic particles, has not been previously considered, as this effect can have a significant influence on the disk structure. We reexamine the problem by creating a new two-fluid model that includes the dynamical effect of the relativistic particle pressure, as well as the background (thermal) gas pressure. The new model is analogous to the incorporation of the cosmic-ray pressure in the two-fluid model of cosmic-ray-modified supernova shock waves. We derive a new set of shock jump conditions and obtain dynamical solutions that describe the structure of the disk, the discontinuous shock, and the outflow. From this, we show that smooth (shock-free) global flows are impossible when relativistic particle diffusion is included in the dynamical model.

  10. SUBMILLIMETER QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN MAGNETICALLY CHOKED ACCRETION FLOW MODELS OF SgrA*

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2013-09-10

    High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) appear in general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetically choked accretion flows around rapidly rotating black holes (BHs). We perform polarized radiative transfer calculations with the ASTRORAY code to explore the manifestations of these QPOs for SgrA*. We construct a simulation-based model of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow and find model parameters by fitting the mean polarized source spectrum. The simulated QPOs have a total submillimeter flux amplitude up to 5% and a linearly polarized flux amplitude up to 2%. The oscillations reach high levels of significance 10{sigma}-30{sigma} and high-quality factors Q Almost-Equal-To 5. The oscillation period T Almost-Equal-To 100 M Almost-Equal-To 35 minutes corresponds to the rotation period of the BH magnetosphere that produces a trailing spiral in resolved disk images. The total flux signal is significant over noise for all tested frequencies 87 GHz, 230 GHz, and 857 GHz and inclination angles 10 Degree-Sign , 37 Degree-Sign , and 80 Degree-Sign . The non-detection in the 230 GHz SubMillimeter Array light curve is consistent with a low signal level and a low sampling rate. The presence of submillimeter QPOs in SgrA* will be better tested with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  11. Comparison between Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation of Supercritical Accretion Flows and a Steady Model with Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Cheng-Liang; Mineshige, Shin; Takeuchi, Shun; Ohsuga, Ken

    2015-06-01

    We apply our two-dimensional (2D), radially self-similar steady-state accretion flow model to the analysis of hydrodynamic simulation results of supercritical accretion flows. Self-similarity is checked and the input parameters for the model calculation, such as advective factor and heat capacity ratio, are obtained from time-averaged simulation data. Solutions of the model are then calculated and compared with the simulation results. We find that in the converged region of the simulation, excluding the part too close to the black hole, the radial distributions of azimuthal velocity {{v}φ }, density ρ and pressure p basically follow the self-similar assumptions, i.e., they are roughly proportional to {{r}-0.5}, {{r}-n}, and {{r}-(n+1)}, respectively, where n∼ 0.85 for the mass injection rate of 1000{{L}E}/{{c}2}, and n∼ 0.74 for 3000{{L}E}/{{c}2}. The distribution of vr and {{v}θ } agrees less with self-similarity, possibly due to convective motions in the rθ plane. The distribution of velocity, density, and pressure in the θ direction obtained by the steady model agrees well with the simulation results within the calculation boundary of the steady model. Outward mass flux in the simulations is overall directed toward a polar angle of 0.8382 rad (∼ 48\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 0) for 1000{{L}E}/{{c}2} and 0.7852 rad (∼ 43\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 4) for 3000{{L}E}/{{c}2}, and ∼94% of the mass inflow is driven away as outflow, while outward momentum and energy fluxes are focused around the polar axis. Parts of these fluxes lie in the region that is not calculated by the steady model, and special attention should be paid when the model is applied.

  12. Modeling Seven Years of Event Horizon Telescope Observations with Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Fish, Vincent L.; Johnson, Michael D.; Rosenfeld, Katherine; Wang, Carlos; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Akiyama, Kazunori; Johannsen, Tim; Roy, Alan L.

    2016-04-01

    An initial three-station version of the Event Horizon Telescope, a millimeter-wavelength very-long baseline interferometer, has observed Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) repeatedly from 2007 to 2013, resulting in the measurement of a variety of interferometric quantities. Of particular importance is that there is now a large set of closure phases measured over a number of independent observing epochs. We analyze these observations within the context of a realization of semi-analytic radiatively inefficient disk models, implicated by the low luminosity of Sgr A*. We find a broad consistency among the various observing epochs and between different interferometric data types, with the latter providing significant support for this class of model of Sgr A*. The new data significantly tighten existing constraints on the spin magnitude and its orientation within this model context, finding a spin magnitude of a={0.10}-0.10-0.10+0.30+0.56, an inclination with respect to the line of sight of θ ={60^\\circ }-{8^\\circ -{13}^\\circ }+{5^\\circ +{10}^\\circ }, and a position angle of ξ ={156^\\circ }-{17^\\circ -{27}^\\circ }+{10^\\circ +{14}^\\circ } east of north. These are in good agreement with previous analyses. Notably, the previous 180° degeneracy in the position angle has now been conclusively broken by the inclusion of the closure-phase measurements. A reflection degeneracy in the inclination remains, permitting two localizations of the spin vector orientation, one of which is in agreement with the orbital angular momentum of the infrared gas cloud G2 and the clockwise disk of young stars. This may support a relationship between Sgr A*'s accretion flow and these larger-scale features.

  13. Mass Accretion Rate of Rotating Viscous Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myeong-Gu

    2009-11-01

    The mass accretion rate of transonic spherical accretion flow onto compact objects such as black holes is known as the Bondi accretion rate, which is determined only by the density and the temperature of gas at the outer boundary. A rotating accretion flow has angular momentum, which modifies the flow profile from the spherical Bondi flow, and hence its mass accretion rate, but most work on disc accretion has taken the mass flux to be given with the relation between that parameter and external conditions left uncertain. Within the framework of a slim α disk, we have constructed global solutions of the rotating, viscous, hot accretion flow in the Paczyński-Wiita potential and determined its mass accretion rate as a function of density, temperature, and angular momentum of gas at the outer boundary. We find that the low angular momentum flow resembles the spherical Bondi flow and its mass accretion rate approaches the Bondi accretion rate for the same density and temperature at the outer boundary. The high angular momentum flow on the other hand is the conventional hot accretion disk with advection, but its mass accretion rate can be significantly smaller than the Bondi accretion rate with the same boundary conditions. We also find that solutions exist only within a limited range of dimensionless mass accretion rate \\dot{m} ≡ \\dot{M}/\\dot{M}_B, where \\dot{M} is the mass accretion rate and \\dot{M}_B is the Bondi accretion rate: when the temperature at the outer boundary is equal to the virial temperature, solutions exist only for 0.05 ≲ \\dot{m} ≤ 1 when α = 0.01. We also find that the dimensionless mass accretion rate is roughly independent of the radius of the outer boundary but inversely proportional to the angular momentum at the outer boundary and proportional to the viscosity parameter, \\dot{m} ≃ 9.0 α λ^{-1} when 0.1 ≲ \\dot{m} ≲ 1, where the dimensionless angular momentum measure λ ≡ l out/lB is the specific angular momentum of gas at

  14. MASS ACCRETION RATE OF ROTATING VISCOUS ACCRETION FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Myeong-Gu

    2009-11-20

    The mass accretion rate of transonic spherical accretion flow onto compact objects such as black holes is known as the Bondi accretion rate, which is determined only by the density and the temperature of gas at the outer boundary. A rotating accretion flow has angular momentum, which modifies the flow profile from the spherical Bondi flow, and hence its mass accretion rate, but most work on disc accretion has taken the mass flux to be given with the relation between that parameter and external conditions left uncertain. Within the framework of a slim alpha disk, we have constructed global solutions of the rotating, viscous, hot accretion flow in the Paczynski-Wiita potential and determined its mass accretion rate as a function of density, temperature, and angular momentum of gas at the outer boundary. We find that the low angular momentum flow resembles the spherical Bondi flow and its mass accretion rate approaches the Bondi accretion rate for the same density and temperature at the outer boundary. The high angular momentum flow on the other hand is the conventional hot accretion disk with advection, but its mass accretion rate can be significantly smaller than the Bondi accretion rate with the same boundary conditions. We also find that solutions exist only within a limited range of dimensionless mass accretion rate m-dotident toM-dot/M-dot{sub B}, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate and M-dot{sub B} is the Bondi accretion rate: when the temperature at the outer boundary is equal to the virial temperature, solutions exist only for 0.05approxaccretion rate is roughly independent of the radius of the outer boundary but inversely proportional to the angular momentum at the outer boundary and proportional to the viscosity parameter, m-dotapprox =9.0 alphalambda{sup -1} when 0.1 approx

  15. ASYMMETRIC ACCRETION FLOWS WITHIN A COMMON ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2015-04-10

    This paper examines flows in the immediate vicinity of stars and compact objects dynamically inspiralling within a common envelope (CE). Flow in the vicinity of the embedded object is gravitationally focused, leading to drag and potentially to gas accretion. This process has been studied numerically and analytically in the context of Hoyle–Lyttleton accretion (HLA). Yet, within a CE, accretion structures may span a large fraction of the envelope radius, and in so doing sweep across a substantial radial gradient of density. We quantify these gradients using detailed stellar evolution models for a range of CE encounters. We provide estimates of typical scales in CE encounters that involve main sequence stars, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes with giant-branch companions of a wide range of masses. We apply these typical scales to hydrodynamic simulations of three-dimensional HLA with an upstream density gradient. This density gradient breaks the symmetry that defines HLA flow, and imposes an angular momentum barrier to accretion. Material that is focused into the vicinity of the embedded object thus may not be able to accrete. As a result, accretion rates drop dramatically, by one to two orders of magnitude, while drag rates are only mildly affected. We provide fitting formulae to the numerically derived rates of drag and accretion as a function of the density gradient. The reduced ratio of accretion to drag suggests that objects that can efficiently gain mass during CE evolution, such as black holes and neutron stars, may grow less than implied by the HLA formalism.

  16. Coronal Neutrino Emission in Hypercritical Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, R.; Mineshige, S.; Kawanaka, N.

    2008-03-01

    Hypercritical accretion flows onto stellar mass black holes (BHs) are commonly believed to be as a promising model of central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this model a certain fraction of the gravitational binding energy of accreting matter is deposited to the energy of relativistic jets via neutrino annihilation and/or magnetic fields. However, some recent studies have indicated that the energy deposition rate by neutrino annihilation is somewhat smaller than that needed to power a GRB. To overcome this difficulty, Ramirez-Ruiz and Socrates proposed that high-energy neutrinos from the hot corona above the accretion disk might enhance the efficiency of the energy deposition. We elucidate the disk corona model in the context of hypercritical accretion flows. From the energy balance in the disk and the corona, we can calculate the disk and coronal temperature, Td and Tc, and neutrino spectra, taking into account the neutrino cooling processes by neutrino-electron scatterings and neutrino pair productions. The calculated neutrino spectra consist of two peaks: one by the neutrino emission from the disk and the other by that from the corona. We find that the disk corona can enhance the efficiency of energy release but only by a factor of 1.5 or so, unless the height of the corona is very small, Hll r. This is because the neutrino emission is very sensitive to the temperature of the emitting region, and then the ratio Tc/Td cannot be very large.

  17. Accretion Flows in Magnetic White Dwarf Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, James N.

    2005-01-01

    We received Type A and B funding under the NASA Astrophysics Data Program for the analysis and interpretation of hard x-ray data obtained by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and other NASA sponsored missions for Intermediate Polars (IPS) and Polars. For some targets, optical data was available. We reduced and analyzed the X-ray spectra and the X-ray and optical (obtained at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory) timing data using detailed shock models (which we constructed) to place constraints on the properties of the accreting white dwarfs, the high energy emission mechanisms of white dwarfs, and the large-scale accretion flows of Polars and IPS. IPS and Polars are white dwarf mass-transfer binaries, members of the larger class of cata,clysmic variables. They differ from the bulk of the cataclysmic variables in that they contain strongly magnetic white dwarfs; the white dwarfs in Polars have B, = 7 to 230 MG and those in IPS have B, less than 10 MG. The IPS and Polars are both examples of funneled accretion flows in strong magnetic field systems. The IPS are similar to x-ray pulsars in that accretion disks form in the systems which are disrupted by the strong stellar magnetic fields of the white dwarfs near the stellar surface from where the plasma is funneled to the surface of the white dwarf. The localized hot spots formed at the footpoints of the funnels coupled with the rotation of the white dwarf leads to coherent pulsed x-ray emission. The Polars offer an example of a different accretion topology; the magnetic field of the white dwarf controls the accretion flow from near the inner Lagrangian point of the system directly to the stellar surface. Accretion disks do not form. The strong magnetic coupling generally leads to synchronous orbital/rotational motion in the Polars. The physical system in this sense resembles the Io/Jupiter system. In both IPS and Polars, pulsed emission from the infrared to x-rays is produced as the funneled flows merge onto the

  18. Swept wing ice accretion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1990-01-01

    An effort to develop a three-dimensional modeling method was initiated. This first step towards creation of a complete aircraft icing simulation code builds on previously developed methods for calculating three-dimensional flow fields and particle trajectories combined with a two-dimensional ice accretion calculation along coordinate locations corresponding to streamlines. This work is a demonstration of the types of calculations necessary to predict a three-dimensional ice accretion. Results of calculations using the 3-D method for a MS-317 swept wing geometry are projected onto a 2-D plane normal to the wing leading edge and compared to 2-D results for the same geometry. It is anticipated that many modifications will be made to this approach, however, this effort will lay the groundwork for future modeling efforts. Results indicate that the flow field over the surface and the particle trajectories differed for the two calculations. This led to lower collection efficiencies, convective heat transfer coefficients, freezing fractions, and ultimately ice accumulation for the 3-D calculation.

  19. New Spectral State of Supercritical Accretion Flow with Comptonizing Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Ohsuga, Ken; Mineshige, Shin; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Takabe, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2009-08-01

    Supercritical accretion flows inevitably produce radiation-pressure driven outflows, which Compton up-scatter soft photons from the underlying accretion flow, thereby making hard emission. We performed two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations of supercritical accretion flows and outflows, while incorporating such Compton scattering effects, and demonstrated that there appears a new hard spectral state at higher photon luminosities than that of the slim-disk state. In this state, as the photon luminosity increases, the photon index decreases and the fraction of the hard emission increases. The Compton y-parameter is on the order of unity (and thus the photon index will be ˜2) when the apparent photon luminosity is ˜30LE (with LE being the Eddington luminosity) for nearly face-on sources. This explains the observed spectral hardening of the ULX NGC 1313 X-2 in its brightening phase, and thus supports the model of supercritical accretion onto stellar-mass black holes in this ULX.

  20. The Magnetohydrodynamics of Convection-dominated Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Ramesh; Quataert, Eliot; Igumenshchev, Igor V.; Abramowicz, Marek A.

    2002-09-01

    Radiatively inefficient accretion flows onto black holes are unstable due to both an outwardly decreasing entropy (``convection'') and an outwardly decreasing rotation rate (the ``magnetorotational instability'' [MRI]). Using a linear MHD stability analysis, we show that long-wavelength modes with λ/H>>β-1/2 are primarily destabilized by the entropy gradient and that such ``convective'' modes transport angular momentum inward (λ is the wavelength of the mode, H is the scale height of the disk, and β is the ratio of the gas pressure to the magnetic pressure). Moreover, the stability criteria for the convective modes are the standard Høiland criteria of hydrodynamics. By contrast, shorter wavelength modes with λ/H~β-1/2 are primarily destabilized by magnetic tension and differential rotation. These ``MRI'' modes transport angular momentum outward. The convection-dominated accretion flow (CDAF) model, which has been proposed for radiatively inefficient accretion onto a black hole, posits that inward angular momentum transport and outward energy transport by long-wavelength convective fluctuations are crucial for determining the structure of the accretion flow. Our analysis suggests that the CDAF model is applicable to an MHD accretion flow provided that the magnetic field saturates at a value sufficiently below equipartition (β>>1), so that long-wavelength convective fluctuations with λ/H>>β-1/2 can fit inside the accretion disk. Numerical MHD simulations are required to determine whether such a subequipartition field is in fact obtained.

  1. Azimuthal Stress and Heat Flux In Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlen, Ebru

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows (RIAFs) have low radiative efficiencies and/or low accretion rates. The accreting gas may retain most of its binding energy in the form of heat. This lost energy for hot RIAFs is one of the problems heavily worked on in the literature. RIAF observations on the accretion to super massive black holes (e.g., Sagittarius A* in the center of our Galaxy) have shown that the observational data are not consistent with either advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) or Bondi models. For this reason, it is very important to theoretically comprehend the physical properties of RIAFs derived from observations with a new disk/flow model. One of the most probable candidates for definition of mass accretion and the source of excess heat energy in RIAFs is the gyroviscous modified magnetorotational instability (GvMRI). Dispersion relation is derived by using MHD equations containing heat flux term based on viscosity in the energy equation. Numerical solutions of the disk equations are done and the growth rates of the instability are calculated. This additional heat flux plays an important role in dissipation of energy. The rates of the angular momentum and heat flux which are obtained from numerical calculations of the turbulence brought about by the GVMRI are also discussed.

  2. The slimming effect of advection on black-hole accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasota, J.-P.; Vieira, R. S. S.; Sadowski, A.; Narayan, R.; Abramowicz, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Context. At super-Eddington rates accretion flows onto black holes have been described as slim (aspect ratio H/R ≲ 1) or thick (H/R> 1) discs, also known as tori or (Polish) doughnuts. The relation between the two descriptions has never been established, but it was commonly believed that at sufficiently high accretion rates slim discs inflate, becoming thick. Aims: We wish to establish under what conditions slim accretion flows become thick. Methods: We use analytical equations, numerical 1 + 1 schemes, and numerical radiative MHD codes to describe and compare various accretion flow models at very high accretion rates. Results: We find that the dominant effect of advection at high accretion rates precludes slim discs becoming thick. Conclusions: At super-Eddington rates accretion flows around black holes can always be considered slim rather than thick.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of stochastically driven accretion flows.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sujit Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Chattopadhyay, Amit K

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (or hydromagnetic as coined by Chandrasekhar) perturbations in the presence of stochastic noise in rotating shear flows. The particular emphasis is the flows whose angular velocity decreases but specific angular momentum increases with increasing radial coordinate. Such flows, however, are Rayleigh stable but must be turbulent in order to explain astrophysical observed data and, hence, reveal a mismatch between the linear theory and observations and experiments. The mismatch seems to have been resolved, at least in certain regimes, in the presence of a weak magnetic field, revealing magnetorotational instability. The present work explores the effects of stochastic noise on such magnetohydrodynamic flows, in order to resolve the above mismatch generically for the hot flows. We essentially concentrate on a small section of such a flow which is nothing but a plane shear flow supplemented by the Coriolis effect, mimicking a small section of an astrophysical accretion disk around a compact object. It is found that such stochastically driven flows exhibit large temporal and spatial autocorrelations and cross-correlations of perturbation and, hence, large energy dissipations of perturbation, which generate instability. Interestingly, autocorrelations and cross-correlations appear independent of background angular velocity profiles, which are Rayleigh stable, indicating their universality. This work initiates our attempt to understand the evolution of three-dimensional hydromagnetic perturbations in rotating shear flows in the presence of stochastic noise.

  4. Dead Zone Accretion Flows in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Neal; Sano, T.

    2008-01-01

    Planets form inside protostellar disks in a dead zone where the electrical resistivity of the gas is too high for magnetic forces to drive turbulence. We show that much of the dead zone nevertheless is active and flows toward the star while smooth, large-scale magnetic fields transfer the orbital angular momentum radially outward. Stellar X-ray and radionuclide ionization sustain a weak coupling of the dead zone gas to the magnetic fields, despite the rapid recombination of free charges on dust grains. Net radial magnetic fields are generated in the magnetorotational turbulence in the electrically conducting top and bottom surface layers of the disk, and reach the midplane by ohmic diffusion. A toroidal component to the fields is produced near the midplane by the orbital shear. The process is similar to the magnetization of the solar tachocline. The result is a laminar, magnetically driven accretion flow in the region where the planets form.

  5. Self consistent modeling of accretion columns in accretion powered pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkner, Sebastian; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Becker, Peter A.; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    We combine three physical models to self-consistently derive the observed flux and pulse profiles of neutron stars' accretion columns. From the thermal and bulk Comptonization model by Becker & Wolff (2006) we obtain seed photon continua produced in the dense inner regions of the accretion column. In a thin outer layer these seed continua are imprinted with cyclotron resonant scattering features calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The observed phase and energy dependent flux corresponding to these emission profiles is then calculated, taking relativistic light bending into account. We present simulated pulse profiles and the predicted dependency of the observable X-ray spectrum as a function of pulse phase.

  6. Viscosity parameter values in accretion flows around black holes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkoti, Shreeram; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Viscosity is responsible for the transport of angular momentum in accretion processes. Assuming mixed stress prescription suitable for flow discontinuities, we draw parameter space of specific angular momentum and specific energy of flow at the inner sonic point for all possible values of viscosity parameter. Then, we identify the region which is capable of producing standard Rankine-Hugoniot shocks. From this analysis, it is found that a large range of values of viscosity parameter (0.0-0.3) is capable of producing shocks. At values larger than this, the parameter space allowing shock formation is negligible. The shock formation causes piling up of matter in the post-shock region which Comptonizes soft X-ray photons coming from the Keplerian accretion disk, creating the hard X-Ray radiation. Since numerical simulations generally produce alpha parameters very smaller as compared to this upper limit, we conclude that the shocks remain essential component to model black hole spectral and timing properties.

  7. Self-Consistent Models of Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Ramesh

    1997-01-01

    The investigations of advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), with emphasis on applications to X-ray binaries containing black holes and neutron stars is presented. This work is now being recognized as the standard paradigm for understanding the various spectral states of black hole X-ray Binaries (BHXBs). Topics discussed include: (1) Problem in BHXBS, namely that several of these binaries have unusually large concentrations of lithium in their companion stars; (2) A novel test to show that black holes have event horizons; (3) Application of the ADAF model to the puzzling X-ray delay in the recent outburst of the BHXB, GRO J1655-40; (4) Description of the various spectral states in BHXBS; (5) Application of the ADAF model to the famous supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy, Sgr A(*); (6) Writing down and solving equations describing steady-state, optically thin, advection-dominated accretion onto a Kerr black hole; (7) The effect of "photon bubble" instability on radiation dominated accretion disks; and (8) Dwarf nova disks in quiescence that have rather low magnetic Reynolds number, of order 10(exp 3).

  8. An investigation of the stability of the Bondi-Hoyle model of accretion flow. [onto massive astronomical bodies at high Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    The Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (1944) accretion model is considered which involves accretion onto a massive body moving at a high Mach number with respect to the ambient medium and the production of a high-density accretion column along the axis where particle orbits intersect. The stability of steady-state solutions with respect to short-wavelength perturbations is analyzed using the WKB approximation, and the accretion column is shown to be unstable toward such perturbations. It is noted that this instability is not affected by the position of the stagnation point in the steady-state solution.

  9. High-redshift supermassive black holes: accretion through cold flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yu; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2014-05-01

    We use zoom-in techniques to re-simulate three high-redshift (z ≥ 5.5) haloes which host 109 M⊙ black holes from the ˜Gpc volume, MassiveBlack cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. We examine a number of factors potentially affecting supermassive black hole growth at high redshift in cosmological simulations. We find insignificant differences in the black hole accretion history by (i) varying the region over which feedback energy is deposited directly, (ii) changing mass resolution by factors of up to 64, (iii) changing the black hole seed mass by a factor of 100. Switching from the density-entropy formulation to the pressure-entropy formulation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics slightly increases the accretion rate. In general numerical details/model parameters appear to have small effects on the main fuelling mechanism for black holes at these high redshifts. The insensitivity to simulation technique seems to be a hallmark of the cold flow feeding picture of these high-z supermassive black holes. We show that the gas that participates in critical accretion phases in these massive objects at z > 6-7 is in all cases colder, denser and forms more coherent streams than the average gas in the halo. This is also mostly the case when the black hole accretion is feedback regulated (z < 6), however, the distinction is less prominent. For our resimulated haloes, cold flows appear to be a viable mechanism for forming the most massive black holes in the early universe, occurring naturally in Λ cold dark matter models of structure formation, without requiring fine-tuning of numerical parameters.

  10. Going with the flow: using gas clouds to probe the accretion flow feeding Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCourt, Michael; Madigan, Ann-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The massive black hole in our Galactic centre, Sgr A*, accretes only a small fraction of the gas available at its Bondi radius. The physical processes determining this accretion rate remain unknown, partly due to a lack of observational constraints on the gas at distances between ˜10 and ˜105 Schwarzschild radii (Rs) from the black hole. Recent infrared observations identify low-mass gas clouds, G1 and G2, moving on highly eccentric, nearly co-planar orbits through the accretion flow around Sgr A*. Although it is not yet clear whether these objects contain embedded stars, their extended gaseous envelopes evolve independently as gas clouds. In this paper we attempt to use these gas clouds to constrain the properties of the accretion flow at ˜103 Rs. Assuming that G1 and G2 follow the same trajectory, we model the small differences in their orbital parameters as evolution resulting from interaction with the background flow. We find evolution consistent with the G-clouds originating in the clockwise disc. Our analysis enables the first unique determination of the rotation axis of the accretion flow: we localize the rotation axis to within 20°, finding an orientation consistent with the parsec-scale jet identified in X-ray observations and with the circumnuclear disc, a massive torus of molecular gas ˜1.5 pc from Sgr A*. This suggests that the gas in the accretion flow comes predominantly from the circumnuclear disc, rather than the winds of stars in the young clockwise disc. This result will be tested by the Event-Horizon Telescope within the next year. Our model also makes testable predictions for the orbital evolution of G1 and G2, falsifiable on a 5-10 year time-scale.

  11. Observational evidence for matter propagation in accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revnivtsev, M.; Potter, S.; Kniazev, A.; Burenin, R.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Churazov, E.

    2011-02-01

    We study simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of three intermediate polars, EX Hya, V1223 Sgr and TV Col, with the aim of understanding the propagation of matter in their accretion flows. We show that in all cases the power spectra of the flux variability of binary systems in X-ray and optical bands are similar to each other, and the majority of X-ray and optical fluxes are correlated with time lag <1 s. These findings support the idea that the optical emission of accretion discs in these binary systems largely originates as the reprocessing of the X-ray luminosity of their white dwarfs. In the best obtained data set of EX Hya we see that the optical light curve unambiguously contains some component that leads the X-ray emission by ˜7 s. We interpret this in the framework of the model of propagating fluctuations and thus deduce the time of travel of matter from the innermost part of the truncated accretion disc to the white dwarf surface. This value agrees very well with the time expected for matter threaded on to the magnetosphere of the white dwarf to fall to its surface. The data sets of V1223 Sgr and TV Col in general confirm these findings, but have poorer quality.

  12. Dynamical structure of magnetized dissipative accretion flow around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Biplob; Das, Santabrata

    2016-09-01

    We study the global structure of optically thin, advection dominated, magnetized accretion flow around black holes. We consider the magnetic field to be turbulent in nature and dominated by the toroidal component. With this, we obtain the complete set of accretion solutions for dissipative flows where bremsstrahlung process is regarded as the dominant cooling mechanism. We show that rotating magnetized accretion flow experiences virtual barrier around black hole due to centrifugal repulsion that can trigger the discontinuous transition of the flow variables in the form of shock waves. We examine the properties of the shock waves and find that the dynamics of the post-shock corona (PSC) is controlled by the flow parameters, namely viscosity, cooling rate and strength of the magnetic field, respectively. We separate the effective region of the parameter space for standing shock and observe that shock can form for wide range of flow parameters. We obtain the critical viscosity parameter that allows global accretion solutions including shocks. We estimate the energy dissipation at the PSC from where a part of the accreting matter can deflect as outflows and jets. We compare the maximum energy that could be extracted from the PSC and the observed radio luminosity values for several supermassive black hole sources and the observational implications of our present analysis are discussed.

  13. Spherical steady accretion flows: Dependence on the cosmological constant, exact isothermal solutions, and applications to cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, Patryk; Malec, Edward; Karkowski, Janusz

    2013-10-01

    We investigate spherical, isothermal and polytropic steady accretion models in the presence of the cosmological constant. Exact solutions are found for three classes of isothermal fluids, assuming the test gas approximation. The cosmological constant damps the mass accretion rate and—above a certain limit—completely stops the steady accretion onto black holes. A “homoclinic-type” accretion flow of polytropic gas has been discovered in anti-de Sitter spacetimes in the test-gas limit. These results can have cosmological connotation, through the Einstein-Straus vacuole model of embedding local structures into Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetimes. In particular, one infers that steady accretion would not exist in the late phases of Penrose’s scenario of the evolution of the Universe, known as the Weyl curvature hypothesis.

  14. MAGNETICALLY CONTROLLED ACCRETION FLOWS ONTO YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Fred C.; Gregory, Scott G.

    2012-01-01

    Accretion from disks onto young stars is thought to follow magnetic field lines from the inner disk edge to the stellar surface. The accretion flow thus depends on the geometry of the magnetic field. This paper extends previous work by constructing a collection of orthogonal coordinate systems, including the corresponding differential operators, where one coordinate traces the magnetic field lines. This formalism allows for an (essentially) analytic description of the geometry and the conditions required for the flow to pass through sonic points. Using this approach, we revisit the problem of magnetically controlled accretion flow in a dipole geometry, and then generalize the treatment to consider magnetic fields with multiple components, including dipole, octupole, and split monopole contributions. This approach can be generalized further to consider more complex magnetic field configurations. Observations indicate that accreting young stars have substantial dipole and octupole components, and that accretion flow is transonic. If the effective equation of state for the fluid is too stiff, however, the flow cannot pass smoothly through the sonic points in steady state. For a multipole field of order l, we derive a general constraint on the polytropic index, n > l + 3/2, required for steady transonic flow to reach free-fall velocities. For octupole fields, inferred on surfaces of T Tauri stars, the index n > 9/2, so that the flow must be close to isothermal. The inclusion of octupole field components produces higher densities at the stellar surface and smaller areas for the hot spots, which occur at higher latitudes; the magnetic truncation radius is smaller (larger) for octupole components that are aligned (anti-aligned) with the stellar dipole. This contribution thus increases our understanding of magnetically controlled accretion for young stellar objects and can be applied to a variety of additional astrophysical problems.

  15. The Instability in Accretion Flows: GvMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardimci, Melis; Ebru Devlen, Doç.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we discuss the physical instability defining the expected turbulence in Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows (RIAFs) around the supermassive black holes (e.g., Sagittarius A* in the center of our Galaxy). These flows, with a high probability, include weakly collisional hot, optically thin and dilute plasmas. Within these flows, gravitational potential energy brought about by turbulent stresses is trapped as heat energy. Thus, in order accretion to be realized, outward transport of heat as well as angular momentum is required. This outward heat transport may reduce the mass inflow rate on black hole. We solve MHD equations including variation of viscosity coefficients with pressure in the momentum conservation equation. We plot the wave number-frequency diagrams for the wave modes. We show that one of the most probable candidates for definition of mass accretion and the source of excess heat energy in RIAFs is the gyroviscous modified magnetorotational instabilitiy (GvMRI).

  16. The Influence of Outflow in Supercritical Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra Zeraatgari, Fatemeh; Abbassi, Shahram; Mosallanezhad, Amin

    2016-06-01

    We solve the radiation-hydrodynamic equations of supercritical accretion flows in the presence of radiation force and outflow by using self-similar solutions. Similar to the pioneering works, in this paper we consider a power-law function for mass inflow rate as \\dot{M}\\propto {r}s. We found that s = 1 when the radiative cooling term is included in the energy equation. Correspondingly, the effective temperature profile with respect to the radius was obtained as {T}{eff}\\propto {r}-1/2. In addition, we investigated the influence of the outflow on the dynamics of the accretion flow. We also calculated the continuum spectrum emitted from the disk surface as well as the bolometric luminosity of the accretion flow. Furthermore, our results show that the advection parameter, f, depends strongly on mass inflow rate.

  17. FILAMENTARY ACCRETION FLOWS IN THE EMBEDDED SERPENS SOUTH PROTOCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Helen; Myers, Philip C.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Wilson, Grant W.; Hedden, Abigail

    2013-04-01

    One puzzle in understanding how stars form in clusters is the source of mass-is all of the mass in place before the first stars are born, or is there an extended period when the cluster accretes material which can continuously fuel the star formation process? We use a multi-line spectral survey of the southern filament associated with the Serpens South embedded cluster-forming region in order to determine if mass is accreting from the filament onto the cluster, and whether the accretion rate is significant. Our analysis suggests that material is flowing along the filament's long axis at a rate of {approx}30 M{sub Sun} Myr{sup -1} (inferred from the N{sub 2}H{sup +} velocity gradient along the filament), and radially contracting onto the filament at {approx}130 M{sub Sun} Myr{sup -1} (inferred from HNC self-absorption). These accretion rates are sufficient to supply mass to the central cluster at a similar rate to the current star formation rate in the cluster. Filamentary accretion flows may therefore be very important in the ongoing evolution of this cluster.

  18. Potential flow analysis of glaze ice accretions on an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaguli, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical/experimental study of the flow fields about an airfoil with leading edge glaze ice accretion shapes are presented. Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel to measure surface pressure distributions and boundary layer separation reattachment characteristics on a general aviation wing section to which was affixed wooden ice shapes which approximated typical glaze ice accretions. Comparisons were made with predicted pressure distributions using current airfoil analysis codes as well as the Bristow mixed analysis/design airfoil panel code. The Bristow code was also used to predict the separation reattachment dividing streamline by inputting the appropriate experimental surface pressure distribution.

  19. Peculiarities of the accretion flow in the system HL CMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semena, A. N.; Revnivtsev, M. G.; Buckley, D.; Lutovinov, A. A.; Breitenbach, H.

    2016-06-01

    The properties of the aperiodic luminosity variability for the dwarf novaHLCMa are considered. The variability of the system HL CMa is shown to be suppressed at frequencies above 0.7 × 10-2 Hz. Different variability suppression mechanisms related to the radiation reprocessing time, partial disk evaporation, and characteristic variability formation time are proposed. It has been found that the variability suppression frequency does not change when the system passes from the quiescent state to the outburst one, suggesting that the accretion flow geometry is invariable. It is concluded from the optical and Xray luminosities of the system that the boundary layer on the white dwarf surface is optically thick in both quiescent and outburst states. The latter implies that the optically thick part of the accretion flow (disk) reaches the white dwarf surface. The accretion rate in the system and the accretion flow geometry and temperature have been estimated from the variability power spectra and spectral characteristics in a wide energy range, from the optical to X-ray ones.

  20. Two-dimensional Numerical Simulations of Supercritical Accretion Flows Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Hong; Yuan, Feng; Ohsuga, Ken; Bu, De-Fu

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of super-Eddington accretion flows by performing two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Compared with previous works, in this paper we include the T θphi component of the viscous stress and consider various values of the viscous parameter α. We find that when T θphi is included, the rotational speed of the high-latitude flow decreases, while the density increases and decreases at the high and low latitudes, respectively. We calculate the radial profiles of inflow and outflow rates. We find that the inflow rate decreases inward, following a power law form of \\dot{M}_in\\propto r^s. The value of s depends on the magnitude of α and is within the range of ~0.4-1.0. Correspondingly, the radial profile of density becomes flatter compared with the case of a constant \\dot{M}(r). We find that the density profile can be described by ρ(r)vpropr -p and the value of p is almost same for a wide range of α ranging from α = 0.1 to 0.005. The inward decrease of inflow accretion rate is very similar to hot accretion flows, which is attributed to the mass loss in outflows. To study the origin of outflow, we analyze the convective stability of the slim disk. We find that depending on the value of α, the flow is marginally stable (when α is small) or unstable (when α is large). This is different from the case of hydrodynamical hot accretion flow, where radiation is dynamically unimportant and the flow is always convectively unstable. We speculate that the reason for the difference is because radiation can stabilize convection. The origin of outflow is thus likely because of the joint function of convection and radiation, but further investigation is required.

  1. Hyper-Eddington accretion flows on to massive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inayoshi, Kohei; Haiman, Zoltán; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2016-07-01

    We study very high rate, spherically symmetric accretion flows on to massive black holes (BHs; 102 ≲ MBH ≲ 106 M⊙) embedded in dense metal-poor clouds, performing one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations. We find solutions from outside the Bondi radius at hyper-Eddington rates, unimpeded by radiation feedback when (n∞/105 cm-3) > (MBH/104 M⊙)-1(T∞/104 K)3/2, where n∞ and T∞ are the density and temperature of ambient gas. Accretion rates in this regime are steady, and larger than 5000LEdd/c2, where LEdd is the Eddington luminosity. At lower Bondi rates, the accretion is episodic due to radiative feedback and the average rate is below the Eddington rate. In the hyper-Eddington case, the solution consists of a radiation-dominated central core, where photon trapping due to electron scattering is important, and an accreting envelope which follows a Bondi profile with T ≃ 8000 K. When the emergent luminosity is limited to ≲ LEdd because of photon trapping, radiation from the central region does not affect the gas dynamics at larger scales. We apply our result to the rapid formation of massive BHs in protogalaxies with a virial temperature of Tvir ≳ 104K. Once a seed BH forms at the centre of the galaxy, it can grow to a maximum ˜105(Tvir/104 K) M⊙ via gas accretion independent of the initial BH mass. Finally, we discuss possible observational signatures of rapidly accreting BHs with/without allowance for dust. We suggest that these systems could explain Lyα emitters without X-rays and nearby luminous infrared sources with hot dust emission, respectively.

  2. Radiation-MHD Simulations of Black Hole Accretion Flows and Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsuga, K.

    2012-08-01

    We perform two-dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the accretion disks, jets, and disk outflows around black holes. We can reproduce the three distinct inflow-outflow modes, which corresponds to the two-dimensional version of the slim disk model, the standard disk model, and the radiatively inefficient accretion flow, with one numerical code. In the case of the super-Eddington accretion flow, we find that a radiatively driven, magnetically collimated jet is produced around the rotation axis and that a time-dependent, clumpy outflow with larger opening angle forms. Such jet and outflow might resolve the relativistic powerful jets of the luminous compact objects and the ultra fast outflows of active galactic nuclei.

  3. ROTATING ACCRETION FLOWS: FROM INFINITY TO THE BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jason; Ostriker, Jeremiah; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-04-20

    Accretion onto a supermassive black hole of a rotating inflow is a particularly difficult problem to study because of the wide range of length scales involved. There have been broadly utilized analytic and numerical treatments of the global properties of accretion flows, but detailed numerical simulations are required to address certain critical aspects. We use the ZEUS code to run hydrodynamical simulations of rotating, axisymmetric accretion flows with Bremsstrahlung cooling, considering solutions for which the centrifugal balance radius significantly exceeds the Schwarzschild radius, with and without viscous angular momentum transport. Infalling gas is followed from well beyond the Bondi radius down to the vicinity of the black hole. We produce a continuum of solutions with respect to the single parameter M-dot{sub B}/ M-dot{sub Edd}, and there is a sharp transition between two general classes of solutions at an Eddington ratio of M-dot{sub B}/M-dot{sub Edd}{approx}few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}. Our high inflow solutions are very similar to the standard Shakura and Sunyaev results. But our low inflow results are to zeroth order the stationary Papaloizou and Pringle solution, which has no accretion. To next order in the small, assumed viscosity they show circulation, with disk and conical wind outflows almost balancing inflow. These solutions are characterized by hot, vertically extended disks, and net accretion proceeds at an extremely low rate, only of order {alpha} times the inflow rate. Our simulations have converged with respect to spatial resolution and temporal duration, and they do not depend strongly on our choice of boundary conditions.

  4. VERTICAL CONVECTION IN NEUTRINO-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tong; Gu, Wei-Min; Li, Ang; Kawanaka, Norita E-mail: norita@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-05-20

    We present the effects of vertical convection on the structure and luminosity of the neutrino-dominated accretion flow (NDAF) around a stellar-mass black hole in spherical coordinates. We find that the convective energy transfer can suppress the radial advection in the NDAF and that the density, temperature, and opening angle are slightly changed. As a result, the neutrino and annihilation luminosities are increased, which allows the energy requirement of gamma-ray bursts to be achieved.

  5. Modeling the Accretion Structure of AU Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood-Stone, Corwin; Miller, Brendan P.; Richards, Mercedes T.; Budaj, Ján; Peters, Geraldine J.

    2012-12-01

    AU Mon is a long-period (11.113 days) Algol-type binary system with a persistent accretion disk that is apparent as double-peaked Hα emission. We present previously unpublished optical spectra of AU Mon which were obtained over 20 years from 1991-2011 with dense orbital phase coverage. We utilize these data, along with archival UV spectra, to model the temperature and structure of the accretion disk and the gas stream. Synthetic spectral profiles for lines including Hα, Hβ, and the Al III and Si IV doublets were computed with the Shellspec program. The best match between the model spectra and the observations is obtained for an accretion disk of inner/outer radius 5.1/23 R ⊙, thickness of 5.2 R ⊙, density of 1.0 × 10-13 g cm-3, and maximum temperature of 14,000 K, along with a gas stream at a temperature of ~8000 K transferring ~2.4 × 10-9 M ⊙ yr-1. We show Hα Doppler tomograms of the velocity structure of the gas, constructed from difference profiles calculated through sequentially subtracting contributions from the stars and accretion structures. The tomograms provide independent support for the Shellspec modeling, while also illustrating that residual emission at sub-Keplerian velocities persists even after subtracting the disk and stream emission. Spectral variability in the Hα profile beyond that expected from either the orbital or the long-period cycle is present on both multi-week and multi-year timescales, and may reflect quasi-random changes in the mass transfer rate or the disk structure. Finally, a transient UV spectral absorption feature may be modeled as an occasional outflow launched from the vicinity of the disk-stream interaction region.

  6. PROTOSTELLAR ACCRETION FLOWS DESTABILIZED BY MAGNETIC FLUX REDISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Li Zhiyun; Zhao Bo

    2012-09-20

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known magnetic flux problem can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two-dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the prestellar phase of star formation to the protostellar mass accretion phase. In the latter phase, the magnetic flux is transported outward mainly through advection by strongly magnetized low-density regions that expand against the collapsing inflow. The tussle between the gravity-driven infall and magnetically driven expansion leads to a highly filamentary inner accretion flow that is more disordered than previously envisioned. The efficient outward transport of magnetic flux by advection lowers the field strength at small radii, making the magnetic braking less efficient and the formation of rotationally supported disks easier in principle. However, we find no evidence for such disks in any of our rotating collapse simulations. We conclude that the inner protostellar accretion flow is shaped to a large extent by the flux redistribution-driven magnetic interchange instability. How disks form in such an environment is unclear.

  7. Protostellar Accretion Flows Destabilized by Magnetic Flux Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Li, Zhi-Yun; Shang, Hsien; Zhao, Bo

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known magnetic flux problem can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two-dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the prestellar phase of star formation to the protostellar mass accretion phase. In the latter phase, the magnetic flux is transported outward mainly through advection by strongly magnetized low-density regions that expand against the collapsing inflow. The tussle between the gravity-driven infall and magnetically driven expansion leads to a highly filamentary inner accretion flow that is more disordered than previously envisioned. The efficient outward transport of magnetic flux by advection lowers the field strength at small radii, making the magnetic braking less efficient and the formation of rotationally supported disks easier in principle. However, we find no evidence for such disks in any of our rotating collapse simulations. We conclude that the inner protostellar accretion flow is shaped to a large extent by the flux redistribution-driven magnetic interchange instability. How disks form in such an environment is unclear.

  8. Terrane accretion: Insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Katharina; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    The oceanic crust is not homogenous, but contains significantly thicker crust than norm, i.e. extinct arcs, spreading ridges, detached continental fragments, volcanic piles or oceanic swells. These (crustal) fragments may collide with continental crust and form accretionary complexes, contributing to its growth. We analyse this process using a thermo-mechanical computer model (i2vis) of an ocean-continent subduction zone. In this model the oceanic plate can bend spontaneously under the control of visco-plastic rheologies. It moreover incorporates effects such as mineralogical phase changes, fluid release and consumption, partial melting and melt extraction. Based on our 2-D experiments we suggest that the lithospheric buoyancy of the downgoing slab and the rheological strength of crustal material may result in a variety of accretionary processes. In addition to terrane subduction, we are able to identify three distinct modes of terrane accretion: frontal accretion, basal accretion and underplating plateaus. We show that crustal fragments may dock onto continental crust and cease subduction, be scrapped off the downgoing plate, or subduct to greater depth prior to slab break off and subsequent exhumation. Direct consequences of these processes include slab break off, subduction zone transference, structural reworking, formation of high-pressure terranes, partial melting and crustal growth.

  9. Hot accretion flow with radiative cooling: state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mao-Chun; Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Gan, Zhaoming

    2016-06-01

    We investigate state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries through different parameters by using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulation method. For radiative cooling in hot accretion flow, we take into account the bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and synchrotron self-Comptonization self-consistently in the dynamics. Our main result is that the state transitions occur when the accretion rate reaches a critical value dot{M} ˜ 3α dot{M}_Edd, above which cold and dense clumpy/filamentary structures are formed, embedded within the hot gas. We argued this mode likely corresponds to the proposed two-phase accretion model, which may be responsible for the intermediate state of black hole X-ray binaries. When the accretion rate becomes sufficiently high, the clumpy/filamentary structures gradually merge and settle down on to the mid-plane. Eventually the accretion geometry transforms to a disc-corona configuration. In summary, our results are consistent with the truncated accretion scenario for the state transition.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Viscous Accretion Flow around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Jae; Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Kumar, Rajiv; Hyung, Siek; Ryu, Dongsu

    2016-06-01

    We present shocked viscous accretion flow onto a black hole in a two dimensional cylindrical geometry, where initial conditions were chosen from analytical solutions. The simulation code used the Lagrangian Total Variation Diminishing (LTVD) and remap routine, which enabled us to attain high accuracy in capturing shocks and to handle the angular momentum distribution correctly. The steady state shocked solution in the inviscid, as well as in the viscous regime, matched theoretical predictions well, but increasing viscosity renders the accretion shock unstable. Large amplitude shock oscillation is accompanied by intermittent, transient inner multiple shocks. Such oscillation of the inner part of disk is interpreted as the source of QPO in hard X-rays observed in microquasars; and strong shock oscillation induces strong episodic jet emission. The periodicity of jets and shock oscillation are similar. Our simulation shows that the jets for higher viscosity parameter are evidently stronger and faster than that for lower viscosity.

  11. Self-similar Hot Accretion Flow onto a Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2001-06-01

    We consider hot, two-temperature, viscous accretion onto a rotating, unmagnetized neutron star. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, as well as free-free cooling from the electrons. We show that the accretion flow has an extended settling region that can be described by means of two analytical self-similar solutions: a two-temperature solution that is valid in an inner zone, r<~102.5, where r is the radius in Schwarzschild units; and a one-temperature solution that is valid in an outer zone, r>~102.5. In both zones the density varies as ρ~r-2 and the angular velocity as Ω~r-3/2. We solve the flow equations numerically and confirm that the analytical solutions are accurate. Except for the radial velocity, all gas properties in the self-similar settling zone, such as density, angular velocity, temperature, luminosity, and angular momentum flux, are independent of the mass accretion rate; these quantities do depend sensitively on the spin of the neutron star. The angular momentum flux is outward under most conditions; therefore, the central star is nearly always spun down. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy that is released as the star is braked by viscosity, and the contribution from gravity is small; hence, the radiative efficiency, η=Lacc/Mc2, is arbitrarily large at low M. For reasonable values of the gas adiabatic index γ, the Bernoulli parameter is negative; therefore, in the absence of dynamically important magnetic fields, a strong outflow or wind is not expected. The flow is also convectively stable but may be thermally unstable. The described solution is not advection dominated; however, when the spin of the star is small enough, the flow transforms smoothly to an advection-dominated branch of solution.

  12. RELATIVISTIC GLOBAL SOLUTIONS OF NEUTRINO-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Li; Liu Tong; Gu Weimin; Lu Jufu

    2013-08-15

    Neutrino-dominated accretion flows (NDAFs) around rotating stellar-mass black holes are plausible candidates for the central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We investigate one-dimensional global solutions of NDAFs, taking into account general relativity in the Kerr metric, neutrino physics, and nucleosynthesis more precisely than previous works. We calculate 16 solutions with different characterized accretion rates and black hole spins to exhibit the radial distributions of various physical properties in NDAFs. We confirm that the electron degeneracy has important effects in NDAFs and we find that the electron fraction is about 0.46 in the outer region for all 16 solutions. From the perspective of the mass fraction, free nucleons, {sup 4}He, and {sup 5}6Fe dominate in the inner, middle, and outer regions, respectively. The influence of neutrino trapping on the annihilation is of importance for the superhigh accretion ( M-dot =10 M{sub sun} s{sup -1}) and most of the 16 solutions have an adequate annihilation luminosity for GRBs.

  13. The lamppost model of accreting black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, A.

    2016-06-01

    Niedzwiecki, Zdziarski & Szanecki (2016, ApJL, submitted) have studied the lamppost model, in which the X-ray source in accreting black-hole systems is located on the rotation axis close to the horizon. We point out a number of inconsistencies in the widely used lamppost model relxilllp. They appear to invalidate those model fitting results for which the source distances from the horizon are within several gravitational radii. Furthermore, we note that if those results were correct, most of the photons produced in the lamppost would be trapped by the black hole, and the source luminosity as measured at infinity would be much larger than that observed. This appears to be in conflict with the observed smooth state transitions between the hard and soft states of X-ray binaries. The required increase of the accretion rate and the associated efficiency reduction present also a problem for AGNs. Then, those models imply the luminosity measured in the local frame much higher than the dissipated power due to time dilation and redshift, and the electron temperature significantly higher than that observed. We show that these conditions imply that the fitted sources would be out of the pair equilibrium.

  14. Self-similar hot accretion flow onto a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2001-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical solutions which describe a hot, viscous, two-temperature accretion flow onto a neutron star or any other compact star with a surface. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, and free-free cooling from the electrons. Outside a thin boundary layer, where the accretion flow meets the star, we show that there is an extended settling region which is well-described by two self-similar solutions: (1) a two-temperature solution which is valid in an inner zone r<=102.5 (r is in Schwarzchild units), and (2) a one-temperature solution at larger radii. In both zones, ρ~r-2, Ω~r-3/2, v~r0, Tp~r-1 in the two-temperature zone, Te~r-1/2. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy of the star as the star is braked by viscosity; hence the luminosity is independent of Ṁ. The settling solution is convectively and viscously stable and is unlikely to have strong winds or outflows. The flow is thermally unstable, but the instability may be stabilized by thermal conduction. The settling solution described here is not advection-dominated, and is thus different from the self-similar ADAF found around black holes. When the spin of the star is small enough, however, the present solution transforms smoothly to a (settling) ADAF. .

  15. THE LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS OF ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Xinwu

    2011-08-20

    We calculate the advection/diffusion of the large-scale magnetic field threading an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) and find that the magnetic field can be dragged inward by the accretion flow efficiently if the magnetic Prandtl number P{sub m}={eta}/{nu}{approx}1. This is due to the large radial velocity of the ADAF. It is found that the magnetic pressure can be as high as {approx}50% of the gas pressure in the inner region of the ADAF close to the black hole horizon, even if the external imposed homogeneous vertical field strength is {approx}< 5% of the gas pressure at the outer radius of the ADAF, which is caused by the gas in the ADAF plunging rapidly to the black hole within the marginal stable circular orbit. In the inner region of the ADAF, the accretion flow is significantly pressured in the vertical direction by the magnetic fields, and therefore its gas pressure can be two orders of magnitude higher than that in the ADAF without magnetic fields. This means that the magnetic field strength near the black hole is underestimated by assuming equipartition between magnetic and gas pressure with the conventional ADAF model. Our results show that the magnetic field strength of the flow near the black hole horizon can be more than one order of magnitude higher than that in the ADAF at {approx}3R{sub g} (R{sub g} = 2GM/c{sup 2}), which implies that the Blandford-Znajek mechanism could be more important than the Blandford-Payne mechanism for ADAFs. We find that the accretion flow is decelerated near the black hole by the magnetic field when the external imposed field is strong enough or the gas pressure of the flow is low at the outer radius, or both. This corresponds to a critical accretion rate, below which the accretion flow will be arrested by the magnetic field near the black hole for a given external imposed field. In this case, the gas may accrete as magnetically confined blobs diffusing through field lines in the region very close to the black

  16. RESOLVING THE BONDI ACCRETION FLOW TOWARD THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE OF NGC 3115 WITH CHANDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Ka-Wah; Irwin, Jimmy A.; Yukita, Mihoko; Million, Evan T.; Mathews, William G.

    2011-07-20

    Gas undergoing Bondi accretion onto a supermassive black hole (SMBH) becomes hotter toward smaller radii. We searched for this signature with a Chandra observation of the hot gas in NGC 3115, which optical observations show has a very massive SMBH. Our analysis suggests that we are resolving, for the first time, the accretion flow within the Bondi radius of an SMBH. We show that the temperature is rising toward the galaxy center as expected in all accretion models in which the black hole is gravitationally capturing the ambient gas. There is no hard central point source that could cause such an apparent rise in temperature. The data support that the Bondi radius is at about 4''-5'' (188-235 pc), suggesting an SMBH of 2 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun} that is consistent with the upper end of the optical results. The density profile within the Bondi radius has a power-law index of 1.03{sup +0.23}{sub -0.21}, which is consistent with gas in transition from the ambient medium and the accretion flow. The accretion rate at the Bondi radius is determined to be M-dot{sub B} = 2.2x10{sup -2} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Thus, the accretion luminosity with 10% radiative efficiency at the Bondi radius (10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) is about six orders of magnitude higher than the upper limit of the X-ray luminosity of the nucleus.

  17. Characteristics of transonic spherical symmetric accretion flow in Schwarzschild-de Sitter and Schwarzschild anti-de Sitter backgrounds, in pseudo-general relativistic paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shubhrangshu; Banik, Prabir

    2015-07-01

    dominant (CD) galaxies directly from ambient intercluster medium (ICM). However, for high mass accretion rate, the influence of cosmological constant on Bondi accretion dynamics, generically, diminishes. As active galactic nuclei (AGN)/ICM feedback can be advertently linked to Bondi type spherical accretion, any proper modeling of AGN feedback or megaparsecs-scale jet dynamics or accretion flow from ICM onto the central regions of host galaxies should take into account the relevant information of repulsive Λ, especially in context to supergiant elliptical galaxies or CD galaxies present in rich galaxy clusters. This could also explore the feasibility to limit the value of Λ, from the kinematics in local galactic-scales.

  18. Modeling Gas Distribution in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, Martin; Lewis, Josiah; Brittain, Sean

    2010-07-01

    Protoplanetary accretion disks are disks of dust and gas which surround and feed material onto a forming star in the earliest stages of its evolution. One of the most useful methods for studying these disks is near infrared spectroscopy of rovibrational CO emission. This paper presents the methods in which synthetically generated spectra are modeled and fit to spectral data gathered from protoplanetary disks. This paper also discussed the methods in which this code can be improved by modifying the code to run a Monte Carlo analysis of best fit across the CONDOR cluster at Clemson University, thereby allowing for the creation of a catalog of protoplanetary disks with detailed information about them as gathered from the model.

  19. Slim accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowicz, M.A.; Czerny, B.; Lasota, J.P.; Szuszkiewicz, E.

    1988-09-01

    A new branch of equilibrium solutions for stationary accretion disks around black holes is found. These solutions correspond to moderately super-Eddington accretion rates. The existence of the new branch is a consequence of an additional cooling due to general relativistic Roche lobe overflow and horizontal advection of heat. On an accretion rate versus surface density plane the new branch forms, together with the two standard branches (corresponding to the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk models) a characteristically S-shaped curve. This could imply a limit cycle-type behavior for black hole accretion flows with accretion rates close ot the Eddington one. 29 references.

  20. Ion viscosity mediated by tangled magnetic fields in Accretion flows onto black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, P.; Becker, P. A.; Kafatos, M.

    1995-12-01

    We examine the viscosity mechanism due to momentum transfer between ions in the presence of tangled magnetic fields in accretion flows onto black holes. We do not attempt to present a self-consistent description of the tangled magnetic field; we merely assume its existence and take its coherence length lambda_ {coh} (which is the maximum length a given magnetic field line can be expected to be straight, on average) to be a free parameter. We arrive at a formulation for a hybrid viscosity in which the tangled magnetic field plays the role of an intermediary in momentum transfer between ions. It does so by affecting the mean free path of the ions; the effective mean free path of the ions in our formulation lies in between the usual ion-ion mean free path lambda_ {ii} and lambda_ {coh}. Our calculations are relevant in the scenario of accretion disks around BLACK HOLES, which are expected to have near equipartition tangled magnetic fields embedded in them. We apply this viscosity mechanism to a steady state model of a two temperature quasi-Keplerian accretion disk. The values of the USUAL alpha parameter arising from this mechanism are FOUND to range from =~ 0.01 to =~ 0.5. We find the viscosity to be influenced both by the degree to which the magnetic fields are tangled (represented by xi = lambda_ {coh}/r) and the relative accretion rate dot {M}/dot {M}Eddington. Our results suggest the viability of quasi-spherical accretion for near and super-Eddington accretion rates.

  1. Universal Accretion Growth Using Sandpile Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Srabani; McKie, Shane; Spencer, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    The Bak-Tang- Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile process is a model of a complex dynamical system with a large collection of particles or grains in a node that sheds load to their neighbours when they reach capacity. The cascades move around thesystem till it reaches stability with a critical point as an attractor. The BTW growth process shows self-organized criticality (SOC) with power-law distribution in cascade sizes having slope -5/3. This self-similarity of structureis synonymous with the fractal structure found in molecular clouds of Kolmogorov dimension 1.67 and by treating cascades as waves, scaling functions are found to be analogous to those observed for velocity structure functions influid turbulence. We apply the BTW sandpile model to study growth on a 2 dimensional rotating lattice in a magnetic field. In this paper, we show that this is a naturally occuring universal process giving rise to scale-freestructures with size limited only by the number of infalling grains. We also compare the BTW process with other sandpile models such as the Manna and Zhang processes. We find that the BTW sandpile model can be applied to a widerange of objects including molecular clouds, accretion disks and perhaps galaxies.

  2. The Effects of Accretion Flow Dynamics on the Black Hole Shadow of Sagittarius A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Hung-Yi; Akiyama, Kazunori; Asada, Keiichi

    2016-11-01

    A radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF), which is commonly characterized by its sub-Keplerian nature, is a favored accretion model for the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center, Sagittarius A*. To investigate the observable features of an RIAF, we compare the modeled shadow images, visibilities, and spectra of three flow models with dynamics characterized by (i) a Keplerian shell that is rigidly rotating outside the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) and infalling with a constant angular momentum inside ISCO, (ii) a sub-Keplerian motion, and (iii) a free-falling motion with zero angular momentum at infinity. At near-millimeter wavelengths, the emission is dominated by the flow within several Schwarzschild radii. The energy shift due to these flow dynamics becomes important and distinguishable, suggesting that the flow dynamics are an important model parameter for interpreting the millimeter/sub-millimeter very long baseline interferometric observations with the forthcoming, fully assembled Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). As an example, we demonstrate that structural variations of Sagittarius A* on event horizon-scales detected in previous EHT observations can be explained by the non-stationary dynamics of an RIAF.

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HOT ACCRETION FLOWS. II. NATURE, ORIGIN, AND PROPERTIES OF OUTFLOWS AND THEIR POSSIBLE OBSERVATIONAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Feng; Bu Defu; Wu Maochun E-mail: dfbu@shao.ac.cn

    2012-12-20

    Hydrodynamical (HD) and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) numerical simulations of hot accretion flows have indicated that the inflow accretion rate decreases inward. Two models have been proposed to explain this result. In the adiabatic inflow-outflow solution (ADIOS), this is because of the loss of gas in the outflow. In the alternative convection-dominated accretion flow model, it is thought that the flow is convectively unstable and gas is locked in convective eddies. We investigate the nature of the inward decrease of the accretion rate using HD and MHD simulations. We calculate various properties of the inflow and outflow such as temperature and rotational velocity. Systematic and significant differences are found. These results suggest that the inflow and outflow are not simply convective turbulence; instead, systematic inward and outward motion (i.e., real outflow) must exist. We have also analyzed the convective stability of MHD accretion flows and found that they are stable. These results favor the ADIOS scenario. We suggest that the mechanisms of producing outflow in HD and MHD flows are the buoyancy associated with the convection and the centrifugal force associated with the angular momentum transport mediated by the magnetic field, respectively. The latter is similar to the Blandford and Payne mechanism but no large-scale open magnetic field is required. We discuss some possible observational applications, including the Fermi bubble in the Galactic center and winds in active galactic nuclei and black hole X-ray binaries.

  4. Linear analysis on the growth of non-spherical perturbations in supersonic accretion flows

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-10-20

    We analyzed the growth of non-spherical perturbations in supersonic accretion flows. We have in mind an application to the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). Such non-spherical perturbations have been suggested by a series of papers by Arnett, who has numerically investigated violent convections in the outer layers of pre-collapse stars. Moreover, Couch and Ott demonstrated in their numerical simulations that such perturbations may lead to a successful supernova even for a progenitor that fails to explode without fluctuations. This study investigated the linear growth of perturbations during the infall onto a stalled shock wave. The linearized equations are solved as an initial and boundary value problem with the use of a Laplace transform. The background is a Bondi accretion flow whose parameters are chosen to mimic the 15 M {sub ☉} progenitor model by Woosley and Heger, which is supposed to be a typical progenitor of CCSNe. We found that the perturbations that are given at a large radius grow as they flow down to the shock radius; the density perturbations can be amplified by a factor of 30, for example. We analytically show that the growth rate is proportional to l, the index of the spherical harmonics. We also found that the perturbations oscillate in time with frequencies that are similar to those of the standing accretion shock instability. This may have an implication for shock revival in CCSNe, which will be investigated in our forthcoming paper in more detail.

  5. A luminous hot accretion flow in the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus NGC 7213

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Ma, Renyi; Yang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    The active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 7213 shows a complex correlation between the monochromatic radio luminosity LR and the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity LX, i.e. the correlation is unusually weak with p ˜ 0 (in the form L_R∝ L_X^p) when LX is below a critical luminosity, and steep with p > 1 when LX is above that luminosity. Such a hybrid correlation in individual AGNs is unexpected as it deviates from the fundamental plane of AGN activity. Interestingly, a similar correlation pattern is observed in the black-hole X-ray binary H1743-322, where it has been modelled by switching between different modes of accretion. We propose that the flat LR-LX correlation of NGC 7213 is due to the presence of a luminous hot accretion flow, an accretion model whose radiative efficiency is sensitive to the accretion rate. Given the low luminosity of the source, LX ˜ 10-4 of the Eddington luminosity, the viscosity parameter is determined to be small, α ≈ 0.01. We also modelled the broad-band spectrum from radio to γ-rays, the time lag between the radio and X-ray light curves, and the implied size and the Lorentz factor of the radio jet. We predict that NGC 7213 will enter into a two-phase accretion regime when L_X⪆ 1.5 × 10^{42} erg s^{-1}. When this happens, we predict a softening of the X-ray spectrum with the increasing flux and a steep radio/X-ray correlation.

  6. Challenging accretion models with an HETG observation of T Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Young, accreting stars often emit soft X-rays from the accretion shock on the stellar surface. The favored model predicts high densities in the accretion spot compatible with most observations. However, X-ray data of the nearest accreting star (TW Hya) and of the eponymous T Tau show signatures incompatible with shock models. Proposed model modifications require an enhanced density of higher temperature tracers compared to cooler plasma. We propose to test this with a 130 ks HETG observation of T Tau to (a) provide the first significant measurement of its Ne IX triplet (high temperature) to augment XMM-Newton data of the O VII triplet (low temperature) and (b) to search for spatial offsets of the soft X-rays which could explain the lack of accretion signatures in T Tau by jet emission.

  7. Photon spectra and radiative properties of supercritical accretion flows with Comptonizing outflows around stellar-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Ohsuga, Ken; Mineshige, Shin; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) have recently been found in the off-center region of nearby external galaxies. The typical photon luminosities of ULXs range 1039.5-41 [erg/s], which ex-ceeds the Eddington luminosity for neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes. There are two possible models considered to account for such large photon luminosities: subcritical accretion (i.e., accretion below the Eddington accretion rate) onto an intermediate-mass black hole and supercritical accretion (i.e., accretion exceeding the Eddington accretion rate) onto a stellar-mass black hole. Since the black hole masses of ULXs are poorly known at present, we cannot discriminate between these two models. The study of radiation spectra of supercritical accre-tion flows may give a clue to resolve this issue. We calculated X-ray spectra of supercritical accretion flows with mildly hot outflows by Monte-Carlo techniques using two-dimensional ra-diation hydrodynamic simulation data of Kawashima et al. (2009). Our method is based on Pozdnyakov et al. (1977), and we incorporated radiative processes such as the modified black-body radiation with special relativistic effects (i.e., the Doppler shift and the aberration) at the photosphere, the free-free absorption, the photon trapping effect, the thermal Comptoniza-tion, and the bulk Comptonization. We found that the thermal inverse Compton scattering by electrons of the outflow affects the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the supercritical accretion flow. The fraction of the hard emission increases as the mass accretion rate increases (i.e., the photon luminosity increases). When the isotropic X-ray luminosity is below about 10 Eddington luminosity, the SED is similar to that of the slim disk state (i.e., the one-dimensional model of the supercritical accretion flow). By contrast, when the isotropic X-ray luminosity is larger than about 10 Eddington luminosity, the SED becomes harder at high energy region and deviates from the slim

  8. Gamma-ray activity of Seyfert galaxies and constraints on hot accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojaczyński, Rafał; Niedźwiecki, Andrzej; Xie, Fu-Guo; Szanecki, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Aims: We check how the Fermi/LAT data constrain the physics of hot accretion flows that are most likely present in low-luminosity AGNs. Methods: Using a precise model of emission from hot flows, we studied the flow γ-ray emission resulting from proton-proton interactions. We explored the dependence of the γ-ray luminosity on the accretion rate, the black hole spin, the magnetic field strength, the electron heating efficiency, and the particle distribution. Then, we compared the hadronic γ-ray luminosities predicted by the model for several nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies with the results of our analysis of 6.4 years of Fermi/LAT observations of these AGNs. Results: In agreement with previous studies, we find a significant γ-ray detection in NGC 6814. We were only able to derive upper limits for the remaining objects, although we report marginally significant (~3σ) signals at the positions of NGC 4151 and NGC 4258. The derived upper limits for the flux above 1 GeV allow us to constrain the proton acceleration efficiency in flows with heating of electrons dominated by Coulomb interactions, which case is favored by the X-ray spectral properties. In these flows, at most ~10% of the accretion power can be used for a relativistic acceleration of protons. Upper limits for the flux below 1 GeV can constrain the magnetic field strength and black hole spin value; we find these constraints for NGC 7213 and NGC 4151. We also note that the spectral component above ~4 GeV previously found in the Fermi/LAT data of Centaurus A may be due to hadronic emission from a flow within the above constraint. We rule out this origin of the γ-ray emission for NGC 6814. For models with a strong magnetohydrodynamic heating of electrons, the hadronic γ-ray fluxes are below the Fermi/LAT sensitivity even for the closest AGNs. In these models, nonthermal Compton radiation may dominate in the γ-ray range if electrons are efficiently accelerated and the acceleration index is hard; for the index

  9. Structure of relativistic accretion disk with non-standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khesali, A. R.; Salahshoor, K.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of stationary, axisymmetric advection-dominated accretion disk (ADAF) around rotating black hole, using non-standard model, was examined. In this model, the transport efficiency of the angular momentum α was dependent on the magnetic Prandtl number α ∝ Pm^{δ } . The full relativistic shear stress recently obtained by a new manner, was used. By considering black hole spin and Prandtl number instantaneously, the structure of ADAFs was changed in inner and outer region of the disk. It was discovered that the accretion flow was denser and hotter in the inner region, due to the black hole spin, and in the outer region, due to the presence of Prandtl parameter. Inasmuch as the rotation of the black hole affected the transport efficiency of angular momentum in parts of the disk very close to the even horizon, then in these regions, the viscosity depended on the rotation of black hole. Also, it was discovered that the effect of the black hole spin on the structure of the disk was related to the presence of Prandtl parameter.

  10. Accretion Flow Dynamics of MAXI J1836-194 During Its 2011 Outburst from TCAF Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Arghajit; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Santanu; Molla, Aslam Ali

    2016-03-01

    The Galactic transient X-ray binary MAXI J1836-194 was discovered on 2011 August 29. Here we make a detailed study of the spectral and timing properties of its 2011 outburst using archival data from the RXTE Proportional Counter Array instrument. The evolution of accretion flow dynamics of the source during the outburst through spectral analysis with Chakrabarti-Titarchuk’s two-component advective flow (TCAF) solution as a local table model in XSPEC. We also fitted spectra with combined disk blackbody and power-law models and compared it with the TCAF model fitted results. The source is found to be in hard and hard-intermediate spectral states only during the entire phase of this outburst. No soft or soft-intermediate spectral states are observed. This could be due to the fact that this object belongs to a special class of sources (e.g., MAXI J1659-152, Swift J1753.5-0127, etc.) that have very short orbital periods and that the companion is profusely mass-losing or the disk is immersed inside an excretion disk. In these cases, flows in the accretion disk are primarily dominated by low viscous sub-Keplerian flow and the Keplerian rate is not high enough to initiate softer states. Low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are observed sporadically although as in normal outbursts of transient black holes, monotonic evolutions of QPO frequency during both rising and declining phases are observed. From the TCAF fits, we find the mass of the black hole in the range of 7.5-11 M⊙, and from time differences between peaks of the Keplerian and sub-Keplerian accretion rates we obtain a viscous timescale for this particular outburst, ˜10 days.

  11. Fermi bubbles inflated by winds launched from the hot accretion flow in Sgr A*

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Guobin; Yuan, Feng; Bu, Defu; Sun, Mouyuan; Su, Meng E-mail: fyuan@shao.ac.cn

    2014-08-01

    A pair of giant gamma-ray Bubbles has been revealed by Fermi-LAT. In this paper we investigate their formation mechanism. Observations have indicated that the activity of the supermassive black hole located at the Galactic center, Sgr A*, was much stronger than at the present time. Specifically, one possibility is that while Sgr A* was also in the hot accretion regime, the accretion rate should be 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} times higher during the past ∼10{sup 7} yr. On the other hand, recent magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of hot accretion flows have unambiguously shown the existence and obtained the properties of strong winds. Based on this knowledge, by performing three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, we show in this paper that the Fermi Bubbles could be inflated by winds launched from the 'past' hot accretion flow in Sgr A*. In our model, the active phase of Sgr A* is required to last for about 10 million years and it was quenched no more than 0.2 million years ago. The central molecular zone (CMZ) is included and it collimates the wind orientation toward the Galactic poles. Viscosity suppresses the Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and results in the smoothness of the Bubbles edge. The main observational features of the Bubbles can be well explained. Specifically, the ROSAT X-ray features are interpreted by the shocked interstellar medium and the interaction region between the wind and CMZ gas. The thermal pressure and temperature obtained in our model are consistent with recent Suzaku observations.

  12. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Magnetically Choked Accretion Flows around Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Blandford, Roger D.

    2012-04-26

    Black hole (BH) accretion flows and jets are qualitatively affected by the presence of ordered magnetic fields. We study fully three-dimensional global general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of radially extended and thick (height H to cylindrical radius R ratio of |H/R| {approx} 0.2-1) accretion flows around BHs with various dimensionless spins (a/M, with BH mass M) and with initially toroidally-dominated ({phi}-directed) and poloidally-dominated (R-z directed) magnetic fields. Firstly, for toroidal field models and BHs with high enough |a/M|, coherent large-scale (i.e. >> H) dipolar poloidal magnetic flux patches emerge, thread the BH, and generate transient relativistic jets. Secondly, for poloidal field models, poloidal magnetic flux readily accretes through the disk from large radii and builds-up to a natural saturation point near the BH. While models with |H/R| {approx} 1 and |a/M| {le} 0.5 do not launch jets due to quenching by mass infall, for sufficiently high |a/M| or low |H/R| the polar magnetic field compresses the inflow into a geometrically thin highly non-axisymmetric 'magnetically choked accretion flow' (MCAF) within which the standard linear magneto-rotational instability is suppressed. The condition of a highly-magnetized state over most of the horizon is optimal for the Blandford-Znajek mechanism that generates persistent relativistic jets with and 100% efficiency for |a/M| {approx}> 0.9. A magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetospheric interface forms between the compressed inflow and bulging jet magnetosphere, which drives a new jet-disk oscillation (JDO) type of quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) mechanism. The high-frequency QPO has spherical harmonic |m| = 1 mode period of {tau} {approx} 70GM/c{sup 3} for a/M {approx} 0.9 with coherence quality factors Q {approx}> 10. Overall, our models are qualitatively distinct from most prior MHD simulations (typically, |H/R| << 1 and poloidal flux is limited by

  13. The Accretion Flow and Boundary Layer Structure in the Dwarf Nova SS Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabizadeh, Armin; Balman, Solen; Godon, Patrick; Sion, Edward; Hertfelder, Marius

    2016-07-01

    We present X-ray analysis of dwarf novae SS Aur (51 ksec) using XMM-Newton Observatory archival data obtained in quiescence for a better understanding of the accretion flow structure. We find X-ray orbital modulations. We report power spectral analysis for EPIC (X-ray) and OM (UV) light curves suggesting high levels of red noise with no significant QPO or periodicities. We simultaneously fitted EPIC pn, MOS1 and MOS2 data using a model for interstellar medium absorption (tbabs) and a multi-temperature plasma emission model (cevmkl) as expected from low accretion rate quiescent dwarf novae. However, the composite model fit yields unacceptable reduced χ ^{2} values due to the existence of soft excess. The soft excess is well modeled using a blackbody model (kT˜˜24 eV) giving a better reduced χ ^{2} value over 3σ significance level. This may indicate the existence of optically thick boundary layer emission. We will discuss the origin of this excess. The best fitting model is a combination of a blackbody, a cevmkl and a power law with an interstellar absorption which yields a reduced χ ^{2} of 1.05. The fit also shows some oxygen and iron over abundances. SS Aur has a maximum thermal plasma temperature of ˜22 keV. The X-ray luminosity in the 0.1 to 50.0 keV energy band is ˜2.0×10 ^{33} ergs ^{-1}. Finally, we discuss these characteristics in the light of standard disk models and accretion flows and geometry in nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables.

  14. Spinning up black holes with super-critical accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sądowski, A.; Bursa, M.; Abramowicz, M.; Kluźniak, W.; Lasota, J.-P.; Moderski, R.; Safarzadeh, M.

    2011-08-01

    We study the process of spinning up black holes by accretion from slim disks for a wide range of accretion rates. We show that for super-Eddington accretion rates and low values of the viscosity parameter α ( ≲ 0.01) the limiting value of the dimensionless spin parameter a∗ can reach values higher than a∗ = 0.9978 inferred by Thorne in his seminal study. For Ṁ = 10 ṀEdd and α = 0.01, spin equilibrium is reached at a∗ = 0.9994. We show that the equilibrium spin value depends strongly on the assumed value of α. We also prove that for high accretion rates the impact of captured radiation on spin evolution is negligible.

  15. TURBULENCE AND STEADY FLOWS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL GLOBAL STRATIFIED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Flock, M.; Dzyurkevich, N.; Klahr, H.; Turner, N. J.; Henning, Th.

    2011-07-10

    We present full 2{pi} global three-dimensional stratified magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of accretion disks. We interpret our results in the context of protoplanetary disks. We investigate the turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) using the PLUTO Godunov code in spherical coordinates with the accurate and robust HLLD Riemann solver. We follow the turbulence for more than 1500 orbits at the innermost radius of the domain to measure the overall strength of turbulent motions and the detailed accretion flow pattern. We find that regions within two scale heights of the midplane have a turbulent Mach number of about 0.1 and a magnetic pressure two to three orders of magnitude less than the gas pressure, while in those outside three scale heights the magnetic pressure equals or exceeds the gas pressure and the turbulence is transonic, leading to large density fluctuations. The strongest large-scale density disturbances are spiral density waves, and the strongest of these waves has m = 5. No clear meridional circulation appears in the calculations because fluctuating radial pressure gradients lead to changes in the orbital frequency, comparable in importance to the stress gradients that drive the meridional flows in viscous models. The net mass flow rate is well reproduced by a viscous model using the mean stress distribution taken from the MHD calculation. The strength of the mean turbulent magnetic field is inversely proportional to the radius, so the fields are approximately force-free on the largest scales. Consequently, the accretion stress falls off as the inverse square of the radius.

  16. The relativistic equation of state in accretion and wind flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Prasad; Mondal, Soumen

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we derive a 4-velocity distribution function for the relativistic ideal gas following the original approach of Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB). Using this distribution function, the relativistic equation of state (EOS): ρ-ρ0=(p, is expressed in the parametric form: ρ=ρ0f(λ), and p=ρ0g(λ), where λ is a parameter related to the kinetic energy, and hence, to the temperature of the gas. In the nonrelativistic limit, this distribution function perfectly reduces to original MB distribution and the EOS reduces to ρ-ρ0=3/2 p, whereas in the extreme ultra-relativistic limit, the EOS becomes ρ=3p correctly. Using these parametric equations the adiabatic index γ=cp/cv and the sound speed as are calculated as a function of λ. They also satisfy the inequalities: 4/3 ⩽γ⩽ 5/3 and as⩽ 1/√{3} perfectly. The computed distribution function, adiabatic index γ, and the sound speed as are compared with the results obtained from the canonical ensemble theory which nicely match with the standard results (Synge, 1957 and Chandrasekhar, 1939). The main advantage in using the EOS is that the probability distribution function can be factorized and therefore, may be helpful to solve complex dynamics of the astrophysical system. Interestingly, in one of the astrophysical application revels that shocks in accretion flows become unlikely and except for the region very nearby the compact object, the EOS remains non-relativistic (Mondal and Basu, 2011). We therefore, conclude that the new form of EOS will be helpful to verify many conventional ideas in many astrophysical problems.

  17. Accretion Flow Properties of MAXI J1543–564 during 2011 Outburst from the TCAF Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Debjit; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Santanu; Jana, Arghajit

    2016-08-01

    We derive accretion flow properties of the transient black hole candidate (BHC) MAXI J1543–564 using the RXTE data. We use the two-component advective flow (TCAF) solution to fit the data of the initial rising phase of outburst (from 2011 May 10 to 15). The 2.5–25 keV spectra are fitted using the TCAF solution fits file as a local additive table model in XSPEC. We extract physical flow parameters such as the two-component (Keplerian disk and sub-Keplerian halo) accretion rates and size and the property of the Compton cloud (post-shock region close to a black hole). Similar to other classical transient BHCs, monotonic evolution of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) is observed during the rising phase of the outburst, which is fitted with the propagating oscillatory shock (POS) model, which describes how the Compton cloud properties change from day to day. From the nature of variations of TCAF model fitted physical flow parameters and QPOs, we only found hard-intermediate and soft-intermediate spectral states during this phase of the outburst under study. We also calculated the frequency of the dominating QPOs from the TCAF model fitted shock parameters and found that they roughly match with the observed and POS model fitted values. From our spectro-temporal study of the source with TCAF and POS models, the most probable mass of the BHC is found to be 12.6–14.0 M ⊙, or {13}-0.4+1.0 {M}ȯ .

  18. Accretion Flow Properties of MAXI J1543-564 during 2011 Outburst from the TCAF Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Debjit; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Santanu; Jana, Arghajit

    2016-08-01

    We derive accretion flow properties of the transient black hole candidate (BHC) MAXI J1543-564 using the RXTE data. We use the two-component advective flow (TCAF) solution to fit the data of the initial rising phase of outburst (from 2011 May 10 to 15). The 2.5-25 keV spectra are fitted using the TCAF solution fits file as a local additive table model in XSPEC. We extract physical flow parameters such as the two-component (Keplerian disk and sub-Keplerian halo) accretion rates and size and the property of the Compton cloud (post-shock region close to a black hole). Similar to other classical transient BHCs, monotonic evolution of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) is observed during the rising phase of the outburst, which is fitted with the propagating oscillatory shock (POS) model, which describes how the Compton cloud properties change from day to day. From the nature of variations of TCAF model fitted physical flow parameters and QPOs, we only found hard-intermediate and soft-intermediate spectral states during this phase of the outburst under study. We also calculated the frequency of the dominating QPOs from the TCAF model fitted shock parameters and found that they roughly match with the observed and POS model fitted values. From our spectro-temporal study of the source with TCAF and POS models, the most probable mass of the BHC is found to be 12.6-14.0 M ⊙, or {13}-0.4+1.0 {M}⊙ .

  19. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  20. On the X-ray spectra of luminous, inhomogeneous accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merloni, A.; Malzac, J.; Fabian, A. C.; Ross, R. R.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the expected X-ray spectral and variability properties of black hole accretion discs at high luminosity, under the hypothesis that radiation-pressure-dominated discs are subject to violent clumping instabilities and, as a result, have a highly inhomogeneous two-phase structure. After deriving the full accretion disc solutions explicitly in terms of the parameters of the model, we study their radiative properties both with a simple two-zone model, treatable analytically, and with radiative transfer simulations which account simultaneously for energy balance and Comptonization in the hot phase, together with reflection, reprocessing, ionization and thermal balance in the cold phase. We show that, if not only the density, but also the heating rate within these flows is inhomogeneous, then complex reflection-dominated spectra can be obtained for a high enough covering fraction of the cold phase. In general, large reflection components in the observed X-ray spectra should be associated with strong soft excesses, resulting from the combined emission of ionized atomic emission lines. The variability properties of such systems are such that, even when contributing to a large fraction of the hard X-ray spectrum, the reflection component is less variable than the power-law-like emission originating from the hot Comptonizing phase, in agreement with what is observed in many Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies and bright Seyfert 1. Our model falls within the family of those trying to explain the complex X-ray spectra of bright AGN with ionized reflection, but presents an alternative, specific, physically motivated, geometrical set-up for the complex multiphase structure of the inner regions of near-Eddington accretion flows.

  1. Freddi: Fast Rise Exponential Decay accretion Disk model Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunova, G. V.; Malanchev, K. L.

    2016-10-01

    Freddi (Fast Rise Exponential Decay: accretion Disk model Implementation) solves 1-D evolution equations of the Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk. It simulates fast rise exponential decay (FRED) light curves of low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The basic equation of the viscous evolution relates the surface density and viscous stresses and is of diffusion type; evolution of the accretion rate can be found on solving the equation. The distribution of viscous stresses defines the emission from the source. The standard model for the accretion disk is implied; the inner boundary of the disk is at the ISCO or can be explicitely set. The boundary conditions in the disk are the zero stress at the inner boundary and the zero accretion rate at the outer boundary. The conditions are suitable during the outbursts in X-ray binary transients with black holes. In a binary system, the accretion disk is radially confined. In Freddi, the outer radius of the disk can be set explicitely or calculated as the position of the tidal truncation radius.

  2. Current Experimental Basis for Modeling Ice Accretions on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a review of the experimental basis for modeling ice accretions on swept wings. Experimental work related to ice accretion physics on swept wings conducted between 1954 and 2004 is reviewed. Proposed models or explanations of scallop formations are singled out and discussed. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the work done to determine the basic macroscopic mechanisms of scallop formation. The role of feather growth and its connection to scallop growth is discussed. Conceptual steps in modeling scallop formations are presented. Research elements needed for modeling are discussed.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Accretion Flows, Jets, and Winds Around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Ramesh

    Accretion flows around black holes in X-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei and gamma- ray bursts are highly relativistic. This is especially true of the inner regions of these flows where the accreting gas comes close to the black hole and from where relativistic jets are launched. Understanding the properties of black holes and the effects of their associated relativistic ejections on their environment is a central goal of NASA's Astrophysics Theory program. We propose to carry out three-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations, as well as analytical studies, focusing on two main problems: quantitatively studying the feedback effects of winds and jets ejected from AGN accretion flows on their environment, and pinning down the validity of the standard model of thin black-hole accretion disks by Novikov & Thorne (1973, NT). The PI and his team possess general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) codes which are uniquely suited for simulating fully relativistic highly magnetized flows. These codes will be used to perform the following tasks: (1) To study the validity of the NT model in the region inside the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). On the one hand, simulations for a range of black hole spin values will be performed, in order to find the errors in spin estimates, obtained using the NT model, of black holes in X-ray binaries. On the other hand, we will look for an improved disk model using our simulation results. (2) Large-dynamic-range simulations of advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs) for a range of black hole spin values, to understand (i) the mass, energy and momentum output of winds and jets, which is important for understanding feedback effects on galaxy formation, and cooling flows; (ii) the relative importance of feedback through a relativistic jet versus a non-relativistic wind; and (iii) the effect of ADAF disk winds on jet collimation. The proposed research will be done by postdoctoral fellow Dr. Akshay Kulkarni and

  4. Modelling aperiodic X-ray variability in black hole binaries as propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations: A short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Black hole binary systems can emit very bright and rapidly varying X-ray signals when material from the companion accretes onto the black hole, liberating huge amounts of gravitational potential energy. Central to this process of accretion is turbulence. In the propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations model, turbulence is generated throughout the inner accretion flow, causing fluctuations in the accretion rate. Fluctuations from the outer regions propagate towards the black hole, modulating the fluctuations generated in the inner regions. Here, I present the theoretical motivation behind this picture before reviewing the array of statistical variability properties observed in the light curves of black hole binaries that are naturally explained by the model. I also discuss the remaining challenges for the model, both in terms of comparison to data and in terms of including more sophisticated theoretical considerations.

  5. Numerical simulations of two-dimensional and three-dimensional accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Takuya; Ishii, Takanori; Sekino, Nobuhiro; Sawada, Keisuke; Shima, Eiji; Livio, Mario; Anzer, Ulrich

    1992-03-01

    Numerical simulations of 2D and 3D accretion flows past a gravitating compact object from a uniform flow at a large distance upstream are performed by solving the Eulerian equations. The 2D flows exhibit a 'flip-flop instability' if the central accreting body is small. If the central body is enlarged at some instance in the oscillating flow, then the accretion shock shows a rather periodic oscillation similar to the von Karman vortex street. In the case of 3D flows, it is found that the shock cone is much more robust than in 2D, and the flip-flop instability takes a different, probably less violent, form. The causes of the instabilities are discussed.

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON THE VISCOSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN HOT ACCRETION FLOWS AROUND BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. F.; Taam, Ronald E. E-mail: r-taam@northwestern.edu

    2013-07-15

    The magnitude of the viscosity and magnetic field parameters in hot accretion flows is investigated in low luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). Theoretical studies show that a geometrically thin, optically thick disk is truncated at mass accretion rates less than a critical value by mass evaporated vertically from the disk to the corona, with the truncated region replaced by an advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF). The critical accretion rate for such a truncation is a function of the viscosity and magnetic field. Observations of X-ray photon indices and spectral fits of a number of LLAGNs published in the literature provide an estimate of the critical rate of mass accretion and the truncation radius, respectively. By comparing the observational results with theoretical predictions, the viscosity and magnetic field parameters in the hot accretion flow region are estimated. Specifically, the mass accretion rates inferred in different sources constrain the viscosity parameter, whereas the truncation radii of the disk, as inferred from spectral fits, further constrain the magnetic field parameter. It is found that the value of the viscosity parameter in the corona/ADAF ranges from 0.17 to 0.5, with values clustered about 0.2-0.3. Magnetic pressure is required by the relatively small truncation radii for some LLAGNs and is found to be as high as its equipartition value with the gas pressure. The inferred values of the viscosity parameter are in agreement with those obtained from the observations of non-stationary accretion in stellar mass black hole X-ray transients. This consistency provides support for the paradigm that a geometrically thin disk is truncated by means of a mass evaporation process from the disk to the corona at low mass accretion rates.

  7. An XMM-Newton Monitoring Campaign of the Accretion Flow in IGRJ16318-4848

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Nicastro, Fabrizio

    2005-01-01

    This grant is associated to a successful XMM-Newton-AO3 observational proposal to monitor the spectrum of the X-ray loud component of the recently discovered binary system IGR J16138-4848, to study the conditions of the accretion flows (and their evolution) in binary system. All four EPIC-PN and MOS observations of the target have now been performed (the last one of the 4, only 3 months ago). The four observations were logarithmically spaced, so to cover timescales from days to months. Data from all four pointings have now been reduced, using the XMM-Newton data reduction pipeline, and spectra and lightcurves from the target have been extracted. For the first three observations we have already performed the observation-by-observation data analysis, by fitting the single EPIC spectra with spectral models that include an intrinsic continuum power law (reduced at low energy by neutral absorption), a 6.4 keV iron emission line (detected in all spectra with varying intensity) and a Compton-reflection component. A Compton reflection component is also detected in all spectra, although at lower significance. The analysis of the fourth and last observation of our monitoring campaign has just recently begun. Next, we will (1) stack together the four observations of IGR J16138-4848, to obtain high-accuracy estimates of the average spectral parameters of this object; and then (2) proceed to the time-evolving analysis, of the three spectral parameters: (a) Gamma (the slope of the intrinsic continuum), (b) W(FeK), the equivalent width of the 6.4 keV Iron emission line, and (c) R, the relative amount of Compton reflection. Through this time-resolved spectroscopic analysis we hope to constrain (a) the physical state of the accreting matter and its relation with the X-ray output, and (b) the evolution of the accretion flow geometry, distribution and covering factor.

  8. A Liquid Sodium Model of a BH Accretion Disk Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckley, Howard; Colgate, Stirling; Pariev, Vladimir; Weatherall, James

    2002-04-01

    A magnetic dynamo experiment is under construction at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experiment is designed to demonstrate in the laboratory the alpha-omega magnetic dynamo, which is believed to operate in many rotating and conducting astrophysical objects. The experiment uses the Couette flow of liquid sodium between two cylinders rotating with different angular velocities to model the omega-effect. The alpha-effect is created by the rising and expanding jets of liquid sodium driven through a pair of orifices in the end plates of the cylindrical vessel. The driven jets simulate plumes driven by buoyancy either within stars or from star-disk collisions in AGN accretion disks. A water analog of the dynamo device has been constructed and the flow necessary for the dynamo has been demonstrated. Numerical simulations of the kinematic dynamo predict that the toroidal field produced by the omega-effect will be B_phi (R_m/2pi) B_poloidal 20 x B_poloidal for the expected magnetic Reynolds number of Rm 120. The critical rate of jets necessary for the dynamo self-excitation is predicted to be a pair of jets every 4 revolutions of the outer cylinder. Within the limitations on the strength of materials and the power of the drive, the self-excitation of the dynamo appears to be feasible.

  9. Relativistic reverberation in the accretion flow of a tidal disruption event.

    PubMed

    Kara, Erin; Miller, Jon M; Reynolds, Chris; Dai, Lixin

    2016-07-21

    Our current understanding of the curved space-time around supermassive black holes is based on actively accreting black holes, which make up only ten per cent or less of the overall population. X-ray observations of that small fraction reveal strong gravitational redshifts that indicate that many of these black holes are rapidly rotating; however, selection biases suggest that these results are not necessarily reflective of the majority of black holes in the Universe. Tidal disruption events, where a star orbiting an otherwise dormant black hole gets tidally shredded and accreted onto the black hole, can provide a short, unbiased glimpse at the space-time around the other ninety per cent of black holes. Observations of tidal disruptions have hitherto revealed the formation of an accretion disk and the onset of an accretion-powered jet, but have failed to reveal emission from the inner accretion flow, which enables the measurement of black hole spin. Here we report observations of reverberation arising from gravitationally redshifted iron Kα photons reflected off the inner accretion flow in the tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57. From the reverberation timescale, we estimate the mass of the black hole to be a few million solar masses, suggesting an accretion rate of 100 times the Eddington limit or more. The detection of reverberation from the relativistic depths of this rare super-Eddington event demonstrates that the X-rays do not arise from the relativistically moving regions of a jet, as previously thought. PMID:27338795

  10. OBSERVING THE END OF COLD FLOW ACCRETION USING HALO ABSORPTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Kaufmann, Tobias; Bullock, James S.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; Diemand, Juerg; Wadsley, James

    2011-07-01

    We use cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to study the cool, accreted gas in two Milky Way size galaxies through cosmic time to z = 0. We find that gas from mergers and cold flow accretion results in significant amounts of cool gas in galaxy halos. This cool circum-galactic component drops precipitously once the galaxies cross the critical mass to form stable shocks, M{sub vir} = M{sub sh} {approx} 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}. Before reaching M{sub sh}, the galaxies experience cold mode accretion (T < 10{sup 5} K) and show moderately high covering fractions in accreted gas: f{sub c} {approx} 30%-50% for R < 50 comoving kpc and N{sub Hi}>10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. These values are considerably lower than observed covering fractions, suggesting that outflowing gas (not included here) is important in simulating galaxies with realistic gaseous halos. Within {approx}500 Myr of crossing the M{sub sh} threshold, each galaxy transitions to hot mode gas accretion, and f{sub c} drops to {approx}5%. The sharp transition in covering fraction is primarily a function of halo mass, not redshift. This signature should be detectable in absorption system studies that target galaxies of varying host mass, and may provide a direct observational tracer of the transition from cold flow accretion to hot mode accretion in galaxies.

  11. Relativistic reverberation in the accretion flow of a tidal disruption event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Erin; Miller, Jon M.; Reynolds, Chris; Dai, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    Our current understanding of the curved space-time around supermassive black holes is based on actively accreting black holes, which make up only ten per cent or less of the overall population. X-ray observations of that small fraction reveal strong gravitational redshifts that indicate that many of these black holes are rapidly rotating; however, selection biases suggest that these results are not necessarily reflective of the majority of black holes in the Universe. Tidal disruption events, where a star orbiting an otherwise dormant black hole gets tidally shredded and accreted onto the black hole, can provide a short, unbiased glimpse at the space-time around the other ninety per cent of black holes. Observations of tidal disruptions have hitherto revealed the formation of an accretion disk and the onset of an accretion-powered jet, but have failed to reveal emission from the inner accretion flow, which enables the measurement of black hole spin. Here we report observations of reverberation arising from gravitationally redshifted iron Kα photons reflected off the inner accretion flow in the tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57. From the reverberation timescale, we estimate the mass of the black hole to be a few million solar masses, suggesting an accretion rate of 100 times the Eddington limit or more. The detection of reverberation from the relativistic depths of this rare super-Eddington event demonstrates that the X-rays do not arise from the relativistically moving regions of a jet, as previously thought.

  12. Relativistic reverberation in the accretion flow of a tidal disruption event.

    PubMed

    Kara, Erin; Miller, Jon M; Reynolds, Chris; Dai, Lixin

    2016-07-21

    Our current understanding of the curved space-time around supermassive black holes is based on actively accreting black holes, which make up only ten per cent or less of the overall population. X-ray observations of that small fraction reveal strong gravitational redshifts that indicate that many of these black holes are rapidly rotating; however, selection biases suggest that these results are not necessarily reflective of the majority of black holes in the Universe. Tidal disruption events, where a star orbiting an otherwise dormant black hole gets tidally shredded and accreted onto the black hole, can provide a short, unbiased glimpse at the space-time around the other ninety per cent of black holes. Observations of tidal disruptions have hitherto revealed the formation of an accretion disk and the onset of an accretion-powered jet, but have failed to reveal emission from the inner accretion flow, which enables the measurement of black hole spin. Here we report observations of reverberation arising from gravitationally redshifted iron Kα photons reflected off the inner accretion flow in the tidal disruption event Swift J1644+57. From the reverberation timescale, we estimate the mass of the black hole to be a few million solar masses, suggesting an accretion rate of 100 times the Eddington limit or more. The detection of reverberation from the relativistic depths of this rare super-Eddington event demonstrates that the X-rays do not arise from the relativistically moving regions of a jet, as previously thought.

  13. The Structure of the Accretion Flow on pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvet, Nuria

    1999-07-01

    We propose to test an essential prediction of the magnetospheric accretion model for T Tauri stars. STIS echelle spectra will be used to search for the relatively narrow high-temperature emission lines that must result from the magnetospheric accretion shock, but are not expected in the previous, alternative boundary layer model. By combining the results from high temperature {10^5 K} lines, accessible only with HST, with optical lines and optical-UV continuum emission, we will develop physically self-consistent models of accretion shock structure. The geometrically distribution of the emitting gas as derived from our results will test theories of mass-loading of magnetic field lines at the magnetosphere-disk interface. Analysis of the UV emission lines will also provide improved calibrations between ultraviolet continuum emission and accretion luminosities, and thus improve estimates of mass accretion rates for T Tauri stars.

  14. Numerical simulation of vertical oscillations in an axisymmetric thick accretion flow around a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Arnab; Giri, Kinsuk; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-11-01

    We study time evolution of rotating, axisymmetric, two-dimensional inviscid accretion flows around black holes using a grid-based finite difference method. We do not use reflection symmetry on the equatorial plane in order to inspect if the disc along with the centrifugal barrier oscillated vertically. In the inviscid limit, we find that the CENtrifugal pressure supported BOundary Layer (CENBOL) is oscillating vertically, more so, when the specific angular momentum is higher. As a result, the rate of outflow produced from the CENBOL, also oscillates. Indeed, the outflow rates in the upper half and the lower half are found to be anticorrelated. We repeat the exercise for a series of specific angular momentum λ of the flow in order to demonstrate effects of the centrifugal force on this interesting behaviour. We find that, as predicted in theoretical models of discs in vertical equilibrium, the CENBOL is produced only when the centrifugal force is significant and more specifically, when λ > 1.5. Outflow rate itself is found to increase with λ as well and so is the oscillation amplitude. The cause of oscillation appears to be due to the interaction among the back flow from the centrifugal barrier, the outflowing winds and the inflow. For low angular momentum, the back flow as well as the oscillation are missing. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an oscillating solution is found with a well-tested grid-based finite difference code, and such a solution could be yet another reason of why quasi-periodic oscillations should be observed in black hole candidates that are accreting low angular momentum transonic flows.

  15. On the 'flip-flop' instability of Bondi-Hoyle accretion flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livio, Mario; Soker, Noam; Matsuda, Takuya; Anzer, Ulrich

    1991-01-01

    A simple physical interpretation is advanced by means of an analysis of the shock cone in the accretion flows past a compact object and with an examination of the accretion-line stability analyses. The stability of the conical shock is examined against small angular deflections with attention given to several simplifying assumptions. A line instability is identified in the Bondi-Hoyle accretion flows that leads to the formation of a large opening-angle shock. When the opening angle becomes large the instability becomes irregular oscillation. The analytical methodology is compared to previous numerical configurations that demonstrate different shock morphologies. The Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto a compact object is concluded to generate a range of nonlinear instabilities in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous cases with a quasiperiodic oscillation in the linear regime.

  16. Formation of a proto-quasar from accretion flows in a halo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangalam, A.

    2001-12-01

    We present a detailed model for the formation of massive objects at the centers of galaxies. The effects of supernovae heating and the conditions of gas loss are revisited. The escape time of the gas is compared with the cooling time, which provides an additional condition not previously considered. Its consequences for the allowed mass range of the halo is calculated and parameterized in terms of the spin parameter, lambdav, the redshift of collapse, zc, the fraction of baryons in stars, f*, and the efficiency of supernovae, nu . It is shown that sufficient gas is retained to form massive dark objects and quasars even for moderately massive halos but a decline is expected at low redshifts. Subsequently, a gaseous disk forms with a radial extent of a kpc, spun up by tidal torques and magnetized by supernovae fields with fields strengths of 10-100 mu G. In a model of a self-similar accretion flow in an initially dominant halo, it is shown that for typical halo parameters, about 108 Msun accretes via small magnetic stresses (or alternatively by self-gravity induced instability or by alpha viscosity) in 108 years into a compact region. A model of a self-gravitating evolution of a compact magnetized disk (r0 <~ 100 pc), which is relevant when a significant fraction of the disk mass falls in, is presented, and it has a rapid collapse time scale of a million years. The two disk solutions, one for accretion in an imposed halo potential and the other for a self-gravitating disk, obtained here, have general utility and can be adapted to other contexts like protostellar disks as well. Implications of this work for dwarf galaxy formation, and a residual large scale seed field, are also breifly discussed.

  17. Exceptional X-ray Weak Quasars: Implications for Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, William; Luo, Bin; Hall, Patrick; Wu, Jianfeng; Anderson, Scott; Garmire, Gordon; Gibson, Robert; Just, Dennis; Plotkin, Richard; Richards, Gordon; Schneider, Donald; Shemmer, Ohad; Shen, Yue

    2015-04-01

    Actively accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are found, nearly universally, to create luminous X-ray emission, and this point underlies the utility of X-ray surveys for finding growing SMBHs throughout the Universe. However, there are exceptions to this rule that provide novel insights, including PHL 1811 analogs and some weak-line quasars. We have been systematically studying such X-ray weak quasars with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, aiming (1) to define their optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions, (2) to measure their basic X-ray spectral properties, and (3) to establish the optical/UV emission-line and continuum properties that most directly trace X-ray weakness. Many of these type 1 quasars show unusually hard X-ray spectra, suggesting that small-scale absorption/reflection has a primary role in causing their X-ray weakness and distinctive emission-line properties. Physical considerations indicate that this small-scale absorber/reflector may be the geometrically thick inner accretion disk expected to form if PHL 1811 analogs and weak-line quasars have unusually high SMBH accretion rates.

  18. An analytical model of accretion onto white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, N.; Hernanz, M.

    2013-05-01

    The analytical model of Frank et al. (2002) has been used to investigate the structure of the accretion stream onto white dwarfs (WD). In particular, the post-shock region (temperature, density and gas velocity distributions) and X-ray spectrum emitted by this region. We have obtained the temperature, density and gas velocity distributions of the emission region for different masses of white dwarfs and at different positions in the shock coordinate. Also, we calculated the emitted spectrum for different WD masses and at different positions of the shock with the principal objective of study the accretion at different points of the emission region.

  19. Testing General Relativity with Accretion-Flow Imaging of Sgr A^{*}.

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Tim; Wang, Carlos; Broderick, Avery E; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Fish, Vincent L; Loeb, Abraham; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-26

    The Event Horizon Telescope is a global, very long baseline interferometer capable of probing potential deviations from the Kerr metric, which is believed to provide the unique description of astrophysical black holes. Here, we report an updated constraint on the quadrupolar deviation of Sagittarius A^{*} within the context of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow model in a quasi-Kerr background. We also simulate near-future constraints obtainable by the forthcoming eight-station array and show that in this model already a one-day observation can measure the spin magnitude to within 0.005, the inclination to within 0.09°, the position angle to within 0.04°, and the quadrupolar deviation to within 0.005 at 3σ confidence. Thus, we are entering an era of high-precision strong gravity measurements. PMID:27610837

  20. Testing General Relativity with Accretion-Flow Imaging of Sgr A^{*}.

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Tim; Wang, Carlos; Broderick, Avery E; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Fish, Vincent L; Loeb, Abraham; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-26

    The Event Horizon Telescope is a global, very long baseline interferometer capable of probing potential deviations from the Kerr metric, which is believed to provide the unique description of astrophysical black holes. Here, we report an updated constraint on the quadrupolar deviation of Sagittarius A^{*} within the context of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow model in a quasi-Kerr background. We also simulate near-future constraints obtainable by the forthcoming eight-station array and show that in this model already a one-day observation can measure the spin magnitude to within 0.005, the inclination to within 0.09°, the position angle to within 0.04°, and the quadrupolar deviation to within 0.005 at 3σ confidence. Thus, we are entering an era of high-precision strong gravity measurements.

  1. Testing General Relativity with Accretion-Flow Imaging of Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannsen, Tim; Wang, Carlos; Broderick, Avery E.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Fish, Vincent L.; Loeb, Abraham; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope is a global, very long baseline interferometer capable of probing potential deviations from the Kerr metric, which is believed to provide the unique description of astrophysical black holes. Here, we report an updated constraint on the quadrupolar deviation of Sagittarius A* within the context of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow model in a quasi-Kerr background. We also simulate near-future constraints obtainable by the forthcoming eight-station array and show that in this model already a one-day observation can measure the spin magnitude to within 0.005, the inclination to within 0.09°, the position angle to within 0.04°, and the quadrupolar deviation to within 0.005 at 3 σ confidence. Thus, we are entering an era of high-precision strong gravity measurements.

  2. Thermal Evolution of Ceres: Coupled Modelling of Accretion and Compaction by Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wladimir Otto; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    Ceres with a radius of ~475 km and a mean density of ~2.1 g cm3 likely experienced a complex thermal evolution influenced by the heating of radioactive elements, accretion, and compaction. Short-lived radionuclides can substantially heat a body due to radioactive decay depending on the formation time and the porosity structure of the body. The higher the porosity the smaller is the thermal conductivity and the weaker the cooling (and vice versa). Assuming an initially porous structure, compaction is thus an important process that influenced the temperature but also structure of planetesimals, since it causes a radius decrease. It has been shown that porosity loss by hot pressing is the most efficient compaction process in planetesimals and can be described by the thermally activated creep flow. Furthermore, the size of a body (i.e. the volume to surface ratio) plays an important role in the temperature evolution, therefore accretion (radius increase), its duration and the porosity of the accreting material need to be considered.Here, we investigate the coupled effects of accretion and compaction on the thermal evolution of Ceres. We trace the development of the porosity and density both during and after the accretion that occurs in a late runaway regime to answer following questions. 1. How and at which temperatures does compaction proceed? Is Ceres expected to be partially porous? Is a differentiated interior compatible with a porous outer shell? 2. How does the combination of accretion and compaction influence the temperature? Can accretion reduce the time scale of compaction and differentiation or even prevent them? Can prolonged accretion be approximated adequately by instantaneous formation?We will show that while the temperature evolution varies strongly with the duration of accretion, the final porosity profiles are rather similar due to the heating by the long-lived radiogenic nuclides. Compared to models neglecting porosity, insulating properties of a low

  3. General relativistic versus Newtonian: A universality in spherically symmetric radiation hydrodynamics for quasistatic transonic accretion flows

    SciTech Connect

    Malec, Edward; Rembiasz, Tomasz

    2010-12-15

    We compare Newtonian and general relativistic descriptions of the stationary accretion of self-gravitating fluids onto compact bodies. Spherical symmetry and thin gas approximation are assumed. Luminosity depends, among other factors, on the temperature and the contribution of gas to the total mass, in both--general relativistic (L{sub GR}) and Newtonian (L{sub N})--models. We discover a remarkable universal behavior for transonic flows: the ratio of respective luminosities L{sub GR}/L{sub N} is independent of the fractional mass of the gas and depends on asymptotic temperature. It is close to 1 in the regime of low asymptotic temperatures and can grow several times at high temperatures. These conclusions are valid for a wide range of polytropic equations of state.

  4. ACCRETION OF GAS ONTO GAP-OPENING PLANETS AND CIRCUMPLANETARY FLOW STRUCTURE IN MAGNETIZED TURBULENT DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Uribe, A. L.; Klahr, H.; Henning, Th.

    2013-06-01

    We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of stellar accretion disks, using the PLUTO code, and studied the accretion of gas onto a Jupiter-mass planet and the structure of the circumplanetary gas flow after opening a gap in the disk. We compare our results with simulations of laminar, yet viscous disks with different levels of an {alpha}-type viscosity. In all cases, we find that the accretion flow across the surface of the Hill sphere of the planet is not spherically or azimuthally symmetric, and is predominantly restricted to the mid-plane region of the disk. Even in the turbulent case, we find no significant vertical flow of mass into the Hill sphere. The outer parts of the circumplanetary disk are shown to rotate significantly below Keplerian speed, independent of viscosity, while the circumplanetary disk density (therefore the angular momentum) increases with viscosity. For a simulation of a magnetized turbulent disk, where the global averaged alpha stress is {alpha}{sub MHD} = 10{sup -3}, we find the accretion rate onto the planet to be M-dot {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}M{sub J} yr{sup -1} for a gap surface density of 12 g cm{sup -2}. This is about a third of the accretion rate obtained in a laminar viscous simulation with equivalent {alpha} parameter.

  5. Modeling of surface roughness effects on glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Yamaguchi, Keiko; Berkowitz, Brian M.; Potapczuk, Mark

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations focused on studying the cause and effect of roughness on accreting glaze ice surfaces were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 1 to 4 inch diameter cylinders in three icing wind tunnels (the Data Products of New England six inch test facility, the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel, and the B. F. Goodrich Ice Protection Research Facility). Infrared thermal video recordings were made of accreting ice surfaces in the Goodrich facility. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film; a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads; a horn zone where roughness elements grow into horn shapes; a runback zone where surface water ran back as rivulets; and a dry zone where rime feathers formed. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate with time towards the stagnation point. The behavior of the transition appeared to be controlled by boundary layer transition and bead formation mechanisms at the interface between the smooth and rough zones. Regions of wet ice growth and enhanced heat transfer were clearly visible in the infrared video recordings of glaze ice surfaces. A simple multi-zone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model was proposed to include spatial variability in surface roughness.

  6. ON THE ROLE AND ORIGIN OF NONTHERMAL ELECTRONS IN HOT ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Niedźwiecki, Andrzej; Stȩpnik, Agnieszka

    2015-02-01

    We study the X-ray spectra of tenuous, two-temperature accretion flows using a model involving an exact, Monte Carlo computation of the global Comptonization effect as well as a general relativistic description of both the flow structure and radiative processes. In our previous work, we found that in flows surrounding supermassive black holes, thermal synchrotron radiation is not capable of providing a sufficient seed photon flux to explain the X-ray spectral indices as well as the cut-off energies measured in several best-studied active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In this work, we complete the model by including seed photons provided by nonthermal synchrotron radiation and we find that it allows us to reconcile the hot flow model with the AGN data. We take into account two possible sources of nonthermal electrons. First, we consider e {sup ±} produced by charged-pion decay, which should always be present in the innermost part of a two-temperature flow due to proton-proton interactions. We find that for a weak heating of thermal electrons (small δ) the synchrotron emission of pion-decay e {sup ±} is much stronger than the thermal synchrotron emission in the considered range of bolometric luminosities, L ∼ (10{sup –4}-10{sup –2}) L {sub Edd}. The small-δ model including hadronic effects, in general, agrees with the AGN data, except for the case of a slowly rotating black hole and a thermal distribution of protons. For large δ, the pion-decay e {sup ±} have a negligible effect and, in this model, we consider nonthermal electrons produced by direct acceleration. We find an approximate agreement with the AGN data for the fraction of the heating power of electrons, which is used for the nonthermal acceleration η ∼ 0.1. However, for constant η and δ, the model predicts a positive correlation of the X-ray spectral index with the Eddington ratio, and hence a fine tuning of η and/or δ with the accretion rate is required to explain the negative correlation

  7. Upper Limit of the Viscosity Parameter in Accretion Flows around a Black Hole with Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkoti, Shreeram; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-01-01

    Black hole accretion is necessarily transonic; thus, flows must become supersonic and, therefore, sub-Keplerian before they enter into the black hole. The viscous timescale is much longer than the infall timescale close to a black hole. Hence, the angular momentum remains almost constant and the centrifugal force ˜ {l}2/{r}3 becomes increasingly dominant over the gravitational force ˜ 1/{r}2. The slowed down matter piles creating an accretion shock. The flow between shock and inner sonic point is puffed up and behaves like a boundary layer. This so-called Comptonizing cloud/corona produces hard X-rays and jets/outflows and, therefore, is an important component of black hole astrophysics. In this paper, we study steady state viscous, axisymmetric, transonic accretion flows around a Schwarzschild black hole. We adopt a viscosity parameter α and compute the highest possible value of α (namely, {α }{cr}) for each pair of two inner boundary parameters (namely, specific angular momentum carried to horizon, lin and specific energy at inner sonic point, E({x}{in})) which is still capable of producing a standing or oscillating shock. We find that while such possibilities exist for α as high as {α }{cr}=0.3 in very small regions of the flow parameter space, typical {α }{cr} appears to be about ˜0.05-0.1. Coincidentally, this also happens to be the typical viscosity parameter achieved by simulations of magnetorotational instabilities in accretion flows. We therefore believe that all realistic accretion flows are likely to have centrifugal pressure supported shocks unless the viscosity parameter everywhere is higher than {α }{cr}.

  8. Ice accretion modeling for wind turbine rotor blades

    SciTech Connect

    Chocron, D.; Brahimi, T.; Paraschivoiu, I.; Bombardier, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    The increasing application of wind energy in northern climates implies operation of wind turbines under severe atmospheric icing conditions. Such conditions are well known in the Scandinavian countries, Canada and most of Eastern European countries. An extensive study to develop a procedure for the prediction of ice accretion on wind turbines rotor blades appears to be essential for the safe and economic operation of wind turbines in these cold regions. The objective of the present paper is to develop a computer code capable of simulating the shape and amount of ice which may accumulate on horizontal axis wind turbine blades when operating in icing conditions. The resulting code is capable to predict and simulate the formation of ice in rime and glaze conditions, calculate the flow field and particle trajectories and to perform thermodynamic analysis. It also gives the possibility of studying the effect of different parameters that influence ice formation such as temperature, liquid water content, droplet diameter and accretion time. The analysis has been conducted on different typical airfoils as well as on NASA/DOE Mod-0 wind turbine. Results showed that ice accretion on wind turbines may reduce the power output by more than 20%.

  9. Towards combined modeling of planetary accretion and differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Gerya, T.; Morishima, R.; Tackley, P. J.; Labrosse, S.

    2011-12-01

    Results of current 1D models on planetesimal accretion yield an onion-like thermal structure with very high internal temperatures due to powerful short-lived radiogenic heating in the planetesimals. These lead to extensive silicate melting in the parent bodies. Yet, magma ocean and impact processes are not considered in these models and core formation is, if taken into account, assumed to be instantaneous with no feedback on the mantle evolution. It was pointed out that impacts can not only deposit heat deep into the target body, which is later buried by ejecta of further impacts [1], but also that impacts expose in the crater region originally deep-seated layers, thus cooling the interior [2]. This combination of impact effects becomes even more important when we consider that planetesimals of all masses contribute to planetary accretion. This leads occasionally to collisions between bodies with large ratios between impactor and target mass. Thus, all these processes can be expected to have a profound effect on the thermal evolution during the epoch of planetary accretion and may have implications for the onset of mantle convection and cannot be described properly in 1D geometry. Here we present a new methodology, which can be used to simulate the internal evolution of a planetary body during accretion and differentiation: Using the N-body code PKDGRAV [3] we simulate the accretion of planetary embryos from an initial annulus of several thousand planetesimals. The growth history of the largest resulting planetary embryo is used as an input for the thermomechanical 2D code I2ELVIS [4]. The thermomechanical model takes recent parametrizations of impact processes like impact heating and crater excavation [5] into account. The model also includes both long- and short-lived radiogenic isotopes and a more realistic treatment of largely molten silicates [6]. Results show that late-formed planetesimals do not experience silicate melting and avoid thermal alteration

  10. Spectral Analysis and Experimental Modeling of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. J.; Breuer, K. S.; Torres, B. E.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme for relating wind tunnel ice accretion roughness to the resulting enhancement of heat transfer is described. First, a spectral technique of quantitative analysis of early ice roughness images is reviewed. The image processing scheme uses a spectral estimation technique (SET) which extracts physically descriptive parameters by comparing scan lines from the experimentally-obtained accretion images to a prescribed test function. Analysis using this technique for both streamwise and spanwise directions of data from the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) are presented. An experimental technique is then presented for constructing physical roughness models suitable for wind tunnel testing that match the SET parameters extracted from the IRT images. The icing castings and modeled roughness are tested for enhancement of boundary layer heat transfer using infrared techniques in a "dry" wind tunnel.

  11. Towards combined modeling of planetary accretion and differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Gerya, T. V.; Morishima, R.; Tackley, P. J.; Labrosse, S.

    2012-09-01

    accretion yield an onion-like thermal structure with very high internal temperatures due to powerful short-lived radiogenic heating in the planetesimals. These lead to extensive silicate melting in the parent bodies. Yet, magma ocean and impact processes are not considered in these models and core formation is, if taken into account, assumed to be instantaneous with no feedback on the mantle evolution. It was pointed out that impacts can not only deposit heat deep into the target body, which is later buried by ejecta of further impacts [1], but also that impacts expose in the crater region originally deep-seated layers, thus cooling the interior [2]. This combination of impact effects becomes even more important when we consider that planetesimals of all masses contribute to planetary accretion. This leads occasionally to collisions between bodies with large ratios between impactor and target mass. Thus, all these processes can be expected to have a profound effect on the thermal evolution during the epoch of planetary accretion and may have implications for the onset of mantle convection and cannot be described properly in 1D geometry. Here we present a new methodology, which can be used to simulate the internal evolution of a planetary body during accretion and differentiation: Using the N-body code PKDGRAV[3] we simulate the accretion of planetary embryos from an initial annulus of several thousand planetesimals. The growth history of the largest resulting planetary embryo is used as an input for the thermomechanical 2D code I2ELVIS [4]. The thermomechanical model takes recent parametrizations of impact processes like impact heating and crater excavation [5] into account. The model also includes both long- and short-lived radiogenic isotopes and a more realistic treatment of largely molten silicates [6]. Results show that late-formed planetesimals do not experience silicate melting and avoid thermal alteration, whereas in early-formed bodies accretion and iron

  12. Thin accretion disks in f(R) modified gravity models

    SciTech Connect

    Pun, C. S. J.; Harko, T.; Kovacs, Z.

    2008-07-15

    We consider the basic physical properties of matter forming a thin accretion disc in the static and spherically symmetric space-time metric of the vacuum f(R) modified gravity models. The Lagrangian of the generalized gravity theory is also obtained in a parametric form, and the conditions of the viability of the model are also discussed. The exact Schwarzschild-type solution of the gravitational field equations in the f(R) gravity contains a linearly increasing term, as well as a logarithmic correction, as compared to the standard Schwarzschild solution of general relativity, and it depends on four arbitrary integration constants. The energy flux and the emission spectrum from the accretion disk around the f(R) gravity black holes are obtained, and they are compared to the general relativistic case. Particular signatures can appear in the electromagnetic spectrum, thus leading to the possibility of directly testing modified gravity models by using astrophysical observations of the emission spectra from accretion disks.

  13. An Accretion Model for the Growth of Black Hole in Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ye; Cheng, K. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    A possible accretion model associated with the ionization instability of quasar disks is proposed to address the growth of the central black hole harbored in the host galaxy. The evolution of quasars in cosmic time is assumed to change from a highly active state to a quiescent state triggered by the S-shaped ionization instability of the quasar accretion disk. For a given external mass transfer rate ionization instability can modify accretion rate in the disk and separates the accretion flows of the disk into three different phases like a S-shape. We suggest that the bright quasars observed today are those quasars with disks in the upper branch of S-shaped instability and the dormant quasars are the system in the lower branch. The disk is assumed to evolve as ADIOS configuration in the lower branch. The mass ratio between black hole and its host galactic bulge is a nature consequence of ADIOS. Our model also demonstrates that a seed black hole 2 x 10(exp 6) solar masses similar to those found in spiral galaxies today is needed to produce a black hole with a final mass 2 x 10(exp 8) solar masses.

  14. Acoustic geometry through perturbation of mass accretion rate: radial flow in static spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananda, Deepika B.; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Das, Tapas K.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an alternative derivation of the general relativistic acoustic analogue geometry by perturbing the mass accretion rate or flux of an ideal fluid flowing radially in a general static and spherically symmetric spacetime. To the best of our knowledge, this has so far been done in non-relativistic scenario. The resulting causal structure of the two dimensional acoustic geometry is qualitatively similar to that one derives via the perturbation of the velocity potential. Using this, we then briefly discuss the stability issues by studying the wave configurations generated by the perturbation of the mass accretion rate, and formally demonstrate the stability of the accretion process. This is in qualitative agreement with earlier results on stability, established via study of wave configurations generated by the perturbation of velocity potential, by using the acoustic geometry associated with it. We further discuss explicit examples of the Schwarzschild and Rindler spacetimes.

  15. A numerical study of the stability of radiative shocks. [in accretion flows onto white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, J. N.; Wolff, M. T.; Durisen, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the oscillatory instability of optically thin radiative shocks in time-dependent numerical calculations of accretion flows onto degenerate dwarfs. The present nonlinear calculations yield good quantitative agreement with the linear results obtained for oscillation frequencies, damping rates, and critical alpha-values. The fundamental mode and the first overtone in the shock radius and luminosity variations can be clearly identified, and evidence is sometimes seen for the second overtone. Time-dependent calculations are also performed which include additional physics relevant to degenerate dwarf accretion, such as electron thermal conduction, unequal electron and ion temperatures, Compton cooling, and relativistic corrections to the bremsstrahlung cooling law. All oscillatory modes are found to be damped, and hence stable, in the case of a 1-solar mass white dwarf accreting in spherical symmetry.

  16. General Relativistic Hydrodynamic Simulation of Accretion Flow from a Stellar Tidal Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Hotaka; Krolik, Julian H.; Cheng, Roseanne M.; Piran, Tsvi; Noble, Scott C.

    2015-05-01

    We study how the matter dispersed when a supermassive black hole tidally disrupts a star joins an accretion flow. Combining a relativistic hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar disruption with a relativistic hydrodynamics simulation of the subsequent debris motion, we track the evolution of such a system until ≃ 80% of the stellar mass bound to the black hole has settled into an accretion flow. Shocks near the stellar pericenter and also near the apocenter of the most tightly bound debris dissipate orbital energy, but only enough to make its characteristic radius comparable to the semimajor axis of the most bound material, not the tidal radius as previously envisioned. The outer shocks are caused by post-Newtonian relativistic effects, both on the stellar orbit during its disruption and on the tidal forces. Accumulation of mass into the accretion flow is both non-monotonic and slow, requiring several to 10 times the orbital period of the most tightly bound tidal streams, while the inflow time for most of the mass may be comparable to or longer than the mass accumulation time. Deflection by shocks does, however, cause some mass to lose both angular momentum and energy, permitting it to move inward even before most of the mass is accumulated into the accretion flow. Although the accretion rate still rises sharply and then decays roughly as a power law, its maximum is ≃ 0.1× the previous expectation, and the timescale of the peak is ≃ 5× longer than previously predicted. The geometric mean of the black hole mass and stellar mass inferred from a measured event timescale is therefore ≃ 0.2× the value given by classical theory.

  17. Turbulent Distortion of Condensate Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazoume, R.; Orou Chabi, J.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1997-01-01

    When a simple model for the relationship between the density-temperature fluctuation correlation and mean values is used, we determine that the rate of change of turbulent intensity can influence directly the accretion rate of droplets. Considerable interest exists in the accretion rate for condensates in nonequilibrium flow with icing and the potential role which reactant accretion can play in nonequilibrium exothermic reactant processes. Turbulence is thought to play an important role in such flows. It has already been experimentally determined that turbulence influences the sizes of droplets in the heterogeneous nucleation of supersaturated vapors. This paper addresses the issue of the possible influence of turbulence on the accretion rate of droplets.

  18. Modeling the Accretion and Feedback Processes of Galaxies Similar to the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Steven; Arielle Phillips, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Composed of sheets, walls, and filaments, the cosmic web connects clusters of galaxies together and is responsible for regulating galaxy evolution by the accreting mass into galaxies via filaments. In an effort to further understand the evolution of galaxies, we first study filaments and devise an interactive analytical model for disk galaxies with accurate inflow and outflow rates of matter. Using accretion rates and feedback rates from different regions in the Galaxy, it is now possible to model and predict galactic behavior for a galaxy with similar mass and morphology as the Milky Way. Other models simulate feedback or accretion processes numerically and in greater detail. Here we consolidate the rates to make one single model for the galaxy as a whole. In this model, we take the rates from other papers and use them to calculate the total mass flowed, energy used, distance travelled, and current location of the gas from the following parameters: change in time, redshift value, morphology of the galaxy, and type of active galactic nuclei (AGN) the galaxy has at its center. Although, we have just begun to make this detailed model, it will serve as the foundation for future work to be done to further understand galaxy evolution.

  19. The subcritical baroclinic instability in local accretion disc models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesur, G.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2010-04-01

    Context. The presence of vortices in accretion discs has been debated for more than a decade. Baroclinic instabilities might be a way to generate these vortices in the presence of a radial entropy gradient. However, the nature of these instabilities is still unclear and 3D parametric instabilities can lead to the rapid destruction of these vortices. Aims: We present new results exhibiting a subcritical baroclinic instability (SBI) in local shearing box models. We describe the 2D and 3D behaviour of this instability using numerical simulations and we present a simple analytical model describing the underlying physical process. Methods: We investigate the SBI in local shearing boxes, using either the incompressible Boussinesq approximation or a fully compressible model. We explore the parameter space varying several local dimensionless parameters and we isolate the regime relevant for the SBI. 3D shearing boxes are also investigated using high resolution spectral methods to resolve both the SBI and 3D parametric instabilities. Results: A subcritical baroclinic instability is observed in flows stable for the Solberg-Hoïland criterion using local simulations. This instability is found to be a nonlinear (or subcritical) instability, which cannot be described by ordinary linear approaches. It requires a radial entropy gradient weakly unstable for the Schwartzchild criterion and a strong thermal diffusivity (or equivalently a short cooling time). In compressible simulations, the instability produces density waves which transport angular momentum outward with typically α ⪉ 3 × 10-3, the exact value depending on the background temperature profile. Finally, the instability survives in 3D, vortex cores becoming turbulent due to parametric instabilities. Conclusions: The subcritical baroclinic instability is a robust phenomenon, which can be captured using local simulations. The instability survives in 3D thanks to a balance between the 2D SBI and 3D parametric

  20. Relativistic reverberation in the accretion flow of a Tidal Disruption Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Erin; Miller, Jon M.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Dai, Lixin J.

    2016-04-01

    Our current understanding of the curved spacetime around supermassive black holes is based on actively accreting black holes, which make up only ten per cent or less of the overall population. X-ray observations of that small fraction reveal strong gravitational redshifts that indicate that many of these black holes are rapidly rotating, however selection biases suggest that these results of a few are not necessarily reflective of the majority of black hole spins in the Universe. Tidal disruption events, where a star orbiting an otherwise dormant black hole gets tidally shredded and accreted on to the black hole, can provide a short, unbiased glimpse at the spacetime around the other ninety per cent of black holes. Observations of tidal disruptions have hitherto revealed the formation of an accretion disc and the onset of an accretion-powered jet, but have failed to reveal gravitational redshifts from innermost regions close to the event horizon, which enable the measurement of black hole spin. Here, we report observations of reverberation arising from photons from highly ionized iron (from K shell electrons) reflected off the accretion flow in a tidal disruption event. The asymmetric iron line profile indicates that we are seeing a region close to the event horizon of the black hole, where gravitational redshifts are strong. From the reverberation time delay, we estimate the mass of the central black hole to be a few million solar masses. Combined with the observed luminosity, we conclude the tidal disruption event is accreting at least 100 times the Eddington limit, which is consistent with predictions of the mass fallback rate of a tidally disrupted star. The detection of reverberation from the relativistic depths of this rare hyper-Eddington event demonstrates that the X-rays do not arise from the relativistically moving regions of a jet, as previously thought.

  1. ELECTRON HEATING BY THE ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITY IN COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION FLOWS. II. ELECTRON HEATING EFFICIENCY AS A FUNCTION OF FLOW CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2015-02-20

    In the innermost regions of low-luminosity accretion flows, including Sgr A* at the center of our Galaxy, the frequency of Coulomb collisions is so low that the plasma has two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. This paradigm assumes that Coulomb collisions are the only channel for transferring the ion energy to the electrons. In this work, the second of a series, we assess the efficiency of electron heating by ion velocity-space instabilities in collisionless accretion flows. The instabilities are seeded by the pressure anisotropy induced by magnetic field amplification, coupled to the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we showed in Paper I that if the electron-to-ion temperature ratio is T {sub 0e}/T {sub 0i} ≲ 0.2, the ion cyclotron instability is the dominant mode for ion betas β{sub 0i} ∼ 5-30 (here, β{sub 0i} is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), as appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows. In this work, we employ analytical theory and one-dimensional PIC simulations (with the box aligned with the fastest-growing wave vector of the ion cyclotron mode) to fully characterize how the electron heating efficiency during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability depends on the electron-to-proton temperature ratio, the plasma beta, the Alfvén speed, the amplification rate of the mean field (in units of the ion Larmor frequency), and the proton-to-electron mass ratio. Our findings can be incorporated as a physically grounded subgrid model into global fluid simulations of low-luminosity accretion flows, thus helping to assess the validity of the two-temperature assumption.

  2. Electron Heating by the Ion Cyclotron Instability in Collisionless Accretion Flows. II. Electron Heating Efficiency as a Function of Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2015-02-01

    In the innermost regions of low-luminosity accretion flows, including Sgr A* at the center of our Galaxy, the frequency of Coulomb collisions is so low that the plasma has two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. This paradigm assumes that Coulomb collisions are the only channel for transferring the ion energy to the electrons. In this work, the second of a series, we assess the efficiency of electron heating by ion velocity-space instabilities in collisionless accretion flows. The instabilities are seeded by the pressure anisotropy induced by magnetic field amplification, coupled to the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we showed in Paper I that if the electron-to-ion temperature ratio is T 0e /T 0i <~ 0.2, the ion cyclotron instability is the dominant mode for ion betas β0i ~ 5-30 (here, β0i is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), as appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows. In this work, we employ analytical theory and one-dimensional PIC simulations (with the box aligned with the fastest-growing wave vector of the ion cyclotron mode) to fully characterize how the electron heating efficiency during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability depends on the electron-to-proton temperature ratio, the plasma beta, the Alfvén speed, the amplification rate of the mean field (in units of the ion Larmor frequency), and the proton-to-electron mass ratio. Our findings can be incorporated as a physically grounded subgrid model into global fluid simulations of low-luminosity accretion flows, thus helping to assess the validity of the two-temperature assumption.

  3. Interpreting the radio/X-ray correlation of black hole X-ray binaries based on the accretion-jet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Yuan, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Two types of correlations between the radio and X-ray luminosities (LR and LX) have been found in black hole X-ray binaries. For some sources, they follow the `original' type of correlation which is described by a single power law. Later it was found that some other sources follow a different correlation consisting of three power-law branches, with each branch having different power-law indexes. In this work, we explain these two types of correlation under the coupled accretion-jet model. We attribute the difference between these two types of sources to the different value of viscosity parameter α. One possible reason for different α is the different configuration of magnetic field in the accretion material coming from the companion stars. For the `single power-law' sources, their α is high; so their accretion is always in the mode of advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) for the whole range of X-ray luminosity. For those `hybrid power-law' sources, the value of α is small so their accretion mode changes from an ADAF to a luminous hot accretion flow, and eventually to two-phase accretion as the accretion rate increases. Because the dependence of radiative efficiency on the mass accretion rate is different for these three accretion modes, different power-law indexes in the LR-LX correlation are expected. Constraints on the ratio of the mass-loss rate into the jet and the mass accretion rate in the accretion flow are obtained, which can be tested in future by radiative magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of jet formation.

  4. Probing the parsec-scale accretion flow of 3C 84 with millimeter wavelength polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Plambeck, R. L.; Bower, G. C.; Rao, Ramprasad; Marrone, D. P.; Jorstad, S. G.; Marscher, A. P.; Doeleman, S. S.; Fish, V. L.; Johnson, M. D.

    2014-12-10

    We report the discovery of Faraday rotation toward radio source 3C 84, the active galactic nucleus in NGC 1275 at the core of the Perseus Cluster. The rotation measure (RM), determined from polarization observations at wavelengths of 1.3 and 0.9 mm, is (8.7 ± 2.3)× 10{sup 5} rad m{sup –2}, among the largest ever measured. The RM remained relatively constant over a 2 yr period even as the intrinsic polarization position angle wrapped through a span of 300°. The Faraday rotation is likely to originate either in the boundary layer of the radio jet from the nucleus or in the accretion flow onto the central black hole. The accretion flow probably is disk-like rather than spherical on scales of less than a parsec, otherwise the RM would be even larger.

  5. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics of accretion flows - II. Treating stiff source terms and exploring physical limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roedig, C.; Zanotti, O.; Alic, D.

    2012-10-01

    We present the implementation of an implicit-explicit (IMEX) Runge-Kutta numerical scheme for general relativistic (GR) hydrodynamics coupled to an optically thick radiation field in two existing GR-(magneto)hydrodynamics codes. We argue that the necessity of such an improvement arises naturally in most astrophysically relevant regimes where the optical thickness is high as the equations become stiff. By performing several simple 1D tests, we verify the codes' new ability to deal with this stiffness and show consistency. Then, still in one spatial dimension, we compute a luminosity versus accretion rate diagram for the set-up of spherical accretion on to a Schwarzschild black hole and find good agreement with previous work which included more radiation processes than we currently have available. Lastly, we revisit the supersonic Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL) accretion in two dimensions where we can now present simulations of realistic temperatures, down to T ˜ 106 K or less. Here we find that radiation pressure plays an important role, but also that these highly dynamical set-ups push our approximate treatment towards the limit of physical applicability. The main features of radiation hydrodynamics BHL flows manifest as (i) an effective adiabatic index approaching γeff ˜ 4/3; (ii) accretion rates two orders of magnitude lower than without radiation pressure, but still super-Eddington; (iii) luminosity estimates around the Eddington limit, hence with an overall radiative efficiency as small as ηBHL˜10-2; (iv) strong departures from thermal equilibrium in shocked regions; (v) no appearance of the flip-flop instability. We conclude that the current optically thick approximation to the radiation transfer does give physically substantial improvements over the pure hydro also in set-ups departing from equilibrium, and, once accompanied by an optically thin treatment, is likely to provide a fundamental tool for investigating accretion flows in a large variety of

  6. Inference on accretion flow dynamics using TCAF solution from the analysis of spectral evolution of H 1743-322 during the 2010 outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak; Chakrabarti, Sandip K. E-mail: dipak@csp.res.in

    2014-05-01

    We study accretion flow dynamics of the Galactic transient black hole candidate (BHC) H 1743-322 during its 2010 outburst by analyzing spectral data using the two-component advective flow (TCAF; Keplerian and sub-Keplerian) solution after its inclusion in XSPEC as a local model. We compare our TCAF solution fitted results with combined disk blackbody (DBB) and power-law (PL) model fitted results and find a similar smooth variation of thermal (Keplerian or DBB) and non-thermal (PL or sub-Keplerian) fluxes/rates in two types of model fits. For a spectral analysis, 2.5-25 keV spectral data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array instrument are used. From the TCAF solution fit, accretion flow parameters, such as Keplerian rate, sub-Keplerian rate, location of centrifugal pressure-supported shock, and strength of the shock, are extracted, providing a deeper understanding of the accretion process and properties of accretion disks around BHC H 1743-322 during its X-ray outburst. Based on the halo to disk accretion rate ratio, shock properties, accretion rates, and the nature of the quasi-periodic oscillations' (if observed) entire outburst is classified into four different spectral states: hard, hard-intermediate, soft-intermediate, and soft. From the time variation of intrinsic flow parameters, it appears that their evolutions in the declining phase do not retrace the path of the rising phase. Since our current model does not include magnetic fields, spectral turnover at energies beyond 500-600 keV cannot be explained.

  7. Spectral Modeling of the Comptonized Continua of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael Thomas; Pottschmidt, Katja; Becker, Peter A.; Marcu, Diana; Wilms, Jörn; Wood, Kent S.

    2015-01-01

    We are undertaking a program to analyze the X-ray spectra of the accretion flows onto strongly magnetic neutron stars in high mass binary systems such as Cen X-3, and XTE J1946+274. These accreting pulsars typically have X-ray spectra consisting of broad Comptonized cutoff power-laws. Current theory suggests these X-ray spectra result from radiation-dominated shocks that develop in the high-velocity magnetically channeled plasma accretion flows onto the surfaces of the neutron stars. These X-ray pulsars often, but not always, show cyclotron resonant scattering features implying neutron star surface magnetic field strengths above 1012 G. Proper fitting of cyclotron line centroids (for example, to investigate how the line centroid varies with X-ray luminosity) requires a robust model for the Comptonized X-ray continuum upon which the cyclotron lines are superposed, and this can be provided by a continuum model based on the physics of the accretion column.We discuss in this presentation our ongoing program for the analysis of the X-ray spectra formed in these systems. Our program consists of two parts. First, we are modeling the X-ray spectra from the Suzaku X-ray satellite of accreting X-ray pulsars Cen X-3 and XTE J1946+274 utilizing the best currently existing empirical models. The second part of our program is building a new analysis tool based on the analytical model of Becker and Wolff (2007). In the high temperature optically thick plasma flows, the processes of bremsstrahlung emission from the hot plasma, black body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface, and cyclotron emission from electrons in the first Landau excited state, all contribute to the total observed X-ray spectrum. We show recent results from our new implementation and its comparison with the Suzaku data for these X-ray pulsars.This research is supported by the NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program.

  8. Hydrodynamic Models of Line-Driven Accretion Disk Winds III: Local Ionization Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereyra, Nicolas Antonio; Kallman, Timothy R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic models of line-driven accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variable systems and calculate wind mass-loss rates and terminal velocities. The models are 2.5-dimensional, include an energy balance condition with radiative heating and cooling processes, and includes local ionization equilibrium introducing time dependence and spatial dependence on the line radiation force parameters. The radiation field is assumed to originate in an optically thick accretion disk. Wind ion populations are calculated under the assumption that local ionization equilibrium is determined by photoionization and radiative recombination, similar to a photoionized nebula. We find a steady wind flowing from the accretion disk. Radiative heating tends to maintain the temperature in the higher density wind regions near the disk surface, rather than cooling adiabatically. For a disk luminosity L (sub disk) = solar luminosity, white dwarf mass M(sub wd) = 0.6 solar mass, and white dwarf radii R(sub wd) = 0.01 solar radius, we obtain a wind mass-loss rate of M(sub wind) = 4 x 10(exp -12) solar mass yr(exp -1) and a terminal velocity of approximately 3000 km per second. These results confirm the general velocity and density structures found in our earlier constant ionization equilibrium adiabatic CV wind models. Further we establish here 2.5D numerical models that can be extended to QSO/AGN winds where the local ionization equilibrium will play a crucial role in the overall dynamics.

  9. On the Lamppost Model of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedźwiecki, Andrzej; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Szanecki, Michał

    2016-04-01

    We study the lamppost model, in which the X-ray source in accreting black hole (BH) systems is located on the rotation axis close to the horizon. We point out a number of inconsistencies in the widely used lamppost model relxilllp, e.g., neglecting the redshift of the photons emitted by the lamppost that are directly observed. They appear to invalidate those model fitting results for which the source distances from the horizon are within several gravitational radii. Furthermore, if those results were correct, most of the photons produced in the lamppost would be trapped by the BH, and the luminosity generated in the source as measured at infinity would be much larger than that observed. This appears to be in conflict with the observed smooth state transitions between the hard and soft states of X-ray binaries. The required increase of the accretion rate and the associated efficiency reduction also present a problem for active galactic nuclei. Then, those models imply the luminosity measured in the local frame is much higher than that produced in the source and measured at infinity, due to the additional effects of time dilation and redshift, and the electron temperature is significantly higher than that observed. We show that these conditions imply that the fitted sources would be out of the e± pair equilibrium. On the other hand, the above issues pose relatively minor problems for sources at large distances from the BH, where relxilllp can still be used.

  10. An Accretion Model for the Growth of the Central Black Holes Associated with Ionization Instability in Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Y.; Cheng, K. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    A possible accretion model associated with the ionization instability of quasar disks is proposed to address the growth of the central black hole (BH) harbored in the host galaxy. The evolution of quasars in cosmic time is assumed to change from a highly active state to a quiescent state triggered by the S-shaped ionization instability of the quasar accretion disk. For a given external mass transfer rate supplied by the quasar host galaxy, ionization instability can modify the accretion rate in the disk and separate the accretion flows of the disk into three different phases, like an S-shape. We suggest that the bright quasars observed today are those quasars with disks in the upper branch of the S-shaped instability, and the faint or 'dormant' quasars are simply these systems in the lower branch. The middle branch is the transition state, which is unstable. We assume the quasar disk evolves according to the advection-dominated inflow-outflow solution (ADIOS) configuration in the stable lower branch of the S-shaped instability, and the Eddington accretion rate is used to constrain the accretion rate in the highly active phase. The mass ratio between a BH and its host galactic bulge is a natural consequence of an ADIOS. Our model also demonstrates that a seed BH approx. 2 x 10(exp 6) solar masses similar to those found in spiral galaxies today is needed to produce a BH with a final mass of approx. 2 x 10(exp 8) solar masses.

  11. Numerical simulations of adiabatic axisymmetric accretion flow. I - A new mechanism for the formation of jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryxell, B. A.; Taam, Ronald E.; Mcmillan, S. L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the uniform axisymmetric flow past a gravitating sphere have been studied. It is found that the structure of the flow is extremely sensitive to the boundary condition at the surface of the gravitating object. For the case in which the boundary is totally absorbing, a steady state flow is reached. However, for a boundary which is not totally absorbing, steady state flows are not obtained. The morphology of the flow is also sensitive to the Mach number at infinity and to the ratio of the free-fall velocity at the surface of the gravitating object to the flow velocity at inifinity. A new mechanism for the formation of jets is identified in which a fraction of the accretion energy is tapped to drive an anisotropic supersonic outflow with collimation provided by a combination of the inertia of matter which surrounds the beam and the development of multiple shock structures.

  12. Numerical simulations of optically thick accretion onto a black hole. II. Rotating flow

    SciTech Connect

    Fragile, P. Chris; Olejar, Ally; Anninos, Peter

    2014-11-20

    In this paper, we report on recent upgrades to our general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics code, Cosmos++, including the development of a new primitive inversion scheme and a hybrid implicit-explicit solver with a more general M {sub 1} closure relation for the radiation equations. The new hybrid solver helps stabilize the treatment of the radiation source terms, while the new closure allows for a much broader range of optical depths to be considered. These changes allow us to expand by orders of magnitude the range of temperatures, opacities, and mass accretion rates, and move a step closer toward our goal of performing global simulations of radiation-pressure-dominated black hole accretion disks. In this work, we test and validate the new method against an array of problems. We also demonstrate its ability to handle super-Eddington, quasi-spherical accretion. Even with just a single proof-of-principle simulation, we already see tantalizing hints of the interesting phenomenology associated with the coupling of radiation and gas in super-Eddington accretion flows.

  13. The Accretion Wind Model of Fermi Bubbles. II. Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Guobin; Yuan, Feng; Gan, Zhaoming; Sun, Mouyuan

    2015-09-01

    In a previous work, we have shown that the formation of Fermi bubbles can be due to the interaction between winds launched from the hot accretion flow in Sgr A* and the interstellar medium (ISM). In that work, we focus only on the morphology. In this paper we continue our study by calculating the gamma-ray radiation. Some cosmic-ray protons (CRp) and electrons (CRe) must be contained in the winds, which are likely formed by physical processes such as magnetic reconnection. We have performed MHD simulations to study the spatial distribution of CRp, considering the advection and diffusion of CRp in the presence of magnetic field. We find that a permeated zone is formed just outside of the contact discontinuity between winds and the ISM, where the collisions between CRp and thermal nuclei mainly occur. The decay of neutral pions generated in the collisions, combined with the inverse Compton scattering of background soft photons by the secondary leptons generated in the collisions and primary CRe, can well explain the observed gamma-ray spectral energy distribution. Other features such as the uniform surface brightness along the latitude and the boundary width of the bubbles are also explained. The advantage of this “accretion wind” model is that the adopted wind properties come from the detailed small-scale MHD numerical simulation of accretion flows and the value of mass accretion rate has independent observational evidences. The success of the model suggests that we may seriously consider the possibility that cavities and bubbles observed in other contexts such as galaxy clusters may be formed by winds rather than jets.

  14. THE ACCRETION WIND MODEL OF FERMI BUBBLES. II. RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Guobin; Yuan, Feng; Gan, Zhaoming; Sun, Mouyuan

    2015-09-20

    In a previous work, we have shown that the formation of Fermi bubbles can be due to the interaction between winds launched from the hot accretion flow in Sgr A* and the interstellar medium (ISM). In that work, we focus only on the morphology. In this paper we continue our study by calculating the gamma-ray radiation. Some cosmic-ray protons (CRp) and electrons (CRe) must be contained in the winds, which are likely formed by physical processes such as magnetic reconnection. We have performed MHD simulations to study the spatial distribution of CRp, considering the advection and diffusion of CRp in the presence of magnetic field. We find that a permeated zone is formed just outside of the contact discontinuity between winds and the ISM, where the collisions between CRp and thermal nuclei mainly occur. The decay of neutral pions generated in the collisions, combined with the inverse Compton scattering of background soft photons by the secondary leptons generated in the collisions and primary CRe, can well explain the observed gamma-ray spectral energy distribution. Other features such as the uniform surface brightness along the latitude and the boundary width of the bubbles are also explained. The advantage of this “accretion wind” model is that the adopted wind properties come from the detailed small-scale MHD numerical simulation of accretion flows and the value of mass accretion rate has independent observational evidences. The success of the model suggests that we may seriously consider the possibility that cavities and bubbles observed in other contexts such as galaxy clusters may be formed by winds rather than jets.

  15. The Sharpest Spatial View of a Black Hole Accretion Flow from the Chandra X-ray Visionary Project Observation of the NGC 3115 Bondi Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Jimmy; Wong, K.; Shcherbakov, R. V.; Yukita, M.; Mathews, W. G.

    2013-04-01

    Spatially resolved X-ray spectra of hot gas within a black hole accretion flow provide powerful constraints on accretion models. However, very few nearby supermassive black holes have large enough Bondi radii to be spatially resolved even with Chandra. The best candidate for such a study is the 4-5 arcsec (188-235 pc) Bondi region of the nearest billion solar mass supermassive black hole in the S0 galaxy NGC 3115. We present observational results from our Chandra X-ray Visionary Project (XVP) of NGC 3115, a deep 1 Msec observation that allows us to remove most contaminating X-ray point sources in the region close to the black hole, and to create the first detailed density and temperature profiles of the gas within the Bondi region of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. Interpretation of the results are also discussed.

  16. Modeling the Effects of Ice Accretion on the Low Pressure Compressor and the Overall Turbofan Engine System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Wright, William B.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study is on utilizing a mean line compressor flow analysis code coupled to an engine system thermodynamic code, to estimate the effects of ice accretion on the low pressure compressor, and quantifying its effects on the engine system throughout a notional flight trajectory. In this paper a temperature range in which engine icing would occur was assumed. This provided a mechanism to locate potential component icing sites and allow the computational tools to add blockages due to ice accretion in a parametric fashion. Ultimately the location and level of blockage due to icing would be provided by an ice accretion code. To proceed, an engine system modeling code and a mean line compressor flow analysis code were utilized to calculate the flow conditions in the fan-core and low pressure compressor and to identify potential locations within the compressor where ice may accrete. In this study, an "additional blockage" due to the accretion of ice on the metal surfaces, has been added to the baseline aerodynamic blockage due to boundary layer, as well as the blade metal blockage. Once the potential locations of ice accretion are identified, the levels of additional blockage due to accretion were parametrically varied to estimate the effects on the low pressure compressor blade row performance operating within the engine system environment. This study includes detailed analysis of compressor and engine performance during cruise and descent operating conditions at several altitudes within the notional flight trajectory. The purpose of this effort is to develop the computer codes to provide a predictive capability to forecast the onset of engine icing events, such that they could ultimately help in the avoidance of these events.

  17. Physical properties of the inner shocks in hot, tilted black hole accretion flows

    SciTech Connect

    Generozov, Aleksey; Blaes, Omer; Fragile, P. Chris; Henisey, Ken B.

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of hot, pressure-supported, tilted black hole accretion flows, in which the angular momentum of the flow is misaligned with the black hole spin axis, can exhibit two nonaxisymmetric shock structures in the inner regions of the flow. We analyze the strength and significance of these shock structures in simulations with tilt angles of 10° and 15°. By integrating fluid trajectories in the simulations through the shocks and tracking the variations of fluid quantities along these trajectories, we show that these shocks are strong, with substantial compression ratios, in contrast to earlier claims. However, they are only moderately relativistic. We also show that the two density enhancements resembling flow streams in their shape are in fact merely post-shock compressions, as fluid trajectories cut across, rather than flow along, them. The dissipation associated with the shocks is a substantial fraction (≅ 3%-12%) of the rest mass energy advected into the hole, and therefore comparable to the dissipation expected from turbulence. The shocks should therefore make order unity changes in the observed properties of black hole accretion flows that are tilted.

  18. Toy model for a two-dimensional accretion disk dominated by Poynting flux

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2001-08-15

    We discuss the effect of the Poynting flux on a magnetically dominated thin accretion disk, which is simplified to a two-dimensional disk on the equatorial plane. It is shown in the relativistic formulation that the Poynting flux caused by a rotating magnetic field with Keplerian angular velocity can balance the energy and angular momentum conservation of a stationary accretion flow.

  19. Collapse and backward motion of axisymmetric toroidal vortices in an accretion flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2013-08-15

    The problem of the interaction of two coaxial, counter-rotating ring vortices in the presence of a convergent (accretion) flow with a sink at the center of symmetry has been solved. The vortices that would recede from each other in the absence of a flow (the problem inverse to the Helmholtz problem) are shown to be brought closer together by the flow and then ejected with acceleration along the axis of symmetry. The ejection velocity increases with sink strength. However, if the sink strength exceeds some critical value that depends on the initial conditions, then no ejection occurs and the vortices are captured by the flow and collapse. A similar capture and collapse are also possible during the motion of a single vortex in a flow. The difference from the planar case, where no collapse occurs, is significant. The detected phenomenon can be applied when studying nonlinear processes in atmospheric vortices as well as in active galactic nuclei and planetary atmospheres.

  20. Effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on wind properties in hot accretion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, De-Fu; Wu, Mao-Chun; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2016-06-01

    Previous works have clearly shown the existence of winds from black hole hot accretion flow and investigated their detailed properties. In extremely low accretion rate systems, the collisional mean-free path of electrons is large compared with the length-scale of the system, thus thermal conduction is dynamically important. When the magnetic field is present, the thermal conduction is anisotropic and energy transport is along magnetic field lines. In this paper, we study the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on the wind production in hot accretion flows by performing two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We find that thermal conduction has only moderate effects on the mass flux of wind. But the energy flux of wind can be increased by a factor of ˜10 due to the increase of wind velocity when thermal conduction is included. The increase of wind velocity is because of the increase of driving forces (e.g. gas pressure gradient force and centrifugal force) when thermal conduction is included. This result demonstrates that thermal conduction plays an important role in determining the properties of wind.

  1. Observations and Models of Accretion in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Bonnie Kathleen

    Saturn's F ring is the solar system's principal natural laboratory for direct observation of accretion and disruption processes. Among the structures contained in its meager ˜10 km radial width are jets, strands, and moonlets over an azimuthally asymmetric span. The nearby moons Prometheus and Pandora stir up ring material and create observably changing structures on timescales of days to decades. In addition to the observations over the last three decades, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Visual classification of the shapes of these 27 features divides the data set into three classes: Moonlet, Icicle, and Core. Two features are classified as Moonlets because each is opaque in its occultation, which makes them candidates for solid objects. A majority of features are classified as Icicles, which partially block stellar signal for 22 m to just over 3.7 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals that Icicles are likely transient clumps, moonlets are possible solid objects, and cores show the variety of F ring morphology. We suggest that Icicles may evolve into Moonlets, which are an order of magnitude less abundant. The locations of the Icicles and Moonlets are weakly correlated to the location of Prometheus. Motivated by the observations and previous models, I develop a more rigorous model of the evolution of aggregates in Saturn's F ring via tidally-modified accretion. For the first time, I assess the multimodal distribution resultant of collisional models and diagnose the cause. I apply the model to the F ring for constant body densities; then I assess how the system evolves when compaction is allowed. I develop an

  2. Exceptional X-ray Weak Quasars: Implications for Accretion Flows and Emission-Line Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, W. Niel; Luo, Bin; Hall, Patrick B.; Wu, Jianfeng; Anderson, Scott F.; Garmire, Gordon; Gibson, Robert; Plotkin, Richard; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Shen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Actively accreting supermassive black holes are found, nearly universally, to create luminous X-ray emission, and this point underlies the utility of X-ray surveys for finding active galactic nuclei throughout the Universe. However, there are apparent X-ray weak exceptions to this rule that are now providing novel insights, including weak-line quasars (WLQs) and especially analogs of the extreme WLQ, PHL 1811. We have been systematically studying such X-ray weak quasars with Chandra and near-infrared spectroscopy, and I will report results on their remarkable properties and describe implications for models of the accretion disk/corona and emission-line formation. We have found evidence that many of these quasars may have geometrically thick inner accretion disks, likely due to high accretion rates, that shield the high-ionization broad line region from the relevant ionizing continuum. This model can explain, in a simple and unified manner, their weak lines and diverse X-ray properties. Such shielding may, more generally, play a role in shaping the broad distributions of quasar emission-line equivalent widths and blueshifts.

  3. Combining N-body accretion simulations with partitioning experiments in a statistical model of terrestrial planet accretion and core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. A.; Ciesla, F.; Campbell, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial planets accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, metallic cores segregated from their silicate mantles, acquiring their modern compositions through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and experimental results. We have run 100 N-body simulations of terrestrial planet accretion, with Jupiter and Saturn on either circular (CJS) or eccentric (EJS) orbits, to gain insight into the statistics of this highly stochastic process (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). An Earth (Mars) analogue forms in 84-92% (2-10%) of our simulations. We draw on our recent high P-T metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5500 K. In our model, N-body simulations describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks. As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). By utilizing a large number of N-body simulations, we obtain a statistical view and observe a wide range of outcomes. We use this model to predict the core compositions of Earth-like planets. For partial equilibration of the mantle at 50% of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, we find that their cores contain 6.9 ± 1.8 wt% Si and 4.8 ± 2.3 wt% O (Figure), with this uncertainty due entirely to variations in accretion history in our 100 simulations. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to high P-T equations of state (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Earth analogues experience 0.7 ± 0.1 or 0.9 ± 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion in EJS or CJS simulations respectively, which is due to both the effects of high P-T partitioning and the temporal evolution of the Earth analogue

  4. An analytic toy model for relativistic accretion in Kerr space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejeda, Emilio; Taylor, Paul A.; Miller, John C.

    2013-02-01

    We present a relativistic model for the stationary axisymmetric accretion flow of a rotating cloud of non-interacting particles falling on to a Kerr black hole. Based on a ballistic approximation, streamlines are described analytically in terms of time-like geodesics, while a simple numerical scheme is introduced for calculating the density field. A novel approach is presented for describing all of the possible types of orbit by means of a single analytic expression. This model is a useful tool for highlighting purely relativistic signatures in the accretion flow dynamics coming from a strong gravitational field with frame dragging. In particular, we explore the coupling due to this between the spin of the black hole and the angular momentum of the infalling matter. Moreover, we demonstrate how this analytic solution may be used for benchmarking general relativistic numerical hydrodynamics codes by comparing it against results of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations for a collapsar-like set-up. These simulations are performed first for a ballistic flow (with zero pressure) and then for a hydrodynamical one where we measure the effects of pressure gradients on the infall, thus exploring the extent of applicability of the ballistic approximation.

  5. A Pure Hydrodynamic Instability in Shear Flows and Its Application to Astrophysical Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Sujit Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-10-01

    We provide a possible resolution for the century-old problem of hydrodynamic shear flows, which are apparently stable in linear analysis but shown to be turbulent in astrophysically observed data and experiments. This mismatch is noticed in a variety of systems, from laboratory to astrophysical flows. There are so many uncountable attempts made so far to resolve this mismatch, beginning with the early work of Kelvin, Rayleigh, and Reynolds toward the end of the nineteenth century. Here we show that the presence of stochastic noise, whose inevitable presence should not be neglected in the stability analysis of shear flows, leads to pure hydrodynamic linear instability therein. This explains the origin of turbulence, which has been observed/interpreted in astrophysical accretion disks, laboratory experiments, and direct numerical simulations. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first solution to the long-standing problem of hydrodynamic instability of Rayleigh-stable flows.

  6. Quasi-static model of collimated jets and radio lobes. I. Accretion disk and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Fowler, T. Kenneth; Pino, Jesse

    2014-07-10

    This is the first of a series of papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetic helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures on very large scales and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. In this work, we solve a set of one-dimensional equations similar to the steady-state standard accretion disk model, but now including the large-scale magnetic fields giving rises to jets. We find that the frequently made assumption that large-scale fields are frozen into the disk is fundamentally incorrect, due to the necessity for current and the accreting mass to flow perpendicular to magnetic flux surfaces. A correct treatment greatly simplifies the calculations, yielding fields that leave the disk nearly vertically with magnetic profiles uniquely determined by disk angular momentum conservation. Representative solutions of the magnetic fields in different radial regions of the disk surface are given, and they determine the overall key features in the jet structure and its dissipation, which will be the subjects of later papers.

  7. Towards Coupled Modelling of Accretion and Water-Rock Differentiation of Icy Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wladimir Otto; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    The early Solar system produced a variety of bodies with different properties. Among the small bodies, objects that contain notable amounts of water ice (Ceres, icy satellites) are of particular interest. Water-rock separation on such worlds is probable and has been confirmed in some cases. Heating by 26Al and 60Fe suffices to produce liquid water (T>273 K) even in km-sized seeds during the early accretion of icy worlds.Assuming accretion of ice and dust, the rheology is dominated by one of the two components, depending on their proportions. Two differentiation regimes arise: (a) Upon melting of an icy matrix, the dust grains settle via Stokes flow; (b) Upon melting of ice in a rocky matrix, water ascends through the matrix via Darcy flow. Prior to ice melting, porosity is reduced by creep of ice. However, there are leftover pores filled with gas. For (a) the differentiation scheme is not affected. For (b) ice melting increases the porosity of the matrix. Only a part of the void space will be filled with water. Water will percolate if the matrix (1) deforms sufficiently to close the pores filled with gas and (2) deforms further to squeeze the water out of the matrix. Temperatures of up to 700 K are needed for this. Thus, water will first migrate downwards filling the pores, vacated previously by gas. After that, it will either remain in suspension until the matrix deforms and then percolate, or will vaporise first and then fill the pores with the vapour. Subsequent matrix deformation will mobilise the vapour. On its way to the surface water will form in the cooler layers.The differentiation starts during the accretion. At the end of the accretion, a pre-differentiated structure around the centre is possible, leading to a reallocation of the heat sources and changing the temperature profile. The evolution path varies with the growth rate assumed.We couple porosity loss and water-rock differentiation of an accreting icy object in an adaptive-grid 1D numerical model

  8. Simulations of Viscous Accretion Flow around Black Holes in a Two-dimensional Cylindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Jae; Chattopadhyay, Indranil; Kumar, Rajiv; Hyung, Siek; Ryu, Dongsu

    2016-11-01

    We simulate shock-free and shocked viscous accretion flows onto a black hole in a two-dimensional cylindrical geometry, where initial conditions were chosen from analytical solutions. The simulation code used the Lagrangian total variation diminishing plus remap routine, which enabled us to attain high accuracy in capturing shocks and to handle the angular momentum distribution correctly. The inviscid shock-free accretion disk solution produced a thick disk structure, while the viscous shock-free solution attained a Bondi-like structure, but in either case, no jet activity nor any quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO)-like activity developed. The steady-state shocked solution in the inviscid as well as in the viscous regime matched theoretical predictions well. However, increasing viscosity renders the accretion shock unstable. Large-amplitude shock oscillation is accompanied by intermittent, transient inner multiple shocks. This oscillation of the inner part of the disk is interpreted as the source of QPO in hard X-rays observed in micro-quasars. Strong shock oscillation induces strong episodic jet emission. The jets also show the existence of shocks, which are produced as one shell hits the preceding one. The periodicities of the jets and shock oscillation are similar; the jets for the higher viscosity parameter appear to be stronger and faster.

  9. Self-similar hot accretion flow onto a rotating neutron star: Structure and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2001-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical solutions which describe a hot, viscous, two-temperature accretion flow onto a rotating neutron star or any other rotating compact star with a surface. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, and free-free cooling from the electrons. Outside a thin boundary layer, where the accretion flow meets the star, we show that there is an extended settling region which is well-described by two self-similar solutions: (i) a two-temperature solution which is valid in an inner zone r<=102.5 (r is in Schwarzchild units), and (ii) a one-temperature solution at larger radii. In both zones, ρ~r-2, Ω~r-3/2, v~r0, Tp~r-1 in the two-temperature zone, Te~r-1/2. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy of the star as the star is braked by viscosity. Hence the luminosity and the flow parameters (density, temperature, angular velocity) are independent of M. The settling solution described here is not advection-dominated, and is thus different from the self-similar ADAF found around black holes. When the spin of the star is small enough, however, the present solution transforms smoothly to a (settling) ADAF. We carried out a stability analysis of the settling flow. The flow is convectively and viscously stable and is unlikely to have strong winds or outflows. Unlike another cooling-dominated system-the SLE disk,-the settling flow is thermally stable provided that thermal conduction is taken into account. This strong saturated-like thermoconduction does not change the structure of the flow. .

  10. Launching jets from accretion belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Ron; Soker, Noam

    2016-05-01

    We propose that sub-Keplerian accretion belts around stars might launch jets. The sub-Keplerian inflow does not form a rotationally supported accretion disk, but it rather reaches the accreting object from a wide solid angle. The basic ingredients of the flow are a turbulent region where the accretion belt interacts with the accreting object via a shear layer, and two avoidance regions on the poles where the accretion rate is very low. A dynamo that is developed in the shear layer amplifies magnetic fields to high values. It is likely that the amplified magnetic fields form polar outflows from the avoidance regions. Our speculative belt-launched jets model has implications on a rich variety of astrophysical objects, from the removal of common envelopes to the explosion of core collapse supernovae by jittering jets.

  11. Buoyancy-limited magnetic viscosity in quasi-stellar object accretion disk models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakimoto, Philip J.; Coroniti, Ferdinand V.

    1989-01-01

    Alpha models of astrophysical accretion disks assume an ad hoc viscous stress which scales locally as the total pressure. It is shown here that, if turbulent magnetic Maxwell stresses are the source of this viscosity in quasi-stellar object accretion disk models, then the stress cannot follow the assumed alpha-law in the radiation pressure-dominated inner region of the disk.

  12. Quantitative model of the growth of floodplains by vertical accretion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Troutman, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional model is developed to quantitatively predict the change in elevation, over a period of decades, for vertically accreting floodplains. This unsteady model approximates the monotonic growth of a floodplain as an incremental but constant increase of net sediment deposition per flood for those floods of a partial duration series that exceed a threshold discharge corresponding to the elevation of the floodplain. Sediment deposition from each flood increases the elevation of the floodplain and consequently the magnitude of the threshold discharge resulting in a decrease in the number of floods and growth rate of the floodplain. Floodplain growth curves predicted by this model are compared to empirical growth curves based on dendrochronology and to direct field measurements at five floodplain sites. The model was used to predict the value of net sediment deposition per flood which best fits (in a least squares sense) the empirical and field measurements; these values fall within the range of independent estimates of the net sediment deposition per flood based on empirical equations. These empirical equations permit the application of the model to estimate of floodplain growth for other floodplains throughout the world which do not have detailed data of sediment deposition during individual floods. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  13. Modeling the optical-X-ray accretion lag in LMC X-3: Insights into black-hole accretion physics

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, James F.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Buxton, Michelle M.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Remillard, Ronald A.; Kara, Erin

    2014-03-10

    The X-ray persistence and characteristically soft spectrum of the black hole X-ray binary LMC X-3 make this source a touchstone for penetrating studies of accretion physics. We analyze a rich, ten-year collection of optical/infrared (OIR) time-series data in conjunction with all available contemporaneous X-ray data collected by the All-Sky Monitor and Proportional Counter Array detectors aboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. A cross-correlation analysis reveals an X-ray lag of ≈2 weeks. Motivated by this result, we develop a model that reproduces the complex OIR light curves of LMC X-3. The model is comprised of three components of emission: stellar light, accretion luminosity from the outer disk inferred from the time-lagged X-ray emission, and light from the X-ray-heated star and outer disk. Using the model, we filter a strong noise component out of the ellipsoidal light curves and derive an improved orbital period for the system. Concerning accretion physics, we find that the local viscous timescale in the disk increases with the local mass accretion rate; this in turn implies that the viscosity parameter α decreases with increasing luminosity. Finally, we find that X-ray heating is a strong function of X-ray luminosity below ≈50% of the Eddington limit, while above this limit X-ray heating is heavily suppressed. We ascribe this behavior to the strong dependence of the flaring in the disk upon X-ray luminosity, concluding that for luminosities above ≈50% of Eddington, the star lies fully in the shadow of the disk.

  14. Bipolar flows, molecular gas disks, and the collapse and accretion of rotating interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1987-01-01

    Rigorous numerical models of the collapse and accretion of rotating, axisymmetric, isothermal interstellar clouds are studied. The results show that molecular gas disks and evacuated bipolar cavities both appear to be natural consequences of the collapse of rotating interstellar clouds. Dynamically significant magnetic fields may not be necessary for explaining either phenomenon. The models strongly support theoretical models of the type where an isotropic wind from a pre-main sequence star is extrinsically collimated by a rotationally derived molecular gas cloud. The models imply that collimation should be strongest on small scales where rotational effects are most important, i.e., in the dense region of the molecular gas disk.

  15. A New Model for Spectral Formation in Accretion-Powered X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, P. A.; Wolfram, K. D.

    2006-09-01

    Accretion-powered X-ray pulsars are among the most luminous X-ray sources in the Galaxy yet no satisfactory model for the formation of their observed X-ray spectra has emerged. We report on a self-consistent calculation of the spectrum emerging from a magnetically funneled pulsar accretion flow that includes a treatment of the bulk and thermal Comptonization occurring in a radiation-dominated shock. Using a rigorous eigenfunction expansion method, we obtain a closed-form expression for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the flow. The Green's function is convolved with bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and blackbody source terms to calculate the emergent photon spectrum. We show that energization of photons in the shock naturally produces a X-ray spectrum with a relatively flat continuum and a high-energy exponential cutoff. Finally, we demonstrate the good agreement of our model with the spectra of bright pulsars such as Her X-1 and Cen X-3. This research was funded by NASA and the Office of Naval Research.

  16. Experimental evidence for modifying the current physical model for ice accretion on aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.; Walker, E.

    1986-01-01

    Closeup movies, still photographs, and other experimental data suggest that the current physical model for ice accretion needs significant modification. At aircraft airspeeds there was no flow of liquid over the surface of the ice after a short initial flow, even at barely subfreezing temperatures. Instead, there were very large stationary drops on the ice surface that lose water from their bottoms by freezing and replenish their liquid by catching the microscopic cloud droplets. This observation disagrees with the existing physical model, which assumes there is a thin liquid film continuously flowing over the ice surface. With no such flow, the freezing-fraction concept of the model fails when a mass balance is performed on the surface water. Rime ice does, as the model predicts, form when the air temperature is low enough to cause the cloud droplets to freeze almost immediately on impact. However, the characteristic shapes of horn-glaze ice or rime ice are primarily caused by the ice shape affecting the airflow locally and consequently the droplet catch and the resulting ice shape. Ice roughness greatly increases the heat transfer coefficient, stops the movement of drops along the surface, and may also affect the airflow initially and thereby the droplet catch. At high subreezing temperatures the initial flow and shedding of surface drops have a large effect on the ice shape. At the incipient freezing limit, no ice forms.

  17. r-Process Nucleosynthesis in Hot Accretion Disk Flows from Black Hole-Neutron Star Mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, Rebecca; Mclaughlin, Gail C; Ruffert, Maximilian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Hix, William Raphael

    2008-01-01

    We consider hot accretion disk outflows from black hole-neutron star mergers in the context of the nucleosynthesis they produce. We begin with a three-dimensional numerical model of a black hole-neutron star merger and calculate the neutrino and antineutrino fluxes emitted from the resulting accretion disk. We then follow the element synthesis in material outflowing the disk along parameterized trajectories. We find that at least a weak r-process is produced, and in some cases a main r-process as well. The neutron-rich conditions required for this production of r-process nuclei stem directly from the interactions of the neutrinos emitted by the disk with the free neutrons and protons in the outflow.

  18. r-Process Nucleosynthesis in Hot Accretion Disk Flows from Black Hole - Neutron Star Mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, Rebecca; Mclaughlin, Gail C; Ruffert, Maximilian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Hix, William Raphael

    2008-01-01

    We consider hot accretion disk outflows from black hole-neutron star mergers in the context of the nucleosynthesis they produce. We begin with a three-dimensional numerical model of a black hole-neutron star merger and calculate the neutrino and antineutrino fluxes emitted from the resulting accretion disk. We then follow the element synthesis in material outflowing the disk along parameterized trajectories. We find that at least a weak r-process is produced, and in some cases a main r-process as well. The neutron-rich conditions required for this production of r-process nuclei stem directly from the interactions of the neutrinos emitted by the disk with the free neutrons and protons in the outflow.

  19. Exceptional X-ray Weak Quasars: Implications for Accretion Flows and Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Niel

    2014-11-01

    Actively accreting SMBHs are found, nearly universally, to create luminous X-ray emission. However, there are exceptions to this rule that provide novel insights, including PHL 1811 analogs and some weak-line quasars. We have been systematically studying such X-ray weak quasars with Chandra, and have now established the optical/UV emission-line and continuum properties that most directly trace X-ray weakness. We will report our results on the remarkable basic X-ray properties of these objects and describe their implications for models of the accretion disk/corona, emission-line formation, and quasar winds. Furthermore, we will report NuSTAR observations indicating that a significant fraction of BAL quasars are intrinsically X-ray weak, thereby promoting strong wind driving.

  20. Resolving the Bondi Accretion Flow toward the Supermassive Black Hole of NGC 3115 with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ka-Wah; Irwin, J.; Million, E.; Yukita, M.; Mathews, W.; Bregman, J.

    2011-09-01

    Gas undergoing Bondi accretion on to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) becomes hotter toward smaller radii. We searched for this signature with a Chandra observation of the hot gas in NGC 3115, which optical observation show has a very massive SMBH. Our observations show that the gas temperature rises toward the galaxy center as expected in all accretion models in which the black hole is gravitationally capturing the ambient gas. The data support that the Bondi radius is at least about 4-5 arcsec (188-235 pc), suggesting a supermassive blackhole of two billion solar masses that is consistent with the upper end of the optical results. The density profile within the Bondi radius has a power law index of 1.03, and we will discuss the interpretations of the results.

  1. Spectral Modeling of the Comptonized Continua of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars: Recent Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael T.; Becker, P. A.; Marcu, D.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wilms, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2014-01-01

    We are undertaking a program to analyze the X-ray spectra of the accretion flows onto strongly magnetic neutron stars in high mass binary systems such as Her X-1, Cen X-3, and LMC X-4. These accreting pulsars typically have X-ray spectra consisting of broad Comptonized cutoff power-laws. Current theory suggests these X-ray spectra result from the impact of the high-velocity magnetically channeled plasma accretion flows onto the surfaces of the neutron stars. The flows have such high energy density that shocks developing in the plasmas can be radiation-dominated. These X-ray pulsars often, but not always, show cyclotron resonant scattering features implying neutron star surface magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. Over the past few years a number of studies have reported both positive and negative correlations of the cyclotron line energy centroids with X-ray luminosity in a number of pulsars. However, the detailed analysis of the cyclotron line centroids suffers from the lack of a robust model for the Comptonized X-ray continuum upon which the cyclotron lines are superposed. We discuss in this presentation our progress in developing tools for the analysis of the X-ray spectra formed in these systems. The range of parameter conditions presented by the many known real accreting pulsar systems substantially exceeds that of the limited set of pulsars on which the original analytic model of Becker and Wolff (2007) was validated. In the high temperature optically thick plasmas, the processes of bremsstrahlung emission from the hot plasma, black body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface, and cyclotron emission from electrons in the first Landau excited state, all contribute to the total local photon population in the shock structure. We discuss our strategy for numerically accounting for the relative contribution to the full X-ray spectrum made by each of these physical processes. Solving for the integrated spectrum involves numerical

  2. Mass accretion flows in the high-mass star forming complex NGC 6334

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Schilke, P.; Zernickel, A.; Schmiedeke, A.; Möller, Th.; Qin, S.-L.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is one of the major topics of astrophysical research, in particular the process of accretion from large-scale clouds down to small-scale cores. We have selected the nearby, filamentary, high-mass star forming complex NGC 6334 to study the gas velocity at different scales and probe the infall rates onto the protostellar cores embedded in the NGC 6334-I and I(N) clusters. This study makes use of single-dish and interferometric submillimeter observations, complemented with 3D numerical non-LTE radiative transfer modeling. We measure a mass accretion rate of 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 throughout the filament increasing up to 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 towards the densest regions where high-mass stars are forming. At smaller scales, our 3D model is consistent with accretion rates of 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 towards the clusters, and 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 onto the protostars.

  3. Dynamo dominated accretion and energy flow: The mechanism of active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Li, H.

    1998-12-31

    An explanation of the magnetic fields of the universe, the central mass concentration of galaxies, the massive black hole of every galaxy, and the AGN phenomena has been an elusive goal. The authors suggest here the outlines of such a theoretical understanding and point out where the physical understanding is missing. They believe there is an imperative to the sequence of mass flow and hence energy flow in the collapse of a galactic mass starting from the first non-linearity appearing in structure formation following decoupling. This first non-linearity of a two to one density fluctuation, the Lyman-{alpha} clouds, ultimately leads to the emission spectra of the phenomenon of AGN, quasars, blazars, etc. The over-arching physical principle is the various mechanisms for the transport of angular momentum. They believe they have now understood the new physics of two of these mechanisms that have previously been illusive and as a consequence they impose strong constraints on the initial conditions of the mechanisms for the subsequent emission of the gravitational binding energy. The new phenomena described are: (1) the Rossby vortex mechanism of the accretion disk {alpha}-viscosity, and (2) the mechanism of the {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo in the accretion disk. The Rossby vortex mechanism leads to a prediction of the black hole mass and rate of energy release and the {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo leads to the generation of the magnetic flux of the galaxy (and the far greater magnetic flux of clusters) and separately explains the primary flux of energy emission as force-free magnetic energy density. This magnetic flux and magnetic energy density separately are the necessary consequence of the saturation of a dynamo created by the accretion disk with a gain greater than unity.

  4. Modelling accretion disc and stellar wind interactions: the case of Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I. M.; Petropoulou, M.; Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.

    2016-07-01

    Sgr A* is an ideal target to study low-luminosity accreting systems. It has been recently proposed that properties of the accretion flow around Sgr A* can be probed through its interactions with the stellar wind of nearby massive stars belonging to the S-cluster. When a star intercepts the accretion disc, the ram and thermal pressures of the disc terminate the stellar wind leading to the formation of a bow shock structure. Here, a semi-analytical model is constructed which describes the geometry of the termination shock formed in the wind. With the employment of numerical hydrodynamic simulations, this model is both verified and extended to a region prone to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Because the characteristic wind and stellar velocities are in ˜108 cm s-1 range, the shocked wind may produce detectable X-rays via thermal bremsstrahlung emission. The application of this model to the pericentre passage of S2, the brightest member of the S-cluster, shows that the shocked wind produces roughly a month long X-ray flare with a peak luminosity of L ≈ 4 × 1033 erg s-1 for a stellar mass-loss rate, disc number density, and thermal pressure strength of dot{M}_w= 10^{-7} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}, nd = 105 cm-3, and α = 0.1, respectively. This peak luminosity is comparable to the quiescent X-ray emission detected from Sgr A* and is within the detection capabilities of current X-ray observatories. Its detection could constrain the density and thickness of the disc at a distance of ˜3000 gravitational radii from the supermassive black hole.

  5. An Accretion-jet Model for M87: Interpreting the Spectral Energy Distribution and Faraday Rotation Measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianchao; Wu, Qingwen; Lu, Ru-Sen

    2016-10-01

    M87 is arguably the best supermassive black hole (BH) to explore jet and/or accretion physics, due to its proximity and fruitful high-resolution multi-waveband observations. We model the multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) of the M87 core that observed at a scale of 0.4 arcsec (∼105 R g, R g is gravitational radius), as recently presented by Prieto et al. Similar to Sgr A*, we find that the millimeter bump as observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array can be modeled by the synchrotron emission of the thermal electrons in an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF), while the low-frequency radio emission and X-ray emission may predominantly come from the jet. The millimeter radiation from ADAF predominantly comes from the region within 10R g, which is roughly consistent with the recent very long baseline interferometry observations at 230 GHz. We further calculate the Faraday rotation measure (RM) from both ADAF and jet models, and find that the RM predicted from the ADAF is roughly consistent with the measured value, while the RM predicted from the jet is much higher if jet velocity close to the BH is low or moderate (e.g., v jet ≲ 0.6 c). With the constraints from the SED modeling and RM, we find that the accretion rate close to the BH horizon is ∼ (0.2{--}1) × {10}-3 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1\\ll {\\dot{M}}{{B}}∼ 0.2 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 ({\\dot{M}}{{B}} is Bondi accretion rate), where the electron density profile, n e ∝ r ∼‑1, in the accretion flow, is consistent with that determined from X-ray observation inside the Bondi radius and recent numerical simulations.

  6. Using Simulations of Black Holes to Study General Relativity and the Properties of Inner Accretion Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoormann, Janie Katherine

    While Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) has been tested extensively in our solar system, it is just beginning to be tested in the strong gravitational fields that surround black holes. As a way to study the behavior of gravity in these extreme environments, I have used and added to a ray-tracing code that simulates the X-ray emission from the accretion disks surrounding black holes. In particular, the observational channels which can be simulated include the thermal and reflected spectra, polarization, and reverberation signatures. These calculations can be performed assuming GR as well as four alternative spacetimes. These results can be used to see if it is possible to determine if observations can test the No-Hair theorem of GR which states that stationary, astrophysical black holes are only described by their mass and spin. Although it proves difficult to distinguish between theories of gravity, it is possible to exclude a large portion of the possible deviations from GR using observations of rapidly spinning stellar mass black holes such as Cygnus X-1. The ray-tracing simulations can furthermore be used to study the inner regions of black hole accretion flows. I examined the dependence of X-ray reverberation observations on the ionization of the disk photosphere. My results show that X-ray reverberation and X-ray polarization provides a powerful tool to constrain the geometry of accretion disks which are too small to be imaged directly. The second part of my thesis describes the work on the balloon-borne X-Calibur hard X-ray polarimetry mission and on the space-borne PolSTAR polarimeter concept.

  7. NUCLEAR DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOWS IN TWO DIMENSIONS. I. TORUS EVOLUTION WITH PARAMETRIC MICROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Metzger, Brian D.

    2013-02-15

    We explore the evolution of radiatively inefficient accretion disks in which nuclear reactions are dynamically important ('Nuclear Dominated Accretion Flows' or NuDAFs). Examples of such disks are those generated by the merger of a white dwarf with a neutron star or black hole, or by the collapse of a rotating star. Here, we present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations that systematically explore the effect of adding a single nuclear reaction to a viscous torus. The equation of state, anomalous shear stress, and nuclear reactions are given parametric forms. Our results point to the existence of two qualitatively different regimes of NuDAF evolution: (1) steady accretion with quiescent burning or (2) detonation of the disk. These outcomes are controlled primarily by the ratio {Psi} of the nuclear energy released to the enthalpy at the burning radius. Disks detonate if {Psi} exceeds a critical value {Psi}{sub crit} {approx} 1, and if burning occurs in regions where neutrino cooling is unimportant. Thermonuclear runaways are seeded by the turbulent mixing of hot ash with cold fuel at the burning front. Disks with {Psi} < {Psi}{sub crit} do not explode, but instead power a persistent collimated outflow of unbound material composed primarily of ash, with a mass-loss rate that increases with {Psi}. We discuss the implications of our results for supernova-like counterparts from astrophysical events in the NuDAF regime. In particular, detonations following a white dwarf-neutron star merger could account for some subluminous Type Ia supernovae, such as the class defined by SN 2002cx.

  8. Detectable MeV neutrinos from black hole neutrino-dominated accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Bing; Li, Ye; Ma, Ren-Yi; Xue, Li

    2016-06-01

    Neutrino-dominated accretion flows (NDAFs) around rotating stellar-mass black holes (BHs) have been theorized as the central engine of relativistic jets launched in massive star core collapse events or compact star mergers. In this work, we calculate the electron neutrino/antineutrino spectra of NDAFs by fully taking into account the general relativistic effects, and investigate the effects of viewing angle, BH spin, and mass accretion rate on the results. We show that even though a typical NDAF has a neutrino luminosity lower than that of a typical supernova (SN), it can reach 1050- 1051 erg s-1 peaking at ˜10 MeV , making NDAFs potentially detectable with the upcoming sensitive MeV neutrino detectors if they are close enough to Earth. Based on the observed gamma-ray burst (GRB) event rate in the local universe and requiring that at least three neutrinos are detected to claim a detection, we estimate a detection rate up to ˜(0.10 - 0.25 ) per century for GRB-related NDAFs by the Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) detector if one neglects neutrino oscillation. If one assumes that all type Ib/c SNe have an engine-driven NDAF, the Hyper-K detection rate would be ˜(1 - 3 ) per century. By considering neutrino oscillations, the detection rate may decrease by a factor of 2-3. Detecting one such event would establish the observational evidence of NDAFs in the Universe.

  9. Black Hole Advective Accretion Disks with Optical Depth Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Artemove, Y.V.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G.S.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Novikov, I.D.

    2006-02-01

    We have constructed numerically global solutions of advective accretion disks around black holes that describe a continuous transition between the effectively optically thick outer and optically thin inner disk regions. We have concentrated on models of accretion flows with large mass accretion rates, and we have employed a bridging formula for radiative losses at high and low effective optical depths.

  10. Exploring non-normality in magnetohydrodynamic rotating shear flows: Application to astrophysical accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Bhatia, Tanayveer; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-10-01

    shear flows are ubiquitous in astrophysics, especially accretion disks, where molecular viscosity is too low to account for observed data. The primary accepted cause of energy-momentum transport therein is turbulent viscosity. Hence, these results would have important implications in astrophysics.

  11. The structure and appearance of winds from supercritical accretion disks. I - Numerical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Equations for the structure and appearance of supercritical accretion disks and the radiation-driven winds which emanate from them are derived and solved by a steady-state hydrodynamic computer code with a relaxation technique used in stellar structure problems. The present model takes into account the mass of the accreting star, the total accretion rate, a generalization of the disk alpha parameter which accounts for heating by processes in addition to viscosity, and the ratio of the total luminosity to the Eddington luminosity. Solutions indicate that for accretion onto a hard-surfaced star, steady, optically thick winds result for even slightly supercritical accretion, and the object will appear as a supergiant star with a high mass loss rate and a nonblackbody spectrum. Winds from black hole accretion disks are expected to depend on the form of the accretion interior to the critical radius, possibly consisting of no ejection at all, a wind similar to that of a hard-surfaced star, or a column of material ejected from a hole in the accretion disk.

  12. State Transitions and Diagnostics of Accretion Flows in Neutron Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makishima, Kazuo

    Based on broad-band X-ray observations with Suzaku, augmented by MAXI, we review luminosity-dependent spectral state transitions of weak-field neutron stars (NSs) in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). When more luminous than a few percent of the Eddington value, these accreting NSs are in the High/Soft state. The spectrum is rather soft, and can be described by emission from a multi-color standard disk plus a blackbody component from a fraction of the NS surface (Mitsuda et al. PASJ 36, 741, 1984). The latter component is often Comptonized by a corona, which has a relatively cool (a few keV) temperature and a high optical depth (Sakurai et al. PASJ 64, 72, 2012; Sugizaki et al. PASJ 65, 58 2013). When the luminosity falls below the threshold, an LMXB changes into the Low/Hard state, like in black-hole binaries. The spectrum becomes much harder, often extending to ~100 keV, and can be described by a sum of a cool disk emission and a strongly-Comptonized blackbody emission. The Comptonizing corona becomes much hotter (a few tens keV) and thiner (Sakurai et al. PASJ 66, in press; arrive: 1308.6091S) than in the High Soft state. Just below the threshold, the coronal flow is considered rather spherical, because nearly the entire NS surface is shining. As the luminosity further decreases, the blackbody-emitting area decreases, at least in Aql X-1 (Sakurai et al. ibid.), possibly because of the emergence of a weak magnetosphere (Asai, K. et al. ApJ 773, 117, 2013; Matsuoka, M. and Asai, K. PASJ 65, 26, 2013). Although the state transition in LMXBs is very clearcut, the overall emission-model composition remains the same. This behavior can be quantified by a new quantity, Q=(electron temperature)/(seed-photon temperature). As the luminosity decreases from the Eddington value, Q increases from 1 to about 5, when the y-parameter increases from 0 to about 1. Across the transition into the Low/Hard state, Q quickly (but continuously) increase to about 10. As the luminosity

  13. Complex organic molecules along the accretion flow in isolated and externally irradiated protoplanetary disks.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catherine; Herbst, Eric; Nomura, Hideko; Millar, T J; Weaver, Susanna Widicus

    2014-01-01

    The birth environment of the Sun will have influenced the physical and chemical structure of the pre-solar nebula, including the attainable chemical complexity reached in the disk, important for prebiotic chemistry. The formation and distribution of complex organic molecules (COMs) in a disk around a T Tauri star is investigated for two scenarios: (i) an isolated disk, and (ii) a disk irradiated externally by a nearby massive star. The chemistry is calculated along the accretion flow from the outer disk inwards using a comprehensive network which includes gas-phase reactions, gas-grain interactions, and thermal grain-surface chemistry. Two simulations are performed, one beginning with complex ices and one with simple ices only. For the isolated disk, COMs are transported without major chemical alteration into the inner disk where they thermally desorb into the gas reaching an abundance representative of the initial assumed ice abundance. For simple ices, COMs can efficiently form on grain surfaces under the conditions in the outer disk. Gas-phase COMs are released into the molecular layer via photodesorption. For the irradiated disk, complex ices are also transported inwards; however, they undergo thermal processing caused by the warmer conditions in the irradiated disk which tends to reduce their abundance along the accretion flow. For simple ices, grain-surface chemistry cannot efficiently synthesise COMs in the outer disk because the necessary grain-surface radicals, which tend to be particularly volatile, are not sufficiently abundant on the grain surfaces. Gas-phase COMs are formed in the inner region of the irradiated disk via gas-phase chemistry induced by the desorption of strongly bound molecules such as methanol; hence, the abundances are not representative of the initial molecular abundances injected into the outer disk. These results suggest that the composition of comets formed in isolated disks may differ from those formed in externally irradiated

  14. Ice accretion simulation on multi-element airfoils using extended Messinger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgen, S.; Canıbek, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the current article, the problem of in-flight ice accumulation on multi-element airfoils is studied numerically. The analysis starts with flow field computation using the Hess-Smith panel method. The second step is the calculation of droplet trajectories and droplet collection efficiencies. In the next step, convective heat transfer coefficient distributions around the airfoil elements are calculated using the Integral Boundary-Layer Method. The formulation accounts for the surface roughness due to ice accretion. The fourth step consists of establishing the thermodynamic balance and computing ice accretion rates using the Extended Messinger Model. At low temperatures and low liquid water contents, rime ice occurs for which the ice shape is determined by a simple mass balance. At warmer temperatures and high liquid water contents, glaze ice forms for which the energy and mass conservation equations are combined to yield a single first order ordinary differential equation, solved numerically. Predicted ice shapes are compared with experimental shapes reported in the literature and good agreement is observed both for rime and glaze ice. Ice shapes and masses are also computed for realistic flight scenarios. The results indicate that the smaller elements in multielement configurations accumulate comparable and often greater amount of ice compared to larger elements. The results also indicate that the multi-layer approach yields more accurate results compared to the one-layer approach, especially for glaze ice conditions.

  15. Application of a physical continuum model to recent X-ray observations of accreting pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu-Cheatham, Diana Monica; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Becker, Peter A.; Wood, Kent S.; Wilms, Joern; Britton Hemphill, Paul; Gottlieb, Amy; Fuerst, Felix; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Ballhausen, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    We present a uniform spectral analysis in the 0.5-50 keV energy range of a sample of accreting pulsars by applying an empirical broad-band continuum cut-off power-law model. We also apply the newly implemented physical continuum model developed by Becker and Wolff (2007, ApJ 654, 435) to a number of high-luminosity sources. The X-ray spectral formation process in this model consists of the Comptonization of bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and black body photons emitted by the hot, magnetically channeled, accreting plasma near the neutron star surface. This model describes the spectral formation in high-luminosity accreting pulsars, where the dominant deceleration mechanism is via a radiation-dominated radiative shock. The resulting spectra depend on five physical parameters: the mass accretion rate, the radius of the accretion column, the electron temperature and electron scattering cross-sections inside the column, and the magnetic field strength. The empirical model is fitted to Suzaku data of a sample of high-mass X-ray binaries covering a broad luminosity range (0.3-5 x 10 37 erg/s). The physical model is fitted to Suzaku data from luminous sources: LMC X-4, Cen X-3, GX 304-1. We compare the results of the two types of modeling and summarize how they can provide new insight into the process of accretion onto magnetized neutron stars.

  16. TIME EVOLUTION OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL ACCRETION FLOWS: EFFECTS OF THE ADIABATIC INDEX AND OUTER BOUNDARY CONDITION

    SciTech Connect

    Janiuk, Agnieszka; Sznajder, Maciej; Moscibrodzka, Monika; Proga, Daniel

    2009-11-10

    We study a slightly rotating accretion flow onto a black hole, using the fully three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations. We consider hydrodynamics of an inviscid flow, assuming a spherically symmetric density distribution at the outer boundary and a small, latitude-dependent angular momentum. We investigate the role of the adiabatic index and gas temperature, and the flow behavior due to non-axisymmetric effects. Our 3D simulations confirm axisymmetric results: the material that has too much angular momentum to be accreted forms a thick torus near the equator, and the mass accretion rate is lower than the Bondi rate. In our previous study of the 3D accretion flows, for gamma = 5/3, we found that the inner torus precessed, even for axisymmetric conditions at large radii. The present study shows that the inner torus precesses also for other values of the adiabatic index: gamma = 4/3, 1.2, and 1.01. However, the time for the precession to set increases with decreasing gamma. In particular, for gamma = 1.01, we find that depending on the outer boundary conditions, the torus may shrink substantially due to the strong inflow of the non-rotating matter, and the precession will have insufficient time to develop. On the other hand, if the torus is supplied by the continuous inflow of the rotating material from the outer radii, its inner parts will eventually tilt and precess, as was for the larger gamma's.

  17. Theory of Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Björnsson, Gunnlaugur; Pringle, James E.

    1999-03-01

    Part I. Observations of Black Holes: 1. Black holes in our Galaxy: observations P. Charles; 2. Black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei: observations G. M. Madejski; Part II. Physics Close to a Black Hole: 3. Physics of black holes I. D. Novikov; 4. Physics of black hole accretion M. A. Abramowicz; Part III. Turbulence, Viscosity: 5. Disc turbulence and viscosity A. Brandenburg; Part IV. Radiative Processes: 6. The role of electron-positron pairs in accretion flows G. Björnsson; 7. Accretion disc-corona models and X/Y-ray spectra of accreting black holes J. Poutanen; 8. Emission lines: signatures of relativistic rotation A. C. Fabian; Part V. Accretion Discs: 9. Spectral tests of models for accretion disks around black holes J. H. Krolik; 10. Advection-dominated accretion around black holes R. Narayan, R. Mahadevan and E. Quataert; 11. Accretion disc instabilities and advection dominated accretion flows J.-P. Lasota; 12. Magnetic field and multi-phase gas in AGN A. Celotti and M. J. Rees; Part V. Discs in Binary Black Holes: 13. Supermassive binary black holes in galaxies P. Artymowicz; Part VI. Stability of Accretion Discs: 14. Large scale perturbation of an accretion disc by a black hole binary companion J. C. B. Papaloizou, C. Terquem and D. N. C. Lin; 15. Stable oscillations of black hole accretion discs M. Nowak and D. Lehr; Part VI. Coherant Structures: 16. Spotted discs A. Bracco, A. Provenzale, E. A. Spiegel and P. Yecko; Self-organized critically in accretion discs P. Wiita and Y. Xiong; Summary: old and new advances in black hole accretion disc theory R. Svensson.

  18. Theory of Black Hole Accretion Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Björnsson, Gunnlaugur; Pringle, James E.

    2010-08-01

    Part I. Observations of Black Holes: 1. Black holes in our Galaxy: observations P. Charles; 2. Black holes in Active Galactic Nuclei: observations G. M. Madejski; Part II. Physics Close to a Black Hole: 3. Physics of black holes I. D. Novikov; 4. Physics of black hole accretion M. A. Abramowicz; Part III. Turbulence, Viscosity: 5. Disc turbulence and viscosity A. Brandenburg; Part IV. Radiative Processes: 6. The role of electron-positron pairs in accretion flows G. Björnsson; 7. Accretion disc-corona models and X/Y-ray spectra of accreting black holes J. Poutanen; 8. Emission lines: signatures of relativistic rotation A. C. Fabian; Part V. Accretion Discs: 9. Spectral tests of models for accretion disks around black holes J. H. Krolik; 10. Advection-dominated accretion around black holes R. Narayan, R. Mahadevan and E. Quataert; 11. Accretion disc instabilities and advection dominated accretion flows J.-P. Lasota; 12. Magnetic field and multi-phase gas in AGN A. Celotti and M. J. Rees; Part V. Discs in Binary Black Holes: 13. Supermassive binary black holes in galaxies P. Artymowicz; Part VI. Stability of Accretion Discs: 14. Large scale perturbation of an accretion disc by a black hole binary companion J. C. B. Papaloizou, C. Terquem and D. N. C. Lin; 15. Stable oscillations of black hole accretion discs M. Nowak and D. Lehr; Part VI. Coherant Structures: 16. Spotted discs A. Bracco, A. Provenzale, E. A. Spiegel and P. Yecko; Self-organized critically in accretion discs P. Wiita and Y. Xiong; Summary: old and new advances in black hole accretion disc theory R. Svensson.

  19. A jet emission model to probe the dynamics of accretion and ejection coupling in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzac, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Compact jets are probably the most common form of jets in X-ray binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei. They seem to be present in all sources in the so-called hard X-ray spectral state. They are characterised by a nearly flat Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) extending from the radio to the infrared bands. This emission is usually interpreted as partially self absorbed synchrotron emission from relativistic leptons accelerated in the jet. The observed flat spectral shape requires energy dissipation and acceleration of particules over a wide range of distances along the jet. This distributed energy dissipation is likely to be powered by internal shocks caused by fluctuations of the outflow velocity. I will discuss such an internal shock model in the context of black hole binaries. I will show that internal shocks can produce the observed SEDs and also predict a strong, wavelength dependent, variability that resembles the observed one. The assumed velocity fluctuations of the jet must originate in the accretion flow. The model thus predicts a strong connection between the observable properties of the jet in the radio to IR bands, and the variability of the accretion flow as observed in X-rays. If the model is correct, this offers a unique possibility to probe the dynamics of the coupled accretion and ejection processes leading to the formation of compact jets.

  20. HYDROMAGNETICS OF ADVECTIVE ACCRETION FLOWS AROUND BLACK HOLES: REMOVAL OF ANGULAR MOMENTUM BY LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC STRESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Chatterjee, Koushik E-mail: kchatterjee009@gmail.com

    2015-07-01

    We show that the removal of angular momentum is possible in the presence of large-scale magnetic stresses in geometrically thick, advective, sub-Keplerian accretion flows around black holes in steady state, in the complete absence of α-viscosity. The efficiency of such an angular momentum transfer could be equivalent to that of α-viscosity with α = 0.01–0.08. Nevertheless, the required field is well below its equipartition value, leading to a magnetically stable disk flow. This is essentially important in order to describe the hard spectral state of the sources when the flow is non/sub-Keplerian. We show in our simpler 1.5 dimensional, vertically averaged disk model that the larger the vertical-gradient of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field is, the stronger the rate of angular momentum transfer becomes, which in turn may lead to a faster rate of outflowing matter. Finding efficient angular momentum transfer in black hole disks via magnetic stresses alone, is very interesting when the generic origin of α-viscosity is still being explored.

  1. Collective molecular dissipation on Navier-Stokes macroscopic scales: Accretion disc viscous modeling in SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    In the nonlinear Navier-Stokes viscous flow dynamics, physical damping is mathematically accomplished by a braking term in the momentum equation, corresponding to a heating term in the energy equation, both responsible of the conversion of mechanical energy into heat. In such two terms, it is essential the role of the viscous stress tensor, relative to contiguous macroscopic moving flow components, depending on the macroscopic viscosity coefficient ν. A working formulation for ν can always be found analytically, tuning some arbitrary parameters in the current known formulations, according to the geometry, morphology and physics of the flow. Instead, in this paper, we write an alternative hybrid formulation for ν, where molecular parameters are also included. Our expression for ν has a more physical interpretation of the internal damping in dilute gases because the macroscopic viscosity is related to the small scale molecular dissipation, not strictly dependent on the flow morphology, as well as it is free of any arbitrary parameter. Results for some basic 2D tests are shown in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) framework. An application to the 3D accretion disc modeling for low mass cataclysmic variables is also discussed. Consequences of the macroscopic viscosity coefficient reformulation in a more strictly physical terms on the thermal conductivity coefficient for dilute gases are also discussed.

  2. A Model to Assess the Risk of Ice Accretion Due to Ice Crystal Ingestion in a Turbofan Engine and its Effects on Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Wright, William B.; Struk, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that were attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was one or more of the following anomalies: degraded engine performance, engine roll back, compressor surge and stall, and flameout of the combustor. The main focus of this research is the development of a computational tool that can estimate whether there is a risk of ice accretion by tracking key parameters through the compression system blade rows at all engine operating points within the flight trajectory. The tool has an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, coupled with a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor blade rows. Assumptions are made to predict the complex physics involved in engine icing. Specifically, the code does not directly estimate ice accretion and does not have models for particle breakup or erosion. Two key parameters have been suggested as conditions that must be met at the same location for ice accretion to occur: the local wet-bulb temperature to be near freezing or below and the local melt ratio must be above 10%. These parameters were deduced from analyzing laboratory icing test data and are the criteria used to predict the possibility of ice accretion within an engine including the specific blade row where it could occur. Once the possibility of accretion is determined from these parameters, the degree of blockage due to ice accretion on the local stator vane can be estimated from an empirical model of ice growth rate and time spent at that operating point in the flight trajectory. The computational tool can be used to assess specific turbine engines to their susceptibility to

  3. Accretion characteristics in intermediate polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Tracey Louise

    This thesis concerns the class of interacting binaries known as intermediate polars (IPs). These are semi-detached magnetic cataclysmic variable systems in which a red dwarf secondary transfers material via Roche lobe overflow onto a white dwarf (WD). The magnetic field of the white dwarf (~10 6 to 10 7 Gauss) plays an important part in determining the type of accretion flow from the secondary. In chapter 1, I discuss binary systems in general, moving on to a more in depth look at Intermediate polars (IPs), their geometry and characteristics, ending with a brief look at all known IPs to date. In the first part of the thesis I present an analysis of the X-ray lightcurves in 16 IPs in order to examine the possible cause of the orbital modulation. I show that X-ray orbital modulation is widespread amongst IN, but not ubiquitous. The orbital modulation is most likely due to photoelectric absorption in material at the edge of the accretion disk. Assuming a random distribution of inclination angles, the fact that such a modulation is seen in seven systems out of sixteen studied (plus two eclipsing systems) implies that modulations are visible at inclination angles in excess of 60°. It is also apparent that these modulations can appear and disappear on timescales of ~years or months in an individual system, which may be evidence for precessing, tilted accretion disks. In the second half of the thesis I use a particle hydrodynamical code known as HyDisc, to investigate the accretion flows in IPs, as a function of parameter space for two dipole models. One where we assume that the density and size scale of the blobs being accreted are constant which we refer to as the n 6 model, and the other where the size scale and density of the accreted blobs are not constant referred to as the n 3 model. I show that the accretion flow can take the form of an accretion disk, accretion stream, propeller accretion and ring accretion for the n 3 model and stream and disk accretion in the

  4. The Influence of Accretion Rate and Metallicity on Thermonuclear Bursts: Predictions from KEPLER Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampe, Nathanael; Heger, Alexander; Galloway, Duncan K.

    2016-03-01

    Using the KEPLER hydrodynamics code, 464 models of thermonuclear X-ray bursters were performed across a range of accretion rates and compositions. We present the library of simulated burst profiles from this sample, and examine variations in the simulated light curve for different model conditions. We find that the recurrence time varies as a power law against accretion rate, and measure its slope while mixed H/He burning is occurring for a range of metallicities, finding the power law gradient to vary from η =1.1 to 1.24. We identify the accretion rates at which mixed H/He burning stops and a transition occurs to different burning regimes. We explore how varying the accretion rate and metallicity affects burst morphology in both the rise and tail.

  5. A Newly Forming Cold Flow Protogalactic Disk, a Signature of Cold Accretion from the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Matuszewski, Mateusz; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D.; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan

    2016-06-01

    How galaxies form from, and are fueled by, gas from the intergalactic medium (IGM) remains one of the major unsolved problems in galaxy formation. While the classical Cold Dark Matter paradigm posits galaxies forming from cooling virialized gas, recent theory and numerical simulations have highlighted the importance of cold accretion flows—relatively cool (T ˜ few × 104 K) unshocked gas streaming along filaments into dark matter halos, including hot, massive, high-redshift halos. These flows are thought to deposit gas and angular momentum into the circumgalactic medium resulting in disk- or ring-like structures, eventually coalescing into galaxies forming at filamentary intersections. We earlier reported a bright, Lyα emitting filament near the QSO HS1549+19 at redshift z = 2.843 discovered with the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager. We now report that the bright part of this filament is an enormous (R > 100 kpc) rotating structure of hydrogen gas with a disk-like velocity profile consistent with a 4 × 1012 M ⊙ halo. The orbital time of the outer part of the what we term a “protodisk” is comparable to the virialization time and the age of the universe at this redshift. We propose that this protodisk can only have recently formed from cold gas flowing directly from the cosmic web.

  6. Accreting pre-main-sequence models and abundance anomalies in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognelli, E.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of producing helium-enhanced stars in globular clusters by accreting polluted matter during the pre-main-sequence phase. We followed the evolution of two different classes of pre-main-sequence accreting models, one which neglects and the other that takes into account the protostellar evolution. We analysed the dependence of the final central helium abundance, of the tracks position in the HR diagram and of the surface lithium abundance evolution on the age at which the accretion of polluted material begins and on the main physical parameters that govern the protostellar evolution. The later is the beginning of the late accretion and the lower are both the central helium and the surface lithium abundances at the end of the accretion phase and in Zero Age Main Sequence (ZAMS). In order to produce a relevant increase of the central helium content the accretion of polluted matter should start at ages lower than 1 Myr. The inclusion of the protostellar evolution has a strong impact on the ZAMS models too. The adoption of a very low seed mass (i.e. 0.001 M⊙) results in models with the lowest central helium and surface lithium abundances. The higher is the accretion rate and the lower is the final helium content in the core and the residual surface lithium. In the worst case - i.e. seed mass 0.001 M⊙ and accretion rate ≥10-5 M⊙ yr-1 - the central helium is not increased at all and the surface lithium is fully depleted in the first few million years.

  7. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics Simulations of Tilted Black Hole Accretion Flows and Their Radiative Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Hotaka; Gammie, C. F.; Dolence, J.; Noble, S. C.

    2013-01-01

    We perform global General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) simulations of non-radiative, magnetized disks that are initially tilted with respect to the black hole's spin axis. We run the simulations with different size and tilt angle of the tori for 2 different resolutions. We also perform radiative transfer using Monte Carlo based code that includes synchrotron emission, absorption and Compton scattering to obtain spectral energy distribution and light curves. Similar work was done by Fragile et al. (2007) and Dexter & Fragile (2012) to model the super massive black hole SgrA* with tilted accretion disks. We compare our results of fully conservative hydrodynamic code and spectra that include X-ray, with their results.

  8. Spectral Analysis of the Accretion Flow in NGC 1052 with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenneman, L. W.; Weaver, K. A.; Kadler, M.; Tueller, J.; Marscher, A.; Ros, E.; Zensus,A.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Aller, M.; Aller, H.; Irwin, J.; Kerp, J.; Kaufmann, S.

    2008-01-01

    We present an analysis of the 101 ks, 2007 Suzaku spectrum of the LINER galaxy NGC 1052. The 0:3..10 keV continuum is well-modeled by a power-law continuum modified by Galactic and intrinsic absorption, and exhibits a soft, thermal emission component below 1 keV. Both a narrow core and a broader component of Fe-Ka emission are robustly detected at 6:4 keV. While the narrow line is consistent with an origin in material distant from the black hole, the broad line is best fit empirically by a model that describes fluorescent emission from the inner accretion disk around a rapidly rotating black hole. We find no direct evidence for Comptonized reflection of the hard X-ray source by the disk above 10 keV, however, which casts doubt on the hypothesis that the broad iron line is produced in a standard accretion disk. We explore other possible scenarios for producing this spectral feature and conclude that the high equivalent width and full width half maximum velocity of the broad iron line (v greater than or equals 0:37c) necessitate an origin within d approx. 8r(sub g) of the hard X-ray source. Based on the confirmed presence of a strong radio jet in this source, the broad iron line may be produced in dense plasma at the base of the jet, implying that emission mechanisms in the central-most portions of active galactic nuclei are more complex than previously thought.

  9. Ice Accretion Modeling using an Eulerian Approach for Droplet Impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Joe Woong; Garza, Dennis P.; Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional Eulerian analysis has been developed for modeling droplet impingement on lifting bodes. The Eulerian model solves the conservation equations of mass and momentum to obtain the droplet flow field properties on the same mesh used in CFD simulations. For complex configurations such as a full rotorcraft, the Eulerian approach is more efficient because the Lagrangian approach would require a significant amount of seeding for accurate estimates of collection efficiency. Simulations are done for various benchmark cases such as NACA0012 airfoil, MS317 airfoil and oscillating SC2110 airfoil to illustrate its use. The present results are compared with results from the Lagrangian approach used in an industry standard analysis called LEWICE.

  10. A radiation-hydrodynamics model of accretion columns for ultra-luminous X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Mineshige, Shin; Ohsuga, Ken; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-10-01

    Prompted by the recent discovery of pulsed emission from an ultra-luminous X-ray source, M 82 X-2 ("ULX-pulsar"), we perform a two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of a supercritical accretion flow onto a neutron star through a narrow accretion column. We set an accretion column with a cone shape filled with tenuous gas with the density of 10-4 g cm-3 above a neutron star and solve the two-dimensional gas motion and radiative transfer within the column. The side boundaries are set such that radiation can freely escape, but gas cannot. Since the initial gas layer is not in a hydrostatic balance, the column gas falls onto the neutron-star surface, and thereby a shock is generated. As a result, the accretion column is composed of two regions: an upper, nearly free-fall region and a lower settling region, as noted by Basko and Sunyaev (1976, MNRAS, 175, 395). The average accretion rate is very high; dot{M}˜ 10^{2{-}3} L_E/c2 (with LE being the Eddington luminosity), and so radiation energy dominates over gas internal energy entirely within the column. Despite the high accretion rate, the radiation flux in the laboratory frame is kept barely below LE/(4πr2) at a distance r in the settling region so that matter can slowly accrete. This adjustment is made possible, since a large amount of photons produced via dissipation of kinetic energy of matter can escape through the side boundaries. The total luminosity can greatly exceed LE by several orders of magnitude, whereas the apparent luminosity observed from the top of the column is much less. Due to such highly anisotropic radiation fields, the observed flux should exhibit periodic variations with the rotation period, provided that the rotation and magnetic axes are misaligned.

  11. A radiation-hydrodynamics model of accretion columns for ultra-luminous X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Mineshige, Shin; Ohsuga, Ken; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-09-01

    Prompted by the recent discovery of pulsed emission from an ultra-luminous X-ray source, M 82 X-2 ("ULX-pulsar"), we perform a two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of a supercritical accretion flow onto a neutron star through a narrow accretion column. We set an accretion column with a cone shape filled with tenuous gas with the density of 10-4 g cm-3 above a neutron star and solve the two-dimensional gas motion and radiative transfer within the column. The side boundaries are set such that radiation can freely escape, but gas cannot. Since the initial gas layer is not in a hydrostatic balance, the column gas falls onto the neutron-star surface, and thereby a shock is generated. As a result, the accretion column is composed of two regions: an upper, nearly free-fall region and a lower settling region, as noted by Basko and Sunyaev (1976, MNRAS, 175, 395). The average accretion rate is very high; dot{M}}˜ 10^{2-3} L_E/c2 (with LE being the Eddington luminosity), and so radiation energy dominates over gas internal energy entirely within the column. Despite the high accretion rate, the radiation flux in the laboratory frame is kept barely below LE/(4πr2) at a distance r in the settling region so that matter can slowly accrete. This adjustment is made possible, since a large amount of photons produced via dissipation of kinetic energy of matter can escape through the side boundaries. The total luminosity can greatly exceed LE by several orders of magnitude, whereas the apparent luminosity observed from the top of the column is much less. Due to such highly anisotropic radiation fields, the observed flux should exhibit periodic variations with the rotation period, provided that the rotation and magnetic axes are misaligned.

  12. Accreting white dwarf models for type 1 supernovae. 1: Presupernova evolution and triggering mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.

    1981-01-01

    As a plausible explosion model for a Type I supernova, the evolution of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs accreting helium in binary systems was investigated from the onset of accretion up to the point at which a thermonuclear explosion occurs. The relationship between the conditions in the binary system and the triggering mechanism for the supernova explosion is discussed, especially for the cases with relatively slow accretion rate. It is found that the growth of a helium zone on the carbon-oxygen core leads to a supernova explosion which is triggered either by the off-center helium detonation for slow and intermediate accretion rates or by the carbon deflagration for slow and rapid accretion rates. Both helium detonation and carbon deflagration are possible for the case of slow accretion, since in this case the initial mass of the white dwarf is an important parameter for determining the mode of ignition. Finally, various modes of building up the helium zone on the white dwarf, namely, direct transfer of helium from the companion star and the various types and strength of the hydrogen shell flashes are discussed in some detail.

  13. TESTING MODELS OF ACCRETION-DRIVEN CORONAL HEATING AND STELLAR WIND ACCELERATION FOR T TAURI STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2009-11-20

    Classical T Tauri stars are pre-main-sequence objects that undergo simultaneous accretion, wind outflow, and coronal X-ray emission. The impact of plasma on the stellar surface from magnetospheric accretion streams is likely to be a dominant source of energy and momentum in the upper atmospheres of these stars. This paper presents a set of models for the dynamics and heating of three distinct regions on T Tauri stars that are affected by accretion: (1) the shocked plasmas directly beneath the magnetospheric accretion streams, (2) stellar winds that are accelerated along open magnetic flux tubes, and (3) closed magnetic loops that resemble the Sun's coronal active regions. For the loops, a self-consistent model of coronal heating was derived from numerical simulations of solar field-line tangling and turbulent dissipation. Individual models are constructed for the properties of 14 well-observed stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. Predictions for the wind mass-loss rates are, on average, slightly lower than the observations, which suggests that disk winds or X-winds may also contribute to the measured outflows. For some of the stars, however, the modeled stellar winds do appear to contribute significantly to the measured mass fluxes. Predictions for X-ray luminosities from the shocks and loops are in general agreement with existing observations. The stars with the highest accretion rates tend to have X-ray luminosities dominated by the high-temperature (5-10 MK) loops. The X-ray luminosities for the stars having lower accretion rates are dominated by the cooler accretion shocks.

  14. Episodic Jet Power Extracted from a Spinning Black Hole Surrounded by a Neutrino-dominated Accretion Flow in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinwu; Liang, En-Wei; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2014-07-01

    It was suggested that the relativistic jets in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powered via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism or the annihilation of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos from a neutrino cooling-dominated accretion flow (NDAF). The advection and diffusion of the large-scale magnetic field of an NDAF is calculated, and the external magnetic field is found to be dragged inward efficiently by the accretion flow for a typical magnetic Prandtl number \\mathscr{P}_m=η /ν ˜ 1. The maximal BZ jet power can be ~1053-1054 erg s-1 for an extreme Kerr black hole, if an external magnetic field with 1014 Gauss is advected by the NDAF. This is roughly consistent with the field strength of the disk formed after a tidal disrupted magnetar. The accretion flow near the black hole horizon is arrested by the magnetic field if the accretion rate is below than a critical value for a given external field. The arrested accretion flow fails to drag the field inward and the field strength decays, and then the accretion re-starts, which leads to oscillating accretion. The typical timescale of such episodic accretion is of an order of one second. This can qualitatively explain the observed oscillation in the soft extended emission of short-type GRBs.

  15. Episodic jet power extracted from a spinning black hole surrounded by a neutrino-dominated accretion flow in gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xinwu; Liang, En-Wei; Yuan, Ye-Fei E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn

    2014-07-10

    It was suggested that the relativistic jets in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powered via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism or the annihilation of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos from a neutrino cooling-dominated accretion flow (NDAF). The advection and diffusion of the large-scale magnetic field of an NDAF is calculated, and the external magnetic field is found to be dragged inward efficiently by the accretion flow for a typical magnetic Prandtl number P{sub m}=η/ν∼1. The maximal BZ jet power can be ∼10{sup 53}-10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1} for an extreme Kerr black hole, if an external magnetic field with 10{sup 14} Gauss is advected by the NDAF. This is roughly consistent with the field strength of the disk formed after a tidal disrupted magnetar. The accretion flow near the black hole horizon is arrested by the magnetic field if the accretion rate is below than a critical value for a given external field. The arrested accretion flow fails to drag the field inward and the field strength decays, and then the accretion re-starts, which leads to oscillating accretion. The typical timescale of such episodic accretion is of an order of one second. This can qualitatively explain the observed oscillation in the soft extended emission of short-type GRBs.

  16. Accretion Flow Dynamics of MAXI J1659-152 from the Spectral Evolution Study of its 2010 Outburst using the TCAF Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Dipak; Molla, Aslam Ali; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Mondal, Santanu

    2015-04-01

    Transient black hole candidates are interesting objects to study in X-rays as these sources show rapid evolutions in their spectral and temporal properties. In this paper, we study the spectral properties of the Galactic transient X-ray binary MAXI J1659-152 during its very first outburst after discovery with the archival data of RXTE Proportional Counter Array instruments. We make a detailed study of the evolution of accretion flow dynamics during its 2010 outburst through spectral analysis using the Chakrabarti-Titarchuk two-component advective flow (TCAF) model as an additive table model in XSPEC. Accretion flow parameters (Keplerian disk and sub-Keplerian halo rates, shock location, and shock strength) are extracted from our spectral fits with TCAF. We studied variations of these fit parameters during the entire outburst as it passed through three spectral classes: hard, hard-intermediate, and soft-intermediate. We compared our TCAF fitted results with standard combined disk blackbody (DBB) and power-law (PL) model fitted results and found that variations of disk rate with DBB flux and halo rate with PL flux are generally similar in nature. There appears to be an absence of the soft state, unlike what is seen in other similar sources.

  17. Modeling and Detection of Ice Particle Accretion in Aircraft Engine Compression Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Simon, Donald L.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The accretion of ice particles in the core of commercial aircraft engines has been an ongoing aviation safety challenge. While no accidents have resulted from this phenomenon to date, numerous engine power loss events ranging from uneventful recoveries to forced landings have been recorded. As a first step to enabling mitigation strategies during ice accretion, a detection scheme must be developed that is capable of being implemented on board modern engines. In this paper, a simple detection scheme is developed and tested using a realistic engine simulation with approximate ice accretion models based on data from a compressor design tool. These accretion models are implemented as modified Low Pressure Compressor maps and have the capability to shift engine performance based on a specified level of ice blockage. Based on results from this model, it is possible to detect the accretion of ice in the engine core by observing shifts in the typical sensed engine outputs. Results are presented in which, for a 0.1 percent false positive rate, a true positive detection rate of 98 percent is achieved.

  18. A new model for the X-ray continuum of the magnetized accreting pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinelli, Ruben; Ferrigno, Carlo; Bozzo, Enrico; Becker, Peter A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Accreting highly magnetized pulsars in binary systems are among the brightest X-ray emitters in our Galaxy. Although a number of high-quality broad-band (0.1-100 keV) X-ray observations are available, the spectral energy distribution of these sources is usually investigated by adopting pure phenomenological models rather than models linked to the physics of accretion. Aims: In this paper, a detailed spectral study of the X-ray emission recorded from the high-mass X-ray binary pulsars Cen X-3, 4U 0115+63, and Her X-1 is carried out by using BeppoSAX and joined Suzaku +NuStar data, together with an advanced version of the compmag model, which provides a physical description of the high-energy emission from accreting pulsars, including the thermal and bulk Comptonization of cyclotron and bremsstrahlung seed photons along the neutron star accretion column. Methods: The compmag model is based on an iterative method for solving second-order partial differential equations, whose convergence algorithm has been improved and consolidated during the preparation of this paper. Results: Our analysis shows that the broad-band X-ray continuum of all considered sources can be self-consistently described by the compmag model. The cyclotron absorption features (not included in the model) can be accounted for by using Gaussian components. From the fits of the compmag model to the data we inferred the physical properties of the accretion columns in all sources, finding values reasonably close to those theoretically expected according to our current understanding of accretion in highly magnetized neutron stars. Conclusions: The updated version of the compmag model has been tailored to the physical processes that are known to occur in the columns of highly magnetized accreting neutron stars and it can thus provide a better understanding of the high-energy radiation from these sources. The availability of broad-band high-quality X-ray data, such as those provided by BeppoSAX in

  19. Broad bounds on Earth's accretion and core formation constrained by geochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudge, John F.; Kleine, Thorsten; Bourdon, Bernard

    2010-06-01

    The Earth formed through the accretion of numerous planetary embryos that were already differentiated into a metallic core and silicate mantle. Prevailing models of Earth's formation, constrained by the observed abundances of metal-loving siderophile elements in Earth's mantle, assume full metal-silicate equilibrium, whereby all memory of the planetary embryos' earlier differentiation is lost. Using the hafnium-tungsten (Hf-W) and uranium-lead (U-Pb) isotopic dating systems, these models suggest rapid accretion of Earth's main mass within about 10 million years (Myr) of the formation of the Solar System. Accretion terminated about 30 or 100 Myr after formation of the Solar System, owing to a giant impact that formed the Moon. Here we present geochemical models of Earth's accretion that preserve some memory of the embryos' original differentiation. These disequilibrium models allow some fraction of the embryos' metallic cores to directly enter the Earth's core, without equilibrating with Earth's mantle. We show that disequilibrium models are as compatible with the geochemical observations as equilibrium models, yet still provide bounds on Earth's accretion and core formation. We find that the Hf-W data mainly constrain the degree of equilibration rather than the timing, whereas the U-Pb data confirm that the end of accretion is consistent with recent estimates of the age of the Moon. Our results indicate that only 36% of the Earth's core must have formed in equilibrium with Earth's mantle. This low degree of equilibration is consistent with the siderophile element abundances in Earth's mantle.

  20. Modeling X-ray Absorbers in AGNs with MHD-Driven Accretion-Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C. R.; Tombesi, F.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2013-04-01

    We have proposed a systematic view of the observed X-ray absorbers, namely warm absorbers (WAs) in soft X-ray and highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind models. While potentially complicated by variability and thermal instability in these energetic outflows, in this simplistic model we have calculated 2D kinematic field as well as density and ionization structure of the wind with density profile of 1/r corresponding to a constant column distribution per decade of ionization parameter. In particular we show semi-analytically that the inner layer of the disk-wind manifests itself as the strongly-ionized fast outflows while the outer layer is identified as the moderately-ionized absorbers. The computed characteristics of these two apparently distinct absorbers are consistent with X-ray data (i.e. a factor of ~100 difference in column and ionization parameters as well as low wind velocity vs. near-relativistic flow). With the predicted contour curves for these wind parameters one can constrain allowed regions for the presence of WAs and UFOs.The model further implies that the UFO's gas pressure is comparable to that of the observed radio jet in 3C111 suggesting that the magnetized disk-wind with density profile of 1/r is a viable agent to help sustain such a self-collimated jet at small radii.

  1. FUNDAMENTAL ASPECTS OF EPISODIC ACCRETION CHEMISTRY EXPLORED WITH SINGLE-POINT MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Ruud; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2012-07-20

    We explore a set of single-point chemical models to study the fundamental chemical aspects of episodic accretion in low-mass embedded protostars. Our goal is twofold: (1) to understand how the repeated heating and cooling of the envelope affects the abundances of CO and related species; and (2) to identify chemical tracers that can be used as a novel probe of the timescales and other physical aspects of episodic accretion. We develop a set of single-point models that serve as a general prescription for how the chemical composition of a protostellar envelope is altered by episodic accretion. The main effect of each accretion burst is to drive CO ice off the grains in part of the envelope. The duration of the subsequent quiescent stage (before the next burst hits) is similar to or shorter than the freeze-out timescale of CO, allowing the chemical effects of a burst to linger long after the burst has ended. We predict that the resulting excess of gas-phase CO can be observed with single-dish or interferometer facilities as evidence of an accretion burst in the past 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} yr.

  2. A toy model for magnetic connection in black hole accretion disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ding-Xiong; Ye, Yong-Chun; Li, Yang; Liu, Dong-Mei

    2007-01-01

    A toy model for magnetic connection in black hole (BH) accretion disc is discussed based on a poloidal magnetic field generated by a single electric current flowing around a Kerr BH in the equatorial plane. We discuss the effects of the coexistence of two kinds of magnetic connection (MC) arising, respectively, from (1) the closed field lines connecting the BH horizon with the disc (henceforth MCHD) and (2) the closed field lines connecting the plunging region with the disc (henceforth MCPD). The magnetic field configuration is constrained by conservation of magnetic flux and a criterion of the screw instability of the magnetic field. Two parameters λ and αm are introduced to describe our model instead of resolving the complicated magnetohydrodynamic equations. Compared with MCHD, energy and angular momentum of the plunging particles are extracted via MCPD more effectively, provided that the BH spin is not very high. It turns out that negative energy can be delivered to the BH by the plunging particles without violating the second law of BH thermodynamics, however it cannot be realized via MCPD in a stable way.

  3. Orbital circularization of a planet accreting disk gas: the formation of distant jupiters in circular orbits based on a core accretion model

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Arika; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: higuchia@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2014-12-10

    Recently, gas giant planets in nearly circular orbits with large semimajor axes (a ∼ 30-1000 AU) have been detected by direct imaging. We have investigated orbital evolution in a formation scenario for such planets, based on a core accretion model. (1) Icy cores accrete from planetesimals at ≲ 30 AU, (2) they are scattered outward by an emerging nearby gas giant to acquire highly eccentric orbits, and (3) their orbits are circularized through the accretion of disk gas in outer regions, where they spend most of their time. We analytically derived equations to describe the orbital circularization through gas accretion. Numerical integrations of these equations show that the eccentricity decreases by a factor of more than 5 while the planetary mass increases by a factor of 10. Because runaway gas accretion increases planetary mass by ∼10-300, the orbits are sufficiently circularized. On the other hand, a is reduced at most only by a factor of two, leaving the planets in the outer regions. If the relative velocity damping by shock is considered, the circularization slows down, but is still efficient enough. Therefore, this scenario potentially accounts for the formation of observed distant jupiters in nearly circular orbits. If the apocenter distances of the scattered cores are larger than the disk sizes, their a shrink to a quarter of the disk sizes; the a-distribution of distant giants could reflect the outer edges of the disks in a similar way that those of hot jupiters may reflect inner edges.

  4. Constraints on the Neutron Star and Inner Accretion Flow in Serpens X-1 Using Nustar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Parker, M. L.; Fuerst, F.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Tendulkar, S.; Harrison, F. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Chakrabarty, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Hailey, C. J.; Natalucci, L.; Paerels, F.; Rana, V.; Stern, D. K.; Tomsick, J. A.; Zhang, Will

    2013-01-01

    We report on an observation of the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1, made with NuSTAR. The extraordinary sensitivity afforded by NuSTAR facilitated the detection of a clear, robust, relativistic Fe K emission line from the inner disk. A relativistic profile is required over a single Gaussian line from any charge state of Fe at the 5 sigma level of confidence, and any two Gaussians of equal width at the same confidence. The Compton back-scattering "hump" peaking in the 10-20 keV band is detected for the first time in a neutron star X-ray binary. Fits with relativistically blurred disk reflection models suggest that the disk likely extends close to the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) or stellar surface. The best-fit blurred reflection models constrain the gravitational redshift from the stellar surface to be ZnS (is) greater than 0.16. The data are broadly compatible with the disk extending to the ISCO; in that case,ZnS(is) greater than 0.22 and RNS (is) less than12.6 km (assuming MnS = 1.4 solar mass and a = 0, where a = cJ/GM2). If the star is as large or larger than its ISCO, or if the effective reflecting disk leaks across the ISCO to the surface, the redshift constraints become measurements. We discuss our results in the context of efforts to measure fundamental properties of neutron stars, and models for accretion onto compact objects.

  5. Are BL Lac-type objects nearby black holes. [gas accretion model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, S. L.; Elliot, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that isolated black holes accreting interstellar gas can account for the characteristic properties of the Lacertids. Emission spectra for various interstellar gas densities and black hole masses are compared with the data plotted by Strittmatter et al. (1972) for the BL Lac-type objects. Rough estimates indicate that there may indeed be a finite number of stellar-mass black holes close to the earth as required by the theory. If it is determined that the BL Lac-type objects lie outside of the galactic disk a black hole accretion model may still apply if certain conditions are satisfied.

  6. Hot Accretion Disks Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoernsson, Gunnlaugur; Abramowicz, Marek A.; Chen, Xingming; Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    1996-08-01

    All previous studies of hot (Tp 1010-1012 K), optically thin accretion disks have neglected either the presence of e+ e- pairs or advective cooling. Thus all hot disk models constructed previously have not been self-consistent. In this paper we calculate local disk models including pair physics, relevant radiative processes in the hot plasma, and the effect of advective cooling. We use a modification of the Björnsson & Svensson mapping method. We find that the role of e+ e- pairs in the structure of hot, optically thin accretion disks is far less significant than was previously thought. The improved description of the radiation-matter interactions provided in the present paper modify the previously obtained values of the critical parameters characterizing advectively dominated flows.

  7. Exploring the Accretion Model of M87 and 3C 84 with the Faraday Rotation Measure Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Feng; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) are believed to be powered by an accretion-jet model, consisting of an inner advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF), an outer truncated standard thin disk, and a jet; however, model degeneracy still exists in this framework. For example, the X-ray emission can originate from either the ADAF or the jet. The aim of the present work is to check these models with the Faraday rotation measure (RM) observations recently detected for two LLAGNs, M87 and 3C 84, in the sub-mm band. For M87, we find that the RM predicted by the model in which the X-ray emission originates from the ADAF is larger than the observed upper limit of RM by over two orders of magnitude, while the model in which the X-ray emission originates from the jet predicts a RM lower than the observed upper limit. For 3C 84, the sub-mm emission is found to be dominated by the jet component, while the Faraday screen is attributed to the ADAFs. This scenario can naturally explain the observed external origin of the RM and why the RM is found to be stable during a two-year interval although the sub-mm emission increases at the same period.

  8. Model dependence of the multi-transonic behaviour, stability properties and the corresponding acoustic geometry for accretion onto rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sonali; Sen, Sharmistha; Nag, Sankhasubhra; Raychowdhury, Suparna; Das, Tapas K.

    2016-02-01

    Stationary, multi-transonic, integral solutions of hydrodynamic axisymmetric accretion onto a rotating black hole have been compared for different geometrical configurations of the associated accretion disc structures described using the polytropic as well as the isothermal equations of state. Such analysis is performed for accretion under the influence of generalised post Newtonian pseudo Kerr black hole potential. The variations of the stationary shock characteristics with black hole spin have been studied in details for all the disc models and are compared for the flow characterised by the two aforementioned equations of state. Using a novel linear perturbation technique it has been demonstrated that the aforementioned stationary solutions are stable, at least upto an astrophysically relevant time scale. It has been demonstrated that the emergence of the horizon related gravity like phenomena (the analogue gravity effects) is a natural consequence of such stability analysis, and the corresponding acoustic geometry embedded within the transonic accretion can be constructed for the propagation of the linear acoustic perturbation of the mass accretion rate. The analytical expression for the associated sonic surface gravity κ has been obtained self consistently. The variations of κ with the black hole spin parameter for all different geometric configurations of matter and for various thermodynamic equations of state have been demonstrated.

  9. Tomography of Accretion Flows in Binary Stars and Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livio, Mario

    2001-01-01

    Under this project, a variety of accretion problems have been studied, with two in particular. In the first, astrophysical jets are observed in many objects ranging from young stars to Active Galactic Nuclei. A major unsolved problem is how do these jets originate from accretion disks. In a series of works, I have examined the launching of outflows from magnetized disks, the extraction of energy from black holes, and the formation of jets in systems like Cataclysmic Variables and supermassive accreting black holes. The results of these works were published in a number of papers. In the second, I examined the potential role of vortices in accretion disks around Young Stellar Objects, for the formation of planets and for angular momentum transport. I showed that vortices are surprisingly stable, and that they are able to concentrate dust in their cores. I also examined the development of spiral shocks in disks. Finally, I studied the evolution of magnetically layered protoplanetary disks, and showed that they exhibit outbursts which could 'pump' the jets that are observed in Herbig-Haro objects. The results of these works were published in a number of papers as well. Additional information on the published papers is contained in the original abstract.

  10. Accretion Flow and Disparate Profiles of Raman Scattered O VI ??1032, 1038 in the Symbiotic Star V1016 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Hee-Won

    2015-04-01

    The symbiotic star V1016 Cygni, a detached binary system consisting of a hot white dwarf and a mass-losing Mira variable, shows very broad emission features at around 6825 Å and 7082 Å, which are Raman scattered Ovi ^U^U 1032, 1038 by atomic hydrogen. In the high resolution spectrum of V1016 Cyg obtained with the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph these broad features exhibit double peak profiles with the red peak stronger than the blue counterpart. However, their profiles differ in such a way that the blue peak of the 7082 feature is relatively weaker than the 6825 counterpart when the two Raman features are normalized to exhibit an equal red peak strength in the Doppler factor space. Assuming that an accretion flow around the white dwarf is responsible for the double peak profiles, we attribute this disparity in the profiles to the local variation of the flux ratio of Ovi ??1032, 1038 in the accretion flow. A Monte Carlo technique is adopted to provide emissivity maps showing the local emissivity of Ovi 1032 and Ovi ??1038 in the vicinity of the white dwarf. We also present a map indicating the differing flux ratios of Ovi ??1032 and 1038. Our result shows that the flux ratio reaches its maximum of 2 in the emission region responsible for the central trough of the Raman feature and that the flux ratio in the inner red emission region is almost 1. The blue emission region and the outer red emission region exhibit an intermediate ratio around 1.5. We conclude that the disparity in the profiles of the two Raman Ovi features strongly implies accretion flow around the white dwarf, which is azimuthally asymmetric.

  11. Electron Heating by the Ion Cyclotron Instability in Collisionless Accretion Flows. I. Compression-driven Instabilities and the Electron Heating Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-02-01

    In systems accreting well below the Eddington rate, such as the central black hole in the Milky Way (Sgr A*), the plasma in the innermost regions of the disk is believed to be collisionless and have two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. However, whether a collisionless faster-than-Coulomb energy transfer mechanism exists in two-temperature accretion flows is still an open question. We study the physics of electron heating during the growth of ion velocity-space instabilities by means of multidimensional, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A background large-scale compression—embedded in a novel form of the PIC equations—continuously amplifies the field. This constantly drives a pressure anisotropy P > P ∥ because of the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. We find that, for ion plasma beta values β0i ~ 5-30 appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows (here, β0i is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), mirror modes dominate if the electron-to-proton temperature ratio is T 0e /T 0i >~ 0.2, whereas for T 0e /T 0i <~ 0.2 the ion cyclotron instability triggers the growth of strong Alfvén-like waves, which pitch-angle scatter the ions to maintain marginal stability. We develop an analytical model of electron heating during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability, which we validate with PIC simulations. We find that for cold electrons (β0e <~ 2 me /mi , where β0e is the ratio of electron thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), the electron energy gain is controlled by the magnitude of the E-cross-B velocity induced by the ion cyclotron waves. This term is independent of the initial electron temperature, so it provides a solid energy floor even for electrons starting with extremely low temperatures. On the other hand, the electron energy gain for β0e >~ 2 me /mi —governed by the conservation of the particle magnetic moment in the growing fields of

  12. ELECTRON HEATING BY THE ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITY IN COLLISIONLESS ACCRETION FLOWS. I. COMPRESSION-DRIVEN INSTABILITIES AND THE ELECTRON HEATING MECHANISM

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh E-mail: rnarayan@cfa.harvard.edu

    2015-02-20

    In systems accreting well below the Eddington rate, such as the central black hole in the Milky Way (Sgr A*), the plasma in the innermost regions of the disk is believed to be collisionless and have two temperatures, with the ions substantially hotter than the electrons. However, whether a collisionless faster-than-Coulomb energy transfer mechanism exists in two-temperature accretion flows is still an open question. We study the physics of electron heating during the growth of ion velocity-space instabilities by means of multidimensional, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A background large-scale compression—embedded in a novel form of the PIC equations—continuously amplifies the field. This constantly drives a pressure anisotropy P > P {sub ∥} because of the adiabatic invariance of the particle magnetic moments. We find that, for ion plasma beta values β{sub 0i} ∼ 5-30 appropriate for the midplane of low-luminosity accretion flows (here, β{sub 0i} is the ratio of ion thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), mirror modes dominate if the electron-to-proton temperature ratio is T {sub 0e}/T {sub 0i} ≳ 0.2, whereas for T {sub 0e}/T {sub 0i} ≲ 0.2 the ion cyclotron instability triggers the growth of strong Alfvén-like waves, which pitch-angle scatter the ions to maintain marginal stability. We develop an analytical model of electron heating during the growth of the ion cyclotron instability, which we validate with PIC simulations. We find that for cold electrons (β{sub 0e} ≲ 2 m{sub e} /m{sub i} , where β{sub 0e} is the ratio of electron thermal pressure to magnetic pressure), the electron energy gain is controlled by the magnitude of the E-cross-B velocity induced by the ion cyclotron waves. This term is independent of the initial electron temperature, so it provides a solid energy floor even for electrons starting with extremely low temperatures. On the other hand, the electron energy gain for β{sub 0e} ≳ 2 m{sub e} /m{sub i}

  13. Aerodynamic Effects of Simulated Ice Accretion on a Generic Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Lee, Sam; Shah, Gautam H.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental research effort was begun to develop a database of airplane aerodynamic characteristics with simulated ice accretion over a large range of incidence and sideslip angles. Wind-tunnel testing was performed at the NASA Langley 12-ft Low-Speed Wind Tunnel using a 3.5 percent scale model of the NASA Langley Generic Transport Model. Aerodynamic data were acquired from a six-component force and moment balance in static-model sweeps from alpha = -5deg to 85deg and beta = -45 deg to 45 deg at a Reynolds number of 0.24 x10(exp 6) and Mach number of 0.06. The 3.5 percent scale GTM was tested in both the clean configuration and with full-span artificial ice shapes attached to the leading edges of the wing, horizontal and vertical tail. Aerodynamic results for the clean airplane configuration compared favorably with similar experiments carried out on a 5.5 percent scale GTM. The addition of the large, glaze-horn type ice shapes did result in an increase in airplane drag coefficient but had little effect on the lift and pitching moment. The lateral-directional characteristics showed mixed results with a small effect of the ice shapes observed in some cases. The flow visualization images revealed the presence and evolution of a spanwise-running vortex on the wing that was the dominant feature of the flowfield for both clean and iced configurations. The lack of ice-induced performance and flowfield effects observed in this effort was likely due to Reynolds number effects for the clean configuration. Estimates of full-scale baseline performance were included in this analysis to illustrate the potential icing effects.

  14. BONDI-HOYLE-LYTTLETON ACCRETION ONTO A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Moeckel, Nickolas; Throop, Henry B.

    2009-12-10

    Young stellar systems orbiting in the potential of their birth cluster can accrete from the dense molecular interstellar medium during the period between the star's birth and the dispersal of the cluster's gas. Over this time, which may span several Myr, the amount of material accreted can rival the amount in the initial protoplanetary disk; the potential importance of this 'tail-end' accretion for planet formation was recently highlighted by Throop and Bally. While accretion onto a point mass is successfully modeled by the classical Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton solutions, the more complicated case of accretion onto a star-disk system defies analytic solution. In this paper, we investigate via direct hydrodynamic simulations the accretion of dense interstellar material onto a star with an associated gaseous protoplanetary disk. We discuss the changes to the structure of the accretion flow caused by the disk, and vice versa. We find that immersion in a dense accretion flow can redistribute disk material such that outer disk migrates inward, increasing the inner disk surface density and reducing the outer radius. The accretion flow also triggers the development of spiral density features, and changes to the disk inclination. The mean accretion rate onto the star remains roughly the same with and without the presence of a disk. We discuss the potential impact of this process on planet formation, including the possibility of triggered gravitational instability, inclination differences between the disk and the star, and the appearance of spiral structure in a gravitationally stable system.

  15. Diagnosing the accretion flow in ultraluminous X-ray sources using soft X-ray atomic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Matthew J.; Walton, Dominic J.; Fabian, Andrew; Roberts, Timothy P.; Heil, Lucy; Pinto, Ciro; Anderson, Gemma; Sutton, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The lack of unambiguous detections of atomic features in the X-ray spectra of ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) has proven a hindrance in diagnosing the nature of the accretion flow. The possible association of spectral residuals at soft energies with atomic features seen in absorption and/or emission and potentially broadened by velocity dispersion could therefore hold the key to understanding much about these enigmatic sources. Here we show for the first time that such residuals are seen in several sources and appear extremely similar in shape, implying a common origin. Via simple arguments we assert that emission from extreme colliding winds, absorption in a shell of material associated with the ULX nebula and thermal plasma emission associated with star formation are all highly unlikely to provide an origin. Whilst CCD spectra lack the energy resolution necessary to directly determine the nature of the features (i.e. formed of a complex of narrow lines or intrinsically broad lines), studying the evolution of the residuals with underlying spectral shape allows for an important, indirect test for their origin. The ULX NGC 1313 X-1 provides the best opportunity to perform such a test due to the dynamic range in spectral hardness provided by archival observations. We show through highly simplified spectral modelling that the strength of the features (in either absorption or emission) appears to anticorrelate with spectral hardness, which would rule out an origin via reflection of a primary continuum and instead supports a picture of atomic transitions in a wind or nearby material associated with such an outflow.

  16. Magnetospheric accretion models for T Tauri stars. 1: Balmer line profiles without rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Hewett, Robert; Calvet, Nuria

    1994-01-01

    We argue that the strong emission lines of T Tauri stars are generally produced in infalling envelopes. Simple models of infall constrained to a dipolar magnetic field geometry explain many peculiarities of observed line profiles that are difficult, if not impossible, to reproduce with wind models. Radiative transfer effects explain why certain lines can appear quite symmetric while other lines simultaneously exhibit inverse P Cygni profiles, without recourse to complicated velocity fields. The success of the infall models in accounting for qualitative features of observed line profiles supports the proposal that stellar magnetospheres disrupt disk accretion in T Tauri stars, that true boundary layers are not usually present in T Tauri stars, and that the observed 'blue veiling' emission arises from the base of the magnetospheric accretion column.

  17. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; Fragile, P. Chris

    2013-12-01

    This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves. In this light we discuss how accretion disks might reveal some of the unique signatures of strong gravity: the event horizon, the innermost stable circular orbit, and the ergosphere. We then review, from a first-principles perspective, the physical processes at play in accretion disks. This leads us to the four primary accretion disk models that we review: Polish doughnuts (thick disks), Shakura-Sunyaev (thin) disks, slim disks, and advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). After presenting the models we discuss issues of stability, oscillations, and jets. Following our review of the analytic work, we take a parallel approach in reviewing numerical studies of black hole accretion disks. We finish with a few select applications that highlight particular astrophysical applications: measurements of black hole mass and spin, black hole vs. neutron star accretion disks, black hole accretion disk spectral states, and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs).

  18. Tidal marsh accretion processes in the San Francisco Bay-Delta - are our models underestimating the historic and future importance of plant-mediated organic accretion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Drexler, J. Z.; Byrd, K. B.; Schile, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    as well as titanium, iron, potassium and manganese. It remains unclear whether the hydrologic conditions associated with mineral inputs or the mineral inputs themselves promote decomposition and favor the accumulation of mineral fractions at the expense of organic fractions. As suspended sediment concentrations are currently decreasing in the SFBay-Delta, organic accretion may be enhanced or at least required for sustaining marsh elevations. These data suggest that a) potential organic accretion may be underestimated during calibration of peat accretion models with recent mineral-rich watershed conditions, and b) plant physiology and biochemistry are significant factors in the future and historic development of coastal peatlands.

  19. Chaotic and stochastic processes in the accretion flows of the black hole X-ray binaries revealed by recurrence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suková, Petra; Grzedzielski, Mikolaj; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Both the well known microquasar GRS 1915+105, as well as its recently discovered analogue, IGR J17091-3624, exhibit variability that is characteristic of a deterministic chaotic system. Their specific kind of quasi-periodic flares that are observed in some states is intrinsically connected with the global structure of the accretion flow, which are governed by the nonlinear hydrodynamics. One plausible mechanism that is proposed to explain this kind of variability is the thermal-viscous instability that operates in the accretion disk. The purely stochastic variability that occurs because of turbulent conditions in the plasma, is quantified by the power density spectra and appears in practically all types of sources and their spectral states. Methods: We pose a question as to whether these two microquasars are one of a kind, or if the traces of deterministic chaos, and hence the accretion disk instability, may also be hidden in the observed variability of other sources. We focus on the black hole X-ray binaries that accrete at a high rate and are, therefore, theoretically prone to the development of radiation pressure-induced instability. To study the nonlinear behaviour of the X-ray sources and distinguish between the chaotic and stochastic nature of their emission, we propose a novel method, which is based on recurrence analysis. Widely known in other fields of physics, this powerful method is used here for the first time in an astrophysical context. We estimate the indications of deterministic chaos quantitatively, such as the Rényi's entropy for the observed time series, and we compare them with surrogate data. Results: Using the observational data collected by the RXTE satellite, we reveal the oscillations pattern and the observable properties of six black hole systems. For five of them, we confirm the signatures of deterministic chaos being the driver of their observed variability. Conclusions: We test the method and confirm the deterministic nature of

  20. A GENERAL RELATIVISTIC MODEL OF ACCRETION DISKS WITH CORONAE SURROUNDING KERR BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    You Bei; Cao Xinwu; Yuan Yefei E-mail: cxw@shao.ac.cn

    2012-12-20

    We calculate the structure of a standard accretion disk with a corona surrounding a massive Kerr black hole in the general relativistic frame, in which the corona is assumed to be heated by the reconnection of the strongly buoyant magnetic fields generated in the cold accretion disk. The emergent spectra of accretion disk-corona systems are calculated by using the relativistic ray-tracing method. We propose a new method to calculate the emergent Comptonized spectra from the coronae. The spectra of disk-corona systems with a modified {alpha}-magnetic stress show that both the hard X-ray spectral index and the hard X-ray bolometric correction factor L{sub bol}/L{sub X,2-10keV} increase with the dimensionless mass accretion rate, which is qualitatively consistent with the observations of active galactic nuclei. The fraction of the power dissipated in the corona decreases with increasing black hole spin parameter a, which leads to lower electron temperatures of the coronae for rapidly spinning black holes. The X-ray emission from the coronae surrounding rapidly spinning black holes becomes weak and soft. The ratio of the X-ray luminosity to the optical/UV luminosity increases with the viewing angle, while the spectral shape in the X-ray band is insensitive to the viewing angle. We find that the spectral index in the infrared waveband depends on the mass accretion rate and the black hole spin a, which deviates from the f{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup 1/3} relation expected by the standard thin disk model.

  1. Outflows from Accretion Disks around Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Cheng-Liang; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2013-02-01

    We solve the set of hydrodynamic equations for accretion disks in the spherical coordinates (rθφ) to obtain the explicit structure along the θ direction. The results display thinner, quasi-Keplerian disks for Shakura-Sunyaev Disks (SSDs) and thicker, sub-Keplerian disks for Advection Dominated Accretion Flows (ADAFs) and slim disks, which are consistent with previous popular analytical models, while an inflow region and an outflow region always exist, which supports the results of some recent numerical simulation works. Our results indicate that the outflows should be common in various accretion disks and stronger in slim disks and ADAFs.

  2. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. I. Constant Density Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Javier; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    We present new models for illuminated accretion disks, their structure and reprocessed emission. We consider the effects of incident X-rays on the surface of an accretion disk by solving simultaneously the equations of radiative transfer, energy balance and ionization equilibrium over a large range of column densities. We assume plane-parallel geometry and azimuthal symmetry, such that each calculation corresponds to a ring at a given distance from the central object. Our models include recent and complete atomic data for K-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We examine the effect on the spectrum of fluorescent Ka line emission and absorption in the emitted spectrum. We also explore the dependence of the spectrum on the strength of the incident X-rays and other input parameters, and discuss the importance of Comptonization on the emitted spectrum.

  3. Graduate Design Education: The Case for an Accretive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walliss, Jillian; Greig, Joan

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 the University of Melbourne began implementation of the Melbourne Model, its new vision for higher education in Australia. Six broad undergraduate university degrees have been introduced and graduate schools created. Students may now progress from an undergraduate generalist degree, with major, to a professional Masters. Alternatively,…

  4. Detached-Eddy Simulations of Separated Flow Around Wings With Ice Accretions: Year One Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K. (Technical Monitor); Thompson, David; Mogili, Prasad

    2004-01-01

    A computational investigation was performed to assess the effectiveness of Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) as a tool for predicting icing effects. The AVUS code, a public domain flow solver, was employed to compute solutions for an iced wing configuration using DES and steady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation methodologies. The configuration was an extruded GLC305/944-ice shape section with a rectangular planform. The model was mounted between two walls so no tip effects were considered. The numerical results were validated by comparison with experimental data for the same configuration. The time-averaged DES computations showed some improvement in lift and drag results near stall when compared to steady RANS results. However, comparisons of the flow field details did not show the level of agreement suggested by the integrated quantities. Based on our results, we believe that DES may prove useful in a limited sense to provide analysis of iced wing configurations when there is significant flow separation, e.g., near stall, where steady RANS computations are demonstrably ineffective. However, more validation is needed to determine what role DES can play as part of an overall icing effects prediction strategy. We conclude the report with an assessment of existing computational tools for application to the iced wing problem and a discussion of issues that merit further study.

  5. Modeling and flow theory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    (1) We recommend the establishment of an experimental test facility, appropriately instrumented, dedicated to research on theoretical modeling concepts. Validation of models for the various flow regimes, and establishment of the limitations or concepts used in the construction of models, are sorely needed areas of research. There exists no mechanism currently for funding of such research on a systematic basis. Such a facility would provide information fundamental to progress in the physics of turbulent multi-phase flow, which would also have impact on the understanding of coal utilization processes; (2) combustion research appears to have special institutional barriers to information exchange because it is an established, commercial ongoing effort, with heavy reliance on empirical data for proprietary configurations; (3) for both gasification and combustion reactors, current models appear to handle adequately some, perhaps even most, gross aspects of the reactors such as overall efficiency and major chemical output constituents. However, new and more stringent requirements concerning NOX, SOX and POX (small paticulate) production require greater understanding of process details and spatial inhomogenities, hence refinement of current models to include some greater detail is necessary; (4) further progress in the theory of single-phase turbulent flow would benefit our understanding of both combustors and gasifiers; and (5) another area in which theoretical development would be extremely useful is multi-phase flow.

  6. Accretion of Ghost Condensate by Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A

    2004-06-02

    The intent of this letter is to point out that the accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes could be extremely efficient. We analyze steady-state spherically symmetric flows of the ghost fluid in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole and calculate the accretion rate. Unlike minimally coupled scalar field or quintessence, the accretion rate is set not by the cosmological energy density of the field, but by the energy scale of the ghost condensate theory. If hydrodynamical flow is established, it could be as high as tenth of a solar mass per second for 10MeV-scale ghost condensate accreting onto a stellar-sized black hole, which puts serious constraints on the parameters of the ghost condensate model.

  7. Thermal instability accretion disk model for the X-ray transient A0620-00

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Min; Wheeler, J. Craig

    1989-01-01

    The limit-cycle thermal instability model for accretion disks is used to study the soft X-ray transient A0620-00. Thermal instability in geometrically thin, Keplerian alpha-model disks is reviewed. The observational constraints on A0620-00 are presented and the parameters chosen for the model are discussed. It is found that, with the adopted parameters, the model requires a central object mass of about 7 solar masses to fit the burst recurrence time. This is consistent with a black hole as the central object. The results suggest that a mass transfer instability may be responsible for outbursts.

  8. Modelling pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, Merryn H.; Burrowes, Kelly S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational model analysis is a method that has been used widely to understand and interpret complexity of interactions in the pulmonary system. Pulmonary blood transport is a multi-scale phenomenon that involves scale-dependent structure and function, therefore requiring different model assumptions for the microcirculation and the arterial or venous flows. The blood transport systems interact with the surrounding lung tissue, and are dependent on hydrostatic pressure gradients, control of vasoconstriction, and the topology and material composition of the vascular trees. This review focuses on computational models that have been developed to study the different mechanisms contributing to regional perfusion of the lung. Different models for the microcirculation and the pulmonary arteries are considered, including fractal approaches and anatomically-based methods. The studies that are reviewed illustrate the different complementary approaches that can be used to address the same physiological question of flow heterogeneity. PMID:18434260

  9. Strong constraints on a super-Eddington accretion flow: XMM-Newton observations of an intermediate-mass black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chichuan; Done, Chris; Ward, Martin

    2016-01-01

    RX J1140.1+0307 is a Narrow Line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) with one of the lowest black hole masses known in an AGN (M ≤ 106 M⊙). We show results from two new XMM-Newton observations, exhibiting soft 2-10 keV spectra, a strong excess at lower energies, and fast X-ray variability which is typical of this class of AGN. The soft excess can be equally well fit using either low-temperature Comptonization or highly smeared, ionized reflection models, but we additionally consider the fast X-ray variability to produce covariance, lag and coherence spectra to show that the low-temperature Comptonization model gives a better description of the break in variability properties between soft and hard X-rays. Both these models require an additional component at the softest energies, as expected from the accretion disc. However, standard disc models cannot connect this to the optical/UV emission from the outer disc unless the mass is underestimated by an order of magnitude. The variable optical and far UV emission instead suggests that L/LEdd ˜ 10 through the outer disc, in which case advection and/or wind losses are required to explain the observed broad-band spectral energy distribution. This implies that the accretion geometry close to the black hole is unlikely to be a flat disc as assumed in the recent X-ray reverberation mapping techniques.

  10. Modelling the cross-spectral variability of the black hole binary MAXI J1659-152 with propagating accretion rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapisarda, S.; Ingram, A.; Kalamkar, M.; van der Klis, M.

    2016-11-01

    The power spectrum of the X-ray fluctuations of accreting black holes often consists of two broad humps. We quantitatively investigate the hypothesis that the lower frequency hump originates from variability in a truncated thin accretion disc, propagating into a large scaleheight inner hot flow which, in turn, itself is the origin of the higher frequency hump. We extend the propagating mass accretion rate fluctuations model PROPFLUC to accommodate double-hump power spectra in this way. Furthermore, we extend the model to predict the cross-spectrum between two energy bands in addition to their power spectra, allowing us to constrain the model using the observed time lags, which in the model result from both propagation of fluctuations from the disc to the hot flow, and inside the hot flow. We jointly fit soft and hard power spectrum, and the cross-spectrum between the two bands using this model for five Swift X-ray Telescope observations of MAXI J1659-152. The new double-hump model provides a better fit to the data than the old single-hump model for most of our observations. The data show only a small phase lag associated with the low-frequency hump. We demonstrate quantitatively that this is consistent with the model. We compare the truncation radius measured from our fits with that measured purely by spectral fitting and find agreement within a factor of two. This analysis encompasses the first joint fits of stellar-mass black hole cross-spectra and power spectra with a single self-consistent physical model.

  11. A model of an X-ray-illuminated accretion disk and corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.

    1993-01-01

    The X-ray-illuminated surface of the accretion disk in a low-mass X-ray Binary (LMXRB) and the X-ray-heated corona above the disk produce optical, UV, and soft X-ray emission lines. This paper presents 1D models of the emission line spectra and the vertical temperature and density structures at different radii. The models include a detailed treatment of the important atomic processes and an escape probability treatment of radiative transfer. Soker and Raymond (1993) use the density structure predicted by these models for a 2D Monte Carlo simulation of the photon scattering in the accretion disk corona (ADC) to examine the effects of the ADC on the angular distribution of X-rays and the flux of X-rays incident on the outer disk. This paper concentrates on the emission line fluxes for various elemental abundances and disk parameters. The UV lines of the classic LMXRBs are consistent with the model predictions. Some CNO processing is necessary to account for the nitrogen and helium abundances in Sco X-1 and other LMXRBs. Comparison of the models with observed spectra also points to a soft X-ray component with luminosity comparable to the hard X-rays. The models predict a substantial luminosity in the group of highly ionized iron lines near 100 A.

  12. Accurate Universal Models for the Mass Accretion Histories and Concentrations of Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D. H.; Jing, Y. P.; Mo, H. J.; Börner, G.

    2009-12-01

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance ΛCDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and ΛCDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the ΛCDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass, when

  13. ACCURATE UNIVERSAL MODELS FOR THE MASS ACCRETION HISTORIES AND CONCENTRATIONS OF DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, D. H.; Jing, Y. P.; Mo, H. J.; Boerner, G.

    2009-12-10

    A large amount of observations have constrained cosmological parameters and the initial density fluctuation spectrum to a very high accuracy. However, cosmological parameters change with time and the power index of the power spectrum dramatically varies with mass scale in the so-called concordance LAMBDACDM cosmology. Thus, any successful model for its structural evolution should work well simultaneously for various cosmological models and different power spectra. We use a large set of high-resolution N-body simulations of a variety of structure formation models (scale-free, standard CDM, open CDM, and LAMBDACDM) to study the mass accretion histories, the mass and redshift dependence of concentrations, and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos. We find that there is significant disagreement between the much-used empirical models in the literature and our simulations. Based on our simulation results, we find that the mass accretion rate of a halo is tightly correlated with a simple function of its mass, the redshift, parameters of the cosmology, and of the initial density fluctuation spectrum, which correctly disentangles the effects of all these factors and halo environments. We also find that the concentration of a halo is strongly correlated with the universe age when its progenitor on the mass accretion history first reaches 4% of its current mass. According to these correlations, we develop new empirical models for both the mass accretion histories and the concentration evolution histories of dark matter halos, and the latter can also be used to predict the mass and redshift dependence of halo concentrations. These models are accurate and universal: the same set of model parameters works well for different cosmological models and for halos of different masses at different redshifts, and in the LAMBDACDM case the model predictions match the simulation results very well even though halo mass is traced to about 0.0005 times the final mass

  14. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  15. Black hole accretion.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Ramesh; Quataert, Eliot

    2005-01-01

    Black holes are most often detected by the radiation produced when they gravitationally pull in surrounding gas, in a process called accretion. The efficiency with which the hot gas radiates its thermal energy strongly influences the geometry and dynamics of the accretion flow. Both radiatively efficient thin disks and radiatively inefficient thick disks are observed. When the accreting gas gets close to the central black hole, the radiation it produces becomes sensitive to the spin of the hole and the presence of an event horizon. Analysis of the luminosities and spectra of accreting black holes has yielded tantalizing evidence for both rotating holes and event horizons. Numerical simulations imply that the relativistic jets often seen from accreting black holes may be powered in part by the spin of the hole. PMID:15637269

  16. V3885 Sagittarius: A Comparison With a Range of Standard Model Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linnell, Albert P.; Godon, Patrick; Hubeny, Ivan; Sion, Edward M; Szkody, Paula; Barrett, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    A chi-squared analysis of standard model accretion disk synthetic spectrum fits to combined Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectra of V3885 Sagittarius, on an absolute flux basis, selects a model that accurately represents the observed spectral energy distribution. Calculation of the synthetic spectrum requires the following system parameters. The cataclysmic variable secondary star period-mass relation calibrated by Knigge in 2006 and 2007 sets the secondary component mass. A mean white dwarf (WD) mass from the same study, which is consistent with an observationally determined mass ratio, sets the adopted WD mass of 0.7M(solar mass), and the WD radius follows from standard theoretical models. The adopted inclination, i = 65 deg, is a literature consensus, and is subsequently supported by chi-squared analysis. The mass transfer rate is the remaining parameter to set the accretion disk T(sub eff) profile, and the Hipparcos parallax constrains that parameter to mas transfer = (5.0 +/- 2.0) x 10(exp -9) M(solar mass)/yr by a comparison with observed spectra. The fit to the observed spectra adopts the contribution of a 57,000 +/- 5000 K WD. The model thus provides realistic constraints on mass transfer and T(sub eff) for a large mass transfer system above the period gap.

  17. Accretion disk dynamics. α-viscosity in self-similar self-gravitating models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubsch, Marcus; Illenseer, Tobias F.; Duschl, Wolfgang J.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the suitability of α-viscosity in self-similar models for self-gravitating disks with a focus on active galactic nuclei (AGN) disks. Methods: We use a self-similar approach to simplify the partial differential equations arising from the evolution equation, which are then solved using numerical standard procedures. Results: We find a self-similar solution for the dynamical evolution of self-gravitating α-disks and derive the significant quantities. In the Keplerian part of the disk our model is consistent with standard stationary α-disk theory, and self-consistent throughout the self-gravitating regime. Positive accretion rates throughout the disk demand a high degree of self-gravitation. Combined with the temporal decline of the accretion rate and its low amount, the model prohibits the growth of large central masses. Conclusions: α-viscosity cannot account for the evolution of the whole mass spectrum of super-massive black holes (SMBH) in AGN. However, considering the involved scales it seems suitable for modelling protoplanetary disks.

  18. Formation of Large Regular Satellites of Giant Planets in an Extended Gaseous Nebula: Subnebula Model and Accretion of Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    We model the subnebulae of Jupiter and Saturn wherein satellite accretion took place. We expect a giant planet subnebula to be composed of an optically thick (given gaseous opacity) inner region inside of the planet's centrifugal radius (located at r(sub c, sup J) = l5R(sub J) for Jupiter and r(sub c, sup S) = 22R(sub S) for Saturn), and an optically thin, extended outer disk out to a fraction of the planet's Roche lobe, which we choose to be R(sub roche)/5 (located at approximately 150R(sub J) near the inner irregular satellites for Jupiter, and approximately 200R(sub S) near Phoebe for Saturn). This places Titan and Ganymede in the inner disk, Callisto and Iapetus in the outer disk, and Hyperion in the transition region. The inner disk is the leftover of the gas accreted by the protoplanet. The outer disk results from the solar torque on nebula gas flowing into the protoplanet during the time of giant planet gap opening. For the sake of specificity, we use a cosmic mixture 'minimum mass' model to constrain the gas densities of the inner disks of Jupiter and Saturn (and also Uranus). For the total mass of the outer disk we use the simple scaling M(sub disk) = M(sub P)tau(sub gap)/tau(sub acc), where M(sub P) is the mass of the giant planet, tau(sub gap) is the gap opening timescale, and tau(sub acc) is the giant planet accretion time. This gives a total outer disk mass of approximately 100M(sub Callisto) for Jupiter and possibly approximately 200M(sub Iapetus) for Saturn (which contain enough condensables to form Callisto and Iapetus respectively). Our model has Ganymede at a subnebula temperature of approximately 250 K and Titan at approximately 100 K. The outer disks of Jupiter and Saturn have constant temperatures of 130 K and 90 K respectively.

  19. Modelling the Accretion History of the Galactic Disk (and the Gravitational Lensing of a High-z Galaxy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Over its long history, the Milky Way is expected to have accreted many dwarf galaxies. The debris from the destruction of most of these dwarf galaxies will by now be fully phase-mixed throughout the Galaxy and hence undetectable as local over-densities in position-space. However, the debris from these systems could have distinct kinematic signatures that may help distinguish these stars from, for example, the Galactic disk. We aim to construct a reliable method of determining the contributions to the Milky Way disk from accreted structures that could be applied to current kinematic data sets, such as SDSS's APOGEE survey. In an effort to mimic the kinematic traits of an accreted satellite, we construct single-orbit models to compare to a cosmologically motivated simulation of satellite accretion. We find that these orbit models adhere to the kinematic signatures of certain types of accreted galaxies better than others, giving us insight on which parameters to trust when searching for accreted populations. As a bonus, we describe a separate project in which we attempt to deduce the intrinsic properties of the 8 o'clock arc, a gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxy at redshift 2.73. Using the lensmodel code and its pixel-based source reconstruction extension pixsrc, we derive a de-lensed image of the galaxy in the source plane.

  20. An accreting black hole model for Sagittarius A(*). 2: A detailed study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    1994-01-01

    Sgr A(*) is a unique, compact radio source at the Galactic center whose characteristics suggest that it may be a massive (i.e., approximately 10(exp 6) solar mass) black hole accreting from an ambient wind in that region. Earlier (simplified) calculations suggested that its 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 20) Hz spectrum could be derived from bremsstrahlung and magnetic bremsstrahlung emission from plasma descending toward the event horizon at a rate of roughly 10(exp 22) g/s. Here, we introduce several significant improvements to the model, including (1) an exact treatment of the cyclotron/synchrotron emissivity that is valid for all temperatures, (2) the actual determination of the temperature distribution in the inflow, and (3) the effect on the spectrum should the accreting plasma have a residual angular momentum, possibly forming a disk at small radii. We find that the most likely value of the mass in this improved model is approximately equals 2 +/- 1 x 10(exp 6) solar mass, close to the range inferred earlier, but about a factor of 2 greater than the previous 'best-fit' number. The main reason for this difference is that the more realistic (new) formulation of the magnetic bremsstrahlung emissivity has fluctuations with frequency that decrease the overall line-of-sight intensity, thereby pointing to a slightly larger mass in order to account for the observed spectrum. We also find that a slight excess of angular momentum in the accreting gas may be necessary in order to account for the IR luminosity from this source. Such an excess is consistent with the results of ongoing three-dimensional simulations that will be reported elsewhere.

  1. Detailed Mid- and Far- Ultraviolet Model Spectra for Accretion Disks in Cataclysmic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Richard A.; Hubeny, Ivan

    1998-01-01

    We present a large grid of computed far- and mid-ultraviolet spectra (850-2000 A) of the integrated light from steady-state accretion disks in luminous cataclysmic variables. The spectra are tabulated at 0.25 A intervals with an adopted FWHM resolution of 1.0 A, so they are suitable for use with observed spectra from a variety of modern space-borne observatories. Twenty-six different combinations of white dwarf mass M(sub wd) and mass accretion rate dot-m are considered, and spectra are presented for six different disk inclinations i. The disk models are computed self-consistently in the plane-parallel approximation, assuming LTE and vertical hydrostatic equilibrium, by solving simultaneously the radiative transfer, hydrostatic equilibrium, and energy balance equations. Irradiation from external sources is neglected. Local spectra of disk annuli are computed taking into account line transitions from elements 1-28 (H through Ni). Limb darkening as well as Doppler broadening and blending of lines are taken into account in computing the integrated disk spectra. The radiative properties of the models are discussed, including the dependence of ultraviolet fluxes and colors on M(sub wd), dot-m, and i. The appearance of the disk spectra is illustrated, with regard to changes in the same three parameters. Finally, possible future improvements to the present models and spectra are discussed.

  2. Compton cooling and its effects on spectral and hydrodynamic properties of an accretion flow around a black hole: results of a coupled monte carlo TVD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, H.; Garain, S. K.; Chakrabarti, S. K.

    We investigate the effects of cooling of the Compton cloud on the outflow formation rate in an accretion disk around a black hole using a time-dependent coupled hydrodynamics - radiative transfer sumulation. We show that as a result of inverse-Comptonization of the soft photons, originating from the Keplerian disk immersed into an accreting sub-Keplerian flow (halo), by the hot Compton cloud, the cloud becomes cooler with the increase in the disk rate. As the resultant thermal pressure is reduced, the post-shock region collapses and the outflow rate is also reduced. We also find a direct correlation between the spectral states and the outflow rates of an accreting black hole.

  3. FUV Emission from AGB Stars: Modeling Accretion Activity Associated with a Binary Companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Alyx Catherine; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that the late stages of evolution for Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are influenced by the presence of binary companions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of direct observational evidence of binarity. However, more recently, strong indirect evidence comes from the discovery of UV emission in a subsample of these objects (fuvAGB stars). AGB stars are comparatively cool objects (< or =3000 K), thus their fluxes falls off drastically for wavelengths 3000 Angstroms and shorter. Therefore, ultraviolet observations offer an important, new technique for detecting the binary companions and/or associated accretion activity. We develop new models of UV emission from fuvAGB stars constrained by GALEX photometry and spectroscopy of these objects. We compare the GALEX UV grism spectra of the AGB M7 star EY Hya to predictions using the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, specifically investigating the ultraviolet wavelength range (1344-2831 Angstroms). We investigate models composed of contributions from a photoionized "hot spot" due to accretion activity around the companion, and "chromospheric" emission from collisionally ionized plasma, to fit the UV observations.

  4. Accretion disk winds in active galactic nuclei: X-ray observations, models, and feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. A strong support of this ``quasar mode'' feedback came from the recent X-ray observation of a mildly relativistic accretion disk wind in a ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and its connection with a large-scale molecular outflow, providing a direct link between the SMBH and the gas out of which stars form. Spectroscopic observations, especially in the X-ray band, show that such accretion disk winds may be common in local AGN and quasars. However, their origin and characteristics are still not fully understood. Detailed theoretical models and simulations focused on radiation, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or a combination of these two processes to investigate the possible acceleration mechanisms and the dynamics of these winds. Some of these models have been directly compared to X-ray spectra, providing important insights into the wind physics. However, fundamental improvements on these studies will come only from the unprecedented energy resolution and sensitivity of the upcoming X-ray observatories, namely ASTRO-H (launch date early 2016) and Athena (2028).

  5. Improved reflection models of black hole accretion disks: Treating the angular distribution of X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    García, J.; Steiner, J. F.; McClintock, J. E.; Brenneman, L. E-mail: jsteiner@head.cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: lbrenneman@cfa.harvard.edu; and others

    2014-02-20

    X-ray reflection models are used to constrain the properties of the accretion disk, such as the degree of ionization of the gas and the elemental abundances. In combination with general relativistic ray tracing codes, additional parameters like the spin of the black hole and the inclination to the system can be determined. However, current reflection models used for such studies only provide angle-averaged solutions for the flux reflected at the surface of the disk. Moreover, the emission angle of the photons changes over the disk due to relativistic light bending. To overcome this simplification, we have constructed an angle-dependent reflection model with the XILLVER code and self-consistently connected it with the relativistic blurring code RELLINE. The new model, relxill, calculates the proper emission angle of the radiation at each point on the accretion disk and then takes the corresponding reflection spectrum into account. We show that the reflected spectra from illuminated disks follow a limb-brightening law highly dependent on the ionization of disk and yet different from the commonly assumed form I∝ln (1 + 1/μ). A detailed comparison with the angle-averaged model is carried out in order to determine the bias in the parameters obtained by fitting a typical relativistic reflection spectrum. These simulations reveal that although the spin and inclination are mildly affected, the Fe abundance can be overestimated by up to a factor of two when derived from angle-averaged models. The fit of the new model to the Suzaku observation of the Seyfert galaxy Ark 120 clearly shows a significant improvement in the constraint of the physical parameters, in particular by enhancing the accuracy in the inclination angle and the spin determinations.

  6. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  7. Modeling MHD accretion-ejection—from the launching area to propagation scales

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanovs, Deniss; Fendt, Christian E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2014-09-20

    We present the results of axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations investigating the launching of jets and outflows from a magnetically diffusive accretion disk. The time evolution of the disk structure is self-consistently taken into account. In contrast to previous works, we have applied spherical coordinates for the numerical grid, implying substantial benefits concerning the numerical resolution and the stability of the simulation. Due to the new setup, we were able to run simulations for more than 150,000 dynamical times on a domain extending 1500 inner disk radii with a resolution of up to 24 cells per disk height in the inner disk. Depending on the disk magnetization, jet launching occurs in two different but complementary regimes—jets driven predominantly by centrifugal or magnetic forces. These regimes differ in the ejection efficiency concerning mass, energy, and angular momentum. We show that it is the actual disk magnetization and not so much the initial magnetization that best describes the disk-jet evolution. Considering the actual disk magnetization, we also find that simulations starting with different initial magnetization evolve in a similar—typical—way, due to advection and diffusion, as the magnetic flux in the disk evolves in time. Exploring a new, modified diffusivity model, we confirm the self-similar structure of the global jet-launching disk, obtaining power laws for the radial profiles of the disk physical variables such as density, magnetic field strength, or accretion velocity.

  8. A review of ice accretion data from a model rotor icing test and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Randall K.; Bond, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment was conducted by the Helicopter Icing Consortium (HIC) in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in which a 1/6 scale fuselage model of a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter with a generic rotor was subjected to a wide range of icing conditions. The HIC consists of members from NASA, Bell Helicopter, Boeing Helicopter, McDonnell Douglas Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, and Texas A&M University. Data was taken in the form of rotor torque, internal force balance measurements, blade strain gage loading, and two dimensional ice shape tracings. A review of the ice shape data is performed with special attention given to repeatability and correctness of trends in terms of radial variation, rotational speed, icing time, temperature, liquid water content, and volumetric median droplet size. Moreover, an indepth comparison between the experimental data and the analysis of NASA's ice accretion code LEWICE is given. Finally, conclusions are drawn as to the quality of the ice accretion data and the predictability of the data base as a whole. Recommendations are also given for improving data taking technique as well as potential future work.

  9. A review of ice accretion data from a model rotor icing test and comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Randall K.; Bond, Thomas H.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment was conducted by the Helicopter Icing Consortium (HIC) in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) in which a 1/6 scale fuselage model of a UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter with a generic rotor was subjected to a wide range of icing conditions. The HIC consists of members from NASA, Bell Helicopter, Boeing Helicopter, McDonnell Douglas Helicopters, Sikorsky Aircraft, and Texas A&M University. Data was taken in the form of rotor torque, internal force balance measurements, blade strain gage loading, and two dimensional ice shape tracings. A review of the ice shape data is performed with special attention given to repeatability and correctness of trends in terms of radial variation, rotational speed, icing time, temperature, liquid water content, and volumetric median droplet size. Moreover, an indepth comparison between the experimental data and the analysis of NASA's ice accretion code LEWICE is given. Finally, conclusions are shown as to the quality of the ice accretion data and the predictability of the data base as a whole. Recommendations are also given for improving data taking technique as well as potential future work.

  10. A Statistical Study of Accretion Disk Model Spectra for Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puebla, Raúl E.; Diaz, Marcos P.; Hubeny, Ivan

    2007-11-01

    We have performed a statistical test of the currently used accretion disk models for cataclysmic variables (CVs) using a set of 33 CVs with steady disks (10 old novae and 23 nova-like systems). The mass transfer rate () for each system was also calculated. Ultraviolet (UV) data were fitted by model spectra using a multiparametric optimization method, aiming to constrain the values. It was verified that these accretion disk models fail to fit both color and flux simultaneously, as previously noted when composite stellar atmosphere models were fitted to the UV spectra of CVs by Wade. By applying such models to a sample of novae and nova-like CVs, we confirm that the limb-darkening effect must be taken into account when estimating mass transfer rates, especially for high-inclination systems. Important fitting degeneracies of the basic disk parameters are analyzed. Our simulations suggest that to reproduce the observations a revision of the temperature profile, at least in the innermost parts of the disk, seems to be required, and possibly the vertical distribution of the viscosity should be revised. In addition, an optically thin layer or an extended disk component should be considered. This component may be physically represented by a disk wind and/or a chromosphere. A physical description of the emission-line profiles may help to break the degeneracies that appear when only the continuum is analyzed. The average value of found for nova-like systems is ~9.3 × 10-9 Modot yr-1, while ~1.3 × 10-8 Modot yr-1 is found for old classical novae. No clear evidence is found for either the presence or absence of a correlation between and the orbital period. Such correlation analysis was performed for high accretion rate systems (15 nova-like systems and 10 old novae), but we were not able to find a well-defined correlation as found by Patterson. By measuring the equivalent width of the emission lines (C IV λ1550 and He II λ1640) we found a lack of systems with low and

  11. Viscosity parameter in dissipative accretion flows with mass outflow around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkoti, Shreeram; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-10-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic simulation of inviscid and viscous flows have shown that significant outflows could be produced from the CENtrifugal pressure-supported BOundary Layer or CENBOL of an advective disc. However, this barrier is weakened in presence of viscosity, more so, if there are explicit energy dissipations at the boundary layer itself. We study effects of viscosity and energy dissipation theoretically on the outflow rate and show that, as the viscosity or energy dissipation (or both) rises, the prospect of formation of outflows is greatly reduced, thereby verifying results obtained through observations and numerical simulations. Indeed, we find that in a dissipative viscous flow, shocks in presence of outflows can be produced only if the Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter α is less than 0.2. This is a direct consequence of modification of the Rankine-Hugoniot relation across the shock in a viscous flow, when the energy dissipation and mass-loss in the form of outflows from the post-shock region are included. If we ignore the effects of mass-loss altogether, the standing dissipative shocks in viscous flows may occur only if α < 0.27. These limits are tighter than the absolute limit of α = 0.3 valid for a situation when the shock itself neither dissipates energy nor any outflow is formed. We compute typical viscosity parameters required to understand spectral and temporal properties of several black hole candidates such as GX399-4, MAXI J1659-152 and MAXI J1836-194 and find that required α are indeed well within our prescribed limit.

  12. EFFECTS OF COMPTON COOLING ON OUTFLOW IN A TWO-COMPONENT ACCRETION FLOW AROUND A BLACK HOLE: RESULTS OF A COUPLED MONTE CARLO TOTAL VARIATION DIMINISHING SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Garain, Sudip K.; Ghosh, Himadri; Chakrabarti, Sandip K. E-mail: himadri@bose.res.in

    2012-10-20

    We investigate the effects of cooling of the Compton cloud on the outflow formation rate in an accretion disk around a black hole. We carry out a time-dependent numerical simulation where both the hydrodynamics and the radiative transfer processes are coupled together. We consider a two-component accretion flow in which the Keplerian disk is immersed into an accreting low-angular momentum flow (halo) around a black hole. The soft photons which originate from the Keplerian disk are inverse-Comptonized by the electrons in the halo and the region between the centrifugal pressure supported shocks and the horizon. We run several cases by changing the rate of the Keplerian disk and see the effects on the shock location and properties of the outflow and the spectrum. We show that as a result of Comptonization of the Compton cloud, the cloud becomes cooler with the increase in the Keplerian disk rate. As the resultant thermal pressure is reduced, the post-shock region collapses and the outflow rate is also reduced. Since the hard radiation is produced from the post-shock region, and the spectral slope increases with the reduction of the electron temperature, the cooling produces softer spectrum. We thus find a direct correlation between the spectral states and the outflow rates of an accreting black hole.

  13. Spherical accretion and AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nulsen, Paul

    2014-06-01

    For a supermassive black hole accreting from a hot, quasi-spherical atmosphere, it is almost inevitable that the fluid approximation fails inside some point within the Bondi radius, but well outside the black hole event horizon. Within the region where the particle mean free paths exceed the radius, the flow must be modeled in terms of the Fokker-Planck equation. In the absence of magnetic fields, it is analogous to the "loss cone" problem for consumption of stars by a black hole. The accretion rate is suppressed well below the Bondi accretion rate and a significant power must be conveyed outward for the flow to proceed. This situation is complicated significantly by the presence of a magnetic field, but I will argue that the main outcomes are similar. I will also argue that the power emerging from such a flow, although generally far too little to suppress cooling on large scales, is an important ingredient of the AGN feedback cycle on scales comparable to the Bondi radius.

  14. HOYLE-LYTTLETON ACCRETION IN THREE DIMENSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blondin, John M.; Raymer, Eric

    2012-06-10

    We investigate the stability of gravitational accretion of an ideal gas onto a compact object moving through a uniform medium at Mach 3. Previous three-dimensional simulations have shown that such accretion is not stable, and that strong rotational 'disk-like' flows are generated and accreted on short timescales. We re-address this problem using overset spherical grids that provide a factor of seven improvement in spatial resolution over previous simulations. With our higher spatial resolution we found these three-dimensional accretion flows remained remarkably axisymmetric. We examined two cases of accretion with different sized accretors. The larger accretor produced very steady flow, with the mass accretion rate varying by less than 0.02% over 30 flow times. The smaller accretor exhibited an axisymmetric breathing mode that modulated the mass accretion rate by a constant 20%. Nonetheless, the flow remained highly axisymmetric with only negligible accretion of angular momentum in both cases.

  15. N-BODY SIMULATION OF PLANETESIMAL FORMATION THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY AND COAGULATION. II. ACCRETION MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: kokubo@th.nao.ac.j

    2009-10-01

    The gravitational instability of a dust layer is one of the scenarios for planetesimal formation. If the density of a dust layer becomes sufficiently high as a result of the sedimentation of dust grains toward the midplane of a protoplanetary disk, the layer becomes gravitationally unstable and spontaneously fragments into planetesimals. Using a shearing box method, we performed local N-body simulations of gravitational instability of a dust layer and subsequent coagulation without gas and investigated the basic formation process of planetesimals. In this paper, we adopted the accretion model as a collision model. A gravitationally bound pair of particles is replaced by a single particle with the total mass of the pair. This accretion model enables us to perform long-term and large-scale calculations. We confirmed that the formation process of planetesimals is the same as that in the previous paper with the rubble pile models. The formation process is divided into three stages: the formation of nonaxisymmetric structures; the creation of planetesimal seeds; and their collisional growth. We investigated the dependence of the planetesimal mass on the simulation domain size. We found that the mean mass of planetesimals formed in simulations is proportional to L {sup 3/2} {sub y}, where L{sub y} is the size of the computational domain in the direction of rotation. However, the mean mass of planetesimals is independent of L{sub x} , where L{sub x} is the size of the computational domain in the radial direction if L{sub x} is sufficiently large. We presented the estimation formula of the planetesimal mass taking into account the simulation domain size.

  16. A Method for the Study of Accretion Disk Emission in Cataclysmic Variables. I. The Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puebla, Raúl E.; Diaz, Marcos P.; Hillier, D. John; Hubeny, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a spectrum synthesis method for modeling the ultraviolet (UV) emission from the accretion disk from cataclysmic variables (CVs). The disk is separated into concentric rings, with an internal structure from the Wade & Hubeny disk-atmosphere models. For each ring, a wind atmosphere is calculated in the comoving frame with a vertical velocity structure obtained from a solution of the Euler equation. Using simple assumptions, regarding rotation and the wind streamlines, these one-dimensional models are combined into a single 2.5-dimensional model for which we compute synthetic spectra. We find that the resulting line and continuum behavior as a function of the orbital inclination is consistent with the observations, and verify that the accretion rate affects the wind temperature, leading to corresponding trends in the intensity of UV lines. In general, we also find that the primary mass has a strong effect on the P Cygni absorption profiles, the synthetic emission line profiles are strongly sensitive to the wind temperature structure, and an increase in the mass-loss rate enhances the resonance line intensities. Synthetic spectra were compared with UV data for two high orbital inclination nova-like CVs—RW Tri and V347 Pup. We needed to include disk regions with arbitrary enhanced mass loss to reproduce reasonably well widths and line profiles. This fact and a lack of flux in some high ionization lines may be the signature of the presence of density-enhanced regions in the wind, or alternatively, may result from inadequacies in some of our simplifying assumptions.

  17. Flight Services and Aircraft Access: Active Flow Control Vertical Tail and Insect Accretion and Mitigation Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    This document serves as the final report for the Flight Services and Aircraft Access task order NNL14AA57T as part of NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project ITD12A+. It includes descriptions of flight test preparations and execution for the Active Flow Control (AFC) Vertical Tail and Insect Accretion and Mitigation (IAM) experiments conducted on the 757 ecoDemonstrator. For the AFC Vertical Tail, this is the culmination of efforts under two task orders. The task order was managed by Boeing Research & Technology and executed by an enterprise-wide Boeing team that included Boeing Research & Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Boeing Defense and Space and Boeing Test and Evaluation. Boeing BR&T in St. Louis was responsible for overall Boeing project management and coordination with NASA. The 757 flight test asset was provided and managed by the BCA ecoDemonstrator Program, in partnership with Stifel Aircraft Leasing and the TUI Group. With this report, all of the required deliverables related to management of this task order have been met and delivered to NASA as summarized in Table 1. In addition, this task order is part of a broader collaboration between NASA and Boeing.

  18. Michel accretion of a polytropic fluid with adiabatic index \\gamma \\gt 5/3: global flows versus homoclinic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaverra, Eliana; Mach, Patryk; Sarbach, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the properties of a polytropic fluid that is radially accreted into a Schwarzschild black hole. The case where the adiabatic index γ lies in the range of 1\\lt γ ≤slant 5/3 has been treated in previous work. In this article, we analyze the complementary range of 5/3\\lt γ ≤slant 2. To this purpose, the problem is cast into an appropriate Hamiltonian dynamical system, whose phase flow is analyzed. While, for 1\\lt γ ≤slant 5/3, the solutions are always characterized by the presence of a unique critical saddle point, we show that, when 5/3\\lt γ ≤slant 2, an additional critical point might appear, which is a center point. For the parametrization used in this paper, we prove that, whenever this additional critical point appears, there is a homoclinic orbit. Solutions corresponding to homoclinic orbits differ from standard transonic solutions with vanishing asymptotic velocities in two aspects: they are local (i.e., they cannot be continued to arbitrarily large radii); the dependence of the density or the value of the velocity on the radius is not monotonic.

  19. Turbomachinery Flows Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Last year, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used the average passage code APNASA to complete the largest three-dimensional simulation of a multistage axial flow compressor to date. Consisting of 29 blade rows, the configuration is typical of those found in aeroengines today. The simulation, which was executed on the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program IBM SP2 parallel computer located at the NASA Ames Research Center, took nearly 90 hr to complete. Since the completion of this activity, a fine-grain, parallel version of APNASA has been written by a team of researchers from General Electric, NASA Lewis, and NYMA. Timing studies performed on the SP2 have shown that, with eight processors assigned to each blade row, the simulation time is reduced by a factor of six. For this configuration, the simulation time would be 15 hr. The reduction in computing time indicates that an overnight turnaround of a multistage configuration simulation is feasible. In addition, average passage forms of two-equation turbulence models were formulated. These models are currently being incorporated into APNASA.

  20. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  1. Hot versus cold: The dichotomy in spherical accretion of cooling flows onto supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-10

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ∼100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z {sub ☉}, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R {sub e} ∼ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  2. Applying a Hydrodynamical Treatment of Stream Flow and Accretion Disk Formation in WASP-12/b Exoplanetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Ian; Lopez, Aaron; Macias, Phil

    2016-01-01

    WASP-12b is a hot Jupiter orbiting dangerously close to its parent star WASP-12 at a radius 1/44th the distance between the Earth and the Sun, or roughly 16 times closer than Mercury. WASP-12's gravitational influence at this incredibly close proximity generates tidal forces on WASP-12b that distort the planet into an egg-like shape. As a result, the planet's surface overflows its Roche lobe through L1, transferring mass to the host star at a rate of 270 million metric tonnes per second. This mass transferring stream forms an accretion disk that transits the parent star, which aids sensitive instruments, such as the Kepler spacecraft, whose role is to examine the periodic dimming of main sequence stars in order to detect ones with orbiting planets. The quasi-ballistic stream trajectory is approximated by that of a massless point particle released from analogous initial conditions in 2D. The particle dynamics are shown to deviate negligibly across a broad range of initial conditions, indicating applicability of our model to "WASP-like" systems in general. We then apply a comprehensive fluid treatment by way of hydrodynamical code FLASH in order to directly model the behavior of mass transfer in a non-inertial reference frame and subsequent disk formation. We hope to employ this model to generate virtual spectroscopic signatures and compare them against collected light curve data from the Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS).

  3. Accreting X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation describes the behavior of matter in environments with extreme magnetic and gravitational fields, explains the instability/stability of accretion disks in certain systems, and discusses how emergent radiation affects accretion flow. Magnetic field measurements are obtained by measuring the lowest cyclotron absorption line energy, observing the cutoff of accretion due to centrifugal inhibition and measuring the spin-up rate at high luminosity.

  4. Dynamics of core accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2013-02-01

    We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the `Piecewise Parabolic Method' with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either `locally isothermal' or `locally isentropic') and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as defined by locally isothermal or

  5. Dynamics of core accretion

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolutionmore » on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as

  6. Dynamics of core accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling

  7. AN ACCRETION MODEL FOR THE ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSAR 4U 0142+61

    SciTech Connect

    Truemper, J. E.; Dennerl, K.; Kylafis, N. D.; Zezas, A.; Ertan, Ue.

    2013-02-10

    We propose that the quiescent emission of anomalous X-ray pulsars/soft gamma-ray repeaters (AXPs/SGRs) is powered by accretion from a fallback disk, requiring magnetic dipole fields in the range 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} G, and that the luminous hard tails of their X-ray spectra are produced by bulk-motion Comptonization in the radiative shock near the bottom of the accretion column. This radiation escapes as a fan beam, which is partly absorbed by the polar cap photosphere, heating it up to relatively high temperatures. The scattered component and the thermal emission from the polar cap form a polar beam. We test our model on the well-studied AXP 4U 0142+61, whose energy-dependent pulse profiles show double peaks, which we ascribe to the fan and polar beams. The temperature of the photosphere (kT {approx} 0.4 keV) is explained by the heating effect. The scattered part forms a hard component in the polar beam. We suggest that the observed high temperatures of the polar caps of AXPs/SGRs, compared with other young neutron stars, are due to the heating by the fan beam. Using beaming functions for the fan beam and the polar beam and taking gravitational bending into account, we fit the energy-dependent pulse profiles and obtain the inclination angle and the angle between the spin axis and the magnetic dipole axis, as well as the height of the radiative shock above the stellar surface. We do not explain the high-luminosity bursts, which may be produced by the classical magnetar mechanism operating in super-strong multipole fields.

  8. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE BLACK HOLE LOW/HARD STATE INNER ACCRETION FLOW WITH NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Tomsick, J. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Bachetti, M.; Wilkins, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Hailey, C. J.; Stern, D. K; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-01-20

    We report on an observation of the Galactic black hole candidate GRS 1739–278 during its 2014 outburst, obtained with NuSTAR. The source was captured at the peak of a rising ''low/hard'' state, at a flux of ∼0.3 Crab. A broad, skewed iron line and disk reflection spectrum are revealed. Fits to the sensitive NuSTAR spectra with a number of relativistically blurred disk reflection models yield strong geometrical constraints on the disk and hard X-ray ''corona''. Two models that explicitly assume a ''lamp post'' corona find its base to have a vertical height above the black hole of h=5{sub −2}{sup +7} GM/c{sup 2} and h = 18 ± 4 GM/c {sup 2} (90% confidence errors); models that do not assume a ''lamp post'' return emissivity profiles that are broadly consistent with coronae of this size. Given that X-ray microlensing studies of quasars and reverberation lags in Seyferts find similarly compact coronae, observations may now signal that compact coronae are fundamental across the black hole mass scale. All of the models fit to GRS 1739–278 find that the accretion disk extends very close to the black hole—the least stringent constraint is r{sub in}=5{sub −4}{sup +3} GM/c{sup 2}. Only two of the models deliver meaningful spin constraints, but a = 0.8 ± 0.2 is consistent with all of the fits. Overall, the data provide especially compelling evidence of an association between compact hard X-ray coronae and the base of relativistic radio jets in black holes.

  9. SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE STUDY OF THE BLACK HOLE BINARY MAXI J1659–152: VARIABILITY FROM A TWO COMPONENT ACCRETION FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Kalamkar, M.; Klis, M. van der; Heil, L.; Homan, J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an energy dependent X-ray variability study of the 2010 outburst of the black hole X-ray binary MAXI J1659–152 with the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). The broadband noise components and the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) observed in the power spectra show a strong and varied energy dependence. Combining Swift XRT data with data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, we report, for the first time, an rms spectrum (fractional rms amplitude as a function of energy) of these components in the 0.5–30 keV energy range. We find that the strength of the low-frequency component (<0.1 Hz) decreases with energy, contrary to the higher frequency components (>0.1 Hz) whose strengths increase with energy. In the context of the propagating fluctuations model for X-ray variability, we suggest that the low-frequency component originates in the accretion disk (which dominates emission below ∼2 keV) and the higher frequency components are formed in the hot flow (which dominates emission above ∼2 keV). As the properties of the QPO suggest that it may have a different driving mechanism, we investigate the Lense–Thirring precession of the hot flow as a candidate model. We also report on the QPO coherence evolution for the first time in the energy band below 2 keV. While there are strong indications that the QPO is less coherent at energies below 2 keV than above 2 keV, the coherence increases with intensity similar to what is observed at energies above 2 keV in other black hole X-ray binaries.

  10. Sustaining Star Formation Rates in Spiral Galaxies Supernova-driven Turbulent Accretion Disk Models Applied to THINGS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Bernd; Leroy, Adam K.

    2011-01-01

    Gas disks of spiral galaxies can be described as clumpy accretion disks without a coupling of viscosity to the actual thermal state of the gas. The model description of a turbulent disk consisting of emerging and spreading clumps contains free parameters, which can be constrained by observations of molecular gas, atomic gas, and the star formation rate for individual galaxies. Radial profiles of 18 nearby spiral galaxies from THINGS, HERACLES, SINGS, and GALEX data are used to compare the observed star formation efficiency, molecular fraction, and velocity dispersion to the model. The observed radially decreasing velocity dispersion can be reproduced by the model. In the framework of this model, the decrease in the inner disk is due to the stellar mass distribution which dominates the gravitational potential. Introducing a radial break in the star formation efficiency into the model improves the fits significantly. This change in the star formation regime is realized by replacing the free-fall time in the prescription of the star formation rate with the molecule formation timescale. Depending on the star formation prescription, the break radius is located near the transition region between the molecular-gas-dominated and atomic-gas-dominated parts of the galactic disk or closer to the optical radius. It is found that only less massive galaxies (log M(M ⊙) <~ 10) can balance gas loss via star formation by radial gas accretion within the disk. These galaxies can thus access their gas reservoirs with large angular momentum. On the other hand, the star formation of massive galaxies is determined by the external gas mass accretion rate from a putative spherical halo of ionized gas or from satellite accretion. In the absence of this external accretion, star formation slowly exhausts the gas within the optical disk within the star formation timescale.

  11. Optical spectroscopy of EX Lupi during quiescence and outburst. Infall, wind, and dynamics in the accretion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Kóspál, Á.; Setiawan, J.; Ábrahám, P.; Dullemond, C.; Eiroa, C.; Goto, M.; Henning, Th.; Juhász, A.

    2012-08-01

    Context. EX Lupi is the prototype of EXor variables. After 50 years of mild variability and smaller outbursts, the object again experienced a large outburst in 2008. Aims: We explore the accretion mechanisms in EX Lupi during its pre-outburst, outburst, and post-outburst phases. Methods: We analyze 10 high-resolution optical spectra of EX Lupi, taken before, during, and after the 2008 outburst. In both quiescence and outburst, the star presents many permitted emission lines. These include lines typical of accreting T Tauri stars, plus a large number of neutral and ionized metallic lines (mostly Fe I and Fe II). During the outburst, the number of emission lines increases to about a thousand, and their structure shows a narrow and a broad component (NC and BC). We study the structure of the BC, which is highly variable on short timescales (24-72 h). Results: An active chromosphere can explain the metallic lines in quiescence and the outburst NC. The dynamics of the BC line profiles suggest that these profiles originate in a hot, dense, non-axisymmetric, and non-uniform accretion column that suffers velocity variations along the line-of-sight on timescales of days. Assuming Keplerian rotation, the emitting region would be located at ~0.1-0.2 AU, which is consistent with the location of the inner disk rim, but the velocity profiles of the lines reveal a combination of rotation and infall. Line ratios of ions and neutrals can be reproduced assuming a temperature of T ~ 6500 K for electron densities of a few times 1012 cm-3 in the line-emitting region. The line profiles also indicate that there is an accretion-related inner disk wind. Conclusions: The data confirm that the 2008 outburst was an episode of increased accretion, albeit much stronger than previous EX Lupi and typical EXors outbursts. The line profiles are consistent with the infall/rotation of a non-axisymmetric structure that could be produced by clumpy accretion during the outburst phase. A strong inner

  12. GRMHD simulations of black hole accretion and jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    As black holes accrete surrounding gas, they often produce relativistic, collimated outflows, or jets. Jets are expected to form in the vicinity of a black hole, making them powerful probes of strong-field gravity. However, how the properties of a jet connect to those of the accretion flow and the black hole (e.g. black hole spin) remains an area of active research. I will discuss recent progress in first-principles general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) models of black hole accretion-jet systems, specifically the emerging picture of how jets form and the factors that determine jet properties. The speaker is supported by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  13. Testing the Propagating Fluctuations Model with a Long, Global Accretion Disk Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-07-01

    The broadband variability of many accreting systems displays characteristic structures; log-normal flux distributions, root-mean square (rms)-flux relations, and long inter-band lags. These characteristics are usually interpreted as inward propagating fluctuations of the mass accretion rate in an accretion disk driven by stochasticity of the angular momentum transport mechanism. We present the first analysis of propagating fluctuations in a long-duration, high-resolution, global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of a geometrically thin (h/r ≈ 0.1) accretion disk around a black hole. While the dynamical-timescale turbulent fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses are too rapid to drive radially coherent fluctuations in the accretion rate, we find that the low-frequency quasi-periodic dynamo action introduces low-frequency fluctuations in the Maxwell stresses, which then drive the propagating fluctuations. Examining both the mass accretion rate and emission proxies, we recover log-normality, linear rms-flux relations, and radial coherence that would produce inter-band lags. Hence, we successfully relate and connect the phenomenology of propagating fluctuations to modern MHD accretion disk theory.

  14. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  15. Turbulence modeling for separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Two projects are described in this report. The first involves assessing turbulence models in separated flow. The second addresses the anomalous behavior of certain turbulence models in stagnation point flow. The primary motivation for developing turbulent transport models is to provide tools for computing non-equilibrium, or complex, turbulent flows. Simple flows can be analyzed using data correlations or algebraic eddy viscosities, but in more complicated flows such as a massively separated boundary layer, a more elaborate level of modeling is required. It is widely believed that at least a two-equation transport model is required in such cases. The transport equations determine the evolution of suitable velocity and time-scales of the turbulence. The present study included assessment of second-moment closures in several separated flows, including sharp edge separation; smooth wall, pressure driven separation; and unsteady vortex shedding. Flows with mean swirl are of interest for their role in enhancing mixing both by turbulent and mean motion. The swirl can have a stabilizing effect on the turbulence. An axi-symmetric extension to the INS-2D computer program was written adding the capability of computing swirling flow. High swirl can produce vortex breakdown on the centerline of the jet and it occurs in various combustors.

  16. Accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Andrei V.

    2004-09-15

    The intent of this paper is to point out that the accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes could be extremely efficient. We analyze steady-state spherically symmetric flows of the ghost fluid in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole and calculate the accretion rate. Unlike minimally coupled scalar field or quintessence, the accretion rate is set not by the cosmological energy density of the field, but by the energy scale of the ghost condensate theory. If hydrodynamical flow is established, it could be as high as a tenth of a solar mass per second for 10 MeV scale ghost condensate accreting onto a stellar-sized black hole, which puts serious constraints on the parameters of the ghost condensate model.

  17. Accretion disks around black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramowicz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The physics of accretion flow very close to a black hole is dominated by several general relativistic effects. It cannot be described by the standard Shakura Sunyaev model or by its relativistic version developed by Novikov and Thome. The most important of these effects is a dynamical mass loss from the inner edge of the disk (Roche lobe overflow). The relativistic Roche lobe overflow induces a strong advective cooling, which is sufficient to stabilize local, axially symmetric thermal and viscous modes. It also stabilizes the non-axially-symmetric global modes discovered by Papaloizou and Pringle. The Roche lobe overflow, however, destabilizes sufficiently self-gravitating accretion disks with respect to a catastrophic runaway of mass due to minute changes of the gravitational field induced by the changes in the mass and angular momentum of the central black hole. One of the two acoustic modes may become trapped near the inner edge of the disk. All these effects, absent in the standard model, have dramatic implications for time-dependent behavior of the accretion disks around black holes.

  18. Application of Pressure-Sensitive Paint to Ice-Accreted Wind Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has been successfully used to measure global surface pressures on an ice-accreted model in an icing wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. Until now, the PSP technique has been limited to use in normal wind tunnels and clear flight environments. This is the first known application of PSP directly to ice in subfreezing conditions. Several major objectives were achieved in these tests. The procedure for applying the coating in the subfreezing tunnel environment was verified. Inspection of the painted ice surface revealed that the paint did not alter the original ice shape and adhered well over the entire coated area. Several procedures were used to show that the paint responded to changes in air pressure and that a repeatable pressure-dependent calibration could be achieved on the PSP-coated surfaces. Differences in pressure measurements made simultaneously on the ice and the metal test model are not yet fully understood, and techniques to minimize or correct them are being investigated.

  19. An ecogeomorphic model of tidal channel initiation and elaboration in progressive marsh accretional contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliard, J.-P.; Toffolon, M.; Carniello, L.; D'Alpaos, A.

    2015-06-01

    The formation and evolution of tidal networks have been described through various theories which mostly assume that tidal network development results from erosional processes, therefore emphasizing the chief role of external forcing triggering channel net erosion such as tidal currents. In contrast, in the present contribution we explore the influence of sediment supply in governing tidal channel initiation and further elaboration using an ecogeomorphic modeling framework. This deliberate choice of environmental conditions allows for the investigation of tidal network growth and development in different sedimentary contexts and provides evidences for the occurrence of both erosional and depositional channel-forming processes. Results show that these two mechanisms in reality coexist but act at different time scales: channel initiation stems from erosional processes, while channel elaboration mostly results from depositional processes. Furthermore, analyses suggest that tidal network ontogeny is accelerated as the marsh accretional activity increases, revealing the high magnitude and prevalence of the depositional processes in governing the morphodynamic evolution of the tidal network. On a second stage, we analyze the role of different initial topographic configurations in driving the development of tidal networks. Results point out an increase in network complexity over highly perturbed initial topographic surfaces, highlighting the legacy of initial conditions on channel morphological properties. Lastly, the consideration that landscape evolution depends significantly on the parameterization of the vegetation biomass distribution suggests that the claim to use uncalibrated models for vegetation dynamics is still questionable when studying real cases.

  20. Modeling of curvilinear suspension flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.; Boulay, Fabienne

    1996-11-01

    The curvilinear parallel-plate and cone-and-plate rheometric flows of monodisperse noncolloidal suspensions have been modeled. Although nonuniform in shear rate, dotγ, the parallel-plate flow has been shown experimentally(A. W. Chow, S. W. Sinton, J. H. Iwayima & T. S. Stephens 1994 Phys. Fluids) 6, 2561. not to exhibit particle migration, contrary to predictions of prior suspension-flow modeling. Predictions of nonuniform particle volume fraction, φ, by the suspension-balance model(P. R. Nott & J. F. Brady 1994 J. Fluid Mech.) 275, 157. for parallel-plate and cone-and-plate flow without normal stress differences are presented. The ``nonmigration'' in parallel-plate flow may be attributed to bulk suspension normal stress differences: assuming the bulk stress has the form Σ ~ η dotγ Q(φ) with η the fluid viscosity, nonmigration is predicted for parallel-plate flow provided that Q_33 = (1/2) Q_11 at the bulk φ of interest, with 1 the flow direction and 3 the vorticity direction. Extending the model to include normal stress differences satisfying this requirement, a range of migration behavior is predicted for the cone-and-plate flow depending upon the ratio Q_11/Q_22.

  1. Modeling the Deterioration of Engine and Low Pressure Compressor Performance During a Roll Back Event Due to Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip, C. E.; Jones, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this study is to apply a computational tool for the flow analysis of the engine that has been tested with ice crystal ingestion in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) of NASA Glenn Research Center. A data point was selected for analysis during which the engine experienced a full roll back event due to the ice accretion on the blades and flow path of the low pressure compressor. The computational tool consists of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) engine system thermodynamic cycle code, and an Euler-based compressor flow analysis code, that has an ice particle melt estimation code with the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor blade rows. Decreasing the performance characteristics of the low pressure compressor (LPC) within the NPSS cycle analysis resulted in matching the overall engine performance parameters measured during testing at data points in short time intervals through the progression of the roll back event. Detailed analysis of the fan-core and LPC with the compressor flow analysis code simulated the effects of ice accretion by increasing the aerodynamic blockage and pressure losses through the low pressure compressor until achieving a match with the NPSS cycle analysis results, at each scan. With the additional blockages and losses in the LPC, the compressor flow analysis code results were able to numerically reproduce the performance that was determined by the NPSS cycle analysis, which was in agreement with the PSL engine test data. The compressor flow analysis indicated that the blockage due to ice accretion in the LPC exit guide vane stators caused the exit guide vane (EGV) to be nearly choked, significantly reducing the air flow rate into the core. This caused the LPC to eventually be in stall due to increasing levels of diffusion in the rotors and high incidence angles in the inlet guide vane (IGV) and EGV stators. The flow analysis indicating

  2. Prospect of the Theory of Black Hole Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Q.; Wang, W.

    2011-12-01

    The theory of black hole accretion disks is one of the most important basic theories and advanced topics in astrophysics. There are four known models of black hole accretion disks: standard thin disk (SSD), Shapiro-Lightman-Eardley (SLE) disk, optically thick advection dominated accretion flows (ADAF) theory (slim disk) and optically thin ADAF theory. During the past decades, they have made great contributions to the development of astrophysics. Despite their great successes in both theory and application, there are still many open questions. First of all, this paper will briefly introduce these four models. Then it will discuss several limitations of these models and review present possible solutions to address these problems. Our review work will contribute to further research of black hole accretion disks to a certain extent.

  3. HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER FLOW DISTRIBUTOR MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M

    2006-09-28

    The hybrid sulfur process (HyS) hydrogen electrolyzer consists of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two porous graphite layers. An aqueous solution of sulfuric acid with dissolved SO{sub 2} gas flows parallel to the PEM through the porous graphite layer on the anode side of the electrolyzer. A flow distributor, consisting of a number of parallel channels acting as headers, promotes uniform flow of the anolyte fluid through the porous graphite layer. A numerical model of the hydraulic behavior of the flow distributor is herein described. This model was developed to be a tool to aid the design of flow distributors. The primary design objective is to minimize spatial variations in the flow through the porous graphite layer. The hydraulic data from electrolyzer tests consists of overall flowrate and pressure drop. Internal pressure and flow distributions are not measured, but these details are provided by the model. The model has been benchmarked against data from tests of the current electrolyzer. The model reasonably predicts the viscosity effect of changing the fluid from water to an aqueous solution of 30 % sulfuric acid. The permeability of the graphite layer was the independent variable used to fit the model to the test data, and the required permeability for a good fit is within the range literature values for carbon paper. The model predicts that reducing the number of parallel channels by 50 % will substantially improve the uniformity of the flow in the porous graphite layer, while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop across the electrolyzer. When the size of the electrolyzer is doubled from 2.75 inches square to 5.5 inches square, the same number of channels as in the current design will be adequate, but it is advisable to increase the channel cross-sectional flow area. This is due to the increased length of the channels.

  4. Groundwater flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Mercer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Deterministic, distributed-parameter, numerical simulation models for analyzing groundwater flow and transport problems have come to be used almost routinely during the past decade. A review of the theoretical basis and practical use of groundwater flow and solute transport models is used to illustrate the state-of-the-art. Because of errors and uncertainty in defining model parameters, models must be calibrated to obtain a best estimate of the parameters. For flow modeling, data generally are sufficient to allow calibration. For solute-transport modeling, lack of data not only limits calibration, but also causes uncertainty in process description. Where data are available, model reliability should be assessed on the basis of sensitivity tests and measures of goodness-of-fit. Some of these concepts are demonstrated by using two case histories. ?? 1988.

  5. Massive star formation by accretion. I. Disc accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haemmerlé, L.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Charbonnel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Massive stars likely form by accretion and the evolutionary track of an accreting forming star corresponds to what is called the birthline in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. The shape of this birthline is quite sensitive to the evolution of the entropy in the accreting star. Aims: We first study the reasons why some birthlines published in past years present different behaviours for a given accretion rate. We then revisit the question of the accretion rate, which allows us to understand the distribution of the observed pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) stars in the HR diagram. Finally, we identify the conditions needed to obtain a large inflation of the star along its pre-MS evolution that may push the birthline towards the Hayashi line in the upper part of the HR diagram. Methods: We present new pre-MS models including accretion at various rates and for different initial structures of the accreting core. We compare them with previously published equivalent models. From the observed upper envelope of pre-MS stars in the HR diagram, we deduce the accretion law that best matches the accretion history of most of the intermediate-mass stars. Results: In the numerical computation of the time derivative of the entropy, some treatment leads to an artificial loss of entropy and thus reduces the inflation that the accreting star undergoes along the birthline. In the case of cold disc accretion, the existence of a significant swelling during the accretion phase, which leads to radii ≳ 100 R⊙ and brings the star back to the red part of the HR diagram, depends sensitively on the initial conditions. For an accretion rate of 10-3M⊙ yr-1, only models starting from a core with a significant radiative region evolve back to the red part of the HR diagram. We also obtain that, in order to reproduce the observed upper envelope of pre-MS stars in the HR diagram with an accretion law deduced from the observed mass outflows in ultra-compact HII regions, the fraction of the

  6. X-Ray Reflection from Inhomogeneous Accretion Disks. I. Toy Models and Photon Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Turner, N. J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2004-03-01

    Numerical simulations of the interiors of radiation-dominated accretion disks show that significant density inhomogeneities can be generated in the gas. Here, we present the first results of our study on X-ray reflection spectra from such heterogeneous density structures. We consider two cases: first, we produce a number of toy models in which a sharp increase or decrease in density, of variable width, is placed at different depths in a uniform slab. Comparing the resulting reflection spectra to those from an unaltered slab shows that the inhomogeneity can affect the emission features, in particular the Fe Kα and O VIII Lyα lines. The magnitude of any differences depends on both the parameters of the density change and the ionizing power of the illuminating radiation, but the inhomogeneity is required to be within ~2 Thomson depths of the surface to cause an effect. However, only relatively small variations in density (by factors of a few) are necessary for significant changes in the reflection features to be possible. Our second test was to compute reflection spectra from the density structure predicted by a simulation of the nonlinear outcome of the photon-bubble instability. The resulting spectra also exhibited differences from the constant-density models, caused primarily by a strong 6.7 keV iron line. Nevertheless, constant-density models can provide a good fit to simulated spectra, albeit with a low reflection fraction, between 2 and 10 keV. Below 2 keV, differences in the predicted soft X-ray line emission result in very poor fits with a constant-density ionized-disk model. The results indicate that density inhomogeneities may further complicate the relationship between the Fe Kα equivalent width and the X-ray continuum. Further calculations are needed to verify that density variations of sufficient magnitude will occur within a few Thomson depths of the disk photosphere.

  7. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary layer flows, shock wave boundary layer interactions and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  8. Evidence of Two Component Accretion Flows as revealed by time lag properties: Results of Long-Term RXTE/ASM Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Long-term RXTE/ASM X-ray data of several Galactic black hole candidates (BHCs) are analyzed. The results of this analysis show the existence of two component accretion flow (TCAF) in both low-mass and high-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs & HMXBs). Large disks with long viscous timescales in the accreting matter with high angular momentum are prevalent in LMXBs due to processes like Roche lobe overflow, while small disks with little viscous delays are observed in HMXBs, primarily because of wind accretion. Two parameters are defined as photon indices, independent of the choice of a BHC, in order to find correlation between the two components, namely, the Keplerian disk component and the sub-Keplerian component, thereby estimating the time lag between two aforesaid timescales. Fluxes of hard and soft photons are observed to be anti-correlated with respect to these photon indices. The time lags give us an idea of the viscosity in the Keplerian component.

  9. Modeling jets in cross flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    Various approaches to the modeling of jets in cross flow are reviewed. These are grouped into four classes, namely: empirical models, integral models, perturbation models, and numerical models. Empirical models depend largely on the correlation of experimental data and are mostly useful for first-order estimates of global properties such as jet trajectory and velocity and temperature decay rates. Integral models are based on some ordinary-differential form of the conservation laws, but require substantial empirical calibration. They allow more details of the flow field to be obtained; simpler versions have to assume similarity of velocity and temperature profiles, but more sophisticated ones can actually calculate these profiles. Perturbation models require little empirical input, but the need for small parameters to ensure convergent expansions limits their application to either the near-field or the far-field. Therefore, they are mostly useful for the study of flow physics. Numerical models are based on conservation laws in partial-differential form. They require little empirical input and have the widest range of applicability. They also require the most computational resources. Although many qualitative and quantitative features of jets in cross flow have been predicted with numerical models, many issues affecting accuracy such as grid resolution and turbulence model are not completely resolved.

  10. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE ACCRETION SHOCKS IN CLASSICAL T TAURI STARS: THE ROLE OF LOCAL ABSORPTION IN THE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bonito, R.; Argiroffi, C.; Peres, G.; Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Ibgui, L.; Matsakos, T.; Stehle, C.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the properties of X-ray emission from accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), generated where the infalling material impacts the stellar surface. Both observations and models of the accretion process reveal several aspects that are still unclear: the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is below the predicted value, and the density versus temperature structure of the shocked plasma, with increasing densities at higher temperature, deduced from the observations, is at odds with that proposed in the current picture of accretion shocks. To address these open issues, we investigate whether a correct treatment of the local absorption by the surrounding medium is crucial to explain the observations. To this end, we describe the impact of an accretion stream on a CTTS by considering a magnetohydrodynamic model. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission from the accretion shock by producing maps and spectra. We perform density and temperature diagnostics on the synthetic spectra, and we directly compare the results with observations. Our model shows that the X-ray fluxes inferred from the emerging spectra are lower than expected because of the complex local absorption by the optically thick material of the chromosphere and of the unperturbed stream. Moreover, our model, including the effects of local absorption, explains in a natural way the apparently puzzling pattern of density versus temperature observed in the X-ray emission from accretion shocks.

  11. An accretion disc-irradiation hybrid model for the optical/UV variability in radio-quiet quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Li, Shuang-Liang; Gu, Minfeng; Guo, Hengxiao

    2016-10-01

    The optical/ultraviolet (UV) variability of quasars has been discovered to be correlated with other quasar properties, such as luminosity, black hole mass and rest-frame wavelength. However, the origin of variability has been a puzzle so far. In this work, we upgrade the accretion disc model, which assumed the variability is caused by the change of global mass accretion rate, by constraining the disc size to match the viscous time-scale of accretion disc to the variability time-scale observed and by including the irradiation/X-ray reprocessing to make the emitted spectrum become steeper. We find this hybrid model can reproduce the observed bluer-when-brighter trend quite well, which is used to validate the theoretical model by several works recently. The traditional correlation between the variability amplitude and rest-frame wavelength can also be well fitted by our model. In addition, a weak positive correlation between variability amplitude and black hole mass is present, qualitatively consistent with recent observations.

  12. Subhalo Accretion through Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Roberto E.; Padilla, Nelson D.

    2016-09-01

    We track subhalo orbits of galaxy- and group-sized halos in cosmological simulations. We identify filamentary structures around halos and use these to define a sample of subhalos accreted from filaments, as well as a control sample of subhalos accreted from other directions. We use these samples to study differences in satellite orbits produced by filamentary accretion. Our results depend on host halo mass. We find that for low masses, subhalos accreted from filaments show ∼10% shorter lifetimes compared to the control sample, show a tendency toward more radial orbits, reach halo central regions earlier, and are more likely to merge with the host. For higher-mass halos this lifetime difference dissipates and even reverses for cluster-sized halos. This behavior appears to be connected to the fact that more massive hosts are connected to stronger filaments with higher velocity coherence and density, with slightly more radial subhalo orbits. Because subhalos tend to follow the coherent flow of the filament, it is possible that such thick filaments are enough to shield the subhalo from the effect of dynamical friction at least during their first infall. We also identify subhalo pairs/clumps that merge with one another after accretion. They survive as a clump for only a very short time, which is even shorter for higher subhalo masses, suggesting that the Magellanic Clouds and other Local group satellite associations may have entered the Milky Way virial radius very recently and probably are in their first infall.

  13. Bondi-Hoyle accretion in an isothermal magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Aaron T.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Cunningham, Andrew J.

    2014-03-01

    In regions of star formation, protostars and newborn stars will accrete mass from their natal clouds. These clouds are threaded by magnetic fields with a strength characterized by the plasma β—the ratio of thermal and magnetic pressures. Observations show that molecular clouds have β ≲ 1, so magnetic fields have the potential to play a significant role in the accretion process. We have carried out a numerical study of the effect of large-scale magnetic fields on the rate of accretion onto a uniformly moving point particle from a uniform, non-self-gravitating, isothermal gas. We consider gas moving with sonic Mach numbers of up to M≈45; magnetic fields that are either parallel, perpendicular, or oriented 45° to the flow; and β as low as 0.01. Our simulations utilize adaptive mesh refinement in order to obtain high spatial resolution where it is needed; this also allows the boundaries to be far from the accreting object to avoid unphysical effects arising from boundary conditions. Additionally, we show that our results are independent of our exact prescription for accreting mass in the sink particle. We give simple expressions for the steady-state accretion rate as a function of β and M for the parallel and perpendicular orientations. Using typical molecular cloud values of M∼5 and β ∼ 0.04 from the literature, our fits suggest that a 0.4 M {sub ☉} star accretes ∼4 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, almost a factor of two less than accretion rates predicted by hydrodynamic models. This disparity can grow to orders of magnitude for stronger fields and lower Mach numbers. We also discuss the applicability of these accretion rates versus accretion rates expected from gravitational collapse, and under what conditions a steady state is possible. The reduction in the accretion rate in a magnetized medium leads to an increase in the time required to form stars in competitive accretion models, making such models less efficient than predicted by

  14. PHYSICAL MODELING OF CONTRACTED FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments on steady flow over uniform grass roughness through centered single-opening contractions were conducted in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility at the U. S. Geological Survey's Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. The experimental series was designed to provide data for calibrating and verifying two-dimensional, vertically averaged surface-water flow models used to simulate flow through openings in highway embankments across inundated flood plains. Water-surface elevations, point velocities, and vertical velocity profiles were obtained at selected locations for design discharges ranging from 50 to 210 cfs. Examples of observed water-surface elevations and velocity magnitudes at basin cross-sections are presented.

  15. Preserving Flow Variability in Watershed Model Calibrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Although watershed modeling flow calibration techniques often emphasize a specific flow mode, ecological conditions that depend on flow-ecology relationships often emphasize a range of flow conditions. We used informal likelihood methods to investig...

  16. Chaotic cold accretion on to black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Ruszkowski, M.; Oh, S. Peng

    2013-07-01

    Bondi theory is often assumed to adequately describe the mode of accretion in astrophysical environments. However, the Bondi flow must be adiabatic, spherically symmetric, steady, unperturbed, with constant boundary conditions. Using 3D adaptive mesh refinement simulations, linking the 50 kpc to the sub-parsec (sub-pc) scales over the course of 40 Myr, we systematically relax the classic assumptions in a typical galaxy hosting a supermassive black hole. In the more realistic scenario, where the hot gas is cooling, while heated and stirred on large scales, the accretion rate is boosted up to two orders of magnitude compared with the Bondi prediction. The cause is the non-linear growth of thermal instabilities, leading to the condensation of cold clouds and filaments when tcool/tff ≲ 10. The clouds decouple from the hot gas, `raining' on to the centre. Subsonic turbulence of just over 100 km s-1 (M > 0.2) induces the formation of thermal instabilities, even in the absence of heating, while in the transonic regime turbulent dissipation inhibits their growth (tturb/tcool ≲ 1). When heating restores global thermodynamic balance, the formation of the multiphase medium is violent, and the mode of accretion is fully cold and chaotic. The recurrent collisions and tidal forces between clouds, filaments and the central clumpy torus promote angular momentum cancellation, hence boosting accretion. On sub-pc scales the clouds are channelled to the very centre via a funnel. In this study, we do not inject a fixed initial angular momentum, though vorticity is later seeded by turbulence. A good approximation to the accretion rate is the cooling rate, which can be used as subgrid model, physically reproducing the boost factor of 100 required by cosmological simulations, while accounting for the frequent fluctuations. Since our modelling is fairly general (turbulence/heating due to AGN feedback, galaxy motions, mergers, stellar evolution), chaotic cold accretion may be common in

  17. Numerical modeling of the subduction initiation after accretion of oceanic island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakin, A.

    2012-04-01

    Accretion of the large terrains leads to the temporal blockage of subduction and accumulation of the oceanic slab material. New subduction front started in the thickened contact zone. This process is modeled numerically in 2D. We apply constant velocity condition at the inlet vertical boundary. Another vertical boundary is treated as a free slide one, Winkler boundary condition is applied to the lower boundary. Sticky air used to represent stress free upper boundary. Scenario of the new front initiation depends on the assumed rheology of oceanic slab and docked island. At the application of the purely viscous rheology of all components of the system: island viscosity 1023 Pas, upper mantle viscosity 3·1019 Pas and slab viscosity in the range 6·1020-6·1022 Pas, we find a variety of dynamic styles. At low slab viscosity in the time scale of several millions years plate is thickened and experienced RTI instability. New subduction front is started after plate break up near the island edge. At the more realistic η=6·1022 Pas oceanic slab is folded before plunging into the mantle. In the intermediate range thickening of the oceanic slab takes place with low angle subduction followed by accelerated submergence of the widen slab tip. Too large time of the transient process and too large scale of oceanic slab accumulation contradict to the observations. Visco-plastic rheology of the crustal rocks brings model closer to the real world. At the early stage of deformation conjugate "viscous faults" form in the oceanic slab in respond to the shortening. Later on sliding along these faults doubles oceanic plate thickness at the contact with docked island. Permanent fault (with dip away from island) was created to accommodate bending of oceanic plate. Thickened plate tip starts to descend with low angle of ca 35o. The most important observation is breakage of island edge that is carried downward with subducted oceanic plate. We compare our results with data on the current

  18. The physical properties of z > 2 Lyman limit systems: new constraints for feedback and accretion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2016-02-01

    We study the physical properties of a homogeneous sample of 157 optically thick absorption line systems at redshifts ˜1.8-4.4, selected from a high-dispersion spectroscopic survey of Lyman limit systems (LLSs). By means of multiple ionization models and Bayesian techniques, we derive the posterior probability distribution functions for the density, metallicity, temperature and dust content of the absorbing gas. We find that z > 2 LLSs are highly ionized with ionization parameters between -3 ≲ log U ≲ -2, depending on the H I column density. LLSs are characterized by low temperatures (T < 5 × 104K) and reside in dust-poor environments. Between z ˜ 2.5-3.5, ˜80 per cent of the LLSs have physical densities between nH ˜ 10- 3.5-10- 2 cm- 3 for the assumed UV background, but we caution that a degeneracy between the ionization parameter and the intensity of the radiation field prevents robust inference on the density and sizes of LLSs. Conversely, metallicity estimates are less sensitive to the assumptions behind ionization corrections. LLSs at z > 2 are characterized by a broad unimodal distribution over > 4 orders of magnitude, with a peak at log Z/Z⊙ ˜ -2. LLSs are metal poor, significantly less enriched than DLAs, with ˜70 per cent of the metallicity PDF below log Z/Z⊙ ≤ -1.5. The median metallicity of super LLSs with log N_{H I}≥ 19 rapidly evolves with redshift, with a 10-fold increase between z ˜ 2.1-3.6 (˜1.5 Gyr). Based on this sample, we find that LLSs at z = 2.5-3.5 account for ˜15 per cent of all the metals produced by UV-selected galaxies. The implications for theories of cold gas accretion and metal ejection from galaxies are also discussed.

  19. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Christian D

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests. PMID:18384599

  20. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langevin, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests.

  1. Self-Consistent Thermal Accretion Disk Corona Models for Compact Objects. II; Application to Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Wilms, Joern; Maisack, Michael; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1997-01-01

    We apply our self-consistent accretion disk corona (ADC) model, with two different geometries, to the broadband X-ray spectrum of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1. As shown in a companion paper, models in which the Comptonizing medium is a slab surrounding the cold accretion disk cannot have a temperature higher than about 140 keV for optical depths greater than 0.2, resulting in spectra that are much softer than the observed 10-30 keV spectrum of Cyg X-1. In addition, the slab-geometry models predict a substantial "soft excess" at low energies, a feature not observed for Cyg X-1, and Fe K-alpha fluorescence lines that are stronger than observed. Previous Comptonization models in the literature have invoked a slab geometry with optical depth tau(sub T) approx. greater than 0.3 and coronal temperature T(sub c) approx. 150 keV, but they are not self-consistent. Therefore, ADC models with a slab geometry are not appropriate for explaining the X-ray spectrum of Cyg X-1. Models with a spherical corona and an exterior disk, however, predict much higher self-consistent coronal temperatures than the slab-geometry models. The higher coronal temperatures are due to the lower amount of reprocessing of coronal radiation in the accretion disk, giving rise to a lower Compton cooling rate. Therefore, for the sphere-plus-disk geometry, the predicted spectrum can be hard enough to describe the observed X-ray continuum of Cyg X-1 while predicting Fe fluorescence lines having an equivalent width of approx. 40 eV. Our best-fit parameter values for the sphere-plus-disk geometry are tau(sub T) approx. equal to 1.5 and T(sub c) approx. equal to 90 keV.

  2. Models of the hard X-ray spectrum of AM Herculis and implications for the accretion rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J. H.; Fabian, A. C.; Ross, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Phenomenological fits to the hard X-ray spectrum of AM Herculis left unexplained the high equivalent width (0.8 + or - 0.1 keV) of Fe K alpha emission. A purely thermal origin implies a much steeper spectrum than was observed. With Monte Carlo calculations, scattering and fluorescent line production in a cold or partially ionized accretion column of hard X-rays emitted at the base were investigated. The strength of the iron emission and the flat spectral continuum can be explained by the effects of fluorescence and absorption within the accretion column and the surface of the white dwarf on a thermal X-ray spectrum. Thomson optical depths across the column in the range 0.2 to 0.7 are acceptable. The accretion rate and gravitational power can be deduced from the optical depth across the column, if the column size is known, and, together with the observed hard X-ray and polarized light luminosities, imply a lower limit for the luminosity in the UV to soft X-ray range, for which the observations give model-dependent values. Estimates of the column size differ by a factor of 40. Small spot sizes and low luminosities would be consistent with the soft component being the expected reprocessed bremsstrahlung and cyclotron radiation, although the constraint of matching the spectrum confines one to solutions with fluxes exceeding 20% the Eddington limits.

  3. Modeling groundwater flow on MPPs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Smith, S.G.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1993-10-01

    The numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media is examined. To enable detailed modeling of large contaminated sites, preconditioned iterative methods and massively parallel computing power are combined in a simulator called PARFLOW. After describing this portable and modular code, some numerical results are given, including one that demonstrates the code`s scalability.

  4. Image-Based Flow Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillard, Seth; Mousel, John; Buchholz, James; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2009-11-01

    A preliminary method has been developed to model complex moving boundaries interacting with fluids in two dimensions using video files. Image segmentation techniques are employed to generate sharp object interfaces which are cast as level sets embedded in a Cartesian flow domain. In this way, boundary evolution is effected directly through imagery rather than by way of functional approximation. Videos of an American eel swimming in a water tunnel apparatus and a guinea pig duodenum undergoing peristaltic contractions in vitro serve as external and internal flow examples, which are evaluated for wake structure and mixing efficacy, respectively.

  5. Modelling the thermal history of Vesta: time scale of accretion and differentiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formisano, M.; Federico, C.; Turrini, D.; Capaccioni, F.

    2012-04-01

    Vesta is the only known intact primordial asteroid in the Solar System showing an internal differentiated structure, as inferred by its spectral connection with HED meteorites (Keil et al. 2002, Scott 2007, Coradini et al. 2011). Recent results (Schiller et al. 2011) indicate a faster cooling of the interior of Vesta than previously thought. If confirmed, this would imply that the thermal history of Vesta diverges from the generally accepted picture (Ghosh & Mc Sween 1998). Using the thermal evolution code (Formisano et al. 2011) we developed, we are simulating several thermal and structural evolution scenarios of Vesta, by varying the delay Δtd in the injection of 26Al in Vesta, which controls the strength of radiogenic sources. We consider a primordial Vesta as a sphere of radius 270 Km with the initial temperature fixed to 200 K. The initial composition is a homogeneous mixture of silicatic (77%) and metallic (23%) material. Our code solves contemporary the heat equation with the source term (i.e. the energy is supplied by the decay of 26Al, 60Fe ) and the equation for the mass transfer in a porous medium, by using a finite difference 1D method. When the melting temperature of Fe-FeS is reached, the percolation of the iron into the silicatic matrix takes place while, when the melting temperature of silicate is reached, the differentiation and subsequent core formation occur. Since our model does not take in account heat removal mechanisms other than the conduction and the irradiation at the surface, our results supply a reliable picture of the thermal history of Vesta up until the onset of the differentiation. When compared to the data provided by HED meteorites, our results suggest short accretion and differentiation times of Vesta respect to the condensation of CAIs. The scenarios characterized by Δtd > 2 Ma show temperatures not reaching the melting temperature of silicate and for this reason they are incompatible with the basaltic magmatism suggest by HEDs

  6. ACCRETION RATE AND THE PHYSICAL NATURE OF UNOBSCURED ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Christopher D.; Gabor, Jared M.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Kelly, Brandon C.; Civano, Francesca; Hao, Heng; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Merloni, Andrea; Salvato, Mara; Urry, C. Megan; Jahnke, Knud; Nagao, Tohru; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Liu, Charles; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Scoville, Nick Z.

    2011-05-20

    We show how accretion rate governs the physical properties of a sample of unobscured broad-line, narrow-line, and lineless active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We avoid the systematic errors plaguing previous studies of AGN accretion rates by using accurate intrinsic accretion luminosities (L{sub int}) from well-sampled multiwavelength spectral energy distributions from the Cosmic Evolution Survey, and accurate black hole masses derived from virial scaling relations (for broad-line AGNs) or host-AGN relations (for narrow-line and lineless AGNs). In general, broad emission lines are present only at the highest accretion rates (L{sub int}/L{sub Edd} > 10{sup -2}), and these rapidly accreting AGNs are observed as broad-line AGNs or possibly as obscured narrow-line AGNs. Narrow-line and lineless AGNs at lower specific accretion rates (L{sub int}/L{sub Edd} < 10{sup -2}) are unobscured and yet lack a broad-line region. The disappearance of the broad emission lines is caused by an expanding radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) at the inner radius of the accretion disk. The presence of the RIAF also drives L{sub int}/L{sub Edd} < 10{sup -2} narrow-line and lineless AGNs to have ratios of radio-to-optical/UV emission that are 10 times higher than L{sub int}/L{sub Edd} > 10{sup -2} broad-line AGNs, since the unbound nature of the RIAF means it is easier to form a radio outflow. The IR torus signature also tends to become weaker or disappear from L{sub int}/L{sub Edd} < 10{sup -2} AGNs, although there may be additional mid-IR synchrotron emission associated with the RIAF. Together, these results suggest that specific accretion rate is an important physical 'axis' of AGN unification, as described by a simple model.

  7. A pebbles accretion model with chemistry and implications for the solar system in the lights of Juno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad

    2016-10-01

    The chemical compositions of the solar system giant planets are a major source of informations on their origins. Since the measurements by the Galileo probe, multiple models have been put forward to try and explain the noble gases enrichment in Jupiter. The most discussed among these are its formation in the outer cold nebula and its formation in a partially photoevaporated disk. In this work I couple a pebbles accretion model to the disk's chemistry and photoevaporation in order to make predictions from both scenarios and compare them to the upcoming Juno measurements. The model include pebbles and gas accretion, type I and II migration, photoevaporation and chemical measurements from meteorites, comets and disks. Population synthesis simulations are used to explore the models free parameters (planets initial conditions), where then the results are narrowed down using the planets chemical, dynamical and core mass costraints. We end up with a population that fits all of the constrains. These are then used to predict the oxygen abundance and core mass in Jupiter, to be compared to results of Juno. Same calculations are also done for Saturn and Neptune for comparison. I will present the results from these simulations as well as the predictions from all of the different models.Ali-Dib, M. (2016ab, submitted to MNRAS)

  8. ICEG2D (v2.0) - An Integrated Software Package for Automated Prediction of Flow Fields for Single-Element Airfoils With Ice Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson David S.; Soni, Bharat K.

    2001-01-01

    An integrated geometry/grid/simulation software package, ICEG2D, is being developed to automate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for single- and multi-element airfoils with ice accretions. The current version, ICEG213 (v2.0), was designed to automatically perform four primary functions: (1) generate a grid-ready surface definition based on the geometrical characteristics of the iced airfoil surface, (2) generate high-quality structured and generalized grids starting from a defined surface definition, (3) generate the input and restart files needed to run the structured grid CFD solver NPARC or the generalized grid CFD solver HYBFL2D, and (4) using the flow solutions, generate solution-adaptive grids. ICEG2D (v2.0) can be operated in either a batch mode using a script file or in an interactive mode by entering directives from a command line within a Unix shell. This report summarizes activities completed in the first two years of a three-year research and development program to address automation issues related to CFD simulations for airfoils with ice accretions. As well as describing the technology employed in the software, this document serves as a users manual providing installation and operating instructions. An evaluation of the software is also presented.

  9. Continuum modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, L.; Lagrée, P.-Y.

    2011-10-01

    The continuum modelling of transient granular flows is of primary importance in the context of predicting the behaviour of many natural systems involving granular matter. In this perspective, the granular column collapse experiment provides an interesting benchmark due to its challenging complexity (Lajeunesse et al 2004, Lube et al 2004), and form a trying test for candidate rheological models. In this contribution, we present 2D continuum simulations of granular column collapse using Navier-Stokes solver Gerris (Popinet 2003). The rheology implemented to model the granular media is the so-called μ(I)-rheology, relating the frictional properties and the viscosity of the material to the pressure and shear rate. In addition, discrete simulations using the Contact Dynamics method are performed for systematic comparison between the granular flow dynamics and its continuum counterpart (Staron & Hinch 2005). We find a good agreement, recovering the shape of the flow in the course of time as well as experimental scaling laws for the run-out. A systematic underestimation of the latter is nevertheless observed, and discussed in terms of physical and numerical modeling.

  10. The Accretion Disk Limit Cycle Model: Toward an Understanding of the Long-Term Behavior of SS Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannizzo, John K.

    1993-12-01

    We present detailed computations of the limit cycle model for dwarf nova outbursts with application to SS Cygni, the best studied dwarf nova. We examine how secular changes in the input parameters of the model affect the properties associated with the outbursts. For input parameters which reproduce the observed outburst recurrence times and outburst durations for SS Cyg, our time-dependent, accretion disk instability code generates light curves in which one or more short outbursts tend to be sandwiched between two long outbursts. We find that the relative frequency of long versus short outbursts can be influenced by changes in the accretion disk viscosity and mass transfer rate. By forming moving averages taken from the long-term AAVSO light curve of SS Cyg, we find a strong correlation between the recurrence time for outbursts tc and the ratio of the number of long outbursts N(L) to the number of short outbursts N(S) occurring in a given time interval. This can be accounted for in the model in several ways. Changes in the radius of the inner edge of the disk produce correlated changes in tc and N(L)/N(S), as do slow variations in either αcold or αhot -- the accretion disk viscosity parameters in quiescence and outburst. In this latter scenario, there must be a fundamental asymmetry between the two alphas in the sense that both quantities cannot be varying in step with each other i.e., one must remain fixed while the other varies. Finally, variations in the mass transfer rate MṡT cannot directly account for the observed long-term changes in the light curve of SS Cyg as was postulated by Hempelmann & Kurths and by Cannizzo & Mattei.

  11. Giant Planet Accretion in a Low-Turbulence Circumplanetary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Gennaro; Marzari, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    At least 5% of confirmed planets discovered by the Kepler Mission have a mass greater than Jupiter's. Gas giants more massive than Saturn account for at least 18% of all confirmed planets.The final stages of gas accretion of a giant planet occur in the presence of a circumplanetary disk (CPD). Recently, it was proposed that turbulence (and hence transport) in these disks is driven by MRI, possibly generating low-turbulence regions known as Dead Zones. It was thus suggested that gas accretion through a CPD and on the planet can be severely reduced by a Dead Zone. If CPDs create a bottleneck for the accretion of gas, then the growth of planets more massive than Jupiter may become problematic.We investigate how gas accretion on a Jupiter-mass planet is affected by a Dead Zone by means of global 3D hydrodynamics calculations. We model both the CPD and the protoplanetary disk. The accretion flow is resolved at a length scale smaller than Jupiter's radius, Rj, by using a nested-grid technique. We assume that the kinematic viscosity is constant and equal to nu=1e-5 Omega a^2, where a and Omega are respectively the planet's orbital radius and frequency. A Dead Zone around the planet is represented by a region of low viscosity (nu=1e-8 Omega a^2), extending out to ~60Rj and above and below the CPD mid-plane for a few local scale heights. We obtain an accretion rate of ~5e-5 Omega Sigma a^2, where Sigma is the unperturbed protoplanetary disk density. Calculations by D'Angelo et al. (2003) and Bate et al. (2003), which used nu=1e-5 Omega a^2 everywhere but applied a much coarser resolution and different accretion parameters, found an accretion rate of ~2e-4 Omega Sigma a^2. Accounting for variations of several tens of percent, arising from differences (between these and previous calculations) in numerical parameters and resolution, we argue that a CPD Dead Zone, as modeled here, does not significantly affect the gas accretion rate of a giant planet. This result is compatible

  12. ReefSAM - Reef Sedimentary Accretion Model: A new 3D coral reef evolution model/simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Samuel; Webster, Jody

    2013-04-01

    Coral reefs show characteristic morphological patterns (e.g. coral dominated margins with detrital carbonate dominated lagoons/back-reef) and temporal development (e.g. Hopley et al. 2007). While the processes which lead to predictable patterns on a range of scales have been discussed qualitatively, a full quantitative understanding of the range of processes and parameters involved requires modelling. Previous attempts to model complex Holocene reef systems (i.e. One Tree Reef, GBR - Barrett and Webster 2012) using a carbonate stratigraphic forward model (Carbonate3D - Warrlich et al. 2002) identified a number of important but unsimulated processes and potential model improvements. ReefSAM has been written from scratch in Matlab using these findings and experiences from using Carbonate3D. It simulates coralgal accretion and carbonate sand production and transport. Specific improvements include: 1. a more complex hydrodynamic model based on wave refraction and incorporating vertical (depth) and lateral (substrate dependent) variations in transport energy and erosion. 2. a complex reef growth model incorporating depth, wave energy/turbidity and substrate composition. 3. Paleo-water depth, paleo-wave energy and bio-zone (combination of paleo-water depth and wave energy) model outputs allowing coralgal habitat changes through time and space to be simulated and compared to observational data. The model is compared to the well studied One Tree Reef - tests similar to those undertaken in Barrett and Webster 2012 with Carbonate3D are presented. Model development coincides with plans for further intensive drilling at One Tree Reef (mid 2013) providing an opportunity to test the model predictively. The model is still in active development. References: Barrett, S.J., Webster, J.M.,2012. Holocene evolution of the Great Barrier Reef: Insights from 3D numerical modelling. Sedimentary Geology 265-266, 56-71. Warrlich, G.M.D., Waltham, D.A., Bosence D.W.J., 2002. Quantifying the

  13. Flows In Model Human Femoral Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, Lloyd H.; Kwack, Eug Y.; Crawford, Donald W.

    1990-01-01

    Flow is visualized with dye traces, and pressure measurements made. Report describes experimental study of flow in models of human femoral artery. Conducted to examine effect of slight curvature of artery on flow paths and distribution of pressure.

  14. Modeling shrouded stator cavity flows in axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Tolchinsky, I.; Okiishi, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computational analyses were completed to understand the nature of shrouded stator cavity flows. From this understanding, a one-dimensional model of the flow through shrouded stator cavities was developed. This model estimates the leakage mass flow, temperature rise, and angular momentum increase through the cavity, given geometry parameters and the flow conditions at the interface between the cavity and primary flow path. This cavity model consists of two components, one that estimates the flow characteristics through the labyrinth seals and the other that predicts the transfer of momentum due to windage. A description of the one-dimensional model is given. The incorporation and use of the one-dimensional model in a multistage compressor primary flow analysis tool is described. The combination of this model and the primary flow solver was used to reliably simulate the significant impact on performance of the increase of hub seal leakage in a twelve-stage axial-flow compressor. Observed higher temperatures of the hub region fluid, different stage matching, and lower overall efficiencies and core flow than expected could be correctly linked to increased hub seal clearance with this new technique. The importance of including these leakage flows in compressor simulations is shown.

  15. Flow dynamics and sedimentation of lateral accretion packages in sinuous deep-water channels: A 3D seismic case study from the northwestern South China Sea margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengli; Gong, Chenglin

    2016-07-01

    The current study uses 3D seismic data to document architectural styles and flow dynamics of lateral accretion packages (LAPs) associated with sinuous deep-water channels, contributing to a better understanding of flow processes and sedimentation associated with LAPs. The documented LAPs underwent three main stages of architectural evolution, including the early incision stages characterized by intense downcutting, active migration stages characterized by active migration and avulsion of the individual channels, and late abandonment stages characterized by the termination of sediment gravity-flows and LAP growth. These three stages of LAP growth repeated through time, yielding a fining-upward pattern from sandy channel-fill turbidites, into sand-mud couplets, all capped by muddy turbidites. A river-reversed helical flow circulation was created by an imbalance, through the flow depth, of inwardly directed pressure gradient forces near the bed and outwardly directed centrifugal forces near the surface. It consists of low-velocity cores near the outer banks and low-velocity cores along the inner banks. Such river-reversed helical flow pattern is evidenced by volumetrically extensive LAPs and toplap and downlap terminations along the gentle banks and by aerially restricted, seismically unresolvable levees and truncation terminations near the steep banks. This river-reversed helical flow circulation favors asymmetric intra-channel deposition characterized by inner bank deposition versus outer bank erosion, and which, in turn, forced individual channels to consistently migrate towards outer banks, resulting in significant asymmetric cross-channel profiles with aerially extensive LAPs along inner banks.

  16. Can the Subsonic Accretion Model Explain the Spin Period Distribution of Wind-fed X-Ray Pulsars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-06-01

    Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) generally accrete from the wind matter of their massive companion stars. Recently, Shakura et al. suggested a subsonic accretion model for low-luminosity (<4 × 1036 erg s-1), wind-fed X-ray pulsars. To test the feasibility of this model, we investigate the spin period distribution of wind-fed X-ray pulsars with a supergiant companion star, using a population synthesis method. We find that the modeled distribution of supergiant HMXBs in the spin period-orbital period diagram is consistent with observations, provided that the winds from the donor stars have relatively low terminal velocities (≲1000 km s-1). The measured wind velocities in several supergiant HMXBs seem to favor this viewpoint. The predicted number ratio of wind-fed X-ray pulsars with persistent X-ray luminosities that are higher and lower than 4 × 1036 erg s-1 is about 1:10.

  17. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  18. Continuous MHD Jet Launching from Resistive Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casse, Fabien L.; Keppens, Rony

    We present numerical MHD simulations of a magnetized accretion disk launching super-fastmagnetosonic jets. These axisymmetric simulations model a time-dependant resistive accretion disk threaded by an initial vertical magnetic field. The resistivity is only important inside the disk and is prescribed as an alpha-type law where the alpha coefficient αm is smaller than unity. We show that the launching of a collimated outflow occurs self-consistently and the ejection of matter is continuous and quasi-stationary. These are the first ever 2.5D simulations of resistive accretion disks launching non-transient ideal MHD jets. This outflow is safely characterized as a jet since the flow becomes super-fastmagnetosonic well-collimated and reaches a quasi-stationary state. We present a complete illustration and explanation of the `accretion-ejection' mechanism that leads to jet formation from a magnetized accretion disk. In particular the magnetic torque inside the disk brakes the matter azimuthally and allows for accretion while it is responsible for an effective magneto-centrifugal acceleration in the jet. As such the magnetic field channels the disk angular momentum and powers the jet acceleration and collimation. The jet originates from the inner disk region where equipartition between thermal and magnetic forces is achieved.

  19. Observational Tests of the Picture of Disk Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.

    2014-09-01

    In this chapter, I present a summary of observational tests of the basic picture of disk accretion. An emphasis is placed on tests relevant to black holes, but many of the fundamental results are drawn from studies of other classes of systems. Evidence is discussed for the basic structures of accretion flows. The cases of systems with and without accretion disks are discussed, as is the evidence that disks actually form. Also discussed are the hot spots where accretion streams impact the disks, and the boundary layers in the inner parts of systems where the accretors are not black holes. The nature of slow, large amplitude variability is discussed. It is shown that some of the key predictions of the classical thermal-viscous ionization instability model for producing outbursts are in excellent agreement with observational results. It is also show that there are systems whose outbursts are extremely difficult to explain without invoking variations in the rate of mass transfer from the donor star into the outer accretion disk, or tidally induced variations in the mass transfer rates. Finally, I briefly discuss recent quasar microlensing measurements which give truly independent constraints on the inner accretion geometry around black holes.

  20. Global scale groundwater flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin; de Graaf, Inge; van Beek, Ludovicus; Bierkens, Marc

    2013-04-01

    As the world's largest accessible source of freshwater, groundwater plays vital role in satisfying the basic needs of human society. It serves as a primary source of drinking water and supplies water for agricultural and industrial activities. During times of drought, groundwater sustains water flows in streams, rivers, lakes and wetlands, and thus supports ecosystem habitat and biodiversity, while its large natural storage provides a buffer against water shortages. Yet, the current generation of global scale hydrological models does not include a groundwater flow component that is a crucial part of the hydrological cycle and allows the simulation of groundwater head dynamics. In this study we present a steady-state MODFLOW (McDonald and Harbaugh, 1988) groundwater model on the global scale at 5 arc-minutes resolution. Aquifer schematization and properties of this groundwater model were developed from available global lithological model (e.g. Dürr et al., 2005; Gleeson et al., 2010; Hartmann and Moorsdorff, in press). We force the groundwtaer model with the output from the large-scale hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), specifically the long term net groundwater recharge and average surface water levels derived from routed channel discharge. We validated calculated groundwater heads and depths with available head observations, from different regions, including the North and South America and Western Europe. Our results show that it is feasible to build a relatively simple global scale groundwater model using existing information, and estimate water table depths within acceptable accuracy in many parts of the world.

  1. ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, S. H.; Martin, R. G.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a model for the long-term evolution of a circumplanetary disk that is fed mass from a circumstellar disk and contains regions of low turbulence (dead zones). We show that such disks can be subject to accretion-driven outbursts, analogous to outbursts previously modeled in the context of circumstellar disks to explain FU Ori phenomena. Circumplanetary disks around a proto-Jupiter can undergo outbursts for infall accretion rates onto the disks in the range M-dot{sub infall} approx. 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, typical of accretion rates in the T Tauri phase. During outbursts, the accretion rate and disk luminosity increases by several orders of magnitude. Most of the planet mass growth during planetary gas accretion may occur via disk outbursts involving gas that is considerably hotter than predicted by steady state models. For low infall accretion rates M-dot{sub infall} {approx}< 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} that occur in late stages of disk accretion, disk outbursts are unlikely to occur, even if dead zones are present. Such conditions are favorable for the formation of icy satellites.

  2. Formation of Continuous and Episodic Relativistic Outflows in Regions of Stability and Instability in Advection-Dominated Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Truong V.; Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Becker, Peter A.; Putney, Joy; Edge, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that particle acceleration in the vicinity of a shock in an advection-dominated accretion disk can extract enough energy to power a relativistic jet from a supermassive black hole at the center of a radio-loud active galaxy. However, to maintain a steady jet, a stable shock location is required. By employing the Chevalier & Imamura linearization method and the Nakayama instability boundary conditions, we have also shown that there is a region of the energy and angular momentum parameter space in which disk/shocks with outflows can be either stable or unstable. In a region of instability, the velocity profiles that exhibit pre-shock deceleration and pre-shock acceleration are always unstable to the zeroth mode with zero frequency of oscillation. However, in a region of stability, the zeroth mode, the fundamental, and the overtones are all stable for both pre-shock deceleration as well as pre-shock acceleration. Building on this new insight, in this paper, we explore new parameter values in the regions of stability and instability to explain the production of the observed continuous and episodic relativistic outflows (jets) in M87 and Sgr A*, respectively.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic Accretion Around Supermassive Black Holes : Short-Length Disc for Stronger Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Ritabrata

    2016-07-01

    Thin accretion flow, i.e., geometrically thin accretion disc was first studied by Shakura and Sunyaev. Relativistic fluid flows around a black hole produce enormous energy on the cost of permanent lost of the gravitational potential due to the fall into a infinitely sloped gravitational well or to be specific, into a space time singularity. This energy is actually observed in different wavelengths and we specify the source as Active Galactic Nuclei, quasars, Gamma-ray burst sources etc. Eventually, two popular kind of accretion disc models are there. The first one is advection dominated, known as geometrically thin optically thick accretion disc. The other is geometrically thick but optically thin as it does not capture photons inside! The jets formed by accretion phenomena are still not well explained. Size of the accretion disc, power of the jets can be powered by magnetic fields generated by the ionized particles of the accretion flow. We show the exact dependency of the disc size upon the magnetic field present along with the quantity of the central gravitating mass.

  4. GAS ACCRETION FROM A CIRCUMBINARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Yasuhiro; Ando, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    A new computational scheme is developed to study gas accretion from a circumbinary disk. The scheme decomposes the gas velocity into two components one of which denotes the Keplerian rotation and the other of which does the deviation from it. This scheme enables us to solve the centrifugal balance of a gas disk against gravity with better accuracy, since the former inertia force cancels the gravity. It is applied to circumbinary disk rotating around binary of which primary and secondary has mass ratio, 1.4:0.95. The gravity is reduced artificially softened only in small circular regions around the primary and secondary. The radii are 7% of the binary separation and much smaller than those in the previous grid based simulations. Seven models are constructed to study dependence on the gas temperature and the initial inner radius of the disk. The gas accretion shows both fast and slow time variations while the binary is assumed to have a circular orbit. The time variation is due to oscillation of spiral arms in the circumbinary disk. The masses of primary and secondary disks increase while oscillating appreciably. The mass accretion rate tends to be higher for the primary disk although the secondary disk has a higher accretion rate in certain periods. The accretion rates onto the two components are similar within the fluctuations in late times, i.e., after the binary rotates more than 20 times. The primary disk is perturbed intensely by the impact of gas flow so that the outer part is removed. The secondary disk is quiet in most of time on the contrary. Both the primary and secondary disks have traveling spiral waves which transfer angular momentum within them.

  5. Overview of recent advances in accretion disk theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsuga, Ken

    2012-07-01

    The accretion disk theory, which is initiated in 1970's, has made a success for understanding the powerful compact objects, XRBs, AGNs, and so on. Although one- dimensional accretion disk models (standard disk, slim disk, RIAF) were constructed based on the phenomenological α-viscosity prescription, multi-dimensional MHD/Radiation-MHD simulations are recently performed to resolve the disk structure and dynamics from the first principle. The time variations of the disk and the disk-jet connection are also investigated by the multi-dimensional study. We briefly summarize the disk models and introduce the recent advances of the numerical simulations of the black-hole accretion flows and outflows.

  6. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. II. Diagnostic Tools for X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis to the 2 - 10 keV energy region, and in particular to the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe Ka with the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is approx. 800 eV for models with log Epsilon approx. 1.5, and decreases monotonically as Epsilon increases. For lower values of Epsilon the Fe K(alpha) EW decreases to a minimum near log Epsilon approx. 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low ionized, reflection dominated cases, the 2 -10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power-law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S L(alpha) lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca x K(alpha) line. In some cases the S xv blends with the He-like Si RRC producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  7. Active Flow Control (AFC) and Insect Accretion and Mitigation (IAM) System Design and Integration on the Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael G.; Harris, F. Keith; Spoor, Marc A.; Boyland, Susannah R.; Farrell, Thomas E.; Raines, David M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a systems overview of how the Boeing and NASA team designed, analyzed, fabricated, and integrated the Active Flow Control (AFC) technology and Insect Accretion Mitigation (IAM) systems on the Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator. The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project partnered with Boeing to demonstrate these two technology systems on a specially outfitted Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator during the spring of 2015. The AFC system demonstrated attenuation of flow separation on a highly deflected rudder and increased the side force generated. This AFC system may enable a smaller vertical tail to provide the control authority needed in the event of an engine failure during takeoff while still operating in a conventional manner over the rest of the flight envelope. The AFC system consisted of ducting to obtain air from the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a control valve to modulate the system mass flow, a heat exchanger to lower the APU air temperature, and additional ducting to deliver the air to the AFC actuators located on the vertical tail. The IAM system demonstrated how to mitigate insect residue adhesion on a wing's leading edge. Something as small as insect residue on a leading edge can cause turbulent wedges that interrupt laminar flow, resulting in an increase in drag and fuel use. The IAM system consisted of NASA developed Engineered Surfaces (ES) which were thin aluminum sheet substrate panels with coatings applied to the exterior. These ES were installed on slats 8 and 9 on the right wing of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. They were designed to support panel removal and installation in one crew shift. Each slat accommodated 4 panels. Both the AFC and IAM flight test were the culmination of several years of development and produced valuable data for the advancement of modern aircraft designs.

  8. Chaotic cold accretion on to black holes in rotating atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Brighenti, F.; Temi, P.

    2015-07-01

    The fueling of black holes is one key problem in the evolution of baryons in the universe. Chaotic cold accretion (CCA) profoundly differs from classic accretion models, as Bondi and thin disc theories. Using 3D high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations, we now probe the impact of rotation on the hot and cold accretion flow in a typical massive galaxy. In the hot mode, with or without turbulence, the pressure-dominated flow forms a geometrically thick rotational barrier, suppressing the black hole accretion rate to ~1/3 of the spherical case value. When radiative cooling is dominant, the gas loses pressure support and quickly circularizes in a cold thin disk; the accretion rate is decoupled from the cooling rate, although it is higher than that of the hot mode. In the more common state of a turbulent and heated atmosphere, CCA drives the dynamics if the gas velocity dispersion exceeds the rotational velocity, i.e., turbulent Taylor number Tat< 1. Extended multiphase filaments condense out of the hot phase via thermal instability (TI) and rain toward the black hole, boosting the accretion rate up to 100 times the Bondi rate (Ṁ• ~ Ṁcool). Initially, turbulence broadens the angular momentum distribution of the hot gas, allowing the cold phase to condense with prograde or retrograde motion. Subsequent chaotic collisions between the cold filaments, clouds, and a clumpy variable torus promote the cancellation of angular momentum, leading to high accretion rates. As turbulence weakens (Tat > 1), the broadening of the distribution and the efficiency of collisions diminish, damping the accretion rate ∝ Tat-1, until the cold disk drives the dynamics. This is exacerbated by the increased difficulty to grow TI in a rotating halo. The simulated sub-Eddington accretion rates cover the range inferred from AGN cavity observations. CCA predicts inner flat X-ray temperature and r-1 density profiles, as recently discovered in M 87 and NGC 3115. The synthetic Hα images

  9. Cafeteria diet induce changes in blood flow that are more related with heat dissipation than energy accretion.

    PubMed

    Sabater, David; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Romero, María Del Mar; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià; Remesar, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background. A "cafeteria" diet is a self-selected high-fat diet, providing an excess of energy, which can induce obesity. Excess of lipids in the diet hampers glucose utilization eliciting insulin resistance, which, further limits amino acid oxidation for energy. Methods. Male Wistar rats were exposed for a month to "cafeteria" diet. Rats were cannulated and fluorescent microspheres were used to determine blood flow. Results. Exposure to the cafeteria diet did not change cardiac output, but there was a marked shift in organ irrigation. Skin blood flow decreased to compensate increases in lungs and heart. Blood flow through adipose tissue tended to increase in relation to controls, but was considerably increased in brown adipose tissue (on a weight basis). Discussion. The results suggest that the cafeteria diet-induced changes were related to heat transfer and disposal. PMID:27547590

  10. Cafeteria diet induce changes in blood flow that are more related with heat dissipation than energy accretion

    PubMed Central

    Sabater, David; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Romero, María del Mar; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Alemany, Marià

    2016-01-01

    Background. A “cafeteria” diet is a self-selected high-fat diet, providing an excess of energy, which can induce obesity. Excess of lipids in the diet hampers glucose utilization eliciting insulin resistance, which, further limits amino acid oxidation for energy. Methods. Male Wistar rats were exposed for a month to “cafeteria” diet. Rats were cannulated and fluorescent microspheres were used to determine blood flow. Results. Exposure to the cafeteria diet did not change cardiac output, but there was a marked shift in organ irrigation. Skin blood flow decreased to compensate increases in lungs and heart. Blood flow through adipose tissue tended to increase in relation to controls, but was considerably increased in brown adipose tissue (on a weight basis). Discussion. The results suggest that the cafeteria diet-induced changes were related to heat transfer and disposal. PMID:27547590

  11. Spherical Accretion in a Uniformly Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpi, Monica; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Wasserman, Ira

    1996-10-01

    We consider spherically symmetric accretion of material from an initially homogeneous, uniformly expanding medium onto a Newtonian point mass M. The gas is assumed to evolve adiabatically with a constant adiabatic index F, which we vary over the range Γ ɛ [1, 5/3]. We use a one-dimensional Lagrangian code to follow the spherical infall of material as a function of time. Outflowing shells gravitationally bound to the point mass fall back, giving rise to a inflow rate that, after a rapid rise, declines as a power law in time. If there were no outflow initially, Bondi accretion would result, with a characteristic accretion time-scale ta,0. For gas initially expanding at a uniform rate, with a radial velocity U = R/t0 at radius R, the behavior of the flow at all subsequent times is determined by ta,0/t0. If ta,0/t0 ≫ 1, the gas has no time to respond to pressure forces, so the fluid motion is nearly collisionless. In this case, only loosely bound shells are influenced by pressure gradients and are pushed outward. The late-time evolution of the mass accretion rate Mdot is close to the result for pure dust, and we develop a semianalytic model that accurately accounts for the small effect of pressure gradients in this limit. In the opposite regime, ta,0/t0 ≪ 1, pressure forces significantly affect the motion of the gas. At sufficiently early times, t ≤ ttr, the flow evolved along a sequence of quasi-stationary, Bondi-like states, with a time-dependent Mdot determined by the slowly varying gas density at large distances. However, at later times, t ≥ ttr, the fluid flow enters a dustllke regime; ttr is the time when the instantaneous Bondi accretion radius reaches the marginally bound radius. The transition time ttr depends sensitively on ta,0/t0 for a given Γ and can greatly exceed t0. We show that there exists a critical value Γ = 11/9, below which the transition from fluid to ballistic motion disappears. As one application of our calculations, we consider the

  12. A preferential flow model based on flow variability in macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, M.

    2004-12-01

    Simulating infiltration in soils containing macropores still provides unsatisfactory results, as existing models seem not to capture all relevant processes. Recent studies of macropore flow initiation in natural soils containing earthworm channels revealed a distinct flow rate variability in the macropores depending on the initiation process (Weiler & Naef, 2003, J of Hydrology, 273: 139-154). When macropore flow was initiated at the soil surface, most of the macropores received very little water while a few macropores received a large proportion of the total inflow. In contrast, when macropore flow was initiated from a saturated or nearly saturated soil layer, macropore flow rate variation was much lower. The objective of this study was to develop and test a model, which combines the macropore flow variability with several established approaches to model dual permeability soils. We then evaluate the INfiltration-INitiation-INteraction Model (IN3M) as a tool to explore the influence of macropore flow variability on infiltration behavior by performing a sensitivity analysis and applying IN3M to sprinkling and dye tracer experiments at various field sites with different macropore and soil matrix properties. The sensitivity analysis showed that the flow variability in macropores reduces interaction between the macropores and the surrounding soil matrix and thus increases bypass flow, especially for surface initiation of macropore flow and at higher rainfall intensities. The model application shows reasonable agreement between IN3M simulations and field data in terms of water balance, water content change, and dye patterns. The influence of macropore flow variability on the hydrological response of the soil was considerable and especially pronounced for soils where initiation occurs at the soil surface.

  13. Magnetized Accretion-Ejection Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Jonathan

    1994-09-01

    For both active galactic nuclei (AGN) and young stellar objects (YSO), the common belief is growing that there is an interdependency between accretion of mass onto a central object and the highly collimated jets. This thesis deals with the investigation of the physical mechanism that leads to the formation of jets from a magnetized accretion disk. This has been done by solving the set of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) equations in the case of an isothermal disk, using a self-similar approach. All the dynamical terms are included, so that the main results are independant of the modelling and thus, completely general. Indeed, a different temperature vertical profile only slightly modifies the parameters required for stationarity. A resistive thin accretion disk is thread by open magnetic field lines, sheared by its differential rotation. The field lines brake the disk and extract both angular momentum and mechanical energy from it. Because of the large magnetic "lever arm" acting on the disk, the magnetic braking is always dominant and the viscous torque is negligible. An equipartition magnetic field is enough, without significantly perturbing the Keplerian rotation. Thus, jets carry away all the angular momentum of the underlying accretion disk. Steady state accretion is achieved in the disk due to an anomalous magnetic diffusivity that allows the matter to slip across the field lines. This anomalous transport coefficient should arise from the saturation of a strong magnetic instability triggered in the disk. Ambipolar diffusion, which could have been used without losing the generality of the present results, remains however smaller than this anomalous diffusivity in the inner parts of a circumstellar disk. It has been found that steady state ejection can be achieved only if the magnetic torque changes its sign at the disk surface. From this point on, the field lines accelerate azimuthaly the matter transfering it both angular momentum and energy. This requires a

  14. Analyzing the Spectra of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael

    This proposal seeks funding for the analysis of accretion-powered X-ray pulsar spectra from NASA/ HEASARC archived X-ray data. Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near high mass X-ray binary systems. Such systems have accretion flows where plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field, eventually falling onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star compact object. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broad power-law continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. The energies of these cyclotron line features have recently been shown to vary with X-ray luminosity in a number of sources such as Her X-1 and V 0332+53, a phenomenon not well understood. Another recent development is the relatively new analytic model for the spectral continuum formation in accretion-powered pulsar systems developed by Becker & Wolff. In their formalism the accretion flows are assumed to go through radiation- dominated radiative shocks and settle onto the neutron star surface. The radiation field consists of strongly Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission from the entire plasma, Comptonized cyclotron emission from the de-excitations of Landau-excited electrons in the neutron star magnetic field, and Comptonized black-body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface. We seek to develop the data analysis tools to apply this model framework to the X-ray data from a wide set of sources to make progress characterizing the basic accretion properties (e.g., magnetic field strength, plasma temperatures, polar cap size, accretion rate per unit area, dominance of bulk vs. thermal Comptonization) as well as understanding the variations of the cyclotron line energies with X-ray luminosity. The three major goals of our proposed work are as follows: In the first year

  15. Hawaii Island Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Hawaii Island. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume II – Island of Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.

  16. East Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for East Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  17. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  18. Time-dependent spherically symmetric accretion onto compact X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Ostriker, J. P.; Stark, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical arguments and a numerical hydrodynamic code are used to investigate spherically symmetric accretion onto a compact object, in an attempt to provide some insight into gas flows heated by an outgoing X-ray flux. It is shown that preheating of spherically symmetric accretion flows by energetic radiation from an X-ray source results in time-dependent behavior for a much wider range of source parameters than was determined previously and that there are two distinct types of instability. The results are compared with observations of X-ray bursters and transients as well as with theories on quasars and active galactic nuclei that involve quasi-spherically symmetric accretion onto massive black holes. Models based on spherically symmetric accretion are found to be inconsistent with observations of bursters and transients.

  19. The Behavior of Accretion Disks in Low Mass X-ray Binaries: Disk Winds and Alpha Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayless, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation presents research on two low mass X-ray binaries. The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy with the ACS/SBC on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3-m SMARTS telescope at CTIO. We show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km/s as determined from the Doppler width of the C IV emission line. The broad and shallow eclipse indicates that the disk has a vertically-extended, optically-thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to 50% of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically-thick base of the disk wind. V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115) is a low mass X-ray binary which continues to be a black hole candidate. We have new photometric data of this system from the Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope's high speed CCD photometer at McDonald Observatory. The light curve is largely sinusoidal which we model with two components: a constant light source from the disk and a sinusoidal modulation at the orbital period from the irradiated face of the companion star. This is a radical re-interpretation of the orbital light curve. We do not require a large or asymmetric disk rim to account for the modulation in the light curve. Thus, the orbital inclination is unconstrained in our new model, removing the foundation for any claims of the compact object being a black hole.

  20. Cold Accretion from the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    The cosmic web is a vast, foam-like network of filaments and voids stretching throughout the universe. How did the first galaxies form within the cosmic web, at the intersections of filaments? New observations of a protodisk a galaxy in the early stages of formation may provide a clue.Models for Galaxy FormationNarrowband image of the candidate protodisk (marked with a white ellipse) and filaments (outlined in white). [Adapted from Martin et al. 2016]The standard model for galaxy formation, known as the hot accretion model, argues that galaxies form out of collapsing, virialized gas that forms a hot halo and then slowly cools, fueling star and galaxy formation at its center.But what if galaxies are actually formed from cool gas? In this contrasting picture, the cold accretion model, cool (temperature of ~104 K) unshocked gas from cosmic web filaments flows directly onto galactic disks forming at the filamentary intersections. The narrow streams of cold gas deliver fuel for star formation.A signature of the cold accretion model is that the streams of cold gas form a disk as the gas spirals inward, sinking toward the central protogalaxy. Detecting these cold-flow disks could be strong evidence in support of this model and last year, a team of authors reported just such a detection! This year theyre back again with a second object that may provide confirmation of cold accretion from the cosmic web.A Candidate ProtodiskThe team, led by Christopher Martin (California Institute of Technology), made the discovery using the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager, an instrument designed to observe faint emission from the intergalactic medium. Martin and collaborators found a large (R 100 kpc, more than six times the radius of the Milky Way), rotating structure of hydrogen gas, illuminated by the nearby quasi-stellar object QSO HS1549+1919. The system is located at a redshift of z~2.8.The authors testthree potential kinematic models of the candidate protodisk and filaments. In (a) two

  1. A toy terrestrial carbon flow model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parton, William J.; Running, Steven W.; Walker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    A generalized carbon flow model for the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world is reported. The model is a simplification of the Century model and the Forest-Biogeochemical model. Topics covered include plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling, biomes, the utility of the carbon flow model for predicting carbon dynamics under global change, and possible applications to state-and-transition models and environmentally driven global vegetation models.

  2. Accretion disk coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Holt, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations of partial X-ray eclipses from 4U1822-37 have shown that the central X-ray source in this system is diffused by a large Compton-thick accretion disk corona (ADC). Another binary, 4U2129-47, also displays a partial eclipse and contains an ADC. The possible origin of an ADC is discussed and a simple hydrostatic evaporated ADC model is developed which, when applied to 4U1822-37, 4U2129+47 and Cyg X-3, can explain their temporal and spectral properties. The quasi-sinusoidal modulation of all three sources can be reconciled with the partial occultation of the ADC by a bulge at the edge of the accretion disk which is caused by the inflowing material. The height of this bulge is an order of magnitude larger than the hydrostatic disk height and is the result of turbulence in the outer region of the disk. The spectral properties of all three sources can be understood in terms of Compton scattering of the original source spectrum by the ADC. Spectral variations with epoch in Cyg X-3 are probably caused by changes in the optical depth of the corona. A consequence of our model is that any accreting neutron star X-ray source in a semi-detached binary system which is close to its Eddington limit most likely contains an optically thick ADC.

  3. Dynamics of flux tubes in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, E. T.; Duncan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The study of magnetized plasmas in astrophysics is complicated by a number of factors, not the least of which is that in considering magnetic fields in stars or accretion disks, we are considering plasmas with densities well above those we can study in the laboratory. In particular, whereas laboratory plasmas are dominated by the confining magnetic field pressure, stars, and probably accretion disks, have magnetic fields whose beta (ratio of gas pressure to magnetic field pressure) is much greater than 1. Observations of the Sun suggest that under such circumstances the magnetic field breaks apart into discrete flux tubes with a small filling factor. On the other hand, theoretical treatments of MHD turbulence in high-beta plasmas tend to assume that the field is more or less homogeneously distributed throughout the plasma. Here we consider a simple model for the distribution of magnetic flux tubes in a turbulent medium. We discuss the mechanism by which small inhomogeneities evolve into discrete flux tubes and the size and distribution of such flux tubes. We then apply the model to accretion disks. We find that the fibrilation of the magnetic field does not enhance magnetic buoyancy. We also note that the evolution of an initially diffuse field in a turbulent medium, e.g., any uniform field in a shearing flow, will initially show exponential growth as the flux tubes form. This growth saturates when the flux tube formation is complete and cannot be used as the basis for a self-sustaining dynamo effect. Since the typical state of the magnetic field is a collection of intense flux tubes, this effect is of limited interest. However, it may be important early in the evolution of the galactic magnetic field, and it will play a large role in numerical simulations. Finally, we note that the formation of flux tubes is an essential ingredient in any successful dynamo model for stars or accretion disks.

  4. VISCOPLASTIC FLUID MODEL FOR DEBRIS FLOW ROUTING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes how a generalized viscoplastic fluid model, which was developed based on non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, can be successfully applied to routing a debris flow down a channel. The one-dimensional dynamic equations developed for unsteady clear-water flow can be used for debris flow routing if the flow parameters, such as the momentum (or energy) correction factor and the resistance coefficient, can be accurately evaluated. The writer's generalized viscoplastic fluid model can be used to express such flow parameters in terms of the rheological parameters for debris flow in wide channels. A preliminary analysis of the theoretical solutions reveals the importance of the flow behavior index and the so-called modified Froude number for uniformly progressive flow in snout profile modeling.

  5. AGN Feedback and Cooling Flows: Problems with Simple Hydrodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleo, John C.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2006-07-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that active galactic nuclei, and radio galaxies in particular, have an impact on large-scale structure and galaxy formation. In principle, radio galaxies are energetic enough to halt the cooling of the virialized intracluster medium (ICM) in the inner regions of galaxy clusters, solving the cooling flow problem and explaining the high-mass truncation of the galaxy luminosity function. We explore this process through a series of high-resolution, three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of jetted active galaxies that act in response to cooling-mediated accretion of an ICM atmosphere. We find that our models are incapable of producing a long-term balance of heating and cooling; catastrophic cooling can be delayed by the jet action but inevitably takes hold. At the heart of the failure of these models is the formation of a low-density channel through which the jet can freely flow, carrying its energy out of the cooling core. It is possible that this failure is due to an oversimplified treatment of the fast jet (which may underestimate the ``dentist drill'' effect). However, it seems likely that additional complexity (large-angle jet precession or ICM turbulence) or additional physics (magnetohydrodynamic effects and plasma transport processes) is required to produce a spatial distribution of jet heating that can prevent catastrophic cooling. This work also underscores the importance of including jet dynamics in any feedback model, as opposed to the isotropically inflated bubble approach taken in some previous works.

  6. Carbon-Oxygen White Dwarfs Accreting CO-rich Matter. I. A Comparison between Rotating and Nonrotating Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersanti, Luciano; Gagliardi, Simona; Iben, Icko, Jr.; Tornambé, Amedeo

    2003-02-01

    We investigate the lifting effect of rotation on the thermal evolution of CO white dwarfs accreting CO-rich matter. We find that rotation induces the cooling of the accreting structure so that the delivered gravitational energy causes a greater expansion with respect to the standard nonrotating case. The increase in the surface radius produces a decrease in the surface value of the critical angular velocity and, therefore, the accreting white dwarf becomes gravitationally unbound (Roche instability). This occurrence is due to an increase in the total angular momentum of the accreting white dwarf and depends critically on the amount of specific angular momentum deposited by the accreted matter. If the specific angular momentum of the accreted matter is equal to that of the outer layers of the accreting structure, the Roche instability occurs well before the accreting white dwarf can attain the physical conditions for carbon burning. If the values of both initial angular velocity and accretion rate are small, we find that the accreting white dwarf undergoes a secular instability when its total mass approaches 1.4 Msolar. At this stage, the ratio between the rotational energy and the gravitational binding energy of the white dwarf becomes of the order of 0.1, so that the star must deform by adopting an elliptical shape. In this case, since the angular velocity of the white dwarf is as large as ~1 rad s-1, the anisotropic mass distribution induces the loss of rotational energy and angular momentum via gravitational wave radiation. We find that, independent of the braking efficiency, the white dwarf contracts and achieves the physical conditions suitable for explosive carbon burning at the center so that a Type Ia supernova event is produced.

  7. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being

  8. Magnetically elevated accretion disks in active galactic nuclei: broad emission line regions and associated star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Silk, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    We propose that the accretion disks fueling active galactic nuclei are supported vertically against gravity by a strong toroidal (φ -direction) magnetic field that develops naturally as the result of an accretion disk dynamo. The magnetic pressure elevates most of the gas carrying the accretion flow at R to large heights z ˜ 0.1 R and low densities, while leaving a thin dense layer containing most of the mass - but contributing very little accretion - around the equator. We show that such a disk model leads naturally to the formation of a broad emission line region through thermal instability. Extrapolating to larger radii, we demonstrate that local gravitational instability and associated star formation are strongly suppressed compared to standard disk models for AGN, although star formation in the equatorial zone is predicted for sufficiently high mass supply rates. This new class of accretion disk models thus appears capable of resolving two longstanding puzzles in the theory of AGN fueling: the formation of broad emission line regions and the suppression of fragmentation thought to inhibit accretion at the required rates. We show that the disk of stars that formed in the Galactic Center a few million years ago could have resulted from an episode of magnetically elevated accretion at ˜0.1 of the Eddington limit.

  9. He-accreting white dwarfs: accretion regimes and final outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Yungelson, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    The behaviour of carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) subject to direct helium accretion is extensively studied. We aim to analyse the thermal response of an accreting WD to mass deposition at different timescales. The analysis has been performed for initial WD masses and accretion rates in the range 0.60-1.02 M⊙ and 10-9-10-5 M⊙ yr-1, respectively. Thermal regimes in the parameter space MWD-dot{M}_He leading to formation of red-giant-like structures, steady burning of He, and mild, strong and dynamical flashes have been identified and the transition between these regimes has been studied in detail. In particular, the physical properties of WDs experiencing the He-flash accretion regime have been investigated to determine the mass retention efficiency as a function of the accretor total mass and accretion rate. We also discuss to what extent the building up of a He-rich layer via H burning could be described according to the behaviour of models accreting He-rich matter directly. Polynomial fits to the obtained results are provided for use in binary population synthesis computations. Several applications for close binary systems with He-rich donors and CO WD accretors are considered and the relevance of the results for interpreting He novae is discussed.

  10. Accretion of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M

    2008-11-28

    The origin of the Earth and its Moon has been the focus of an enormous body of research. In this paper I review some of the current models of terrestrial planet accretion, and discuss assumptions common to most works that may require re-examination. Density-wave interactions between growing planets and the gas nebula may help to explain the current near-circular orbits of the Earth and Venus, and may result in large-scale radial migration of proto-planetary embryos. Migration would weaken the link between the present locations of the planets and the original provenance of the material that formed them. Fragmentation can potentially lead to faster accretion and could also damp final planet orbital eccentricities. The Moon-forming impact is believed to be the final major event in the Earth's accretion. Successful simulations of lunar-forming impacts involve a differentiated impactor containing between 0.1 and 0.2 Earth masses, an impact angle near 45 degrees and an impact speed within 10 per cent of the Earth's escape velocity. All successful impacts-with or without pre-impact rotation-imply that the Moon formed primarily from material originating from the impactor rather than from the proto-Earth. This must ultimately be reconciled with compositional similarities between the Earth and the Moon. PMID:18826928

  11. Accretion of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Canup, Robin M

    2008-11-28

    The origin of the Earth and its Moon has been the focus of an enormous body of research. In this paper I review some of the current models of terrestrial planet accretion, and discuss assumptions common to most works that may require re-examination. Density-wave interactions between growing planets and the gas nebula may help to explain the current near-circular orbits of the Earth and Venus, and may result in large-scale radial migration of proto-planetary embryos. Migration would weaken the link between the present locations of the planets and the original provenance of the material that formed them. Fragmentation can potentially lead to faster accretion and could also damp final planet orbital eccentricities. The Moon-forming impact is believed to be the final major event in the Earth's accretion. Successful simulations of lunar-forming impacts involve a differentiated impactor containing between 0.1 and 0.2 Earth masses, an impact angle near 45 degrees and an impact speed within 10 per cent of the Earth's escape velocity. All successful impacts-with or without pre-impact rotation-imply that the Moon formed primarily from material originating from the impactor rather than from the proto-Earth. This must ultimately be reconciled with compositional similarities between the Earth and the Moon.

  12. Transient phenomena from accreting magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, Dmitry

    In this contribution, I will review the recent progress in the research of accreting magnetized neutron stars (observed as X-ray pulsars) based on the study of their variability on different time scales. Specifically, I will focus on the properties of the X-ray emitting region. In recent years, the high-quality observational data accumulated with the new generation of X-ray observatories have triggered a renewed interest in these systems. The new studies are primarily focused on the detailed structure of the two physical regions of the objects: (i) the emitting area above the polar caps of the neutron star and (ii) the magnetospheric boundary, where the infalling matter couples to the accretoŕs magnetic field. The modulation of the matter supply from the binary companion as well as the instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the transient character of the majority of X-ray pulsars. The observations show that the "persistent" pulsars also exhibit numerous types of variabilities over a broad range of time scales (off-states, pulse-to-pulse variability, switches of spectral states, alternation of the pulsar's spin-up/spin-down episodes etc.). Of particular importance are the observed variations of the cyclotron absorption features (cyclotron lines), whose centroid energies are directly proportional to the magnetic field strength at the site of the line formation. The detailed studies of these variabilities have lead to the development of new theoretical models describing the physics in the emitting region and at the magnetospheric boundary. It has been proposed that the configuration and geometry of the two areas may change abruptly when the mass accretion rate reaches certain critical values. Such changes cause transitions between different accretion modes. A particular mode is expected to be characterized by certain variability patterns and can thus be inferred from the observations. I will describe these recent observations and the models which are aimed at

  13. The baroclinic instability in the context of layered accretion. Self-sustained vortices and their magnetic stability in local compressible unstratified models of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyra, W.; Klahr, H.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Turbulence and angular momentum transport in accretion disks remains a topic of debate. With the realization that dead zones are robust features of protoplanetary disks, the search for hydrodynamical sources of turbulence continues. A possible source is the baroclinic instability (BI), which has been shown to exist in unmagnetized non-barotropic disks. Aims: We aim to verify the existence of the baroclinic instability in 3D magnetized disks, as well as its interplay with other instabilities, namely the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) and the magneto-elliptical instability. Methods: We performed local simulations of non-isothermal accretion disks with the Pencil Code. The entropy gradient that generates the baroclinic instability is linearized and included in the momentum and energy equations in the shearing box approximation. The model is compressible, so excitation of spiral density waves is allowed and angular momentum transport can be measured. Results: We find that the vortices generated and sustained by the baroclinic instability in the purely hydrodynamical regime do not survive when magnetic fields are included. The MRI by far supersedes the BI in growth rate and strength at saturation. The resulting turbulence is virtually identical to an MRI-only scenario. We measured the intrinsic vorticity profile of the vortex, finding little radial variation in the vortex core. Nevertheless, the core is disrupted by an MHD instability, which we identify with the magneto-elliptic instability. This instability has nearly the same range of unstable wavelengths as the MRI, but has higher growth rates. In fact, we identify the MRI as a limiting case of the magneto-elliptic instability, when the vortex aspect ratio tends to infinity (pure shear flow). We isolated its effect on the vortex, finding that a strong but unstable vertical magnetic field leads to channel flows inside the vortex, which stretch it apart. When the field is decreased or resistivity is used

  14. ACCRETING CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS: OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-01-20

    I calculate the spectral energy distributions of accreting circumplanetary disks using atmospheric radiative transfer models. Circumplanetary disks only accreting at 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} around a 1 M{sub J} planet can be brighter than the planet itself. A moderately accreting circumplanetary disk ( M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; enough to form a 10 M{sub J} planet within 1 Myr) around a 1 M{sub J} planet has a maximum temperature of ∼2000 K, and at near-infrared wavelengths (J, H, K bands), this disk is as bright as a late-M-type brown dwarf or a 10 M{sub J} planet with a ''hot start''. To use direct imaging to find the accretion disks around low-mass planets (e.g., 1 M{sub J} ) and distinguish them from brown dwarfs or hot high-mass planets, it is crucial to obtain photometry at mid-infrared bands (L', M, N bands) because the emission from circumplanetary disks falls off more slowly toward longer wavelengths than those of brown dwarfs or planets. If young planets have strong magnetic fields (≳100 G), fields may truncate slowly accreting circumplanetary disks ( M-dot ≲10{sup −9} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and lead to magnetospheric accretion, which can provide additional accretion signatures, such as UV/optical excess from the accretion shock and line emission.

  15. Magnetized Accretion-Ejection Structures: 2.5-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Continuous Ideal Jet Launching from Resistive Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casse, Fabien; Keppens, Rony

    2002-12-01

    We present numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of a magnetized accretion disk launching trans-Alfvénic jets. These simulations, performed in a 2.5-dimensional time-dependent polytropic resistive MHD framework, model a resistive accretion disk threaded by an initial vertical magnetic field. The resistivity is only important inside the disk and is prescribed as η=αmVAHexp(- 2Z2/H2), where VA stands for Alfvén speed, H is the disk scale height, and the coefficient αm is smaller than unity. By performing the simulations over several tens of dynamical disk timescales, we show that the launching of a collimated outflow occurs self-consistently and the ejection of matter is continuous and quasi-stationary. These are the first ever simulations of resistive accretion disks launching nontransient ideal MHD jets. Roughly 15% of accreted mass is persistently ejected. This outflow is safely characterized as a jet since the flow becomes superfast magnetosonic, well collimated, and reaches a quasi-stationary state. We present a complete illustration and explanation of the ``accretion-ejection'' mechanism that leads to jet formation from a magnetized accretion disk. In particular, the magnetic torque inside the disk brakes the matter azimuthally and allows for accretion, while it is responsible for an effective magnetocentrifugal acceleration in the jet. As such, the magnetic field channels the disk angular momentum and powers the jet acceleration and collimation. The jet originates from the inner disk region where equipartition between thermal and magnetic forces is achieved. A hollow, superfast magnetosonic shell of dense material is the natural outcome of the inward advection of a primordial field.

  16. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  17. Lessons from accretion disks in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Keith

    1998-04-01

    We survey recent progress in the interpretation of observations of cataclysmic variables, whose accretion disks are heated by viscous dissipation rather than irradiation. Many features of standard viscous accretion disk models are confirmed by tomographic imaging studies of dwarf novae. Eclipse maps indicate that steady disk temperature structures are established during outbursts. Doppler maps of double-peaked emission lines suggest disk chromospheres heated by magnetic activity. Gas streams impacting on the disk rim leave expected signatures both in the eclipses and emission lines. Doppler maps of dwarf nova IP Peg at the beginning of an outburst show evidence for tidally-induced spiral shocks. While enjoying these successes, we must still face up to the dreaded ``SW Sex syndrome'' which afflicts most if not all cataclysmic variables in high accretion states. The anomalies include single-peaked emission lines with skewed kinematics, flat temperature-radius profiles, shallow offset line eclipses, and narrow low-ionization absorption lines at phase 0.5. The enigmatic behavior of AE Aqr is now largely understood in terms of a magnetic propeller model in which the rapidly spinning white dwarf magnetosphere expels the gas stream out of the system before an accretion disk can form. A final piece in this puzzle is the realization that an internal shock zone occurs in the exit stream at just the right place to explain the anomalous kinematics and violent flaring of the single-peaked emission lines. Encouraged by this success, we propose that disk-anchored magnetic propellers operate in the high accretion rate systems afflicted by the SW Sex syndrome. Magnetic fields anchored in the Keplerian disk sweep forward and apply a boost that expels gas stream material flowing above the disk plane. This working hypothesis offers a framework on which we can hang all the SW Sex anomalies. The lesson for theorists is that magnetic links appear to be transporting energy and angular

  18. The radial dependence of pebble accretion rates: A source of diversity in planetary systems. I. Analytical formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, S.; Guillot, T.; Morbidelli, A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The classical planetesimal accretion scenario for the formation of planets has recently evolved with the idea that pebbles, centimeter- to meter-sized icy grains migrating in protoplanetary disks, can control planetesimal and/or planetary growth. Aims: We investigate how pebble accretion depends on disk properties and affects the formation of planetary systems. Methods: We construct analytical models of pebble accretion onto planetary embryos that consistently account for the mass and orbital evolution of the pebble flow and reflect disk structure. Results: We derive simple formulas for pebble accretion rates in the so-called settling regime for planetary embryos that are more than 100 km in size. For relatively smaller embryos or in outer disk regions, the accretion mode is three-dimensional (3D), meaning that the thickness of the pebble flow must be taken into account, and resulting in an accretion rate that is independent of the embryo mass. For larger embryos or in inner regions, the accretion is in a two-dimensional (2D) mode, i.e., the pebble disk may be considered infinitely thin. We show that the radial dependence of the pebble accretion rate is different (even the sign of the power-law exponent changes) for different disk conditions such as the disk heating source (viscous heating or stellar irradiation), drag law (Stokes or Epstein, and weak or strong coupling), and in the 2D or 3D accretion modes. We also discuss the effect of the sublimation and destruction of icy pebbles inside the snow line. Conclusions: Pebble accretion easily produces a large diversity of planetary systems. In other words, to infer the results of planet formation through pebble accretion correctly, detailed prescriptions of disk evolution and pebble growth, sublimation, destruction and migration are required.

  19. Experimental Flow Models for SSME Flowfield Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, L. C.; Ramsey, P. E.

    1989-01-01

    Full scale flow models with extensive instrumentation were designed and manufactured to provide data necessary for flow field characterization in rocket engines of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) type. These models include accurate flow path geometries from the pre-burner outlet through the throat of the main combustion chamber. The turbines are simulated with static models designed to provide the correct pressure drop and swirl for specific power levels. The correct turbopump-hot gas manifold interfaces were designed into the flow models to permit parametric/integration studies for new turbine designs. These experimental flow models provide a vehicle for understanding the fluid dynamics associated with specific engine issues and also fill the more general need for establishing a more detailed fluid dynamic base to support development and verification of advanced math models.

  20. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  1. Three-dimensional thermochemical nonequilibrium flow modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, L. T.; Li, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional thermochemical nonequilibrium model has been developed and applied to the study of entry flows surrounding space vehicles. The model accounts for both chemical and vibrational nonequilibrium phenomena behind the bow shock. The thermodynamic state of a real gas is modeled with a translational-rotational temperature and a electron-vibrational temperature. Their internal energies are averaged to determine the temperature used in the reaction rates calculation. In order to establish the validity of the selected models, both one- and two-temperature models with seven and/or eleven species were investigated. Several numerical experiments that include a sphere, the RAMC vehicle and 3D AFE forebody flows were performed. Preliminary results were compared with RAMC-II experimental data. Good agreement was obtained after a two-temperature model with eleven species and thirty reactions was incorporated into the study.

  2. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Eikmann, W.

    2013-05-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code XILLVER that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic database. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Γ of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter ξ at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A Fe relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are 1.2 <= Γ <= 3.4, 1 <= ξ <= 104, and 0.5 <= A Fe <= 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file (http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu/~javier/xillver/) suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in XSPEC. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of XILLVER.

  3. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Ekmann, W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code xillver that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic data base. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Gamma of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter zeta at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A(sub Fe) relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are: 1.2 <= Gamma <= 3.4, 1 <= zeta <= 104, and 0.5 <= A(sub Fe) <= 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in xspec. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of xillver.

  4. X-RAY REFLECTED SPECTRA FROM ACCRETION DISK MODELS. III. A COMPLETE GRID OF IONIZED REFLECTION CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.; McClintock, J. E.; Dauser, T.; Wilms, J.; Eikmann, W.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R. E-mail: jem@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: thomas.dauser@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de E-mail: wiebke.eikmann@sternwarte.uni-erlangen.de

    2013-05-10

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code XILLVER that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic database. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index {Gamma} of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter {xi} at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A{sub Fe} relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are 1.2 {<=} {Gamma} {<=} 3.4, 1 {<=} {xi} {<=} 10{sup 4}, and 0.5 {<=} A{sub Fe} {<=} 10. These ranges capture the physical conditions typically inferred from observations of active galactic nuclei, and also stellar-mass black holes in the hard state. This library is intended for use when the thermal disk flux is faint compared to the incident power-law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file (http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu/{approx}javier/xillver/) suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in XSPEC. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of XILLVER.

  5. Average-passage flow model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Kirtley, Kevin; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A 3-D model was developed for simulating multistage turbomachinery flows using supercomputers. This average passage flow model described the time averaged flow field within a typical passage of a bladed wheel within a multistage configuration. To date, a number of inviscid simulations were executed to assess the resolution capabilities of the model. Recently, the viscous terms associated with the average passage model were incorporated into the inviscid computer code along with an algebraic turbulence model. A simulation of a stage-and-one-half, low speed turbine was executed. The results of this simulation, including a comparison with experimental data, is discussed.

  6. Formation of massive stars by growing accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, André

    We calculate pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks with accretion rates growing with the actual stellar masses. We show that accretion rates growing at least as M1.5 are necessary to fit the constraints on the lifetimes and HR diagram. Most interestingly, such accretion rates growing with the stellar mass well correspond to those derived from observations of mass outflows (Churchwell 2000; Henning et al. 2000). These rates also lie in the permitted region of the dynamical models.

  7. Black hole accretion disc impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihajoki, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analytic model for computing the luminosity and spectral evolution of flares caused by a supermassive black hole impacting the accretion disc of another supermassive black hole. Our model includes photon diffusion, emission from optically thin regions and relativistic corrections to the observed spectrum and time-scales. We test the observability of the impact scenario with a simulated population of quasars hosting supermassive black hole binaries. The results indicate that for a moderate binary mass ratio of 0.3, and impact distances of 100 primary Schwarzschild radii, the accretion disc impacts can be expected to equal or exceed the host quasar in brightness at observed wavelength λ = 510 nm up to z = 0.6. We conclude that accretion disc impacts may function as an independent probe for supermassive black hole binaries. We release the code used for computing the model light curves to the community.

  8. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  9. Kinetic model for dilute traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana A.

    The flow of traffic represents a many-particle non-equilibrium problem with important practical consequences. Traffic behavior has been studied using a variety of approaches, including fluid dynamics models, Boltzmann equation, and recently cellular automata (CA). The CA model for traffic flow that Nagel and Schreckenberg (NS) introduced can successfully mimic many of the known features of the traffic flow. We show that in the dilute limit of the NS model, where vehicles exhibit free flow, cars show significant nearest neighbor correlation primarily via a short-range repulsion. introduce an approximate analytic model to describe this dilute limit. We show that the distribution of the distance between consecutive vehicles obeys a drift-diffusion equation. We compared this model with direct simulations. The steady state solution and relaxation of this model agrees well with direct simulations. We explore how this model breaks down as the transition to jams occurs.

  10. The accretion history of dark matter haloes - III. A physical model for the concentration-mass relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Camila A.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.; Schaye, Joop; Duffy, Alan R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a semi-analytic, physically motivated model for dark matter halo concentration as a function of halo mass and redshift. The semi-analytic model combines an analytic model for the halo mass accretion history (MAH), based on extended Press-Schechter (EPS) theory, with an empirical relation between concentration and formation time obtained through fits to the results of numerical simulations. Because the semi-analytic model is based on EPS theory, it can be applied to wide ranges in mass, redshift and cosmology. The resulting concentration-mass (c-M) relations are found to agree with the simulations, and because the model applies only to relaxed haloes, they do not exhibit the upturn at high masses or high redshifts found by some recent works. We predict a change of slope in the z ˜ 0 c-M relation at a mass-scale of 1011 M⊙. We find that this is due to the change in the functional form of the halo MAH, which goes from being dominated by an exponential (for high-mass haloes) to a power law (for low-mass haloes). During the latter phase, the core radius remains approximately constant, and the concentration grows due to the drop of the background density. We also analyse how the c-M relation predicted by this work affects the power produced by dark matter annihilation, finding that at z = 0 the power is two orders of magnitude lower than that obtained from extrapolating best-fitting c-M relations. We provide fits to the c-M relations as well as numerical routines to compute concentrations and MAHs.†

  11. Wetland Accretion Rate Model of Ecosystem Resilience (WARMER) and its application to habitat sustainability for endangered species in the San Francisco Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Thorne, Karen M.; Casazza, Michael L.; Overton, Cory T.; Callaway, John C.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2014-01-01

    Salt marsh faunas are constrained by specific habitat requirements for marsh elevation relative to sea level and tidal range. As sea level rises, changes in relative elevation of the marsh plain will have differing impacts on the availability of habitat for marsh obligate species. The Wetland Accretion Rate Model for Ecosystem Resilience (WARMER) is a 1-D model of elevation that incorporates both biological and physical processes of vertical marsh accretion. Here, we use WARMER to evaluate changes in marsh surface elevation and the impact of these elevation changes on marsh habitat for specific species of concern. Model results were compared to elevation-based habitat criteria developed for marsh vegetation, the endangered California clapper rail (Rallus longirostris obsoletus), and the endangered salt marsh harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys raviventris) to determine the response of marsh habitat for each species to predicted >1-m sea-level rise by 2100. Feedback between vertical accretion mechanisms and elevation reduced the effect of initial elevation in the modeled scenarios. Elevation decreased nonlinearly with larger changes in elevation during the latter half of the century when the rate of sea-level rise increased. Model scenarios indicated that changes in elevation will degrade habitat quality within salt marshes in the San Francisco Estuary, and degradation will accelerate in the latter half of the century as the rate of sea-level rise accelerates. A sensitivity analysis of the model results showed that inorganic sediment accumulation and the rate of sea-level rise had the greatest influence over salt marsh sustainability.

  12. Mathematical and computational models of plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinsky, K. V.

    Investigations of plasma flows are of interest, firstly, due to numerous applications, and secondly, because of their general principles, which form a special branch of physics: the plasma dynamics. Numerical simulation and computation, together with theoretic and experimental methods, play an important part in these investigations. Speaking on flows, a relatively dense plasma is mentioned, so its mathematical models appertain to the fluid mechanics, i.e., they are based on the magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma. Time dependent two dimensional models of plasma flows of two wide-spread types are considered: the flows across the magnetic field and those in the magnetic field plane.

  13. Analytical models for complex swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissov, A.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    We develops a new class of analytical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for swirling flows, and suggests ways to predict and control such flows occurring in various technological applications. We view momentum accumulation on the axis as a key feature of swirling flows and consider vortex-sink flows on curved axisymmetric surfaces with an axial flow. We show that these solutions model swirling flows in a cylindrical can, whirlpools, tornadoes, and cosmic swirling jets. The singularity of these solutions on the flow axis is removed by matching them with near-axis Schlichting and Long's swirling jets. The matched solutions model flows with very complex patterns, consisting of up to seven separation regions with recirculatory 'bubbles' and vortex rings. We apply the matched solutions for computing flows in the Ranque-Hilsch tube, in the meniscus of electrosprays, in vortex breakdown, and in an industrial vortex burner. The simple analytical solutions allow a clear understanding of how different control parameters affect the flow and guide selection of optimal parameter values for desired flow features. These solutions permit extension to other problems (such as heat transfer and chemical reaction) and have the potential of being significantly useful for further detailed investigation by direct or large-eddy numerical simulations as well as laboratory experimentation.

  14. Non-LTE Models and Theoretical Spectra of Accretion Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei. III. Integrated Spectra for Hydrogen-Helium Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubeny, Ivan; Agol, Eric; Blaes, Omer; Krolik, Julian

    2010-11-01

    We have constructed a grid of non-LTE disk models for a wide range of black hole mass and mass accretion rate, for several values of viscosity parameter alpha, and for two extreme values of the black hole spin: the maximum-rotation Kerr black hole, and the Schwarzschild (non-rotating) black hole. Our procedure calculates self-consistently the vertical structure of all disk annuli together with the radiation field, without any approximations imposed on the optical thickness of the disk, and without any ad hoc approximations to the behavior of the radiation intensity. The total spectrum of a disk is computed by summing the spectra of the individual annuli, taking into account the general relativistic transfer function. The grid covers nine values of the black hole mass between M = 1/8 and 32 billion solar masses with a two-fold increase of mass for each subsequent value; and eleven values of the mass accretion rate, each a power of 2 times 1 solar mass/year. The highest value of the accretion rate corresponds to 0.3 Eddington. We show the vertical structure of individual annuli within the set of accretion disk models, along with their local emergent flux, and discuss the internal physical self-consistency of the models. We then present the full disk-integrated spectra, and discuss a number of observationally interesting properties of the models, such as optical/ultraviolet colors, the behavior of the hydrogen Lyman limit region, polarization, and number of ionizing photons. Our calculations are far from definitive in terms of the input physics, but generally we find that our models exhibit rather red optical/UV colors. Flux discontinuities in the region of the hydrogen Lyman limit are only present in cool, low luminosity models, while hotter models exhibit blueshifted changes in spectral slope.

  15. X-rays and gamma-rays from accretion flows onto black holes in Seyferts and X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Johnson, W. Neil; Poutanen, Juri; Magdziarz, Pawel; Gierlinski, Marek

    1997-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of X-ray/gamma ray spectra of radio quiet Seyfert galaxies and Galactic black hole candidates are reviewed. The spectra from these objects share the following characteristics: an underlying power law with a high energy cutoff above 200 keV; a Compton reflection component with a Fe K alpha line, and a low energy absorption by intervening cold matter. The X-ray energy spectral index, alpha, is typically in the range between 0.8 and 1 in Seyfert spectra, and that of the hard state spectra of the black hole candidates Cygnus X-1 and GX 339-4 is typically between 0.6 and 0.8. The Compton reflection component corresponds with cold matter covering a solid angle of between 0.8pi and 2pi as seen from the X-ray source. The broadband spectra of both classes of sources are well fitted by Compton upscattering of soft photons in thermal plasma. The fits yield a thermal plasma temperature of 100 keV and the Thomson optical depth of 1. All the spectra presented are cut off before the electron rest energy 511 keV, indicating that electron/positron pair production is an important process.

  16. SRMAFTE facility checkout model flow field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, Harold R.

    1992-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Equipment (SRMAFTE) facility was constructed for the purpose of evaluating the internal propellant, insulation, and nozzle configurations of solid propellant rocket motor designs. This makes the characterization of the facility internal flow field very important in assuring that no facility induced flow field features exist which would corrupt the model related measurements. In order to verify the design and operation of the facility, a three-dimensional computational flow field analysis was performed on the facility checkout model setup. The checkout model measurement data, one-dimensional and three-dimensional estimates were compared, and the design and proper operation of the facility was verified. The proper operation of the metering nozzles, adapter chamber transition, model nozzle, and diffuser were verified. The one-dimensional and three-dimensional flow field estimates along with the available measurement data are compared.

  17. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  18. Modeling the Effect of Kick Velocity during the Accretion Induced Collapse of White Dwarfs on Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taani, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The kick velocity which arises during the binary interaction plays an important role in disruption or surviving the binary systems. This paper attempts to draw an evolutionary connection of the long-period (Porb ≥ 2 d) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with orbits of low eccentricity (e ≤ 0.2). We propose that a kick velocity caused by dynamical effects of asymmetric collapse imparted to the companion star through an accretion induced collapse (AIC) of white dwarfs-that become unstable once they approach the Chandrasekhar limit-can account for the differences in their orbital period distributions. Furthermore, in some cases, an appropriate kick can disrupt the binary system and result in the birth of isolated MSPs. Otherwise, the binary survives and an eccentric binary MSP is formed. In this case only the binding energy equivalent (0.2M⊙) of mass is lost and the system remains intact in a symmetric collapse. Consequently, the AIC decreases the mass of the neutron star and increases the orbital period leading to orbit circularization. We present the results of our model and discuss the possible implications for the binary MSPs in galactic disk and globular clusters.

  19. Modeling MHD accretion-ejection: episodic ejections of jets triggered by a mean-field disk dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanovs, Deniss; Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2014-11-20

    We present MHD simulations exploring the launching, acceleration, and collimation of jets and disk winds. The evolution of the disk structure is consistently taken into account. Extending our earlier studies, we now consider the self-generation of the magnetic field by an α{sup 2}Ω mean-field dynamo. The disk magnetization remains on a rather low level, which helps to evolve the simulations for T > 10, 000 dynamical time steps on a domain extending 1500 inner disk radii. We find the magnetic field of the inner disk to be similar to the commonly found open field structure, favoring magneto-centrifugal launching. The outer disk field is highly inclined and predominantly radial. Here, differential rotation induces a strong toroidal component, which plays a key role in outflow launching. These outflows from the outer disk are slower, denser, and less collimated. If the dynamo action is not quenched, magnetic flux is continuously generated, diffuses outward through the disk, and fills the entire disk. We have invented a toy model triggering a time-dependent mean-field dynamo. The duty cycles of this dynamo lead to episodic ejections on similar timescales. When the dynamo is suppressed as the magnetization falls below a critical value, the generation of the outflows and also accretion is inhibited. The general result is that we can steer episodic ejection and large-scale jet knots by a disk-intrinsic dynamo that is time-dependent and regenerates the jet-launching magnetic field.

  20. The Physics of Wind-Fed Accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, Christopher W.; Liedahl, Duane A.; Akiyama, Shizuka

    2008-09-30

    We provide a brief review of the physical processes behind the radiative driving of the winds of OB stars and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton capture and accretion of a fraction of the stellar wind by a compact object, typically a neutron star, in detached high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In addition, we describe a program to develop global models of the radiatively-driven photoionized winds and accretion flows of HMXBs, with particular attention to the prototypical system Vela X-l. The models combine XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC emission models appropriate to X-ray photoionized plasmas, improved models of the radiative driving of photoionized winds, FLASH time-dependent adaptive-mesh hydrodynamics calculations, and Monte Carlo radiation transport. We present two- and three-dimensional maps of the density, temperature, velocity, ionization parameter, and emissivity distributions of representative X-ray emission lines, as well as synthetic global Monte Carlo X-ray spectra. Such models help to better constrain the properties of the winds of HMXBs, which bear on such fundamental questions as the long-term evolution of these binaries and the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium.

  1. The Physics of Wind-Fed Accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Liedahl, D A; Akiyama, S; Plewa, T

    2008-05-27

    We provide a brief review of the physical processes behind the radiative driving of the winds of OB stars and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton capture and accretion of a fraction of the stellar wind by a compact object, typically a neutron star, in detached high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In addition, we describe a program to develop global models of the radiatively-driven photoionized winds and accretion flows of HMXBs, with particular attention to the prototypical system Vela X-1. The models combine XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC emission models appropriate to X-ray photoionized plasmas, improved models of the radiative driving of photoionized winds, FLASH time-dependent adaptive-mesh hydrodynamics calculations, and Monte Carlo radiation transport. We present two- and three-dimensional maps of the density, temperature, velocity, ionization parameter, and emissivity distributions of representative X-ray emission lines, as well as synthetic global Monte Carlo X-ray spectra. Such models help to better constrain the properties of the winds of HMXBs, which bear on such fundamental questions as the long-term evolution of these binaries and the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium.

  2. Classical Accreting Pulsars with NICER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Soft excesses are very common center dot Lx > 1038 erg/s - reprocessing by optically thick material at the inner edge of the accretion disk center dot Lx < 1036 erg/s - photoionized or collisionally heated diffuse gas or thermal emission from the NS surface center dot Lx 1037 erg/s - either or both types of emission center dot NICER observations of soft excesses in bright X-ray pulsars combined with reflection modeling will constrain the ionization state, metalicity and dynamics of the inner edge of the magnetically truncated accretion disk Reflection models of an accretion disk for a hard power law - Strong soft excess below 3 keV from hot X-ray heated disk - For weakly ionized case: strong recombination lines - Are we seeing changes in the disk ionization in 4U1626-26? 13 years of weekly monitoring with RXTE PCA center dot Revealed an unexpectedly large population of Be/X-ray binaries compared to the Milky Way center dot Plotted luminosities are typical of "normal" outbursts (once per orbit) center dot The SMC provides an excellent opportunity to study a homogenous population of HMXBs with low interstellar absorption for accretion disk studies. Monitoring with NICER will enable studies of accretion disk physics in X-ray pulsars center dot The SMC provides a potential homogeneous low-absorption population for this study center dot NICER monitoring and TOO observations will also provide measurements of spinfrequencies, QPOs, pulsed fluxes, and energy spectra.

  3. Self-Consistent Thermal Accretion Disk Corona Models for Compact Objects. I: Properties of the Corona and the Spectrum of Escaping Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, James B.; Wilms, Jorn; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1997-01-01

    We present the properties of accretion disk corona (ADC) models in which the radiation field, the temperature, and the total opacity of the corona are determined self-consistently. We use a nonlinear Monte Carlo code to perform the calculations. As an example, we discuss models in which the corona is situated above and below a cold accretion disk with a plane-parallel (slab) geometry, similar to the model of Haardt & Maraschi. By Comptonizing the soft radiation emitted by the accretion disk, the corona is responsible for producing the high-energy component of the escaping radiation. Our models include the reprocessing of radiation in the accretion disk. Here the photons either are Compton-reflected or photoabsorbed, giving rise to fluorescent line emission and thermal emission. The self- consistent coronal temperature is determined by balancing heating (due to viscous energy dissipation) with Compton cooling, determined using the fully relativistic, angle-dependent cross sections. The total opacity is found by balancing pair productions with annihilations. We find that, for a disk temperature kT(sub BB) approx. less than 200 eV, these coronae are unable to have a self-consistent temperature higher than approx. 140 keV if the total optical depth is approx. less than 0.2, regardless of the compactness parameter of the corona and the seed opacity. This limitation corresponds to the angle-averaged spectrum of escaping radiation having a photon index approx. greater than 1.8 within the 5-30 keV band. Finally, all models that have reprocessing features also predict a large thermal excess at lower energies. These constraints make explaining the X-ray spectra of persistent black hole candidates with ADC models very problematic.

  4. Hard apex transition in quasi-periodic oscillators - Closing of the accretion gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehle, Garrett T.; Blandford, Roger D.

    1993-01-01

    We propose that the 'hard apex' transition in the X-ray two-color diagrams for low-mass X-ray binaries exhibiting quasi-periodic oscillation is associated with closure of a gap between the accretion disk and the star. At low accretion rates, gas crosses this gap intermittently. However, when the mass accretion rate increases, the disk thickens and its inner edge touches the star, thus forming a boundary layer through which the gas flows steadily. This explanation is viable provided that the equation of state of nuclear matter is not significantly harder than the Bethe-Johnson I prescription. Accretion gap scenarios are possibly distinguishable from models which invoke a small magnetosphere around the neutron star, in that they preclude large stellar magnetic fields and associate the high-frequency (horizontal-branch) oscillations with different sites.

  5. Dynamic modelling of packaging material flow systems.

    PubMed

    Tsiliyannis, Christos A

    2005-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed for reused and recycled packaging material flows. It allows a rigorous description of the flows and stocks during the transition to new targets imposed by legislation, product demand variations or even by variations in consumer discard behaviour. Given the annual reuse and recycle frequency and packaging lifetime, the model determines all packaging flows (e.g., consumption and reuse) and variables through which environmental policy is formulated, such as recycling, waste and reuse rates and it identifies the minimum number of variables to be surveyed for complete packaging flow monitoring. Simulation of the transition to the new flow conditions is given for flows of packaging materials in Greece, based on 1995--1998 field inventory and statistical data. PMID:15864957

  6. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  7. ARE RADIO ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI POWERED BY ACCRETION OR BLACK HOLE SPIN?

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, B. R.; Rohanizadegan, Mina; Nulsen, P. E. J.

    2011-01-20

    We compare accretion and black hole spin as potential energy sources for outbursts from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Based on our adopted spin model, we find that the distribution of AGN power estimated from X-ray cavities is consistent with a broad range of both spin parameters and accretion rates. Sufficient quantities of molecular gas are available in most BCGs to power their AGNs by accretion alone. However, we find no correlation between AGN power and molecular gas mass over the range of jet power considered here. For a given AGN power, the BCG's gas mass and accretion efficiency, defined as the fraction of the available cold molecular gas that is required to power the AGN, both vary by more than two orders of magnitude. Most of the molecular gas in BCGs is apparently consumed by star formation or is driven out of the nucleus by the AGN before it reaches the nuclear black hole. Bondi accretion from hot atmospheres is generally unable to fuel powerful AGNs, unless their black holes are more massive than their bulge luminosities imply. We identify several powerful AGNs that reside in relatively gas-poor galaxies, indicating an unusually efficient mode of accretion, or that their AGNs are powered by another mechanism. If these systems are powered primarily by black hole spin rather than by accretion, spin must also be tapped efficiently in some systems, i.e., P{sub jet}> M-dot c{sup 2}, or their black hole masses must be substantially larger than the values implied by their bulge luminosities. We constrain the (model-dependent) accretion rate at the transition from radiatively inefficient to radiatively efficient accretion flows to be a few percent of the Eddington rate, a value that is consistent with other estimates.

  8. Impact of black hole's spin to power the accretion/outflow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-07-01

    I plan to address how important role the spin of black hole is playing to determine various features of accretion and outflow/jet. I will also attempt to explore the relative importance among magnetic fields, viscous and cooling processes of accretion flows and the Kerr parameter of black holes to determine observed features. This will be done based on magnetohydrodynamical modelling of the flow in the pseudo-Newtonian framework. Finally, I will attempt to predict the spin of black holes in observed sources.

  9. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  10. Hyper-Eddington mass accretion on to a black hole with super-Eddington luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yuya; Inayoshi, Kohei; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    We perform 1D radiation hydrodynamical simulations to solve accretion flows on to massive black holes (BHs) with a very high rate. Assuming that photon trapping limits the luminosity emerging from the central region to L ≲ LEdd, Inayoshi, Haiman & Ostriker (2016) have shown that an accretion flow settles to a `hyper-Eddington solution, with a steady and isothermal (T ≃ 8000 K) Bondi profile reaching ≳ 5000 times the Eddington accretion rate dot{M}_Eddequiv L_Edd/c^2. Here, we address the possibility that gas accreting with finite angular momentum forms a bright nuclear accretion disc, with a luminosity exceeding the Eddington limit (1 ≲ L/LEdd ≲ 100). Combining our simulations with an analytic model, we find that a transition to steady hyper-Eddington accretion still occurs, as long as the luminosity remains below L/LEdd ≲ 35 (MBH/104 M⊙)3/2(n∞/105 cm-3)(T∞/104 K)-3/2(r⋆/1014 cm)-1/2, where n∞ and T∞ are the density and temperature of the ambient gas, and r⋆ is the radius of the photosphere, at which radiation emerges. If the luminosity exceeds this value, accretion becomes episodic. Our results can be accurately recovered in a toy model of an optically thick spherical shell, driven by radiation force into a collapsing medium. When the central source is dimmer than the above critical value, the expansion of the shell is halted and reversed by ram pressure of the collapsing medium, and by shell's weight. Our results imply that rapid, unimpeded hyper-Eddington accretion is possible even if the luminosity of the central source far exceeds the Eddington limit, and can be either steady or strongly episodic.

  11. Electron thermodynamics in GRMHD simulations of low-luminosity black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, S. M.; Tchekhovskoy, A.; Quataert, E.; Chandra, M.; Gammie, C. F.

    2015-12-01

    Simple assumptions made regarding electron thermodynamics often limit the extent to which general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations can be applied to observations of low-luminosity accreting black holes. We present, implement, and test a model that self-consistently evolves an entropy equation for the electrons and takes into account the effects of spatially varying electron heating and relativistic anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. We neglect the backreaction of electron pressure on the dynamics of the accretion flow. Our model is appropriate for systems accreting at ≪10-5 of the Eddington accretion rate, so radiative cooling by electrons can be neglected. It can be extended to higher accretion rates in the future by including electron cooling and proton-electron Coulomb collisions. We present a suite of tests showing that our method recovers the correct solution for electron heating under a range of circumstances, including strong shocks and driven turbulence. Our initial applications to axisymmetric simulations of accreting black holes show that (1) physically motivated electron heating rates that depend on the local magnetic field strength yield electron temperature distributions significantly different from the constant electron-to-proton temperature ratios assumed in previous work, with higher electron temperatures concentrated in the coronal region between the disc and the jet; (2) electron thermal conduction significantly modifies the electron temperature in the inner regions of black hole accretion flows if the effective electron mean free path is larger than the local scaleheight of the disc (at least for the initial conditions and magnetic field configurations we study). The methods developed in this work are important for producing more realistic predictions for the emission from accreting black holes such as Sagittarius A* and M87; these applications will be explored in future work.

  12. Active states and structure transformations in accreting white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneva, Daniela; Kaygorodov, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    Active states in white dwarfs are usually associated with light curve's effects that concern to the bursts, flickering or flare-up occurrences. It is common that a gas-dynamics source exists for each of these processes there. We consider the white dwarf binary stars with accretion disc around the primary. We suggest a flow transformation modeling of the mechanisms that are responsible for ability to cause some flow instability and bring the white dwarfs system to the outburst's development. The processes that cause the accretion rate to sufficiently increase are discussed. Then the transition from a quiescent to an active state is realized. We analyze a quasi-periodic variability in the luminosity of white dwarf binary stars systems. The results are supported with an observational data.

  13. Cyclotron Resonance in Accreting Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipankar

    2016-07-01

    Cyclotron Resonance Absorption/Scattering features provide direct measurement of magnetic field strength in the line forming region. This has enabled the estimation of magnetic field strengths of nearly two dozen neutron stars in accreting high mass binary systems. With improved spectroscopic sensitivity, new X-ray observatories such as NuSTAR, Astrosat and Hitomi are opening the doors to studying detailed features such as the line shape and phase dependence with high significance. Such studies will help understand the nature of matter accumulation in, and outflow from, the magnetically confined accretion column on the neutron star. This talk will describe the results of MHD simulations of the matter flow in such systems, the diagnostics of such flows using cyclotron lines, and comparison with recent observations from NuSTAR and Astrosat.

  14. Turbulent motion of mass flows. Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglit, Margarita; Yakubenko, Alexander; Yakubenko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    New mathematical models for unsteady turbulent mass flows, e.g., dense snow avalanches and landslides, are presented. Such models are important since most of large scale flows are turbulent. In addition to turbulence, the two other important points are taken into account: the entrainment of the underlying material by the flow and the nonlinear rheology of moving material. The majority of existing models are based on the depth-averaged equations and the turbulent character of the flow is accounted by inclusion of drag proportional to the velocity squared. In this paper full (not depth-averaged) equations are used. It is assumed that basal entrainment takes place if the bed friction equals the shear strength of the underlying layer (Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011). The turbulent characteristics of the flow are calculated using a three-parameter differential model (Lushchik et al., 1978). The rheological properties of moving material are modeled by one of the three types of equations: 1) Newtonian fluid with high viscosity, 2) power-law fluid and 3) Bingham fluid. Unsteady turbulent flows down long homogeneous slope are considered. The flow dynamical parameters and entrainment rate behavior in time as well as their dependence on properties of moving and underlying materials are studied numerically. REFERENCES M.E. Eglit and A.E. Yakubenko, 2014. Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., 108, 139-148 Margarita E. Eglit and Alexander E. Yakubenko, 2016. The effect of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on dynamics of turbulent slope flows. Fluid Dynamics, 51(3) Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), 143-147 Lushchik, V.G., Paveliev, A.A. , and Yakubenko, A.E., 1978. Three-parameter model of shear turbulence. Fluid Dynamics, 13, (3), 350-362

  15. Compressor Flow Control Concepts. 2; UEET Compressor Flow Control Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2001-01-01

    Several passive flow control devices have been modeled computationally in the Swift CFD code. The models were applied to the first stage rotor and stator of the baseline UEET compressor in an attempt to improve efficiency and/or stall margin. The devices included suction surface bleed, tip injection, self-aspirated rotors, area-ruled casing, and vortex generators. The models and computed results will be described in the presentation. None of the results have shown significant gains in efficiency; however, casing vortex generators have shown potential improvements in stall margin.

  16. Structure and Spectroscopy of Black Hole Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D; Mauche, C

    2005-02-14

    The warped spacetime near black holes is one of the most exotic observable environments in the Universe. X-ray spectra from active galaxies obtained with the current generation of X-ray observatories reveal line emission that is modified by both special relativistic and general relativistic effects. The interpretation is that we are witnessing X-ray irradiated matter orbiting in an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole, as it prepares to cross the event horizon. This interpretation, however, is based upon highly schematized models of accretion disk structure. This report describes a project to design a detailed computer model of accretion disk atmospheres, with the goal of elucidating the high radiation density environments associated with mass flows in the curved spacetime near gravitationally collapsed objects. We have evolved the capability to generate realistic theoretical X-ray line spectra of accretion disks, thereby providing the means for a workable exploration of the behavior of matter in the strong-field limit of gravitation.

  17. Lattice-based flow field modeling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Zhao, Ye; Fan, Zhe; Li, Wei; Qiu, Feng; Yoakum-Stover, Suzanne; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an approach for simulating the natural dynamics that emerge from the interaction between a flow field and immersed objects. We model the flow field using the Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM) with boundary conditions appropriate for moving objects and accelerate the computation on commodity graphics hardware (GPU) to achieve real-time performance. The boundary conditions mediate the exchange of momentum between the flow field and the moving objects resulting in forces exerted by the flow on the objects as well as the back-coupling on the flow. We demonstrate our approach using soap bubbles and a feather. The soap bubbles illustrate Fresnel reflection, reveal the dynamics of the unseen flow field in which they travel, and display spherical harmonics in their undulations. Our simulation allows the user to directly interact with the flow field to influence the dynamics in real time. The free feather flutters and gyrates in response to lift and drag forces created by its motion relative to the flow. Vortices are created as the free feather falls in an otherwise quiescent flow. PMID:15527053

  18. Mathematical Models of Continuous Flow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saville, D. A.; Snyder, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Development of high resolution continuous flow electrophoresis devices ultimately requires comprehensive understanding of the ways various phenomena and processes facilitate or hinder separation. A comprehensive model of the actual three dimensional flow, temperature and electric fields was developed to provide guidance in the design of electrophoresis chambers for specific tasks and means of interpreting test data on a given chamber. Part of the process of model development includes experimental and theoretical studies of hydrodynamic stability. This is necessary to understand the origin of mixing flows observed with wide gap gravitational effects. To insure that the model accurately reflects the flow field and particle motion requires extensive experimental work. Another part of the investigation is concerned with the behavior of concentrated sample suspensions with regard to sample stream stability particle-particle interactions which might affect separation in an electric field, especially at high field strengths. Mathematical models will be developed and tested to establish the roles of the various interactions.

  19. Transient Wellbore Fluid Flow Model

    1982-04-06

    WELBORE is a code to solve transient, one-dimensional two-phase or single-phase non-isothermal fluid flow in a wellbore. The primary thermodynamic variables used in solving the equations are the pressure and specific energy. An equation of state subroutine provides the density, quality, and temperature. The heat loss out of the wellbore is calculated by solving a radial diffusion equation for the temperature changes outside the bore. The calculation is done at each node point in themore » wellbore.« less

  20. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  1. Modeling groundwater flow and quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Glynn, Pierre D.; Selinus, Olle

    2013-01-01

    In most areas, rocks in the subsurface are saturated with water at relatively shallow depths. The top of the saturated zone—the water table—typically occurs anywhere from just below land surface to hundreds of feet below the land surface. Groundwater generally fills all pore spaces below the water table and is part of a continuous dynamic flow system, in which the fluid is moving at velocities ranging from feet per millennia to feet per day (Fig. 33.1). While the water is in close contact with the surfaces of various minerals in the rock material, geochemical interactions between the water and the rock can affect the chemical quality of the water, including pH, dissolved solids composition, and trace-elements content. Thus, flowing groundwater is a major mechanism for the transport of chemicals from buried rocks to the accessible environment, as well as a major pathway from rocks to human exposure and consumption. Because the mineral composition of rocks is highly variable, as is the solubility of various minerals, the human-health effects of groundwater consumption will be highly variable.

  2. General single phase wellbore flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Liang-Biao; Arbabi, S.; Aziz, K.

    1997-02-05

    A general wellbore flow model, which incorporates not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow, is presented in this report. The new wellbore model is readily applicable to any wellbore perforation patterns and well completions, and can be easily incorporated in reservoir simulators or analytical reservoir inflow models. Three dimensionless numbers, the accelerational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub af}, the gravitational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub gf}, and the inflow-directional to accelerational pressure gradient ratio R{sub da}, have been introduced to quantitatively describe the relative importance of different pressure gradient components. For fluid flow in a production well, it is expected that there may exist up to three different regions of the wellbore: the laminar flow region, the partially-developed turbulent flow region, and the fully-developed turbulent flow region. The laminar flow region is located near the well toe, the partially-turbulent flow region lies in the middle of the wellbore, while the fully-developed turbulent flow region is at the downstream end or the heel of the wellbore. Length of each region depends on fluid properties, wellbore geometry and flow rate. As the distance from the well toe increases, flow rate in the wellbore increases and the ratios R{sub af} and R{sub da} decrease. Consequently accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops have the greatest impact in the toe region of the wellbore. Near the well heel the local wellbore flow rate becomes large and close to the total well production rate, here R{sub af} and R{sub da} are small, therefore, both the accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops can be neglected.

  3. Modes of crustal accretion and their implications for hydrothermal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Rüpke, Lars H.; Hasenclever, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    Hydrothermal convection at mid-ocean ridges links the ocean's long-term chemical evolution to solid earth processes, forms hydrothermal ore deposits, and sustains the unique chemosynthetic vent fauna. Yet the depth extent of hydrothermal cooling and the inseparably connected question of how the lower crust accretes remain poorly constrained. Here based on coupled models of crustal accretion and hydrothermal circulation, we provide new insights into which modes of lower crust formation and hydrothermal cooling are thermally viable and most consistent with observations at fast-spreading ridges. We integrate numerical models with observations of melt lens depth, thermal structure, and melt fraction. Models matching all these observations always require a deep crustal-scale hydrothermal flow component and less than 50% of the lower crust crystallizing in situ.

  4. Holistic Flow Model of Spiritual Wellness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Melanie; Dupey, Peggy

    2005-01-01

    The Holistic Flow Model of Spiritual Wellness is a conceptualization of spiritual health and well-being that has implications for clinical practice and research. The model is unique in its placement of the spirit at the center of Life and in its fluid vision of the spirit. The authors present the model after a discussion of spirituality and the…

  5. A compendium of fracture flow models, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Diodato, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    The report is designed to be used as a decision-making aid for individuals who need to simulate fluid flow in fractured porous media. Fracture flow codes of varying capability in the public and private domain were identified in a survey of government, academia, and industry. The selection and use of an appropriate code requires conceptualization of the geology, physics, and chemistry (for transport) of the fracture flow problem to be solved. Conceptual models that have been invoked to describe fluid flow in fractured porous media include explicit discrete fracture, dual continuum (porosity and/or permeability), discrete fracture network, multiple interacting continua, multipermeability/multiporosity, and single equivalent continuum. The explicit discrete-fracture model is a ``near-field`` representation, the single equivalent continuum model is a ``far-field`` representation, and the dual-continuum model is intermediate to those end members. Of these, the dual-continuum model is the most widely employed. The concept of multiple interacting continua has been applied in a limited number of examples. Multipermeability/multiporosity provides a unified conceptual model. The ability to accurately describe fracture flow phenomena will continue to improve as a result of advances in fracture flow research and computing technology. This improvement will result in enhanced capability to protect the public environment, safety, and health.

  6. Detrital Zircon Geochronology: New Evidence for an Old Model for Accretion of the Southwest Baltic Shield.

    PubMed

    de Haas GJ; Andersen; Vestin

    1999-09-01

    Disruption of the original crustal architecture as a result of tectonic events often complicates studies of the crustal evolution of Precambrian cratons. Ion-probe U-Pb dating of detrital zircons is one way to circumvent this problem. It yields a "fingerprint" of the source of the metasedimentary host that can be used to tie the host to a counterpart elsewhere. In this study, ion-probe U-Pb dating of detrital zircons from segments of the late Mesoproterozoic Southwest Scandinavian Domain (SSD) of the Baltic Shield provides new evidence for an old model of crustal evolution and tectonic development. Zircon ages for both the pebble and matrix fraction of the Seljord conglomerate, Telemark sector, Norway, show a 1.9-1.7-Ga frequency maximum, as was previously recognized for metasediments from the adjacent Bamble sector. However, the Telemark metasediments lack evidence for significant input of 1.4-1.6-Ga-old crustal material, characteristic of some of the Bamble metasediments. A maximum depositional age of ca. 1450 Ma is inferred for the Seljord conglomerate and a quartzite from the Bamble sector. Definite evidence for significant amounts of pre-1.6-Ga crust in the SSD is absent. Instead, provenance from the early Mesoproterozoic Svecofennian Domain for the 1.9-1.7-Ga crust is proposed, supported by the omnipresence of small amounts of Archean zircons and the distribution of Nd model ages of these and other SSD metasediments. It is proposed that the SSD originally formed a single, continuous belt, fringing the Baltic Shield, with the northernmost segments transported to their current position west of the Oslo rift along north-south-trending shear zones, i.e., at odds with the commonly held view of progressive westward growth of the Baltic Shield. The detrital zircon ages from the Faurefjell quartzite, Rogaland-Vest Agder sector, cluster around 1.65 Ga and reveal a maximum depositional age of 1244+/-40 Ma. Its deviating depositional setting indicates that the Rogaland

  7. DETECTION OF ACCRETION X-RAYS FROM QS Vir: CATACLYSMIC OR A LOT OF HOT AIR?

    SciTech Connect

    Matranga, Marco; Drake, Jeremy J.; Kashyap, Vinay; Steeghs, Danny

    2012-03-10

    An XMM-Newton observation of the nearby 'pre-cataclysmic' short-period (P{sub orb} = 3.62 hr) binary QS Vir (EC 13471-1258) revealed regular narrow X-ray eclipses when the white dwarf passed behind its M2-4 dwarf companion. The X-ray emission provides a clear signature of mass transfer and accretion onto the white dwarf. The low-resolution XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are consistent with a cooling flow model and indicate an accretion rate of M-dot = 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. At 48 pc distant, QS Vir is then the second nearest accreting cataclysmic variable known, with one of the lowest accretion rates found to date for a non-magnetic system. To feed this accretion through a wind would require a wind mass-loss rate of M-dot {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} if the accretion efficiency is of the order of 10%. Consideration of likely mass-loss rates for M dwarfs suggests this is improbably high and pure wind accretion unlikely. A lack of accretion disk signatures also presents some difficulties for direct Roche lobe overflow. We speculate that QS Vir is on the verge of Roche lobe overflow, and that the observed mass transfer could be supplemented by upward chromospheric flows on the M dwarf, analogous to spicules and mottles on the Sun, that escape the Roche surface to be subsequently swept up into the white dwarf Roche lobe. If so, QS Vir would be in a rare evolutionary phase lasting only a million years. The X-ray luminosity of the M dwarf estimated during primary eclipse is L{sub X} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 28} erg s{sup -1}, which is consistent with that of rapidly rotating 'saturated' K and M dwarfs.

  8. Testing the cooling flow model in the intermediate polar EX Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Raymond, J. C.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Mauche, C. W.; Suleimanov, V.

    2015-06-01

    We use the best available X-ray data from the intermediate polar EX Hydrae to study the cooling-flow model often applied to interpret the X-ray spectra of these accreting magnetic white dwarf binaries. First, we resolve a long-standing discrepancy between the X-ray and optical determinations of the mass of the white dwarf in EX Hya by applying new models of the inner disk truncation radius. Our fits to the X-ray spectrum now agree with the white dwarf mass of 0.79 M⊙ determined using dynamical methods through spectroscopic observations of the secondary. We use a simple isobaric cooling flow model to derive the emission line fluxes, emission measure distribution, and H-like to He-like line ratios for comparison with the 496 ks Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observation of EX Hydrae. We find that the H/He ratios are not well reproduced by this simple isobaric cooling flow model and show that while H-like line fluxes can be accurately predicted, fluxes of lower-Z He-like lines are significantly underestimated. This discrepancy suggests that an extra heating mechanism plays an important role at the base of the accretion column, where cooler ions form. We thus explored more complex cooling models, including the change of gravitational potential with height in the accretion column and a magnetic dipole geometry. None of these modifications to the standard cooling flow model are able to reproduce the observed line ratios. While a cooling flow model with subsolar (0.1 ⊙) abundances is able to reproduce the line ratios by reducing the cooling rate at temperatures lower than ~107.3 K, the predicted line-to-continuum ratios are much lower than observed. We discuss and discard mechanisms, such as photoionization, departures from constant pressure, resonant scattering, different electron-ion temperatures, and Compton cooling. Thermal conduction transfers energy from the region above 107 K, where the H-like lines are mostly formed, to the cooler regions where the

  9. A model for insect tracheolar flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Anne; Chatterjee, Krishnashis

    2015-11-01

    Tracheoles are the terminal ends of the microscale tracheal channels present in most insect respiratory systems that transport air directly to the tissue. From a fluid dynamics perspective, tracheolar flow is notable because it lies at the intersection of several specialized fluid flow regimes. The flow through tracheoles is creeping, microscale gas flow in the rarefied regime. Here, we use lubrication theory to model the flow through a single microscale tracheole and take into account fluid-structure interactions through an imposed periodic wall deformation corresponding to the rhythmic abdominal compression found in insects, and rarefaction effects using slip boundary conditions. We compare the pressure, axial pressure gradient, and axial and radial velocities in the channel, and the volumetric flow rate through the channel for no-slip, low slip, and high slip conditions under two different channel deformation regimes. We find that the presence of slip tends to reduce the flow rate through the model tracheole and hypothesize that one of the mechanical functions of tracheoles is to act as a diffuser to decelerate the flow, enhance mixing, and increase the residency time of freshly oxygenated air at the surface of the tissue. This work was funded by the NSF under grant no. 1437387.

  10. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    SciTech Connect

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  11. Reduced order model of draft tube flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, P.; Štefan, D.

    2014-03-01

    Swirling flow with compact coherent structures is very good candidate for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), i.e. for decomposition into eigenmodes, which are the cornerstones of the flow field. Present paper focuses on POD of steady flows, which correspond to different operating points of Francis turbine draft tube flow. Set of eigenmodes is built using a limited number of snapshots from computational simulations. Resulting reduced order model (ROM) describes whole operating range of the draft tube. ROM enables to interpolate in between the operating points exploiting the knowledge about significance of particular eigenmodes and thus reconstruct the velocity field in any operating point within the given range. Practical example, which employs axisymmetric simulations of the draft tube flow, illustrates accuracy of ROM in regions without vortex breakdown together with need for higher resolution of the snapshot database close to location of sudden flow changes (e.g. vortex breakdown). ROM based on POD interpolation is very suitable tool for insight into flow physics of the draft tube flows (especially energy transfers in between different operating points), for supply of data for subsequent stability analysis or as an initialization database for advanced flow simulations.

  12. Modeling of Turbulent Free Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; DeBonis, James R.; Georgiadis, Nicolas J.

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of turbulent free shear flows is crucial to the simulation of many aerospace applications, yet often receives less attention than the modeling of wall boundary layers. Thus, while turbulence model development in general has proceeded very slowly in the past twenty years, progress for free shear flows has been even more so. This paper highlights some of the fundamental issues in modeling free shear flows for propulsion applications, presents a review of past modeling efforts, and identifies areas where further research is needed. Among the topics discussed are differences between planar and axisymmetric flows, development versus self-similar regions, the effect of compressibility and the evolution of compressibility corrections, the effect of temperature on jets, and the significance of turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers for reacting shear flows. Large eddy simulation greatly reduces the amount of empiricism in the physical modeling, but is sensitive to a number of numerical issues. This paper includes an overview of the importance of numerical scheme, mesh resolution, boundary treatment, sub-grid modeling, and filtering in conducting a successful simulation.

  13. Effects of Compton Cooling on Outflows in a Two Component Accretion Flow around a Black Hole: Results of a Coupled Monte Carlo-Tvd Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garain, Sudip K.; Ghosh, Himadri; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of cooling on the outflow rate from an accretion disk around a black hole is investigated using a coupled Monte Carlo Total Variation Diminishing code. A correlation between the spectral states and the outflow rates is found as a consequence.

  14. GENERALIZED VISCOPLASTIC MODELING OF DEBRIS FLOW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1988-01-01

    The earliest model developed by R. A. Bagnold was based on the concept of the 'dispersive' pressure generated by grain collisions. Some efforts have recently been made by theoreticians in non-Newtonian fluid mechanics to modify or improve Bagnold's concept or model. A viable rheological model should consist both of a rate-independent part and a rate-dependent part. A generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model that has both parts as well as two major rheological properties (i. e. , the normal stress effect and soil yield criterion) is shown to be sufficiently accurate, yet practical for general use in debris-flow modeling. In fact, Bagnold's model is found to be only a particular case of the GVF model. analytical solutions for (steady) uniform debris flows in wide channels are obtained from the GVF model based on Bagnold's simplified assumption of constant grain concentration.

  15. Towards a new modelling of gas flows in a semi-analytical model of galaxy formation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, M.; Lagache, G.; Bethermin, M.; Guiderdoni, B.

    2015-03-01

    We present an extended version of the semi-analytical model, GalICS. Like its predecessor, eGalICS applies a post-treatment of the baryonic physics on pre-computed dark-matter merger trees extracted from an N-body simulation. We review all the mechanisms that affect, at any given time, the formation and evolution of a galaxy in its host dark-matter halo. We mainly focus on the gas cycle from the smooth cosmological accretion to feedback processes. To follow this cycle with a high accuracy, we introduce some novel prescriptions: i) a smooth baryonic accretion with two phases: a cold mode and a hot mode built on the continuous dark-matter accretion. In parallel to this smooth accretion, we implement the standard photoionisation modelling to reduce the input gas flow on the smallest structures. ii) a complete monitoring of the hot gas phase. We compute the evolution of the core density, the mean temperature and the instantaneous escape fraction of the hot atmosphere by considering that the hot gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium in the dark-matter potential well, and by applying a principle of conservation of energy on the treatment of gas accretion, supernovae and super massive black hole feedback iii) a new treatment for disc instabilities based on the formation, the migration and the disruption of giant clumps. The migration of such clumps in gas-rich galaxies allows to form pseudo-bulges. The different processes in the gas cycle act on different time scales, and we thus build an adaptive time-step scheme to solve the evolution equations. The model presented here is compared in detail to the observations of stellar-mass functions, star formation rates, and luminosity functions, in a companion paper. Model outputs are available at the CDS. Model outputs are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/575/A33

  16. On the Structure of Accretion Disks with Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Cheng-Liang; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2011-06-01

    To study the outflows from accretion disks, we solve the set of hydrodynamic equations for accretion disks in spherical coordinates (rθphi) to obtain the explicit structure along the θ-direction. Using self-similar assumptions in the radial direction, we change the equations to a set of ordinary differential equations about the θ-coordinate, which are then solved with symmetrical boundary conditions in the equatorial plane; the velocity field is then obtained. The α viscosity prescription is applied and an advective factor f is used to simplify the energy equation. The results display thinner, quasi-Keplerian disks for Shakura-Sunyaev disks; thicker, sub-Keplerian disks for advection-dominated accretion flows; and slim disks which are consistent with previous popular analytical models. However, an inflow region and an outflow region always exist, except when the viscosity parameter α is too large, which supports the results of some recent numerical simulation works. Our results indicate that the outflows should be common in various accretion disks and may be stronger in slim disks, where both advection and radiation pressure are dominant. We also present the structure's dependence on the input parameters and discuss their physical meanings. The caveats of this work and possible improvements for the future are discussed.

  17. Thin accretion discs are stabilized by a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sądowski, Aleksander

    2016-07-01

    By studying three-dimensional, radiative, global simulations of sub-Eddington, geometrically thin (H/R ≈ 0.15) black hole accretion flows we show that thin discs which are dominated by magnetic pressure are stable against thermal instability. Such discs are thicker than predicted by the standard model and show significant amount of dissipation inside the marginally stable orbit. Radiation released in this region, however, does not escape to infinity but is advected into the black hole. We find that the resulting accretion efficiency (5.5 ± 0.5 per cent for the simulated 0.8dot{M}_Edd disc) is very close to the predicted by the standard model (5.7 per cent).

  18. Simple leakage flow model for brush seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Raymond E.; Dowler, Constance A.; Holle, Glenn F.

    1991-06-01

    Brush seals are potential replacements for some or most of the air-to-air labyrinth seals in gas turbine engines. A simple flow model is presented to generalize brush seal leakage performance throughout the range of test and application environments. The model uses a single parameter, effective brush thickness, to correlate flow through the seal. This effective brush thickness is a measure of the compactness of the bristle bed. Initial model results have been obtained using leakage flow data from two investigators. The results indicate that this simple single parameter model gives insight into the active nature of a brush seal and approximately accounts for the effect of fluid temperature, especially at the higher pressure ratios, where brush seals are commonly applied.

  19. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

  20. Why Do T Tauri Disks Accrete?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; D'Alessio, Paola; Calvet, Nuria; Muzerolle, James

    2006-01-01

    Observations of T Tauri stars and young brown dwarfs suggest that the accretion rates of their disks scales roughly with the square of the central stellar mass. No dependence of accretion rate on stellar mass is predicted by the simplest version of the Gammie layered disk model, in which nonthermal ionization of upper disk layers allows accretion to occur via the magnetorotational instability. We show that a minor modification of Gaminie's model to include heating by irradiation from the central star yields a modest dependence of accretion on the mass of the central star. A purely viscous disk model could provide a strong dependence of accretion rate on stellar mass if the initial disk radius (before much viscous evolution has occurred) has a strong dependence on stellar mass. However, it is far from clear that at least the most massive pre-main-sequence disks can be totally magnetically activated by X-rays or cosmic rays. We suggest that a combination of effects are responsible for the observed dependence, with the lowest mass stars having the lowest mass disks, which can be thoroughly magnetically active, while the higher mass stars have higher mass disks that have layered accret,ion and relatively inactive or "dead" central zones at some radii. In such dead zones, we suggest that gravitational instabilities may play a role in allowing accretion to proceed. In this connection, we emphasize the uncertainty in disk masses derived from dust emission and argue that T Tauri disk masses have been systematically underestimated by conventional analyses. Furtlier study of accretion rates, especially in the lowest mass stars, would help to clarify the mechanisms of accretion in T Tauri stars.

  1. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O.

    1994-04-04

    Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

  2. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-08-02

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  3. Analytic Model of Reactive Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2004-11-15

    A simple analytic model allows prediction of rate constants and size effect behavior before a hydrocode run if size effect data exists. At infinite radius, it defines not only detonation velocity but also average detonation rate, pressure and energy. This allows the derivation of a generalized radius, which becomes larger as the explosive becomes more non-ideal. The model is applied to near-ideal PBX 9404, in-between ANFO and most non-ideal AN. The power of the pressure declines from 2.3, 1.5 to 0.8 across this set. The power of the burn fraction, F, is 0.8, 0 and 0, so that an F-term is important only for the ideal explosives. The size effect shapes change from concave-down to nearly straight to concave-up. Failure is associated with ideal explosives when the calculated detonation velocity turns in a double-valued way. The effect of the power of the pressure may be simulated by including a pressure cutoff in the detonation rate. The models allows comparison of a wide spectrum of explosives providing that a single detonation rate is feasible.

  4. Advanced Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gerz, Thomas

    The present chapter introduces the method of computational simulation to predict and study turbulent atmospheric flows. This includes a description of the fundamental approach to computational simulation and the practical implementation using the technique of large-eddy simulation. In addition, selected contributions from IPA scientists to computational model development and various examples for applications are given. These examples include homogeneous turbulence, convective boundary layers, heated forest canopy, buoyant thermals, and large-scale flows with baroclinic wave instability.

  5. Doppler probe of accretion onto a T Tauri star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P. P.; Gahm, G. F.; Herczeg, G. J.; Stempels, H. C.; Walter, F. M.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The YY Ori stars are T Tauri stars with prominent time-variable redshifted absorption components that flank certain emission lines. S CrA, one of the brightest of these stars, affords the rare opportunity of directly probing the accretion processes on the line of sight to one of the components of this wide visual pair. Aims: We followed the spectral changes in S CrA to derive the physical structure of the accreting gas. Methods: A series of high-resolution spectra of the two components of S CrA was obtained during four nights with the UVES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. Results: We found that both stars are very similar with regard to surface temperature, radius, and mass. Variable redshifted absorption components are particularly prominent in the SE component. During one night, this star developed a spectrum unique among the T Tauri stars: extremely strong and broad redshifted absorption components appeared in many lines of neutral and ionized metals, in addition to those of hydrogen and helium. The absorption depths of cooler, low-ionization lines peak at low velocities - while more highly ionized lines have peak absorption depths at high velocities. The different line profiles indicate that the temperature and density of the accretion stream increase as material approaches the star. We derive the physical conditions of the flow at several points along the accretion funnel directly from the spectrum of the infalling gas. We estimated mass accretion rates of about 10-7 M⊙/yr, which is similar to that derived from the relation based on the strength of Hα emission line. Conclusions: This is the first time the density and temperature distributions in accretion flows around a T Tauri star have been inferred from observations. Compared with predictions from standard models of accretion in T Tauri stars, which assume a dipole stellar magnetic field, we obtained higher densities and a steeper temperature rise toward the star. Based on observations

  6. Diagnosing the Black Hole Accretion Physics of Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni; Ashby, Matthew; Baganoff, Frederick; Becklin, Eric; Carey, Sean; Gammie, Charles; Ghez, Andrea; Glaccum, William; Gurwell, Mark; Haggard, Daryl; Hora, Joseph; Ingalls, James; Marrone, Daniel; Meyer, Leo; Morris, Mark; Smith, Howard; Willner, Steven; Witzel, Gunther

    2016-08-01

    The Galactic center offers the closest opportunity for studying accretion onto supermassive black holes. The fluctuating source, Sgr A*, is detected across the electromagnetic spectrum and may originate in the accretion flow or jet. Recent general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic (GRMHD) models indicate that variability can be produced by a tilted inner disk, gravitational lensing of bright spots in the disk by the hole, or particle acceleration in reconnection events. These models produce different flare characteristics, and in particular better characterization of flares may enable us to distinguish between strong and weakly magnetized disks. Disentangling the power source and emission mechanisms of the flares is a central challenge to our understanding of the Sgr A* accretion flow. Following our successful observations of the variability of Sgr A* with IRAC in 2013 and 2014, we propose simultaneous IRAC (4.5 micron) and Chandra (2-10 keV) observations to (1) probe the accretion physics of Sgr A* on event-horizon scales and (2) detect any effect of the object G2 on Sgr A*. Specifically, we propose six additional epochs of observation, each of 24 uninterrupted hours; four in 2017 July and two in 2018 July. In this proposal we request two 24-hour (86.4 ks) Chandra periods, and are requesting another four through the Chandra TAC to have simultaneous X-ray observations in each of the six Spitzer epochs. Independent of this proposal we will also request NuSTAR (3-79 keV), SMA/ALMA/APEX (0.8 mm), and Keck/Magellan NIR (2.2 micron) observations during the IRAC/Chandra epochs. Only such long-duration, continuous, multi-wavelength observations can achieve a comprehensive view of the dominant emission process(es) and quantify the physical properties near the event horizon. Theoretical models are increasing in physical sophistication, and our study will provide essential constraints for the next generation of models.

  7. Preliminary Saturated-Zone Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-10

    This milestone consists of an updated fully 3D model of ground-water flow within the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. All electronic files pertaining to this deliverable have been transferred via ftp transmission to Steve Bodnar (M and O) and the technical data base. The model was developed using a flow and transport simulator, FEHMN, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and represents a collaborative effort between staff from the US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model contained in this deliverable is minimally calibrated and represents work in progress. The flow model developed for this milestone is designed to feed subsequent transport modeling studies at Los Alamos which also use the FEHMN software. In addition, a general-application parameter estimation routine, PEST, was used in conjunction with FEHMN to reduce the difference between observed and simulated values of hydraulic head through the adjustment of model variables. This deliverable in large part consists of the electronic files for Yucca Mountain Site saturated-zone flow model as it existed as of 6/6/97, including the executable version of FEHMN (accession no. MOL.19970610.0204) used to run the code on a Sun Ultrasparc I workstation. It is expected that users of the contents of this deliverable be knowledgeable about the oration of FEHMN.

  8. The quiescent X-ray spectrum of accreting black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Reis, Rubens C.; Miller, Jon M.; Cackett, Edward M.; Degenaar, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    The quiescent state is the dominant accretion mode for black holes on all mass scales. Our knowledge of the X-ray spectrum is limited due to the characteristic low luminosity in this state. Herein, we present an analysis of the sample of dynamically confirmed stellar-mass black holes observed in quiescence in the Chandra/XMM-Newton/Suzaku era resulting in a sample of eight black holes with ˜570 ks of observations. In contrast to the majority of active galactic nuclei where observations are limited by contamination from diffuse gas, the stellar-mass systems allow for a clean study of the X-ray spectrum resulting from the accretion flow alone. The data are characterized using simple models. We find a model consisting of a power law or thermal bremsstrahlung to both provide excellent descriptions of the data, where we measure Γ = 2.06 ± 0.03 and kT = 5.03^{+0.33}_{-0.31} keV, respectively, in the 0.3-10 keV bandpass, at a median luminosity of Lx ˜ 5.5 × 10-7LEdd. This result in discussed in the context of our understanding of the accretion flow on to stellar and supermassive black holes at low luminosities.

  9. A void distribution model-flashing flow

    SciTech Connect

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new model for flashing flow based on wall nucleations is proposed here and the model predictions are compared with some experimental data. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites was used. Thus it was possible to avoid the usual assumption of a constant bubble number density. Comparisons of the model with the data shows that the model based on the nucleation site density correlation appears to be acceptable to describe the vapor generation in the flashing flow. For the limited data examined, the comparisons show rather satisfactory agreement without using a floating parameter to adjust the model. This result indicated that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic predictions of the flashing phenomenon is possible on the present wall nucleation based model.

  10. A Policy Model for Secure Information Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adetoye, Adedayo O.; Badii, Atta

    When a computer program requires legitimate access to confidential data, the question arises whether such a program may illegally reveal sensitive information. This paper proposes a policy model to specify what information flow is permitted in a computational system. The security definition, which is based on a general notion of information lattices, allows various representations of information to be used in the enforcement of secure information flow in deterministic or nondeterministic systems. A flexible semantics-based analysis technique is presented, which uses the input-output relational model induced by an attacker’s observational power, to compute the information released by the computational system. An illustrative attacker model demonstrates the use of the technique to develop a termination-sensitive analysis. The technique allows the development of various information flow analyses, parametrised by the attacker’s observational power, which can be used to enforce what declassification policies.

  11. NEUTRINO-COOLED ACCRETION MODEL WITH MAGNETIC COUPLING FOR X-RAY FLARES IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Yang; Gu Weimin; Liu Tong; Lu Jufu

    2013-08-20

    The neutrino-cooled accretion disk, which was proposed to work as the central engine of gamma-ray bursts, encounters difficulty in interpreting the X-ray flares after the prompt gamma-ray emission. In this paper, the magnetic coupling (MC) between the inner disk and the central black hole (BH) is taken into consideration. For mass accretion rates around 0.001 {approx} 0.1 M{sub Sun} s{sup -1}, our results show that the luminosity of neutrino annihilation can be significantly enhanced due to the coupling effects. As a consequence, after the gamma-ray emission, a remnant disk with mass M{sub disk} {approx}< 0.5 M{sub Sun} may power most of the observed X-ray flares with the rest frame duration less than 100 s. In addition, a comparison between the MC process and the Blandford-Znajek mechanism is shown on the extraction of BH rotational energy.

  12. A new integrated tectonic model for the Mesozoic-Early Cenozoic subduction, spreading, accretion and collision history of Tethys adjacent to the southern margin of Eurasia (NE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Parlak, Osman; Ustaömer, Timur; Taslı, Kemal; İnan, Nurdan; Dumitrica, Paulian; Karaoǧlan, Fatih

    2014-05-01

    A major Tethyan suture zone (İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan-Kars Suture Zone) borders the southern margin of Eurasia throughout the Pontides. In eastern Turkey the suture zone includes a range of redeposited terrigenous and volcanogenic sedimentary rocks, pelagic sedimentary rocks and also igneous/metamorphic rocks. The igneous rocks are mostly basaltic blocks and thrust sheets within melange, plus relatively intact, to dismembered, ophiolitic rocks (oceanic crust). Two alternative hypotheses have been developed and tested during this work: 1. The suture zone preserves a single Andean-type active continental margin associated with northward subduction, accretion and arc magmatism during Mesozoic-early Cenozoic time; 2. The suture zone preserves the remnants of two different subduction zones, namely a continental margin subduction zone (as above) and an intra-ocean subduction zone (preferred model). To determine the age of the oceanic crust, relevant to both hypotheses, zircons were extracted from basic ophiolitic rocks (both intact and dismembered) and dated by the U/Pb method (U238/U236) using an ion probe at Edinburgh University. This yielded the following results for the intact ophiolites (Ma): plagiogranite cutting sheeted dykes of the Refahiye ophiolite (east of Erzincan), 183.6±1.7 (2σ); isotropic gabbro from the Karadaǧ ophiolite (northeast of Erzurum), 179.4±1.7 (2σ). In addition, dismembered ophiolites gave the following ages: gabbro cumulate (Bayburt area), 186.2±1.4 (2σ), gabbro cumulate (N of Horasan), 178.1±1.8 (2σ). Furthermore, two samples from a kilometre-sized (arc-related) tonalite body, mapped as cutting a thrust sheet of ophiolitic isotropic gabbro in the Kırdaǧ area, yielded ages of 182.1±3.2 (2σ) and 185.1±3.0 (2σ) Ma. We infer that the ophiolitic and related magmatic arc rocks formed by spreading in a supra-subduction zone setting during the late Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian-Toarcian). This amends former assumptions of a Late

  13. Model flocks in a steady vortical flow.

    PubMed

    Baggaley, A W

    2015-05-01

    We modify the standard Vicsek model to clearly distinguish between intrinsic noise due to imperfect alignment between organisms and extrinsic noise due to fluid motion. We then consider the effect of a steady vortical flow, the Taylor-Green vortex, on the dynamics of the flock, for various flow speeds, with a fixed intrinsic particle speed. We pay particular attention to the morphology of the flow, and quantify its filamentarity. Strikingly, above a critical flow speed there is a pronounced increase in the filamentarity of the flock, when compared to the zero-flow case. This is due to the fact that particles appear confined to areas of low vorticity; a familiar phenomena, commonly seen in the clustering of inertial particles in vortical flows. Hence, the cooperative motion of the particles gives them an effective inertia, which is seen to have a profound effect on the morphology of the flock, in the presence of external fluid motion. Finally, we investigate the angle between the flow and the particles direction of movement and find it follows a power-law distribution. PMID:26066260

  14. Effects of ice accretions on aircraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Frank T.; Khodadoust, Abdollah

    2001-11-01

    This article is a systematic and comprehensive review, correlation, and assessment of test results available in the public domain which address the aerodynamic performance and control degradations caused by various types of ice accretions on the lifting surfaces of fixed wing aircraft. To help put the various test results in perspective, overviews are provided first of the important factors and limitations involved in computational and experimental icing simulation techniques, as well as key aerodynamic testing simulation variables and governing flow physics issues. Following these are the actual reviews, assessments, and correlations of a large number of experimental measurements of various forms of mostly simulated in-flight and ground ice accretions, augmented where appropriate by similar measurements for other analogous forms of surface contamination and/or disruptions. In-flight icing categories reviewed include the initial and inter-cycle ice accretions inherent in the use of de-icing systems which are of particular concern because of widespread misconceptions about the thickness of such accretions which can be allowed before any serious consequences occur, and the runback/ridge ice accretions typically associated with larger-than-normal water droplet encounters which are of major concern because of the possible potential for catastrophic reductions in aerodynamic effectiveness. The other in-flight ice accretion category considered includes the more familiar large rime and glaze ice accretions, including ice shapes with rather grotesque features, where the concern is that, in spite of all the research conducted to date, the upper limit of penalties possible has probably not been defined. Lastly, the effects of various possible ground frost/ice accretions are considered. The concern with some of these is that for some types of configurations, all of the normally available operating margins to stall at takeoff may be erased if these accretions are not

  15. Modeling magnetically insulated devices using flow impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Rosenthal, S.E. )

    1995-04-01

    In modern pulsed power systems the electric field stresses at metal surfaces in vacuum transmission lines are so high that negative surfaces are space-charge-limited electron emitters. These electrons do not cause unacceptable losses because magnetic fields due to system currents result in net motion parallel to the electrodes. It has been known for several years that a parameter known as flow impedance is useful for describing these flows. Flow impedance is a measure of the separation between the anode and the mean position of the electron cloud, and it will be shown in this paper that in many situations flow impedance depends upon the geometry of the transmission line upstream of the point of interest. It can be remarkably independent of other considerations such as line currents and voltage. For this reason flow impedance is a valuable design parameter. Models of impedance transitions and voltage adders using flow impedance will be developed. Results of these models will be compared to two-dimensional, time-dependent, particle-in-cell simulations.

  16. A Substance Flow Model for Global Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccari, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    A system-based substance flow model (SFM) for phosphorus is developed based on the global phosphorus substance flow analysis (SFA) of Cordell et al (2009). The model is based strictly on mass balance considerations. It predicts the sensitivity of phosphorus consumption to various interventions intended to conserve reserves, as well as interactions among these efforts, allowing a comparison of their impacts on phosphorus demand. The interventions include control of phosphorus losses from soil erosion, food production and food waste, or phosphorus recycling such as from animal manure or human waste.

  17. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  18. THE ELECTROMAGNETIC MODEL OF SHORT GRBs, THE NATURE OF PROMPT TAILS, SUPERNOVA-LESS LONG GRBs, AND HIGHLY EFFICIENT EPISODIC ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-05-01

    Many short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) show prompt tails lasting up to hundreds of seconds that can be energetically dominant over the initial sub-second spike. In this paper we develop an electromagnetic model of short GRBs that explains the two stages of the energy release, the prompt spike and the prompt tail. The key ingredient of the model is the recent discovery that an isolated black hole can keep its open magnetic flux for times much longer than the collapse time and thus can spin down electromagnetically, driving the relativistic wind. First, the merger is preceded by an electromagnetic precursor wind with total power L{sub p} Almost-Equal-To (((GM{sub NS}){sup 3}B{sub NS}{sup 2})/c{sup 5}R){proportional_to}(-t){sup - Vulgar-Fraction-One-Quarter }, reaching 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} for typical neutron star masses of 1.4 M{sub Sun} and magnetic fields B {approx} 10{sup 12} G. If a fraction of this power is converted into pulsar-like coherent radio emission, this may produce an observable radio burst of a few milliseconds (like the Lorimer burst). At the active stage of the merger, two neutron stars produce a black hole surrounded by an accretion torus in which the magnetic field is amplified to {approx}10{sup 15} G. This magnetic field extracts the rotational energy of the black hole and drives an axially collimated electromagnetic wind that may carry of the order of 10{sup 50} erg, limited by the accretion time of the torus, a few hundred milliseconds. For observers nearly aligned with the orbital normal this is seen as a classical short GRB. After the accretion of the torus, the isolated black hole keeps the open magnetic flux and drives the equatorially (not axially) collimated outflow, which is seen by an observer at intermediate polar angles as a prompt tail. The tail carries more energy than the prompt spike, but its emission is de-boosted for observers along the orbital normal. Observers in the equatorial plane miss the prompt spike

  19. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  20. Modelling flow-induced crystallisation in polymers.

    PubMed

    Graham, Richard S

    2014-04-01

    Flow profoundly influences the crystallisation kinetics and morphology of polymeric materials. By distorting the configuration of polymer chains, flow breaks down the kinetic barriers to crystallisation and directs the resulting crystallisation. This flow-induced crystallisation (FIC) in polymers is a fascinating, externally driven, non-equilibrium phase transition, which is controlled by kinetics. Furthermore, the effect is of central importance to the polymer industry as crystallisation determines virtually all of the useful properties of semi-crystalline polymer products. However, simulating flow-induced crystallisation in polymers is notoriously difficult due to the very wide spread of length and timescales, especially as the most pronounced flow-induced effects occur for long chains at low undercooling. In this article I will discuss multiscale modelling techniques for polymer FIC. In particular, I will review recent attempts to connect modelling approaches across different levels of coarse-graining. This has the ultimate aim of passing insight from the most detailed simulation techniques to more tractable approaches intended to model polymer processing. I will discuss the exciting prospects for future work in this area.

  1. Modeling Stromatolite Growth Under Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, H. J.; Gong, J.; Tice, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stromatolite growth models based on diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) has been fairly successful at producing features commonly recognized in stromatolitic structures in the rock record. These models generally require slow mixing of solutes at time scales comparable to the growth of organisms and largely ignore fluid erosions. Recent research on microbial mats suggests that fluid flow might have a dominant control on the formation, deformation and erosion of surface microbial structures, raising the possibility that different styles of fluid flow may influence the morphology of stromatolites. Many stromatolites formed in relatively high energy, shallow water environments under oscillatory currents driven by wind-induced waves. In order to investigate the potential role of oscillatory flows in shaping stromatolites, we are constructing a numerical model of stromatolite growth parameterized by flume experiments with cyanobacterial biofilms. The model explicitly incorporates reaction-diffusion processes, surface deformation and erosion, biomass growth, sedimentation and mineral precipitation. A Lattice-Boltzmann numerical scheme was applied to the reaction-diffusion equations in order to boost computational efficiency. A basic finite element method was employed to compute surface deformation and erosion. Growth of biomass, sedimentation and carbonate precipitation was based on a modified discrete cellular automata scheme. This model will be used to test an alternative hypothesis for the formation of stromatolites in higher energy, shallow and oscillatory flow environments.

  2. Slurry fired heater cold-flow modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Moujaes, S.F.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical work leading to the scale-up of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant slurry fired heater. The scale-up involved a theoretical model using empirical relations in the derivation, and employed variables such as flow conditions, liquid viscosity, and slug frequency. Such variables have been shown to affect the heat transfer characteristics ofthe system. The model assumes that, if all other variables remain constant, the heat transfer coefficient can be scaled up proportional to D/sup -2/3/ (D = inside diameter of the fired heater tube). All flow conditions, liquid viscosities, and pipe inclinations relevant to the demonstration plant have indicated a slug flow regime in the slurry fired heater. The annular and stratified flow regimes should be avoided to minimize the potential for excessive pipe erosion and to decrease temperature gradients along the pipe cross section leading to coking and thermal stresses, respectively. Cold-flow studies in 3- and 6.75-in.-inside-diameter (ID) pipes were conducted to determine the effect of scale-up on flow regime, slug frequency, and slug dimensions. The developed model assumes that conduction heat transfer occurs through the liquid film surrounding the gas slug and laminar convective heat transfer to the liquid slug. A weighted average of these two heat transfer mechanisms gives a value for the average pipe heat transfer coefficient. The cold-flow work showed a decrease in the observed slug frequency between the 3- and 6.75-ID pipes. Data on the ratio of gas to liquid slug length in the 6.75-in. pipe are not yet complete, but are expected to yield generally lower values than those obtained in the 3-in. pipe; this will probably affect the scale-up to demonstration plant conditions. 5 references, 15 figures, 7 tables.

  3. Accretion at the periastron passage of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, Amit

    2016-09-01

    We present high resolution numerical simulations of the colliding wind system η Carinae, showing accretion onto the secondary star close to periastron passage. Our hydrodynamical simulations include self gravity and radiative cooling. The smooth stellar winds collide and develop instabilities, mainly the non-linear thin shell instability, and form filaments and clumps. We find that a few days before periastron passage the dense filaments and clumps flow towards the secondary as a result of its gravitational attraction, and reach the zone where we inject the secondary wind. We run our simulations for the conventional stellar masses, M_1=120 {M_⊙} and M_2=30 {M_⊙}, and for a high mass model, M_1=170 {M_⊙} and M_2=80 {M_⊙}, that was proposed to better fit the history of giant eruptions. As expected, the simulations results show that the accretion processes is more pronounced for a more massive secondary star.

  4. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbo-machinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tensor. Penn State will lead the effort to make direct measurements of the momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors in high-speed multistage compressor flow field in the turbomachinery laboratory at Penn State. They will also process the data by both conventional and conditional spectrum analysis to derive momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors due to blade-to-blade periodic and aperiodic components, revolution periodic and aperiodic components arising from various blade rows and non-deterministic (which includes random components) correlations. The modeling results from this program will be publicly available and generally applicable to steady-state Navier-Stokes solvers used for turbomachinery component (compressor or turbine) flow field predictions. These models will lead to improved methodology, including loss and efficiency prediction, for the design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and drastically reduce the time required for the design and development cycle of turbomachinery.

  5. Hydromechanical Modeling of Tectonically Driven Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhang, Y. K.; Liang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater flow in bedrock is mainly controlled by the distribution of fractures and faults formed by tectonics. Understanding the formation of fractures and faults due to crust movement and their effects on groundwater flow are important in assessment and development of the groundwater resources in fractured rocks. A three-dimensional solid-fluid coupling model of a homogeneous or heterogeneous cubic bedrock was built with the finite difference model FLAC3D to simulate the rock deformation and fluid flow induced by the crust movement during 10000 years. Two opposite velocity boundary conditions on the left and right part of model were used to simulate the shear stress due to the crust movement. The results indicate that for the homogeneous formation the high compressive stresses and thus the maximum pore pressure concentrate along the middle of formation as time progresses. The pore pressure along the middle of formation increases at early time, then approaches a peak value, and finally decreases as time progresses, indicating that the plastic failure of the formation may happen along the middle of formation where the fluid flow is changed by stresses. The heterogeneous case considered is that the mechanical and hydrological properties are different in one half of the formation from the other half. In this case the distribution and change of the stresses and pore pressure are similar with the homogeneous case while the magnitudes are smaller. The results of this study can help one to understand the effects of tectonics on the groundwater flow in fractured rocks. Keywords: solid-fluid coupling model, stresses, pore pressure, groundwater flow

  6. Accretion Disks and the Formation of Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin Michelle

    2011-02-01

    In this thesis, we examine the role of accretion disks in the formation of stellar systems, focusing on young massive disks which regulate the flow of material from the parent molecular core down to the star. We study the evolution of disks with high infall rates that develop strong gravitational instabilities. We begin in chapter 1 with a review of the observations and theory which underpin models for the earliest phases of star formation and provide a brief review of basic accretion disk physics, and the numerical methods that we employ. In chapter 2 we outline the current models of binary and multiple star formation, and review their successes and shortcomings from a theoretical and observational perspective. In chapter 3 we begin with a relatively simple analytic model for disks around young, high mass stars, showing that instability in these disks may be responsible for the higher multiplicity fraction of massive stars, and perhaps the upper mass to which they grow. We extend these models in chapter 4 to explore the properties of disks and the formation of binary companions across a broad range of stellar masses. In particular, we model the role of global and local mechanisms for angular momentum transport in regulating the relative masses of disks and stars. We follow the evolution of these disks throughout the main accretion phase of the system, and predict the trajectory of disks through parameter space. We follow up on the predictions made in our analytic models with a series of high resolution, global numerical experiments in chapter 5. Here we propose and test a new parameterization for describing rapidly accreting, gravitationally unstable disks. We find that disk properties and system multiplicity can be mapped out well in this parameter space. Finally, in chapter 6, we address whether our studies of unstable disks are relevant to recently detected massive planets on wide orbits around their central stars.

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Electrochemical Flow Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, NC; Wainright, JS; Savinell, RF

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical flow capacitors (EFCs) for grid-scale energy storage are a new technology that is beginning to receive interest. Prediction of the expected performance of such systems is important as modeling can be a useful avenue in the search for design improvements. Models based off of circuit analogues exist to predict EFC performance, but these suffer from deficiencies (e.g. a multitude of fitting constants that are required and the ability to analyze only one spatial direction at a time). In this paper mathematical models based off of three-dimensional macroscopic balances (similar to models for porous electrodes) are reported. Unlike existing three-dimensional porous electrode-based approaches for modeling slurry electrodes, advection (i.e., transport associated with bulk fluid motion) of the overpotential is included in order to account for the surface charge at the interface between flowing particles and the electrolyte. Doing so leads to the presence of overpotential boundary layers that control the performance of EFCs. These models were used to predict the charging behavior of an EFC under both flowing and non-flowing conditions. Agreement with experimental data was good, including proper prediction of the steady-state current that is achieved during charging of a flowing EFC. (C) The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 License (CC BY-NC-ND, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is not changed in any way and is properly cited. For permission for commercial reuse, please email: oa@electrochem.org. All rights reserved.

  8. Template Matching Using a Fluid Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William Curtis

    Template matching is successfully used in machine recognition of isolated spoken words. In these systems a word is broken into frames (20 millisecond time slices) and the spectral characteristics of each frame are found. Thus, each word is represented as a 2-dimensional (2-D) function of spectral characteristic and frame number. An unknown word is recognized by matching its 2-D representation to previously stored example words, or templates, also in this 2-D form. A new model for this matching step will be introduced. The 2-D representations of the template and unknown are used to determine the shape of a volume of viscous fluid. This volume is broken up into many small elements. The unknown is changed into the template by allowing flows between the element boundaries. Finally the match between the template and unknown is determined by calculating a weighted squared sum of the flow values. The model also allows the relative flow resistance between the element boundaries to be changed. This is useful for characterizing the important features of a given template. The flow resistances are changed according to the gradient of a simple performance function. This performance function is evaluated using a set of training samples provided by the user. The model is applied to isolated word and single character recognition tasks. Results indicate the applications where this model works best.

  9. The Student Flow Model: Issues and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount Royal Coll., Calgary (Alberta).

    Results of a task force review of the student flow model at Mount Royal College (Alberta, Canada) are presented. Issues and recommendations are considered for: (1) pre-admission; (2) admission, academic advising, registration, and orientation; (3) instruction/academic support; and (4) post-graduation. Goals include: provide accurate information to…

  10. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grant R; Oonk, J B Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P; Baum, Stefi A; Voit, G Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R; Davis, Timothy A; McDonald, Michael A; Edge, Alastair C; Clarke, Tracy E; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N; Edwards, Louise O V; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R; Quillen, Alice C; Urry, C Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S; Wise, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds--a departure from the 'hot mode' accretion model--although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy's centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing 'shadows' cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it. PMID:27279215

  11. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grant R; Oonk, J B Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P; Baum, Stefi A; Voit, G Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R; Davis, Timothy A; McDonald, Michael A; Edge, Alastair C; Clarke, Tracy E; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N; Edwards, Louise O V; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R; Quillen, Alice C; Urry, C Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S; Wise, Michael W

    2016-06-08

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds--a departure from the 'hot mode' accretion model--although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy's centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing 'shadows' cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it.

  12. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  13. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  14. Heat transfer on accreting ice surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, Keiko; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Based on previous observations of glaze ice accretion on aircraft surfaces, a multizone model with distinct zones of different surface roughness is demonstrated. The use of surface roughness in the LEWICE ice accretion prediction code is examined. It was found that roughness is used in two ways: (1) to determine the laminar to turbulent boundary-layer transition location; and (2) to calculate the convective turbulent heat-transfer coefficient. A two-zone version of the multizone model is implemented in the LEWICE code, and compared with experimental convective heat-transfer coefficient and ice accretion results. The analysis of the boundary-layer transition, surface roughness, and viscous flowfield effects significantly increased the accuracy in predicting heat-transfer coefficients. The multizone model was found to significantly improve the ice accretion prediction for the cases compared.

  15. Lightman-Eardley instabilities and accretion disk thickening. [for compact astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    After reviewing the role of Compton scattering in accretion disks around black holes, it is discussed whether Lightman-Eardley (LE) secular instabilities can trigger and maintain Pringle-Rees (PR) thermal instabilities. The radiative-transfer-equation and equation-of-state criteria for LE stability in alpha-viscosity-law disk models and dynamic viscosity criteria for more general situations is derived. On the basis of these considerations the LE instability is insufficient for inducing PR instabilities and hot thick inner regions important in accretion-disk models of compact hard X-ray sources. The density thinning due to radial velocity gradients in the accretion flow is suggested as a more likely and satisfactory mechanism.

  16. Traffic flow forecasting: Comparison of modeling approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.L.; Demetsky, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    The capability to forecast traffic volume in an operational setting has been identified as a critical need for intelligent transportation systems (ITS). In particular, traffic volume forecasts will support proactive, dynamic traffic control. However, previous attempts to develop traffic volume forecasting models have met with limited success. This research effort focused on developing traffic volume forecasting models for two sites on Northern Virginia`s Capital Beltway. Four models were developed and tested for the freeway traffic flow forecasting problem, which is defined as estimating traffic flow 15 min into the future. They were the historical average, time-series, neural network, and nonparametric regression models. The nonparametric regression model significantly outperformed the other models. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test revealed that the nonparametric regression model experienced significantly lower errors than the other models. In addition, the nonparametric regression model was easy to implement, and proved to be portable, performing well at two distinct sites. Based on its success, research is ongoing to refine the nonparametric regression model and to extend it to produce multiple interval forecasts.

  17. Formation of a protocluster: A virialized structure from gravoturbulent collapse. II. A two-dimensional analytical model for a rotating and accreting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Context. Most stars are born in the gaseous protocluster environment where the gas is reprocessed after the global collapse from the diffuse molecular cloud. The knowledge of this intermediate step gives more accurate constraints on star formation characteristics. Aims: We demonstrate that a virialized globally supported structure, in which star formation happens, is formed out of a collapsing molecular cloud, and we derive a mapping from the parent cloud parameters to the protocluster to predict its properties with a view to confront analytical calculations with observations and simulations. Methods: We decomposed the virial theorem into two dimensions to account for the rotation and the flattened geometry. Equilibrium was found by balancing rotation, turbulence, and self-gravity, while turbulence was maintained through accretion driving and it dissipates in one crossing time. We estimated the angular momentum and the accretion rate of the protocluster from the parent cloud properties. Results: The two-dimensional virial model predicts the size and velocity dispersion given the mass of the protocluster and that of the parent cloud. The gaseous protoclusters lie on a sequence of equilibrium with the trend R ~ M0.5 with limited variations, depending on the evolutionary stage, parent cloud, and parameters that are not well known, such as turbulence driving efficiency by accretion and turbulence anisotropy. The model reproduces observations and simulation results successfully. Conclusions: The properties of protoclusters follow universal relations and they can be derived from that of the parent cloud. The gaseous protocluster is an important primary stage of stellar cluster formation, and should be taken into account when studying star formation. Using simple estimates to infer the peak position of the core mass function (CMF) we find a weak dependence on the cluster mass, suggesting that the physical conditions inside protoclusters may contribute to set a CMF, and by

  18. Investigation of surface water behavior during glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Turnock, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    Microvideo observations of glaze ice accretions on 1-in-diameter cylinders in a closed-loop refrigerated wind tunnel were obtained to study factors controlling the behavior of unfrozen surface water during glaze ice accretion. Three zones of surface water behavior were noted, each with a characteristic roughness. The effect of substrate thermal and roughness properties on ice accretions was also studied. The contact angle and hysteresis were found to increase sharply at temperatures just below 0 C, explaining the high resistance to motion of water beads observed on accreting glaze ice surfaces. Based on the results, a simple multizone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model is proposed.

  19. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2015-12-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that covers the entire range of fluid flows, from low Mach weakly compressible to transonic and supersonic flows. One of the most restrictive limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method, the low Mach number limit, is overcome here by three fundamental changes to the LBM scheme: use of an appropriately chosen multispeed lattice, accurate evaluation of the equilibrium, and the entropic relaxation for the collision. The range of applications is demonstrated through the simulation of a bow shock in front of an airfoil and the simulation of decaying compressible turbulence with shocklets.

  20. Scaling and modeling of turbulent suspension flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Scaling factors determining various aspects of particle-fluid interactions and the development of physical models to predict gas-solid turbulent suspension flow fields are discussed based on two-fluid, continua formulation. The modes of particle-fluid interactions are discussed based on the length and time scale ratio, which depends on the properties of the particles and the characteristics of the flow turbulence. For particle size smaller than or comparable with the Kolmogorov length scale and concentration low enough for neglecting direct particle-particle interaction, scaling rules can be established in various parameter ranges. The various particle-fluid interactions give rise to additional mechanisms which affect the fluid mechanics of the conveying gas phase. These extra mechanisms are incorporated into a turbulence modeling method based on the scaling rules. A multiple-scale two-phase turbulence model is developed, which gives reasonable predictions for dilute suspension flow. Much work still needs to be done to account for the poly-dispersed effects and the extension to dense suspension flows.

  1. Single point modeling of rotating turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadid, A. H.; Mansour, N. N.; Zeman, O.

    1994-01-01

    A model for the effects of rotation on turbulence is proposed and tested. These effects which influence mainly the rate of turbulence decay are modeled in a modified turbulent energy dissipation rate equation that has explicit dependence on the mean rotation rate. An appropriate definition of the rotation rate derived from critical point theory and based on the invariants of the deformation tensor is proposed. The modeled dissipation rate equation is numerically well behaved and can be used in conjunction with any level of turbulence closure. The model is applied to the two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model and is used to compute separated flows in a backward-facing step and an axisymmetric swirling coaxial jets into a sudden expansion. In general, the rotation modified dissipation rate model shows some improvements over the standard kappa-epsilon model.

  2. Flow stress model in metal cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    A model for the plastic deformation that occurs in metal cutting, based on dislocation mechanics, is presented. The model explains the fundamental deformation structure that develops during machining and is based on the well known Cottrell-Stokes Law, wherein the flow stress is partitioned into two parts; an athermal part which occurs in the shear fronts (or shear bands); and a thermal part which occurs in the lamella regions. The deformation envokes the presence of a cellular dislocation distribution which always exists in the material ahead of the shear process. This 'alien' dislocation distribution either exists in the metal prior to cutting or is produced by the compressive stress field which operates in front of the shear process. The magnitude of the flow stress and direction of the shear are shown to be correlated to the stacking fault energy of the metal being cut. The model is tested with respect to energy consumption rates and found to be consistent with observed values.

  3. Experimental evaluations of the microchannel flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances have enabled a new wave of biomechanics measurements, and have renewed interest in selecting appropriate rheological models for soft tissues such as the liver, thyroid, and prostate. The microchannel flow model was recently introduced to describe the linear response of tissue to stimuli such as stress relaxation or shear wave propagation. This model postulates a power law relaxation spectrum that results from a branching distribution of vessels and channels in normal soft tissue such as liver. In this work, the derivation is extended to determine the explicit link between the distribution of vessels and the relaxation spectrum. In addition, liver tissue is modified by temperature or salinity, and the resulting changes in tissue responses (by factors of 1.5 or greater) are reasonably predicted from the microchannel flow model, simply by considering the changes in fluid flow through the modified samples. The 2 and 4 parameter versions of the model are considered, and it is shown that in some cases the maximum time constant (corresponding to the minimum vessel diameters), could be altered in a way that has major impact on the observed tissue response. This could explain why an inflamed region is palpated as a harder bump compared to surrounding normal tissue.

  4. Dynamical Model of Flow in Martian Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek; Witek, Piotr; Misiura, Katarzyna

    On the surface of Mars, under current conditions, liquid water could exist only occasionally in lowest regions of the planet. This water contains probably some components that decrease its freezing point and raised its boiling point. However billions years ago more dense atmosphere on the Mars allows for the presence of large volume of liquid water. There are a number of structures apparently resulting from flowing liquid water in the past. They are of two types: outflow channels and valley networks. We investigate here the possible flow in some chosen valley networks. The numerical model is used. We try to determine the basic properties of the flow, its erosion as well as the transport efficiencies of the material. The comparison with the terrestrial rivers indicates some important differences. Acknowledgments This work was partially supported by the National Science Centre (grant 2011/01/B/ST10/06653).

  5. Modeling groundwater flow on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Fogwell, T.W.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1994-12-31

    The authors will explore the numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. An interdisciplinary team of mathematicians, computer scientists, hydrologists, and environmental engineers is developing a sophisticated simulation code for use on workstation clusters and MPPs. To date, they have concentrated on modeling flow in the saturated zone (single phase), which requires the solution of a large linear system. they will discuss their implementation of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers. The preconditioners under consideration include simple diagonal scaling, s-step Jacobi, adaptive Chebyshev polynomial preconditioning, and multigrid. They will present some preliminary numerical results, including simulations of groundwater flow at the LLNL site. They also will demonstrate the code`s scalability.

  6. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  7. A SWIFT SURVEY OF ACCRETION ONTO STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Mark T.; Miller, Jon M.

    2013-05-20

    reveal the disk radius to be decreasing as the spectrum hardens, i.e., enters the hard state. This is in contrast to expectations from the standard disk truncation paradigm and points toward a contribution from spectral hardening. The availability of simultaneous X-ray and optical/UV data for a subset of observations facilitates a critical examination of the role of disk irradiation via a modified disk model with a variable emissivity profile (i.e., T(r){proportional_to}r {sup -p}). The broadband spectra (X-ray-optical/UV) reveal irradiation of the accretion disk to be an important effect at all luminosities sampled herein, i.e., p {approx}< 0.75 for luminosities {approx}> 10{sup -3} L{sub Edd}. The accretion disk is found to dominate the UV emission irrespective of the assumed hard spectral component. Overall, we find the broadband soft-state spectra to be consistent with an irradiated accretion disk plus a corona, but we are unable to make conclusive statements regarding the nature of the hard-state accretion flow (e.g., ADAF/corona versus jet). Finally, the Swift data reveal a relation between the flux emitted by the accretion disk and that emitted by the corona, for this sample of stellar-mass black holes, that is found to be in broad agreement with the observed disk-corona relationship in Seyfert galaxies, suggesting a scale invariant coupling between the accretion disk and the corona.

  8. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jin

    2007-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the

  9. Throat Flow Modelling of Expansion Deflection Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. V.; Hempsell, C. M.

    Modelling of the supersonic flow within a rocket nozzle of both conventional and expansion deflection (ED) design is well handled by Method of Characteristics based algorithms. This approach provides both a predic- tion of the flowfield, and allows efficient optimisation of nozzle shape with respect to length. However, the Method of Characteristics requires a solution of the transonic flow through the nozzle throat to provide initial conditions, and the accuracy of the description of the transonic flow will clearly affect the overall accuracy of the complete nozzle flow calculation. However, it is relatively simple to show that conventional analytical methods for this process break down when applied to the more complex throat geometry of ED nozzles. This requires the use of a time marching solution method, which allows the analysis of the flow within this region even on such advanced configurations. This paper demonstrates this capability, outlines a general method for ED nozzle throat geometric definition, and examines the effect of various throat parameters on the permissible range of ED contours. It is found that the design of length optimised ED nozzles is highly sensitive to small changes in these parameters, and hence they must be selected with care.

  10. Viscoelastic Flow Modelling for Polymer Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Shauvik; Padding, Johan; Peters, Frank; Kuipers, Hans; Multi-scale Modelling of Multi-phase Flows Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymer liquids are used in the oil industry to improve the volumetric sweep and displacement efficiency of oil from a reservoir. Surprisingly, it is not only the viscosity but also the elasticity of the displacing fluid that determine the displacement efficiency. The main aim of our work is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the effect of fluid elasticity, by developing an advanced computer simulation methodology for the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media. We simulate a 3D unsteady viscoelastic flow through a converging diverging geometry of realistic pore dimension using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).The primitive variables velocity, pressure and extra stresses are used in the formulation of models. The viscoelastic stress part is formulated using a FENE-P type of constitutive equation, which can predict both shear and elongational stress properties during this flow. A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach using Finite volume method (FVM) with staggered grid has been applied. A novel second order Immersed boundary method (IBM) has been incorporated to mimic porous media. The effect of rheological parameters on flow characteristics has also been studied. The simulations provide an insight into 3D flow asymmetry at higher Deborah numbers. Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry experiments are carried out to obtain further insights. These simulations present, for the first time, a detailed computational study of the effects of fluid elasticity on the imbibition of an oil phase.

  11. Accretion on to Magnetic White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Dayal

    2014-01-01

    The Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (MCVs) are close interacting binaries where mass is transferred from a late type secondary star to a magnetic white dwarf. Two modes of accretion can be identified depending on the strength of the magnetic field, the mass transfer rate and orbital parameters. (a) Disced Accretion: In the Intermediate polars (IPs), the mass transfer stream circularises and forms an accretion disc. Material couples on to field lines in a narrow inner transition region where the velocity in the orbital plane changes from Keplerian to co-rotation (b) Discless Accretion: In the polars, the accretion stream is disrupted by the magnetic field before it can circularise. Material couples on to field lines via an inner transition region where the velocity changes from essentially free fall to co-rotation. The polars have no counterparts in neutron star systems and their study provides unique insights into the complex nature of the magnetospheric boundary. The observed properties of accretion shocks at the white dwarf surface such as the anomalous soft-X-ray excess and its time variability provide strong support for the hypothesis that under certain circumstances the field channelled funnel flow is "blobby". This has been attributed to interchange instabilities such as the Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the shocked gas at the stream-magnetosphere boundary where the stream fragments into discrete clumps of gas. As the clumps penetrate into the magnetosphere, they are shredded into smaller mass blobs via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that then couple on to field lines over an extended inner transition region in the orbital plane. The more massive blobs penetrate deep into the photosphere of the white dwarf releasing their energy as a reprocessed soft-X-ray black body component. Although similar instabilities are expected in the inner transition region in disced accretion albeit on a different scale there has been no direct observational evidence

  12. Rarefield-Flow Shuttle Aerodynamics Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Larman, Kevin T.; Moats, Christina D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of the Shuttle Orbiter rarefied-flow aerodynamic force coefficients has been derived from the ratio of flight acceleration measurements. The in-situ, low-frequency (less than 1Hz), low-level (approximately 1 x 10(exp -6) g) acceleration measurements are made during atmospheric re-entry. The experiment equipment designed and used for this task is the High Resolution Accelerometer Package (HiRAP), one of the sensor packages in the Orbiter Experiments Program. To date, 12 HiRAP re-entry mission data sets spanning a period of about 10