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Sample records for accretion-induced collapse aic

  1. Radio Transients from Accretion-induced Collapse of White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate observational properties of accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of white dwarfs (WDs) in radio frequencies. If AIC is triggered by accretion from a companion star, a dense circumstellar medium can be formed around the progenitor system. Then, the ejecta from AIC collide with the dense circumstellar medium, creating a strong shock. The strong shock can produce synchrotron emission that can be observed in radio frequencies. Even if AIC occurs as a result of WD mergers, we argue that AIC may cause fast radio bursts (FRBs) if a certain condition is satisfied. If AIC forms neutron stars (NSs) that are so massive that rotation is required to support themselves (i.e., supramassive NSs), the supramassive NSs may immediately lose their rotational energy by the r-mode instability and collapse to black holes. If the collapsing supramassive NSs are strongly magnetized, they may emit FRBs, as previously proposed. The AIC radio transients from single-degenerate systems may be detected in future radio transient surveys like the Very Large Array Sky Survey or the Square Kilometer Array transient survey. Because AIC has been proposed as a source of gravitational waves (GWs), GWs from AIC may be accompanied by radio-bright transients that can be used to confirm the AIC origin of observed GWs.

  2. The signature of single-degenerate accretion-induced collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2014-10-10

    The accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of a white dwarf to a neutron star has long been suggested as a natural theoretical outcome in stellar evolution, but there has never been a direct detection of such an event. This is not surprising since the small amount of radioactive nickel synthesized (∼10{sup –3} M {sub ☉}) implies a relatively dim optical transient. Here we argue that a particularly strong signature of an AIC would occur for an oxygen-neon-magnesium (ONeMg) white dwarf accreting from a star that is experiencing Roche-lobe overflow as it becomes a red giant. In such cases, the ∼10{sup 50} erg explosion from the AIC collides with and shock-heats the surface of the extended companion, creating an X-ray flash lasting ∼1 hr followed by an optical signature that peaks at an absolute magnitude of ∼ – 16 to –18 and lasts for a few days to a week. These events would be especially striking in old stellar environments where hydrogen-rich supernova-like transients would not normally be expected. Although the rate of such events is not currently known, we describe observing strategies that could be utilized with high cadence surveys that should either detect these events or place strong constraints on their rates.

  3. GENERAL RELATIVISTIC SIMULATIONS OF ACCRETION INDUCED COLLAPSE OF NEUTRON STARS TO BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Perna, Rosalba

    2012-10-10

    Neutron stars (NSs) in the astrophysical universe are often surrounded by accretion disks. Accretion of matter onto an NS may increase its mass above the maximum value allowed by its equation of state, inducing its collapse to a black hole (BH). Here we study this process for the first time, in three-dimensions, and in full general relativity. By considering three initial NS configurations, each with and without a surrounding disk (of mass {approx}7% M{sub NS}), we investigate the effect of the accretion disk on the dynamics of the collapse and its imprint on both the gravitational wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) signals that can be emitted by these sources. We show in particular that, even if the GW signal is similar for the accretion induced collapse (AIC) and the collapse of an NS in vacuum (and detectable only for Galactic sources), the EM counterpart could allow us to discriminate between these two types of events. In fact, our simulations show that, while the collapse of an NS in vacuum leaves no appreciable baryonic matter outside the event horizon, an AIC is followed by a phase of rapid accretion of the surviving disk onto the newly formed BH. The post-collapse accretion rates, on the order of {approx}10{sup -2} M{sub Sun} s{sup -1}, make these events tantalizing candidates as engines of short gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Axisymmetric general relativistic simulations of the accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, E. B.; Ott, C. D.; Rezzolla, L.; Dessart, L.; Dimmelmeier, H.; Marek, A.; Janka, H.-T.

    2010-02-15

    The accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of a white dwarf may lead to the formation of a protoneutron star and a collapse-driven supernova explosion. This process represents a path alternative to thermonuclear disruption of accreting white dwarfs in type Ia supernovae. In the AIC scenario, the supernova explosion energy is expected to be small and the resulting transient short-lived, making it hard to detect by electromagnetic means alone. Neutrino and gravitational-wave (GW) observations may provide crucial information necessary to reveal a potential AIC. Motivated by the need for systematic predictions of the GW signature of AIC, we present results from an extensive set of general-relativistic AIC simulations using a microphysical finite-temperature equation of state and an approximate treatment of deleptonization during collapse. Investigating a set of 114 progenitor models in axisymmetric rotational equilibrium, with a wide range of rotational configurations, temperatures and central densities, and resulting white dwarf masses, we extend previous Newtonian studies and find that the GW signal has a generic shape akin to what is known as a 'type III' signal in the literature. Despite this reduction to a single type of waveform, we show that the emitted GWs carry information that can be used to constrain the progenitor and the postbounce rotation. We discuss the detectability of the emitted GWs, showing that the signal-to-noise ratio for current or next-generation interferometer detectors could be high enough to detect such events in our Galaxy. Furthermore, we contrast the GW signals of AIC and rotating massive star iron core collapse and find that they can be distinguished, but only if the distance to the source is known and a detailed reconstruction of the GW time series from detector data is possible. Some of our AIC models form massive quasi-Keplerian accretion disks after bounce. The disk mass is very sensitive to progenitor mass and angular momentum

  5. Formation of redbacks via accretion-induced collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley, Sarah L.; Tout, Christopher A.; Ferrario, Lilia; Wickramasinghe, Dayal T.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the growing class of binary millisecond pulsars known as redbacks. In these systems, the pulsar's companion has a mass between 0.1 and about 0.5 M⊙ in an orbital period of less than 1.5 d. All show extended radio eclipses associated with circumbinary material. They do not lie on the period-companion mass relation expected from the canonical intermediate-mass X-ray binary evolution in which the companion filled its Roche lobe as a red giant and has now lost its envelope and cooled as a white dwarf. The redbacks lie closer to, but usually at higher period than, the period-companion mass relation followed by cataclysmic variables and low-mass X-ray binaries. In order to turn on as a pulsar mass accretion on to a neutron star must be sufficiently weak, considerably weaker than expected in systems with low-mass main-sequence companions driven together by magnetic braking or gravitational radiation. If a neutron star is formed by accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf as it approaches the Chandrasekhar limit some baryonic mass is abruptly lost to its binding energy so that its effective gravitational mass falls. We propose that redbacks form when accretion-induced collapse of a white dwarf takes place during cataclysmic variable binary evolution because the loss of gravitational mass makes the orbit expand suddenly so that the companion no longer fills its Roche lobe. Once activated, the pulsar can ablate its companion and so further expand the orbit and also account for the extended eclipses in the radio emission of the pulsar that are characteristic of these systems. The whole period-companion mass space occupied by the redbacks can be populated in this way.

  6. RADIO TRANSIENTS FROM THE ACCRETION-INDUCED COLLAPSE OF WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2013-01-10

    It has long been expected that in some scenarios when a white dwarf (WD) grows to the Chandrasekhar limit, it can undergo an accretion-induced collapse (AIC) to form a rapidly rotating neutron star. Nevertheless, the detection of such events has so far evaded discovery, likely because the optical, supernova-like emission is expected to be dim and short-lived. Here we propose a novel signature of AIC: a transient radio source lasting for a few months. Rapid rotation along with flux freezing and dynamo action can grow the WD's magnetic field to magnetar strengths during collapse. The spin-down of this newly born magnetar generates a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) within the {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -1} M{sub Sun} of ejecta surrounding it. Our calculations show that synchrotron emission from the PWN may be detectable in the radio, even if the magnetar has a rather modest magnetic field of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} G and an initial spin period of {approx}10 ms. An all-sky survey with a detection limit of 1 mJy at 1.4 GHz would see {approx}4(f/10{sup -2}) above threshold at any given time, where f is the ratio of the AIC rate to Type Ia supernova rate. A similar scenario may result from binary neutron stars if some mergers produce massive neutron stars rather than black holes. We conclude with a discussion of the detectability of these types of transient radio sources in an era of facilities with high mapping speeds.

  7. Nickel-rich outflows from accretion discs formed by the accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, B. D.; Piro, A. L.; Quataert, E.

    2009-07-01

    A white dwarf (WD) approaching the Chandrasekhar mass may in several circumstances undergo accretion-induced collapse (AIC) to a neutron star (NS) before a thermonuclear explosion ensues. It has generally been assumed that such an AIC does not produce a detectable supernova (SN). If, however, the progenitor WD is rapidly rotating (as may be expected due to its prior accretion), a centrifugally supported disc forms around the NS upon collapse. We calculate the subsequent evolution of this accretion disc and its nuclear composition using time-dependent height-integrated simulations with initial conditions taken from the AIC calculations of Dessart and collaborators. Soon after its formation, the disc is cooled by neutrinos and its composition is driven neutron rich (electron fraction Ye ~ 0.1) by electron captures. However, as the disc viscously spreads, it is irradiated by neutrinos from the central proto-NS, which dramatically alters its neutron-to-proton ratio. We find that electron neutrino captures increase Ye to ~0.5 by the time that weak interactions in the disc freeze out. Because the disc becomes radiatively inefficient and begins forming α-particles soon after freeze out, powerful winds blow away most of the disc's remaining mass. These Ye ~ 0.5 outflows synthesize up to a few times 10-2Msolar in 56Ni. As a result, AIC may be accompanied by a radioactively powered SN-like transient that peaks on a time-scale of ~1 d. Since few intermediate mass elements are likely synthesized, these nickel-rich explosions should be spectroscopically distinct from other SNe. The time-scale, velocity and composition of the AIC transient can be modified if the disc wind sweeps up a ~0.1Msolar remnant disc created by a WD-WD merger; such an `enshrouded' AIC may account for sub-luminous, sub-Chandrasekhar Type I SNe. Optical transient surveys such as the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System and the Palomar Transient Factory should detect a few AIC transients per

  8. Modeling the Effect of Kick Velocity during the Accretion Induced Collapse of White Dwarfs on Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taani, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The kick velocity which arises during the binary interaction plays an important role in disruption or surviving the binary systems. This paper attempts to draw an evolutionary connection of the long-period (Porb ≥ 2 d) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with orbits of low eccentricity (e ≤ 0.2). We propose that a kick velocity caused by dynamical effects of asymmetric collapse imparted to the companion star through an accretion induced collapse (AIC) of white dwarfs-that become unstable once they approach the Chandrasekhar limit-can account for the differences in their orbital period distributions. Furthermore, in some cases, an appropriate kick can disrupt the binary system and result in the birth of isolated MSPs. Otherwise, the binary survives and an eccentric binary MSP is formed. In this case only the binding energy equivalent (0.2M⊙) of mass is lost and the system remains intact in a symmetric collapse. Consequently, the AIC decreases the mass of the neutron star and increases the orbital period leading to orbit circularization. We present the results of our model and discuss the possible implications for the binary MSPs in galactic disk and globular clusters.

  9. FORMATION OF BINARY MILLISECOND PULSARS BY ACCRETION-INDUCED COLLAPSE OF WHITE DWARFS UNDER WIND-DRIVEN EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ablimit, Iminhaji; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-02-20

    Accretion-induced collapse (AIC) of massive white dwarfs (WDs) has been proposed to be an important channel to form binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Recent investigations on thermal timescale mass transfer in WD binaries demonstrate that the resultant MSPs are likely to have relatively wide orbit periods (≳ 10 days). Here we calculate the evolution of WD binaries taking into account the excited wind from the companion star induced by X-ray irradiation of the accreting WD, which may drive rapid mass transfer even when the companion star is less massive than the WD. This scenario can naturally explain the formation of the strong-field neutron star in the low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822–37. After AIC the mass transfer resumes when the companion star refills its Roche lobe, and the neutron star is recycled owing to mass accretion. A large fraction of the binaries will evolve to become binary MSPs with an He WD companion, with the orbital periods distributed between ≳ 0.1 days and ≲ 30 days, while some of them may follow the cataclysmic variable-like evolution toward very short orbits. If we instead assume that the newborn neutron star appears as an MSP and that part of its rotational energy is used to ablate its companion star, the binaries may also evolve to be the redback-like systems.

  10. Hypercritical Accretion, Induced Gravitational Collapse, and Binary-Driven Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2014-10-01

    The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm has been successfully applied to the explanation of the concomitance of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with supernovae (SNe) Ic. The progenitor is a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star (NS) companion. The explosion of the SN leads to hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion, which reaches the critical mass, hence inducing its gravitational collapse to a black hole (BH) with consequent emission of the GRB. The first estimates of this process were based on a simplified model of the binary parameters and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion rate. We present here the first full numerical simulations of the IGC phenomenon. We simulate the core-collapse and SN explosion of CO stars to obtain the density and ejection velocity of the SN ejecta. We follow the hydrodynamic evolution of the accreting material falling into the Bondi-Hoyle surface of the NS all the way up to its incorporation in the NS surface. The simulations go up to BH formation when the NS reaches the critical mass. For appropriate binary parameters, the IGC occurs in short timescales ~102-103 s owing to the combined effective action of the photon trapping and the neutrino cooling near the NS surface. We also show that the IGC scenario leads to a natural explanation for why GRBs are associated only with SNe Ic with totally absent or very little helium.

  11. HYPERCRITICAL ACCRETION, INDUCED GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE, AND BINARY-DRIVEN HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Chris L.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, Remo

    2014-10-01

    The induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm has been successfully applied to the explanation of the concomitance of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with supernovae (SNe) Ic. The progenitor is a tight binary system composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron star (NS) companion. The explosion of the SN leads to hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion, which reaches the critical mass, hence inducing its gravitational collapse to a black hole (BH) with consequent emission of the GRB. The first estimates of this process were based on a simplified model of the binary parameters and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion rate. We present here the first full numerical simulations of the IGC phenomenon. We simulate the core-collapse and SN explosion of CO stars to obtain the density and ejection velocity of the SN ejecta. We follow the hydrodynamic evolution of the accreting material falling into the Bondi-Hoyle surface of the NS all the way up to its incorporation in the NS surface. The simulations go up to BH formation when the NS reaches the critical mass. For appropriate binary parameters, the IGC occurs in short timescales ∼10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} s owing to the combined effective action of the photon trapping and the neutrino cooling near the NS surface. We also show that the IGC scenario leads to a natural explanation for why GRBs are associated only with SNe Ic with totally absent or very little helium.

  12. Gamma-ray bursts and cosmic rays from accretion-induced collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon; Kozlovsky, Ben Z.; Nussinov, Shmuel; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the birth of naked or nearly naked neutron stars in accretion-induced collapse or in the bare collapse of white dwarfs can produce cosmological gamma-ray bursts and can provide the required injection rate of cosmic rays into the interstellar space. It is estimated that most of the e(+)e(-) pairs annihilate in flight on a short time scale in the vicinity of the neutron star. It is shown that the gamma-ray bursts, the 0.511 MeV Galactic annihilation radiation, and the cosmic rays exclude the possibility that the large uncertainties in the Galactic pulsar birthrate and the Galactic SN II explosion rate would allow a significant contribution to the pulsar birthrate from naked or nearly naked neutron star formation. The upper bound on the Galactic birthrate of naked or nearly naked neutron stars of less than 1 in 1000 yr makes it very unlikely that a neutrino burst unaccompanied by optical emission from the birth of a naked or nearly naked neutron star will be detected in the near future by underground neutrino telescopes.

  13. Neutron stars and millisecond pulsars from accretion-induced collapse in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailyn, Charles D.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the limits on the number of millisecond pulsars which could be formed in globular clusters by the generally accepted scenario (in which a neutron star is created by the supernova of an initially massive star and subsequently captures a companion to form a low-mass X-ray binary which eventually becomes a millisecond pulsar). It is found that, while the number of observed low-mass X-ray binaries can be adequately explained in this way, the reasonable assumption that the pulsar luminosity function in clusters extends below the current observational limits down to the luminosity of the faintest millisecond pulsars in the field suggests a cluster population of millisecond pulsars which is substantially larger than the standard model can produce. Alleviating this problem by postulating much shorter lifetimes for the X-ray binaries requires massive star populations sufficiently large that the mass loss resulting from their evolution would be likely to unbind the cluster. It is argued that neutron star formation in globular clusters by accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs may resolve the discrepancy in birthrates.

  14. Thermal runaway during the evolution of ONeMg cores towards accretion-induced collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Josiah; Quataert, Eliot; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-10-01

    We study the evolution of degenerate electron cores primarily composed of the carbon burning products 16O, 20Ne, and 24Mg (hereafter ONeMg cores) that are undergoing compression. Electron capture reactions on A = 20 and 24 isotopes reduce the electron fraction and heat the core. We develop and use a new capability of the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) stellar evolution code that provides a highly accurate implementation of these key reactions. These new accurate rates and the ability of MESA to perform extremely small spatial zoning demonstrates a thermal runaway in the core triggered by the temperature and density sensitivity of the 20Ne electron capture reactions. Both analytics and numerics show that this thermal runaway does not trigger core convection, but rather leads to a centrally concentrated (r < km) thermal runaway that will subsequently launch an oxygen deflagration wave from the centre of the star. We use MESA to perform a parameter study that quantifies the influence of the 24Mg mass fraction, the central temperature, the compression rate, and uncertainties in the electron capture reaction rates on the ONeMg core evolution. This allows us to establish a lower limit on the central density at which the oxygen deflagration wave initiates of ρc ≳ 8.5 × 109 g cm- 3. Based on previous work and order-of-magnitude calculations, we expect objects which ignite oxygen at or above these densities to collapse and form a neutron star. Calculations such as these are an important step in producing more realistic progenitor models for studies of the signature of accretion-induced collapse.

  15. Evidence for Neutron Star Formation from Accretion Induced Collapse of a White Dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paradijis, J. Van; VanDenHeuvel, E. P. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Finger, M. H.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1997-01-01

    The orbital parameters of the recently discovered transient burster/pulsar GRO J1744-28 indicate that this system is a low-mass X-ray binary in an advanced stage of its mass transfer, with several tenths of a solar mass already transferred from the donor to the compact star. All neutron stars known to have accreted such an amount have very weak magnetic fields, and this has led to the idea that the magnetic fields of neutron stars decay as a result of accretion. The observation of a strongly magnetized neutron star in GRO J1744-28 then suggests that this neutron star was formed recently as a result of the collapse of a white dwarf during an earlier stage of the current phase of mass transfer. It is shown that this model can consistently explain the observed characteristics of GRO J1744-28. Attractive progenitors for such an evolution are the luminous supersoft X-ray sources detected with ROSAT.

  16. Factor Analysis and AIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akaike, Hirotugu

    1987-01-01

    The Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) was introduced to extend the method of maximum likelihood to the multimodel situation. Use of the AIC in factor analysis is interesting when it is viewed as the choice of a Bayesian model; thus, wider applications of AIC are possible. (Author/GDC)

  17. Tightening the Noose on LMXB Formation of MSPs: Need for AIC ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Yi, I.

    1997-12-01

    The origin of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) remains an outstanding problem despite the early and considerable evidence that they are the descendents of neutron stars spun up by accretion in low mass x-ray binaries (LMXBs). The route to MSPs from LMXBs may pass through the high luminosity Z-source LMXBs but is (severely) limited by the very limited population (and apparent birth rate) of Z-sources available. The more numerous x-ray bursters, the Atoll sources, are likely to (still) be short in numbers or birth rate but are now also found to be likely inefficient in the spin-up torques they can provide: the accretion in these relatively low accretion rate systems is likely dominated by an advection dominated flow in which matter accretes onto the NS via sub-Keplerian flows which then transfer correspondingly less angular momentum to the NS. We investigate the implications of the possible ADAF flows in low luminosity NS-LMXBs and find it is unlikely they can produce MSPs. The standard model can still be allowed if most NS-LMXBs are quiescent and undergo transient-like outbursts similar to the soft x-ray transients (which mostly contain black holes). However, apart from Cen X-4 and Aql X-1, few such systems have been found and the SXTs appear instead to be significantly deficient in NS systems. Direct production of MSPs by the accretion induced collapse (AIC) of white dwarfs has been previously suggested to solve the MSP vs. LMXB birth rate problem. We re-examine AIC models in light of the new constraints on direct LMXB production and the additional difficulty imposed by ADAF flows and constraints on SXT populations and derive constraints on the progenitor WD spin and magnetic fields.

  18. Dynamic microphones M-87/AIC and M-101/AIC and earphone H-143/AIC. [for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of the M-87/AIC and M-101/AIC dynamic microphone and H-143 earphones were tested for the purpose of establishing the relative performance levels of units supplied by four vendors. The microphones and earphones were tested for frequency response, sensitivity, linearity, impedance and noise cancellation. Test results are presented and discussed.

  19. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  20. Autonomic Intelligent Cyber Sensor (AICS) Version 1.0.1

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    The Autonomic Intelligent Cyber Sensor (AICS) provides cyber security and industrial network state awareness for Ethernet based control network implementations. The AICS utilizes collaborative mechanisms based on Autonomic Research and a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) to: 1) identify anomalous network traffic; 2) discover network entity information; 3) deploy deceptive virtual hosts; and 4) implement self-configuring modules. AICS achieves these goals by dynamically reacting to the industrial human-digital ecosystem in which it resides. Information is transported internally and externally on a standards based, flexible two-level communication structure.

  1. Autonomic Intelligent Cyber Sensor (AICS) Version 1.0.1

    2015-03-01

    The Autonomic Intelligent Cyber Sensor (AICS) provides cyber security and industrial network state awareness for Ethernet based control network implementations. The AICS utilizes collaborative mechanisms based on Autonomic Research and a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) to: 1) identify anomalous network traffic; 2) discover network entity information; 3) deploy deceptive virtual hosts; and 4) implement self-configuring modules. AICS achieves these goals by dynamically reacting to the industrial human-digital ecosystem in which it resides. Information is transportedmore » internally and externally on a standards based, flexible two-level communication structure.« less

  2. Investigating the performance of AIC in selecting phylogenetic models.

    PubMed

    Jhwueng, Dwueng-Chwuan; Huzurbazar, Snehalata; O'Meara, Brian C; Liu, Liang

    2014-08-01

    The popular likelihood-based model selection criterion, Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), is a breakthrough mathematical result derived from information theory. AIC is an approximation to Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence with the derivation relying on the assumption that the likelihood function has finite second derivatives. However, for phylogenetic estimation, given that tree space is discrete with respect to tree topology, the assumption of a continuous likelihood function with finite second derivatives is violated. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the expected log likelihood of a candidate model, and the expected KL divergence in the context of phylogenetic tree estimation. We find that given the tree topology, AIC is an unbiased estimator of the expected KL divergence. However, when the tree topology is unknown, AIC tends to underestimate the expected KL divergence for phylogenetic models. Simulation results suggest that the degree of underestimation varies across phylogenetic models so that even for large sample sizes, the bias of AIC can result in selecting a wrong model. As the choice of phylogenetic models is essential for statistical phylogenetic inference, it is important to improve the accuracy of model selection criteria in the context of phylogenetics. PMID:24867284

  3. Model Selection and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC): The General Theory and Its Analytical Extensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozdogan, Hamparsum

    1987-01-01

    This paper studies the general theory of Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) and provides two analytical extensions. The extensions make AIC asymptotically consistent and penalize overparameterization more stringently to pick only the simplest of the two models. The criteria are applied in two Monte Carlo experiments. (Author/GDC)

  4. Mission science value-cost savings from the Advanced Imaging Communication System (AICS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    An Advanced Imaging Communication System (AICS) was proposed in the mid-1970s as an alternative to the Voyager data/communication system architecture. The AICS achieved virtually error free communication with little loss in the downlink data rate by concatenating a powerful Reed-Solomon block code with the Voyager convolutionally coded, Viterbi decoded downlink channel. The clean channel allowed AICS sophisticated adaptive data compression techniques. Both Voyager and the Galileo mission have implemented AICS components, and the concatenated channel itself is heading for international standardization. An analysis that assigns a dollar value/cost savings to AICS mission performance gains is presented. A conservative value or savings of $3 million for Voyager, $4.5 million for Galileo, and as much as $7 to 9.5 million per mission for future projects such as the proposed Mariner Mar 2 series is shown.

  5. AIC Computations Using Navier-Stokes Equations on Single Image Supercomputers For Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru

    2004-01-01

    A procedure to accurately generate AIC using the Navier-Stokes solver including grid deformation is presented. Preliminary results show good comparisons between experiment and computed flutter boundaries for a rectangular wing. A full wing body configuration of an orbital space plane is selected for demonstration on a large number of processors. In the final paper the AIC of full wing body configuration will be computed. The scalability of the procedure on supercomputer will be demonstrated.

  6. Stellar Iron Core Collapse in 3+1 General Relativity and The Gravitational Wave Signature of Core-Collapse Supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Christian David

    2007-04-01

    I perform and analyze the first ever calculations of rotating stellar iron core collapse in {3+1} general relativity that start out with presupernova models from stellar evolutionary calculations and include a microphysical finite-temperature nuclear equation of state, an approximate scheme for electron capture during collapse and neutrino pressure effects. Based on the results of these calculations, I obtain the to-date most realistic estimates for the gravitational wave signal from collapse, bounce and the early postbounce phase of core collapse supernovae. I supplement my {3+1} GR hydrodynamic simulations with 2D Newtonian neutrino radiation-hydrodynamic supernova calculations focussing on (1) the late postbounce gravitational wave emission owing to convective overturn, anisotropic neutrino emission and protoneutron star pulsations, and (2) on the gravitational wave signature of accretion-induced collapse of white dwarfs to neutron stars.

  7. Collapsed Lung

    MedlinePlus

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  8. Tracheal collapse.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, C S

    1991-06-01

    Tracheal collapse, one form of tracheal obstruction, is classically described as occurring in middle-aged or older toy breed dogs with a history of chronic "goose-honk" cough. Many dogs with tracheal collapse fit this description, but others are young and may wheeze, hack, or have no cough at all. Patients with a history and physical examination compatible with tracheal collapse are definitively diagnosed based on the findings of the following respiratory tract examinations: inspiratory/expiratory radiographs, fluoroscopy, culture and susceptibility, and a thorough endoscopic evaluation. Prosthetic ring tracheoplasty relieves many of the signs of tracheal obstruction but does not cure the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment are expected to give the dog a better quality life. Following prosthetic ring tracheoplasty, most dogs are more active, breathe easier, cough less, and require less medical treatment for respiratory disease.

  9. Nonradiative collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K.A.; Kovalchuk, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is made of matter-distribution evolution for pressure in general relativity in the presence of an electromagnetic field in the framework of six types of symmetry: spherical, plane, pseudospherical, cylindrical, pseudoplane, and toroidal. For the first three types, the scalar zero-mass field with minimum coupling is also taken into account. The investigation is carried out for exact solutions of field equations obtained under the assumption of nonradiative collapse, meaning the absence of scalar or gravitational radiation of the system during collapse. The results are interpreted in light of the cosmic-censorship hypothesis. 13 references.

  10. Collapsing Containers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Justina L.; Battino, Rubin

    1994-01-01

    Describes variations on atmospheric pressure demonstrations and some systematic studies. Demonstrations use steam, generated either externally or internally to the container, to sweep out residual air. Preferred vessels collapsed slowly. Demonstrations use plastic milk jugs set in layers of aluminum foil, pop bottles immersed in 4-L beakers…

  11. Collapsible pistons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, R. N. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A piston assembly is described for use in a hypervelocity gun comprising a forward cylindrical section longitudinally spaced from a rearward cylindrical section by an intermediate section. The intermediate section is longitudinally collapsible when subjected to a predetermined force, to allow the distance between the forward and rearward sections to be suddenly reduced.

  12. AIC649 Induces a Bi-Phasic Treatment Response in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Daniela; Weber, Olaf; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Tennant, Bud C; Menne, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    AIC649 has been shown to directly address the antigen presenting cell arm of the host immune defense leading to a regulated cytokine release and activation of T cell responses. In the present study we analyzed the antiviral efficacy of AIC649 as well as its potential to induce functional cure in animal models for chronic hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus transgenic mice and chronically woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infected woodchucks were treated with AIC649, respectively. In the mouse system AIC649 decreased the hepatitis B virus titer as effective as the "gold standard", Tenofovir. Interestingly, AIC649-treated chronically WHV infected woodchucks displayed a bi-phasic pattern of response: The marker for functional cure--hepatitis surface antigen--first increased but subsequently decreased even after cessation of treatment to significantly reduced levels. We hypothesize that the observed bi-phasic response pattern to AIC649 treatment reflects a physiologically "concerted", reconstituted immune response against WHV and therefore may indicate a potential for inducing functional cure in HBV-infected patients. PMID:26656974

  13. Use of the AIC with the EM algorithm: A demonstration of a probability model selection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Glosup, J.G.; Axelrod M.C.

    1994-11-15

    The problem of discriminating between two potential probability models, a Gaussian distribution and a mixture of Gaussian distributions, is considered. The focus of our interest is a case where the models are potentially non-nested and the parameters of the mixture model are estimated through the EM algorithm. The AIC, which is frequently used as a criterion for discriminating between non-nested models, is modified to work with the EM algorithm and is shown to provide a model selection tool for this situation. A particular problem involving an infinite mixture distribution known as Middleton`s Class A model is used to demonstrate the effectiveness and limitations of this method.

  14. Truth, models, model sets, AIC, and multimodel inference: a Bayesian perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Richard J.; Link, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Statistical inference begins with viewing data as realizations of stochastic processes. Mathematical models provide partial descriptions of these processes; inference is the process of using the data to obtain a more complete description of the stochastic processes. Wildlife and ecological scientists have become increasingly concerned with the conditional nature of model-based inference: what if the model is wrong? Over the last 2 decades, Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) has been widely and increasingly used in wildlife statistics for 2 related purposes, first for model choice and second to quantify model uncertainty. We argue that for the second of these purposes, the Bayesian paradigm provides the natural framework for describing uncertainty associated with model choice and provides the most easily communicated basis for model weighting. Moreover, Bayesian arguments provide the sole justification for interpreting model weights (including AIC weights) as coherent (mathematically self consistent) model probabilities. This interpretation requires treating the model as an exact description of the data-generating mechanism. We discuss the implications of this assumption, and conclude that more emphasis is needed on model checking to provide confidence in the quality of inference.

  15. Collapse Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02154 Collapse Tubes

    The discontinuous channels in this image are collapsed lava tubes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -19.7N, Longitude 317.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Perturbation of energy metabolism by fatty-acid derivative AIC-47 and imatinib in BCR-ABL-harboring leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Haruka; Kumazaki, Minami; Minami, Yosuke; Ito, Yuko; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Kuranaga, Yuki; Taniguchi, Kohei; Yamada, Nami; Otsuki, Yoshinori; Naoe, Tomoki; Akao, Yukihiro

    2016-02-01

    In Ph-positive leukemia, imatinib brought marked clinical improvement; however, further improvement is needed to prevent relapse. Cancer cells efficiently use limited energy sources, and drugs targeting cellular metabolism improve the efficacy of therapy. In this study, we characterized the effects of novel anti-cancer fatty-acid derivative AIC-47 and imatinib, focusing on cancer-specific energy metabolism in chronic myeloid leukemia cells. AIC-47 and imatinib in combination exhibited a significant synergic cytotoxicity. Imatinib inhibited only the phosphorylation of BCR-ABL; whereas AIC-47 suppressed the expression of the protein itself. Both AIC-47 and imatinib modulated the expression of pyruvate kinase M (PKM) isoforms from PKM2 to PKM1 through the down-regulation of polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1). PTBP1 functions as alternative splicing repressor of PKM1, resulting in expression of PKM2, which is an inactive form of pyruvate kinase for the last step of glycolysis. Although inactivation of BCR-ABL by imatinib strongly suppressed glycolysis, compensatory fatty-acid oxidation (FAO) activation supported glucose-independent cell survival by up-regulating CPT1C, the rate-limiting FAO enzyme. In contrast, AIC-47 inhibited the expression of CPT1C and directly fatty-acid metabolism. These findings were also observed in the CD34(+) fraction of Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. These results suggest that AIC-47 in combination with imatinib strengthened the attack on cancer energy metabolism, in terms of both glycolysis and compensatory activation of FAO.

  17. AN/AIC-22(V) Intercommunications Set (ICS) fiber optic link engineering analysis report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minter, Richard; Blocksom, Roland; Ling, Christopher

    1990-08-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) problems constitute a serious threat to operational Navy aircraft systems. The application of fiber optic technology is a potential solution to these problems. EMI reported problems in the P-3 patrol aircraft AN/AIC-22(V) Intercommunications System (ICS) were selected from an EMI problem database for investigation and possible application of fiber optic technology. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed to demonstrate the level of EMI immunity of fiber optics when used in an ICS. A full duplex single channel fiber optic audio link was designed and assembled from modified government furnished equipment (GFE) previously used in another Navy fiber optic application. The link was taken to the Naval Air Test Center (NATC) Patuxent River, Maryland and temporarily installed in a Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) P-3A aircraft for a side-by-side comparison test with the installed ICS. With regards to noise reduction, the fiber optic link provided a qualitative improvement over the conventional ICS. In an effort to obtain a quantitative measure of comparison, audio frequency range both with and without operation of the aircraft VHF and UHF radio transmitters.

  18. Improving data analysis in herpetology: Using Akaike's information criterion (AIC) to assess the strength of biological hypotheses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazerolle, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    In ecology, researchers frequently use observational studies to explain a given pattern, such as the number of individuals in a habitat patch, with a large number of explanatory (i.e., independent) variables. To elucidate such relationships, ecologists have long relied on hypothesis testing to include or exclude variables in regression models, although the conclusions often depend on the approach used (e.g., forward, backward, stepwise selection). Though better tools have surfaced in the mid 1970's, they are still underutilized in certain fields, particularly in herpetology. This is the case of the Akaike information criterion (AIC) which is remarkably superior in model selection (i.e., variable selection) than hypothesis-based approaches. It is simple to compute and easy to understand, but more importantly, for a given data set, it provides a measure of the strength of evidence for each model that represents a plausible biological hypothesis relative to the entire set of models considered. Using this approach, one can then compute a weighted average of the estimate and standard error for any given variable of interest across all the models considered. This procedure, termed model-averaging or multimodel inference, yields precise and robust estimates. In this paper, I illustrate the use of the AIC in model selection and inference, as well as the interpretation of results analysed in this framework with two real herpetological data sets. The AIC and measures derived from it is should be routinely adopted by herpetologists. ?? Koninklijke Brill NV 2006.

  19. Perceived challenges and attitudes to regimen and product selection from Italian haemophilia treaters: the 2013 AICE survey.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M; Coppola, A; Rocino, A; Zanon, E; Morfini, M; Accorsi, Arianna; Aru, Anna Brigida; Biasoli, Chiara; Cantori, Isabella; Castaman, Giancarlo; Cesaro, Simone; Ciabatta, Carlo; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Delios, Grazia; Di Minno, Giovanni; D'Incà, Marco; Dragani, Alfredo; Ettorre, Cosimo Pietro; Gagliano, Fabio; Gamba, Gabriella; Gandini, Giorgio; Giordano, Paola; Giuffrida, Gaetano; Gresele, Paolo; Latella, Caterina; Luciani, Matteo; Margaglione, Maurizio; Marietta, Marco; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Messina, Maria; Molinari, Angelo Claudio; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Oliovecchio, Emily; Peyvandi, Flora; Piseddu, Gavino; Rossetti, Gina; Rossi, Vincenza; Santagostino, Elena; Schiavoni, Mario; Schinco, Piercarla; Serino, Maria Luisa; Tagliaferri, Annarita; Testa, Sophie

    2014-03-01

    Despite great advances in haemophilia care in the last 20 years, a number of questions on haemophilia therapy remain unanswered. These debated issues primarily involve the choice of the product type (plasma-derived vs. recombinant) for patients with different characteristics: specifically, if they were infected by blood-borne virus infections, and if they bear high or low risk of inhibitor development. In addition, the most appropriate treatment regimen in non-inhibitor and inhibitor patients compel physicians operating at the haemophilia treatment centres (HTCs) to take important therapeutic decisions, which are often based on their personal clinical experience rather than on evidence-based recommendations from published literature data. To know the opinion on the most controversial aspects in haemophilia care of Italian expert physicians, who are responsible for common clinical practice and therapeutic decisions, we have conducted a survey among the Directors of HTCs affiliated to the Italian Association of Haemophilia Centres (AICE). A questionnaire, consisting of 19 questions covering the most important topics related to haemophilia treatment, was sent to the Directors of all 52 Italian HTCs. Forty Directors out of 52 (76.9%) responded, accounting for the large majority of HTCs affiliated to the AICE throughout Italy. The results of this survey provide for the first time a picture of the attitudes towards clotting factor concentrate use and product selection of clinicians working at Italian HTCs.

  20. Collapsable seal member

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1983-12-08

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  1. Collapsable seal member

    DOEpatents

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  2. Critical chemotactic collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.

    2010-04-01

    A Keller-Segel model describes macroscopic dynamics of bacterial colonies and biological cells as well as dynamics of a gas of self-gravitating Brownian particles. Bacteria secret chemical which attracts other bacteria so that they move towards chemical gradient creating nonlocal attraction between bacteria. If bacterial (or Brownian particle) density exceeds a critical value then the density collapses (blows up) in a finite time which corresponds to bacterial aggregation or gravitational collapse. Collapse in the Keller-Segel model has striking qualitative similarities with a nonlinear Schrödinger equation including critical collapse in two dimensions and supercritical collapse in three dimensions. A self-similar solution near blow up point is studied in the critical two-dimensional case and it has a form of a rescaled steady state solution which contains a critical number of bacteria. Time dependence of scaling of that solution has square root scaling law with logarithmic modification.

  3. Collapse in Thermal Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M. I.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Dobson, D. P.; Davies, R.

    2013-12-01

    Collapsing thermal plumes have been investigated through experimental and numerical simulations. Collapsing plumes are an uncommon fluid dynamical phenomenon, usually seen when the buoyancy source is turned off. A series of fluid dynamical experiments were conducted on thermal plumes at a variety of temperature and viscosity contrasts, in a 26.5 cm^3 cubic tank heated by a constant temperature heater 2 cm in diameter and no-slip bottom and top surfaces. Working fluids included Lyle's Golden Syrup and ADM's Liquidose 436 syrup, which have strongly-temperature dependent viscosity and high Pr number (10^3-10^7 at experimental conditions). Visualisation included white light shadowgraphs and PIV of the central plane. Temperature contrasts ranged from 3-60°C, and two differing forms of collapse were identified. At very low temperature differences 'no rise' collapse was discovered, where the plumes stagnate in the lower third of the tank before collapsing. At temperature differences between 10-23°C normal evolution occurred until 'lens shape' collapse developed between midway and two-thirds of the distance from the base. The lens shape originated in the top of the conduit and was present throughout collapse. At temperatures above ΔT=23°C the plumes follow the expected growth and shape and flatten out at the top of the tank. Thermal collapse remains difficult to explain given experimental conditions (continuous heating). Instead it is possible that small density differences arising from crystallization at ambient temperatures changes plume buoyancy-inducing collapse. We show results on the evolution of the refractive index of the syrup through time to ascertain this possibility. Preliminary numerical results using Fluidity will be presented to explore a greater parameter range of viscosity contrasts and tank aspect ratios.

  4. Sulci Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in serveral ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire ediface to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in an area of 'sulci' ridges east of Olympus Mons. Graben cut the ridges, and one graben hosts the collapse pits. It is likely that these collapse pits are related to volatile release from material that filled the lows at some point after graben formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 18.6, Longitude 234.6 East (125.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in

  5. How Well Can We Detect Lineage-Specific Diversification-Rate Shifts? A Simulation Study of Sequential AIC Methods

    PubMed Central

    May, Michael R.; Moore, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists have long been fascinated by the extreme differences in species numbers across branches of the Tree of Life. This has motivated the development of statistical methods for detecting shifts in the rate of lineage diversification across the branches of phylogenic trees. One of the most frequently used methods, MEDUSA, explores a set of diversification-rate models, where each model assigns branches of the phylogeny to a set of diversification-rate categories. Each model is first fit to the data, and the Akaike information criterion (AIC) is then used to identify the optimal diversification model. Surprisingly, the statistical behavior of this popular method is uncharacterized, which is a concern in light of: (1) the poor performance of the AIC as a means of choosing among models in other phylogenetic contexts; (2) the ad hoc algorithm used to visit diversification models, and; (3) errors that we reveal in the likelihood function used to fit diversification models to the phylogenetic data. Here, we perform an extensive simulation study demonstrating that MEDUSA (1) has a high false-discovery rate (on average, spurious diversification-rate shifts are identified ≈30% of the time), and (2) provides biased estimates of diversification-rate parameters. Understanding the statistical behavior of MEDUSA is critical both to empirical researchers—in order to clarify whether these methods can make reliable inferences from empirical datasets—and to theoretical biologists—in order to clarify the specific problems that need to be solved in order to develop more reliable approaches for detecting shifts in the rate of lineage diversification. [Akaike information criterion; extinction; lineage-specific diversification rates; phylogenetic model selection; speciation.] PMID:27037081

  6. Collapse of Surface Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longquan; Chan, Chon U.; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscopic gaseous domains that entrap on immersed solid surfaces in water. They are surprisingly stable and are difficult to be distinguished from polymeric/hydrophobic drops and solid particles (contamination). Here, we report a comparative study of contact line motion across surface nanobubbles, polymeric drops and solid particles. We show that surface nanobubbles spontaneously collapse once contact line touches them while a fast jump process and a pinning process are observed on polymeric drops and on solid particles, respectively. These distinct contact line dynamics provide a new approach to identify surface nanobubbles. The collapse of surface nanobubbles demonstrates their gaseous property and also indicates that they are metastable. The collapse process last few milliseconds with a characteristic speed of 0.1 mm/s, which is much longer and slower than that of hydrodynamic phenomena. We further show that the collapse phenomenon can be explained with a microscopic contact line dynamics.

  7. Countdown to Systems Collapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tysseling, John C.; Easton, Jeff; Weaks, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the University of New Mexico Albuquerque developed a strategic business plan for renewing its utility systems when faced with the imminent collapse of its entire energy infrastructure and a $75-100 million price tag for upgrades. (EV)

  8. Cosmogenesis and Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearle, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Some possible benefits of dynamical collapse for a quantum theory of cosmogenesis are discussed. These are a possible long wait before creation begins, creation of energy and space, and choice of a particular universe out of a superposition.

  9. Collapsed lung (pneumothorax)

    MedlinePlus

    Air around the lung; Air outside the lung; Pneumothorax dropped lung; Spontaneous pneumothorax ... Collapsed lung can be caused by an injury to the lung. Injuries can include a gunshot or knife wound ...

  10. Alba Patera Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    This image of the Alba Patera region has both lava tube collapse pits (running generally east/west) and subsidence related collapse within structural grabens.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 26.9, Longitude 256.5 East (103.5 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  11. Lava Tube Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in the southern hemisphere of Mars. They are likely lava tube collapse pits related to flows from Hadriaca Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -36.8, Longitude 89.6 East (270.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space

  12. Collapsing white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, E.; Cooperstein, J.; Kahana, S.; Nomoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the hydrodynamic collapse of an accreting C + O white dwarf are presented. Collapse is induced by electron captures in the iron core behind a conductive deflagration front. The shock wave produced by the hydrodynamic bounce of the iron core stalls at about 115 km, and thus a neutron star formed in such a model would be formed as an optically quiet event.

  13. Sulci Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    This is the Noctis Labyrinthus region of Mars. These collapse pits are forming along structural fractures that are allowing the release of volatiles from the subsurface. This is believed to be the way that chaos terrain forms on Mars. This area represents the early stage of chaos formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -12.6, Longitude 264 East (96 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in

  14. Ascraeus Mons Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Ascraeus Mons. The pits and channels are all related to lava tube formation and emptying.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 8, Longitude 253.9 East (106.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  15. Tharsis Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found within the extensive lava flows of the Tharsis region. They are related to lava tubes, likely coming from Ascraeus Mons.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 22.8, Longitude 266.8 East (93.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office

  16. Alba Patera Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found within graben surrounding Alba Patera. Alba Patera is an old volcano that has subsided after it's magma chamber was evacuated.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 43.1, Longitude 259.4 East (100.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  17. Tractus Catena Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in graben located in Tractus Catena. These features are related to subsidence after magma chamber evacuation of Alba Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 35.8, Longitude 241.7 East (118.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  18. Growth cone collapse assay.

    PubMed

    Cook, Geoffrey M W; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Keynes, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The growth cone collapse assay has proved invaluable in detecting and purifying axonal repellents. Glycoproteins/proteins present in detergent extracts of biological tissues are incorporated into liposomes, added to growth cones in culture and changes in morphology are then assessed. Alternatively purified or recombinant molecules in aqueous solution may be added directly to the cultures. In both cases after a defined period of time (up to 1 h), the cultures are fixed and then assessed by inverted phase contrast microscopy for the percentage of growth cones showing a collapsed profile with loss of flattened morphology, filopodia, and lamellipodia.

  19. Collapsible high gain antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cribb, H. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A lightweight small high gain antenna which is capable of being packaged in a collapsed form and automatically expanded when in use is described. The antenna includes a cylindrical housing having a rod with a piston adjacent to one end extending through it. Attached to the outer end of the rod in a normally collapsed state is a helical wire coil. When the gas producing means is activated the piston and rod are shifted outwardly to expand the wire coil. A latch is provided for holding the helical coil in the expanded position.

  20. Dynamical collapse of trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemond, J. J. Benjamin; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Grebogi, Celso; van de Wouw, Nathan; Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-04-01

    Friction induces unexpected dynamical behaviour. In the paradigmatic pendulum and double-well systems with friction, modelled with differential inclusions, distinct trajectories can collapse onto a single point. Transversal homoclinic orbits display collapse and generate chaotic saddles with forward dynamics that is qualitatively different from the backward dynamics. The space of initial conditions converging to the chaotic saddle is fractal, but the set of points diverging from it is not: friction destroys the complexity of the forward dynamics by generating a unique horseshoe-like topology.

  1. Collapsible and Deployable Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Cable-controlled mechanisms allow large structures stored in small spaces. Combination of telescoping struts and pivot points allows very large structure collapsed into very small one. Concept used not only for straight but for tapered or curved ones as well. Structure adaptable to terrestrial uses as portable towers, scaffolds, and bridge beams folded compactly for transportation or storage.

  2. Collapsing Enormous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    One of the big puzzles in astrophysics is how supermassive black holes (SMBHs) managed to grow to the large sizes weve observed in the very early universe. In a recent study, a team of researchers examines the possibility that they were formed by the direct collapse of supermassive stars.Formation MysterySMBHs billions of times as massive as the Sun have been observed at a time when the universe was less than a billion years old. But thats not enough time for a stellar-mass black hole to grow to SMBH-size by accreting material so another theory is needed to explain the presence of these monsters so early in the universes history. A new study, led by Tatsuya Matsumoto (Kyoto University, Japan), poses the following question: what if supermassive stars in the early universe collapsed directly into black holes?Previous studies of star formation in the early universe have suggested that, in the hot environment of these primordial times, stars might have been able to build up mass much faster than they can today. This could result in early supermassive stars roughly 100,000 times more massive than the Sun. But if these early stars end their lives by collapsing to become massive black holes in the same way that we believe massive stars can collapse to form stellar-mass black holes today this should result in enormously violent explosions. Matusmoto and collaborators set out to model this process, to determine what we would expect to see when it happens!Energetic BurstsThe authors modeled the supermassive stars prior to collapse and then calculated whether a jet, created as the black hole grows at the center of the collapsing star, would be able to punch out of the stellar envelope. They demonstrated that the process would work much like the widely-accepted collapsar model of massive-star death, in which a jet successfully punches out of a collapsing star, violently releasing energy in the form of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB).Because the length of a long GRB is thought to

  3. Mechanics of collapsing cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Leen

    2016-03-01

    A brief survey is given of the dynamical phenomena accompanying the collapse of cavitation bubbles. The discussion includes shock waves, microjets and the various ways in which collapsing bubbles produce damage.

  4. Collapse of an antibubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen; Yuan, BaoGang; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to a soap bubble, an antibubble is a liquid globule surrounded by a thin film of air. The collapse behavior of an antibubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. It is found that the retraction velocity of the thin air film of antibubbles depends on the thickness of the air film, e, the surface tension coefficient σ, etc., and varies linearly with (σ/ρe)1/2, according to theoretical analysis and experimental observations. During the collapse of the antibubble, many tiny bubbles can be formed at the rim of the air film due to the Rayleigh instability. In most cases, a larger bubble will emerge finally, which holds most of the volume of the air film.

  5. Collapse of an antibubble.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Ji, Chen; Yuan, BaoGang; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to a soap bubble, an antibubble is a liquid globule surrounded by a thin film of air. The collapse behavior of an antibubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. It is found that the retraction velocity of the thin air film of antibubbles depends on the thickness of the air film, e, the surface tension coefficient σ, etc., and varies linearly with (σ/ρe)(1/2), according to theoretical analysis and experimental observations. During the collapse of the antibubble, many tiny bubbles can be formed at the rim of the air film due to the Rayleigh instability. In most cases, a larger bubble will emerge finally, which holds most of the volume of the air film. PMID:23848619

  6. Rigid collapsible dish structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, William B. (Inventor); Giebler, Martin M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A collapsible dish structure composed of a plurality of rows of rigid radial petal assemblies concentric with the axis of the dish. The petal assemblies consist of a center petal and two side petals, the center petal hinged on an axis tangent to a circle concentric with the axis of the dish and the side petals hinged to the center petal at their mating edge. The center petal is foldable inwardly and the side petals rotate about their hinges such that the collapsed dish structure occupies a much smaller volume than the deployed dish. Means of controlling the shape of the dish to compensate for differential expansion of the deployed dish are also provided.

  7. Collapse, environment, and society.

    PubMed

    Butzer, Karl W

    2012-03-01

    Historical collapse of ancient states poses intriguing social-ecological questions, as well as potential applications to global change and contemporary strategies for sustainability. Five Old World case studies are developed to identify interactive inputs, triggers, and feedbacks in devolution. Collapse is multicausal and rarely abrupt. Political simplification undermines traditional structures of authority to favor militarization, whereas disintegration is preconditioned or triggered by acute stress (insecurity, environmental or economic crises, famine), with breakdown accompanied or followed by demographic decline. Undue attention to stressors risks underestimating the intricate interplay of environmental, political, and sociocultural resilience in limiting the damages of collapse or in facilitating reconstruction. The conceptual model emphasizes resilience, as well as the historical roles of leaders, elites, and ideology. However, a historical model cannot simply be applied to contemporary problems of sustainability without adjustment for cumulative information and increasing possibilities for popular participation. Between the 14th and 18th centuries, Western Europe responded to environmental crises by innovation and intensification; such modernization was decentralized, protracted, flexible, and broadly based. Much of the current alarmist literature that claims to draw from historical experience is poorly focused, simplistic, and unhelpful. It fails to appreciate that resilience and readaptation depend on identified options, improved understanding, cultural solidarity, enlightened leadership, and opportunities for participation and fresh ideas.

  8. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  9. Collapse, environment, and society

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Historical collapse of ancient states poses intriguing social-ecological questions, as well as potential applications to global change and contemporary strategies for sustainability. Five Old World case studies are developed to identify interactive inputs, triggers, and feedbacks in devolution. Collapse is multicausal and rarely abrupt. Political simplification undermines traditional structures of authority to favor militarization, whereas disintegration is preconditioned or triggered by acute stress (insecurity, environmental or economic crises, famine), with breakdown accompanied or followed by demographic decline. Undue attention to stressors risks underestimating the intricate interplay of environmental, political, and sociocultural resilience in limiting the damages of collapse or in facilitating reconstruction. The conceptual model emphasizes resilience, as well as the historical roles of leaders, elites, and ideology. However, a historical model cannot simply be applied to contemporary problems of sustainability without adjustment for cumulative information and increasing possibilities for popular participation. Between the 14th and 18th centuries, Western Europe responded to environmental crises by innovation and intensification; such modernization was decentralized, protracted, flexible, and broadly based. Much of the current alarmist literature that claims to draw from historical experience is poorly focused, simplistic, and unhelpful. It fails to appreciate that resilience and readaptation depend on identified options, improved understanding, cultural solidarity, enlightened leadership, and opportunities for participation and fresh ideas. PMID:22371579

  10. Gravitinos from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Grifols, J.A.; Masso, E.; Toldra, R.

    1998-01-01

    We reanalyze the limits on the gravitino mass m{sub 3/2} in superlight gravitino scenarios derived from arguments on energy loss during gravitational collapse. We conclude that the mass range 10{sup {minus}6} eV{le}m{sub 3/2}{le}2.3{times}10{sup {minus}5} eV is excluded by SN 1987A data. In terms of the scale of supersymmetry breaking {Lambda}, the range 70 GeV {le}{Lambda}{le}300 GeV is not allowed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Shearfree cylindrical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2009-09-15

    We consider diagonal cylindrically symmetric metrics, with an interior representing a general nonrotating fluid with anisotropic pressures. An exterior vacuum Einstein-Rosen spacetime is matched to this using Darmois matching conditions. We show that the matching conditions can be explicitly solved for the boundary values of metric components and their derivatives, either for the interior or exterior. Specializing to shearfree interiors, a static exterior can only be matched to a static interior, and the evolution in the nonstatic case is found to be given in general by an elliptic function of time. For a collapsing shearfree isotropic fluid, only a Robertson-Walker dust interior is possible, and we show that all such cases were included in Cocke's discussion. For these metrics, Nolan and Nolan have shown that the matching breaks down before collapse is complete, and Tod and Mena have shown that the spacetime is not asymptotically flat in the sense of Berger, Chrusciel, and Moncrief. The issues about energy that then arise are revisited, and it is shown that the exterior is not in an intrinsic gravitational or superenergy radiative state at the boundary.

  12. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    Caldera-formation is one of the most awe-inspiring and powerful displays of nature's force. Resultant deposits may cover vast areas and significantly alter the immediate topography. Post-collapse activity may include resurgence, unrest, intra-caldera volcanism and potentially the start of a new magmatic cycle, perhaps eventually leading to renewed collapse. Since volcanoes and their eruptions are the surface manifestation of magmatic processes, calderas provide key insights into the generation and evolution of large-volume silicic magma bodies in the Earth's crust. Despite their potentially ferocious nature, calderas play a crucial role in modern society's life. Collapse calderas host essential economic deposits and supply power for many via the exploitation of geothermal reservoirs, and thus receive considerable scientific, economic and industrial attention. Calderas also attract millions of visitors world-wide with their spectacular scenic displays. To build on the outcomes of the 2005 calderas workshop in Tenerife (Spain) and to assess the most recent advances on caldera research, a follow-up meeting was proposed to be held in Mexico in 2008. This abstract volume presents contributions to the 2nd Calderas Workshop held at Hotel Misión La Muralla, Querétaro, Mexico, 19-25 October 2008. The title of the workshop `Reconstructing the evolution of collapse calderas: Magma storage, mobilisation and eruption' set the theme for five days of presentations and discussions, both at the venue as well as during visits to the surrounding calderas of Amealco, Amazcala and Huichapan. The multi-disciplinary workshop was attended by more than 40 scientist from North, Central and South America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Contributions covered five thematic topics: geology, geochemistry/petrology, structural analysis/modelling, geophysics, and hazards. The workshop was generously supported by the International Association of Volcanology and the Chemistry of The Earth's Interior

  13. Gravitational collapse of Hagedorn fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malafarina, Daniele

    2016-05-01

    We consider a toy model for the relativistic collapse of a homogeneous perfect fluid that takes into account an equation of state for high density matter, in the form of a Hagedorn phase, and semiclassical corrections in the strong field. We show that collapse reaches a critical minimum size and then bounces. We discuss the conditions needed for the collapse to halt and form a compact object. We argue that implications of models such as the one presented here are of great importance for astrophysics as they show that black holes may not be the only final outcome of collapse of very massive stars.

  14. Magnetized Tolman-Bondi collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germani, Cristiano; Tsagas, Christos G.

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the gravitational implosion of magnetized matter by studying the inhomogeneous collapse of a weakly magnetized Tolman-Bondi spacetime. The role of the field is analyzed by looking at the convergence of neighboring particle world lines. In particular, we identify the magnetically related stresses in the Raychaudhuri equation and use the Tolman-Bondi metric to evaluate their impact on the collapsing dust. We find that, despite the low energy level of the field, the Lorentz force dominates the advanced stages of the collapse, leading to a strongly anisotropic contraction. In addition, of all the magnetic stresses, those that resist the collapse are found to grow faster.

  15. Collapse of Surface Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chon U.; Chen, Longquan; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-03-01

    Surface attached nanobubbles populate surfaces submerged in water. These nanobubbles have a much larger contact angle and longer lifetime than predicted by classical theory. Moreover, it is difficult to distinguish them from hydrophobic droplets, e.g., polymeric contamination, using standard atomic force microscopy. Here, we report fast dynamics of a three phase contact line moving over surface nanobubbles, polymeric droplets, and hydrophobic particles. The dynamics is distinct: across polymeric droplets the contact line quickly jumps and hydrophobic particles pin the contact line, while surface nanobubbles rapidly shrink once merging with the contact line, suggesting a method to differentiate nanoscopic gaseous, liquid, and solid structures. Although the collapse process of surface nanobubbles occurs within a few milliseconds, we show that it is dominated by microscopic dynamics rather than bulk hydrodynamics.

  16. The Nimitz Freeway Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2004-10-01

    One of the most tragic sights created by the Loma Prieta earthquake of Oct. 17, 1989, was the collapse of the double-deck Nimitz Freeway (the Cypress Street Viaduct on Interstate 880) just south and east of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in Oakland. Along a 1.4-km north-south stretch, the upper deck of the freeway fell on top of the lower deck of the freeway, killing 42 motorists (see Fig. 1). Even though the earthquake occurred during rush hour (5:04 p.m.), traffic was extremely light that day because the third game of the World Series between the Oakland Athletics and the San Francisco Giants was about to begin and many commuters were already at home in front of their television sets.

  17. Gravitational collapse of Vaidya spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertogradov, Vitalii

    2016-03-01

    The gravitational collapse of generalized Vaidya spacetime is considered. It is known that the endstate of gravitational collapse, as to whether a black hole or a naked singularity is formed, depends on the mass function M(v,r). Here we give conditions for the mass function which corresponds to the equation of the state P = αρ where α ∈ (0, 1 3] and according to these conditions we obtain either a black hole or a naked singularity at the endstate of gravitational collapse. Also we give conditions for the mass function when the singularity is gravitationally strong.

  18. The role of multicollinearity in landslide susceptibility assessment by means of Binary Logistic Regression: comparison between VIF and AIC stepwise selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cama, Mariaelena; Cristi Nicu, Ionut; Conoscenti, Christian; Quénéhervé, Geraldine; Maerker, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Landslide susceptibility can be defined as the likelihood of a landslide occurring in a given area on the basis of local terrain conditions. In the last decades many research focused on its evaluation by means of stochastic approaches under the assumption that 'the past is the key to the future' which means that if a model is able to reproduce a known landslide spatial distribution, it will be able to predict the future locations of new (i.e. unknown) slope failures. Among the various stochastic approaches, Binary Logistic Regression (BLR) is one of the most used because it calculates the susceptibility in probabilistic terms and its results are easily interpretable from a geomorphological point of view. However, very often not much importance is given to multicollinearity assessment whose effect is that the coefficient estimates are unstable, with opposite sign and therefore difficult to interpret. Therefore, it should be evaluated every time in order to make a model whose results are geomorphologically correct. In this study the effects of multicollinearity in the predictive performance and robustness of landslide susceptibility models are analyzed. In particular, the multicollinearity is estimated by means of Variation Inflation Index (VIF) which is also used as selection criterion for the independent variables (VIF Stepwise Selection) and compared to the more commonly used AIC Stepwise Selection. The robustness of the results is evaluated through 100 replicates of the dataset. The study area selected to perform this analysis is the Moldavian Plateau where landslides are among the most frequent geomorphological processes. This area has an increasing trend of urbanization and a very high potential regarding the cultural heritage, being the place of discovery of the largest settlement belonging to the Cucuteni Culture from Eastern Europe (that led to the development of the great complex Cucuteni-Tripyllia). Therefore, identifying the areas susceptible to

  19. Identification of a Collapsing Protostar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Neal J., II; Zhou, Shudong; Kompe, Carsten; Walmsley, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    The globular molecular cloud B335 contains a single, deeply embedded far-infrared source. Our recent observations of H2CO and CS lines toward this source provide direct kinematic evidence for collapse. Both the intensity and detailed shape of the line profiles match those expected from inside-out collapse inside a radius of 0.036 pc. The collapse began about 1.5 x 10(exp 5) years ago, similar to the onset of the outflow. The mass accretion rate is about 10 times the outflow rate, and about 0.4 solar mass should have now accumulated in the star and disk. Because B335 rotates only, any disk would still be small (about 3 AU). The accretion luminosity should be adequate to power the observed luminosity. Consequently, we believe that B335 is indeed a collapsing protostar.

  20. Stress evolution during caldera collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holohan, E. P.; Schöpfer, M. P. J.; Walsh, J. J.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanics of caldera collapse are subject of long-running debate. Particular uncertainties concern how stresses around a magma reservoir relate to fracturing as the reservoir roof collapses, and how roof collapse in turn impacts upon the reservoir. We used two-dimensional Distinct Element Method models to characterise the evolution of stress around a depleting sub-surface magma body during gravity-driven collapse of its roof. These models illustrate how principal stress orientations rotate during progressive deformation so that roof fracturing transitions from initial reverse faulting to later normal faulting. They also reveal four end-member stress paths to fracture, each corresponding to a particular location within the roof. Analysis of these paths indicates that fractures associated with ultimate roof failure initiate in compression (i.e. as shear fractures). We also report on how mechanical and geometric conditions in the roof affect pre-failure unloading and post-failure reloading of the reservoir. In particular, the models show how residual friction within a failed roof could, without friction reduction mechanisms or fluid-derived counter-effects, inhibit a return to a lithostatically equilibrated pressure in the magma reservoir. Many of these findings should be transferable to other gravity-driven collapse processes, such as sinkhole formation, mine collapse and subsidence above hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  1. Collapse Pits in Bernard Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in serveral ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire ediface to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These pits occur in the floor of Bernard Crater. These collapse pits were likely formed by the release of volatiles from the materials deposited in the crater floor.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -24, Longitude 205.5 East (154.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission

  2. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  3. On voltage collapse in electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, H.D.; Dobson, I.; Thomas, R.J.; Thorp, J.S.; Fekih-Ahmed, L. . School of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    Several voltage collapses have had a period of slowly decreasing voltage followed by an accelerating collapse in voltage. This paper analyzes this type of voltage collapse based on a center manifold voltage collapse model. The essence of this model is that the system dynamics after bifurcation are captured by the center manifold trajectory and it is a computable model that allows prediction of voltage collapse. Both physical explanations and computational considerations of this model are presented. The authors clarify the use of static and dynamic models to explain voltage collapse. Voltage collapse dynamics are demonstrated on a simple power system model.

  4. Convection, nucleosynthesis, and core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazan, Grant; Arnett, David

    1994-01-01

    We use a piecewise parabolic method hydrodynamics code (PROMETHEUS) to study convective burning in two dimensions in an oxygen shell prior to core collapse. Significant mixing beyond convective boundaries determined by mixing-length theory brings fuel (C-12) into the convective regon, causing hot spots of nuclear burning. Plumes dominate the velocity structure. Finite perturbations arise in a region in which O-16 will be explosively burned to Ni-56 when the star explodes; the resulting instabilities and mixing are likely to distribute Ni-56 throughout the supernova envelope. Inhomogeneities in Y(sub e) may be large enough to affect core collapse and will affect explosive nucleosynthesis. The nature of convective burning is dramatically different from that assumed in one-dimensional simulations; quantitative estimates of nucleosynthetic yields, core masses, and the approach to core collapse will be affected.

  5. Phase Transitions and Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, Nicholas A.

    1994-01-01

    Results are presented for numerical calculations of gravitational collapses and explosions. Two effects are studied. The first involves aspects of the numerical models used in almost all current gravitational collapse calculations. The second involves phase transitions in the equation of state of dense matter. A (1+1) dimensional general relativistic hydrodynamics code was constructed to investigate both effects. A modification of standard artificial viscosity methods was developed. This extended both the tensor artificial viscosity formulation and the artificial heat conduction formulation to the general relativistic regime. This method shows better results for collapse calculations than the standard scalar artificial viscosity. Numerical collapse calculations were also examined with respect to the number of zones used in the model. These calculations suggest that the number of zones used in current supernova calculations may be insufficient, and that the more sophisticated artificial viscosity methods used may be useful in future core collapse investigations. The second effect studied by this thesis is the impact of phase transitions in dense matter on the results of core collapse in Type 2 supernovae. Two different phase transitions were investigated. The QCD phase transition embodies the prediction of quantum chromodynamics that at high density the constituents of baryonic matter will be free quarks and gluons. The effects on the shock wave formed by core collapse and bounce is studied for various phase transitions. We find that some of the phase transitions modeled significantly increase the shock strength. The second phase transition we study is one from a normal hadronic gas to Q matter. Q matter is a phase of dense baryonic matter that is motivated by soliton models for the nucleus. It has been used to model zero temperature dense matter in static stellar objects, here we extend it to finite temperature, determine the phase transitions with hadronic matter

  6. GRAVITATIONAL WAVES FROM STELLAR COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FRYER

    2001-01-01

    Stellar core-collapse plays an important role in nearly all facets of astronomy: cosmology (as standard candles), formation of compact objects, nucleosynthesis and energy deposition in galaxies. In addition, they release energy in powerful explosions of light over a range of energies, neutrinos, and the subject of this meeting, gravitational waves. Because of this broad range of importance, astronomers have discovered a number of constraints which can be used to help them understand the importance of stellar core-collapse as gravitational wave sources.

  7. Thermal duality and gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Thermal duality is a relationship between the behaviour of heterotic string models of the E(8)×E(8) or SO(32) types at inversely related temperatures, a variant of T duality in the Euclidean regime. This duality would have consequences for the nature of the Hagedorn transition in these string models. We propose that the vacuum admits a family of deformations in situations where there are closed surfaces of constant area but high radial acceleration (a string regularized version of a Penrose trapped surface), such as would be formed in situations of extreme gravitational collapse. This would allow a radical resolution of the firewall paradox by allowing quantum effects to significantly modify the spacetime geometry around a collapsed object. A string bremsstrahlung process would convert the kinetic energy of infalling matter in extreme gravitational collapse to form a region of the deformed vacuum, which would be equivalent to forming a high temperature string phase. A heuristic criterion for the conversion process is presented, relating Newtonian gravity to the string tension, suggesting an upper limit to the strength of the gravitational interaction. This conversion process might have observable consequences for charged particles falling into a rotating collapsed object by producing high energy particles via a variant of the Penrose process.

  8. Chemotactic collapse and mesenchymal morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2005-08-01

    We study the effect of chemotactic signaling among mesenchymal cells. We show that the particular physiology of the mesenchymal cells allows one-dimensional collapse in contrast to the case of bacteria, and that the mesenchymal morphogenesis represents thus a more complex type of pattern formation than those found in bacterial colonies. We compare our theoretical predictions with recent in vitro experiments.

  9. Colony collapse disorder in Europe.

    PubMed

    Dainat, Benjamin; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Neumann, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is a condition of honey bees, which has contributed in part to the recent major losses of honey bee colonies in the USA. Here we report the first CCD case from outside of the USA. We suggest that more standardization is needed for the case definition to diagnose CCD and to compare data on a global scale.

  10. Bellechester, Minnesota, USA, lagoon collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, E. C.; Broberg, J. S.; Kehren, A. R.; Graziani, M. M.; Turri, W. L.

    1993-12-01

    Bellechester, Minnesota, is a small community of approximately 155 residents located on the county line between Goodhue and Wabasha counties in southeast Minnesota's karst region. Bellechester is served by a 21-year-old wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) consisting of three waste-stabilization ponds. On 28 April 1992 six sinkholes were discovered to have drained cell 2 of the WWTF resulting in the loss of approximately 8.7×106 1 of partially treated effluent and about 600 m3 of soil into previously undetected subsurface voids of unknown dimensions. In the week following the collapse, approximately 200 water wells located within a 5-km radius of the WWTF were sampled in an after-the-fact, emergency sampling program. Twelve samples with elevated fecal coliform levels, 18 samples with nitrate-nitrogen greater than the 10 mg/1 standard, and no samples with elevated chlorides were found. However, the elevated levels could not be unambiguously attributed to the WWTF collapse. This is the third WWTF to fail by sinkhole collapse in southeast Minnesota since 1974. All three collapsed lagoons have been located in similar geomorphic and stratigraphic settings. However, at least two lagoons have collapsed in the adjacent area in northeast Iowa, and these lagoons are located at different stratigraphic positions. Twenty-two WWTFs constructed in southeast Minnesota's karst region in the last 25 years have been identified as subject to potential sinkhole collapse. An unknown but significant number of manure storage lagoons, flood control structures, etc., have also been constructed in the karst region and are at risk. Public agencies are beginning to develop plans to deal with the risk associated with existing and future waste lagoons in this environment. The critical hydrogeologic parameters that can be used to prioritize the risk of collapse at existing facilities include: (1) the lithology of the first bedrock beneath each lagoon, (2) the thickness of surficial materials

  11. Evolution of a continuously collapsed quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damnjanović, Milan

    1990-10-01

    The process in which quantum evolution is continuously disturbed by a collapse is considered. It is shown that such process can be treated as an evolution generated by the changed-collapsed-Hamiltonian. The observable to which the collapse is related to, becomes an integral of motion. Exactly this fact is the source of the well known quantum Zeno paradox.

  12. Collapsing thin shells with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsate, Térence; Rocha, Jorge V.; Santarelli, Raphael

    2014-06-01

    We construct exact solutions describing the motion of rotating thin shells in a fully backreacted five-dimensional rotating black hole spacetime. The radial equation of motion follows from the Darmois-Israel junction conditions, where both interior and exterior geometries are taken to be equal angular momenta Myers-Perry solutions. We show that rotation generates anisotropic pressures and momentum along the shell. Gravitational collapse scenarios including rotation are analyzed and a new class of stationary solutions is introduced. Energy conditions for the anisotropic matter shell are briefly discussed. We find that the weak energy condition is not violated for the collapse scenario where the shell starts at rest from infinity, nor for the new class of stationary solutions in anti-de Sitter. We further prove that the cosmic censorship conjecture is always satisfied in our setup.

  13. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    PubMed

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  14. Collapse Mechanisms Of Masonry Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccaro, G.; Rauci, M.

    2008-07-01

    The paper outlines a possible approach to typology recognition, safety check analyses and/or damage measuring taking advantage by a multimedia tool (MEDEA), tracing a guided procedure useful for seismic safety check evaluation and post event macroseismic assessment. A list of the possible collapse mechanisms observed in the post event surveys on masonry structures and a complete abacus of the damages are provided in MEDEA. In this tool a possible combination between a set of damage typologies and each collapse mechanism is supplied in order to improve the homogeneity of the damages interpretation. On the other hand recent researches of one of the author have selected a number of possible typological vulnerability factors of masonry buildings, these are listed in the paper and combined with potential collapse mechanisms to be activated under seismic excitation. The procedure takes place from simple structural behavior models, derived from the Umbria-Marche earthquake observations, and tested after the San Giuliano di Puglia event; it provides the basis either for safety check analyses of the existing buildings or for post-event structural safety assessment and economic damage evaluation. In the paper taking advantage of MEDEA mechanisms analysis, mainly developed for the post event safety check surveyors training, a simple logic path is traced in order to approach the evaluation of the masonry building safety check. The procedure starts from the identification of the typological vulnerability factors to derive the potential collapse mechanisms and their collapse multipliers and finally addresses the simplest and cheapest strengthening techniques to reduce the original vulnerability. The procedure has been introduced in the Guide Lines of the Regione Campania for the professionals in charge of the safety check analyses and the buildings strengthening in application of the national mitigation campaign introduced by the Ordinance of the Central Government n. 3362

  15. Collapse Mechanisms Of Masonry Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zuccaro, G.; Rauci, M.

    2008-07-08

    The paper outlines a possible approach to typology recognition, safety check analyses and/or damage measuring taking advantage by a multimedia tool (MEDEA), tracing a guided procedure useful for seismic safety check evaluation and post event macroseismic assessment. A list of the possible collapse mechanisms observed in the post event surveys on masonry structures and a complete abacus of the damages are provided in MEDEA. In this tool a possible combination between a set of damage typologies and each collapse mechanism is supplied in order to improve the homogeneity of the damages interpretation. On the other hand recent researches of one of the author have selected a number of possible typological vulnerability factors of masonry buildings, these are listed in the paper and combined with potential collapse mechanisms to be activated under seismic excitation. The procedure takes place from simple structural behavior models, derived from the Umbria-Marche earthquake observations, and tested after the San Giuliano di Puglia event; it provides the basis either for safety check analyses of the existing buildings or for post-event structural safety assessment and economic damage evaluation. In the paper taking advantage of MEDEA mechanisms analysis, mainly developed for the post event safety check surveyors training, a simple logic path is traced in order to approach the evaluation of the masonry building safety check. The procedure starts from the identification of the typological vulnerability factors to derive the potential collapse mechanisms and their collapse multipliers and finally addresses the simplest and cheapest strengthening techniques to reduce the original vulnerability. The procedure has been introduced in the Guide Lines of the Regione Campania for the professionals in charge of the safety check analyses and the buildings strengthening in application of the national mitigation campaign introduced by the Ordinance of the Central Government n. 3362

  16. Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation. I. Collapsing Cores within Collapsing Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo-Romero, Raúl; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Loughnane, Robert M.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation scenario through numerical simulations of the prestellar stages of the collapse of a marginally gravitationally unstable isothermal sphere immersed in a strongly gravitationally unstable, uniform background medium. The core developes a Bonnor-Ebert (BE)-like density profile, while at the time of singularity (the protostar) formation the envelope approaches a singular-isothermal-sphere (SIS)-like r-2 density profile. However, these structures are never hydrostatic. In this case, the central flat region is characterized by an infall speed, while the envelope is characterized by a uniform speed. This implies that the hydrostatic SIS initial condition leading to Shu's classical inside-out solution is not expected to occur, and therefore neither should the inside-out solution. Instead, the solution collapses from the outside-in, naturally explaining the observation of extended infall velocities. The core, defined by the radius at which it merges with the background, has a time-variable mass, and evolves along the locus of the ensemble of observed prestellar cores in a plot of M/MBE versus M, where M is the core's mass and MBE is the critical BE mass, spanning the range from the “stable” to the “unstable” regimes, even though it is collapsing at all times. We conclude that the presence of an unstable background allows a core to evolve dynamically from the time when it first appears, even when it resembles a pressure-confined, stable BE-sphere. The core can be thought of as a ram-pressure confined BE-sphere, with an increasing mass due to the accretion from the unstable background.

  17. HIERARCHICAL GRAVITATIONAL FRAGMENTATION. I. COLLAPSING CORES WITHIN COLLAPSING CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Naranjo-Romero, Raúl; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Loughnane, Robert M.

    2015-11-20

    We investigate the Hierarchical Gravitational Fragmentation scenario through numerical simulations of the prestellar stages of the collapse of a marginally gravitationally unstable isothermal sphere immersed in a strongly gravitationally unstable, uniform background medium. The core developes a Bonnor–Ebert (BE)-like density profile, while at the time of singularity (the protostar) formation the envelope approaches a singular-isothermal-sphere (SIS)-like r{sup −2} density profile. However, these structures are never hydrostatic. In this case, the central flat region is characterized by an infall speed, while the envelope is characterized by a uniform speed. This implies that the hydrostatic SIS initial condition leading to Shu's classical inside-out solution is not expected to occur, and therefore neither should the inside-out solution. Instead, the solution collapses from the outside-in, naturally explaining the observation of extended infall velocities. The core, defined by the radius at which it merges with the background, has a time-variable mass, and evolves along the locus of the ensemble of observed prestellar cores in a plot of M/M{sub BE} versus M, where M is the core's mass and M{sub BE} is the critical BE mass, spanning the range from the “stable” to the “unstable” regimes, even though it is collapsing at all times. We conclude that the presence of an unstable background allows a core to evolve dynamically from the time when it first appears, even when it resembles a pressure-confined, stable BE-sphere. The core can be thought of as a ram-pressure confined BE-sphere, with an increasing mass due to the accretion from the unstable background.

  18. Bubble-Induced Cave Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned “natural” instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a “collapse”. We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  19. Avalanche Collapse of Interdependent Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. J.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2012-12-01

    We reveal the nature of the avalanche collapse of the giant viable component in multiplex networks under perturbations such as random damage. Specifically, we identify latent critical clusters associated with the avalanches of random damage. Divergence of their mean size signals the approach to the hybrid phase transition from one side, while there are no critical precursors on the other side. We find that this discontinuous transition occurs in scale-free multiplex networks whenever the mean degree of at least one of the interdependent networks does not diverge.

  20. Dynamics of dissipative gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O.

    2004-10-15

    The Misner and Sharp approach to the study of gravitational collapse is extended to the dissipative case in, both, the streaming out and the diffusion approximations. The role of different terms in the dynamical equation are analyzed in detail. The dynamical equation is then coupled to a causal transport equation in the context of Israel-Stewart theory. The decreasing of the inertial mass density of the fluid, by a factor which depends on its internal thermodynamics state, is reobtained, at any time scale. In accordance with the equivalence principle, the same decreasing factor is obtained for the gravitational force term. Prospective applications of this result to some astrophysical scenarios are discussed.

  1. Collapsible Cryogenic Storage Vessel Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.

    2002-01-01

    Collapsible cryogenic storage vessels may be useful for future space exploration missions by providing long-term storage capability using a lightweight system that can be compactly packaged for launch. Previous development efforts have identified an 'inflatable' concept as most promising. In the inflatable tank concept, the cryogen is contained within a flexible pressure wall comprised of a flexible bladder to contain the cryogen and a fabric reinforcement layer for structural strength. A flexible, high-performance insulation jacket surrounds the vessel. The weight of the tank and the cryogen is supported by rigid support structures. This design concept is developed through physical testing of a scaled pressure wall, and through development of tests for a flexible Layered Composite Insulation (LCI) insulation jacket. A demonstration pressure wall is fabricated using Spectra fabric for reinforcement, and burst tested under noncryogenic conditions. An insulation test specimens is prepared to demonstrate the effectiveness of the insulation when subject to folding effects, and to examine the effect of compression of the insulation under compressive loading to simulate the pressure effect in a nonrigid insulation blanket under the action atmospheric pressure, such as would be seen in application on the surface of Mars. Although pressure testing did not meet the design goals, the concept shows promise for the design. The testing program provides direction for future development of the collapsible cryogenic vessel concept.

  2. Dyadosphere formed in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffini, Remo; Xue Shesheng

    2008-10-10

    We first recall the concept of Dyadosphere (electron-positron-photon plasma around a formed black holes) and its motivation, and recall on (i) the Dirac process: annihilation of electron-positron pairs to photons; (ii) the Breit-Wheeler process: production of electron-positron pairs by photons with the energy larger than electron-positron mass threshold; the Sauter-Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian and rate for the process of electron-positron production in a constant electric field. We present a general formula for the pair-production rate in the semi-classical treatment of quantum mechanical tunneling. We also present in the Quantum Electro-Dynamics framework, the calculations of the Schwinger rate and effective Lagrangian for constant electromagnetic fields. We give a review on the electron-positron plasma oscillation in constant electric fields, and its interaction with photons leading to energy and number equipartition of photons, electrons and positrons. The possibility of creating an overcritical field in astrophysical condition is pointed out. We present the discussions and calculations on (i) energy extraction from gravitational collapse; (ii) the formation of Dyadosphere in gravitational collapsing process, and (iii) its hydrodynamical expansion in Reissner Nordstroem geometry. We calculate the spectrum and flux of photon radiation at the point of transparency, and make predictions for short Gamma-Ray Bursts.

  3. Grain Growth in Collapsing Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, S. C. F.; Benevides-Soares, P.; Barbuy, B.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Se ha considerado un proceso de coagulaci6n de granos en nubes colapsantes de diferentes metalicidades. Se aplicaron los calculos al intervalo de densidades n = lO to , forrespondiendo a la fase isotermica de contracci6n de nubes. A lo largo de esta fase en el colap- so, la temperatura es por lo tanto constante, en donde se alcanza T Q lOKpara nubes de metalicidad solar y T 100 K para nubes de baja metalicidad. El tamano final del grano es mayor para las mayores metali- cidades. ABSTRACT. A process of grain coagulation in collapsing clouds of different metallicities is considered. The calculations are applied to the density range n = 1O to , corresponding to the isothermal phase of cloud contraction. Along this phase in the collapse, the temperature is thus a constant, where T % 10 K for solar-metallicity clouds, and T % 100 K for low metallicity clouds is reached. The final grain size is larger for the higher metallicities. Keq : INTERSTELLAR-CLOUDS - INTERSTELLAR-CRAINS

  4. Core-collapse supernova explosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y

    2011-01-01

    Neutrinos play important roles in the pre-collapse evolution, explosion, and aftermath of core-collapse supernovae. Detected neutrino signals from core-collapse supernovae would provide insight into the explosion mechanism and unknown neutrino mixing parameters. Achieving these goals requires large-scale, multiphysics simulations. For many years, several groups have performed such simulations with increasing realism. Current simulations and plans for future work of the Oak Ridge group are described.

  5. Gravitational radiation from collapsing magnetized dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Yoshida, Shijun; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2007-04-15

    In this article we study the influence of magnetic fields on the axial gravitational waves emitted during the collapse of a homogeneous dust sphere. We found that while the energy emitted depends weakly on the initial matter perturbations it has strong dependence on the strength and the distribution of the magnetic field perturbations. The gravitational wave output of such a collapse can be up to an order of magnitude larger or smaller calling for detailed numerical 3D studies of collapsing magnetized configurations.

  6. Constructing black hole entropy from gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; Ellis, George F. R.; Goswami, Rituparno; Hamid, Aymen I. M.

    2015-03-01

    Based on a recent proposal for the gravitational entropy of free gravitational fields, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of black hole formation through gravitational collapse in the framework of the semitetrad 1 +1 +2 covariant formalism. In the simplest case of an Oppenheimer-Snyder-Datt collapse, we prove that the change in gravitational entropy outside a collapsing body is related to the variation of the surface area of the body itself, even before the formation of horizons. As a result, we are able to relate the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the black hole end state to the variation of the vacuum gravitational entropy outside the collapsing body.

  7. Dynamics of the constrained polymer collapse.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of California-San Diego

    2003-06-01

    The dynamics of polymer collapse with a fixed distance between endpoints is studied analytically and numerically by the Nose-Hoover algorithm. We find that at the pearling stage of the collapse the number of pearls decays as t{sup -1/2} leading to anomalously long collapse time. To understand the effect of Stokes drag we reduced the problem of long-polymer-chain collapse to the one-dimensional diffusion-limited coalescence of particles with the mass-dependent mobility. In this case the number of pearls decays slower, as t{sup -3/7}.

  8. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    PubMed

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes.

  9. Gravitational collapse in f(R) theories

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J.A.R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Núñez, B. Montes E-mail: alvaro.delacruzdombriz@uct.ac.za

    2012-04-01

    We study the gravitational collapse in modified gravitational theories. In particular, we analyze a general f(R) model with uniformly collapsing cloud of self-gravitating dust particles. This analysis shares analogies with the formation of large-scale structures in the early Universe and with the formation of stars in a molecular cloud experiencing gravitational collapse. In the same way, this investigation can be used as a first approximation to the modification that stellar objects can suffer in these modified theories of gravity. We study concrete examples, and find that the analysis of gravitational collapse is an important tool to constrain models that present late-time cosmological acceleration.

  10. Critical perspectives on historical collapse

    PubMed Central

    Butzer, Karl W.; Endfield, Georgina H.

    2012-01-01

    Historical collapse of ancient states or civilizations has raised new awareness about its possible relevance to current issues of sustainability, in the context of global change. This Special Feature examines 12 case studies of societies under stress, of which seven suffered severe transformation. Outcomes were complex and unpredictable. Five others overcame breakdown through environmental, political, or socio-cultural resilience, which deserves as much attention as the identification of stressors. Response to environmental crises of the last millennium varied greatly according to place and time but drew from traditional knowledge to evaluate new information or experiment with increasing flexibility, even if modernization or intensification were decentralized and protracted. Longer-term diachronic experience offers insight into how societies have dealt with acute stress, a more instructive perspective for the future than is offered by apocalyptic scenarios. PMID:22371580

  11. Abdominal Distension and Vascular Collapse.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Gina; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal distension, confusion and vascular collapse. The emergent radiologic imaging obtained showed massive bilateral adrenal enlargement, but despite the initial clinical suspicion of possible overwhelming sepsis and/or massive abdominal/intralesional hemorrhage, lab tests based obtained rapidly confirmed the diagnosis of acute Addisonian crisis which responded dramatically to adrenocorticoid hormone replacement therapy and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient's established history of metastatic lung cancer confirmed this as a case of metastatic massive bilateral adrenal metastases with an initial presentation of acute adrenal insufficiency which is uncommon in the setting of metastatic carcinomatosis but more typically associated with lymphomas. Recognition of this clinical possibility is vital to enable rapid diagnosis and consequent life saving therapy. PMID:27328473

  12. Understand rotating isothermal collapses yet

    SciTech Connect

    Tohline, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    A scalar virial equation is used to describe the dynamic properties of equilibrium gas clouds, taking into account the relative effects of surface pressure, rotation, self gravity and internal isothermal pressure. Details concerning the internal structure of the clouds are ignored in order to obtain a globalized analytical expression. The obtained solution to the equation is found to agree with the surface-pressure-dominated model of Stahler (1983), and the rotation-dominated model of Hayashi, Narita, and Miyama (1982). On the basis of the analytical expression of virial equilibrium in the clouds, some of the limiting properties of isothermal clouds are described, and a realistic starting model for cloud collapse is proposed. 18 references.

  13. Nonadiabatic charged spherical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; Le Denmat, G.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2007-09-15

    We present a complete set of the equations and matching conditions required for the description of physically meaningful charged, dissipative, spherically symmetric gravitational collapse with shear. Dissipation is described with both free-streaming and diffusion approximations. The effects of viscosity are also taken into account. The roles of different terms in the dynamical equation are analyzed in detail. The dynamical equation is coupled to a causal transport equation in the context of Israel-Stewart theory. The decrease of the inertial mass density of the fluid, by a factor which depends on its internal thermodynamic state, is reobtained, with the viscosity terms included. In accordance with the equivalence principle, the same decrease factor is obtained for the gravitational force term. The effect of the electric charge on the relation between the Weyl tensor and the inhomogeneity of the energy density is discussed.

  14. Collective Baryon Decay and Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, George; Barbieri, James

    2014-01-01

    While it is widely believed that the gravitational collapse of a sufficiently large mass will lead to a density singularity and an event horizon, we propose that this never happens when quantum effects are taken into account. In particular, we propose that when the conditions become ripe for the formation of a trapped surface, a quantum critical firewall sweeps over the collapsing body, transforming the nucleons in the collapsing matter into a lepton/photon gas together with droplets of a positive vacuum energy. This will happen regardless of the matter density at the time a trapped surface starts to form, and as a result, we predict that at least in all cases of gravitational collapse involving ordinary matter, a large fraction of the rest mass of the collapsing matter will be converted into a burst of neutrinos and γ-rays. We predict that the peak luminosity of these bursts is only weakly dependent on the mass of the collapsing object, and on the order of (ɛq/mPc2)1/4c5/G where ɛq is the mean energy of a nucleon parton and mP is the Planck mass. The duration of the bursts will depend on the mass of the collapsing object; in the case of stellar core collapse, we predict that the duration of both the neutrino and γ-ray bursts will be on the order of 10s.

  15. Gravitational Collapse with Negative Energy Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, Jayant V.

    2007-04-01

    This paper re-examines the classical problem of the collapse of a dust ball, with the added input of a negative energy scalar field. It is shown that not only is the collapse halted prior to the singularity, but a black hole may not even form. The object bounces at a stage when it is still outside any event horizon.

  16. Critical gravitational collapse with angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, Carsten; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2016-10-01

    We derive a theoretical model of mass and angular momentum scaling in type-II critical collapse with rotation. We focus on the case where the critical solution has precisely one, spherically symmetric, unstable mode. We demonstrate agreement with numerical results for critical collapse of a rotating radiation fluid, which falls into this case.

  17. Architecture of collapsed-paleocave reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G. ); Mescher, P. )

    1996-01-01

    It is important to investigate the architecture of collapsed-paleocave reservoirs at interwell scales in outcrops because reservoir heterogeneities cannot be adequately characterized by cores and log correlation sections. A 3000-foot long quarry wall of Ellenburger strata in central Texas displays the lithologic and pore network heterogeneities at typical well spacings (1300 to 2600 feet). The quarry wall exposes the transition from stratified host rock into a complex collapsed-paleocave system showing several developmental episodes. This paleocave system has over 2600 feet of laterally continuous chaotic breccias. The dimensions of these breccias are similar as to what is imaged by 3-D seismic over paleocave reservoirs. Collapsed-paleocave reservoirs are not single collapsed passages of tens of feet across, but are homogenized collapsed-cave systems hundreds to several thousand feet across. This concept of scale is very important because collapsed-paleocave systems offer larger exploration targets than individual cave passages. Collapsed-paleocave systems are complex because they are the homogenization of chaotic breccias and cave-sediment fill from passages, chambers, and shafts and of crackle breccias from roof- and wall-rock and pillars. Pore networks are associated with chaotic breakdown breccias, cave roof- and wall-crackle breccias, and/or clastic sediment fill. Strong heterogeneity within a collapsed paleocave system should be expected. Lateral and vertical changes in collapsed-paleocave-related facies have the strongest effect on reservoir heterogeneity and quality. Within individual facies there can be distinct reservoir quality variation, such as between the cave-sediment fill and associated blocks. Tectonic fractures, however, can interconnect the highly variable pore networks within a collapsed-paleocave reservoir.

  18. Architecture of collapsed-paleocave reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, R.G.; Mescher, P.

    1996-12-31

    It is important to investigate the architecture of collapsed-paleocave reservoirs at interwell scales in outcrops because reservoir heterogeneities cannot be adequately characterized by cores and log correlation sections. A 3000-foot long quarry wall of Ellenburger strata in central Texas displays the lithologic and pore network heterogeneities at typical well spacings (1300 to 2600 feet). The quarry wall exposes the transition from stratified host rock into a complex collapsed-paleocave system showing several developmental episodes. This paleocave system has over 2600 feet of laterally continuous chaotic breccias. The dimensions of these breccias are similar as to what is imaged by 3-D seismic over paleocave reservoirs. Collapsed-paleocave reservoirs are not single collapsed passages of tens of feet across, but are homogenized collapsed-cave systems hundreds to several thousand feet across. This concept of scale is very important because collapsed-paleocave systems offer larger exploration targets than individual cave passages. Collapsed-paleocave systems are complex because they are the homogenization of chaotic breccias and cave-sediment fill from passages, chambers, and shafts and of crackle breccias from roof- and wall-rock and pillars. Pore networks are associated with chaotic breakdown breccias, cave roof- and wall-crackle breccias, and/or clastic sediment fill. Strong heterogeneity within a collapsed paleocave system should be expected. Lateral and vertical changes in collapsed-paleocave-related facies have the strongest effect on reservoir heterogeneity and quality. Within individual facies there can be distinct reservoir quality variation, such as between the cave-sediment fill and associated blocks. Tectonic fractures, however, can interconnect the highly variable pore networks within a collapsed-paleocave reservoir.

  19. Collapse of the Pilcomayo River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Vide, J. P.; Amarilla, M.; Zárate, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Pilcomayo River flows south-eastwards from the Bolivian Andes across the Chaco Plains, setting the border between Argentina and Paraguay. It flows down along 1000 km, in principle, to finally join the Paraguay River. It spills over the plains during the rainy season from January to March. The sediment load of the Pilcomayo is one of the largest in the world: 140 million tons per year, which is mostly wash load from the upland Andes. The mean concentration of suspended sediment is 15 g/l. The maximum recorded concentration is as high as 60 g/l. The river has built a large fan covering a surface of 210,000 km2, with many abandoned channels. Today, it is a river prone to avulsion, raising border disputes between the two lowland countries, Argentina and Paraguay. Moreover, the very special feature of Pilcomayo River is that it does not actually flow into the Paraguay River. Very far upstream of the mouth in the Paraguay the channel blocks itself with sediment and wood debris forcing water and sediment to spread across the plains. Moreover, the point of blockage has moved hundreds of kilometers upstream throughout the 20th century. Many environmental issues arise because of this collapse (channel discontinuity), not the least of them is the migration of fish. The future of the river concerns Bolivia and the two lowland countries.

  20. Small, Lightweight, Collapsible Glove Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    A small, lightweight, collapsible glove box enables its user to perform small experiments and other tasks. Originally intended for use aboard a space shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS), this glove box could also be attractive for use on Earth in settings in which work space or storage space is severely limited and, possibly, in which it is desirable to minimize weight. The development of this glove box was prompted by the findings that in the original space-shuttle or ISS setting, (1) it was necessary to perform small experiments in a large general-purpose work station, so that, in effect, they occupied excessive space; and it took excessive amounts of time to set up small experiments. The design of the glove box reflects the need to minimize the space occupied by experiments and the time needed to set up experiments, plus the requirement to limit the launch weight of the box and the space needed to store the box during transport into orbit. To prepare the glove box for use, the astronaut or other user has merely to insert hands through the two fabric glove ports in the side walls of the box and move two hinges to a locking vertical position (see figure). The user could do this while seated with the glove box on the user fs lap. When stowed, the glove box is flat and has approximately the thickness of two pieces of 8-in. (.20 cm) polycarbonate.

  1. Costa Rica's Chain of laterally collapsed volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    From the NW extreme to the SW end of Costa Rica's volcanic backbone, a number of laterally collapsed volcanoes can be observed. Due to several factors, attention has been given to active volcanoes disregarding the importance of collapsed features in terms of assessing volcanic hazards for future generations around inhabited volcanoes. In several cases the typical horseshoe shape amphitheater-like depression can be easily observed. In other cases due to erosion, vegetation, topography, seismic activity or drastic weather such characteristics are not easily recognized. In the order mentioned above appear: Orosi-Cacao, Miravalles, Platanar, Congo, Von Frantzius, Cacho Negro and Turrialba volcanoes. Due to limited studies on these structures it is unknown if sector collapse occurred in one or several phases. Furthermore, in the few studied cases no evidence has been found to relate collapses to actual eruptive episodes. Detailed studies on the deposits and materials composing dome-like shapes will shed light on unsolved questions about petrological and chemical composition. Volume, form and distance traveled by deposits are part of the questions surrounding most of these collapsed volcanoes. Although most of these mentioned structures are extinct, at least Irazú volcano (active volcano) has faced partial lateral collapses recently. It did presented strombolian activity in the early 60s. Collapse scars show on the NW flank show important mass removal in historic and prehistoric times. Moreover, in 1994 a minor hydrothermal explosion provoked the weakening of a deeply altered wall that holds a crater lake (150m diameter, 2.6x106 ). A poster will depict images of the collapsed volcanoes named above with mayor descriptive characteristics. It will also focus on the importance of deeper studies to assess the collapse potential of Irazú volcano with related consequences. Finally, this initiative will invite researchers interested in such topic to join future studies in

  2. Caviton collapse of SRS by SBS

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, C.; Bezzerides, B.; DuBois, D.F.; Rose, H.

    1984-01-01

    Particle simulations are performed to show that the ion waves resulting from Stimulated Brillouin Scatter (SBS) can trigger the collapse of the plasma waves excited by Stimulated Raman Scatter (SRS). We discuss the effect of this collapse mechanism on the hot-electron spectrum produced by the electrostatic waves. A fluid model for the coupling of the ion fluctuations to the plasma waves is formulated and we discuss the necessary condition on the SBS to induce collapse of the plasma waves produced by SRS.

  3. Biological effects of stellar collapse neutrinos

    PubMed

    Collar, J I

    1996-02-01

    Massive stars in their final stages of collapse radiate most of their binding energy in the form of MeV neutrinos. The recoil atoms that they produce in elastic scattering off nuclei in organic tissue create radiation damage which is highly effective in the production of irreparable DNA harm, leading to cellular mutation, neoplasia, and oncogenesis. Using a conventional model of the galaxy and of the collapse mechanism, the periodicity of nearby stellar collapses and the radiation dose are calculated. The possible contribution of this process to the paleontological record of mass extinctions is examined.

  4. Naked singularity resolution in cylindrical collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Yasunari; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, we study the gravitational collapse of null dust in cylindrically symmetric spacetime. The naked singularity necessarily forms at the symmetry axis. We consider the situation in which null dust is emitted again from the naked singularity formed by the collapsed null dust and investigate the backreaction by this emission for the naked singularity. We show a very peculiar but physically important case in which the same amount of null dust as that of the collapsed one is emitted from the naked singularity as soon as the ingoing null dust hits the symmetry axis and forms the naked singularity. In this case, although this naked singularity satisfies the strong curvature condition by Krolak (limiting focusing condition), geodesics which hit the singularity can be extended uniquely across the singularity. Therefore, we may say that the collapsing null dust passes through the singularity formed by itself and then leaves for infinity. Finally, the singularity completely disappears and the flat spacetime remains.

  5. Voltage collapse in complex power grids

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Porco, John W.; Dörfler, Florian; Bullo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A large-scale power grid's ability to transfer energy from producers to consumers is constrained by both the network structure and the nonlinear physics of power flow. Violations of these constraints have been observed to result in voltage collapse blackouts, where nodal voltages slowly decline before precipitously falling. However, methods to test for voltage collapse are dominantly simulation-based, offering little theoretical insight into how grid structure influences stability margins. For a simplified power flow model, here we derive a closed-form condition under which a power network is safe from voltage collapse. The condition combines the complex structure of the network with the reactive power demands of loads to produce a node-by-node measure of grid stress, a prediction of the largest nodal voltage deviation, and an estimate of the distance to collapse. We extensively test our predictions on large-scale systems, highlighting how our condition can be leveraged to increase grid stability margins. PMID:26887284

  6. Taming the Collapse of Optical Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Min; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Xi-Lin; Kong, Ling-Jun; Lou, Kai; Tu, Chenghou; Tian, Yongjun; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2012-12-01

    Field collapse, which occurs in various nonlinear systems, has attracted much attention, owing to its universality, complexity, and applicability. A great challenge and expectation is to achieve the controllable and designable collapsing pattern. Here we predict theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the novel collapsing behaviors of the vector optical fields in a self-focusing Kerr medium. Surprisingly, the results reveal that the collapse of the vector optical field is controllable and designable by engineering the distribution of hybrid states of polarization, and has the robust feature insensitive to the random noise. Our idea has its significance which it opens a new window for manipulating the optical field and the different kinds of field, and then facilitates to push the related researches.

  7. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in biological populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Jeff

    2014-03-01

    Natural populations can collapse suddenly in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery from such a collapse can be difficult. We have used laboratory microbial ecosystems to directly measure theoretically proposed early warning signals of impending population collapse. Yeast cooperatively break down the sugar sucrose, meaning that below a critical size the population cannot sustain itself. We have demonstrated experimentally that changes in the fluctuations of the population size can serve as an early warning signal that the population is close to collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to ``cheater'' cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We confirm this possibility experimentally and find that such social parasitism decreases the resilience of the population.

  8. Arsia Mons Collapse Pits in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Arsia Mons and are related to lava tube collapse.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.8, Longitude 240.4 East (119.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal

  9. Precursory singularities in spherical gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Kayll

    1992-05-01

    General conditions are developed for the formation of naked precursory ('shell-focusing') singularities in spherical gravitational collapse. These singularities owe their nakedness to the fact that the gravitational potential fails to be single valued prior to the onset of a true gravitational singularity. It is argued that they do not violate the spirit of cosmic censorship. Rather, they may well be an essentially generic feature of relativistic gravitational collapse.

  10. Climate and the collapse of civilization

    SciTech Connect

    Abate, T.

    1994-09-01

    This article looks at the archaeological debate over two important questions: whether abrupt climate changes caused or contributed to the collapse of ancient civilizations and, if the archaeological and paleoclimatological record yields evidence to that effect, what would it mean in a world that today debates whether industrial civilization is altering Earth's climate with uncertain consequences. Areas discussed include the following: climate hints from archaeological sites; hesitations about whether climate change caused civilizations to collapse; and the interdisciplinary checks on each side.

  11. Cardiovascular collapse with attempted pericardial drain withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Molly B; Spitznagel, Rachel A; Kugler, Jane A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a rare but serious emergency condition in the pediatric population. As treatment, a pericardial drain is often placed to evacuate the fluid. We present a case of a 4-year-old girl with cardiac tamponade secondary to renal failure. After the tamponade resolved, she suffered cardiovascular collapse upon attempted drain withdrawal. This case highlights an unusual cause for cardiovascular collapse, which occurred on blind removal of a pericardial drain. PMID:27625522

  12. Detailed Jet Dynamics in a Collapsing Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed visualizations of the micro-jet forming inside an aspherically collapsing cavitation bubble near a free surface. The high-quality visualizations of large and strongly deformed bubbles disclose so far unseen features of the dynamics inside the bubble, such as a mushroom-like flattened jet-tip, crown formation and micro-droplets. We also find that jetting near a free surface reduces the collapse time relative to the Rayleigh time.

  13. Cardiovascular collapse with attempted pericardial drain withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Molly B; Spitznagel, Rachel A; Kugler, Jane A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a rare but serious emergency condition in the pediatric population. As treatment, a pericardial drain is often placed to evacuate the fluid. We present a case of a 4-year-old girl with cardiac tamponade secondary to renal failure. After the tamponade resolved, she suffered cardiovascular collapse upon attempted drain withdrawal. This case highlights an unusual cause for cardiovascular collapse, which occurred on blind removal of a pericardial drain.

  14. Cardiovascular collapse with attempted pericardial drain withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Molly B; Spitznagel, Rachel A; Kugler, Jane A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a rare but serious emergency condition in the pediatric population. As treatment, a pericardial drain is often placed to evacuate the fluid. We present a case of a 4-year-old girl with cardiac tamponade secondary to renal failure. After the tamponade resolved, she suffered cardiovascular collapse upon attempted drain withdrawal. This case highlights an unusual cause for cardiovascular collapse, which occurred on blind removal of a pericardial drain. PMID:27625522

  15. Subsidence and collapse at Texas Salt Domes

    SciTech Connect

    Mullican, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    This book provides a description of the mechanisms and extent of natural and man-induced subsidence and collapse at Texas salt domes. In the Houston diapir province, Frasch mining has caused subsidence bowls and collapse sinkholes at 12 of the 14 sulfur-productive domes. Understanding the structural and hydrologic instability that results at the surface and subsurface is crucial in evaluating the suitability of salt domes as repositories for waste disposal. Part of the Bureau's Coastal Salt Dome Program, this study used aerial photographs, remote-sensing methods, historical and modern topographic maps, and field checks to detect subsidence and collapse associated with natural salt diapiric processes and commercial resource recovery and to determine which processes are likely to reduce the stability and integrity of hydrologic and structural barriers around salt diapirs. Figures and tables illustrating the extent and evolution of subsidence and collapse, along with photographs showing their effects, highlight the text discussion of the salt domes detailed in this study-Boling, Orchard, Moss Bluff, Spindletop, Hoskins Mound, Fannett, Long Point, Nash, High Island, Bryan Mound, Clemens, and Gulf. The author concludes that Frasch sulfur mining from cap rocks causes the most catastrophic subsidence and collapse and that subsidence over salt domes includes processes ranging from trough subsidence to various types of subsurface caving. He concludes that salt domes characterized by subsidence and collapse are unfavorable sites for storage/disposal of hazardous wastes.

  16. Four tails problems for dynamical collapse theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQueen, Kelvin J.

    2015-02-01

    The primary quantum mechanical equation of motion entails that measurements typically do not have determinate outcomes, but result in superpositions of all possible outcomes. Dynamical collapse theories (e.g. GRW) supplement this equation with a stochastic Gaussian collapse function, intended to collapse the superposition of outcomes into one outcome. But the Gaussian collapses are imperfect in a way that leaves the superpositions intact. This is the tails problem. There are several ways of making this problem more precise. But many authors dismiss the problem without considering the more severe formulations. Here I distinguish four distinct tails problems. The first (bare tails problem) and second (structured tails problem) exist in the literature. I argue that while the first is a pseudo-problem, the second has not been adequately addressed. The third (multiverse tails problem) reformulates the second to account for recently discovered dynamical consequences of collapse. Finally the fourth (tails problem dilemma) shows that solving the third by replacing the Gaussian with a non-Gaussian collapse function introduces new conflict with relativity theory.

  17. Spitzer Observations of L429: A Near-collapse or Collapsing Starless Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Amelia M.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Rieke, George H.; Bieging, John H.; Misselt, Karl A.; Myers, Philip C.; Shirley, Yancy L.

    2009-01-01

    We present Spitzer infrared (IR) observations of the starless core L429. The IR images of this core show an absorption feature, caused by the dense core material, at wavelengths <= 70 μ. The core has a steep density profile, and reaches AV > 35 mag near the center. We show that L429 is either collapsing or in a near-collapse state.

  18. Atomistic simulations of langmuir monolayer collapse.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Christian D; Travesset, Alex

    2006-11-21

    Monolayers at the vapor/water interface collapse by exploring the third dimension at sufficient lateral compression, either by forming three-dimensional structures or by solubilization into the aqueous solution. In this paper, we provide an atomistic description of collapse from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. More specifically, we investigate monolayers of arachidic acids spread on pure water and in an aqueous solution with Ca2+ ions in the subphase. In both cases, it is found that the collapsed systems generally lead to the formation of multilayer structures, which in the system with Ca2+ ions, proceeds by an intermediate regime where the monolayer exhibits significant roughness (of the order of 4 A). If no roughness is present, the system forms collapsed structures into the aqueous solution. The computational cost of atomic MD limits our simulations to relatively small system sizes, fast compression rates, and temporal scales on the order of a nanosecond. We discuss the issues caused by these limitations and present a detailed discussion of how the collapse regime proceeds at long time scales. We conclude with a summary of the implications of our results for further theoretical and experimental studies. PMID:17106994

  19. Geophysical mapping of solution and collapse dolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Karst rocks such as limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, or salt can be dissolved physically by water or chemically by water enriched with carbon dioxide. The dissolution driven by water flowing through the karst aquifer either occurs along fractures and bedding partings in telogenetic rocks, or within the primary interconnected pore space in eogenetic rocks. The enlargement of either fractures or pores by dissolution creates a large secondary porosity typical for karst rocks, which is often very heterogenously distributed and results in preferential flow pathes in the sub-surface, with cavities as large-scale end members of the sub-surface voids. Once the sub-surface voids enlarged by dissolution grow to a certain size, the overburden rock can become instable and voids and caves can collapse. Depending of the type of overburden, the collapse initiated at depth propagates towards the surface and finally results in a collapse structure, such as collapse dolines, sinkholes, and tiangkengs on the very large scale. We present results from geophysical surveys over existing karst structures based on gravimetric, electrical, and geomagnetical methods. We have chosen two types of dolines, solution and collapse dolines, to capture and compare the geophysical signals resulting from these karst structures. We compare and discuss our geophysical survey results with simplified theoretical models describing the evolution of the karst structure and three-dimensional structural models for the current situation derived for the different locations.

  20. Fishing amplifies forage fish population collapses.

    PubMed

    Essington, Timothy E; Moriarty, Pamela E; Froehlich, Halley E; Hodgson, Emma E; Koehn, Laura E; Oken, Kiva L; Siple, Margaret C; Stawitz, Christine C

    2015-05-26

    Forage fish support the largest fisheries in the world but also play key roles in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to upper trophic-level predators, such as large fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Fishing can, thereby, have far reaching consequences on marine food webs unless safeguards are in place to avoid depleting forage fish to dangerously low levels, where dependent predators are most vulnerable. However, disentangling the contributions of fishing vs. natural processes on population dynamics has been difficult because of the sensitivity of these stocks to environmental conditions. Here, we overcome this difficulty by collating population time series for forage fish populations that account for nearly two-thirds of global catch of forage fish to identify the fingerprint of fisheries on their population dynamics. Forage fish population collapses shared a set of common and unique characteristics: high fishing pressure for several years before collapse, a sharp drop in natural population productivity, and a lagged response to reduce fishing pressure. Lagged response to natural productivity declines can sharply amplify the magnitude of naturally occurring population fluctuations. Finally, we show that the magnitude and frequency of collapses are greater than expected from natural productivity characteristics and therefore, likely attributed to fishing. The durations of collapses, however, were not different from those expected based on natural productivity shifts. A risk-based management scheme that reduces fishing when populations become scarce would protect forage fish and their predators from collapse with little effect on long-term average catches.

  1. Fishing amplifies forage fish population collapses

    PubMed Central

    Essington, Timothy E.; Moriarty, Pamela E.; Froehlich, Halley E.; Hodgson, Emma E.; Koehn, Laura E.; Oken, Kiva L.; Siple, Margaret C.; Stawitz, Christine C.

    2015-01-01

    Forage fish support the largest fisheries in the world but also play key roles in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to upper trophic-level predators, such as large fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Fishing can, thereby, have far reaching consequences on marine food webs unless safeguards are in place to avoid depleting forage fish to dangerously low levels, where dependent predators are most vulnerable. However, disentangling the contributions of fishing vs. natural processes on population dynamics has been difficult because of the sensitivity of these stocks to environmental conditions. Here, we overcome this difficulty by collating population time series for forage fish populations that account for nearly two-thirds of global catch of forage fish to identify the fingerprint of fisheries on their population dynamics. Forage fish population collapses shared a set of common and unique characteristics: high fishing pressure for several years before collapse, a sharp drop in natural population productivity, and a lagged response to reduce fishing pressure. Lagged response to natural productivity declines can sharply amplify the magnitude of naturally occurring population fluctuations. Finally, we show that the magnitude and frequency of collapses are greater than expected from natural productivity characteristics and therefore, likely attributed to fishing. The durations of collapses, however, were not different from those expected based on natural productivity shifts. A risk-based management scheme that reduces fishing when populations become scarce would protect forage fish and their predators from collapse with little effect on long-term average catches. PMID:25848018

  2. Collapse of composite tubes under end moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockwell, Alan E.; Cooper, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Cylindrical tubes of moderate wall thickness such as those proposed for the original space station truss, may fail due to the gradual collapse of the tube cross section as it distorts under load. Sometimes referred to as the Brazier instability, it is a nonlinear phenomenon. This paper presents an extension of an approximate closed form solution of the collapse of isotropic tubes subject to end moments developed by Reissner in 1959 to include specially orthotropic material. The closed form solution was verified by an extensive nonlinear finite element analysis of the collapse of long tubes under applied end moments for radius to thickness ratios and composite layups in the range proposed for recent space station truss framework designs. The finite element analysis validated the assumption of inextensional deformation of the cylindrical cross section and the approximation of the material as specially orthotropic.

  3. Damage tolerant design using collapse techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new approach to the design of structures for improved global damage tolerance is presented. In its undamaged condition the structure is designed subject to strength, displacement and buckling constraints. In the damaged condition the only constraint is that the structure will not collapse. The collapse load calculation is formulated as a maximization problem and solved by an interior extended penalty function. The design for minimum weight subject to constraints on the undamaged structure and a specified level of the collapse load is a minimization problem which is also solved by a penalty function formulation. Thus the overall problem is of a nested or multilevel optimization. Examples are presented to demonstrate the difference between the present and more traditional approaches.

  4. The sudden collapse of pollinator communities.

    PubMed

    Lever, J Jelle; van Nes, Egbert H; Scheffer, Marten; Bascompte, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Declines in pollinator populations may harm biodiversity and agricultural productivity. Little attention has, however, been paid to the systemic response of mutualistic communities to global environmental change. Using a modelling approach and merging network theory with theory on critical transitions, we show that the scale and nature of critical transitions is likely to be influenced by the architecture of mutualistic networks. Specifically, we show that pollinator populations may collapse suddenly once drivers of pollinator decline reach a critical point. A high connectance and/or nestedness of the mutualistic network increases the capacity of pollinator populations to persist under harsh conditions. However, once a tipping point is reached, pollinator populations collapse simultaneously. Recovering from this single community-wide collapse requires a relatively large improvement of conditions. These findings may have large implications for our view on the sustainability of pollinator communities and the services they provide.

  5. Collapse of DNA under Alternating Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunda; Riehn, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that double-stranded DNA can collapse in presence of a strong electric field. Here we provide an in-depth study of the collapse of DNA under weak confinement in microchannels as a function of buffer strength, driving frequency, applied electric field strength, and molecule size. We find that the critical electric field at which DNA molecules collapse (10s of kV/cm) is strongly dependent on driving frequency dependent (100 … 800 Hz) and molecular size (20 … 160 kbp), and weakly dependent on the ionic strength (8 … 60 mM). We argue that an apparent stretching at very high electric fields is an artifact of the finite frame time of video microscopy. PACS numbers: 87.14.gk, 36.20.Ey, 82.35.Lr, 82.35.Rs PMID:26274209

  6. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-03-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disc on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  7. Collapse of DNA under alternating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunda; Riehn, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that double-stranded DNA can collapse in the presence of a strong electric field. Here we provide an in-depth study of the collapse of DNA under weak confinement in microchannels as a function of buffer strength, driving frequency, applied electric-field strength, and molecule size. We find that the critical electric field at which DNA molecules collapse (tens of kV/m) is strongly dependent on driving frequency (100-800 Hz) and molecular size (20-160 kbp), and weakly dependent on the ionic strength (8-60 mM). We argue that an apparent stretching at very high electric fields is an artifact of the finite frame time of video microscopy.

  8. Gravitational collapse of generalized Vaidya spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkenyeleye, Maombi D.; Goswami, Rituparno; Maharaj, Sunil D.

    2014-09-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of a generalized Vaidya spacetime in the context of the cosmic censorship hypothesis. We develop a general mathematical framework to study the conditions on the mass function so that future directed nonspacelike geodesics can terminate at the singularity in the past. Thus our result generalizes earlier works on gravitational collapse of the combinations of Type-I and Type-II matter fields. Our analysis shows transparently that there exist classes of generalized Vaidya mass functions for which the collapse terminates with a locally naked central singularity. We calculate the strength of these singularities to show that they are strong curvature singularities and there can be no extension of spacetime through them.

  9. Scaling of curvature in subcritical gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkle, David; Duncan, G. Comer

    1998-09-01

    We perform numerical simulations of the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric scalar field. For those data that just barely do not form black holes we find the maximum curvature at the position of the central observer. We find a scaling relation between this maximum curvature and distance from the critical solution. The scaling relation is analogous to that found by Choptuik for the black hole mass for those data that do collapse to form black holes. We also find a periodic wiggle in the scaling exponent.

  10. Structural control on karst collapse sinkhole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Antonio; Ascione, Alessandra; Mazzoli, Stefano; Santangelo, Nicoletta

    2013-04-01

    Collapse sinkholes owing their formation to erosion and deformation phenomena caused by subsurface karstification are widespread in the carbonate massifs of peninsular Italy. In contrast with solution dolines, which are densely distributed on the subplanar top surfaces of the carbonate massifs, the collapse sinkholes (hereinafter labelled karst collapse sinkholes) generally occur as isolated landforms and mostly affect the slopes and piedmont areas. In the latter instances, the sinkholes also affect alluvial fan conglomerates, or slope debris, overlying the carbonate rocks. We investigated the karst collapse sinkholes of the southern-central Apennines mountain belt (Italy), which is representative of a young orogenic system, characterised by recent tectonic activity and strong seismicity. The aim of the study is the identification of the causative factors which control the occurrence of such hazardous phenomena. The study was based on a regional scale analysis on sinkhole distribution in relation to the local geological-structural, geomorphological and hydrogeological contexts, and was paralleled with field analysis of some selected areas. The regional scale analysis indicates that the karst collapse sinkholes are not the mere response to the concurrence of the climatic and lithological conditions which commonly favour the development of karst processes, the occurrence of such landforms appearing strongly influenced by distinctive structural and hydrogeological conditions. In particular, a close relationship between the karst collapse sinkholes and the main extensional faults showing evidence of late Quaternary activity may be envisaged. This is inferred from the spatial distribution of the karst collapse sinkholes, which is strikingly uneven, the sinkholes generally occurring in alignments following large late Quaternary fault zones, or being clustered at the terminations of those faults. In addition, areas affected by the occurrence of groups of sinkholes, are

  11. Tests for intact and collapsed magnetofossil chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, R.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, new techniques for the detection of magnetofossils have been proposed, based on their unique first-order reversal curves (FORC) and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) signatures. These signatures are related to the non-interacting (FORC) and strongly uniaxial anisotropy (FMR) of isolated chains of magnetic particles. However, little is known about the fate of these signatures in sediments where magnetosome chains collapsed during early diagenetic processes. Due to the impossibility of observing the particle arrangement in-situ, the structure of collapsed chains can only be inferred from TEM images of magnetic extracts and from first-principles consideration on the mechanical stability of magnetosome chains once the biological material around them is dissolved. The magnetic properties of double chains, produced by some strains of cocci, are also not known. According to these considerations, four main magnetofossil structures were taken into consideration: (1) isolated, linear chains, (2) double, half-staggered chains, where the gaps of one chain face the magnetosomes in the other chain, (3) double chains with side-to-side magnetosomes, which might result from a "jackknife" type of collapse of a single, long chain, and (4) zig-zag collapsed chains of elongated crystals, where the magnetosome long axes are perpendicular to the chain axis. The collapsed structures might be relevant in sediments where magnetofossils carry a significant part of the remanent magnetization, because chain collapse tends to cancel the original natural remanent magnetization. Detailed models for the hysteretic and anhysteretic properties of structures (1-4) have been calculated by taking realistic distributions of magnetosome size, elongation, and spacing into account, as inferred from a number of published TEM observations. Model calculations took a total of >2 years continuous running time on two computers in an effort to obtain realistic results, which are shown here for the

  12. Quantum evolution disturbed by successive collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammjanović, Milan

    1990-03-01

    The process in which the evolution of a quantum system is interrupted in equal time intervals by the collapse is studied. The analysis is performed without any assumption about the source of the collapse. Zeno's paradox appears in this approach also: at the beginning of the process the decay probability is linear (and not quadratic) in time. The increase of entropy is discussed; it appears that a two-state system asymptotically goes to the totally mixed state, independently of the initial state, whenever the measured observable is not an integral of motion.

  13. Advanced collapsible tank for liquid containment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Tanks for bulk liquid containment will be required to support advanced planetary exploration programs. Potential applications include storage of potable, process, and waste water, and fuels and process chemicals. The launch mass and volume penalties inherent in rigid tanks suggest that collapsible tanks may be more efficient. Collapsible tanks are made of lightweight flexible material and can be folded compactly for storage and transport. Although collapsible tanks for terrestrial use are widely available, a new design was developed that has significantly less mass and bulk than existing models. Modelled after the shape of a sessible drop, this design features a dual membrane with a nearly uniform stress distribution and a low surface-to-volume ratio. It can be adapted to store a variety of liquids in nearly any environment with constant acceleration field. Three models of 10L, 50L, and 378L capacity have been constructed and tested. The 378L (100 gallon) model weighed less than 10 percent of a commercially available collapsible tank of equivalent capacity, and required less than 20 percent of the storage space when folded for transport.

  14. Testing Protostellar Collapse Theory through Extinction Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilner, David

    1997-07-01

    The identification of collapsing protostars remains a ``holy grail'' of star formation studies. The best collapse candidate is generally recognized to be B335, an isolated round globule containing a deeply embedded low luminosity young stellar object {detected only at Lambda>60 Mum}. In an influential study, Zhou et al. {1993} observed a variety of trace molecules in B335 and showed that detailed radiative transfer models based on the velocity and density fields of the ``inside-out'' collapse theory developed by Shu {1977} reproduced the spectra extremely well. Here we propose to use NICMOS to obtain near-infrared photometry of background stars shining through B335, to measure the density field in a way that suffers from none of the problems inherent in molecular line work {abundances, opacities, unknown collision rates, etc.}. Ground based data show that the projected reddening distribution at large radii {>30''} is in good agreement with an npropto r^-2 density profile. Deeper observations using NICMOS will probe into higher extinctions and smaller radii and show directly if the density field has relaxed to the npropto r^-1.5 form predicted for collapse. The proposed observations take advantage of the high sensitivity of NICMOS to sample the B335 infall zone to equivalent visual extinctions of 50 magnitudes or more, a regime that simply cannot be probed from the ground.

  15. Colony Collapse Disorder: A descriptive studey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We ...

  16. Geophysical mapping of solution and collapse sinkholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2014-12-01

    Karst rocks such as limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, or salt can be dissolved physically by water or chemically by water enriched with carbon dioxide. The dissolution is driven by water flowing through the karst aquifer and either occurs along fractures and bedding partings in telogenetic rocks, or within the primary interconnected pore space in eogenetic rocks. The enlargement of either fractures or pores by dissolution creates a large secondary porosity typical of soluble rocks, which is often very heterogenously distributed and results in preferential flow paths in the sub-surface, with cavities as large-scale end members of the sub-surface voids. Once the sub-surface voids enlarged by dissolution grow to a certain size, the overburden rock can become unstable and voids and caves can collapse. Depending on the type of overburden, the collapse initiated at depth may propagate towards the surface and finally results at the surface as collapse sinkholes and tiangkengs on the very large scale. We present results from geophysical surveys over existing karst structures based on gravimetric, electrical, and geomagnetical methods. We have chosen two types of sinkholes, solution and collapse sinkholes, to capture and compare the geophysical signals resulting from these karst structures. We compare and discuss our geophysical survey results with simplified theoretical models describing the evolution of the karst structure, and we derive three-dimensional structural models of the current situation for the different locations with our numerical tool PREDICTOR.

  17. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized symptoms of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new o...

  18. Collapse dynamics of smectic-A bubbles.

    PubMed

    Caillier, F; Oswald, P

    2006-06-01

    The collapse dynamics of smectic-A bubbles are analyzed experimentally and theoretically. Each bubble is expanded from a flat film stretched at the end of a hollow cylinder and deflated through a pressure release by means of a capillary tube. Its total collapse time can be varied between 0.1s and 20s by suitably choosing the length and the internal diameter of the capillary. This experiment allowed us to show that the collapse takes place in two steps: an initial one, which lasts a fraction of a second, where the meniscus destabilizes and fills up with focal conics, followed by a much longer period during which the bubble collapses and exchanges material with the meniscus. By measuring simultaneously the Laplace pressure and the internal pressure inside the bubble, we were able to fully characterize the shear-thinning behavior of the smectic phase within the meniscus. We emphasize that this method is generic and could be applied as well to other systems such as soap bubbles, on condition that inertial effects are negligible. PMID:16791458

  19. A spherical collapse solution with neutrino outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, E.N. )

    1990-08-01

    A three-parameter family of solutions of Einstein's field equations is given that represents a collapsing perfect fluid with outgoing neutrino flux. Solutions with naked'' singularities are exhibited. They can be forbidden by requiring pressure less than or equal to the density as a condition of cosmic censorship.

  20. Neutrino-antineutrino annihilation around collapsing star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berezinsky, V. S.; Prilutsky, O. F.

    1985-01-01

    Stellar collapse is accompanied by emission of E sub neutrino approximately 10 MeV neutrinos and antineutrinos with the energy output W sub neutrino approximately 10 to the 53rd power to 10 to the 54th power erg. Annihilation of these particles in the vicinity of collapsar is considered. The physical consequences are discussed.

  1. When Communities Collapse: Implications for Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitchen, Janet M.

    1987-01-01

    The decline of agriculture in the 1920s and 1930s was compounded by the subsequent collapse of the rural social community, leaving the rural poor without a community and thus exacerbating and prolonging their poverty. Present restructuring of agriculture in the United States may have a similar impact on rural communities. (JHZ)

  2. Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A; Ospino, J.

    2006-08-15

    We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

  3. Spherical gravitational collapse in N dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Rituparno; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate here spherically symmetric gravitational collapse in a space-time with an arbitrary number of dimensions and with a general type I matter field, which is a broad class that includes most of the physically reasonable matter forms. We show that given the initial data for matter in terms of the initial density and pressure profiles at an initial surface t=t{sub i} from which the collapse evolves, there exist the rest of the initial data functions and classes of solutions of Einstein equations which we construct here, such that the space-time evolution goes to a final state which is either a black hole or a naked singularity, depending on the nature of initial data and evolutions chosen, and subject to validity of the weak energy condition. The results are discussed and analyzed in the light of the cosmic censorship hypothesis in black hole physics. The formalism here combines the earlier results on gravitational collapse in four dimensions in a unified treatment. Also the earlier work is generalized to higher-dimensional space-times to allow a study of the effect of the number of dimensions on the possible final outcome of the collapse in terms of either a black hole or naked singularity. No restriction is adopted on the number of dimensions, and other limiting assumptions such as self-similarity of space-time are avoided, in order to keep the treatment general. Our methodology allows us to consider to an extent the genericity and stability aspects related to the occurrence of naked singularities in gravitational collapse.

  4. Spherical gravitational collapse in N dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Rituparno; Joshi, Pankaj S.

    2007-10-01

    We investigate here spherically symmetric gravitational collapse in a space-time with an arbitrary number of dimensions and with a general type I matter field, which is a broad class that includes most of the physically reasonable matter forms. We show that given the initial data for matter in terms of the initial density and pressure profiles at an initial surface t=ti from which the collapse evolves, there exist the rest of the initial data functions and classes of solutions of Einstein equations which we construct here, such that the space-time evolution goes to a final state which is either a black hole or a naked singularity, depending on the nature of initial data and evolutions chosen, and subject to validity of the weak energy condition. The results are discussed and analyzed in the light of the cosmic censorship hypothesis in black hole physics. The formalism here combines the earlier results on gravitational collapse in four dimensions in a unified treatment. Also the earlier work is generalized to higher-dimensional space-times to allow a study of the effect of the number of dimensions on the possible final outcome of the collapse in terms of either a black hole or naked singularity. No restriction is adopted on the number of dimensions, and other limiting assumptions such as self-similarity of space-time are avoided, in order to keep the treatment general. Our methodology allows us to consider to an extent the genericity and stability aspects related to the occurrence of naked singularities in gravitational collapse.

  5. Formation of planetesimals in collapsing pebble clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlberg Jansson, K.; Johansen, A.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids and Kuiper belt objects are remnant planetesimals from the epoch of planet formation. Their physical properties hold important clues to understanding how minor bodies formed in the Solar Nebula. The first stage of the planet formation process is the accumulation of dust and ice grains into mm-cm-sized pebbles. Due to the interaction with the gas in the protoplanetary disk, these pebbles can clump together through the streaming instability and form gravitationally bound particle pebble 'clouds'. Pebbles in the cloud collide with each other, dissipating energy into heat. As the cloud loses energy, it contracts, and one would expect the particles to move faster and faster due to the negative heat capacity nature of self-gravitating systems. However, for high-mass clouds, the collapse is limited by free-fall and the cloud does not have time to virialize. This in turn leads to lower collision speeds but thanks to increased density also to increased collision rates and a runaway collapse. We investigate three important properties of the collapse: (i) the time-scale to collapse to solid density, (ii) the temporal evolution of the size spectrum of the pebbles, and (iii) the multiplicity of the resulting planetesimals. We find that planetesimals larger than 100 km in radius collapse on the free-fall time-scale of about 25 years. Lower-mass clouds have longer pebble collision time-scales and hence collapse much more slowly, with collapse times of a few hundred years for 10-km-scale planetesimals and a few thousand years for 1-km-scale planetesimals. The mass of the pebble cloud also determines the structure of the resulting planetesimal. The collision speed among the pebbles in low- mass clouds is below the threshold for fragmentation, forming pebble- pile planetesimals consisting of the primordial pebbles from the nebula. Planetesimals above 100 km in radius, on the other hand, consist of mixtures of dust (pebble fragments) and pebbles which have undergone

  6. Collapse of Corroded Pipelines under Combined Tension and External Pressure.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hao; Yan, Sunting; Jin, Zhijiang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, collapse of corroded pipeline under combined external pressure and tension is investigated through numerical method. Axially uniform corrosion with symmetric imperfections is firstly considered. After verifying with existing experimental results, the finite element model is used to study the effect of tension on collapse pressure. An extensive parametric study is carried out using Python script and FORTRAN subroutine to investigate the influence of geometric parameters on the collapse behavior under combined loads. The results are used to develop an empirical equation for estimating the collapse pressure under tension. In addition, the effects of loading path, initial imperfection length, yielding anisotropy and corrosion defect length on the collapse behavior are also investigated. It is found that tension has a significant influence on collapse pressure of corroded pipelines. Loading path and anisotropic yielding are also important factors affecting the collapse behavior. For pipelines with relatively long corrosion defect, axially uniform corrosion models could be used to estimate the collapse pressure. PMID:27111544

  7. Collapse of Corroded Pipelines under Combined Tension and External Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Yan, Sunting; Jin, Zhijiang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, collapse of corroded pipeline under combined external pressure and tension is investigated through numerical method. Axially uniform corrosion with symmetric imperfections is firstly considered. After verifying with existing experimental results, the finite element model is used to study the effect of tension on collapse pressure. An extensive parametric study is carried out using Python script and FORTRAN subroutine to investigate the influence of geometric parameters on the collapse behavior under combined loads. The results are used to develop an empirical equation for estimating the collapse pressure under tension. In addition, the effects of loading path, initial imperfection length, yielding anisotropy and corrosion defect length on the collapse behavior are also investigated. It is found that tension has a significant influence on collapse pressure of corroded pipelines. Loading path and anisotropic yielding are also important factors affecting the collapse behavior. For pipelines with relatively long corrosion defect, axially uniform corrosion models could be used to estimate the collapse pressure. PMID:27111544

  8. Why do naked singularities form in gravitational collapse? II

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Goswami, Rituparno; Dadhich, Naresh

    2004-10-15

    We examine physical features that could lead to formation of a naked singularity rather than black hole, as end state of spherical collapse. Generalizing earlier results on dust collapse to general type I matter fields, it is shown that collapse always creates black hole if shear vanishes or density is homogeneous. It follows that nonzero shear is a necessary condition for singularity to be visible to external observers, when trapped surface formation is delayed by shearing forces or inhomogeneity within the collapsing cloud.

  9. Shunt failure caused by valve collapse.

    PubMed

    Lundar, T; Langmoen, I A; Hovind, K H

    1991-06-01

    Shunt failure due to collapse of the Mini-Holter valve was observed 13 times in 11 out of 179 children with an implanted Mini-Holter ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) or ventriculo-atrial (VA) shunt during a 10 year period. Intussusception of the proximal or distal end of the valve thus caused a shunt failure rate of 6% of the children in this series. Two children experienced this complication twice. All collapsed valves were part of a VP shunt system. Because of this experience use of the mini valve was abandoned and an adult Holter valve was implanted in children over the age of one month. Breakdown of this particular valve has not occurred in 102 children and two hundred adults with the adult Holter shunt system.

  10. Collapse of the Late Proterozoic ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopf, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over the past two decades is now sufficient to permit an initial quantitative assessment of the patterns of biotic diversity and extinction that occurred during Proterozoic time. Because of limitations in both the quality and quantity of data currently available, however, generalizations thus derived must be regarded as tentative. Nevertheless, read literally, available palaeontological data appear to indicate that the global ecosystem experienced a gradual but massive collapse between 1 000 Ma and the beginning of the Phanerozoic, a supposition consistent with other lines of geological and geochemical evidence. A possible forcing agent for such a collapse appears to have been a decrease in ambient levels of carbon dioxide and a resultant decrease in average global temperature, photosynthetic efficiency, and primary productivity.

  11. Protostellar Collapse Using Multigroup Radiation Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaytet, N.; Chabrier, G.; Audit, E.; Commerçon, B.; Masson, J.; González, M.; Ferguson, J.; Delahaye, F.

    2015-10-01

    Many simulations of protostellar collapse make use of a grey treatment of radiative transfer coupled to the hydrodynamics. However, interstellar gas and dust opacities present large variations as a function of frequency. In this paper, we present multigroup radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the collapse of a spherically symmetric cloud and the formation of the first and second Larson cores. We have used a non-ideal gas equation of state as well as an extensive set of spectral opacities. Small differences between grey and multigroup simulations were observed. The first and second core accretion shocks were found to be super- and sub-critical, respectively. Varying the initial size and mass of the parent cloud had little impact on the core properties (especially for the second core). We finally present early results from 3D simulations that were performed using the RAMSES code.

  12. Energy balance in the WTC collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kaiqi; Xu, Kang; Ansourian, Peter; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The main aim of this report is to provide an analysis of Twin Towers of the New York City's World Trade Centre collapsed after attacked by two jet aircrafts. The approach mainly focused on the effect of temperature on mechanical properties of the building, by modelling heat energy in the south tower. Energy balance during the collapse between the energy inputs by aircraft petrol and the transient heat to the towers was conducted. Both the overall structure between 80 to 83 stories and individual elements was modelled. The main elements contributed to the heat transition includes external and internal columns. Heat applied in 2D and 3D models for single elements was through convection and conduction. Analysis of transient heat was done using Strand7.

  13. Collapse of vacuum bubbles in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Wang, Shang-Yung

    2011-02-15

    We revisit the dynamics of a false vacuum bubble in a background de Sitter spacetime. We find that there exists a large parameter space that allows the bubble to collapse into a black hole or to form a wormhole. This may have interesting implications for the creation of a baby universe in the laboratory, the string landscape where the bubble nucleation takes place among a plenitude of metastable vacua, and the inflationary physics.

  14. Collapsing glomerulopathy associated with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasaprasad, N. D.; Chandramohan, G.; Praveen, V.; Fernando, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) usually presents with reduced glomerular filtration rate, heavy proteinuria and has unfavorable prognosis. Numerous associations with CG are found. We encountered a case of CG associated with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with proteinuria and dialysis-requiring severe renal failure. Our patient made partial recovery of his renal function and became dialysis-independent after antituberculous therapy and oral steroids. Long-term follow-up is needed to assess the progression of the disease. PMID:27795635

  15. Collapsible sheath fluid reservoirs for flow cytometers

    DOEpatents

    Mark, Graham A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a container in the form of a single housing for holding fluid, including a first collapsible reservoir having a first valve. The first reservoir initially contains a volume of fluid. The container also includes a second reservoir, initially empty (or substantially empty), expandable to a second volume. The second reservoir has a second valve. As the volume of said first reservoir decreases, the volume of the second reservoir proportionally increases.

  16. Simulated Cytoskeletal Collapse via Tau Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sendek, Austin; Fuller, Henry R.; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Cox, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i) taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii) removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii) a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundles falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06–0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse. PMID:25162587

  17. Growth of a collapsing Langmuir monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, S.; Datta, A.; Hazra, S.

    2006-05-15

    Langmuir monolayers of stearic acid on Co ions in the aqueous subphase have been deposited at different stages of constant pressure collapse, on hydrophilic Si(001) using a modified version of the inverse Langmuir-Schaefer method of horizontal deposition. The electron density profiles (EDPs) along the depth of the deposited films, extracted from the x-ray reflectivity data, show that a monolayer to bi-molecular layer transformation takes place after collapse. The molecules in the lower monolayer have asymmetric configurations with head groups touching water and tails in air, whereas molecules in the upper layer are in symmetric configurations with tails on both sides of the heads. Atomic force microscopy images of the deposited films after collapse, however, show nearly circular islands of height more than that of the bimolecular layer observed in the EDP. As pressure increases, ridges are seen to coexist with these islands. Although the coverage of such islands and ridges is low, they play an important role in determining the growth mode. The growth of the wetting and island layers, taken together, has a striking similarity with the Stranski-Krastanow mode, observed usually for heteroepitaxial growth.

  18. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  19. Gravitational collapse of a susy star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavelli, L.

    2006-10-01

    The evidence for a positive vacuum energy in our universe suggests that we might be living in a false vacuum destined to ultimately decay to a true vacuum free of dark energy. At present the simplest example of such a universe is one that is exactly supersymmetric (susy). It is expected that the nucleation rate of critically sized susy bubbles will be enhanced in regions of high density such as in degenerate stars. The consequent release of energy stored in Pauli towers provides a possible model for gamma ray bursts. Whether or not all or any of the currently observed bursts are due to this mechanism, it is important to define the signatures of this susy phase transition. After such a burst, due to the lifting of degeneracy pressure, the star would be expected to collapse into a black hole even though its mass is below the Chandrasekhar limit. Previous studies have treated the star as fully releasing its stored energy before the collapse. In this article we make an initial investigation of the effects of the collapse during the gamma ray emission.

  20. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-15

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  1. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark L.; Chertkow, Merek A.; Harris, James A.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{44}$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  2. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark L.; Chertkow, Merek A.; Harris, James A.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10more » $$^{44}$$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.« less

  3. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-01

    Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  4. Cooperation, cheating, and collapse in microbial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    Natural populations can suffer catastrophic collapse in response to small changes in environmental conditions, and recovery after such a collapse can be exceedingly difficult. We have used laboratory yeast populations to study proposed early warning signals of impending extinction. Yeast cooperatively breakdown the sugar sucrose, meaning that there is a minimum number of cells required to sustain the population. We have demonstrated experimentally that the fluctuations in the population size increase in magnitude and become slower as the population approaches collapse. The cooperative nature of yeast growth on sucrose suggests that the population may be susceptible to cheater cells, which do not contribute to the public good and instead merely take advantage of the cooperative cells. We have confirmed this possibility experimentally by using a cheater yeast strain that lacks the gene encoding the cooperative behavior [1]. However, recent results in the lab demonstrate that the presence of a bacterial competitor may drive cooperation within the yeast population.[4pt] [1] Gore et al, Nature 459, 253 -- 256 (2009)

  5. Gopherus agassizii (desert tortoise). Burrow collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughran, Caleb L.; Ennen, Joshua; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    In the deserts of the southwestern U.S., burrows are utilized by the Desert Tortoise to escape environmental extremes (reviewed by Ernst and Lovich 2009. Turtles of the United States and Canada. 2nd ed. Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 827 pp.). However, the potential for mortality through burrow collapse and entrapment is poorly documented. Nicholson and Humphreys (1981. Proceedings of the Desert Tortoise Council, pp. 163−194) suggested that collapse due to livestock trampling may cause mortality. In addition, Lovich et al. (2011. Chelon. Cons. Biol. 10[1]:124–129) documented a Desert Tortoise that used a steel culvert as a burrow surrogate. The culvert filled completely with sediment following a significant rain event, entombing the animal and ultimately resulting in its death. We note that this mortality was associated with an anthropogenic structure; because tortoises are prodigious diggers, one might hypothesize that they have the ability to dig out of collapsed natural burrows in most situations. Circumstances described here presented us with an opportunity to test this hypothesis.

  6. Collapse and fragmentation of molecular cloud cores. 2: Collapse induced by stellar shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1995-01-01

    The standard scenario for low-mass star formation involves 'inside-out' collapse of a dense molecular cloud core following loss of magnetic field support through ambipolar diffusion. However, isotopic anomalies in presolar grains and meteoritical inclusions imply that the collapse of the presolar cloud may have been triggered by a stellar shock wave. This paper explores 'outside-in' collapse, that is, protostellar collapse initiated directly by the compression of quiescent dense cloud cores impacted by relatively slow stellar shock waves. A second-order accurate, gravitational hydrodynamics code has been used to study both the spherically symmetrical and three-dimensional evolution of initially centrally condensed, isothermal, self-gravitating, solar-mass cloud cores that are struck by stellar shock waves with velocities up to 25 km/s and postshock temperatures of 10 to 10,000 K. The models show that such mild shock waves do not completely shred and destroy the cloud, and that the dynamical ram pressure can compress the cloud to the verge of self-gravitational collapse. However, compression caused by a high postshock temperature is a considerably more effective means of inducing collapse. Shock-induced collapse produces high initial mass accretion rates (greater than 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr in a solar-mass cloud) that decline rapidly to much lower values, depending on the presence (approximately 10(exp -6) solar mass/yr) or absence (approximately 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr) of an infinite reservoir of mass. Stellar mass accretion rates approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr have been previously inferred from the luminosities of T Tauri stars; balanced mass accretion (stellar rate = envelope rate) at approximately 10(exp -7) solar mass/yr could then be possible if accretion occurs from a finite mass reservoir. Fluid tracers are used to determine what fraction of the stellar shock material is incorporated into the resulting protostellar object and disk

  7. Is spontaneous wave function collapse testable at all?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos

    2015-07-01

    Mainstream literature on spontaneous wave function collapse never reflects on or profits from the formal coincidence and conceptual relationship with standard collapse under time-continuous quantum measurement (monitoring). I propose some easy lessons of standard monitoring theory which would make spontaneous collapse models revise some of their claims. In particular, the objective detection of spontaneous collapse remains impossible as long as the correct identification of what corresponds to the signal in standard monitoring is missing from spontaneous collapse models, the physical detectability of the “signal” is not stated explicitly and, finally, the principles of physical detection are not revealed.

  8. Prediction of femoral head collapse in osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y; Yoshida, H; Leali, A; Fetto, J F; Chao, E Y S

    2006-06-01

    The femoral head deteriorates in osteonecrosis. As a consequence of that, the cortical shell of the femoral head can buckle into the cancellous bone supporting it. In order to examine the buckling scenario we performed numerical analysis of a realistic femoral head model. The analysis included a solution of the hip contact problem, which provided the contact pressure distribution, and subsequent buckling simulation based on the given contact pressure. The contact problem was solved iteratively by approximating the cartilage by a discrete set of unilateral linear springs. The buckling calculations were based on a finite element mesh with brick elements for the cancellous bone and shell elements for the cortical shell. Results of 144 simulations for a variety of geometrical, material, and loading parameters strengthen the buckling scenario. They, particularly, show that the normal cancellous bone serves as a strong supporting foundation for the cortical shell and prevents it from buckling. However, under the development of osteonecrosis the deteriorating cancellous bone is unable to prevent the cortical shell from buckling and the critical pressure decreases with the decreasing Young modulus of the cancellous bone. The local buckling of the cortical shell seems to be the driving force of the progressive fracturing of the femoral head leading to its entire collapse. The buckling analysis provides an additional criterion of the femoral head collapse, the critical contact pressure. The buckling scenario also suggests a new argument in speculating on the femoral head reinforcement. If the entire collapse of the femoral head starts with the buckling of the cortical shell then it is reasonable to place the reinforcement as close to the cortical shell as possible.

  9. Collapse structures within a hydrogeothermal carbonate aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hartmann, Hartwig; Buness, Hermann; Musmann, Patrick; Schulz, Rüdiger

    2010-05-01

    In hydrogeothermal projects karst is of special interest. In the vicinity of production and injection wells karst allows for a high hydraulic transmissivity. The solution process increases porosity and in the extreme leads to the formation of caves. There is no direct evidence by seismic methods to detect such processes, without well control. Increased porosity increase the impedance contrast to adjacent layers and leads to higher seismic amplitudes. It is questionable, whether caves still exist at a depth of more than 3000m. However, breccia caused by collapsed caves, also has higher porosities and should show high amplitude anomalies. The Bavarian Molasse basin is one of most prospective hydrogeothermal provinces in Germany. An Upper Jurassic carbonate platform comprises the potential geothermal aquifer. Seismic data shows circular depressions at the top of the carbonate layer. Underneath the depressions high amplitude anomalies can be found. These features are interpreted as collapse structures within the carbonate platform. Pulldown effects at the base of the carbonate platform are caused by decreasing seismic velocity within the disturbed zone. Several of such features line up along prominent fault lineaments. At the beginning of the basin development within Mid-Tertiary times the platform has been covered by relative thin layers of shale and clastic sediments. During this time the platform has been affected by small scale tectonic movements. This has established a topography, which could have induced the formation of karst. Larger caves collapsed during the ongoing basin development and resulted in the circular depressions. The process ceased during Rupelian, as can be deduced from seismic data.

  10. Ancient reef ecosystem expansion and collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copper, P.

    1994-01-01

    Platform carbonate and, particularly, reef ecosystem development (with reefs representing the acme of carbonate platform growth) were highly cyclical in early to mid Paleozoic time, especially in relation to known or postulated times of global warming or cooling. These cycles do not appear to correspond to postulated 26 Ma rhythms seen in diversity patterns, nor were they regular. There were major periods of worldwide reef expansion (e.g. mid-Silurian-Late Devonian), corresponding to global warming well above present day norms, and periods of complete global reef collapse (e.g., mid-Cambrian to mid-Ordovician, Late Devonian) corresponding to global perturbations. At times of major reef expansion in the Paleozoic, areas covered by equatorial reef and inter-reef carbonate platforms are conservatively estimated to have periodically exceeded 5 million sq. km, nearly ten times that in the modern ocean. At times of global reef collapse, e.g. the Famennian (Late Devonian), reef complexes were completely absent or, at best, covered <1000 sq. km. The chief factors relating to periodic collapse and mass extinction of reef biotas appear to be related to climatic change and possibly ocean anoxic events, in turn as a response to large scale, geologically disruptive factors such as plate collisions, plate movement across equatorial belts and volcanism. Stress “signals” in Cambrian through Cretaceous reef ecosystems appear to be comparable to those of today: whether these relate to physical versus biological stress is uncertain. Reef stress is evident in globally reduced areas and thicknesses of reef carbonate production, the absence of large scale barrier reef systems and reduction to smaller patch reef complexes (or, periodically, following mass extinctions, no reefs at all), reduced species and genus diversity, small skeletons or colonies, limited or no biotic zonation along reef transects, and arrested succession and ecologic replacement of complex, more highly evolved

  11. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  12. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  13. Detecting wave function collapse without prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Charles Wesley; Tumulka, Roderich

    2015-08-01

    We are concerned with the problem of detecting with high probability whether a wave function has collapsed or not, in the following framework: A quantum system with a d-dimensional Hilbert space is initially in state ψ; with probability 0 < p < 1, the state collapses relative to the orthonormal basis b1, …, bd. That is, the final state ψ' is random, it is ψ with probability 1 - p and bk (up to a phase) with p times Born's probability || ψ 2 . Now an experiment on the system in state ψ' is desired that provides information about whether or not a collapse has occurred. Elsewhere [C. W. Cowan and R. Tumulka, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47, 195303 (2014)], we identify and discuss the optimal experiment in case that ψ is either known or random with a known probability distribution. Here, we present results about the case that no a priori information about ψ is available, while we regard p and b1, …, bd as known. For certain values of p, we show that the set of ψs for which any experiment E is more reliable than blind guessing is at most half the unit sphere; thus, in this regime, any experiment is of questionable use, if any at all. Remarkably, however, there are other values of p and experiments E such that the set of ψs for which E is more reliable than blind guessing has measure greater than half the sphere, though with a conjectured maximum of 64% of the sphere.

  14. Nuclear Physics in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Fischer, T.; Froelich, C.; Hix, William Raphael; Langanke, Karlheinz; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Scheidegger, Simon; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl W.; Whitehouse, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Core-collapse and the launch of a supernova explosion form a very short episode of few seconds in the evolution of a massive star, during which an enormous gravitational energy of several times 1053 erg is transformed into observable neutrino-, kinetic-, and electromagnetic radiation energy. We emphasize the wide range of matter conditions that prevail in a supernova event and sort the conditions into distinct regimes in the density and entropy phase diagram to briefly discuss their different impact on the neutrino signal, gravitational wave emission, and ejecta.

  15. Cosmic-ray ionisation in collapsing clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Hennebelle, P.; Galli, D.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Cosmic rays play an important role in dense molecular cores, affecting their thermal and dynamical evolution and initiating the chemistry. Several studies have shown that the formation of protostellar discs in collapsing clouds is severely hampered by the braking torque exerted by the entrained magnetic field on the infalling gas, as long as the field remains frozen to the gas. Aims: In this paper we examine the possibility that the concentration and twisting of the field lines in the inner region of collapse can produce a significant reduction of the ionisation fraction. Methods: To check whether the cosmic-ray ionisation rate can fall below the critical value required to maintain good coupling, we first study the propagation of cosmic rays in a model of a static magnetised cloud varying the relative strength of the toroidal/poloidal components and the mass-to-flux ratio. We then follow the path of cosmic rays using realistic magnetic field configurations generated by numerical simulations of a rotating collapsing core with different initial conditions. Results: We find that an increment of the toroidal component of the magnetic field, or, in general, a more twisted configuration of the field lines, results in a decrease in the cosmic-ray flux. This is mainly due to the magnetic mirroring effect that is stronger where larger variations in the field direction are present. In particular, we find a decrease of the cosmic-ray ionisation rate below 10-18 s-1 in the central 300-400 AU, where density is higher than about 109 cm-3. This very low value of the ionisation rate is attained in the cases of intermediate and low magnetisation (mass-to-flux ratio λ = 5 and 17, respectively) and for toroidal fields larger than about 40% of the total field. Conclusions: Magnetic field effects can significantly reduce the ionisation fraction in collapsing clouds. We provide a handy fitting formula to compute approximately the attenuation of the cosmic-ray ionisation rate

  16. Core-collapse supernovae and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1994-12-01

    I discuss some of the physics that governs the collapse and explosion of a massive star, including issues such as lepton number losses in the infall stage and neutrino heating and convection following the core bounce. I review recent work on the neutrino process and the r-process, describing how the nucleosynthesis depends on the explosion mechanism. Some of the interesting possibilities for oscillations of closure mass {nu}{sub {tau}}s are discussed, along with their signatures in terrestrial detectors and in nucleosynthesis.

  17. Conditional Probabilities and Collapse in Quantum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laura, Roberto; Vanni, Leonardo

    2008-09-01

    We show that including both the system and the apparatus in the quantum description of the measurement process, and using the concept of conditional probabilities, it is possible to deduce the statistical operator of the system after a measurement with a given result, which gives the probability distribution for all possible consecutive measurements on the system. This statistical operator, representing the state of the system after the first measurement, is in general not the same that would be obtained using the postulate of collapse.

  18. Electromagnetic wave collapse in a radiation background.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Mattias; Brodin, Gert; Stenflo, Lennart

    2003-10-17

    The nonlinear interaction, due to quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects between an electromagnetic pulse and a radiation background, is investigated by combining the methods of radiation hydrodynamics with the QED theory for photon-photon scattering. For the case of a single coherent electromagnetic pulse, we obtain a Zakharov-like system, where the radiation pressure of the pulse acts as a driver of acoustic waves in the photon gas. For a sufficiently intense pulse and/or background energy density, there is focusing and the subsequent collapse of the pulse. The relevance of our results for various astrophysical applications are discussed.

  19. A collapsible trap for capturing ruffe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Andrew J.; Czypinski, Gary D.; Selgeby, James H.

    1998-01-01

    A modified version of the Windermere trap was designed, constructed, and tested for its effectiveness in capturing ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus. The inexpensive, lightweight, collapsible trap was easily deployed and retrieved from a small boat. Field tests conducted at the St. Louis River estuary in western Lake Superior in spring 1995 and 1996 indicated that the trap was effective in capturing ruffe. Proportions of the ruffe in trap and bottom trawl catches were similar in 1995 and 1996. This trap could be a useful tool in surveillance, monitoring, or control programs for ruffe or similar species, either to augment existing sampling programs or especially in situations where gillnetting or bottom trawling are not feasible.

  20. Climate and the collapse of Maya civilization.

    PubMed

    Haug, Gerald H; Günther, Detlef; Peterson, Larry C; Sigman, Daniel M; Hughen, Konrad A; Aeschlimann, Beat

    2003-03-14

    In the anoxic Cariaco Basin of the southern Caribbean, the bulk titanium content of undisturbed sediment reflects variations in riverine input and the hydrological cycle over northern tropical South America. A seasonally resolved record of titanium shows that the collapse of Maya civilization in the Terminal Classic Period occurred during an extended regional dry period, punctuated by more intense multiyear droughts centered at approximately 810, 860, and 910 A.D. These new data suggest that a century-scale decline in rainfall put a general strain on resources in the region, which was then exacerbated by abrupt drought events, contributing to the social stresses that led to the Maya demise.

  1. Critical conditions for core-collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Keshet, Uri; Balberg, Shmuel

    2012-06-22

    The explosion of a core-collapse supernova can be approximated by the breakdown of steady-state solutions for accretion onto a proto-neutron star (PNS). We analytically show that as the neutrino luminosity exceeds a critical value L(c), the neutrinosphere pressure exceeds the hydrostatic limit even for an optimal shock radius R. This yields L(c) [proportionally] M(2)T(2) (with logarithmic corrections) and R [proportionally] M/T, in agreement with numerical results, where M and T are the PNS mass and neutrino temperature, respectively. The near-critical flow can be approximated as a ballistic shell on top of an isothermal layer. PMID:23004581

  2. Karst collapse in cities and mining areas, China

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Chen )

    1988-08-01

    Karst collapse is a dynamic geological phenomenon, in which the rock mass or deposits overlying the karstified zone subsides down along the karst cavity, resulting in a collapse pit or sinkhole. After discussing the typical examples of collapse emerging in the karst cities and mines in provinces and regions of South China, such as Guangdong, Guangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Zhejiang, Yunnan, Guizhou, and Jiangxi, it is considered that human activities of economy and production have become a major effect in causing karst collapse. Man-made collapses make 66.4 percent of the total, whereas natural ones 33.6 percent. Most of the collapses occurred to the area with soil overburden (96.7 percent), only a few in areas of bedrock overburden (3.3 percent). The karst collapses have a close relationship with the extent of karst development, the character and the thickness of overburden, and the dynamic condition of underground water. Collapse usually occurs in those parts of an area that are more intensely karstified, with soil thickness less than 5 m and a high amplitude of water table fluctuation. Many kinds of mechanical effects are caused by pumping or draining on the over-burden and destroying its equilibrium, leading to the collapse. These effects included the support loss and load-added effect, penetrating suffusion, gas explosion, water-hammer, suction pressure erosion, and liquefaction effects. The collapses are the result of varied comprehensive effects, particularly the support loss and load-added, and penetrating suffusion.

  3. Quantum corrected spherical collapse: A phenomenological framework

    SciTech Connect

    Ziprick, Jonathan; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2010-08-15

    A phenomenological framework is presented for incorporating quantum gravity motivated corrections into the dynamics of spherically symmetric collapse. The effective equations are derived from a variational principle that guarantees energy conservation and the existence of a Birkhoff theorem. The gravitational potential can be chosen as a function of the areal radius to yield specific nonsingular static spherically symmetric solutions that generically have two horizons. For a specific choice of potential, the effective stress energy tensor violates only the dominant energy condition. The violations are maximum near the inner horizon and die off rapidly. A numerical study of the quantum corrected collapse of a spherically symmetric scalar field in this case reveals that the modified gravitational potential prevents the formation of a central singularity and ultimately yields a static, mostly vacuum, spacetime with two horizons. The matter 'piles up' on the inner horizon giving rise to mass inflation at late times. The Cauchy horizon is transformed into a null, weak singularity, but in contrast to Einstein gravity, the absence of a central singularity renders this null singularity stable.

  4. Sudden trust collapse in networked societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Gama Batista, João; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe; Challet, Damien

    2015-03-01

    Trust is a collective, self-fulfilling phenomenon that suggests analogies with phase transitions. We introduce a stylized model for the build-up and collapse of trust in networks, which generically displays a first order transition. The basic assumption of our model is that whereas trustworthiness begets trustworthiness, panic also begets panic, in the sense that a small decrease in trustworthiness may be amplified and ultimately lead to a sudden and catastrophic drop of collective trust. We show, using both numerical simulations and mean-field analytic arguments, that there are extended regions of the parameter space where two equilibrium states coexist: a well-connected network where global confidence is high, and a poorly connected network where global confidence is low. In these coexistence regions, spontaneous jumps from the well-connected state to the poorly connected state can occur, corresponding to a sudden collapse of trust that is not caused by any major external catastrophe. In large systems, spontaneous crises are replaced by history dependence: whether the system is found in one state or in the other essentially depends on initial conditions. Finally, we document a new phase, in which agents are well connected yet distrustful.

  5. Critical Collapse of Rotating Radiation Fluids.

    PubMed

    Baumgarte, Thomas W; Gundlach, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the first fully relativistic simulations of the critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids. We observe critical scaling both in subcritical evolutions-in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space-and in supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of black holes. We measure the mass and angular momentum of these black holes, and find that both show critical scaling with critical exponents that are consistent with perturbative results. The critical exponents are universal: they are not affected by angular momentum, and are independent of the direction in which the critical curve, which separates subcritical from supercritical evolutions in our two-dimensional parameter space, is crossed. In particular, these findings suggest that the angular momentum decreases more rapidly than the square of the mass, so that, as criticality is approached, the collapse leads to the formation of a nonspinning black hole. We also demonstrate excellent agreement of our numerical data with new closed-form extensions of power-law scalings that describe the mass and angular momentum of rotating black holes formed close to criticality. PMID:27314710

  6. Shear flow induced unfolding of collapsed polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Netz, Roland

    2006-03-01

    In the process of clotting in small vessels, platelets form a plug in an injured zone only in the presence of a protein known as the von Willebrand Factor (vWF). The absence or malfunction of the vWF leads to a bleeding disorder, the so-called von Willebrand disease. It is believed that the protein is collapsed (or globular) when released into the blood flow, and that it undergoes a transition at high shear rates that allows it to bind platelets. Using hydrodynamic simulations of a simple model of the vWF in shear flow, we show that a globular polymer undergoes a globule-stretch transition at a critical shear rate. Below this threshold shear rate the polymer remains collapsed and slightly deformed, while above it the chain displays strong elongations in the direction of the flow. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our results in the case of blood flow, and compare them to the physiological values present in the body.

  7. Multiscale Analysis of a Collapsible Respiratory Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiali, Samir; Bell, E. David; Swarts, J. Douglas

    2006-11-01

    The Eustachian tube (ET) is a collapsible respiratory airway that connects the nasopharynx with the middle ear (ME). The ET normally exists in a collapsed state and must be periodically opened to maintain a healthy and sterile ME. Although the inability to open the ET (i.e. ET dysfunction) is the primary etiology responsible for several common ME diseases (i.e. Otitis Media), the mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction are not well established. To investigate these mechanisms, we developed a multi-scale model of airflow in the ET and correlated model results with experimental data obtained in healthy and diseased subjects. The computational models utilized finite-element methods to simulate fluid-structure interactions and molecular dynamics techniques to quantify the adhesive properties of mucus glycoproteins. Results indicate that airflow in the ET is highly sensitive to both the dynamics of muscle contraction and molecular adhesion forces within the ET lumen. In addition, correlation of model results with experimental data obtained in diseased subjects was used to identify the biomechanical mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction.

  8. Null fluid collapse in brane world models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2014-03-01

    The brane world description of our Universe entails a large extra dimension and a fundamental scale of gravity that may be lower than the Planck scale by several orders of magnitude. An interesting consequence of this scenario occurs in the nature of spherically symmetric vacuum solutions to the brane gravitational field equations, which often have properties quite distinct from the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. In this paper, the spherically symmetric collapse on the brane world of four types of null fluid, governed by the barotropic, polytropic, strange quark "bag" model and Hagedorn equations of state, is investigated. In each case, we solve the approximate gravitational field equations, obtained in the high-density limit, determine the equation which governs the formation of apparent horizons and investigate the conditions for the formation of naked singularities. Though, naively, one would expect the increased effective energy density on the brane to favor the formation of black holes over naked singularities, we find that, for the types of fluid considered, this is not the case. However, the black hole solutions differ substantially from their general-relativistic counterparts and brane world corrections often play a role analogous to charge in general relativity. As an astrophysical application of this work, the possibility that energy emission from a Hagedorn fluid collapsing to form a naked singularity may be a source of GRBs in the brane world is also considered.

  9. Critical Collapse of Rotating Radiation Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Gundlach, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the first fully relativistic simulations of the critical collapse of rotating radiation fluids. We observe critical scaling both in subcritical evolutions—in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space—and in supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of black holes. We measure the mass and angular momentum of these black holes, and find that both show critical scaling with critical exponents that are consistent with perturbative results. The critical exponents are universal: they are not affected by angular momentum, and are independent of the direction in which the critical curve, which separates subcritical from supercritical evolutions in our two-dimensional parameter space, is crossed. In particular, these findings suggest that the angular momentum decreases more rapidly than the square of the mass, so that, as criticality is approached, the collapse leads to the formation of a nonspinning black hole. We also demonstrate excellent agreement of our numerical data with new closed-form extensions of power-law scalings that describe the mass and angular momentum of rotating black holes formed close to criticality.

  10. Systematic investigation of the effect of lyophilizate collapse on pharmaceutically relevant proteins III: collapse during storage at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Schersch, K; Betz, O; Garidel, P; Muehlau, S; Bassarab, S; Winter, G

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the effect of lyophilizate collapse on the stability of pharmaceutical proteins. Recently, it was shown that collapse during freeze-drying has no major negative impact on protein stability during storage at elevated temperatures when compared to non-collapsed cakes [1,2]. In this part of the study, lyophilizates that collapsed during the freeze-drying process were compared to cakes that were initially non-collapsed but collapsed during subsequent storage under accelerated stress conditions. Collapsed and non-collapsed lyophilizates of identical formulation and comparable residual moisture levels, containing a monoclonal IgG antibody, were stored at 40 °C and 50 °C for up to 3 months. Protein stability was monitored using a comprehensive set of analytical techniques assessing the formation of soluble and insoluble aggregates as well as protein conformation. The properties of the freeze-dried cake, namely the glass transition temperature, excipient crystallinity, sucrose degradation, reconstitution behavior, and the residual moisture content, were analyzed as well. The incorporated protein was significantly better stabilized in cakes that collapsed during the freeze-drying process when compared to lyophilizates that collapsed during subsequent storage. This effect can be related to the onset of crystallization and hydrolysis of the stabilizer and non-enzymatic browning. PMID:23727369

  11. Gravitationally collapsing shells in (2+1) dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Robert B.; Oh, John J.

    2006-12-15

    We study gravitationally collapsing models of pressureless dust, fluids with pressure, and the generalized Chaplygin gas (GCG) shell in (2+1)-dimensional spacetimes. Various collapse scenarios are investigated under a variety of the background configurations such as anti-de Sitter (AdS) black hole, de Sitter (dS) space, flat and AdS space with a conical deficit. As with the case of a disk of dust, we find that the collapse of a dust shell coincides with the Oppenheimer-Snyder type collapse to a black hole provided the initial density is sufficiently large. We also find - for all types of shell - that collapse to a naked singularity is possible under a broad variety of initial conditions. For shells with pressure this singularity can occur for a finite radius of the shell. We also find that GCG shells exhibit diverse collapse scenarios, which can be easily demonstrated by an effective potential analysis.

  12. Energy localization in nonlinear fiber arrays: Collapse-effect compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, A.B.; Luther, G.G.; De Angelis, C.; Turitsyn, S.K.

    1995-07-03

    We analyze a collapse mechanism of energy localization in nonlinear fiber arrays. The nonlinear fiber array is suggested as a device to amplify and compress optical pulses. Pulse propagation in one-dimensional fiber arrays has features of collapse (self-focusing) dynamics. Collapse-type compression leads to the localization of all energy initially dispersed in array into a few fibers. Numerical simulations demonstrate the robustness of the suggested compression mechanism.

  13. Caldera collapse at near-ridge seamounts: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coumans, Jason P.; Stix, John

    2016-10-01

    Collapse calderas are sub-circular volcanic depressions caused by subsidence of the magma reservoir roof during an eruption. Scaled physical models of caldera collapse using flat topography have been instrumental in investigating the spatial and temporal development of calderas, in particular, two distinctive sets of concentric ring faults, one reverse and one normal. More recent analog studies have investigated the effect of non-flat topography which alters the principle stress trajectories and resulting collapse structure. This work provides the basis for investigating how naturally scaled topographic loads may affect caldera collapse in relation to shallow magma reservoirs. The objective of this study is to understand how a near-ridge seamount affects caldera collapse from both a central and offset position as the seamount migrates above the magma reservoir as a result of plate motion. We utilize scaled analog models of caldera collapse in conjunction with three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to investigate caldera collapse dynamics at near-ridge seamounts. Experiments using a seamount cone positioned centrally above the magma reservoir result in (1) increased subsidence along the interior outward-dipping faults and (2) a preference to more symmetric collapse patterns as indicated by the subsidence profile and structure of the caldera relative to experiments with an offset cone. When the cone is offset, the collapse is asymmetric and trapdoor in nature, with the center of greatest subsidence displaced away from the region of largest topographic load. For these latter experiments, subsidence is focused where the roof is thinnest along an initial reverse fault, followed by a transition to an antithetic graben structure. The asymmetric collapse in the experiments results in a caldera with a tilted profile. Offset calderas at near-ridge seamounts are tilted towards the ridge axis, suggesting that they may have collapsed

  14. GENERAL: Non-Spherical Gravitational Collapse of Strange Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Zade S.; D, Patil K.; N, Mulkalwar P.

    2008-05-01

    We study the non-spherical gravitational collapse of the strange quark null fluid. The interesting feature which emerges is that the non-spherical collapse of charged strange quark matter leads to a naked singularity whereas the gravitational collapse of neutral quark matter proceeds to form a black hole. We extend the earlier work of Harko and Cheng [Phys. Lett. A 266 (2000) 249] to the non-spherical case.

  15. Protostellar collapse in a self-gravitating sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee; Boss, Alan; Calvet, Nuria; Whitney, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    We present preliminary calculations of protostellar cloud collapse starting from an isothermal, self-gravitating gaseous layer in hydrostatic equilibrium. This gravitationally unstable layer collapses into a flattened or toroidal density distribution, even in the absence of rotation or magnetic fields. We suggest that the flat infalling envelope recently observed in HL Tau by Hayashi et al.is the result of collapse from an initially nonspherical layer. We also speculate that the later evolution of such a flattened, collapsing envelope can produce a structure similar to the 'flared disk' invoked by Kenyon and Hartmann to explain the infrared excesses of many T Tauri stars.

  16. Developing empirical collapse fragility functions for global building types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, K.; Wald, D.; D'Ayala, D.

    2011-01-01

    Building collapse is the dominant cause of casualties during earthquakes. In order to better predict human fatalities, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) program requires collapse fragility functions for global building types. The collapse fragility is expressed as the probability of collapse at discrete levels of the input hazard defined in terms of macroseismic intensity. This article provides a simple procedure for quantifying collapse fragility using vulnerability criteria based on the European Macroseismic Scale (1998) for selected European building types. In addition, the collapse fragility functions are developed for global building types by fitting the beta distribution to the multiple experts’ estimates for the same building type (obtained from EERI’s World Housing Encyclopedia (WHE)-PAGER survey). Finally, using the collapse probability distributions at each shaking intensity level as a prior and field-based collapse-rate observations as likelihood, it is possible to update the collapse fragility functions for global building types using the Bayesian procedure.

  17. A rational characterization of proprietary High Collapse casing grades

    SciTech Connect

    Klementich, E.F.

    1995-12-31

    An increasing number of users are finding it necessary to utilize {open_quotes}High Collapse{close_quotes} casing grades for deep set and intermediate size drilling and production casing strings. Unfortunately, the great variety of proprietary (non-API) high collapse casing grades has made it extremely difficult for drilling and completion engineers to logically select the optimum size, weight, and grade of pipe meeting the design objective, due to the wide variation in collapse resistance claims and the guaranteed pipe dimensional and mechanical properties supporting that claim. This paper provides a technically sound method for selecting and safely using high collapse pipe.

  18. Interpretation of collapsed terrain on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewa Zalewska, Natalia; Skocki, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    On the images from HiRISE camera within volcanoes and circumpolar areas there are depressions that can be explained in two ways, either by melting subsurface layer of ice or by cooling of lava which forms branch intrusion and flank craters underneath. On many pictures from Mars similar cavities are found on the slopes of Martian craters on Arsia Mons , Pavonis Mons on northern hemisphere and Alba Patera on southern hemisphere. Such cavities can be compared to a Hawaiian type volcanoes. At the top of Mauna Loa linearly arranged craters can be seen, strikingly similar to those on Arsia Mons . Basing on map ice content measured by Odyssey GRS apparatus, in this place of the volcanic cone, quite small ice content can be observed that varies in the range of 2-4% hydrogen abundance. It is therefore difficult to explain these collapses by unfreezing of subsurface ice. In an infrared spectrum of these areas there are no bands of water in the CRISM spectra, although it does not say that the water in the form of ice couldn't have been there before. In the central part of Chryse, there are series of chains depressions caused most likely by the collapse of land. These forms have been associated with an open pingo type system additionally with assisted topography of the area or tectonics and internal cracks in the rocks. These are noticed on the slopes of craters or wherever the area decline. Then flowing subsurface water or brine coming from the ice layer could while freezing accumulate and create a longitudinal hill that collapsed due to seasonal thawing forming gullies or canyons . At the end of these gullies remaining trace of the leak can be seen, as if there was a crack in the ground and liquid flew out on the surface. Cryosubsurface processes on Mars can support the hypothesis of geochemical origin of water, which separates from the magma, and its primary source comes from the protoplanetary disk. The water separated from the magma migrates up to the surface and if the

  19. Spreading and collapse of big basaltic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Peltier, Aline; Poland, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Among the different types of volcanoes, basaltic ones usually form the most voluminous edifices. Because volcanoes are growing on a pre-existing landscape, the geologic and structural framework of the basement (and earlier volcanic landforms) influences the stress regime, seismicity, and volcanic activity. Conversely, the masses of these volcanoes introduce a morphological anomaly that affects neighboring areas. Growth of a volcano disturbs the tectonic framework of the region, clamps and unclamps existing faults (some of which may be reactivated by the new stress field), and deforms the substratum. A volcano's weight on its basement can trigger edifice spreading and collapse that can affect populated areas even at significant distance. Volcano instability can also be driven by slow tectonic deformation and magmatic intrusion. The manifestations of instability span a range of temporal and spatial scales, ranging from slow creep on individual faults to large earthquakes affecting a broad area. In the frame of MED-SVU project, our work aims to investigate the relation between basement setting and volcanic activity and stability at three Supersite volcanoes: Etna (Sicily, Italy), Kilauea (Island of Hawaii, USA) and Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France). These volcanoes host frequent eruptive activity (effusive and explosive) and share common features indicating lateral spreading and collapse, yet they are characterized by different morphologies, dimensions, and tectonic frameworks. For instance, the basaltic ocean island volcanoes of Kilauea and Piton de la Fournaise are near the active ends of long hotspot chains while Mt. Etna has developed at junction along a convergent margin between the African and Eurasian plates and a passive margin separating the oceanic Ionian crust from the African continental crust. Magma supply and plate velocity also differ in the three settings, as to the sizes of the edifices and the extents of their rift zones. These

  20. Photochemically driven collapse of Titan's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, R D; McKay, C P; Lunine, J I

    1997-01-31

    Saturn's giant moon Titan has a thick (1.5 bar) nitrogen atmosphere, which has a temperature structure that is controlled by the absorption of solar and thermal radiation by methane, hydrogen, and organic aerosols into which methane is irreversibly converted by photolysis. Previous studies of Titan's climate evolution have been done with the assumption that the methane abundance was maintained against photolytic depletion throughout Titan's history, either by continuous supply from the interior or by buffering by a surface or near surface reservoir. Radiative-convective and radiative-saturated equilibrium models of Titan's atmosphere show that methane depletion may have allowed Titan's atmosphere to cool so that nitrogen, its main constituent, condenses onto the surface, collapsing Titan into a Triton-like frozen state with a thin atmosphere. PMID:9005844

  1. Gravitational Waves from Core Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Chertkow, Merek A; Hix, William Raphael; Blondin, J. M.; Lentz, Eric J; Messer, Bronson; Yoshida, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the gravitational wave signatures for a suite of axisymmetric core collapse supernova models with progenitor masses between 12 and 25 M{sub odot}. These models are distinguished by the fact that they explode and contain essential physics (in particular, multi-frequency neutrino transport and general relativity) needed for a more realistic description. Thus, we are able to compute complete waveforms (i.e. through explosion) based on non-parameterized, first-principles models. This is essential if the waveform amplitudes and time scales are to be computed more precisely. Fourier decomposition shows that the gravitational wave signals we predict should be observable by AdvLIGO across the range of progenitors considered here. The fundamental limitation of these models is in their imposition of axisymmetry. Further progress will require counterpart three-dimensional models.

  2. Remnants of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Supernovae (SNe) play an essential role in the Universe, and they are detected routinely through dedicated surveys. However, most of these SNe are often too distant (~1-100 Mpc) to resolve the SN ejecta and immediate surroundings of the exploded stars. Fortunately, supernova remnants (SNRs) offer the means to study explosions and dynamics at sub-pc scales. SNRs are observable for up to 105 years after the explosions across the electromagnetic spectrum, and almost 400 SNRs have now been identified in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. In this talk, I will review recent advances in the understanding of core-collapse (CC) SNe based on studies of SNRs. In particular, I will highlight investigations of SNR (a)symmetry and of heavy metal (like iron and titanium) abundances which give insight to the nature and mechanisms of the originating explosions.

  3. Collapse of Synchronization in a Memristive Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Mi; Wang, Chun-Ni; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun

    2015-12-01

    For an oscillating circuit or coupled circuits, damage in electric devices such as inductor, resistance, memristor even capacitor can cause breakdown or collapse of the circuits. These damage could be associated with external attack or aging in electric devices, and then the bifurcation parameters could be deformed from normal values. Resonators or signal generators are often synchronized to produce powerful signal series and this problem could be investigated by using synchronization in network. Complete synchronization could be induced by linear coupling in a two-dimensional network of identical oscillators when the coupling intensity is beyond certain threshold. The collective behavior and synchronization state are much dependent on the bifurcation parameters. Any slight fluctuation in parameter and breakdown in bifurcation parameter can cause transition of synchronization even collapse of synchronization in the network. In this paper, a two-dimensional network composed of the resonators coupled with memristors under nearest-neighbor connection is designed, and the network can reach complete synchronization by carefully selecting coupling intensity. The network keeps synchronization after certain transient period, then a bifurcation parameter in a resonator is switched from the previous value and the adjacent resonators (oscillators) are affected in random. It is found that the synchronization area could be invaded greatly in a diffusive way. The damage area size is much dependent on the selection of diffusive period of damage and deformation degree in the parameter. Indeed, the synchronization area could keep intact at largest size under intermediate deformation degree and coupling intensity. Supported by the National Natural Science of China under Grant Nos. 11265008 and 11365014

  4. Fingerprinting Hydrogen in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nance, Sarafina; Parrent, Jerod; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on the mass of remaining hydrogen envelopes for stars massive enough to explode under core collapse. Using the stellar evolution code, MESA, our initial findings suggest that a significant fraction of massive stars with M_ZAMS = 20-60 Msun lose all but 10^-3 Msun -10^-1 Msun as they near eventual core collapse. This result is dependent on the mass-loss prescription, degree of rotation, metallicity, rates of nuclear burning in the core, and the final stellar configuration. Nevertheless, each of our test cases include a few stars that retain trace amounts of surface hydrogen, which would then be detected as faint H in type IIb/Ib/Ic supernova spectra. We also compare our findings to the progenitor candidate identified for iPTF13bvn using the most recent photometric corrections. We agree with the previous conclusion found by Groh et al. (2013) that the progenitor had an initial mass of 32 Msun, but now with an additional condition of 0.06 Msun of hydrogen on its surface just prior to the explosion. We demonstrate through our study that not all Type Ib supernovae are fully devoid of hydrogen at the time of explosion, which has implications for the nature of the progenitor star and thus provides impetus for a revised classification scheme for 'stripped envelope' supernovae. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  5. Crystallization and collapse in relativistically degenerate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, it is shown that a mass density limit exists beyond which the relativistically degenerate matter would crystallize. The mass density limit, found here, is quite analogous to the mass limit predicted by Chandrasekhar for a type of compact stars called white dwarfs (M{sub Ch} Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.43 Solar Mass). In this study, the old problem of white dwarf core collapse, which has been previously investigated by Chandrasekhar using hydrostatic stability criteria, is revisited in the framework of the quantum hydrodynamics model by inspection of the charge screening at atomic scales in the relativistic degeneracy plasma regime taking into account the relativistic Fermi-Dirac statistics and electron interaction features such as the quantum statistical pressure, Coulomb attraction, electron exchange-correlation, and quantum recoil effects. It is revealed that the existence of ion correlation and crystallization of matter in the relativistically degenerate plasma puts a critical mass density limit on white dwarf core region. It is shown that a white dwarf star with a core mass density beyond this critical limit can undergo the spontaneous core collapse (SCC). The SCC phenomenon, which is dominantly caused by the electron quantum recoil effect (interference and localization of the electron wave function), leads to a new exotic state of matter. In such exotic state, the relativistic electron degeneracy can lead the white dwarf crystallized core to undergo the nuclear fusion and an ultimate supernova by means of the volume reduction (due to the enhanced compressibility) and huge energy release (due to the increase in cohesive energy), under the stars huge inward gravitational pressure. Moreover, it is found that the SCC phenomenon is significantly affected by the core composition (it is more probable for heavier plasmas). The critical mass density found here is consistent with the values calculated for core density of typical white dwarf stars.

  6. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Cornman, R Scott; Tarpy, David R; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees.

  7. Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Cornman, R. Scott; Tarpy, David R.; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees. PMID:22927991

  8. Numerical simulations of non-spherical bubble collapse

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSEN, ERIC; COLONIUS, TIM

    2009-01-01

    A high-order accurate shock- and interface-capturing scheme is used to simulate the collapse of a gas bubble in water. In order to better understand the damage caused by collapsing bubbles, the dynamics of the shock-induced and Rayleigh collapse of a bubble near a planar rigid surface and in a free field are analysed. Collapse times, bubble displacements, interfacial velocities and surface pressures are quantified as a function of the pressure ratio driving the collapse and of the initial bubble stand-off distance from the wall; these quantities are compared to the available theory and experiments and show good agreement with the data for both the bubble dynamics and the propagation of the shock emitted upon the collapse. Non-spherical collapse involves the formation of a re-entrant jet directed towards the wall or in the direction of propagation of the incoming shock. In shock-induced collapse, very high jet velocities can be achieved, and the finite time for shock propagation through the bubble may be non-negligible compared to the collapse time for the pressure ratios of interest. Several types of shock waves are generated during the collapse, including precursor and water-hammer shocks that arise from the re-entrant jet formation and its impact upon the distal side of the bubble, respectively. The water-hammer shock can generate very high pressures on the wall, far exceeding those from the incident shock. The potential damage to the neighbouring surface is quantified by measuring the wall pressure. The range of stand-off distances and the surface area for which amplification of the incident shock due to bubble collapse occurs is determined. PMID:19756233

  9. Temperature-Induced Collapse, and Arrested Collapse, of Anisotropic Endoskeleton Droplets.

    PubMed

    Caggioni, Marco; Lenis, Jessica; Bayles, Alexandra V; Furst, Eric M; Spicer, Patrick T

    2015-08-11

    Micron-scale rod-shaped droplets with a range of aspect ratios are produced using extrusion of oil containing a soft wax crystal network to permit shape customization. A physical model of the droplet shape stability is developed based on balancing interfacial stresses with the internal crystal network yield stress. The model predicts the mechanical properties required for particular droplet size stability, in a given physicochemical environment, and is tested by microscopic observations of droplets over a range of relevant applied temperatures. The time-dependent response to temperature of individual rods is monitored and used to identify the collapse temperature based on structural yielding. Precise temperature control allows variation of the droplet endoskeleton yield stress and direct determination of the droplet stability as a function of size, by observing the onset of collapse by interfacial compression, and enables validation of the model predictions. Mapping the regions of droplet stability and instability for various-sized droplets yields a basis for designing droplet shapes for multiple applications using easily measured physical variables. The phenomenon of arrested collapse is also explored as a means of transforming simple rod-shaped starting materials into more complex shapes and enhancing adhesion to targeted solid surfaces, enabling exploitation of the hybrid solid-liquid nature of these droplets.

  10. 2. EMPIRE STATE MINE. VIEW OF COLLAPSED BUILDINGS AT MINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EMPIRE STATE MINE. VIEW OF COLLAPSED BUILDINGS AT MINE WITH TAILINGS ON RIGHT. CAMERA POINTED SOUTHWEST. COLLAPSED ADIT APPROXIMATELY 25 YARDS UPHILL TO THE LEFT OF FAR BUILDING. TIP TOP AND ONTARIO ARE LOCATED OUT OF THE PICTURE TO THE RIGHT. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Empire State Mine, West side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  11. Collapsing glomerulopathy associated with hepatitis B infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Mantan, M.; Grover, R.; Kaur, S.; Batra, V.

    2016-01-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy has been classified as a variant of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. It is associated with infections, inflammations, and certain medications. While its association with human immunodeficiency virus has been well established its occurrence with hepatitis B has not been reported. We present here a case of collapsing glomerulopathy in a child with hepatitis B infection. PMID:27512304

  12. The Direct Collapse of Supermassive Black Hole Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, John A.; Johansson, Peter H.; Wise, John H.

    2016-10-01

    The direct collapse model of supermassive black hole seed formation requires that thegas cools predominantly via atomic hydrogen. To this end we simulate the effect of ananisotropic radiation source on the collapse of a halo at high redshift. The radiationsource is placed at a distance of 3 kpc (physical) from the collapsing object and is setto emit monochromatically in the center of the Lyman-Werner (LW) band. The LW radiationemitted from the high redshift source is followed self-consistently using ray tracingtechniques. Due to self-shielding, a small amount of H2 is able to form at the verycenter of the collapsing halo even under very strong LW radiation. Furthermore, we find thata radiation source, emitting < 1054 (~103 J21) photons per second isrequired to cause the collapse of a clump of M ~ 105 M⊙. The resultingaccretion rate onto the collapsing object is ~ 0.25 M⊙ yr-1.Our results display significant differences, compared to the isotropic radiation field case,in terms of H2 fraction at an equivalent radius. These differences will significantly effectthe dynamics of the collapse. With the inclusion of a strong anisotropic radiation source, thefinal mass of the collapsing object is found to be M ~ 105 M⊙. This is consistentwith predictions for the formation of a supermassive star or quasi-star leading to asupermassive black hole.

  13. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse on Film and Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Don; Hook, Joseph; Doescher, Russell; Wolf, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This month marks the 75th anniversary of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse. During a gale on Nov. 7, 1940, the bridge exhibited remarkable oscillations before collapsing spectacularly (Figs. 1-5). Physicists over the years have spent a great deal of time and energy studying this event. By using open-source analysis tools and digitized footage of…

  14. PREVENTION OF PHOTORESIST PATTERN COLLAPSE BY USING LIQUID CARBON DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoresist polymers with small aspect ratios are presently cleaned with aqueous solutions. For small aspect ratios, the pattern collapses during the drying step. The origin of resist pattern collapse is the surface tension of the rinse liquid. Following a theoretic model, we pre...

  15. Maternal Postpartum Role Collapse as a Theory of Postpartum Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amankwaa, Linda Clark

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of a theory of maternal postpartum role collapse. The influences of traditional role theory and symbolic interactionism are presented. The development of the maternal postpartum role collapse theory emerged from the study of postpartum depression among African-American women (Amankwaa, 2000).…

  16. Can a collapse of global civilization be avoided?

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Paul R.; Ehrlich, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental problems have contributed to numerous collapses of civilizations in the past. Now, for the first time, a global collapse appears likely. Overpopulation, overconsumption by the rich and poor choices of technologies are major drivers; dramatic cultural change provides the main hope of averting calamity. PMID:23303549

  17. Rising catch variability preceded historical fisheries collapses in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Litzow, Michael A; Mueter, Franz J; Urban, J Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Statistical indicators such as rising variance and rising skewness in key system parameters may provide early warning of "regime shifts" in communities and populations. However, the utility of these indicators has rarely been tested in the large, complex ecosystems that are of most interest to managers. Crustacean fisheries in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea experienced a series of collapses beginning in the 1970s, and we used spatially resolved catch data from these fisheries to test the predictions that increasing variability and skewness would precede stock collapse. Our data set consisted of catch data from 14 fisheries (12 collapsing and two non-collapsing), spanning 278 cumulative years. Our sampling unit for analysis was the Alaska Department of Fish and Game statistical reporting area (mean n for individual fisheries = 42 areas, range 7-81). We found that spatial variability in catches increased prior to stock collapse: a random-effects model estimating trend in variability across all 12 collapsing fisheries showed strong evidence of increasing variability prior to collapse. Individual trends in variability were statistically significant for only four of the 12 collapsing fisheries, suggesting that rising variability might be most effective as an indicator when information from multiple populations is available. Analyzing data across multiple fisheries allowed us to detect increasing variability 1-4 years prior to collapse, and trends in variability were significantly different for collapsing and non-collapsing fisheries. In spite of theoretical expectations, we found no evidence of pre-collapse increases in catch skewness. Further, while models generally predict that rising variability should be a transient phenomenon around collapse points, increased variability was a persistent feature of collapsed fisheries in our study. We conclude that this result is more consistent with fishing effects as the cause of increased catch variability, rather than the

  18. The collapse of Bárðarbunga caldera, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riel, B.; Milillo, P.; Simons, M.; Lundgren, P.; Kanamori, H.; Samsonov, S.

    2015-07-01

    Lying below Vatnajökull ice cap in Iceland, Bárðarbunga stratovolcano began experiencing wholesale caldera collapse in 2014 August 16, one of the largest such events recorded in the modern instrumental era. Simultaneous with this collapse is the initiation of a plate boundary rifting episode north of the caldera. Observations using the international constellation of radar satellites indicate rapid 50 cm d-1 subsidence of the glacier surface overlying the collapsing caldera and metre-scale crustal deformation in the active rift zone. Anomalous earthquakes around the rim of the caldera with highly nondouble-couple focal mechanisms provide a mechanical link to the dynamics of the collapsing magma chamber. A model of the collapse consistent with available geodetic and seismic observations suggests that the majority of the observed subsidence occurs aseismically via a deflating sill-like magma chamber.

  19. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to

  20. General polytropic Larson-Penston-type collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Shi, Chun-Hui

    2014-12-01

    We investigate self-similar hydrodynamics of a general polytropic (GP) gas with spherical symmetry under self-gravity and extend the conventional polytropic (CP) relation n = 2 - γ for the self-similar index n and the polytropic index γ to a general relation n = 2(q + γ - 2)/(3q - 2), where q is a real parameter by specific entropy conservation along streamlines. We derive GP Larson-Penston (LP)-type solutions for q > 2/3 and γ > 4/3; Larson-Penston-Hunter (LPH)-type solutions are also constructed in a GP gas by a time-reversal operation on a GP-LP-type solution and by connecting to a GP free-fall-type solution across t = 0. These GP-LPH solutions describe dynamic processes that a GP gas globule, static and dense initially, undergoes a runaway collapse under self-gravity, forms a central mass singularity, and keeps accreting during a free-fall stage. We apply such GP-LPH-type solutions with variable envelope mass infall rates (EMIRs) for the dynamic evolution of globules and dense cores in star-forming molecular clouds. In particular, a GP-LPH-type solution can sustain an EMIR as low as 10-8 ˜ 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 or even lower - much lower than that of Shu's isothermal model for a cloud core in Class 0 and Class I phases. Such GP-LPH-type solutions with EMIRs as low as 10-9 ˜ 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 offer a sensible viable mechanism of forming brown dwarfs during the accretion stage in a collapsed GP globules with 1.495 ≤ γ ≤ 1.50 and 0.99 ≤ n ≤ 1.0. The GP-LPH solutions with 0.94 < n < 0.99 and 1.47 < γ < 1.495 can even give extremely low EMIRs of 10-12 ˜ 10-9 M⊙ yr-1 to form gaseous planet-type objects in mini gas globules.

  1. Global collapse of the DR21 filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying the most massive and dense star-forming clump in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing DR21 and DR21(OH), we obtained observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. For that, we used molecular line data from our 13CO 1→0, CS 2→1, and N_2H^+ 1→0 survey of the Cygnus X region (FCRAO) and high-angular resolution observations in isotopomeric lines of CO, CS, HCO^+, N_2H^+, and H_2CO, obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. The observations reveal a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e. dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO^+ and 12CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of ˜0.6 km s-1 and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10-3 M_⊙ yr-1 for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M_⊙ at densities of around 10^5 cm-3 within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting (with free-fall times much shorter than sound crossing times and low virial parameter α). The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large scales and is now in a state of global gravitational

  2. Collapse of cooperation in evolving games

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alexander J.; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2014-01-01

    Game theory provides a quantitative framework for analyzing the behavior of rational agents. The Iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma in particular has become a standard model for studying cooperation and cheating, with cooperation often emerging as a robust outcome in evolving populations. Here we extend evolutionary game theory by allowing players’ payoffs as well as their strategies to evolve in response to selection on heritable mutations. In nature, many organisms engage in mutually beneficial interactions and individuals may seek to change the ratio of risk to reward for cooperation by altering the resources they commit to cooperative interactions. To study this, we construct a general framework for the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in arbitrary iterated games. We show that, when there is a tradeoff between the benefits and costs of cooperation, coevolution often leads to a dramatic loss of cooperation in the Iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma. The collapse of cooperation is so extreme that the average payoff in a population can decline even as the potential reward for mutual cooperation increases. Depending upon the form of tradeoffs, evolution may even move away from the Iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma game altogether. Our work offers a new perspective on the Prisoner’s Dilemma and its predictions for cooperation in natural populations; and it provides a general framework to understand the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in iterated interactions. PMID:25422421

  3. Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben; Camp, Richard J.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Crampton, Lisa H.; Leonard, David L.; VanderWerf, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to climate change, given their susceptibility to introduced disease, the strong linkage of disease distribution to climatic conditions, and their current distribution. We document the rapid collapse of the native avifauna on the island of Kaua‘i that corresponds to changes in climate and disease prevalence. Although multiple factors may be pressuring the community, we suggest that a tipping point has been crossed in which temperatures in forest habitats at high elevations have reached a threshold that facilitates the development of avian malaria and its vector throughout these species’ ranges. Continued incursion of invasive weeds and non-native avian competitors may be facilitated by climate change and could also contribute to declines. If current rates of decline continue, we predict multiple extinctions in the coming decades. Kaua‘i represents an early warning for the forest bird communities on the Maui and Hawai‘i islands, as well as other species around the world that are trapped within a climatic space that is rapidly disappearing.

  4. Flux-driven simulations of turbulence collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Rhee, T.; Diamond, P. H.; Xu, X. Q.

    2015-03-15

    Using three-dimensional nonlinear simulations of tokamak turbulence, we show that an edge transport barrier (ETB) forms naturally once input power exceeds a threshold value. Profiles, turbulence-driven flows, and neoclassical coefficients are evolved self-consistently. A slow power ramp-up simulation shows that ETB transition is triggered by the turbulence-driven flows via an intermediate phase which involves coherent oscillation of turbulence intensity and E×B flow shear. A novel observation of the evolution is that the turbulence collapses and the ETB transition begins when R{sub T} > 1 at t = t{sub R} (R{sub T}: normalized Reynolds power), while the conventional transition criterion (ω{sub E×B}>γ{sub lin} where ω{sub E×B} denotes mean flow shear) is satisfied only after t = t{sub C} ( >t{sub R}), when the mean flow shear grows due to positive feedback.

  5. Rippling Instability of a Collapsing Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilveira, Rava; Chaieb, Sahraoui; Mahadevan, L.

    1999-01-01

    The rippling instability of a liquid sheet was first observed by Debregeas, de Gennes, an Brochard-Wyart [Science 279, 1704 (1998)] on a hemispherical bubble resting on a free surface. Unlike a soap bubble, it collapses under its own weight while bursting, and folds into a wavy structure which breaks the original axisymmetry. In fact, this effect occurs for both purely elastic and purely viscous (liquid) sheets, and an analogy can be made between the two mechanisms. We present a theory for the onset of the instability in both cases, in which the growth of the corrugation out of an inextensible initial condition is governed by the competition between gravitational and bending (shearing) forces. The instability occurs for a range of densities, stiffnesses (viscosities), and sizes, a result which arises less from dynamics than from geometry, suggesting a wide validity. We further obtain a quantitative expression for the number of ripples. Finally, we present the results of experiments, which are consistent with our predictions.

  6. Collapse of cooperation in evolving games.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Alexander J; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2014-12-01

    Game theory provides a quantitative framework for analyzing the behavior of rational agents. The Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma in particular has become a standard model for studying cooperation and cheating, with cooperation often emerging as a robust outcome in evolving populations. Here we extend evolutionary game theory by allowing players' payoffs as well as their strategies to evolve in response to selection on heritable mutations. In nature, many organisms engage in mutually beneficial interactions and individuals may seek to change the ratio of risk to reward for cooperation by altering the resources they commit to cooperative interactions. To study this, we construct a general framework for the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in arbitrary iterated games. We show that, when there is a tradeoff between the benefits and costs of cooperation, coevolution often leads to a dramatic loss of cooperation in the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma. The collapse of cooperation is so extreme that the average payoff in a population can decline even as the potential reward for mutual cooperation increases. Depending upon the form of tradeoffs, evolution may even move away from the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game altogether. Our work offers a new perspective on the Prisoner's Dilemma and its predictions for cooperation in natural populations; and it provides a general framework to understand the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in iterated interactions.

  7. Pseudospectral method for gravitational wave collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilditch, David; Weyhausen, Andreas; Brügmann, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    We present a new pseudospectral code, bamps, for numerical relativity written with the evolution of collapsing gravitational waves in mind. We employ the first-order generalized harmonic gauge formulation. The relevant theory is reviewed, and the numerical method is critically examined and specialized for the task at hand. In particular, we investigate formulation parameters—gauge- and constraint-preserving boundary conditions well suited to nonvanishing gauge source functions. Different types of axisymmetric twist-free moment-of-time-symmetry gravitational wave initial data are discussed. A treatment of the axisymmetric apparent horizon condition is presented with careful attention to regularity on axis. Our apparent horizon finder is then evaluated in a number of test cases. Moving on to evolutions, we investigate modifications to the generalized harmonic gauge constraint damping scheme to improve conservation in the strong-field regime. We demonstrate strong-scaling of our pseudospectral penalty code. We employ the Cartoon method to efficiently evolve axisymmetric data in our 3 +1 -dimensional code. We perform test evolutions of the Schwarzschild spacetime perturbed by gravitational waves and by gauge pulses, both to demonstrate the use of our black-hole excision scheme and for comparison with earlier results. Finally, numerical evolutions of supercritical Brill waves are presented to demonstrate durability of the excision scheme for the dynamical formation of a black hole.

  8. Colony Collapse Disorder: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.; Saegerman, Claude; Mullin, Chris; Haubruge, Eric; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Frazier, Maryann; Frazier, Jim; Cox-Foster, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Underwood, Robyn; Tarpy, David R.; Pettis, Jeffery S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. Methods and Principal Findings Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels), no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor) were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. Conclusions/Significance This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted. PMID:19649264

  9. Tulsa Oklahoma Oktoberfest Tent Collapse Report

    PubMed Central

    Deal, Kelly E.; Synovitz, Carolyn K.; Goodloe, Jeffrey M.; King, Brandi; Stewart, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. On October 17, 2007, a severe weather event collapsed two large tents and several smaller tents causing 23 injuries requiring evacuation to emergency departments in Tulsa, OK. Methods. This paper is a retrospective analysis of the regional health system's response to this event. Data from the Tulsa Fire Department, The Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA), receiving hospitals and coordinating services were reviewed and analyzed. EMS patient care reports were reviewed and analyzed using triage designators assigned in the field, injury severity scores, and critical mortality. Results. EMT's and paramedics from Tulsa Fire Department and EMSA provided care at the scene under unified incident command. Of the 23 patients transported by EMS, four were hospitalized, one with critical spinal injury and one with critical head injury. One patient is still in ongoing rehabilitation. Discussion. Analysis of the 2007 Tulsa Oktoberfest mass casualty incident revealed rapid police/fire/EMS response despite challenges of operations at dark under severe weather conditions and the need to treat a significant number of injured victims. There were no fatalities. Of the patients transported by EMS, a minority sustained critical injuries, with most sustaining injuries amenable to discharge after emergency department care. PMID:22649732

  10. Songlines from Direct Collapse Seed Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aykutalp, Aycin; Wise, John; Spaans, Marco; Meijerink, Rowin

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) has been intricately linked to galaxy formation and evolution, and is a key ingredient in the assembly of galaxies. Observations of SMBHs with masses of 109 solar at high redshifts (z~7) poses challenges to the theory of seed black hole formation and their growth in young galaxies. Fundamental to understanding their existence within the first billion years after the Big Bang, is the identification of their formation processes, growth rate and evolution through cosmic time. We perform cosmological hydrodynamic simulations following the growth of direct collapse seed black holes (DCBH) including X-ray irradiation from the central black hole, stellar feedback both from metal-free and metal-rich stars and H2 self-shielding. These simulations demonstrate that X-ray irradiation from the central black hole regulates its growth and influence the formation of stellar population in the host halo. In particular, X-ray radiation enhances H2 formation in metal-free gas and initially induces the star formation in the halo. However, in the long term, X-ray irradiation from the accreting seed DCBH stifles the initial growth relative to the Eddington rate argument. This further complicates the explanation for the existence of SMBHs in the early universe.

  11. Tourism's collapse puts Gambian women at risk.

    PubMed

    Coker, M S

    1995-06-01

    Despite efforts of the Gambian government, which established a ministry in 1981 that would tackle gender issues, improve women's health, and promote empowerment, women are underrepresented in government and business, and 84% are illiterate. Child mortality is among the highest in Africa; 134 children per 1000 die before their fifth birthday. In the mid-1980s austerity measures adopted by the World Bank and IMF left the ministry without funds. Rice and vegetable production, the main source of income for women, fell in the 1990s. In 1994, paddy production dropped 23% from the previous year; this was due to a lack of technical and financial assistance. The collapse of tourism with Capt. Yahya Jammeh's seizure of power has put prostitutes catering to tourists out of work, but women who have lost jobs in the hotel industry may be pushed into local prostitution to survive. The impact of this on the HIV/AIDS epidemic is unclear. Although Gambia is one of the world's most aid-dependent countries (more than a quarter of the GNP before the coup), corruption and mismanagement in the nongovernmental sector is widespread. The director of the Women in Development Programme, a $15m World Bank project, was forced to resign over allegations of fraud. The political process sidelines women; only village chiefs, who are traditionally men, are allowed to vote when new heads are elected.

  12. NAPA Observations of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Stuart; Stockdale, Christopher; van Dyk, Schuyler; Panagia, Nino; Amy, Shaun; Immler, Stefan; Burlon, Davide; Kotak, Rubina; Polshaw, Joe

    2014-04-01

    We propose to continue NAPA observations of nearby core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) to: (1) Determine the physics of SNe through the study of the mass-loss rate, absorption mechanisms, and density distribution of the circumstellar medium (CSM) laid down by the pre-SN stellar wind; (2) Improve our understanding of the various subgroupings (Type Ib, Ic, IIL, IIP, IIn, IIb) which characterise the range of CCSN progenitor systems; and (3) Provide targets for Chandra/Swift X-ray ToO which is sensitive to the thermal emission from the SN shock and, thus, complementary to the non-thermal radio observations. To date we have detected and then monitored 4 out of 6 CCSNe out to distances ~30 Mpc, something not possible prior to CABB. By combining our data with optical and X-ray observations for the Type IIb SN 2011hs and the Type IIP SN 2011ja, we could confirm that their progenitors were a Wolf-Rayet star, and a red supergiant, respectively.

  13. NAPA Observations of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Stuart; Stockdale, Christopher; van Dyk, Schuyler; Panagia, Nino; Amy, Shaun; Immler, Stefan; Burlon, Davide; Kotak, Rubina; Polshaw, Joe; Romero-Canizales, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    We propose to continue NAPA observations of nearby core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) to: (1) Determine the physics of SNe through the study of the mass-loss rate, absorption mechanisms, and density distribution of the circumstellar medium (CSM) laid down by the pre-SN stellar wind; (2) Improve our understanding of the various subgroupings (Type Ib, Ic, IIL, IIP, IIn, IIb) which characterise the range of CCSN progenitor systems; and (3) Provide targets for Chandra/Swift X-ray ToO which is sensitive to the thermal emission from the SN shock and, thus, complementary to the non-thermal radio observations. To date we have detected and then monitored 4 out of 6 CCSNe out to distances ~30 Mpc, something not possible prior to CABB. By combining our data with optical and X-ray observations for the Type IIb SN 2011hs and the Type IIP SN 2011ja, we could confirm that their progenitors were a Wolf-Rayet star, and a red supergiant, respectively.

  14. Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, Eben H.; Camp, Richard J.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Crampton, Lisa H.; Leonard, David L.; VanderWerf, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to climate change, given their susceptibility to introduced disease, the strong linkage of disease distribution to climatic conditions, and their current distribution. We document the rapid collapse of the native avifauna on the island of Kaua‘i that corresponds to changes in climate and disease prevalence. Although multiple factors may be pressuring the community, we suggest that a tipping point has been crossed in which temperatures in forest habitats at high elevations have reached a threshold that facilitates the development of avian malaria and its vector throughout these species’ ranges. Continued incursion of invasive weeds and non-native avian competitors may be facilitated by climate change and could also contribute to declines. If current rates of decline continue, we predict multiple extinctions in the coming decades. Kaua‘i represents an early warning for the forest bird communities on the Maui and Hawai‘i islands, as well as other species around the world that are trapped within a climatic space that is rapidly disappearing. PMID:27617287

  15. Collapse of cooperation in evolving games.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Alexander J; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2014-12-01

    Game theory provides a quantitative framework for analyzing the behavior of rational agents. The Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma in particular has become a standard model for studying cooperation and cheating, with cooperation often emerging as a robust outcome in evolving populations. Here we extend evolutionary game theory by allowing players' payoffs as well as their strategies to evolve in response to selection on heritable mutations. In nature, many organisms engage in mutually beneficial interactions and individuals may seek to change the ratio of risk to reward for cooperation by altering the resources they commit to cooperative interactions. To study this, we construct a general framework for the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in arbitrary iterated games. We show that, when there is a tradeoff between the benefits and costs of cooperation, coevolution often leads to a dramatic loss of cooperation in the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma. The collapse of cooperation is so extreme that the average payoff in a population can decline even as the potential reward for mutual cooperation increases. Depending upon the form of tradeoffs, evolution may even move away from the Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game altogether. Our work offers a new perspective on the Prisoner's Dilemma and its predictions for cooperation in natural populations; and it provides a general framework to understand the coevolution of strategies and payoffs in iterated interactions. PMID:25422421

  16. Collapse and recovery of marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, J A

    2000-08-24

    Overexploitation and subsequent collapse of marine fishes has focused attention on the ability of affected populations to recover to former abundance levels and on the degree to which their persistence is threatened by extinction. Although potential for recovery has been assessed indirectly, actual changes in population size following long-term declines have not been examined empirically. Here I show that there is very little evidence for rapid recovery from prolonged declines, in contrast to the perception that marine fishes are highly resilient to large population reductions. With the possible exception of herring and related species that mature early in life and are fished with highly selective equipment, my analysis of 90 stocks reveals that many gadids (for example, cod, haddock) and other non-clupeids (for example, flatfishes) have experienced little, if any, recovery as much as 15 years after 45-99% reductions in reproductive biomass. Although the effects of overfishing on single species may generally be reversible, the actual time required for recovery appears to be considerable. To exempt marine fishes from existing criteria used to assign extinction risk would be inconsistent with precautionary approaches to fisheries management and the conservation of marine biodiversity.

  17. Collapsing avian community on a Hawaiian island.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Eben H; Camp, Richard J; Gorresen, P Marcos; Crampton, Lisa H; Leonard, David L; VanderWerf, Eric A

    2016-09-01

    The viability of many species has been jeopardized by numerous negative factors over the centuries, but climate change is predicted to accelerate and increase the pressure of many of these threats, leading to extinctions. The Hawaiian honeycreepers, famous for their spectacular adaptive radiation, are predicted to experience negative responses to climate change, given their susceptibility to introduced disease, the strong linkage of disease distribution to climatic conditions, and their current distribution. We document the rapid collapse of the native avifauna on the island of Kaua'i that corresponds to changes in climate and disease prevalence. Although multiple factors may be pressuring the community, we suggest that a tipping point has been crossed in which temperatures in forest habitats at high elevations have reached a threshold that facilitates the development of avian malaria and its vector throughout these species' ranges. Continued incursion of invasive weeds and non-native avian competitors may be facilitated by climate change and could also contribute to declines. If current rates of decline continue, we predict multiple extinctions in the coming decades. Kaua'i represents an early warning for the forest bird communities on the Maui and Hawai'i islands, as well as other species around the world that are trapped within a climatic space that is rapidly disappearing. PMID:27617287

  18. Tulsa oklahoma oktoberfest tent collapse report.

    PubMed

    Deal, Kelly E; Synovitz, Carolyn K; Goodloe, Jeffrey M; King, Brandi; Stewart, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    Background. On October 17, 2007, a severe weather event collapsed two large tents and several smaller tents causing 23 injuries requiring evacuation to emergency departments in Tulsa, OK. Methods. This paper is a retrospective analysis of the regional health system's response to this event. Data from the Tulsa Fire Department, The Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA), receiving hospitals and coordinating services were reviewed and analyzed. EMS patient care reports were reviewed and analyzed using triage designators assigned in the field, injury severity scores, and critical mortality. Results. EMT's and paramedics from Tulsa Fire Department and EMSA provided care at the scene under unified incident command. Of the 23 patients transported by EMS, four were hospitalized, one with critical spinal injury and one with critical head injury. One patient is still in ongoing rehabilitation. Discussion. Analysis of the 2007 Tulsa Oktoberfest mass casualty incident revealed rapid police/fire/EMS response despite challenges of operations at dark under severe weather conditions and the need to treat a significant number of injured victims. There were no fatalities. Of the patients transported by EMS, a minority sustained critical injuries, with most sustaining injuries amenable to discharge after emergency department care.

  19. Numerical simulation of a collapsing bubble subject to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukouvinis, P.; Gavaises, M.; Supponen, O.; Farhat, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper focuses on the simulation of the expansion and aspherical collapse of a laser-generated bubble subjected to an acceleration field and comparison of the results with instances from high-speed videos. The interaction of the liquid and gas is handled with the volume of fluid method. Compressibility effects have been included for each phase to predict the propagation of pressure waves. Initial conditions were estimated through the Rayleigh Plesset equation, based on the maximum bubble size and collapse time. The simulation predictions indicate that during the expansion the bubble shape is very close to spherical. On the other hand, during the collapse the bubble point closest to the bottom of the container develops a slightly higher collapse velocity than the rest of the bubble surface. Over time, this causes momentum focusing and leads to a positive feedback mechanism that amplifies the collapse locally. At the latest collapse stages, a jet is formed at the axis of symmetry, with opposite direction to the acceleration vector, reaching velocities of even 300 m/s. The simulation results agree with the observed bubble evolution and pattern from the experiments, obtained using high speed imaging, showing the collapse mechanism in great detail and clarity.

  20. Massive collapse of volcano edifices triggered by hydrothermal pressurization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Catastrophic collapse of steep volcano flanks threatens lives at stratovolcanoes around the world. Although destabilizing shallow intrusion of magma into the edifice accompanies some collapses (e.g., Mount St. Helens), others have occurred without eruption of juvenile magmatic materials (e.g., Bandai). These latter collapses can be difficult to anticipate. Historic collapses without magmatic eruption are associated with shallow hydrothermal groundwater systems at the time of collapse. Through the use of numerical models of heat and groundwater flow, I evaluate the efficacy of hydrothermally driven collapse. Heating from remote magma intrusion at depth can generate temporarily elevated pore-fluid pressures that propagate upward into an edifice. Effective-stress deformation modeling shows that these pressures are capable of destabilizing the core of an edifice, resulting in massive, deep-seated collapse. Far-field pressurization only occurs with specific rock hydraulic properties; however, data from numerous hydrothermal systems illustrate that this process can transpire in realistic settings. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  1. Deep-collapse operation of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Olcum, Selim; Yamaner, F Yalcin; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Atalar, Abdullah

    2011-11-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have been introduced as a promising technology for ultrasound imaging and therapeutic ultrasound applications which require high transmitted pressures for increased penetration, high signal-to-noise ratio, and fast heating. However, output power limitation of CMUTs compared with piezoelectrics has been a major drawback. In this work, we show that the output pressure of CMUTs can be significantly increased by deep-collapse operation, which utilizes an electrical pulse excitation much higher than the collapse voltage. We extend the analyses made for CMUTs working in the conventional (uncollapsed) region to the collapsed region and experimentally verify the findings. The static deflection profile of a collapsed membrane is calculated by an analytical approach within 0.6% error when compared with static, electromechanical finite element method (FEM) simulations. The electrical and mechanical restoring forces acting on a collapsed membrane are calculated. It is demonstrated that the stored mechanical energy and the electrical energy increase nonlinearly with increasing pulse amplitude if the membrane has a full-coverage top electrode. Utilizing higher restoring and electrical forces in the deep-collapsed region, we measure 3.5 MPa peak-to-peak pressure centered at 6.8 MHz with a 106% fractional bandwidth at the surface of the transducer with a collapse voltage of 35 V, when the pulse amplitude is 160 V. The experimental results are verified using transient FEM simulations.

  2. Induction of ventricular collapse by an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Amin, D V; Antaki, J F; Litwak, P; Thomas, D; Wu, Z J; Watach, M

    1998-01-01

    An important consideration for clinical application of rotary blood pump based ventricular assist is the avoidance of ventricular collapse due to excessive operating speed. Because healthy animals do not typically demonstrate this phenomenon, it is difficult to evaluate control algorithms for avoiding suction in vivo. An acute hemodynamic study was thus conducted to determine the conditions under which suction could be induced. A 70 kg calf was implanted with an axial flow assist device (Nimbus/UoP IVAS; Nimbus Inc., Rancho Cordova, CA) cannulated from the left ventricular apex to ascending aorta. On initiation of pump operation, several vasoactive interventions were performed to alter preload, afterload, and contractility of the left ventricle. Initially, dobutamine increased contractility and heart rate ([HR] = 139; baseline = 70), but ventricular collapse was not achievable, even at the maximal pump speed of 15,000 rpm. Norepinephrine decreased HR (HR = 60), increased contractility, and increased systemic vascular resistance ([SVR] = 24; baseline = 15), resulting in ventricular collapse at a pump speed of 14,000 rpm. Isoproterenol (beta agonist) increased HR (HR = 103) and decreased SVR (SVR = 12), but ventricular collapse was not achieved. Inferior vena cava occlusion reduced preload, and ventricular collapse was achieved at speeds as low as 11,000 rpm. Esmolol (beta1 antagonist) decreased HR (HR = 55) and contractility, and ventricular collapse was achieved at 11,500 rpm. Episodes of ventricular collapse were characterized initially by the pump output exceeding the venous return and the aortic valve remaining closed throughout the cardiac cycle. If continued, the mitral valve would remain open throughout the cardiac cycle. Using these unique states of the mitral and aortic valves, the onset of ventricular collapse could reliably be identified. It is hoped that the ability to detect the onset of ventricular collapse, rather than the event itself, will assist in

  3. Two paths of cluster evolution: global expansion versus core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, Ryan M.; Stahler, Steven W.; Ma, Chung-Pei

    2014-10-01

    All gravitationally bound clusters expand, due to both gas loss from their most massive members and binary heating. All are eventually disrupted tidally, either by passing molecular clouds or the gravitational potential of their host galaxies. However, their interior evolution can follow two very different paths. Only clusters of sufficiently large initial population and size undergo the combined interior contraction and exterior expansion that leads eventually to core collapse. In all other systems, core collapse is frustrated by binary heating. These clusters globally expand for their entire lives, up to the point of tidal disruption. Using a suite of direct N-body calculations, we trace the `collapse line' in rv-N space that separates these two paths. Here, rv and N are the cluster's initial virial radius and population, respectively. For realistic starting radii, the dividing N-value is from 104 to over 105. We also show that there exists a minimum population, Nmin, for core collapse. Clusters with N < Nmin tidally disrupt before core collapse occurs. At the Sun's Galactocentric radius, RG = 8.5 kpc, we find Nmin ≳ 300. The minimum population scales with Galactocentric radius as R_G^{-9/8}. The position of an observed cluster relative to the collapse line can be used to predict its future evolution. Using a small sample of open clusters, we find that most lie below the collapse line, and thus will never undergo core collapse. Most globular clusters, on the other hand, lie well above the line. In such a case, the cluster may or may not go through core collapse, depending on its initial size. We show how an accurate age determination can help settle this issue.

  4. Hamiltonian treatment of the gravitational collapse of thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisóstomo, Juan; Olea, Rodrigo

    2004-05-01

    A Hamiltonian treatment of the gravitational collapse of thin shells is presented. The direct integration of the canonical constraints reproduces the standard shell dynamics for a number of known cases. The formalism is applied in detail to three-dimensional spacetime and the properties of the (2+1)-dimensional charged black hole collapse are further elucidated. The procedure is also extended to deal with rotating solutions in three dimensions. The general form of the equations providing the shell dynamics implies the stability of black holes, as they cannot be converted into naked singularities by any shell collapse process.

  5. Particle creation in (2+1) circular dust collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Gutti, Sashideep; Singh, T. P.

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the quantum particle creation during the circularly symmetric collapse of a 2+1 dust cloud, for the cases when the cosmological constant is either zero or negative. We derive the Ford-Parker formula for the 2+1 case, which can be used to compute the radiated quantum flux in the geometric optics approximation. It is shown that no particles are created when the collapse ends in a naked singularity, unlike in the 3+1 case. When the collapse ends in a Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole, we recover the expected Hawking radiation.

  6. Modeling electrostatically induced collapse transitions in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shklyaev, Oleg E; Mockensturm, Eric; Crespi, Vincent H

    2011-04-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate how a mechanically bistable single-walled carbon nanotube can act as a variable-shaped capacitor. If the voltage is tuned so that collapsed and inflated states are degenerate, the tube's susceptibility to diverse external stimuli--temperature, voltage, trapped atoms--diverges following a universal curve, yielding an exceptionally sensitive sensor or actuator. The boundary between collapsed and inflated states can shift hundreds of angstroms in response to a single gas atom inside the tube. Several potential nanoelectromechanical devices could be based on this electrically tuned crossover between near-degenerate collapsed and inflated configurations.

  7. Bohmian mechanics, collapse models and the emergence of classicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroš, Marko; Donadi, Sandro; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the emergence of classical trajectories in Bohmian mechanics, when a macroscopic object interacts with an external environment. We show that in such a case the conditional wave function of the system follows a dynamics which, under reasonable assumptions, corresponds to that of the Ghirardi–Rimini–Weber (GRW) collapse model. As a consequence, Bohmian trajectories evolve classically. Our analysis also shows how the GRW (istantaneous) collapse process can be derived by an underlying continuous interaction of a quantum system with an external agent, thus throwing a light on how collapses can emerge from a deeper level theory.

  8. Recoverable and Programmable Collapse from Folding Pressurized Origami Cellular Solids.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Fang, H; Wang, K W

    2016-09-01

    We report a unique collapse mechanism by exploiting the negative stiffness observed in the folding of an origami solid, which consists of pressurized cells made by stacking origami sheets. Such a collapse mechanism is recoverable, since it only involves rigid folding of the origami sheets and it is programmable by pressure control and the custom design of the crease pattern. The collapse mechanism features many attractive characteristics for applications such as energy absorption. The reported results also suggest a new branch of origami study focused on its nonlinear mechanics associated with folding. PMID:27661691

  9. Dissipative gravitational collapse of an (an)isotropic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Shyam; Sharma, Ranjan; Paul, Bikash Chandra; Deb, Rumi

    2016-03-01

    We develop a framework to study the effects of pressure anisotropy on the evolution of a collapsing star dissipating energy in the form of radial heat flux. In this construction, the star begins its collapse from an initial static configuration described by Paul and Deb (Astrophys. Space Sci. 354:421, 2014) solution in the presence (or absence) of anisotropic stresses. The form of the initial static solution, which is a generalization of Pant and Sah (Phys. Rev. D 32:1538, 1985) model, complies with all the requirements of a realistic star and provides a simple method to analyze the impacts of anisotropy onto the collapse.

  10. Focal stent collapse in a patient with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, L; Finci, L; Reimers, B; Di Mario, C; Colombo, A

    1998-05-01

    We report a patient with systemic sclerosis having implantation of a 35 mm beStent with immediate success but developing angina at follow-up. A focal stent collapse with focal hyperplasia in and outside the stent was documented by ultrasound after 2 mos. A 14mm Palmaz-Schatz stent was successfully deployed into the collapsed beStent, with good 6-mo angiographic result. The stent collapse was probably due to unequal distribution of radial forces and possibly reactive hyperplasia in this unique patient with systemic sclerosis.

  11. Bohmian mechanics, collapse models and the emergence of classicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroš, Marko; Donadi, Sandro; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the emergence of classical trajectories in Bohmian mechanics, when a macroscopic object interacts with an external environment. We show that in such a case the conditional wave function of the system follows a dynamics which, under reasonable assumptions, corresponds to that of the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. As a consequence, Bohmian trajectories evolve classically. Our analysis also shows how the GRW (istantaneous) collapse process can be derived by an underlying continuous interaction of a quantum system with an external agent, thus throwing a light on how collapses can emerge from a deeper level theory.

  12. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  13. Ultraviolet observations of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Tyler Anthony

    Ultraviolet observations of Core Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) have traditionally lagged behind observations in the optical and near-infrared. With the launch of Swift in 2004 this began to change. The systematic study of UV emission from these objects provides information about supernovae temperature, radius, metallicity and luminosity that may be difficult to obtain from the ground - especially at early times where upwards of 80% of the SNe bolometric flux may come from the UV region. We begin with the examination of an extraordinary Type IIn supernova SN 2007pk, which was at the time the earliest observed Type IIn SNe in the UV, and characterize the explosion properties while examining how the early observed UV emission compares with other observed CCSNe at early times. Building upon this we assemble the largest sample of CCSNe in the UV and examine the UV and bolometric characteristics of CCSNe by subtype. Using these bolometric light curves we go on to calculate empirically based bolometric corrections and UV- ux corrections for use by observers when observing filters are limited or UV observations are unable to be obtained. We improve upon this by identifying a small subsample of Type II Plateau SNe which have simultaneous ground based optical - near infrared data, and improve our bolometric light curve calculation method to more accurately determine bolometric light curve, corrections and UV corrections. Finally, we use recent hydrodynamical models to examine the accuracy of current modeling techniques to reproduce Type IIP SNe, the implications of progenitor properties on the light curves of the SNe, and possibility of future diagnostics for progenitor metalicity, radius, and explosion energies from Type IIP light curves and models.

  14. Catastrophic Ecosystem Collapse in Pleistocene Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. H.; Fogel, M.; Magee, J. W.; Gagan, M.

    2002-12-01

    Extinction of the Australian megafauna (50ñ5ka) occurred shortly after human colonization (55ñ5ka). A link between the two has been suggested, including the possibility that landscape modification was influential, but pinpointing the role of humans remains elusive. To evaluate changes at the ecosystem level across the extinction event we utilize dietary information recorded by d13C preserved in eggshells of the extant emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), a large flightless bird. Emus are opportunistic feeders; their diet reflects the range of food sources available in the weeks before nesting (June). d13C quantifies the proportion of C3 vs C4 vegetation that constitutes the emu's diet. A 150,000-year record of emu dietary intact has been reconstructed using more than 300 individuals from Lake Eyre (south-central Australia) dated by 14C, luminescence and/or racemization. Prior to 50 ka emu diet was highly variable, ranging from 100% C3 to 100% C4. However, immediately after 50 ka, emu diet shifted dramatically: the C4 contribution never exceeded 50% (n=200) after 50 ka, whereas more than half the samples older than 50 ka old contain >50% C4 dietary sources. We attribute the observed changes in emu diet to a fundamental rearrangement of the plant ecosystems in semi-arid central Australia. Such a change in plant communities may have contributed to the extinction of many dependent herbivores. The coincidence in time of megafauna extinction and ecosystem collapse shortly after human colonization suggests there may be a causal link. Development of similar records of vegetation change for other regions of Australia are currently underway to evaluate whether the Lake Eyre record reflects a continental scale reorganization of the Australian biota.

  15. Late Cenozoic regional collapse due to evaporite flow and Dissolution in the Carbondale Collapse Center, West-Central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirkham, R.M.; Streufert, R.K.; Budahn, J.R.; Kunk, M.J.; Perry, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Dissolution and flow of Pennsylvanian evaporitic rocks in west-central Colorado created the Carbondale Collapse Center, a 450 mi2 structural depression with about 4,000 ft of vertical collapse during the late Cenozoic. This paper describes evidence of collapse in the lower Roaring Fork River valley. Both the lateral extent and amount of vertical collapse is constrained by deformed upper Cenozoic volcanic rocks that have been correlated using field mapping, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, geochemistry, and paleomagnetism. The Carbondale Collapse Center is one of at least two contiguous areas that have experienced major evaporite tectonism during the late Cenozoic. Historic sinkholes, deformed Holocene deposits, and modern high-salinity loads in the rivers and thermal springs indicate the collapse process continues today. Flow of evaporitic rocks is an important element in the collapse process, and during initial stages of collapse it was probably the primary causative mechanism. Dissolution, however, is the ultimate means by which evaporite is removed from the collapse area. As the Roaring Fork River began to rapidly down-cut through a broad volcanic plateau during the late Miocene, the underlying evaporite beds were subjected to differential overburden pressures. The evaporitic rocks flowed from beneath the upland areas where overburden pressures remained high, toward the Roaring Fork River Valley where the pressures were much lower. Along the valley the evaporitic rocks rose upward, sometimes as diapirs, forming or enhancing a valley anticline in bedrock and locally upwarping Pleistocene terraces. Wherever the evaporites encountered relatively fresh ground water, they were dissolved, forming underground voids into which overlying bedrock and surficial deposits subsided. The saline ground water eventually discharged to streams and rivers through thermal springs and by seepage into alluvial aquifers.

  16. 3. View of collapsed structure (type A) next to type ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of collapsed structure (type A) next to type B structure, facing east-northeast - Nevada Test Site, Japanese Village, Area 4, Yucca Flat, 4-04 Road near Rainier Mesa Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  17. Measurement of emission from a radiatively collapsed shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, A.; Drake, R. P.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Gjeci, N.; Gillespie, R. S.; Shultz, J. D.; Campbell, D. A.; Human, J.

    2007-11-01

    Radiatively collapsed shocks are systems in which radiation transport causes the shock to ``collapse'' or compress to high densities. Such shocks are present in supernova remnants, passing through interstellar medium, and other such astrophysical systems. With the advent of large laser facilities, conditions can be created so that radiativly collapsed shocks can be studied in quantitative way. Recent experiments have been preformed on the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics to study the dynamics of these shocks. Measurements of radiative emission from the collapsed shock and precursor region have been made using a streaked optical pyrometer from which the temperature of the system can be calculated. Details of the experiment and results will be discussed. This research was sponsored by the NNSA through DOE Research Grants DE-FG52-07NA28058, DE-FG52-04NA00064, and other grants and contracts.

  18. 31. VIEW OF COLLAPSED APRON OF BRIDGE NO. 10 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF COLLAPSED APRON OF BRIDGE NO. 10 AND ELEMENTS OF SUSPENSION STRUCTURE. LOOKING SOUTH. - Greenville Yard, Transfer Bridge System, Port of New York/New Jersey, Upper New York Bay, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  19. On the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Douglas C.

    2011-11-01

    Theory holds that a star born with an initial mass between about 8 and 140 times the mass of the Sun will end its life through the catastrophic gravitational collapse of its iron core to a neutron star or black hole. This core collapse process is thought to usually be accompanied by the ejection of the star's envelope as a supernova. This established theory is now being tested observationally, with over three dozen core-collapse supernovae having had the properties of their progenitor stars directly measured through the examination of high-resolution images taken prior to the explosion. Here I review what has been learned from these studies and briefly examine the potential impact on stellar evolution theory, the existence of "failed supernovae", and our understanding of the core-collapse explosion mechanism.

  20. 6. Photocopy of photograph, 1972. GRAFTON BRIDGE COLLAPSE IN AUGUST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph, 1972. GRAFTON BRIDGE COLLAPSE IN AUGUST OF 1890 (From the original collection of Miss Lois Heflin, Grafton, WV) - Northwestern Virginia Railroad, Grafton Bridge, Spanning Tygart Valley River, Grafton, Taylor County, WV

  1. 24. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH TO SOUTH, SHOWING COLLAPSED SECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH TO SOUTH, SHOWING COLLAPSED SECTION OF BRIDGE AND THE BOSCH HOME ON THE RIGHT Winter 1931-32 - Rowdy Creek Bridge, Spanning Rowdy Creek at Fred Haight Drive, Smith River, Del Norte County, CA

  2. BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED AROUND EIGHT YEARS BEFORE THIS DATE. - Whittlesey Road Bridge, Spanning Black River at Whittlesey Road, Lyons Falls, Lewis County, NY

  3. 30. DETAIL OF COLLAPSED BRIDGE NO. 14 SUSPENSION STRUCTURE. LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. DETAIL OF COLLAPSED BRIDGE NO. 14 SUSPENSION STRUCTURE. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Greenville Yard, Transfer Bridge System, Port of New York/New Jersey, Upper New York Bay, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  4. Battery Carpenter Observation Station, collapsed ruin showing south wall; view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Battery Carpenter Observation Station, collapsed ruin showing south wall; view northeast - Fort McKinley, Battery Carpenter Observation Station, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 275 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  5. Battery Weymouth Combined Observation Station ruin, collapsed; view to west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Battery Weymouth Combined Observation Station ruin, collapsed; view to west - Fort McKinley, Battery Weymouth Combined Observation Station, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 125 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  6. MHD Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae with Cosmos++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Shizuka; Salmonson, Jay

    2010-10-01

    We performed 2D, axisymmetric, MHD simulations with Cosmos++ in order to examine the growth of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in core-collapse supernovae. We have initialized a non-rotating 15 Msolar progenitor, infused with differential rotation and poloidal magnetic fields. The collapse of the iron core is simulated with the Shen EOS, and the parametric Ye and entropy evolution. The wavelength of the unstable mode in the post-collapse environment is expected to be only ~200 m. In order to achieve the fine spatial resolution requirement, we employed remapping technique after the iron core has collapsed and bounced. The MRI unstable region appears near the equator and angular momentum and entropy are transported outward. Higher resolution remap run display more vigorous overturns and stronger transport of angular momentum and entropy. Our results are in agreement with the earlier work by Akiyama et al. [1] and Obergaulinger et al. [2].

  7. Precise computations of chemotactic collapse using moving mesh methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, C. J.; Carretero-González, R.; Russell, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of computing blow-up solutions of chemotaxis systems, or the so-called chemotactic collapse. In two spatial dimensions, such solutions can have approximate self-similar behaviour, which can be very challenging to verify in numerical simulations [cf. Betterton and Brenner, Collapsing bacterial cylinders, Phys. Rev. E 64 (2001) 061904]. We analyse a dynamic (scale-invariant) remeshing method which performs spatial mesh movement based upon equidistribution. Using a suitably chosen monitor function, the numerical solution resolves the fine detail in the asymptotic solution structure, such that the computations are seen to be fully consistent with the asymptotic description of the collapse phenomenon given by Herrero and Velázquez [Singularity patterns in a chemotaxis model, Math. Ann. 306 (1996) 583-623]. We believe that the methods we construct are ideally suited to a large number of problems in mathematical biology for which collapse phenomena are expected.

  8. Nucleosynthesis in jets from rotating magnetized stars during core collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichirou; Nishimura, Nobuya; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    2008-05-12

    We investigate nucleosynthesis inside magnetically driven jets ejected from rotating, magnetized massive stars, or collapsars, based on long-term, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the core collapse of six collapsars with the various distributions of magnetic fields and angular momentum before the collapse. We follow the evolution of the abundances of about 4000 nuclides from the collapse phase to the ejection phase and through the jet generation phase using a large nuclear reaction network. We find that the r-process successfully operates in the jets from three collapsars, so that U and Th are synthesized abundantly, even when the collapsar have a relatively small magnetic field (10{sup 10} G) and a moderately rotating core before the collapse. The abundance patterns inside the jets are similar to that of the r-elements in the solar system.

  9. 5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TIP TOP MINE. EAST SIDE OF STRUCTURE WITH COLLAPSED ADIT. CAMERA POINTED WEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  10. Instability of black hole formation in gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Malafarina, Daniele

    2011-01-15

    We consider here the classic scenario given by Oppenheimer, Snyder, and Datt, for the gravitational collapse of a massive matter cloud, and examine its stability under the introduction of small tangential stresses. We show, by offering an explicit class of physically valid tangential stress perturbations, that an introduction of tangential pressure, however small, can qualitatively change the final fate of collapse from a black hole final state to a naked singularity. This shows instability of black hole formation in collapse and sheds important light on the nature of cosmic censorship hypothesis and its possible formulations. The key effect of these perturbations is to alter the trapped surface formation pattern within the collapsing cloud and the apparent horizon structure. This allows the singularity to be visible, and implications are discussed.

  11. 28. Rear lot of the Adelman Block. The collapsed truss ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Rear lot of the Adelman Block. The collapsed truss roof (ca. 1932) originally sheltered an automobile sales garage - Lockport Historic District, Bounded by Eighth, Hamilton & Eleventh Streets & Illinois & Michigan Canal, Lockport, Will County, IL

  12. 9. South abutment, detail of collapsed east wing wall; also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. South abutment, detail of collapsed east wing wall; also detail of bottom lateral bracing and stringers; looking southeast - Dodd Ford Bridge, County Road 147 Spanning Blue Earth River, Amboy, Blue Earth County, MN

  13. 7. Alternate view of collapsed Panama Mount on beach. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Alternate view of collapsed Panama Mount on beach. Note concrete ring, metal rail and exposed rebar. Looking 320° NW. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. Can plumes collapse?: Experimental results and applications to Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2012-04-01

    Iceland has produced magma in a series of episodic events. From lava chemistry it has been inferred that the plume temperature decreased over the first 5 Myr by ~50°C and for the next 3 Myr following continental break up it continued to oscillate by ~25°C. Such data has been used to infer possible episodic collapse of the Iceland plume. Collapsing plumes are not common fluid dynamical features. In thermochemical plumes it is possible to achieve collapse by varying the relative buoyancy due to chemistry and due to temperature. In thermal plumes however, with a constant heat source we would expect plumes not to collapse but to not continue to rise after reaching a point of neutral buoyancy. We expect thermal plumes, like those Earth's bottom thermal boundary layer is capable of producing, to either rise to the surface or be deflected but not to collapse. We have designed an experimental setup to investigate the conditions that may lead to collapse in thermal plumes with constant heat sources. We used high-Prandtl number fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosities (Lyle Golden syrup and Liquidose 436) as analogues to Earth's high viscosity mantle in a cubic Plexiglas tank (26.5cm inner sides), heated by a circular 2cm diameter heater (flat with the base of the tank). We explored ΔTs between 3-60°C. The flow was visualized with shadowgraphs and an automated -3D Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) system to measure velocities. In Lyle's Golden Syrup collapse occurred at ΔTs as high as 8°C, while in Liquidose 436 the 8°C ΔT run showed only partial collapse. The difference is not unexpected given the different physical properties. Partial collapse was seen even for ΔTs as high as 50°C. Both complete and partial collapse manifested themselves as downwelling flow in the central part of the conduit. Collapse stopped in the hotter plumes when the downwelling fluid met the hottest part of the conduit. The observed results suggest that diffusive

  15. Can plumes collapse?: Experimental results and applications to Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Iceland has produced magma in a series of episodic events. From lava chemistry it has been inferred that the plume temperature decreased over the first 5 Myr by ~50°C and for the next 3 Myr following continental break up it continued to oscillate by ~25°C. Such data has been used to infer possible episodic collapse of the Iceland plume. Collapsing plumes are not common fluid dynamical features. In thermochemical plumes it is possible to achieve collapse by varying the relative buoyancy due to chemistry and due to temperature. In thermal plumes however, with a constant heat source we would expect plumes not to collapse but to not continue to rise after reaching a point of neutral buoyancy. We expect thermal plumes, like those Earth's bottom thermal boundary layer is capable of producing, to either rise to the surface or be deflected but not to collapse. We have designed an experimental setup to investigate the conditions that may lead to collapse in thermal plumes with constant heat sources. We used high-Prandtl number fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosities (Lyle Golden syrup and Liquidose 436) as analogues to Earth's high viscosity mantle in a cubic Plexiglas tank (26.5cm inner sides), heated by a circular 2cm diameter heater (flat with the base of the tank). We explored ΔTs between 3-60°C. The flow was visualized with shadowgraphs and an automated -3D Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) system to measure velocities. In Lyle's Golden Syrup collapse occurred at ΔTs as high as 8°C, while in Liquidose 436 the 8° ΔT run showed only partial collapse. The difference is not unexpected given the different physical properties. Partial collapse was seen even for ΔTs as high as 50°C. Both complete and partial collapse manifested themselves as downwelling flow in the central part of the conduit. Collapse stopped in the hotter plumes when the downwelling fluid met the hottest part of the conduit. The observed results suggest that diffusive

  16. Diffuse interface modeling of a radial vapor bubble collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaletti, Francesco; Marino, Luca; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    A diffuse interface model is exploited to study in details the dynamics of a cavitation vapor bubble, by including phase change, transition to supercritical conditions, shock wave propagation and thermal conduction. The numerical experiments show that the actual dynamic is a sequence of collapses and rebounds demonstrating the importance of nonequilibrium phase changes. In particular the transition to supercritical conditions avoids the full condensation and leads to shockwave emission after the collapse and to successive bubble rebound.

  17. The Collapse of the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    On Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2007, at 6:05 p.m. (during evening rush hour), the I-35W bridge across the Mississippi River in Minneapolis collapsed, killing 13 people and injuring 145. At the time of the collapse, repair work was in progress on the deck of the bridge, resulting in an additional 287 tons of construction material and equipment being on the…

  18. Collapse of the soap-film bridge - Quasistatic description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cryer, Steven A.; Steen, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the collapse of a soap-film bridge from a connected to a disconnected state are recorded. The equilibrium framework for this nonequilibrium event is classical. Experiments confirm predictions of stable and unstable equilibria. A quasistatic description is introduced for the dynamic states to extend the static theory. It is found to adequately describe the collapse trajectory while the bridge is still connected.

  19. Improvement in UOE pipe collapse resistance by thermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sharif, A.M.; Preston, R.

    1996-12-31

    A recent investigation has shown that the UOE pipe manufacturing process significantly degrades the collapse resistance of high strength line pipe. This paper assesses the degree of strength recovery that can be achieved by aging the pipe. An experimental investigation was performed in order to develop a quantitative relationship between time and temperature of aging, which produces an increase in compressive yield strength, with consequent increase in collapse resistance to external pressure loading.

  20. Naked singularities in self-similar spherical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Ori, A.; Piran, T.

    1987-11-09

    We present general-relativistic solutions of self-similar spherical collapse of an adiabatic perfect fluid. We show that if the equation of state is soft enough (GAMMA-1<<1), a naked singularity forms. The singularity resembles the shell-focusing naked singularities that arise in dust collapse. This solution increases significantly the range of matter fields that should be ruled out in order that the cosmic-censorship hypothesis will hold.

  1. Towards the Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y; Endeve, Eirik; Budiardja, R. D.; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are amazing displays of astrohysical fireworks - and the optical emission is only a tiny part of the story. These events involve virtually all branches of physics and spawn phenomena observale by every kind of astronomical observation. This richness of theory and observation presents a formidable challenge to their understanding via computer simulations, but we are entering a new era of realism and maturity in modeling the key processes by collapse and explosion.

  2. Black hole mass threshold from nonsingular quantum gravitational collapse.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin; Goswami, Rituparno; Maartens, Roy; Singh, Parampreet

    2005-08-26

    Quantum gravity is expected to remove the classical singularity that arises as the end state of gravitational collapse. To investigate this, we work with a toy model of a collapsing homogeneous scalar field. We show that nonperturbative semiclassical effects of loop quantum gravity cause a bounce and remove the black hole singularity. Furthermore, we find a critical threshold scale below which no horizon forms: quantum gravity may exclude very small astrophysical black holes.

  3. Three-dimensional strong Langmuir turbulence and wave collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.

    1988-01-01

    Results from the first fully three-dimensional simulations of driven damped strong Langmuir turbulence and wave collapse are presented. Key results are that turbulence is maintained at least in part by nucleation, the cores of most collapsing objects are pancake shaped in form, and the power spectrum falls off approximately as the product of a power law and an exponential at large wave number.

  4. Collapse of spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardonov, Sh.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Muga, J. G.; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ban, Yue; Chen, Xi

    2015-04-01

    A finite-size quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate collapses if the attraction between atoms is sufficiently strong. Here we present a theory of collapse for condensates with the interatomic attraction and spin-orbit coupling. We consider two realizations of spin-orbit coupling: the axial Rashba coupling and the balanced, effectively one-dimensional Rashba-Dresselhaus one. In both cases spin-dependent "anomalous" velocity, proportional to the spin-orbit-coupling strength, plays a crucial role. For the Rashba coupling, this velocity forms a centrifugal component in the density flux opposite to that arising due to the attraction between particles and prevents the collapse at a sufficiently strong coupling. For the balanced Rashba-Dresselhaus coupling, the spin-dependent velocity can spatially split the initial state in one dimension and form spin-projected wave packets, reducing the total condensate density. Depending on the spin-orbit-coupling strength, interatomic attraction, and initial state, this splitting either prevents the collapse or modifies the collapse process. These results show that the collapse can be controlled by a spin-orbit coupling, thus extending the domain of existence of condensates of attracting atoms.

  5. Collapse of ordered spatial pattern in neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinlin; Wang, Chunni; Ma, Jun; Ren, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Spatiotemporal systems can emerge some regular spatial patterns due to self organization or under external periodical pacing while external attack or intrinsic collapse can destroy the regularity in the spatial system. For an example, the electrical activities of neurons in nervous system show regular spatial distribution under appropriate coupling and connection. It is believed that distinct regularity could be induced in the media by appropriate forcing or feedback, while a diffusive collapse induced by continuous destruction can cause breakdown of the media. In this paper, the collapse of ordered spatial distribution is investigated in a regular network of neurons (Morris-Lecar, Hindmarsh-Rose) in two-dimensional array. A stable target wave is developed regular spatial distribution emerges by imposing appropriate external forcing with diversity, or generating heterogeneity (parameter diversity in space). The diffusive invasion could be produced by continuous parameter collapse or switch in local area, e.g, the diffusive poisoning in ion channels of potassium in Morris-Lecar neurons causes breakdown in conductance of channels. It is found that target wave-dominated regularity can be suppressed when the collapsed area is diffused in random. Statistical correlation functions for sampled nodes (neurons) are defined to detect the collapse of ordered state by series analysis.

  6. Estimating the Collapse Pressure of an Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baginski, Frank E.; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Cruz, Juan R.

    2013-01-01

    The collapse pressure of an inflatable membrane is the minimum differential pressure which will sustain a specific desired shape under an applied load. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the collapse pressure of a tension-cone inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (IAD) that is subject to a static aerodynamic load. The IAD surface is modeled as an elastic membrane. For a given aerodynamic load and sufficiently high torus differential pressure, the IAD assumes a stable axisymmetric equilibrium shape. When the torus pressure is reduced sufficiently, the symmetric equilibrium state becomes unstable and we define this instance to be the critical pressure Pcr. In this paper, we will compare our predicted critical torus pressure with the corresponding observed torus collapse pressure (OTCP) for fifteen tests that were conducted by the third author and his collaborators at the NASA Glenn Research Center 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel in April 2008. One of the difficulties with these types of comparisons is establishing the instance of torus collapse and determining the OTCP from quantities measured during the experiment. In many cases, torus collapse is gradual and the OTCP is not well-defined. However, in eight of the fifteen wind tunnel tests where the OTCP is well-defined, we find that the average of the relative differences (Pcr - OTCP/Pcr) was 8.9%. For completeness, we will also discuss the seven tests where the observed torus collapse pressure is not well-defined.

  7. Inspection of collapse cause of Sampoong Department Store.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Won

    2012-04-10

    On June 29, 1995, the Sampoong Department Store in Seoul, South Korea, completely collapsed. It was a five story reinforced concrete (RC) building with underground 4 floors and was built using a technique called "flat slab construction". The collapse is the largest peacetime disaster in South Korean history - 502 people died, 6 missing, and 937 sustained injuries. The Sampoong Department Store was completed in late 1989, and it opened to the public on July 7, 1990, attracting an estimated 40,000 people per day during the building's 5 years in service. After the collapse, intense investigation was conducted to find out the direct causes of the collapse through (1) survey on the present collapse situation and ground condition, (2) strength test of the concrete and steel collected at the site, (3) design documents and construction/management reports, and (4) structural analysis. The investigation revealed that the Sampoong Department Store collapsed because so many direct and indirect causes such as flaws in design phase and mistakes in construction and management process were overlapped.

  8. Inelastic collapse in one-dimensional driven systems under gravity.

    PubMed

    Wakou, Jun'ichi; Kitagishi, Hiroyuki; Sakaue, Takahiro; Nakanishi, Hiizu

    2013-04-01

    We study inelastic collapse in a one-dimensional N-particle system when the system is driven from below under gravity. We investigate the hard-sphere limit of inelastic soft-sphere systems by numerical simulations to find how the collision rate per particle n(coll) increases as a function of the elastic constant of the sphere k when the restitution coefficient e is kept constant. For systems with large enough N>/~20, we find three regimes in e depending on the behavior of n(coll) in the hard-sphere limit: (i) an uncollapsing regime for 1≥e>e(c1), where n(coll) converges to a finite value, (ii) a logarithmically collapsing regime for e(c1)>e>e(c2), where n(coll) diverges as n(coll)~logk, and (iii) a power-law collapsing regime for e(c2)>e>0, where n(coll) diverges as n(coll)~k(α) with an exponent α that depends on N. The power-law collapsing regime shrinks as N decreases and seems not to exist for the system with N=3, while, for large N, the size of the uncollapsing and the logarithmically collapsing regime decreases as e(c1)=/~1-2.6/N and e(c2)=/~1-3.0/N. We demonstrate that this difference between large and small systems exists already in the inelastic collapse without external drive and gravity.

  9. Dynamics of concerted bubble cluster collapse in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-10-01

    Cavitation bubble cluster collapse at the surface of artificial kidney stones during shock wave lithotripsy was investigated in vitro by means of multiframe high-speed photography, passive cavitation detection (PCD), and pressure waveform measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH). It was observed that after the passage of the lithotripter shock pulse the stone was covered by numerous individual bubbles. During their growth phase the bubbles coalesced into bubble clusters, with the biggest cluster at the proximal face of the stone. High-speed camera images suggested that cluster collapse started at the periphery and ended with a violent collapse in a small region in the center of the surface of the stone. Shadowgraphy resolved numerous secondary shock waves emitted during this focused collapse. Shock wave emission during cluster collapse was confirmed by PCD. Measurement with the FOPH showed that these shock waves were typically of short duration (0.2 μs). The majority of the shock waves emanating from cluster collapse were low amplitude but some shock waves registered amplitudes on the order of the incident shock pulse (tens of MPa). [Work supported by NIH DK43881, DK55674.

  10. The UV Properties of Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Tyler A.; Roming, P.

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of robotic telescope transient surveys in the 1990's, the study of Supernovae (SNe) in the optical and infrared wavelengths underwent a revolution as the number of SNe discovered per year increased by well over an order of magnitude in the ensuing decade. UV studies of these objects lagged behind their optical/NIR counterparts, however, due to a limited observing capability. With the launch of Swift in 2005 a similar revolution took place in the UV as it was finally possible to regularly obtain well-sampled UV and optical observations with the Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT; λc = 1928, 2246, 2600 Å). In 2007 Swift/UVOT observed SN 2007pk, which was at the time the earliest observed Type IIn SNe in the UV, and whose study led us to understand the need for a more comprehensive sampling of Core Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) observations than had previously been performed. Using data from Swift’s launch to the end of 2012, we produce a study of the UV characteristics of CCSNe, dependant upon SNe subtype. We find that at early times or around peak magnitude, contingent upon subtype, a majority of the supernovae flux can occur in the UV regime. However, due to ground based observing constraints this flux often goes unmeasured. This missing flux, and associated corrections, has implications for SNe explosion models which use bolometric light curves to examine factors including: supernovae explosion energy, progenitor radius, CSM winds, and metallicity. We then calculate bolometric light curves for this sample of CCSNe, along with empirical UV-corrections from these for bolometric light curves that have been generated without UV data. We then refine these corrections using a smaller sample of Type IIP SNe from the Carnegie Supernovae Project that overlap with Swift observations, resulting in bolometric light curves with a comprehensive UV-NIR coverage. Finally, using recent numerical simulations we compare variations in observed model light curves due

  11. Quantum cosmology, polymer matter, and modified collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreienbuehl, Andreas

    In this dissertation I address the following three questions: 1) how do different clocks compare in regard of the avoidance of the big bang singularity, 2) what is the high energy behavior of polymer quantized matter, and 3) how do quantum gravity effects modify the formation and the properties of black holes? To discuss 1), I consider an isotropic Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology sourced by a non-negative cosmological constant and a massless scalar field. I choose the scale factor as clock and, using a trick by Dirac, Schrodinger quantize the reduced square root Hamiltonian. From the resulting spinor equation I show that no semiclassical wave packet avoids the big bang. I compare this work with that in loop quantum cosmology, where the scalar field is chosen as time variable and the big bang is avoided. As for 2), I explain the details of a project with Professor Husain in which we study a scalar field on a curved background and perform a polymer Fock quantization of the matter degrees of freedom. The quantization is based on the assumption that the underlying field space is discrete and it therefore comes with a fundamental scale. This renders the usual operators on the Fock space scale dependent and causes a transition from a bosonic to a fermionic behavior in the ultraviolet regime. Finally for 3), I present work with Professor Husain and Professor Seahra on a modification of the Hamiltonian formulation of a massless scalar field minimally coupled to a spherically symmetric spacetime. The modification is designed to mimic polymer quantum effects in the region where the scalar field collapses and it is implemented in such a way that the symmetry group of general relativity is preserved. This causes a drastic change in the way black holes form and, thus, in their properties. Namely, the scalar field has to overcome a repulsion and black holes form with a finite mass. Furthermore, the modification gives rise to oscillations in the relation between the black

  12. Cover-collapse sinkholes of the Franconian Alb / Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappe, M.; Heckmann, T.; Mehlhorn, S.; Umstädter, K.; Miedaner, H.; Becht, M.

    2012-04-01

    Recent events of cover-collapse sinkhole formation, the geomorphological, geological and hydrological conditions of selected sinkholes and the spatial and temporal occurrences of such landforms were studied in the Franconian Alb, a karst area located in southeastern Germany. The Franconian Alb consists of karstified limestones and dolomites of Jurassic Age. It is partly covered by Cretaceous and Miocene deposits and a clayey to loamy overburden. The thickness of the loamy cover ranges from a few decimetres up to ten meters. Sinkholes are widely distributed in the area, to some extent they were formed by cover-collapse processes. In order to prepare a geohazard map, historical records from different archives (municipalities, counties, water management agencies, governmental archives, newspapers) were used for a compilation of sinkholes which resulted from collapses. The frequency of occurrence of cover-collapse sinkholes differs in areas with agricultural or forestal use. Farmers often backfill these surficial cavities immediately after their formation, before they can be registered officially. Therefore a documentation of such collapse events may be restricted in terms of detailed statistical analyses. Nevertheless seasonal clusters of collapses can be observed. Recent collapses show close relations to climatic conditions. During winter or spring the majority of collapse events is associated with snow melt or heavy rainfall resulting in an increase of the soil moisture and a decrease of shear strength within the loamy cover. Consequently, loose material overlaying cavities can be washed down, or the sediment itself moves downward. For single events, the antecedent climatic development (precipitation, thickness of snow cover, air temperature, soil temperature) was analysed for identification of the triggering factors. In this context, small-scale surficial karst depressions without outlet (underlain by thick loamy deposits) show an efficient drainage via a few

  13. On the number density of "direct collapse" black hole seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habouzit, Mélanie; Volonteri, Marta; Latif, Muhammad; Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) reside in the center of most local galaxies, but they also power active galactic nuclei and quasars, detected up to z = 7. These quasars put constraints on early BH growth and the mass of BH seeds. The scenario of "direct collapse" is appealing as it leads to the formation of large mass BH seeds, 10^4-10^6 {M_{⊙}}, which eases explaining how quasars at z = 6 - 7 are powered by BHs with masses >109 M⊙. Direct collapse, however, appears to be rare, as the conditions required by the scenario are that gas is metal-free, the presence of a strong photo-dissociating Lyman-Werner flux, and large inflows of gas at the center of the halo, sustained for 10 - 100 Myr. We performed several cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that cover a large range of box sizes and resolutions, thus allowing us to understand the impact of several physical processes on the distribution of direct collapse BHs. We identify halos where direct collapse can happen, and derive the number density of BHs. We also investigate the discrepancies between hydrodynamical simulations, direct or post-processed, and semi-analytical studies. Under optimistic assumptions, we find that for direct collapse to account for BHs in normal galaxies, the critical Lyman-Werner flux required for direct collapse must be about two orders of magnitude lower than predicted by 3D simulations that include detailed chemical models. However, when supernova feedback is relatively weak, enough direct collapse BHs to explain z = 6 - 7 quasars can be obtained for Lyman-Werner fluxes about one order of magnitude lower than found in 3D simulations.

  14. On the number density of `direct collapse' black hole seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habouzit, Mélanie; Volonteri, Marta; Latif, Muhammad; Dubois, Yohan; Peirani, Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) reside in the centre of most local galaxies, but they also power active galactic nuclei and quasars, detected up to z = 7. These quasars put constraints on early BH growth and the mass of BH seeds. The scenario of `direct collapse' is appealing as it leads to the formation of large mass BH seeds, 104-106 M⊙, which eases explaining how quasars at z = 6-7 are powered by BHs with masses >109 M⊙. Direct collapse, however, appears to be rare, as the conditions required by the scenario are that gas is metal-free, the presence of a strong photodissociating Lyman-Werner flux, and large inflows of gas at the centre of the halo, sustained for 10-100 Myr. We performed several cosmological hydrodynamical simulations that cover a large range of box sizes and resolutions, thus allowing us to understand the impact of several physical processes on the distribution of direct collapse BHs. We identify haloes where direct collapse can happen, and derive the number density of BHs. We also investigate the discrepancies between hydrodynamical simulations, direct or post-processed, and semi-analytical studies. Under optimistic assumptions, we find that for direct collapse to account for BHs in normal galaxies, the critical Lyman-Werner flux required for direct collapse must be about two orders of magnitude lower than predicted by 3D simulations that include detailed chemical models. However, when supernova feedback is relatively weak, enough direct collapse BHs to explain z = 6-7 quasars can be obtained for Lyman-Werner fluxes about one order of magnitude lower than found in 3D simulations.

  15. Endograft Collapse After Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bandorski, Dirk Brueck, Martin; Guenther, Hans-Ulrich; Manke, Christoph

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular treatment is an established therapy for thoracic aortic disease. Collapse of the endograft is a potentially fatal complication. We reviewed 16 patients with a thoracic endograft between 2001 and 2006. Medical records of the treated patients were studied. Data collected include age, gender, diagnosis, indication for endoluminal treatment, type of endograft, and time of follow up. All patients (n = 16; mean age, 61 years; range, 21-82 years) underwent computed tomography (CT) for location of the lesion and planning of the intervention. Time of follow-up with CT scan ranged from 1 to 61 months. Indications for endovascular treatment were degenerative aneurysm (n = 7; 44%), aortic dissection (n = 2; 12%), perforated aortic ulcer (n = 4; 25%), and traumatic aortic injury (n = 3; 19%). Three patients suffered from a collapse of the endograft (one patient distal, two patients proximal) between 3 and 8 days after endovascular treatment. These patients were younger (mean age, 37 {+-} 25 years vs. 67 {+-} 16 years; P < 0.05) and showed more oversizing (proximal, 36 {+-} 19.8% vs. 29 {+-} 20.7% [P > 0.05]; distal, 45 {+-} 23.5% vs. 38 {+-} 21.7% [P > 0.05]). Proximal collapse was corrected by placing a bare stent. In conclusion, risk factors for stent-graft collapse are a small lumen of the aorta and a small radius of the aortic arch curvature (young patients), as well as oversizing, which is an important risk factor and is described for different types of endografts and protheses (Gore TAG and Cook Zenith). Dilatation of the collapsed stent-graft is not sufficient. Following therapy implantation of a second stent or surgery is necessary in patients with a proximal endograft collapse. Distal endograft collapse can possibly be treated conservatively under close follow-up.

  16. Collapse in boson-fermion mixtures with all-repulsive interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Prytula, Vladyslav I.; Konotop, Vladimir V.; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Vekslerchik, Vadym E.

    2007-10-15

    We describe the collapse of the bosonic component in a boson-fermion mixture due to the pressure exerted on it by a large fermionic component, leading to collapse in a system with all-repulsive interactions. We describe the phenomena of early collapse and superslow collapse of the mixture.

  17. Detecting the Collapse of Cooperation in Evolving Networks.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Matteo; Yang, Guoli; Danos, Vincent; Dakos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The sustainability of biological, social, economic and ecological communities is often determined by the outcome of social conflicts between cooperative and selfish individuals (cheaters). Cheaters avoid the cost of contributing to the community and can occasionally spread in the population leading to the complete collapse of cooperation. Although such collapse often unfolds unexpectedly, it is unclear whether one can detect the risk of cheater's invasions and loss of cooperation in an evolving community. Here, we combine dynamical networks and evolutionary game theory to study the abrupt loss of cooperation with tools for studying critical transitions. We estimate the risk of cooperation collapse following the introduction of a single cheater under gradually changing conditions. We observe an increase in the average time it takes for cheaters to be eliminated from the community as the risk of collapse increases. We argue that such slow system response resembles slowing down in recovery rates prior to a critical transition. In addition, we show how changes in community structure reflect the risk of cooperation collapse. We find that these changes strongly depend on the mechanism that governs how cheaters evolve in the community. Our results highlight novel directions for detecting abrupt transitions in evolving networks. PMID:27492876

  18. Can static regular black holes form from gravitational collapse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiyang; Zhu, Yiwei; Modesto, Leonardo; Bambi, Cosimo

    2015-02-01

    Starting from the Oppenheimer-Snyder model, we know how in classical general relativity the gravitational collapse of matter forms a black hole with a central spacetime singularity. It is widely believed that the singularity must be removed by quantum-gravity effects. Some static quantum-inspired singularity-free black hole solutions have been proposed in the literature, but when one considers simple examples of gravitational collapse the classical singularity is replaced by a bounce, after which the collapsing matter expands for ever. We may expect three possible explanations: (i) the static regular black hole solutions are not physical, in the sense that they cannot be realized in Nature, (ii) the final product of the collapse is not unique, but it depends on the initial conditions, or (iii) boundary effects play an important role and our simple models miss important physics. In the latter case, after proper adjustment, the bouncing solution would approach the static one. We argue that the "correct answer" may be related to the appearance of a ghost state in de Sitter spacetimes with super Planckian mass. Our black holes have indeed a de Sitter core and the ghost would make these configurations unstable. Therefore we believe that these black hole static solutions represent the transient phase of a gravitational collapse but never survive as asymptotic states.

  19. Subsidence and collapse sinkholes in soluble rock: a numerical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg; Romanov, Douchko; Hiller, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soluble rocks such as limestone, gypsum, anhydrite, and salt are prone to subsidence and the sudden creation of collapse sinkholes. The reason for this behaviour stems from the solubility of the rock: Water percolating through fissures and bedding partings can remove material from the rock walls and thus increase the permeability of the host rock by orders of magnitudes. This process occurs on time scales of 1,000-100,000 years, resulting in enlarged fractures, voids and cavities, which then carry flow efficiently through the rock. The enlargement of sub-surface voids to the meter-size within such short times creates mechanical conditions prone to collapse. The collapse initiates at depth, but then propagates to the surface. By means of numerical modelling, we discuss the long-term evolution of secondary porosity in gypsum rocks, resulting in zones of sub-surface voids, which then become mechanically unstable and collapse. We study two real-world case scenarios, in which we can relate field observations to our numerical model: (i) A dam-site scenario, where flow around the dam caused widespread dissolution of gypsum and subsequent subsidence of the dam and a nearby highway. (ii) A natural collapse sinkhole forming as a result of freshwater inflow into a shallow anhydrite formation with rapid evolution of voids in the sub-surface.

  20. Chain Collapse of an Amyloidogenic Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neha; Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2011-01-01

    Natively unfolded or intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are under intense scrutiny due to their involvement in both normal biological functions and abnormal protein misfolding disorders. Polypeptide chain collapse of amyloidogenic IDPs is believed to play a key role in protein misfolding, oligomerization, and aggregation leading to amyloid fibril formation, which is implicated in a number of human diseases. In this work, we used bovine κ-casein, which serves as an archetypal model protein for amyloidogenic IDPs. Using a variety of biophysical tools involving both prediction and spectroscopic techniques, we first established that monomeric κ-casein adopts a collapsed premolten-globule-like conformational ensemble under physiological conditions. Our time-resolved fluorescence and light-scattering data indicate a change in the mean hydrodynamic radius from ∼4.6 nm to ∼1.9 nm upon chain collapse. We then took the advantage of two cysteines separated by 77 amino-acid residues and covalently labeled them using thiol-reactive pyrene maleimide. This dual-labeled protein demonstrated a strong excimer formation upon renaturation from urea- and acid-denatured states under both equilibrium and kinetic conditions, providing compelling evidence of polypeptide chain collapse under physiological conditions. The implication of the IDP chain collapse in protein aggregation and amyloid formation is also discussed. PMID:21961598

  1. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  2. On Rapidly Rotating Magnetic Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J R; Mathews, G J; Dalhed, H E

    2004-12-20

    The authors have analyzed magnetic effects which may occur in rapidly rotating core collapse supernovae. They consider effects from both magnetic turbulence and the formation of magnetic bubbles. For magnetic turbulence they have made a perturbative analysis for the spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model that incorporates the build up of magnetic field energy in the matter accreting onto the proto-neutron star shortly after collapse and bounce. This significantly modifies the pressure profile and increases the heating of the material above the proto-neutron star resulting in an explosion even in rotating stars which would not explode otherwise. Regarding magnetic bubbles it is shown that a model with an initial uniform magnetic field ({approx} 10{sup 8}) gauss and uniform angular velocity of ({approx} 0.1 rad sec{sup -1}) can form magnetic bubbles due to the very non homologous nature of the collapse. It is estimated that the buoyancy of the bubbles causes matter in the proto-neutron star to rise, carrying neutrino-rich material to the neutron-star surface. This increases the neutrino luminosity sufficiently at early times to achieve a successful neutrino-driven explosion. Both magnetic mechanisms thus provide new means for initiating a Type II core-collapse supernova.

  3. Detecting the Collapse of Cooperation in Evolving Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Matteo; Yang, Guoli; Danos, Vincent; Dakos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The sustainability of biological, social, economic and ecological communities is often determined by the outcome of social conflicts between cooperative and selfish individuals (cheaters). Cheaters avoid the cost of contributing to the community and can occasionally spread in the population leading to the complete collapse of cooperation. Although such collapse often unfolds unexpectedly, it is unclear whether one can detect the risk of cheater’s invasions and loss of cooperation in an evolving community. Here, we combine dynamical networks and evolutionary game theory to study the abrupt loss of cooperation with tools for studying critical transitions. We estimate the risk of cooperation collapse following the introduction of a single cheater under gradually changing conditions. We observe an increase in the average time it takes for cheaters to be eliminated from the community as the risk of collapse increases. We argue that such slow system response resembles slowing down in recovery rates prior to a critical transition. In addition, we show how changes in community structure reflect the risk of cooperation collapse. We find that these changes strongly depend on the mechanism that governs how cheaters evolve in the community. Our results highlight novel directions for detecting abrupt transitions in evolving networks. PMID:27492876

  4. West antarctic ice sheet collapse: Chimera or clear danger

    SciTech Connect

    Alley, R.B. ); MacAyeal, D.R. )

    1993-01-01

    The specter of a west antarctic collapse has been with us for 25 years. Recently, certain official assessments concerned primarily with the future response to projected global warming have concluded that Antarctica will not cause much sea-level rise within the planning horizon of a century or so. At the same time startling new results on ice sheet (in)stability have been emerging, pointing to less stability then previously believed. Some recent results are reviewed briefly: Heinrich layers in the North Atlantic show basally lubricated surges of the Laurentide ice sheet; the west antarctic ice sheet collapsed recently; the modern west antarctic ice sheet is changing rapidly locally; the bed of ice stream B is exceptionally well lubricated by water and water-saturated soft sediments; the modern ice sheet is thinning slowly on average; a model west antarctic ice sheet undergoes rapid collapses long after forcing and probably related to penetration of warmth to the bed. 23 refs.

  5. Tunneling into microstate geometries: quantum effects stop gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Mayerson, Daniel R.; Puhm, Andrea; Vercnocke, Bert

    2016-07-01

    Collapsing shells form horizons, and when the curvature is small classical general relativity is believed to describe this process arbitrarily well. On the other hand, quantum information theory based (fuzzball/firewall) arguments suggest the existence of some structure at the black hole horizon. This structure can only form if classical general relativity stops being the correct description of the collapsing shell before it reaches the horizon size. We present strong evidence that classical general relativity can indeed break down prematurely, by explicitly computing the quantum tunneling amplitude of a collapsing shell of branes into smooth horizonless microstate geometries. We show that the amplitude for tunneling into microstate geometries with a large number of topologically non-trivial cycles is parametrically larger than e - S BH , which indicates that the shell can tunnel into a horizonless configuration long before the horizon has any chance to form. We also use this technology to investigate the tunneling of M2 branes into LLM bubbling geometries.

  6. Endobronchial Cartilage Rupture: A Rare Cause of Lobar Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Nauman; Javaid, Toseef

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare clinical condition, which can present in patients with severe emphysema with sudden onset shortness of breath. We present a case of a 62-year-old male who presented to our emergency department with sudden onset shortness of breath. Chest X-ray showed lung hyperinflation and a right lung field vague small density. Chest Computed Tomography confirmed the presence of right middle lobe collapse. Bronchoscopy revealed partial right middle lobe atelectasis and an endobronchial cartilage rupture. Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare condition that can present as sudden onset shortness of breath due to lobar collapse in patients with emphysema and can be triggered by cough. Bronchoscopic findings include finding a collapsed lung lobe and a visible ruptured endobronchial cartilage. A high index of suspicion, chest imaging, and early bronchoscopy can aid in the diagnosis and help prevent complications. PMID:27525149

  7. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1993-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium implies that it is produced by particles of dominant size of approximately 10(exp -5) cm. There is some indication that in the cores of dense molecular clouds, sub-micron grains can coagulate to form larger particles; this process is probably driven by turbulence. The most primitive meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites) are composed of particles with a bimodal size distribution with peaks near 1 micron (matrix) and 1 mm (chondrules). Models for chondrule formation that involve processing of presolar material by chemical reactions or through an accretion shock during infall assume that aggregates of the requisite mass could form before or during collapse. The effectiveness of coagulation during collapse has been disputed; it appears to depend on specific assumptions. The first results of detailed numerical modeling of spatial and temporal variations of particle sizes in presolar clouds, both static and collapsing, is reported in this article.

  8. Unexplained Neonatal Cardiorespiratory Collapse at Five Minutes of Age

    PubMed Central

    Zaleta, Sona; Miller, Sarah; Kumar, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    We report a case in which a term neonate suffered cardiorespiratory collapse at five minutes of age following an uncomplicated delivery and Apgar score of eight at one minute. Following prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the infant recovered well with no neurological deficit. Although sudden and unexpected postnatal collapse has been extensively described, this case does not fulfil its definition criteria. It provides a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and to the best of our knowledge is the first report of unexplained cardiorespiratory collapse at five minutes of age. The case serves as a timely reminder that cord gas analysis is recommended in all cases of potential fetal compromise and that Apgar scores should be used with caution as a predictor of neurological sequelae. PMID:27006848

  9. Nano-artifact metrics based on random collapse of resist

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Hoga, Morihisa; Ohyagi, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Mikio; Naruse, Makoto; Hanaki, Kenta; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Sekiguchi, Daiki; Tate, Naoya; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-01-01

    Artifact metrics is an information security technology that uses the intrinsic characteristics of a physical object for authentication and clone resistance. Here, we demonstrate nano-artifact metrics based on silicon nanostructures formed via an array of resist pillars that randomly collapse when exposed to electron-beam lithography. The proposed technique uses conventional and scalable lithography processes, and because of the random collapse of resist, the resultant structure has extremely fine-scale morphology with a minimum dimension below 10 nm, which is less than the resolution of current lithography capabilities. By evaluating false match, false non-match and clone-resistance rates, we clarify that the nanostructured patterns based on resist collapse satisfy the requirements for high-performance security applications. PMID:25142401

  10. Cluster coarsening during polymer collapse: Finite-size scaling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Suman; Janke, Wolfhard

    2015-06-01

    We study the kinetics of the collapse of a single flexible polymer when it is quenched from a good solvent to a poor solvent. Results obtained from Monte Carlo simulations show that the collapse occurs through a sequence of events with the formation, growth and subsequent coalescence of clusters of monomers to a single compact globule. Particular emphasis is given in this work to the cluster growth during the collapse, analyzed via the application of finite-size scaling techniques. The growth exponent obtained in our analysis is suggestive of the universal Lifshitz-Slyozov mechanism of cluster growth. The methods used in this work could be of more general validity and applicable to other phenomena such as protein folding.

  11. Feedback Effects of the Magnetorotational Instability on Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, S.; Wheeler, J. C.; Meier, D. L.; Lichtenstadt, I.

    2002-05-01

    We continue our investigation of the effects of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) on collapsing, rotating iron cores. A weak seed field will be exponentially amplified with a growth time t ~ 1/Ω to produce a magnetic field with strength 1014-1016 G within 300 msec after bounce. We follow the collapse with a one-dimensional flux-limited diffusion numerical code. In new work, we explore cylindrical symmetry for angular velocity profiles and invoke a centrifugal quasi-potential to allow somewhat higher initial angular rotation to be explored. We investigate the effect of convection in the core collapse environment to enhance or inhibit the growth of magnetic field, and also explore the feedback effects of the magnetic pressure and viscous drag. The rapid growth of the magnetic field may promote the formation of MHD jets up the rotation axis and, ultimately, a supernova explosion. This research is supported by NASA Grant NAG5-10766 and NSF Grant AST-0098644.

  12. Theoretical analysis of wake-induced parachute collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Spahr, H.R.; Wolf, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    During recent drop tests of a prototype weapon system, the parachute collapsed soon after it became fully inflated. The magnitude and duration of the collapses were severe enough to degrade parachute performance drastically. A computer-assisted analysis is presented which models parachute inflation, forebody and parachute wake generation, and interaction between the wake and the inflating or collapsing parachute. Comparison of the analysis results with full-scale drop test results shows good agreement for two parachute sizes; both parachutes were tested with and without permanent reefing. Computer-generated graphics (black and white drawings, color slides, and color movies) show the forebody and inflating parachute, the wake, and the wake and parachute interaction.

  13. Lateral stress relaxation and collapse in lipid monolayers†

    PubMed Central

    Pocivavsek, Luka; Frey, Shelli L.; Krishan, Kapilanjan; Gavrilov, Kseniya; Ruchala, Piotr; Waring, Alan J.; Walther, Frans J.; Dennin, Michael; Witten, Thomas A.; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2009-01-01

    Surfactants at air/water interfaces are often subjected to mechanical stresses as the interfaces they occupy are reduced in area. The most well characterized forms of stress relaxation in these systems are first order phase transitions from lower density to higher density phases. Here we study stress relaxation in lipid monolayers that occurs once chemical phase transitions have been exhausted. At these highly compressed states, the monolayer undergoes global mechanical relaxations termed collapse. By studying four different types of monolayers, we determine that collapse modes are most closely linked to in-plane rigidity. We characterize the rigidity of the monolayer by analyzing in-plane morphology on numerous length scales. More rigid monolayers collapse out-of-plane via a hard elastic mode similar to an elastic membrane, while softer monolayers relax in-plane by shearing. PMID:19657472

  14. Collapsing shells, critical phenomena, and black hole formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2016-04-01

    We study the gravitational collapse of two thin shells of matter, in asymptotically flat spacetime or constrained to move within a spherical box. We show that this simple two-body system has surprisingly rich dynamics, which includes prompt collapse to a black hole, perpetually oscillating solutions or black hole formation at arbitrarily large times. Collapse is induced by shell crossing and the black hole mass depends sensitively on the number of shell crossings. At certain critical points, the black hole mass exhibits critical behavior, determined by the change in parity (even or odd) of the number of crossings, with or without mass-gap during the transition. Some of the features we observe are reminiscent of confined scalars undergoing "turbulent" dynamics.

  15. Collapsing Glomerulopathy in a Child with Galloway-Mowat Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeybek, Cengiz; Basbozkurt, Gokalp; Hamcan, Salih; Ozcan, Ayhan; Gul, Davut; Gok, Faysal

    2016-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a poor prognosis that was first defined as a triad of central nervous system involvement, hiatal hernia, and nephrotic syndrome. However, this syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous clinical presentation. The nephrotic syndrome is steroid resistant and is responsible for the outcome. The combination of collapsing glomerulopathy and GMS is very rare. A 26-month-old boy presented with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome associated with neurologic findings, including microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, and nystagmus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked cerebral atrophy, optic atrophy, and hypomyelination. A renal biopsy was consistent with collapsing glomerulopathy. If collapsing glomerulopathy is associated with neurological abnormalities, especially with microcephaly, clinicians should consider GMS as a possible underlying cause. PMID:27403357

  16. Modeling colony collapse disorder in honeybees as a contagion.

    PubMed

    Kribs-Zaleta, Christopher M; Mitchell, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Honeybee pollination accounts annually for over $14 billion in United States agriculture alone. Within the past decade there has been a mysterious mass die-off of honeybees, an estimated 10 million beehives and sometimes as much as 90% of an apiary. There is still no consensus on what causes this phenomenon, called Colony Collapse Disorder, or CCD. Several mathematical models have studied CCD by only focusing on infection dynamics. We created a model to account for both healthy hive dynamics and hive extinction due to CCD, modeling CCD via a transmissible infection brought to the hive by foragers. The system of three ordinary differential equations accounts for multiple hive population behaviors including Allee effects and colony collapse. Numerical analysis leads to critical hive sizes for multiple scenarios and highlights the role of accelerated forager recruitment in emptying hives during colony collapse.

  17. Endobronchial Cartilage Rupture: A Rare Cause of Lobar Collapse.

    PubMed

    Dasa, Osama; Siddiqui, Nauman; Ruzieh, Mohammed; Javaid, Toseef

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare clinical condition, which can present in patients with severe emphysema with sudden onset shortness of breath. We present a case of a 62-year-old male who presented to our emergency department with sudden onset shortness of breath. Chest X-ray showed lung hyperinflation and a right lung field vague small density. Chest Computed Tomography confirmed the presence of right middle lobe collapse. Bronchoscopy revealed partial right middle lobe atelectasis and an endobronchial cartilage rupture. Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare condition that can present as sudden onset shortness of breath due to lobar collapse in patients with emphysema and can be triggered by cough. Bronchoscopic findings include finding a collapsed lung lobe and a visible ruptured endobronchial cartilage. A high index of suspicion, chest imaging, and early bronchoscopy can aid in the diagnosis and help prevent complications. PMID:27525149

  18. Collapsing Glomerulopathy in a Child with Galloway-Mowat Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zeybek, Cengiz; Basbozkurt, Gokalp; Hamcan, Salih; Ozcan, Ayhan; Gul, Davut; Gok, Faysal

    2016-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a poor prognosis that was first defined as a triad of central nervous system involvement, hiatal hernia, and nephrotic syndrome. However, this syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous clinical presentation. The nephrotic syndrome is steroid resistant and is responsible for the outcome. The combination of collapsing glomerulopathy and GMS is very rare. A 26-month-old boy presented with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome associated with neurologic findings, including microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, and nystagmus. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked cerebral atrophy, optic atrophy, and hypomyelination. A renal biopsy was consistent with collapsing glomerulopathy. If collapsing glomerulopathy is associated with neurological abnormalities, especially with microcephaly, clinicians should consider GMS as a possible underlying cause. PMID:27403357

  19. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse on Film and Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Don; Hook, Joseph; Doescher, Russell; Wolf, Steven

    2015-11-01

    This month marks the 75th anniversary of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse. During a gale on Nov. 7, 1940, the bridge exhibited remarkable oscillations before collapsing spectacularly (Figs. 1-5). Physicists over the years have spent a great deal of time and energy studying this event. By using open-source analysis tools and digitized footage of the disaster, physics students in both high school and college can continue in this tradition. Students can watch footage of "Galloping Gertie," ask scientific questions about the bridge's collapse, analyze data, and draw conclusions from that analysis. Students should be encouraged to pursue their own investigations, but the question that drove our inquiry was this: "When physics classes watch modern video showing the oscillations and the free fall of the bridge fragments, are these scenes sped up, slowed down, or at the correct speed compared to what was observed by the eyewitnesses on Nov. 7, 1940?"

  20. Collapse of magnetized hypermassive neutron stars in general relativity.

    PubMed

    Duez, Matthew D; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L; Shibata, Masaru; Stephens, Branson C

    2006-01-27

    Hypermassive neutron stars (HMNSs)--equilibrium configurations supported against collapse by rapid differential rotation--are possible transient remnants of binary neutron-star mergers. Using newly developed codes for magnetohydrodynamic simulations in dynamical spacetimes, we are able to track the evolution of a magnetized HMNS in full general relativity for the first time. We find that secular angular momentum transport due to magnetic braking and the magnetorotational instability results in the collapse of an HMNS to a rotating black hole, accompanied by a gravitational wave burst. The nascent black hole is surrounded by a hot, massive torus undergoing quasistationary accretion and a collimated magnetic field. This scenario suggests that HMNS collapse is a possible candidate for the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts.

  1. The White Pine Mine explosively induced, controlled collapse experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W.; Phillips, W.S.

    1996-09-01

    On September 3, 1995, the White Pine Mine, which is owned by Copper Range Company, conducted the first of a planned series of explosive removal of existing pillars in their underground mining operations. The purpose of this operation is to evaluate the effectiveness of pillar rubbilization and roof collapse for planned in-situ leaching of the copper ore from the rock mass. This type of seismic source is unique in that a large, delay fired, explosive source was expected to be followed by collapse of the rock immediately above the explosion into the void created. Characterization of this type of mining source is of interest to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) R&D Seismic Program due to its unique properties. These include the controlled nature of the source in time, location, and magnitude, the fact that the source is located in an active region of underground mining, and that natural collapse of large portions of this mine have occurred in the recent past. The Mine operator is concerned with the characterization of the vibration induced by both the explosive and implosive components of the procedure and determination of the depth to which chimneying of the roof proceeded. This report will document: The reasons for conducting both the explosively induced collapse and the Los Alamos National Laboratory CTBT R&D Experimental Field Program experiment; The local and regional seismic, acoustic, and videographic data acquired; Analysis of the explosion/collapse seismic signal generated; Analysis and location of the aftershocks associated with the collapse; and Conclusions made concerning this type of mining explosion in relation to verification of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  2. Analogue of Caldera Dynamics: the Controlled Salt Cavern Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, P. G.; Rohmer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Caldera collapse (or pit-crater) dynamics are inferred from geological observations and laboratory experiments. Here, we present an analogue of caldera collapse at field scale and possible analogy with large scale caldera dynamics. Through an original exploitation technique in sedimentary environment, a salt layer is emptied, leaving a brine-filled cavern, which eventually collapses after overburden falls into the cavern. Such a collapse was monitored in East France by many instruments (including GPS, extensometers, geophones, broadband seismological sensors, tiltmeter, gravity meter, … ), which allowed us to describe mechanisms of the collapse. Micro-seismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered micro-seismicity observed in the vicinity of this underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M~7.2 earthquake, which occurred ~12000 kilometres away. High-dynamic broadband records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency micro-seismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. Stress oscillations due to the seismic waves may have exceeded the strength required for the rupture of the complex media made of brine and rock triggering micro-earthquakes and leading to damage of the overburden and eventually collapse of the salt cavern. The increment of stress necessary for the failure of a Dolomite layer is of the same order or magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude

  3. An Elastoplastic Model for Partially Saturated Collapsible Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianjun

    2016-02-01

    A unified elastoplastic model for describing the stress-strain behavior of partially saturated collapsible rocks is proposed. The elastic-plastic response due to loading and unloading is captured using bounding surface plasticity. The coupling effect of hydraulic and mechanical responses is addressed by applying the effective stress concept. Special attention is paid to the rock-fluid characteristic curve (RFCC), effective stress parameter, and suction hardening. A wide range of saturation degree is considered. The characteristics of mechanical behavior in partially saturated collapsible rocks are captured for all cases considered.

  4. Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum in AdS gravitational collapse.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, H P; Pando Zayas, Leopoldo A; Rodrigues, E L

    2013-08-01

    We study black hole formation during the gravitational collapse of a massless scalar field in asymptotically D-dimensional anti-de Sitter AdS(D) spacetimes for D = 4, 5. We conclude that spherically symmetric gravitational collapse in asymptotically AdS spaces is turbulent and characterized by a Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum. Namely, we find that after an initial period of weakly nonlinear evolution, there is a regime where the power spectrum of the Ricci scalar evolves as ω(-s) with the frequency, ω, and s ≈ 1.7 ± 0.1.

  5. Trumpet solution from spherical gravitational collapse with puncture gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Thierfelder, Marcus; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Hilditch, David; Bruegmann, Bernd; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the stationary end state obtained by evolving a collapsing spherical star with the gauges routinely adopted to study puncture black holes. We compare the end state of the collapse with the trumpet solution found in the evolution of a single wormhole slice and show that the two solutions closely agree. We demonstrate that the agreement is caused by the use of the Gamma-driver shift condition, which allows the matter to fall inwards into a region of spacetime that is not resolved by the numerical grid, and which simultaneously finds the stationary coordinates of the trumpet outside the matter.

  6. Spontaneous symmetry breaking and collapse in bosonic Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzarella, Giovanni; Salasnich, Luca

    2010-09-15

    We investigate an attractive atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) trapped by a double-well potential in the axial direction and by a harmonic potential in the transverse directions. We obtain numerically a quantum phase diagram which includes all the three relevant phases of the system: Josephson, spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB), and collapse. We consider also the coherent dynamics of the BEC and calculate the frequency of population-imbalance mode in the Josephson phase and in the SSB phase up to the collapse. We show that these phases can be observed by using ultracold vapors of {sup 7}Li atoms in a magneto-optical trap.

  7. Source Analysis of the Crandall Canyon, Utah, Mine Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Dreger, D S; Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2008-02-28

    Analysis of seismograms from a magnitude 3.9 seismic event on August 6, 2007 in central Utah reveals an anomalous radiation pattern that is contrary to that expected for a tectonic earthquake, and which is dominated by an implosive component. The results show the seismic event is best modeled as a shallow underground collapse. Interestingly, large transverse surface waves require a smaller additional non-collapse source component that represents either faulting in the rocks above the mine workings or deformation of the medium surrounding the mine.

  8. 4f electron delocalization and volume collapse in praseodymium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Joseph A.; Moore, Kevin T.; Lipp, Magnus J.; Mattern, Brian A.; Pacold, Joseph I.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Chow, Paul; Rod, Eric; Xiao, Yuming; Evans, William J.

    2012-04-17

    We study the pressure evolution of the 4f electrons in elemental praseodymium metal compressed through several crystallographic phases, including the large volume-collapse transition at 20 GPa. Using resonant x-ray emission, we directly and quantitatively measure the development of multiple electronic configurations with differing 4f occupation numbers, the key quantum observable related to the delocalization of the strongly correlated 4f electrons. These results provide a high-fidelity test of prior predictions by dynamical mean-field theory, and support the hypothesis of a strong connection between electronic and structural degrees of freedom at the volume-collapse transition.

  9. ENSO drove 2500-year collapse of eastern Pacific coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Toth, Lauren T; Aronson, Richard B; Vollmer, Steven V; Hobbs, Jennifer W; Urrego, Dunia H; Cheng, Hai; Enochs, Ian C; Combosch, David J; van Woesik, Robert; Macintyre, Ian G

    2012-07-01

    Cores of coral reef frameworks along an upwelling gradient in Panamá show that reef ecosystems in the tropical eastern Pacific collapsed for 2500 years, representing as much as 40% of their history, beginning about 4000 years ago. The principal cause of this millennial-scale hiatus in reef growth was increased variability of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its coupling with the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The hiatus was a Pacific-wide phenomenon with an underlying climatology similar to probable scenarios for the next century. Global climate change is probably driving eastern Pacific reefs toward another regional collapse.

  10. Oriented perforation to prevent casing collapse for highly inclined wells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Nobuo; McLeod, H.

    1995-09-01

    This paper shows that the oriented-perforation technique is an effective method to control casing collapse problems for highly inclined wells. Three wells were perforated with 180{degree} phasing in the maximum in-situ stress direction. These three wells did not experience casing collapse, while surrounding wells with the standard perforation technique did. Two of the three wells with oriented perforations experienced significantly reduced sand problems. Numerical analysis was conducted to compare how effective orient perforations were in minimizing casing failure when a sheared zone was created around a well during drilling and production.

  11. Thermoinertial bouncing of a relativistic collapsing sphere: A numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A.; Barreto, W.

    2006-01-15

    We present a numerical model of a collapsing radiating sphere, whose boundary surface undergoes bouncing due to a decreasing of its inertial mass density (and, as expected from the equivalence principle, also of the 'gravitational' force term) produced by the 'inertial' term of the transport equation. This model exhibits for the first time the consequences of such an effect, and shows that under physically reasonable conditions this decreasing of the gravitational term in the dynamic equation may be large enough as to revert the collapse and produce a bouncing of the boundary surface of the sphere.

  12. Simulation of the collapse and dissipation of Langmuir wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. L.; Winglee, R. M.; Robinson, P. A.; Glanz, J.; Goldman, M. V.

    1990-01-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations and Zakharov's partial differential equations (PDEs) are used to investigate the collapse of isolated Langmuir wave packets in two dimensions. Collapse thresholds are determined numerically, and the roles of enhanced Langmuir wave damping and nonlinearities not included in the standard Zakharov equations are discussed. The Langmuir wave and ion dynamics in PIC simulations are compared with the predictions of PDE simulations incorporating enhanced Langmuir damping. Electron heating and coherent acceleration in the PIC simulations are discussed and compared with predictions of the transit-time theory.

  13. Critical Phenomena in the Aspherical Collapse of Radiation Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarte, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    We study critical phenomena in the gravitational collapse of radiation fluids. We perform numerical simulations in both spherical symmetry and axisymmetry, and observe critical scaling in both supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of a black hole, and subcritical evolutions, in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space. We identify the critical solution in spherically symmetric collapse, and study the approach to this critical solution in the absence of spherical symmetry. Our simulations are preformed with an unconstrained evolution code, implemented in spherical polar coordinates, and adopting ``moving-puncture'' coordinates. Supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHY-1402780 to Bowdoin College.

  14. Abrupt climate change and collapse of deep-sea ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasuhara, Moriaki; Cronin, T. M.; Demenocal, P.B.; Okahashi, H.; Linsley, B.K.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the deep-sea fossil record of benthic ostracodes during periods of rapid climate and oceanographic change over the past 20,000 years in a core from intermediate depth in the northwestern Atlantic. Results show that deep-sea benthic community "collapses" occur with faunal turnover of up to 50% during major climatically driven oceanographic changes. Species diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index falls from 3 to as low as 1.6 during these events. Major disruptions in the benthic communities commenced with Heinrich Event 1, the Inter-Aller??d Cold Period (IACP: 13.1 ka), the Younger Dryas (YD: 12.9-11.5 ka), and several Holocene Bond events when changes in deep-water circulation occurred. The largest collapse is associated with the YD/IACP and is characterized by an abrupt two-step decrease in both the upper North Atlantic Deep Water assemblage and species diversity at 13.1 ka and at 12.2 ka. The ostracode fauna at this site did not fully recover until ???8 ka, with the establishment of Labrador Sea Water ventilation. Ecologically opportunistic slope species prospered during this community collapse. Other abrupt community collapses during the past 20 ka generally correspond to millennial climate events. These results indicate that deep-sea ecosystems are not immune to the effects of rapid climate changes occurring over centuries or less. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  15. Electromagnetic Powers Of Merging And Collapsing Compact Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2011-09-01

    Understanding possible EM signatures of the merging and collapsing compact object is important for identifying possible sources of LIGO & LISA signals. We estimate the electromagnetic powers that can be produced as a precursor to the merger, as a prompt emission during the collapse of a NS and at the spin-down stage of the resulting Kerr BH. In particular, we find exact non-linear time-dependent structure of magnetospheres of spinning and collapsing NSs in Schwarzschild geometry. Based on this solution, we argue that the collapse of a NS into the BH happens smoothly, without natural formation of current sheets or other dissipative structures on the open field lines and, thus, does not allow the magnetic field to become disconnected from the star and escape to infinity. Thus, as long as an isolated Kerr BH can produce plasma and currents, it does not lose its open magnetic field lines, its magnetospheric structure evolved towards a split monopole and the BH spins down electromagnetically (the closed field lines get absorbed by the hole). The "no hair theorem", which assumes that the outside medium is a vacuum, is not applicable in this case: highly conducting plasma introduces a topological constraint forbidding the disconnection of the magnetic field lines from the BH. Eventually, a single random large scale spontaneous reconnection event will lead to magnetic field release, shutting down the BH engine forever.

  16. Simulating the Entropic Collapse of Coarse-Grained Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Bertrand, Martin; de Haan, Hendrick W.; Harden, James L.; Slater, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Depletion forces play a role in the compaction and decompaction of chromosomal material in simple cells, but it has remained debatable whether they are sufficient to account for chromosomal collapse. We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, which reveal that depletion-induced attraction is sufficient to cause the collapse of a flexible chain of large structural monomers immersed in a bath of smaller depletants. These simulations use an explicit coarse-grained computational model that treats both the supercoiled DNA structural monomers and the smaller protein crowding agents as combinatorial, truncated Lennard-Jones spheres. By presenting a simple theoretical model, we quantitatively cast the action of depletants on supercoiled bacterial DNA as an effective solvent quality. The rapid collapse of the simulated flexible chromosome at the predicted volume fraction of depletants is a continuous phase transition. Additional physical effects to such simple chromosome models, such as enthalpic interactions between structural monomers or chain rigidity, are required if the collapse is to be a first-order phase transition. PMID:25692586

  17. Computational Astrophysics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, dominating the production of elements between oxygen and iron and likely responsible for half the elements heavier than iron. They result from the death throes of massive stars, beginning with stellar core collapse and the formation of a supernova shock wave that must ultimately disrupt such stars. Past, first-principles models most often led to the frustrating conclusion the shock wave stalls and is not revived, at least given the physics included in the models. However, recent progress in the context of two-dimensional, first-principles supernova models is reversing this trend, giving us hope we are on the right track toward a solution of one of the most important problems in astrophysics. Core collapse supernovae are multi-physics events, involving general relativity, hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics, nuclear burning, and radiation transport in the form of neutrinos, along with a detailed nuclear physics equation of state and neutrino weak interactions. Computationally, simulating these catastrophic stellar events presents an exascale computing challenge. I will discuss past models and milestones in core collapse supernova theory, the state of the art, and future requirements. In this context, I will present the results and plans of the collaboration led by ORNL and the University of Tennessee.

  18. Revisit pattern collapse for 14nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kenji; Higgins, Craig; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Hartley, John G.; Goldfarb, Dario L.; Kato, Hirokazu; Petrillo, Karen; Colburn, Matthew E.; Schefske, Jeffrey; Wood, Obert; Wallow, Thomas I.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we have analyzed new data sets of pattern collapse obtained from 300 mm wafers which were coated with a process-of-record (POR) EUV resist and exposed by an EUV Alpha-Demo tool (ADT) and a Vistec VB300 e-beam exposure tool. In order to minimize any processing effects on pattern collapse, the same POR EUV track process was applied to both exposures. A key metric of our analysis is the critical aspect ratio of collapse (CARC)1. We found that CARC of POR EUV resist decreases monotonically with spacing, in the range of ~1.8-2.2 at ~32-54 nm space (60-80 nm pitch) for EUV, and ~1.5-2.1 at ~16-50 nm space (~46-80 nm pitch) for e-beam. We also estimated an apparent Young's modulus of POR EUV resist by fitting a collapse model2 to the CARC data. The resulting modulus ~0.30 GPa was much smaller than the modulus of typical polymer glasses (~1.0-5.0 GPa). Our findings suggest that due to a significant decrease of resist mechanical properties and a sharp increase in capillary force, it will be challenging to maintain aspect ratios above 2.0 for sub-30 nm resist spacing (sub-60 nm pitches). For patterning at these dimensions, alternate processes and materials will become increasingly necessary, e.g. surfactant-based rinse solutions3 and other approaches.

  19. Excision technique in constrained formulations of Einstein equations: collapse scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero-Carrión, I.; Vasset, N.; Novak, J.; Jaramillo, J. L.

    2015-04-01

    We present a new excision technique used in constrained formulations of Einstein equations to deal with black hole in numerical simulations. We show the applicability of this scheme in several scenarios. In particular, we present the dynamical evolution of the collapse of a neutron star to a black hole, using the CoCoNuT code and this excision technique.

  20. 8. COLLAPSED AND SCATTERED BUILDING ON FLOOR OF PIT, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. COLLAPSED AND SCATTERED BUILDING ON FLOOR OF PIT, WITH PILE OF RHYOLITE BOULDERS IN BACKGROUND, VIEW TO SOUTH - Iron Springs Quarry, 150 feet west of Grand Loop Road, 20 miles east of U.S. Highway 287, West Thumb, Teton County, WY

  1. 6. Remains Beneath Collapsed Engine House Roof, Showing Foundation Timbers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Remains Beneath Collapsed Engine House Roof, Showing Foundation Timbers and Automobile Engine Connected to Pulley Wheel, Looking Southwest - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  2. Metal Ion Dependence of Cooperative Collapse Transitions in RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam, Sarvin; Caliskan, Gokhan; Chauhan, Seema; Hyeon, Changbong; Briber, R.M.; Thirumalai, D.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2010-10-12

    Positively charged counterions drive RNA molecules into compact configurations that lead to their biologically active structures. To understand how the valence and size of the cations influences the collapse transition in RNA, small-angle X-ray scattering was used to follow the decrease in the radius of gyration (R{sub g}) of the Azoarcus and Tetrahymena ribozymes in different cations. Small, multivalent cations induced the collapse of both ribozymes more efficiently than did monovalent ions. Thus, the cooperativity of the collapse transition depends on the counterion charge density. Singular value decomposition of the scattering curves showed that folding of the smaller and more thermostable Azoarcus ribozyme is well described by two components, whereas collapse of the larger Tetrahymena ribozyme involves at least one intermediate. The ion-dependent persistence length, extracted from the distance distribution of the scattering vectors, shows that the Azoarcus ribozyme is less flexible at the midpoint of transition in low-charge-density ions than in high-charge-density ions. We conclude that the formation of sequence-specific tertiary interactions in the Azoarcus ribozyme overlaps with neutralization of the phosphate charge, while tertiary folding of the Tetrahymena ribozyme requires additional counterions. Thus, the stability of the RNA structure determines its sensitivity to the valence and size of the counterions.

  3. 23. VIEW SHOWING HIGH WATER IN ROWDY CREEK WITH COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW SHOWING HIGH WATER IN ROWDY CREEK WITH COLLAPSED SECTION IN CREEK, LOOKING NORTH TO SOUTH FROM END OF UNCOLLAPSED SECTION Winter 1931-32 - Rowdy Creek Bridge, Spanning Rowdy Creek at Fred Haight Drive, Smith River, Del Norte County, CA

  4. European Neolithic societies showed early warning signals of population collapse

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Sean S.; Haas, W. Randall; Shennan, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems on the verge of major reorganization—regime shift—may exhibit declining resilience, which can be detected using a collection of generic statistical tests known as early warning signals (EWSs). This study explores whether EWSs anticipated human population collapse during the European Neolithic. It analyzes recent reconstructions of European Neolithic (8–4 kya) population trends that reveal regime shifts from a period of rapid growth following the introduction of agriculture to a period of instability and collapse. We find statistical support for EWSs in advance of population collapse. Seven of nine regional datasets exhibit increasing autocorrelation and variance leading up to collapse, suggesting that these societies began to recover from perturbation more slowly as resilience declined. We derive EWS statistics from a prehistoric population proxy based on summed archaeological radiocarbon date probability densities. We use simulation to validate our methods and show that sampling biases, atmospheric effects, radiocarbon calibration error, and taphonomic processes are unlikely to explain the observed EWS patterns. The implications of these results for understanding the dynamics of Neolithic ecosystems are discussed, and we present a general framework for analyzing societal regime shifts using EWS at large spatial and temporal scales. We suggest that our findings are consistent with an adaptive cycling model that highlights both the vulnerability and resilience of early European populations. We close by discussing the implications of the detection of EWS in human systems for archaeology and sustainability science. PMID:27573833

  5. Response of an arctic predator guild to collapsing lemming cycles.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Niels M; Ims, Rolf A; Høye, Toke T; Gilg, Olivier; Hansen, Lars H; Hansen, Jannik; Lund, Magnus; Fuglei, Eva; Forchhammer, Mads C; Sittler, Benoit

    2012-11-01

    Alpine and arctic lemming populations appear to be highly sensitive to climate change, and when faced with warmer and shorter winters, their well-known high-amplitude population cycles may collapse. Being keystone species in tundra ecosystems, changed lemming dynamics may convey significant knock-on effects on trophically linked species. Here, we analyse long-term (1988-2010), community-wide monitoring data from two sites in high-arctic Greenland and document how a collapse in collared lemming cyclicity affects the population dynamics of the predator guild. Dramatic changes were observed in two highly specialized lemming predators: snowy owl and stoat. Following the lemming cycle collapse, snowy owl fledgling production declined by 98 per cent, and there was indication of a severe population decline of stoats at one site. The less specialized long-tailed skua and the generalist arctic fox were more loosely coupled to the lemming dynamics. Still, the lemming collapse had noticeable effects on their reproductive performance. Predator responses differed somewhat between sites in all species and could arise from site-specific differences in lemming dynamics, intra-guild interactions or subsidies from other resources. Nevertheless, population extinctions and community restructuring of this arctic endemic predator guild are likely if the lemming dynamics are maintained at the current non-cyclic, low-density state.

  6. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of protostellar collapse: Low-metallicity environments

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo

    2014-05-10

    Among many physical processes involved in star formation, radiation transfer is one of the key processes because it dominantly controls the thermodynamics. Because metallicities control opacities, they are one of the important environmental parameters that affect star formation processes. In this work, I investigate protostellar collapse in solar-metallicity and low-metallicity (Z = 0.1 Z {sub ☉}) environments using three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Because radiation cooling in high-density gas is more effective in low-metallicity environments, first cores are colder and have lower entropies. As a result, first cores are smaller, less massive, and have shorter lifetimes in low-metallicity clouds. Therefore, first cores would be less likely to be found in low-metallicity star forming clouds. This also implies that first cores tend to be more gravitationally unstable and susceptible to fragmentation. The evolution and structure of protostellar cores formed after the second collapse weakly depend on metallicities in the spherical and magnetized models, despite the large difference in the metallicities. Because this is due to the change of the heat capacity by dissociation and ionization of hydrogen, it is a general consequence of the second collapse as long as the effects of radiation cooling are not very large during the second collapse. On the other hand, the effects of different metallicities are more significant in the rotating models without magnetic fields, because they evolve slower than other models and therefore are more affected by radiation cooling.

  7. Exploring the dewetting transition in the hydrophobic collapse of melittin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varilly, Patrick; Patel, Amish J.; Chandler, David

    2011-03-01

    We present our recent results on understanding the hydrophobic collapse of melittin dimers. Melittin dimers have large, complementary hydrophobic patches, and the dimer collapse mechanism involves a dewetting transition [Liu, Huang, Zhou and Berne, Nature 437, 159--162 (2005)]. As a result, melittin has become a model system for studying dewetting transitions in proteins. We apply our recently- developed tools for probing density fluctuations in water [Patel, Varilly and Chandler, JPCB 114, 1632--1637 (2010)] to understand this dewetting transition in terms of free energy surfaces, their bistability and their barrier heights. We show how the hydrophobic character of melittin's tetramerization surface results in an enhanced probability of density depletion next to that surface. When two dimers come together, the density depletion is further enhanced, so that even at large separations, there is a metastable dry phase in the region between the dimers. As the dimers come together, the dry phase is stabilized and eventually the wet phase is destabilized, leading to the collapse of the dimers. We explore how mutations that have been observed to suppress the dewetting transition affect the corresponding free energy surfaces and discuss our ongoing efforts to fully map out the reaction coordinate of melittin collapse.

  8. Meteorological Station, interior with collapsed roof showing remnant wooden equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Meteorological Station, interior with collapsed roof showing remnant wooden equipment switch box on east wall; view southeast - Fort McKinley, Meteorological Station, East side of Weymouth Way, approximately 225 feet south of Cove Side Drive, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  9. Exercise-Associated Collapse in Endurance Events: A Classification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a classification system devised for exercise-associated collapse in endurance events based on casualties observed at six Twin Cities Marathons. Major diagnostic criteria are body temperature and mental status. Management protocol includes fluid and fuel replacement, temperature correction, and leg cramp treatment. (Author/SM)

  10. Modelling Technique for Demonstrating Gravity Collapse Structures in Jointed Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stimpson, B.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a base-friction modeling technique for studying the development of collapse structures in jointed rocks. A moving belt beneath weak material is designed to simulate gravity. A description is given of the model frame construction. (Author/SA)

  11. Numerical simulations of the translation of collapsing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igualada-Villodre, Elena; Fuster, Daniel; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present a numerical method developed to solve the collapse of single non-spherical bubbles in an incompressible liquid. The Gerris software is used to solve for the 3D conservation equations in both phases in a system where the total volume changes in the gas are imposed. The numerical results are used to discriminate various bubble collapse regimes as a function of the collapse intensity and the strength of a non-symmetrical force (e.g. gravity). At low Weber numbers and non-zero Froude numbers, the bubble remains approximately spherical. In this regime the solution numerically obtained is shown to converge in the inviscid case to the theoretical solution. For large Weber numbers, a fast jet breaks the bubble dissipating an important part of energy during the collapse. Interestingly, it is possible to identify regimes for moderate Weber numbers where the initiation of jet formation influences its translational motion without breaking the bubble. In accordance with numerical results, experiments with bubbles generated by water electrolysis subjected to shock waves show that bubbles suffer non-spherical interface deformations. The results of this study may help to further develop medical applications using bubbles as drug-carriers.

  12. Stability of a collapsed scalar field and cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.

    1988-08-15

    The static and asymptotically flat solution to the Einstein-massless-scalar model with spherical symmetry describes the spacetime with a naked singularity when it has a nonvanishing scalar charge. We show that such a solution is unstable against the spherical scalar monopole perturbation. This suggests the validity of the cosmic censorship hypothesis in the spherical collapse of the scalar field.

  13. Gravitational collapse of massless scalar field and cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect

    Goldwirth, D.S.; Piran, T.

    1987-12-15

    We present a numerical study of the gravitational collapse of a massless scalar field. We calculate the future evolution of new initial data, suggested by Christodoulou, and we show that in spite of the original expectations these data lead only to singularities engulfed by an event horizon.

  14. The Influence of Binary Stars on Post-Collapse Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, Rosemary

    2008-05-01

    The results in the N-body simulations in Giersz & Heggie (1996) show that although the masses segregate as expected during core collapse, after core collapse there is self-similar evolution with very little further evidence of mass segregation even though the system has not reached equipartition. Binary stars halt core collapse and it is possible that they also halt the tendency toward equipartition. To investigate this problem, we construct two models. One model is a two-component model which assumes that binary stars form in the region dominated by heavy stars. The other model is a single mass model which assumes that binary stars form only in the region of the core. In both models, when the binary heating term is included, we find the post-collapse evolution to be self-similar. The aim of our work is to combine these two models to form a two-component model which assumes that binary formation only occurs in the core.

  15. European Neolithic societies showed early warning signals of population collapse.

    PubMed

    Downey, Sean S; Haas, W Randall; Shennan, Stephen J

    2016-08-30

    Ecosystems on the verge of major reorganization-regime shift-may exhibit declining resilience, which can be detected using a collection of generic statistical tests known as early warning signals (EWSs). This study explores whether EWSs anticipated human population collapse during the European Neolithic. It analyzes recent reconstructions of European Neolithic (8-4 kya) population trends that reveal regime shifts from a period of rapid growth following the introduction of agriculture to a period of instability and collapse. We find statistical support for EWSs in advance of population collapse. Seven of nine regional datasets exhibit increasing autocorrelation and variance leading up to collapse, suggesting that these societies began to recover from perturbation more slowly as resilience declined. We derive EWS statistics from a prehistoric population proxy based on summed archaeological radiocarbon date probability densities. We use simulation to validate our methods and show that sampling biases, atmospheric effects, radiocarbon calibration error, and taphonomic processes are unlikely to explain the observed EWS patterns. The implications of these results for understanding the dynamics of Neolithic ecosystems are discussed, and we present a general framework for analyzing societal regime shifts using EWS at large spatial and temporal scales. We suggest that our findings are consistent with an adaptive cycling model that highlights both the vulnerability and resilience of early European populations. We close by discussing the implications of the detection of EWS in human systems for archaeology and sustainability science. PMID:27573833

  16. Xylem Wall Collapse in Water-Stressed Pine Needles

    PubMed Central

    Cochard, Hervé; Froux, Fabienne; Mayr, Stefan; Coutand, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Wall reinforcement in xylem conduits is thought to prevent wall implosion by negative pressures, but direct observations of xylem geometry during water stress are still largely lacking. In this study, we have analyzed the changes in xylem geometry during water stress in needles of four pine species (Pinus spp.). Dehydrated needles were frozen with liquid nitrogen, and xylem cross sections were observed, still frozen, with a cryo-scanning electron microscope and an epifluorescent microscope. Decrease in xylem pressure during drought provoked a progressive collapse of tracheids below a specific threshold pressure (Pcollapse) that correlates with the onset of cavitation in the stems. Pcollapse was more negative for species with smaller tracheid diameter and thicker walls, suggesting a tradeoff between xylem efficiency, xylem vulnerability to collapse, and the cost of wall stiffening. Upon severe dehydration, tracheid walls were completely collapsed, but lumens still appeared filled with sap. When dehydration proceeded further, tracheids embolized and walls relaxed. Wall collapse in dehydrated needles was rapidly reversed upon rehydration. We discuss the implications of this novel hydraulic trait on the xylem function and on the understanding of pine water relations. PMID:14657404

  17. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Hix, William Raphael; Bruenn, S. W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of including, and improving, the calculation of neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations by removing, or replacing, each opacity individually, or removing opacities in groups. We find that during core collapse improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei based on the hybrid model, relative to the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for a mean nucleus, plays the most important role of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse leading to larger deleptonization of the collapsing core, without the energy downscattering via non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons required for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from NIS on electrons. For the accretion phase NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by $e^+e^-$-annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear electron capture, $e^+e^-$-annihilation pair emission, and non-isoenergetic scattering on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  18. Spherical collapse model in time varying vacuum cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, Spyros; Plionis, Manolis; Sola, Joan

    2010-10-15

    We investigate the virialization of cosmic structures in the framework of flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker cosmological models, in which the vacuum energy density evolves with time. In particular, our analysis focuses on the study of spherical matter perturbations, as they decouple from the background expansion, 'turn around', and finally collapse. We generalize the spherical collapse model in the case when the vacuum energy is a running function of the Hubble rate, {Lambda}={Lambda}(H). A particularly well-motivated model of this type is the so-called quantum field vacuum, in which {Lambda}(H) is a quadratic function, {Lambda}(H)=n{sub 0}+n{sub 2}H{sup 2}, with n{sub 0{ne}}0. This model was previously studied by our team using the latest high quality cosmological data to constrain its free parameters, as well as the predicted cluster formation rate. It turns out that the corresponding Hubble expansion history resembles that of the traditional {Lambda}CDM cosmology. We use this {Lambda}(t)CDM framework to illustrate the fact that the properties of the spherical collapse model (virial density, collapse factor, etc.) depend on the choice of the considered vacuum energy (homogeneous or clustered). In particular, if the distribution of the vacuum energy is clustered, then, under specific conditions, we can produce more concentrated structures with respect to the homogeneous vacuum energy case.

  19. Allee effects and colony collapse disorder in honey bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a mathematical model to quantify the hypothesis that a major ultimate cause of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in honey bees is the presence of an Allee effect in the growth dynamics of honey bee colonies. In the model, both recruitment of adult bees as well as mortality of adult bees have...

  20. 26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE OF TOP FLOOR OF MILL, ABOVE ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST FROM TOP OF STAIRWAY IN CA-290-25. THE PIPE AT CENTER WAS USED TO SPREAD CRUSHED ORE COMING FROM THE JAW CRUSHER EVENLY TO ALL AREA OF THE ORE BIN BELOW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  1. Time evolution of simple molecules during proto-star collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Acharyya, Kinsuk; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2008-10-01

    We study the formation and evolution of several molecules in a collapsing interstellar cloud using a reasonably large reaction network containing more than four hundred atomic and molecular species. We employ a time dependent, spherically symmetric, hydrodynamics code to follow the hydrodynamic and chemical evolution of the collapsing cloud. The flow is assumed to be self-gravitating. We use two models to study the hydrodynamic evolution: in the first model, we inject matter into an initially low density region and in the second model, we start with a constant density cloud and let it collapse due to self-gravity. We study the evolution of the central core for both the cases. We include the grain chemistry to compute the formation of molecular hydrogen and carried out the effect of gas and grain chemistry at each time step. We follow the collapse for more than 10 14 s (about 3 million years) and present the time evolution of the globally averaged abundances of various simple but biologically important molecules, such as glycine, alanine etc. We compare our results with those obtained from observations and found that for lighter molecules the agreement is generally very good. For complex molecules we tend to under predict the abundances. This indicates that other pathways could be present to form these molecules or more accurate reaction rates were needed.

  2. Unveiling the High Energy Obscured Universe: Hunting Collapsed Objects Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Cocchi, M.; Natalucci, L.; Bassani, L.; Caroli, E.; Stephen, J. B.; Caraveo, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Villa, G.

    2005-01-01

    A large part of energy from space is coming from collapsing stars (SN, Hypernovae) and collapsed stars (black holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs). The peak of their energy release is in the hard-X and gamma-ray wavelengths where photons are insensitive to absorption and can travel from the edge the Universe or the central core of the Galaxy without loosing the primordial information of energy, time signature and polarization. The most efficient process to produce energetic photons is gravitational accretion of matter from a "normal" star onto a collapsed companion (LGxMcollxdMacc/dtx( 1Rdisc)-dMacc/dt x c2), exceeding by far the nuclear reaction capability to generate high energy quanta. Thus our natural laboratory for "in situ" investigations are collapsed objects in which matter and radiation co-exist in extreme conditions of temperature and density due to gravitationally bent geometry and magnetic fields. This is a unique opportunity to study the physics of accretion flows in stellar mass and super-massive Black Holes (SMBHs), plasmoids generated in relativistic jets in galactic microQSOs and AGNs, ionised plasma interacting at the touching point of weakly magnetized NS surface, GRB/Supernovae connection, and the mysterious origins of "dark" GRB and X-ray flash.

  3. Resolving the Formation of Protogalaxies. II.Central Gravitational Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, John H.; Turk, Matthew J.; Abel, Tom

    2007-10-15

    Numerous cosmological hydrodynamic studies have addressed the formation of galaxies. Here we choose to study the first stages of galaxy formation, including non-equilibrium atomic primordial gas cooling, gravity and hydrodynamics. Using initial conditions appropriate for the concordance cosmological model of structure formation, we perform two adaptive mesh refinement simulations of {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}} galaxies at high redshift. The calculations resolve the Jeans length at all times with more than 16 cells and capture over 14 orders of magnitude in length scales. In both cases, the dense, 10{sup 5} solar mass, one parsec central regions are found to contract rapidly and have turbulent Mach numbers up to 4. Despite the ever decreasing Jeans length of the isothermal gas, we only find one site of fragmentation during the collapse. However, rotational secular bar instabilities transport angular momentum outwards in the central parsec as the gas continues to collapse and lead to multiple nested unstable fragments with decreasing masses down to sub-Jupiter mass scales. Although these numerical experiments neglect star formation and feedback, they clearly highlight the physics of turbulence in gravitationally collapsing gas. The angular momentum segregation seen in our calculations plays an important role in theories that form supermassive black holes from gaseous collapse.

  4. Simulating the entropic collapse of coarse-grained chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, Tyler N; Bertrand, Martin; de Haan, Hendrick W; Harden, James L; Slater, Gary W

    2015-02-17

    Depletion forces play a role in the compaction and decompaction of chromosomal material in simple cells, but it has remained debatable whether they are sufficient to account for chromosomal collapse. We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, which reveal that depletion-induced attraction is sufficient to cause the collapse of a flexible chain of large structural monomers immersed in a bath of smaller depletants. These simulations use an explicit coarse-grained computational model that treats both the supercoiled DNA structural monomers and the smaller protein crowding agents as combinatorial, truncated Lennard-Jones spheres. By presenting a simple theoretical model, we quantitatively cast the action of depletants on supercoiled bacterial DNA as an effective solvent quality. The rapid collapse of the simulated flexible chromosome at the predicted volume fraction of depletants is a continuous phase transition. Additional physical effects to such simple chromosome models, such as enthalpic interactions between structural monomers or chain rigidity, are required if the collapse is to be a first-order phase transition. PMID:25692586

  5. A dearth of hurricanes cannot explain Maya collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-12-01

    A thousand years ago the great Maya culture of Central America collapsed. Climate change was one factor that stressed the civilization until it fractured: A prolonged period of intense and persistent drought left the Maya's descendants to carry on without a robust elite urban class.

  6. Collapse of charged scalar field in dilaton gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowska, Anna; Rogatko, Marek; Moderski, Rafal

    2011-04-15

    We elaborated the gravitational collapse of a self-gravitating complex charged scalar field in the context of the low-energy limit of the string theory, the so-called dilaton gravity. We begin with the regular spacetime and follow the evolution through the formation of an apparent horizon and the final central singularity.

  7. Testing gravity-induced collapse models with torsion pendulums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Bassam; Wipf, Christopher; Chen, Yanbei

    2016-03-01

    Wavefunction collapse models have been proposed to resolve the measurement problem in QM. Some, , such as Diosi-Penrose model, are motivated by gravity. We first present the theory of such models, highlighting new results, such as fixing the only free paramater in the model. We then propose torsion pendulums as a promising optomechanical platform to test such models.

  8. Overcoming pattern collapse on e-beam and EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouve, A.; Simon, J.; Pikon, A.; Solak, H.; Vannuffel, C.; Tortai, J.-H.

    2006-03-01

    In this study we investigate the pattern collapse mechanism of dense patterns with resolution under 60nm printed in Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV-IL) and Electron Beam Lithographies (EBL). Pattern collapse occurs when physical properties of the material can't imbalanced the capillary force exerted on the pattern during the drying of the rinse liquid. In former simulation models, the height of the pattern at which collapse occurs (critical height, H c) was predicted using either elastic deformation properties, or plasticizing limit value of the resist. Experimental observations of unstuck patterns, lead us to develop 2 new models considering the adhesion properties of the resist film on the substrate. By comparing simulated to experimental results for varying pattern pitchs printed in 2 Chemically Amplified Resists (CARS), we show that pattern collapse behaviour of EUV-IL and EBL patterns is not only ruled by rigidity or strength of the resist but can be perfectly described with equation defining the unsticking of a non bending pattern. Finally by using surfactinated solution on sub-60nm dense patterns, great improvements in H c values and increase of process window latitude are shown. However, due to larger capillary force, this efficiency decreases with pattern pitch and appears limited on patterns width smaller than 40 nm.

  9. Real time ultrafast spectroscopy of shock front pore collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambir, Selezion A.; Kim, Hackjin; Dlott, Dana D.; Frey, Robert B.

    2001-11-01

    Shock-wave induced nanopore collapse (average diameter 100 nm) at 4.2 GPa in a 3-μm-thick poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) layer is measured in real time using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). Pore collapse is monitored via CARS transitions of a dye probe embedded in the porous medium. A pore collapse time constant of 3 ns in PMMA is in poor agreement with hydrodynamic pore collapse models but in excellent agreement with a viscoplastic model that uses the "shock viscosity" determined from the PMMA viscoelastic response to shock. The shock viscosity is more than 12 orders of magnitude smaller than the ordinary viscosity. A downstream gauge of polycrystalline anthracene monitors changes in the steeply rising shock front (<25 ps rise time) after passing through the porous medium or a scattering medium with 100-nm-diam scatterers. The anthracene is a two-dimensional (2D) shock gauge that provides a time sequence of CARS spectra S(t,λ). The 2D gauge is shown to be capable of discriminating between a shock front that gradually rises with time constant tr or a bunch of steeply rising shocklets with an arrival time spread equal to tr. The transmitted shock front is shown to consist of a bunch of steep shocklets with an arrival time spread of 550 ps.

  10. Key variables influencing patterns of lava dome growth and collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, T.; Elsworth, D.; Voight, B.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Lava domes are conical structures that grow by the infusion of viscous silicic or intermediate composition magma from a central volcanic conduit. Dome growth can be characterized by repeated cycles of growth punctuated by collapse, as the structure becomes oversized for its composite strength. Within these cycles, deformation ranges from slow long term deformation to sudden deep-seated collapses. Collapses may range from small raveling failures to voluminous and fast-moving pyroclastic flows with rapid and long-downslope-reach from the edifice. Infusion rate and magma rheology together with crystallization temperature and volatile content govern the spatial distribution of strength in the structure. Solidification, driven by degassing-induced crystallization of magma leads to the formation of a continuously evolving frictional talus as a hard outer shell. This shell encapsulates the cohesion-dominated soft ductile core. Here we explore the mechanics of lava dome growth and failure using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. This meshless model follows the natural evolution of a brittle carapace formed by loss of volatiles and rheological stiffening and avoids difficulties of hour-glassing and mesh-entangelment typical in meshed models. We test the fidelity of the model against existing experimental and observational models of lava dome growth. The particle-dynamics model follows the natural development of dome growth and collapse which is infeasible using simple analytical models. The model provides insight into the triggers that lead to the transition in collapse mechasnism from shallow flank collapse to deep seated sector collapse. Increase in material stiffness due to decrease in infusion rate results in the transition of growth pattern from endogenous to exogenous. The material stiffness and strength are strongly controlled by the magma infusion rate. Increase in infusion rate decreases the time available for degassing induced crystallization leading to a

  11. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic instabilities in stellar core collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yu-Qing; Lian, Biao

    2012-03-01

    A spherically symmetric hydrodynamic stellar core collapse process under gravity is time-dependent and may become unstable once disturbed. Subsequent non-linear evolutions of such growth of hydrodynamic instabilities may lead to various physical consequences. Specifically for a homologous collapse of a stellar core characterized by a polytropic exponent Γ= 4/3, we examine oscillations and/or instabilities of three-dimensional (3D) general polytropic perturbations. Being incompressible, the radial component of vorticity perturbation always grows unstably during the same homologous core collapse. For compressible 3D perturbations, the polytropic index γ of perturbations can differ from Γ= 4/3 of the general polytropic hydrodynamic background flow, where the background specific entropy is conserved along streamlines and can vary in radius and time. Our model formulation here is more general than previous ones. The Brunt-Väisälä buoyancy frequency ? does not vanish, allowing for the existence of internal gravity g- modes and/or g+ modes, depending on the sign of ? respectively. Eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of various oscillatory and unstable perturbation modes are computed, given asymptotic boundary conditions. As studied in several specialized cases of Goldreich & Weber and of Lou & Cao and Cao & Lou, we further confirm that acoustic p modes and surface f modes remain stable in the current more general situations. In comparison, g- modes and sufficiently high radial order g+ modes are unstable, leading to inevitable convective motions within the collapsing stellar interior; meanwhile, sufficiently low radial order g+ modes remain stably trapped in the collapsing core. Unstable growths of 3D g-mode disturbances are governed dominantly by the angular momentum conservation and modified by the gas pressure restoring force. We note in particular that unstable temporal growths of 3D vortical perturbations exist even when the specific entropy distribution becomes

  12. Pharyngeal wall fold influences on the collapsibility of the pharynx.

    PubMed

    Kairaitis, Kristina

    2012-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a disease that is characterised by recurrent pharyngeal obstruction during sleep. The pharynx is a hollow muscular tube lined with epithelium that performs the competing functions of breathing, where it is required to be open and swallowing where it is required to close. The mechanical process by which these large changes in luminal dimensions occur have not been considered, however in other biological tubes such as the oesophagus and the bronchial airways narrowing and closure occurs via folding of the mucosal surface. The transmural pressure (P) required to collapse a tube is related to the number of folds (n) formed during collapse by the equation P=n(2)-1, so that the more folds formed during narrowing and closure, the greater the transmural pressure required to collapse the tube. In biomechanical models, the bronchial airway is modelled as a 2-layer tube with an inner epithelial lining and an outer layer of muscle. These models predict that fold numbers will be reduced with thickening and stiffening of the outer layer, accompanied by an increase in collapsibility. We hypothesise that, similar to other biological tubes the pharynx narrows and closes via folding of the surface of the tube, and that the pharynx can also be modelled as a 2-layer tube. We further hypothesise that when compared to healthy subjects, subjects with OSA will have less pharyngeal wall folds during narrowing and closure, and that this reduction in fold numbers will contribute to an increase in pharyngeal collapsibility. In the absence of muscle activity, subjects with OSA have increased pharyngeal collapsibility when compared with healthy subjects, supporting an anatomical contribution to pharyngeal collapse. Histopathological studies of the pharyngeal epithelium in subjects with OSA demonstrate that, compared with age matched subjects, there is thickening of the epithelial surface with oedema of the submucosal layer, with a loss of tethering of the

  13. The dynamics of collapsing cores and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keto, Eric; Caselli, Paola; Rawlings, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    Low-mass stars are understood to form by the gravitational collapse of the dense molecular clouds known as starless cores. However, it has proven impossible to use continuum observations to distinguish among the different hypotheses describing the collapse because the predicted density distributions for all spherical self-gravitating clouds are quite similar. However, the predicted velocities are quite different. We use two different molecular line transitions, H2O (110-101) and C18O (1-0), that are excited at different densities, 108 and 103 cm-3, to measure the velocities at large and small radii in the contracting core L1544. We compare the observed spectra against those predicted for several different models of gravitational collapse including the Larson-Penston flow, the inside-out collapse of the singular isothermal sphere, the quasi-equilibrium contraction of an unstable Bonnor- Ebert sphere, and the non-equilibrium collapse of an overdense Bonnor-Ebert sphere. Only the model of the unstable quasi-equilibrium Bonnor-Ebert sphere is able to produce the observed shapes of both spectral lines. With this model, we interpret other molecular line observations of L1544 in the literature to find that the extended inward velocities seen in lines of CS(2-1) and N2H+ are located within the starless core itself, in particular in the region where the density profile follows an inverse square law. If these conclusions were to hold in the analysis of other starless cores, this would imply that the formation of hydrostatic clouds within the turbulent interstellar medium is not only possible but also not exceptional and may be an evolutionary phase in low-mass star formation.

  14. Collapse in High-Grade Stenosis during Pulsatile Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shunichi; Tang, Dalin; Ku, David N.

    It has been hypothesized that blood flow through high grade stenotic arteries may produce conditions in which elastic flow choking may occur. The development of atherosclerotic plaque fracture may be exacerbated by the compressive stresses during collapse. This study explored the effects of pulsatile flow on stenotic flow collapse. Pulsatile flow was produced using a gear pump controlled by a digitized physiologic waveform. Upstream and downstream mean pressures and pulsatile flow rates were measured and digitized. An improved model of arterial stenosis was created using an elastomer with an incremental modulus of elasticity matched to a bovine carotid artery in the relevant range of collapse. Additionally, the model retained a very thick wall in the stenotic region similar to arterial disease. Flow choking was observed for pulsatile pressure drops close to those previously reported for steady flow. The phase difference between flow rate and pressure between upstream and downstream of the stenosis occurred by the compliance of tube and stenosis resistance. For 80% nominal stenosis by diameter and 100+/-30mmHg upstream pressure, collapse occurred for average pulsatile pressure drops of 93mmHg. Pulsatile flow experiments in this model revealed the range of conditions for the flow choking and the paradoxical collapse of the stenosis during systole with expansion during diastole. The stenosis severity was dynamic through the pulse cycle and was significantly greater under flow than the nominal severity. The results indicate that flow choking and stenotic compression may be significant in thick-walled arterial stenoses subjected to pulsatile flow.

  15. Diversity waves in collapse-driven population dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-14

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe collapses of the entire population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is cyclic ‘‘diversity waves’’ triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances are characterized by a bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak - species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies.

  16. Diversity waves in collapse-driven population dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-14

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe collapses of the entire population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g.more » by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is cyclic ‘‘diversity waves’’ triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances are characterized by a bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak - species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies.« less

  17. A COMPARISON OF COLLAPSING AND PRECISE ARRIVAL-TIME MAPPING OF MICROSEISMICITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUTLEDGE, JAMES T.; JONES, ROB H.

    2007-01-05

    In this paper they compare the improvements in microseismic location images obtained using precise arrival times with that obtained by the collapsing technique. They first collapse the initial locations for a hydraulic-fracture data set from the Carthage Cotton Valley gas field, they then use the precise-arrival-time locations as measure for the effectiveness of the collapsing. Finally, they examine the changes when applying collapsing to the precise-arrival-time locations.

  18. Mechanism and prevention of karst collapse near mine areas in China

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Weiguo; Zhao Guirong )

    1988-08-01

    The authors of this article have described essential conditions and environmental forms of collapse in covered karst mine areas in China as well as external causes such as drastic lowering of the ground water surface. The authors present a theory of suction action causing collapse, and an air-charging method to prevent the collapse. The result obtained by this method is favorable.

  19. Neutrinos and nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Fröhlich, C.; Casanova, J.; Hempel, M.; Liebendörfer, M.; Melton, C. A.; Perego, A.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars (M > 8-10 M{sub ⊙}) undergo core collapse at the end of their life and explode as supernova with ~ 10⁵¹ erg of kinetic energy. While the detailed supernova explosion mechanism is still under investigation, reliable nucleosynthesis calculations based on successful explosions are needed to explain the observed abundances in metal-poor stars and to predict supernova yields for galactic chemical evolution studies. To predict nucleosynthesis yields for a large number of progenitor stars, computationally efficient explosion models are required. We model the core collapse, bounce and subsequent explosion of massive stars assuming spherical symmetry and using detailed microphysics and neutrino physics combined with a novel method to artificially trigger the explosion (PUSH). We discuss the role of neutrinos, the conditions in the ejecta, and the resulting nucleosynthesis.

  20. Exercise-associated collapse care matrix in the marathon.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William O

    2007-01-01

    Exercise-associated collapse (EAC) was developed as a marathon collapse classification matrix to speed clinical decision making and improve care. The definition was simply stated as the need for assistance during or immediately after endurance activity that specifically excluded cardiac arrest, insulin shock, anaphylaxis, trauma, skin conditions and orthopedic injuries. The presenting symptoms were neither specific nor sensitive and the initial classification, based on presenting rectal temperature, neurological status and ability to walk, was intended to shape the on-site medical intervention. The treatment of EAC centres on fluid redistribution and replacement to improve cerebral and core organ circulation and body temperature correction if needed. Most runners are discharged from the medical area in the company of another person.

  1. Isolated star formation: from cloud formation to core collapse.

    PubMed

    Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2002-01-01

    The formation of stars is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics, as it underlies many other questions, on scales from the formation of galaxies to the formation of the solar system. The physical processes involve the turbulent behavior of a partially ionized medium containing a non-uniform magnetic field. Current debate centers around the time taken for turbulence to decay and the relative importance of the roles played by magnetic fields and turbulence. Technological advances such as millimeter-wave cameras have made possible observations of the temperature and density profiles, and statistical calculations of the lifetimes, of objects collapsing under their own self-gravity and those on the verge of collapse. Increased computing power allows more complex models to be made that include magnetic and turbulent effects. No current model can reproduce all of the observations. PMID:11778038

  2. Collapse of a hydrophobic polymer in a mixture of denaturants.

    PubMed

    Das, Payel; Xia, Zhen; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-04-16

    The solvent quality of an aqueous mixture of two good solvents, urea and guanidinium chloride (GdmCl), for a hydrophobic polymer was investigated using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A counterintuitive collapse of the polymer was found, suggesting that mixing the two denaturants reduces the solvent quality. This cononsolvency of the polymer in the urea + GdmCl mixture is found to be caused by the preferential adsorption of urea on the polymer. The polymer collapses as a result of indirect long-range interactions between monomers resulting from the presence of urea clouds surrounding them. Surprisingly, urea behaves as the better solvent in the mixture not because there exists a stronger affinity of the polymer for urea. Instead, attractive interactions between two unlike denaturant molecules combined with the direct dispersion interactions of the polymer with both denaturants determine the solvent quality of the mixture.

  3. Wavefunction collapse through backaction of counting weakly interacting photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrell, L. E.

    2016-03-01

    We apply the formalism of quantum measurement theory to the idealized measurement of the position of a particle with an optical interferometer, finding that the backaction of counting entangled photons systematically collapses the particle's wavefunction toward a narrow Gaussian wavepacket at the location xest determined by the measurement without appeal to environmental decoherence or other spontaneous collapse mechanism. Further, the variance in the particle's position, as calculated from the post-measurement wavefunction, agrees precisely with shot-noise limited uncertainty of the measured xest. Both the identification of the absolute square of the particle's initial wavefunction as the probability density for xest and the de Broglie hypothesis emerge as consequences of interpreting the intensity of the optical field as proportional to the probability of detecting a photon. Linear momentum information that is encoded in the particle's initial wavefunction survives the measurement, and the pre-measurement expectation values are preserved in the ensemble average.

  4. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kangil; Sik Yang, Sang E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jong-Soo E-mail: ssyang@ajou.ac.kr; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-06

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  5. Collapse and Reversibility of the Superhydrophobic State on Nanotextured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checco, Antonio; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Tasinkevych, Mykola; Giacomello, Alberto; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2014-05-01

    Superhydrophobic coatings repel liquids by trapping air inside microscopic surface textures. However, the resulting composite interface is prone to collapse under external pressure. Nanometer-size textures should facilitate more resilient coatings owing to geometry and confinement effects at the nanoscale. Here, we use in situ x-ray diffraction to study the collapse of the superhydrophobic state in arrays of ≈20 nm-wide silicon textures with cylindrical, conical, and linear features defined by block-copolymer self-assembly and plasma etching. We reveal that the superhydrophobic state vanishes above critical pressures which depend on texture shape and size. This phenomenon is irreversible for all but the conical surface textures which exhibit a spontaneous, partial reappearance of the trapped gas phase upon liquid depressurization. This process is influenced by the kinetics of gas-liquid exchange.

  6. Coupled dynamics of translation and collapse of acoustically driven microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anil J; Szeri, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Pressure gradients drive the motion of microbubbles relative to liquids in which they are suspended. Examples include the hydrostatic pressure due to a gravitational field, and the pressure gradients in a sound field, useful for acoustic levitation. In this paper, the equations describing the coupled dynamics of radial oscillation and translation of a microbubble are given. The formulation is based on a recently derived expression for the hydrodynamic force on a bubble of changing size in an incompressible liquid [J. Magnaudet and D. Legendre, Phys. Fluids 10, 550-556 (1998)]. The complex interaction between radial and translation dynamics is best understood by examination of the added momentum associated with the liquid motion caused by the moving bubble. Translation is maximized when the bubble collapses violently. The new theory for coupled collapse and translation dynamics is compared to past experiments and to previous theories for decoupled translation dynamics. Special attention is paid to bubbles of relevance in biomedical applications. PMID:12398441

  7. Cellular membrane collapse by atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kangil; Jun Ahn, Hak; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Jae-Ho; Sik Yang, Sang; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane dysfunction caused by air plasma in cancer cells has been studied to exploit atmospheric-pressure plasma jets for cancer therapy. Here, we report that plasma jet treatment of cervical cancer HeLa cells increased electrical conductivity across the cellular lipid membrane and caused simultaneous lipid oxidation and cellular membrane collapse. We made this finding by employing a self-manufactured microelectrode chip. Furthermore, increased roughness of the cellular lipid membrane and sequential collapse of the membrane were observed by atomic force microscopy following plasma jet treatment. These results suggest that the cellular membrane catastrophe occurs via coincident altered electrical conductivity, lipid oxidation, and membrane roughening caused by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet, possibly resulting in cellular vulnerability to reactive species generated from the plasma as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells.

  8. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Studies of Zeolite Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Kargl, Florian; Ward, David; Holliman, Peter; Meneau, Florian

    2009-01-29

    In situ inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) experiments have been used to probe heterogeneity and deformability in zeolte Y as this thermally collapses to a high density amorphous (HDA) aluminosilicate phase. The Landau-Placzek ratio R{sub LP} falls slowly as amorphisation advances, increasing in the later stages of collapse clearly showing how homogeneity improves non-linearly--behaviour linked closely with the decline in molar volume V{sub Molar}. The Brillouin frequency {omega}{sub Q} also decreases with amorphisation in a similar fashion, signifying a non-uniform decrease in the speed of sound v{sub l}. All of these changes with zeolite amorphisation infer formation of an intermediate low density amorphous (LDA) phase. This low entropy or 'perfect glass' has mechanical properties which are closer to the zeolite rather to the HDA glass--notably a very small value of Poisson's Ratio signifying unusually low resistance to deformation.

  9. Kax and kol: Collapse and resilience in lowland Maya civilization

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Nicholas P.; Beach, Timothy P.; Luzzadder-Beach, Sheryl

    2012-01-01

    Episodes of population loss and cultural change, including the famous Classic Collapse, punctuated the long course of Maya civilization. In many cases, these downturns in the fortunes of individual sites and entire regions included significant environmental components such as droughts or anthropogenic environmental degradation. Some afflicted areas remained depopulated for long periods, whereas others recovered more quickly. We examine the dynamics of growth and decline in several areas in the Maya Lowlands in terms of both environmental and cultural resilience and with a focus on downturns that occurred in the Terminal Preclassic (second century Common Era) and Terminal Classic (9th and 10th centuries CE) periods. This examination of available data indicates that the elevated interior areas of the Yucatán Peninsula were more susceptible to system collapse and less suitable for resilient recovery than adjacent lower-lying areas. PMID:22371571

  10. Kax and kol: collapse and resilience in lowland Maya civilization.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Nicholas P; Beach, Timothy P; Luzzadder-Beach, Sheryl

    2012-03-01

    Episodes of population loss and cultural change, including the famous Classic Collapse, punctuated the long course of Maya civilization. In many cases, these downturns in the fortunes of individual sites and entire regions included significant environmental components such as droughts or anthropogenic environmental degradation. Some afflicted areas remained depopulated for long periods, whereas others recovered more quickly. We examine the dynamics of growth and decline in several areas in the Maya Lowlands in terms of both environmental and cultural resilience and with a focus on downturns that occurred in the Terminal Preclassic (second century Common Era) and Terminal Classic (9th and 10th centuries CE) periods. This examination of available data indicates that the elevated interior areas of the Yucatán Peninsula were more susceptible to system collapse and less suitable for resilient recovery than adjacent lower-lying areas.

  11. Formation of cD galaxies and dissipationless collapse.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, N.; Rhee, G.

    There is strong new evidence that first ranked galaxies are aligned with their parent cluster and with the direction of the nearest neighbour cluster (scale 15 h-1Mpc) and that the average ellipticity of first ranked ellipticals is a strongly increasing function of radius. The alignment effect is limited to first ranked galaxies. In hierarchical clustering scenarios like the cold dark matter theory, galactic halos and clusters of galaxies are expected to have moderate asphericity. The authors present numerical results of a study of the dissipationless collapse of moderately aspherical systems. Their results indicate that the central part of the collapsed and virialized system does show the large scale elongation imposed by the initial conditions if the system is prolate. The authors also reproduce the increasing ellipticity as a function of radius that is observed for brightest cluster ellipticals.

  12. Coupled dynamics of translation and collapse of acoustically driven microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anil J; Szeri, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Pressure gradients drive the motion of microbubbles relative to liquids in which they are suspended. Examples include the hydrostatic pressure due to a gravitational field, and the pressure gradients in a sound field, useful for acoustic levitation. In this paper, the equations describing the coupled dynamics of radial oscillation and translation of a microbubble are given. The formulation is based on a recently derived expression for the hydrodynamic force on a bubble of changing size in an incompressible liquid [J. Magnaudet and D. Legendre, Phys. Fluids 10, 550-556 (1998)]. The complex interaction between radial and translation dynamics is best understood by examination of the added momentum associated with the liquid motion caused by the moving bubble. Translation is maximized when the bubble collapses violently. The new theory for coupled collapse and translation dynamics is compared to past experiments and to previous theories for decoupled translation dynamics. Special attention is paid to bubbles of relevance in biomedical applications.

  13. Critical phenomena in the aspherical gravitational collapse of radiation fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Montero, Pedro J.

    2015-12-01

    We study critical phenomena in the gravitational collapse of a radiation fluid. We perform numerical simulations in both spherical symmetry and axisymmetry, and observe critical scaling in both supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of a black hole, and subcritical evolutions, in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space. We identify the critical solution in spherically symmetric collapse, find evidence for its universality, and study the approach to this critical solution in the absence of spherical symmetry. For the cases that we consider, aspherical deviations from the spherically symmetric critical solution decay in damped oscillations in a manner that is consistent with the behavior found by Gundlach in perturbative calculations. Our simulations are performed with an unconstrained evolution code, implemented in spherical polar coordinates, and adopting "moving-puncture" coordinates.

  14. Uniqueness of the equation for quantum state vector collapse.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Angelo; Dürr, Detlef; Hinrichs, Günter

    2013-11-22

    The linearity of quantum mechanics leads, under the assumption that the wave function offers a complete description of reality, to grotesque situations famously known as Schrödinger's cat. Ways out are either adding elements of reality or replacing the linear evolution by a nonlinear one. Models of spontaneous wave function collapses took the latter path. The way such models are constructed leaves the question of whether such models are in some sense unique, i.e., whether the nonlinear equations replacing Schrödinger's equation are uniquely determined as collapse equations. Various people worked on identifying the class of nonlinear modifications of the Schrödinger equation, compatible with general physical requirements. Here we identify the most general class of continuous wave function evolutions under the assumption of no-faster-than-light signaling.

  15. Diversity Waves in Collapse-Driven Population Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-01

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe reduction in size of the population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is characterized by cyclic ''diversity waves'' triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances have bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak--species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies. PMID:26367172

  16. iPTF Discoveries of Recent Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Ferretti, R.; Papadogiannakis, S.; Petrushevska, T.; Fremling, C.; Karamehmetoglu, E.; Nyholm, A.; Roy, R.; Hangard, L.; Horesh, A.; Khazov, D.; Knezevic, S.; Johansson, J.; Leloudas, G.; Manulis, I.; Rubin, A.; Soumagnac, M.; Vreeswijk, P.; Yaron, O.; Bar, I.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S.; Blagorodnova, N.

    2016-05-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (ATel #4807) reports the discovery and classification of the following core-collapse SNe. Our automated candidate vetting to distinguish a real astrophysical source (1.0) from bogus artifacts (0.0) is powered by three generations of machine learning algorithms: RB2 (Brink et al. 2013MNRAS.435.1047B), RB4 (Rebbapragada et al. 2015AAS...22543402R) and RB5 (Wozniak et al. 2013AAS...22143105W).

  17. Characteristic microwave-background distortions from collapsing spherical domain walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Guenter; Notzold, Dirk

    1990-01-01

    The redshift distortion induced by collapsing spherical domain walls is calculated. The most frequent microwave background distortions are found to occur at large angles in the form of blue disks. This is the angular region currently measured by the COBE satellite. COBE could therefore detect signals predicted here for domain walls with surface energy density of the order of MeV. Such values for sigma are proposed in the late-time phase-transition scenario of Hill et al. (1989).

  18. Distributional Enstrophy Dissipation Via the Collapse of Three Point Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoda, Takeshi; Sakajo, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Dissipation of enstrophy in 2D incompressible flows in the zero viscous limit is considered to play a significant role in the emergence of the inertial range corresponding to the forward enstrophy cascade in the energy spectrum of 2D turbulent flows. However, since smooth solutions of the 2D incompressible Euler equations conserve the enstrophy, we need to consider non-smooth inviscid and incompressible flows so that the enstrophy dissipates. Moreover, it is physically uncertain what kind of a flow evolution gives rise to such an anomalous enstrophy dissipation. In this paper, in order to acquire an insight about the singular phenomenon mathematically as well as physically, we consider a dispersive regularization of the 2D Euler equations, known as the Euler-α equations, for the initial vorticity distributions whose support consists of three points, i.e., three α -point vortices, and take the α → 0 limit of its global solutions. We prove with mathematical rigor that, under a certain condition on their vortex strengths, the limit solution becomes a self-similar evolution collapsing to a point followed by the expansion from the collapse point to infinity for a wide range of initial configurations of point vortices. We also find that the enstrophy always dissipates in the sense of distributions at the collapse time. This indicates that the triple collapse is a mechanism for the anomalous enstrophy dissipation in non-smooth inviscid and incompressible flows. Furthermore, it is an interesting example elucidating the emergence of the irreversibility of time in a Hamiltonian dynamical system.

  19. Gravitational wave extraction in simulations of rotating stellar core collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Reisswig, C.; Ott, C. D.; Sperhake, U.; Schnetter, E.

    2011-03-15

    We perform simulations of general relativistic rotating stellar core collapse and compute the gravitational waves (GWs) emitted in the core-bounce phase of three representative models via multiple techniques. The simplest technique, the quadrupole formula (QF), estimates the GW content in the spacetime from the mass-quadrupole tensor only. It is strictly valid only in the weak-field and slow-motion approximation. For the first time, we apply GW extraction methods in core collapse that are fully curvature based and valid for strongly radiating and highly relativistic sources. These techniques are not restricted to weak-field and slow-motion assumptions. We employ three extraction methods computing (i) the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar {Psi}{sub 4}, (ii) Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief master functions, and (iii) Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) allowing for the extraction of GWs at future null infinity, where the spacetime is asymptotically flat and the GW content is unambiguously defined. The latter technique is the only one not suffering from residual gauge and finite-radius effects. All curvature-based methods suffer from strong nonlinear drifts. We employ the fixed-frequency integration technique as a high-pass waveform filter. Using the CCE results as a benchmark, we find that finite-radius NP extraction yields results that agree nearly perfectly in phase, but differ in amplitude by {approx}1%-7% at core bounce, depending on the model. Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli-Moncrief waveforms, while, in general, agreeing in phase, contain spurious high-frequency noise of comparable amplitudes to those of the relatively weak GWs emitted in core collapse. We also find remarkably good agreement of the waveforms obtained from the QF with those obtained from CCE. The results from QF agree very well in phase and systematically underpredict peak amplitudes by {approx}5%-11%, which is comparable to the NP results and is certainly within the uncertainties associated with core collapse

  20. Stellar collapse and the formation of black holes.

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, C. L.; Dupuis, R.

    2003-01-01

    We review the engines behind neutrino-driven supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. Combined with our understanding of the convection-enhanced, neutrino-driven supernova mechanism, the stellar collapse can explain all of the supernova-like explosions observed from normal supernovae, to weak explosions and jet-like hypernovae. Combining this theoretical understanding with observations suggests that the collapsar rate is roughly 1/1000th that of normal supernovae.

  1. Collapsing ring model of the origin of the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenker, L.D.

    1988-12-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on the origin of the solar systems: derivation of candidate angular momentum transfer equations; dust ring identified; classic accretional problems in planetary formation; formation of the outer planets; outer solar system satellites; rock rings; comets; the asteroids; formation of the inner planets; meteoric formation processes; formation of the inner planetary satellites; the moon facilitated life on earth; origin of the sun; and residual evidence of the collapsing ring configuration.

  2. Viscosity and Rotation in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot; Burrows, Adam

    2005-02-01

    We construct models of core-collapse supernovae in one spatial dimension, including rotation, angular momentum transport, and viscous dissipation employing an α-prescription. We compare the evolution of a fiducial 11 Msolar nonrotating progenitor with its evolution when including a wide range of imposed initial rotation profiles (1.25scollapse approach Keplerian (P0~1 s). Under the assumption of strict angular momentum conservation, all models in this range leave behind neutron stars with spin periods <~10 ms, shorter than those of most radio pulsars but similar to those expected theoretically for magnetars at birth. A fraction of the gravitational binding energy of collapse is stored in the free energy of differential rotation. This energy source may be tapped by viscous processes, providing a mechanism for energy deposition that is not strongly coupled to the mass accretion rate through the stalled supernova shock. This effect yields qualitatively new dynamics in models of supernovae. We explore several potential mechanisms for viscosity in the core-collapse environment: neutrino viscosity, turbulent viscosity caused by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and turbulent viscosity by entropy- and composition gradient-driven convection. We argue that the MRI is the most effective. We find for rotation periods in the range P0<~5 s and a range of viscous stresses that the postbounce dynamics is significantly affected by the inclusion of this extra energy deposition mechanism; in several cases we obtain strong supernova explosions.

  3. Quantum Superposition, Collapse, and the Default Specification Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhah Shirazi, Armin

    2014-03-01

    Quantum Superposition and collapse lie at the heart of the difficulty in understanding what quantum mechanics is exactly telling us about reality. We present here a principle which permits one to formulate a simple and general mathematical model that abstracts these features out of quantum theory. A precise formulation of this principle in terms of a set-theoretic axiom added to standard set theory may directly connect the foundations of physics to the foundations of mathematics.

  4. Perturbation analysis of a general polytropic homologously collapsing stellar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Lou, Yu-Qing

    2009-12-01

    For dynamic background models of Goldreich & Weber and Lou & Cao, we examine three-dimensional perturbation properties of oscillations and instabilities in a general polytropic homologously collapsing stellar core of a relativistically hot medium with a polytropic index γ = 4/3. Perturbation behaviours, especially internal gravity g modes, depend on the variation of specific entropy in the collapsing core. Among possible perturbations, we identify acoustic p modes and surface f modes as well as internal gravity g+ and g- modes. As in stellar oscillations of a static star, we define g+ and g- modes by the sign of the Brunt-Väisälä buoyancy frequency squared for a collapsing stellar core. A new criterion for the onset of instabilities is established for a homologous stellar core collapse. We demonstrate that the global energy criterion of Chandrasekhar is insufficient to warrant the stability of general polytropic equilibria. We confirm the acoustic p-mode stability of Goldreich & Weber, even though their p-mode eigenvalues appear in systematic errors. Unstable modes include g- modes and sufficiently high-order g+ modes, corresponding to core instabilities. Such instabilities occur before the stellar core bounce, in contrast to instabilities in other models of supernova (SN) explosions. The breakdown of spherical symmetry happens earlier than expected in numerical simulations so far. The formation and motion of the central compact object are speculated to be much affected by such g-mode instabilities. By estimates of typical parameters, unstable low-order l = 1 g-modes may produce initial kicks of the central compact object. Other high-order and high-degree unstable g modes may shred the nascent neutron core into pieces without an eventual compact remnant (e.g. SN 1987A). Formation of binary pulsars and planets around neutron stars might originate from unstable l = 2 g-modes and high-order high-degree g modes, respectively.

  5. Diversity Waves in Collapse-Driven Population Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-01

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe reduction in size of the population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is characterized by cyclic ''diversity waves'' triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances have bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak--species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies.

  6. Numerical study of rotating interstellar clouds: equilibrium and collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1980-06-01

    Equilibrium and collapse of rotating, axisymmetric, idealized interstellar gas clouds is calculated with a 2D hydrodynamics code. The hydrodynamics features an improved angular momentum advection algorithm. Angular momentum is advected consistently with mass by deriving angular momentum fluxes from mass fluxes and the local distribution of specific angular momentum. Local conservation is checked by a graph of mass versus specific angular momentum for the cloud as a whole.

  7. Multidimensional, multiphysics simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Hix, William Raphael

    2008-01-01

    CHIMERA is a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code designed to study core-collapse supernovae. The code is made up of three essentially independent parts: a hydrodynamics module, a nuclear burning module, and a neutrino transport solver combined within an operator-split approach. We review the code s architecture and some recently improved implementations used in the code. We also briefly discuss preliminary results obtained with the code in three spatial dimensions.

  8. Multidimensional, multiphysics simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Hix, William Raphael

    2008-01-01

    CHIMERA is a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code designed to study core-collapse supernovae. The code is made up of three essentially independent parts: a hydrodynamics module, a nuclear burning module, and a neutrino transport solver combined within an operator-split approach. We review the code's architecture and some recently improved implementations used in the code. We also briefly discuss preliminary results obtained with the code in three spatial dimensions.

  9. Weak-interaction processes in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Langanke, K.

    2015-02-24

    Weak interaction processes play an important role for the dynamics of a core-collapse supernova. Due to progress of nuclear modeling and constrained by data it has been possible to improve the rates of these processes for supernova conditions decisively. This manuscript describes the recent advances and the current status in deriving electron capture rates on nuclei and of inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering for applications in supernova simulations and briefly discusses their impact on such studies.

  10. Shear-Induced Collapse in a Lyotropic Lamellar Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Porcar, L.; Warr, G.G.; Hamilton, W.A.; Butler, P.D.

    2005-08-12

    An entropically stabilized cetylpyridinium chloride, hexanol, and heavy brine lyotropic lamellar phase subjected to shear flow has been observed here by small angle neutron scattering to undergo collapse of smectic order above a threshold shear rate. The results are compared with theories predicting that such a lamellar phase sheared above a critical rate should lose its stability by a loss of resistance to compression due to the suppression of membrane fluctuations.

  11. Diversity Waves in Collapse-Driven Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe reduction in size of the population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is characterized by cyclic ‘‘diversity waves’’ triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances have bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak - species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies. PMID:26367172

  12. Formation of Kuiper Belt Binaries by Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Youdin, Andrew N.; Richardson, Derek C.

    2010-09-01

    A large fraction of ~100 km class low-inclination objects in the classical Kuiper Belt (KB) are binaries with comparable masses and a wide separation of components. A favored model for their formation is that they were captured during the coagulation growth of bodies in the early KB. However, recent studies have suggested that large, gsim100 km objects can rapidly form in the protoplanetary disks when swarms of locally concentrated solids collapse under their own gravity. Here, we examine the possibility that KB binaries formed during gravitational collapse when the excess of angular momentum prevented the agglomeration of available mass into a solitary object. We find that this new mechanism provides a robust path toward the formation of KB binaries with observed properties, and can explain wide systems such as 2001 QW322 and multiples such as (47171) 1999 TC36. Notably, the gravitational collapse is capable of producing ~100% binary fraction for a wide range of the swarm's initial angular momentum values. The binary components have similar masses (~80% have a secondary-over-primary radius ratio >0.7) and their separation ranges from ~1000 to ~100,000 km. The binary orbits have eccentricities from e = 0 to ~1, with the majority having e < 0.6. The binary orbit inclinations with respect to the initial angular momentum of the swarm range from i = 0 to ~90°, with most cases having i < 50°. The total binary mass represents a characteristic fraction of the collapsing swarm's total initial mass, M tot, suggesting M tot equivalent to that of a radius ~100-250 km compact object. Our binary formation mechanism also implies that the primary and secondary components in each binary pair should have identical bulk composition, which is consistent with the current photometric data. We discuss the applicability of our results to the Pluto-Charon, Orcus-Vanth, (617) Patroclus-Menoetius, and (90) Antiope binary systems.

  13. The rp-Process in Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, Shinya

    2006-07-12

    Recent hydrodynamic simulations of core-collapse supernovae with accurate neutrino transport suggest that the bulk of the neutrino-heated ejecta is proton rich, in which the production of some interesting proton-rich nuclei is expected. However, there are a number of waiting point nuclei with the {beta}+-lives of a few minutes, which prevent the production of heavy proton-rich nuclei beyond iron in explosive events such as core-collapse supernovae. In this study, it is shown that the rapid proton-capture (rp) process takes place by bypassing these waiting points via neutron-capture reactions even in the proton-rich environment, if there is an intense neutrino flux as expected during the early phase of the neutrino-driven winds of core-collapse supernovae. The nucleosynthesis calculations imply that the neutrino-driven winds can be potentially the origin of light p-nuclei including 92,94Mo and 96,98Ru, which cannot be explained by other astrophysical sites.

  14. Landscape structure and the genetic effects of a population collapse.

    PubMed

    Caplins, Serena A; Gilbert, Kimberly J; Ciotir, Claudia; Roland, Jens; Matter, Stephen F; Keyghobadi, Nusha

    2014-12-01

    Both landscape structure and population size fluctuations influence population genetics. While independent effects of these factors on genetic patterns and processes are well studied, a key challenge is to understand their interaction, as populations are simultaneously exposed to habitat fragmentation and climatic changes that increase variability in population size. In a population network of an alpine butterfly, abundance declined 60-100% in 2003 because of low over-winter survival. Across the network, mean microsatellite genetic diversity did not change. However, patch connectivity and local severity of the collapse interacted to determine allelic richness change within populations, indicating that patch connectivity can mediate genetic response to a demographic collapse. The collapse strongly affected spatial genetic structure, leading to a breakdown of isolation-by-distance and loss of landscape genetic pattern. Our study reveals important interactions between landscape structure and temporal demographic variability on the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of populations. Projected future changes to both landscape and climate may lead to loss of genetic variability from the studied populations, and selection acting on adaptive variation will likely occur within the context of an increasing influence of genetic drift.

  15. Understanding pattern collapse in photolithography process due to capillary forces.

    PubMed

    Chini, S Farshid; Amirfazli, A

    2010-08-17

    Photolithography is the most widely used mass nanoproduction process. Technology requirements demand smaller nanodevices. However, smaller features risk collapse during the drying of rinse liquid because of capillary forces. In the present study, progress is made on two fronts: (i) The importance of surface tension force (STF) on three-phase line on the pattern collapse is investigated. The STF was ignored in previous pattern collapse studies. It is found that inclusion of STF increases the pattern deformation. The calculated deformation error from neglecting STF increases by increasing contact angle, pattern height to width ratio, and trough to width ratio. The deformation error decreases with an increase in elasticity module of pattern. (ii) A more accurate representation for the interface curvature (and related Laplace pressure), that is, using Surface Evolver (SE) simulation rather than cylindrical interface model (CIM), is presented. Curvature values of two-line parallel and box-shaped patterns are derived from SE and compared with the curvature values from CIM. It was found that CIM for the case of two-line parallel overestimates the curvature value and for the case of box-shaped underestimates it. SE simulations also showed that the error of calculating curvature values using CIM for both shapes is only a function of LAR (ratio of pattern length to trough width). For LAR values less than 20, the curvature values from CIM are not accurate for calculating pattern deformation.

  16. C₆₀ fullerene promotes lung monolayer collapse.

    PubMed

    Barnoud, Jonathan; Urbini, Laura; Monticelli, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Airborne nanometre-sized pollutants are responsible for various respiratory diseases. Such pollutants can reach the gas-exchange surface in the alveoli, which is lined with a monolayer of lung surfactant. The relationship between physiological effects of pollutants and molecular-level interactions is largely unknown. Here, we determine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on the properties of a model of lung monolayer using molecular simulations. We simulate phase-separated lipid monolayers in the presence of a model pollutant nanoparticle, C₆₀ fullerene. In the absence of nanoparticles, the monolayers collapse only at very low surface tensions (around 0 mN m(-1)). In the presence of nanoparticles, instead, monolayer collapse is observed at significantly higher surface tensions (up to ca 10 mN m(-1)). Collapse at higher tensions is related to lower mechanical rigidity of the monolayer. It is possible that similar mechanisms operate on lung surfactant in vivo, which suggests that health effects of airborne carbon nanoparticles may be mediated by alterations of the mechanical properties of lung surfactant.

  17. Growth, collapse, and self-organized criticality in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yafeng; Fan, Huawei; Lin, Weijie; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Network growth is ubiquitous in nature (e.g., biological networks) and technological systems (e.g., modern infrastructures). To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands. We find that a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverges from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a relatively short time period. In particular, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis reveals that the collapse size is approximately algebraically distributed, indicating the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis.

  18. Electrolyte-induced collapse of a polyelectrolyte brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesalski, M.; Johannsmann, D.; Rühe, J.

    2004-05-01

    We have investigated the electrolyte-induced collapse of a polyelectrolyte brush covalently attached to a planar solid surface. Positively charged poly-4-vinyl [N-methyl-pyridinium] (MePVP) brushes were prepared in situ at the surface by free radical chain polymerization using a surface-immobilized initiator monolayer ("grafting from" technique) and 4-vinylpyridine as the monomer, followed by a polymer-analogous quaternization reaction. The height of the brushes was measured as a function of the external salt concentration via multiple-angle null ellipsometry. As predicted by mean-field theory, the height of the MePVP brushes remains unaffected by the addition of low amounts of external salt. At higher salt concentrations the brush height decreases. The extent to which the brush shrinks strongly depends on the nature of the salt present in the environment. MePVP brushes collapse to almost the dry layer thickness upon the addition of potassium iodide to a contacting aqueous medium. In contrast, the collapse of MePVP brushes having bromide or chloride counterions is much less pronounced. These brushes remain in a highly swollen state even after large amounts of salt have been added to the solution.

  19. Investigation of structural collapse in unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Clearfield, Drew; Wei, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Though unidirectional freeze casting is a facile method for the production of structurally anisotropic biomedical scaffolds, challenges exist in optimizing the drying process that are often overlooked. In particular, structural collapse may occur if the material's frozen-state glass transition temperature (Tg') is exceeded. It was discovered that unidirectionally freeze cast collagen matrices were highly deformed following lyophilization, rendering them incapable of further use. In this study, modulated differential scanning calorimetry was performed to identify Tg's of unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds, and product temperatures during sublimation were recorded. It was observed that cast matrices from 0.5 to 0.05 M acetic acid (HAc) sublimed at a lyophilizer shelf temperature of -25 °C underwent structural collapse and exceeded their Tg's for the majority of the drying cycle. The use of a low pH suspension (0.5 M HAc) promoted the formation of a non-porous surface, which in turn contributed to the increase of the product temperature above its Tg' during drying. This study has revealed that use of a low shelf temperature (-40 °C) and a low HAc concentration (0.05 M) is effective in maintaining product temperatures under Tg' thereby preventing collapse in unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds.

  20. BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN FAILING CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu

    2011-04-01

    We present results of a systematic study of failing core-collapse supernovae and the formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). Using our open-source general-relativistic 1.5D code GR1D equipped with a three-species neutrino leakage/heating scheme and over 100 presupernova models, we study the effects of the choice of nuclear equation of state (EOS), zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass and metallicity, rotation, and mass-loss prescription on BH formation. We find that the outcome, for a given EOS, can be estimated, to first order, by a single parameter, the compactness of the stellar core at bounce. By comparing protoneutron star (PNS) structure at the onset of gravitational instability with solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkof equations, we find that thermal pressure support in the outer PNS core is responsible for raising the maximum PNS mass by up to 25% above the cold NS value. By artificially increasing neutrino heating, we find the critical neutrino heating efficiency required for exploding a given progenitor structure and connect these findings with ZAMS conditions, establishing, albeit approximately, for the first time based on actual collapse simulations, the mapping between ZAMS parameters and the outcome of core collapse. We also study the effect of progenitor rotation and find that the dimensionless spin of nascent BHs may be robustly limited below a* = Jc/GM{sup 2} = 1 by the appearance of nonaxisymmetric rotational instabilities.

  1. Bounds on collapse models from cold-atom experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Marco; Donadi, Sandro; Vinante, Andrea; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-11-01

    The spontaneous localization mechanism of collapse models induces a Brownian motion in all physical systems. This effect is very weak, but experimental progress in creating ultracold atomic systems can be used to detect it. In this paper, we considered a recent experiment (Kovachy et al., 2015), where an atomic ensemble was cooled down to picokelvins. Any Brownian motion induces an extra increase of the position variance of the gas. We study this effect by solving the dynamical equations for the Continuous Spontaneous Localizations (CSL) model, as well as for its non-Markovian and dissipative extensions. The resulting bounds, with a 95 % of confidence level, are beaten only by measurements of spontaneous X-ray emission and by experiments with cantilever (in the latter case, only for rC ≥ 10-7 m, where rC is one of the two collapse parameters of the CSL model). We show that, contrary to the bounds given by X-ray measurements, non-Markovian effects do not change the bounds, for any reasonable choice of a frequency cutoff in the spectrum of the collapse noise. Therefore the bounds here considered are more robust. We also show that dissipative effects are unimportant for a large spectrum of temperatures of the noise, while for low temperatures the excluded region in the parameter space is the more reduced, the lower the temperature.

  2. Naked singularity explosion in higher-dimensional dust collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimano, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2014-02-01

    In the context of the large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity, it has been argued that an effective naked singularity, called the visible border of spacetime, would be generated by high-energy particle collisions. Motivated by this interesting possibility, we investigate a particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, adopting a spherically symmetric self-similar dust collapse as the simple model of a naked singularity formation. The power and energy of the particle emission behave in two distinct ways depending on a parameter in the model. In a generic case, the emission power is proportional to the quadratic inverse of the remaining time to the Cauchy horizon, which has been known for the four-dimensional case in the literature. On the other hand, in a degenerate case the emission power is proportional to the quartic inverse of the remaining time to the Cauchy horizon, and depends on the total mass of a dust fluid in spite that the central region of the collapse is scale-free due to the self-similarity. In the both cases, within a test-field approximation the energy radiated before any quantum gravitational effect dominates amounts to TeV. This suggests that a backreaction is not ignorable in the TeV-scale gravity context, in contrast to the similar phenomena in stellar collapse.

  3. Preventing Replication Fork Collapse to Maintain Genome Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    Billions of base pairs of DNA must be replicated trillions of times in a human lifetime. Complete and accurate replication once and only once per cell division cycle is essential to maintain genome integrity and prevent disease. Impediments to replication fork progression including difficult to replicate DNA sequences, conflicts with transcription, and DNA damage further add to the genome maintenance challenge. These obstacles frequently cause fork stalling, but only rarely cause a failure to complete replication. Robust mechanisms ensure that stalled forks remain stable and capable of either resuming DNA synthesis or being rescued by converging forks. However, when failures do happen the fork collapses leading to genome rearrangements, cell death and disease. Despite intense interest, the mechanisms to repair damaged replication forks, stabilize them, and ensure successful replication remain only partly understood. Different models of fork collapse have been proposed with varying descriptions of what happens to the DNA and replisome. Here, I will define fork collapse and describe what is known about how the replication checkpoint prevents it to maintain genome stability. PMID:25957489

  4. Relativistic structure, stability, and gravitational collapse of charged neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, Cristian R.

    2005-11-15

    Charged stars have the potential of becoming charged black holes or even naked singularities. We present a set of numerical solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations that represents spherical charged compact stars in hydrostatic equilibrium. The stellar models obtained are evolved forward in time integrating the Einstein-Maxwell field equations. We assume an equation of state of a neutron gas at zero temperature. The charge distribution is taken as being proportional to the rest mass density distribution. The set of solutions present an unstable branch, even with charge-to-mass ratios arbitrarily close to the extremum case. We perform a direct check of the stability of the solutions under strong perturbations and for different values of the charge-to-mass ratio. The stars that are in the stable branch oscillate and do not collapse, while models in the unstable branch collapse directly to form black holes. Stars with a charge greater than or equal to the extreme value explode. When a charged star is suddenly discharged, it does not necessarily collapse to form a black hole. A nonlinear effect that gives rise to the formation of a shell of matter (in supermassive stars), is negligible in the present simulations. The results are in agreement with the third law of black hole thermodynamics and with the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  5. Growth, collapse, and self-organized criticality in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Fan, Huawei; Lin, Weijie; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Network growth is ubiquitous in nature (e.g., biological networks) and technological systems (e.g., modern infrastructures). To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands. We find that a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverges from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a relatively short time period. In particular, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis reveals that the collapse size is approximately algebraically distributed, indicating the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis. PMID:27079515

  6. Classical static final state of collapse with supertranslation memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Long, Jiang

    2016-10-01

    The Kerr metric models the final classical black hole state after gravitational collapse of matter and radiation. Any stationary metric which is close to the Kerr metric has been proven to be diffeomorphic to it. Now, finite supertranslation diffeomorphisms are symmetries which map solutions to inequivalent solutions as such diffeomorphisms generate conserved superrotation charges. The final state of gravitational collapse is therefore parameterized by its mass, angular momentum and supertranslation field, signaled by its conserved superrotation charges. In this paper, we first derive the angle-dependent energy conservation law relating the asymptotic value of the supertranslation field of the final state to the details of the collapse and subsequent evolution of the system. We then generate the static solution with an asymptotic supertranslation field and we study some of its properties. Up to a caveat, the deviation from the Schwarzschild metric could therefore be predicted on a case-by-case basis from accurate modeling of the angular dependence of the ingoing and outgoing energy fluxes leading to the final state.

  7. Free collapse of a rotating sphere of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    The free-fall collapse of a system of 115,000 stars was studied by means of a three-dimensional simulation on the ILLIAC IV computer. The system started from a spherical shape with uniform density and rigid rotation which balanced the gravitational force in the equatorial plane. The system settled down into a 'hot' prolate 'bar' in about two initial rotation periods. This bar rotates about a short axis and is a long-lived form. Detailed discussion of the development of this system leads to several important dynamical inferences: (1) the first collapse does not become triaxial, and the prolate form follows much later; (2) forms seen in projection along the rotation axis are strikingly similar to forms seen in disk galaxy simulations, notwithstanding an unusual thickness along the rotation axis (this strengthens confidence in disk galaxy simulations); (3) many elliptical galaxies must be prolate objects rotating about a short axis and seen in projection; and (4) collapse models of galaxy formation lead to strongly anisotropic velocity dispersions, which are not in agreement with observation.

  8. Spherical collapse in quintessence models with zero speed of sound

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; D'Amico, Guido; Noreña, Jorge; Senatore, Leonardo; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: norena@sissa.it E-mail: senatore@ias.edu

    2010-03-01

    We study the spherical collapse model in the presence of quintessence with negligible speed of sound. This case is particularly motivated for w < −1 as it is required by stability. As pressure gradients are negligible, quintessence follows dark matter during the collapse. The spherical overdensity behaves as a separate closed FLRW universe, so that its evolution can be studied exactly. We derive the critical overdensity for collapse and we use the extended Press-Schechter theory to study how the clustering of quintessence affects the dark matter mass function. The effect is dominated by the modification of the linear dark matter growth function. A larger effect occurs on the total mass function, which includes the quintessence overdensities. Indeed, here quintessence constitutes a third component of virialized objects, together with baryons and dark matter, and contributes to the total halo mass by a fraction ∼ (1+w)Ω{sub Q}/Ω{sub m}. This gives a distinctive modification of the total mass function at low redshift.

  9. Investigation of structural collapse in unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Clearfield, Drew; Wei, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Though unidirectional freeze casting is a facile method for the production of structurally anisotropic biomedical scaffolds, challenges exist in optimizing the drying process that are often overlooked. In particular, structural collapse may occur if the material's frozen-state glass transition temperature (Tg') is exceeded. It was discovered that unidirectionally freeze cast collagen matrices were highly deformed following lyophilization, rendering them incapable of further use. In this study, modulated differential scanning calorimetry was performed to identify Tg's of unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds, and product temperatures during sublimation were recorded. It was observed that cast matrices from 0.5 to 0.05 M acetic acid (HAc) sublimed at a lyophilizer shelf temperature of -25 °C underwent structural collapse and exceeded their Tg's for the majority of the drying cycle. The use of a low pH suspension (0.5 M HAc) promoted the formation of a non-porous surface, which in turn contributed to the increase of the product temperature above its Tg' during drying. This study has revealed that use of a low shelf temperature (-40 °C) and a low HAc concentration (0.05 M) is effective in maintaining product temperatures under Tg' thereby preventing collapse in unidirectionally freeze cast collagen scaffolds. PMID:26676861

  10. GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE AND FILAMENT FORMATION: COMPARISON WITH THE PIPE NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Hartmann, Lee

    2009-10-20

    Recent models of molecular cloud formation and evolution suggest that such clouds are dynamic and generally exhibit gravitational collapse. We present a simple analytic model of global collapse onto a filament and compare this with our numerical simulations of the flow-driven formation of an isolated molecular cloud to illustrate the supersonic motions and infall ram pressures expected in models of gravity-driven cloud evolution. We compare our results with observations of the Pipe Nebula, an especially suitable object for our purposes as its low star formation activity implies insignificant perturbations from stellar feedback. We show that our collapsing cloud model can explain the magnitude of the velocity dispersions seen in the {sup 13}CO filamentary structure by Onishi et al. and the ram pressures required by Lada et al. to confine the lower-mass cores in the Pipe Nebula. We further conjecture that higher-resolution simulations will show small velocity dispersions in the densest core gas, as observed, but which are infall motions and not supporting turbulence. Our results point out the inevitability of ram pressures as boundary conditions for molecular cloud filaments, and the possibility that especially lower-mass cores still can be accreting mass at significant rates, as suggested by observations.

  11. Landscape structure and the genetic effects of a population collapse

    PubMed Central

    Caplins, Serena A.; Gilbert, Kimberly J.; Ciotir, Claudia; Roland, Jens; Matter, Stephen F.; Keyghobadi, Nusha

    2014-01-01

    Both landscape structure and population size fluctuations influence population genetics. While independent effects of these factors on genetic patterns and processes are well studied, a key challenge is to understand their interaction, as populations are simultaneously exposed to habitat fragmentation and climatic changes that increase variability in population size. In a population network of an alpine butterfly, abundance declined 60–100% in 2003 because of low over-winter survival. Across the network, mean microsatellite genetic diversity did not change. However, patch connectivity and local severity of the collapse interacted to determine allelic richness change within populations, indicating that patch connectivity can mediate genetic response to a demographic collapse. The collapse strongly affected spatial genetic structure, leading to a breakdown of isolation-by-distance and loss of landscape genetic pattern. Our study reveals important interactions between landscape structure and temporal demographic variability on the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of populations. Projected future changes to both landscape and climate may lead to loss of genetic variability from the studied populations, and selection acting on adaptive variation will likely occur within the context of an increasing influence of genetic drift. PMID:25320176

  12. Evaluating nuclear physics inputs in core-collapse supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Hix, William Raphael; Baird, Mark L; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Core-collapse supernova models depend on the details of the nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs just as they depend on the details of the macroscopic physics (transport, hydrodynamics, etc.), numerical methods, and progenitors. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We also investigate the feedback between different EoSs and opacities in the context of different progenitors.

  13. INTERPLAY OF NEUTRINO OPACITIES IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-11-20

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e {sup +} e {sup -} annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e {sup +} e {sup -}-annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  14. Redefining the Septal L-Strut to Prevent Collapse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Seob; Lee, Dong Chang; Ha, Dong-Heon; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    During septorhinoplasty, septal cartilage is frequently resected for various purposes but the L-strut is preserved. Numerous materials are inserted into the nasal dorsum during dorsal augmenation rhinoplasty without considering nasal structural safety. This study used a finite element method (FEM) to redefine the septal L-strut, to prevent collapse as pressure moved from the rhinion to the supratip breakpoint on the nasal dorsum and as the contact percentage between the caudal L-strut and the maxillary crest changed. We designed a 1-cm-wide L-strut model based on computed tomography data. At least 45% of the width of the L-strut in the inferior portion of the caudal strut must be preserved during septoplasty to stabilize the septum. In augmentation rhinoplasty, the caudal L-strut must either be preserved perfectly or reinforced to prevent collapse or distortion of the L-strut. The dorsal augmentation material must be fixed in an augmentation pocket to prevent movement of graft material toward the supratip breakpoint, which can disrupt the L-strut. We conducted a numerical analysis using a FEM to predict tissue/organ behavior and to help clinicians understand the reasons for target tissue/organ collapse and deformation. PMID:27073993

  15. Stability of Rigidly Rotating Supermassive Stars against Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaru; Uchida, Haruki; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    We revisit secular stability against quasi-radial collapse for rigidly rotating supermassive stars (SMSs) in general relativity. We suppose that the SMSs are in a nuclear-burning phase and can be modeled by polytropic equations of state with the polytropic index np slightly smaller than 3. The stability is determined in terms of the turning point method. We find a fitting formula of the stability condition for the plausible range of np (2.95≲ {n}{{p}}≲ 3) for SMSs. This condition reconfirms that while non-rotating SMSs with a mass of ˜ {10}5{M}⊙ -{10}6{M}⊙ may undergo a general relativistically induced quasi-radial collapse, rigidly rotating SMSs with a ratio of rotational to gravitational potential energy (β) of ˜ {10}-2 are likely to be stable against collapse unless they are able to accrete ˜5 times more mass during the (relatively brief) hydrogen-burning phase of their evolution. We discuss the implications of our results.

  16. Gravitational Collapse and Black Hole Thermodynamics in Braneworld Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, R.; Soares, I. Damião

    We examine the dynamics of the gravitational collapse in a 4-dim Lorentzian brane embedded in a 5-dim bulk with an extra timelike dimension. By considering the collapse of pure dust on the brane we derive a bouncing FLRW interior solution and match it with a corrected Schwarzschild exterior geometry. In the physical domain considered for the parameters of the solution, the analytical extension is built, exhibiting an exterior event horizon and a Cauchy horizon, analogous to the Reissner-Nordstrom solution. For such an exterior geometry we examine the effects of the bulk-brane corrections in the Hawking radiation. In this scenario the model extends Bekenstein's black hole geometrical thermodynamics for quasi-extremal configurations, with an extra work term in the laws associated with variations of the brane tension. We also propose a simple statistical mechanics model for the entropy of the bouncing collapsed matter by quantizing its fluctuations and constructing the associated partition function. This entropy differs from the geometrical entropy by an additive constant proportional to the area of the extremal black hole and satisfies an analogous first law of thermodynamics. A possible connection between both entropies is discussed.

  17. Low molecular weight Abeta induces collapse of endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cora Sau-Wan; Preisler, Julie; Baum, Larry; Lee, Daniel Hong-Seng; Ng, Ho-Keung; Hugon, Jacques; So, Kwok-Fai; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2009-05-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic multifunction organelle that is responsible for Ca(2+) homeostasis, protein folding, post-translational modification, protein degradation, and transportation of nascent proteins. Disruption of ER architecture might affect the normal physiology of the cell. In yeast, expansion of the ER is observed under unfolded protein response (UPR) and subsequently induces autophagy initiated from the ER. Here, we found that soluble low molecular weight of Abeta disrupted the anchoring between ER and microtubules (MT) and induced collapse of ER. In addition, it decreased the stability of MT. Subsequently, low molecular weight Abeta triggered autophagy and enhanced lysosomal degradation, as shown by electron microscopy and live-cell imaging. Dysfunction of ER can be further proved in postmortem AD brain and transgenic mice bearing APP Swedish mutation by immunohistochemical analysis of calreticulin. Treatment with Taxol, a MT-stabilizing agent, could partially inhibit collapse of the ER and induction of autophagy. The results show that Abeta-induced disruption of MT can affect the architecture of the ER. Collapse/aggregation of the ER may play an important role in Abeta peptide-triggered neurodegenerative processes.

  18. Heating of trapped ultracold atoms by collapse dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laloë, Franck; Mullin, William J.; Pearle, Philip

    2014-11-01

    The continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) theory alters the Schrödinger equation. It describes wave-function collapse as a dynamical process instead of an ill-defined postulate, thereby providing macroscopic uniqueness and solving the so-called measurement problem of standard quantum theory. CSL contains a parameter λ giving the collapse rate of an isolated nucleon in a superposition of two spatially separated states and, more generally, characterizing the collapse time for any physical situation. CSL is experimentally testable, since it predicts some behavior different from that predicted by standard quantum theory. One example is the narrowing of wave functions, which results in energy imparted to particles. Here we consider energy given to trapped ultracold atoms. Since these are the coldest samples under experimental investigation, it is worth inquiring how they are affected by the CSL heating mechanism. We examine the CSL heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in contact with its thermal cloud. Of course, other mechanisms also provide heat and also particle loss. From varied data on optically trapped cesium BECs, we present an energy audit for known heating and loss mechanisms. The result provides an upper limit on CSL heating and thereby an upper limit on the parameter λ . We obtain λ ≲1 (±1 ) ×10-7 s-1.

  19. Growth, collapse, and self-organized criticality in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yafeng; Fan, Huawei; Lin, Weijie; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Xingang

    2016-04-01

    Network growth is ubiquitous in nature (e.g., biological networks) and technological systems (e.g., modern infrastructures). To understand how certain dynamical behaviors can or cannot persist as the underlying network grows is a problem of increasing importance in complex dynamical systems as well as sustainability science and engineering. We address the question of whether a complex network of nonlinear oscillators can maintain its synchronization stability as it expands. We find that a large scale avalanche over the entire network can be triggered in the sense that the individual nodal dynamics diverges from the synchronous state in a cascading manner within a relatively short time period. In particular, after an initial stage of linear growth, the network typically evolves into a critical state where the addition of a single new node can cause a group of nodes to lose synchronization, leading to synchronization collapse for the entire network. A statistical analysis reveals that the collapse size is approximately algebraically distributed, indicating the emergence of self-organized criticality. We demonstrate the generality of the phenomenon of synchronization collapse using a variety of complex network models, and uncover the underlying dynamical mechanism through an eigenvector analysis.

  20. Formation of Kuiper Belt Binaries by Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorny, David; Youdin, A. N.; Richardson, D. C.

    2010-10-01

    A large fraction of 100-km-class low-inclination objects in the classical Kuiper Belt (KB) are binaries with comparable mass and wide separation of components. A favored model for their formation was capture during the coagulation growth of bodies in the early KB. Instead, recent studies suggested that large, 100-km and larger objects can rapidly form in the protoplanetary disks when swarms of locally concentrated solids collapse under their own gravity. Here we examine the possibility that KB binaries formed during gravitational collapse when the excess of angular momentum prevented the agglomeration of available mass into a solitary object. We find that this new mechanism provides a robust path toward the formation of KB binaries with observed properties, and can explain wide systems such as 2001 QW322 and multiples such as (47171) 1999 TC36. Notably, the gravitational collapse is capable of producing 100% binary fraction for a wide range of the swarm's initial angular momentum values. The binary components have similar masses ( 80% have the secondary-over-primary radius ratio >0.7) and their separation ranges from 1,000 to 100,000 km. The binary orbits have eccentricities from e=0 to 1, with the majority having e<0.6. The model inclinations are consistent with the observed general preference for prograde binary orbits. Our binary formation mechanism also implies that the primary and secondary components in each binary pair should have identical bulk composition, which is consistent with the current photometric data.

  1. Respiratory failure due to expiratory central airway collapse.

    PubMed

    Murgu, Septimiu D; Cherrison, Lawrence J; Colt, Henri G

    2007-06-01

    We report a patient with respiratory failure due to expiratory central airway collapse successfully treated with airway stents. A 74-year-old male with obesity and obstructive sleep apnea had recurrent episodes of acute respiratory failure. Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation failed because of patient intolerance and lack of improvement, and soon after he stopped using the noninvasive ventilator he developed severe respiratory failure that required a tracheostomy. He was transferred to our institution one month later. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed diffuse expiratory central airway collapse of both main bronchi and the lower two thirds of the trachea, caused by bulging of the posterior airway membrane. During rigid bronchoscopy we inserted studded silicone stents in the right and left mainstem bronchi and in the distal trachea. The patient was weaned from mechanical ventilation 72 hours later and discharged to a long-term care facility. Expiratory central airway collapse should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with respiratory failure, especially when weaning from mechanical ventilation is difficult. PMID:17521465

  2. Evidences for Black Hole Formation by Complete Stellar Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabel, Igor Felix

    2016-07-01

    One of the most critical parameters that determines the formation of binary black holes is the range of masses of black holes that may form by direct collapse, namely, with no energetic supernova kicks that would unbound the stellar binary. Theoretical models set mass ranges and limits for black hole formation through the complete collapse of the stellar progenitor. However, observational constraints for those mass limits have been elusive. Since the velocity of a stellar black hole encodes the history of its formation and evolution, it may provide observational constraints on the strength of kicks by natal supernova explosions in the formation of the black hole. Based on the motion in three dimensions of five black hole binaries in our Galaxy it is found that the three black holes with < 10 solar masses are runaway black hole binaries due to kicks from natal supernovae, whereas the two black holes with 10 to 15 solar masses remained in their birth place and must have been form by complete or almost complete collapse of the progenitor star. These observations show that there may be binary black holes with components having masses as low as 10 solar masses, which suggests that a significant fraction of massive stellar binaries would end as black hole binaries that would produce a large stochastic gravitational-wave background.

  3. The collapse of white dwarfs to neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.; Baron, E.

    1992-01-01

    The observable consequences of an accreting white dwarf collapsing directly to a neutron star are considered. The outcome depends critically upon the nature of the wind that is driven by neutrino absorption in the surface layers as the dwarf collapses. Unlike previous calculations which either ignored mass loss or employed inadequate zoning to resolve it, a characteristic mass-loss rate of about 0.005 solar mass/s and an energy input of 5 x 10 exp 50 ergs/s is found. Such a large mass-loss rate almost completely obscures any prompt electromagnetic display and certainly rules out the production by this model of gamma-ray bursts situated at cosmological distances. The occurrence of such collapses with the Milky Way Galaxy might, however, be detected and limited by their nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line emission. To avoid the overproduction of rare neutron-rich isotopes heavier than iron, such events must be very infrequent, probably happening no more than once every thousand years.

  4. Computing supernova collapse to neutron stars and black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new numerical code for spherical hydrodynamics in general relativity. The code can handle gravitational collapse to a neutron star or to a black hole without the appearance of singularities. Moreover, the variables and equations in the code are very similar to those appearing in traditional Lagrangian supernova codes. Any such existing code can thus be easily adapted to treat collapse where the final fate is uncertain and may be either a neutron star or a black hole. The code is based on the formulation of Hernandez & Misner, in which retarded time is used as coordinate. This prevents the computational grid from penetrating inside any black hole that may form. We present the equations and a complete finite difference scheme for the adiabatic evolution of a fluid that obeys a gamma-law equation of state. We summarize the results of several testbed calculations performed to check our code. We also give the transformation of the analytic Oppenheimer-Snyder solution for homogeneous dust collapse to our coordinate system.

  5. Modeling asymmetric cavity collapse with plasma equations of state.

    PubMed

    Tully, Brett; Hawker, Nicholas; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-05-01

    We explore the effect that equation of state (EOS) thermodynamics has on shock-driven cavity-collapse processes. We account for full, multidimensional, unsteady hydrodynamics and incorporate a range of relevant EOSs (polytropic, QEOS-type, and SESAME). In doing so, we show that simplified analytic EOSs, like ideal gas, capture certain critical parameters of the collapse such as velocity of the main transverse jet and pressure at jet strike, while also providing a good representation of overall trends. However, more sophisticated EOSs yield different and more relevant estimates of temperature and density, especially for higher incident shock strengths. We model incident shocks ranging from 0.1 to 1000 GPa, the latter being of interest in investigating the warm dense matter regime for which experimental and theoretical EOS data are difficult to obtain. At certain shock strengths, there is a factor of two difference in predicted density between QEOS-type and SESAME EOS, indicating cavity collapse as an experimental method for exploring EOS in this range. PMID:27300976

  6. Redefining the Septal L-Strut to Prevent Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dong-Heon; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    During septorhinoplasty, septal cartilage is frequently resected for various purposes but the L-strut is preserved. Numerous materials are inserted into the nasal dorsum during dorsal augmenation rhinoplasty without considering nasal structural safety. This study used a finite element method (FEM) to redefine the septal L-strut, to prevent collapse as pressure moved from the rhinion to the supratip breakpoint on the nasal dorsum and as the contact percentage between the caudal L-strut and the maxillary crest changed. We designed a 1-cm-wide L-strut model based on computed tomography data. At least 45% of the width of the L-strut in the inferior portion of the caudal strut must be preserved during septoplasty to stabilize the septum. In augmentation rhinoplasty, the caudal L-strut must either be preserved perfectly or reinforced to prevent collapse or distortion of the L-strut. The dorsal augmentation material must be fixed in an augmentation pocket to prevent movement of graft material toward the supratip breakpoint, which can disrupt the L-strut. We conducted a numerical analysis using a FEM to predict tissue/organ behavior and to help clinicians understand the reasons for target tissue/organ collapse and deformation. PMID:27073993

  7. Cosmic core-collapse supernovae from upcoming sky surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, Amy; Fields, Brian D. E-mail: bdfields@illinois.edu

    2009-01-15

    Large synoptic (repeated scan) imaging sky surveys are poised to observe enormous numbers of core-collapse supernovae. We quantify the discovery potential of such surveys, and apply our results to upcoming projects, including DES, Pan-STARRS, and LSST. The latter two will harvest core-collapse supernovae in numbers orders of magnitude greater than have ever been observed to date. These surveys will map out the cosmic core-collapse supernova redshift distribution via direct counting, with very small statistical uncertainties out to a redshift depth which is a strong function of the survey limiting magnitude. This supernova redshift history encodes rich information about cosmology, star formation, and supernova astrophysics and phenomenology; the large statistics of the supernova sample will be crucial to disentangle possible degeneracies among these issues. For example, the cosmic supernova rate can be measured to high precision out to z {approx} 0.5 for all core-collapse types, and out to redshift z {approx} 1 for Type IIn events if their intrinsic properties remain the same as those measured locally. A precision knowledge of the cosmic supernova rate would remove the cosmological uncertainties in the study of the wealth of observable properties of the cosmic supernova populations and their evolution with environment and redshift. Because of the tight link between supernovae and star formation, synoptic sky surveys will also provide precision measurements of the normalization and z {approx}< 1 history of cosmic star-formation rate in a manner independent of and complementary to than current data based on UV and other proxies for massive star formation. Furthermore, Type II supernovae can serve as distance indicators and would independently cross-check Type Ia distances measured in the same surveys. Arguably the largest and least-controlled uncertainty in all of these efforts comes from the poorly-understood evolution of dust obscuration of supernovae in their host

  8. Electromagnetic power of merging and collapsing compact objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2011-06-01

    Understanding possible electromagnetic signatures of merging and collapsing compact objects is important for identifying possible sources of the LIGO signal. Electromagnetic emission can be produced as a precursor to the merger, as a prompt emission during the collapse of a neutron star and at the spin-down stage of the resulting Kerr-Newman black hole. For the neutron star-neutron star mergers, the precursor power scales as L≈BNS2GMNSRNS8/(Rorb7c), while for the neutron star-black hole mergers, it is (GM/(c2RNS))2 times smaller. We demonstrate that the time evolution of the axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields can be expressed in terms of the hyperbolic Grad-Shafranov equation, and we formulate the generalization of Ferraro’s law of isorotation to time-dependent angular velocity. We find an exact nonlinear time-dependent Michel-type (split-monopole) structure of magnetospheres driven by spinning and collapsing neutron stars in Schwarzschild geometry. Based on this solution, we argue that the collapse of a neutron star into a black hole happens smoothly, without the natural formation of current sheets or other dissipative structures on the open field lines; thus, it does not allow the magnetic field to become disconnected from the star and escape to infinity. Therefore, as long as an isolated Kerr black hole can produce plasma and currents, it does not lose its open magnetic field lines. Its magnetospheric structure evolves towards a split monopole, and the black hole spins down electromagnetically (the closed field lines get absorbed by the hole). The “no-hair theorem,” which assumes that the outside medium is a vacuum, is not applicable in this case: highly conducting plasma introduces a topological constraint forbidding the disconnection of the magnetic field lines from the black hole. Eventually, a single random large scale spontaneous reconnection event will lead to magnetic field release, shutting down the electromagnetic black hole engine forever

  9. Investigating the global collapse of filaments using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2015-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of cold, uniform density, self-gravitating filaments, to investigate their longitudinal collapse time-scales; these time-scales are important because they determine the time available for a filament to fragment into cores. A filament is initially characterized by its line-mass, μO, its radius, RO (or equivalently its density ρ O= μ O/π RO^2), and its aspect ratio, AO (≡ZO/RO, where ZO is its half-length). The gas is only allowed to contract longitudinally, i.e. parallel to the symmetry axis of the filament (the z-axis). Pon et al. (2012) have considered the global dynamics of such filaments analytically. They conclude that short filaments (AO ≲ 5) collapse along the z-axis more-or-less homologously, on a time-scale tHOM ˜ 0.44 AO (GρO)-1/2; in contrast, longer filaments (AO ≳ 5) undergo end-dominated collapse, i.e. two dense clumps form at the ends of the filament and converge on the centre sweeping up mass as they go, on a time-scale t_{END} ˜ 0.98 AO^{1/2} (Gρ O)^{-1/2}. Our simulations do not corroborate these predictions. First, for all AO ≳ 2, the collapse time satisfies a single equation t_{COL}˜ (0.49+0.26AO)(Gρ O)^{-1/2}, which for large AO is much longer than the Pon et al. prediction. Secondly, for all AO ≳ 2, the collapse is end-dominated. Thirdly, before being swept up, the gas immediately ahead of an end-clump is actually accelerated outwards by the gravitational attraction of the approaching clump, resulting in a significant ram pressure. For high aspect ratio filaments, the end-clumps approach an asymptotic inward speed, due to the fact that they are doing work both accelerating and compressing the gas they sweep up. Pon et al. appear to have neglected the outward acceleration and its consequences.

  10. Models of spontaneous wave function collapse: what they are, and how they can be tested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    There are few proposals, which explicitly allow for (experimentally testable) deviations from standard quantum theory. Collapse models are among the most-widely studied proposals of this kind. The Schrödinger equation is modified by including nonlinear and stochastic terms, which describe the collapse of the wave function in space. These spontaneous collapses are rare for microscopic systems, hence their quantum properties are left almost unaltered. On the other hand, collapses become more and more frequent, the larger the object, to the point that macroscopic superpositions are rapidly suppressed. The main features of collapse models will be reviewed. An update of the most promising experimental tests will be presented.

  11. Quasispherical gravitational collapse in 5D Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Sushant G.; Jhingan, S.

    2010-07-15

    We obtain a general five-dimensional quasispherical collapsing solutions of irrotational dust in Einstein gravity with the Gauss-Bonnet combination of quadratic curvature terms. These solutions are a generalization, to Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, of the five-dimensional quasispherical Szkeres like collapsing solutions in general relativity. It is found that the collapse proceeds in the same way as in the analogous spherical collapse, i.e., there exists regular initial data such that the collapse proceed to form naked singularities violating cosmic censorship conjecture. The effect of Gauss-Bonnet quadratic curvature terms on the formation and locations of the apparent horizon is deduced.

  12. Basaltic calderas: Collapse dynamics, edifice deformation, and variations of magma withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Laurent; Massin, FréDéRick; Famin, Vincent; Ferrazzini, ValéRie; Roult, GenevièVe

    2011-03-01

    The incremental caldera collapses of Fernandina (1968), Miyakejima (2000), and Piton de la Fournaise (2007) are analyzed in order to understand the collapse dynamics in basaltic setting and the associated edifice deformation. For each caldera, the collapse dynamics is assessed through the evolution of the (1) time interval T between two successive collapse increments, (2) amount of vertical displacement during each collapse increment, and (3) magma outflow rate during the whole collapse caldera process. We show from the evolution of T that Piton de la Fournaise and Fernandina were characterized by a similar collapse dynamics, despite large differences in the caldera geometry and the duration of the whole collapse caldera process. This evolution significantly differs from that of Miyakejima where T strongly fluctuated throughout the whole collapse process. Quantification of the piston vertical displacements enables us to determine the magma outflow rates between each collapse increment. Displacement data (tiltmeter and/or GPS) for Piton de la Fournaise and Miyakejima are used to constrain the edifice overall deformation and the edifice deformation rates. These data reveal that both volcanoes experienced edifice inflation once the piston collapsed into the magma chamber. Such a deformation, which lasts during the first collapse increments only, is interpreted as the result of larger volume of piston intruded in the magma chamber than magma withdrawn before each collapse increment. Once the effect of the collapsing rock column vanishes, edifice deflates. We also determine for each caldera the critical amount of magma evacuated before collapse initiation and compare it to analog models. The significant differences between models and nature are explained by the occurrence of preexisting weak zones in nature, i.e., the ring faults, that are not taken into account in analog models. Finally, we show that T at Piton de la Fournaise and Fernandina was equally controlled by

  13. Energies and stresses associated with collapse-caldera formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, A.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of a collapse caldera is normally associated with a shallow crustal magma chamber. A necessary condition for such a caldera to form is that high local shear stresses concentrate above the magma chamber in a zone within which the ring fault (caldera fault) subsequently develops. The rocks that constitute most volcanic edifices are heterogeneous and anisotropic and include numerous layers with different mechanical properties. For the ring fault to form or reactivate, the appropriate shear-stress conditions in the potential ring-fault zone must be reached in all the rock layers and units between the shallow magma chamber and the surface. Because of the different mechanical properties of these layers and units, these conditions can, in principle, be reached only occasionally, as is confirmed by the general rarity of caldera collapses in active volcanic edifices. Here I present numerical models explaining why the conditions of ring-fault formation are so rarely satisfied, particularly in edifices such as stratovolcanoes which are commonly composed of layers with widely different mechanical properties. Once the conditions for caldera formation are satisfied in the potential ring-fault zone, energy is needed (a) to propagate the ring fault through all the layers and to the surface, and (b) to drive the vertical displacement (the subsidence) along the ring fault. There are many potential energy sources in volcanic edifices, but the principal one for fracture formation in general, and ring-fault development in particular, is the potential energy. The potential energy is composed of two parts: (i) the strain energy related to magma-chamber inflation and deflation, and (ii) the work done by the forces moving the boundary of the edifice and, in this case, the piston-like segment during the caldera collapse (subsidence). Normally, during an eruption, it is only the strain energy stored in the volcano during magma-chamber inflation that is available to generate the

  14. Understanding the collapse mechanism in Langmuir monolayers through polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goto, Thiago Eichi; Caseli, Luciano

    2013-07-23

    The collapse of films at the air-water interface is related to a type of 2D-to-3D transition that occurs when a Langmuir monolayer is compressed beyond its stability limit. Studies on this issue are extremely important because defects in ultrathin solid films can be better understood if the molecular mechanisms related to collapse processes are elucidated. This paper explores how the changes of vibration of specific groups of lipid molecules, as revealed by polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), are affected by the monolayer collapse. Different mechanisms of collapse were studied, for those lipids that undergo constant-area collapse (such as stearic acid) and for those that undergo constant-pressure collapse (such as DPPC, DPPG, and DODAB). Lipid charges also affect the mechanism of collapse, as demonstrated for two oppositely charged lipids.

  15. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1994-01-01

    We simulate collisional evolution of grains in dense turbulent molecular cloud cores (or Bok globules) in static equilibrium and free-fall collapse, assuming spherical symmetry. Relative velocities are due to thermal motions, differential settling, and turbulence, with the latter dominant for sonic turbulence with an assumed Kolmogorov spectrum. Realistic criteria are used to determine outcomes of collisions (coagulation vs. destruction) as functions of particle size and velocity. Results are presented for a variety of cloud parameters (radial density profile, turbulent velocity) and particle properties (density, impact strength). Results are sensitive to the assumed mechanical properties (density and impact strength) of grain aggregates. Particle growth is enhanced if aggregates have low density or fractal structures. On a timescale of a few Myr, an initial population of 0.1 micrometers grains may produce dense compact particles approximately 1 micrometer in size, or fluffy aggregates approximately 100 micrometers. For impact strengths less than or equal to 10(exp 6) ergs/g, a steady state is reached between coagulation of small grains and collisional disruption of larger aggregates. Formation of macroscopic aggregates requires high mechanical strengths and low aggregate densities. We assume sonic turbulence during collapse, with varied eddy size scales determining the dissipation rate or turbulence strength. The degree of collisional evolution during collapse is sensitive to the assumed small-scale structure (inner sc ale) of the turbulence. Weak turbulence results in few collisions and preserves the precollapse particle size distribution with little change. Strong turbulence tends to produce net destruction, rather than particle growth, during infall, unless inpact strengths are greater than 10(exp 6)ergs/g.

  16. Evidence for remotely triggered microearthquakes during salt cavern collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Rohmer, Jérémy

    2012-10-01

    Microseismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered microseismicity observed in the vicinity of an underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M˜ 7.2 earthquake, which occurred ˜12 000 km away. High-dynamic range broad-band records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency microseismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2-D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. On this basis, we show that the increment of stress necessary for the failure of the Dolomite layer, which ensures the stability of the whole system, is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude observed during the passage of the earthquakes waves. This suggests that the stress oscillations due to the seismic waves correlated with the recorded microearthquakes induced damage of the overburden, which eventually led to the collapse of the salt cavern. We show that the contribution of Rayleigh waves is the most efficient to trigger microseismicity at periods close to the natural fundamental frequency of the cavern system found at about 10-20 s by investigating the impulse response of the cavern + overburden + brine system.

  17. Cardiorespiratory collapse at high temperature in swimming adult sockeye salmon.

    PubMed

    Eliason, Erika J; Clark, Timothy D; Hinch, Scott G; Farrell, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    Elevated summer river temperatures are associated with high in-river mortality in adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) during their once-in-a-lifetime spawning migration up the Fraser River (British Columbia, Canada). However, the mechanisms underlying the decrease in whole-animal performance and cardiorespiratory collapse above optimal temperatures for aerobic scope (T opt) remain elusive for aquatic ectotherms. This is in part because all the relevant cardiorespiratory variables have rarely been measured directly and simultaneously during exercise at supra-optimal temperatures. Using the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance hypothesis as a framework, this study simultaneously and directly measured oxygen consumption rate (MO2), cardiac output [Formula: see text], heart rate (f H), and cardiac stroke volume (V s), as well as arterial and venous blood oxygen status in adult sockeye salmon swimming at temperatures that bracketed T opt to elucidate possible limitations in oxygen uptake into the blood or internal delivery through the oxygen cascade. Above T opt, the decline in MO2max and aerobic scope was best explained by a cardiac limitation, triggered by reduced scope for f H. The highest test temperatures were characterized by a negative scope for f H, dramatic decreases in maximal [Formula: see text] and maximal V s, and cardiac dysrhythmias. In contrast, arterial blood oxygen content and partial pressure were almost insensitive to supra-optimal temperature, suggesting that oxygen delivery to and uptake by the gill were not a limiting factor. We propose that the high-temperature-induced en route mortality in migrating sockeye salmon may be at least partly attributed to physiological limitations in aerobic performance due to cardiac collapse via insufficient scope for f H. Furthermore, this improved mechanistic understanding of cardiorespiratory collapse at high temperature is likely to have broader application to other salmonids and perhaps other

  18. Modeling of surface cleaning by cavitation bubble dynamics and collapse.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Kapahi, Anil; Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2016-03-01

    Surface cleaning using cavitation bubble dynamics is investigated numerically through modeling of bubble dynamics, dirt particle motion, and fluid material interaction. Three fluid dynamics models; a potential flow model, a viscous model, and a compressible model, are used to describe the flow field generated by the bubble all showing the strong effects bubble explosive growth and collapse have on a dirt particle and on a layer of material to remove. Bubble deformation and reentrant jet formation are seen to be responsible for generating concentrated pressures, shear, and lift forces on the dirt particle and high impulsive loads on a layer of material to remove. Bubble explosive growth is also an important mechanism for removal of dirt particles, since strong suction forces in addition to shear are generated around the explosively growing bubble and can exert strong forces lifting the particles from the surface to clean and sucking them toward the bubble. To model material failure and removal, a finite element structure code is used and enables simulation of full fluid-structure interaction and investigation of the effects of various parameters. High impulsive pressures are generated during bubble collapse due to the impact of the bubble reentrant jet on the material surface and the subsequent collapse of the resulting toroidal bubble. Pits and material removal develop on the material surface when the impulsive pressure is large enough to result in high equivalent stresses exceeding the material yield stress or its ultimate strain. Cleaning depends on parameters such as the relative size between the bubble at its maximum volume and the particle size, the bubble standoff distance from the particle and from the material wall, and the excitation pressure field driving the bubble dynamics. These effects are discussed in this contribution.

  19. Evidence for remotely triggered microearthquakes during salt cavern collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Rohmer, Jérémy

    2016-04-01

    Microseismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered microseismicity observed in the vicinity of an underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M ˜ 7.2 earthquake, which occurred ˜12 000 km away. High-dynamic range broad-band records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency microseismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2-D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. On this basis, we show that the increment of stress necessary for the failure of the Dolomite layer, which ensures the stability of the whole system, is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude observed during the passage of the earthquakes waves. This suggests that the stress oscillations due to the seismic waves correlated with the recorded microearthquakes induced damage of the overburden, which eventually led to the collapse of the salt cavern. We show that the contribution of Rayleigh waves is the most efficient to trigger microseismicity at periods close to the natural fundamental frequency of the cavern system found at about 10-20 s by investigating the impulse response of the cavern + overburden + brine system.

  20. Cosmological constraints on nonstandard inflationary quantum collapse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Susana J.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    We briefly review an important shortcoming—unearthed in previous works—of the standard version of the inflationary model for the emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure. We consider here some consequences emerging from a proposal inspired on ideas of Penrose and Diósi [R. Penrose, The Emperor’s New Mind. Concerning Computers, Minds and Laws of Physics (1989).][R. Penrose, in Physics meets Philosophy at the Planck Scale: Contemporary Theories in Quantum Gravity, edited by C. Callendar and N. Huggett (2001), pp. 290-+.][L. Diósi, Phys. Lett. A 120, 377 (1987).PYLAAG0375-960110.1016/0375-9601(87)90681-5][L. Diósi, Phys. Rev. A 40, 1165 (1989).PLRAAN0556-279110.1103/PhysRevA.40.1165] about a quantum-gravity induced reduction of the wave function, which has been put forward to address the shortcomings, arguing that its effect on the inflaton field is what can lead to the emergence of the seeds of cosmic structure [A. Perez, H. Sahlmann, and D. Sudarsky, Classical Quantum Gravity 23, 2317 (2006).CQGRDG0264-938110.1088/0264-9381/23/7/008]. The proposal leads to a deviation of the primordial spectrum from the scale-invariant Harrison-Zel’dovich one, and consequently, to a different CMB power spectrum. We perform statistical analyses to test two quantum collapse schemes with recent data from the CMB, including the 7-yr release of WMAP and the matter power spectrum measured using LRGs by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Results from the statistical analyses indicate that several collapse models are compatible with CMB and LRG data, and establish constraints on the free parameters of the models. The data put no restriction on the timescale for the collapse of the scalar field modes.

  1. Creating a Driven, Collapsed Radiative Shock in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reighard, Amy

    2006-10-01

    We report details of the first experimental campaign to create a driven, planar, radiatively collapsed in laboratory experiment. Radiation hydrodynamics experiments are challenging to realize in a laboratory setting, requiring high temperatures in a system of sufficient extent. The Omega laser at ˜10^15 W/cm^2 drives a thin slab of low-Z material at >100 km/s gas via laser ablation pressure. This slab initially shocks, then continues driving a shock through a cylindrical volume of Xe gas at 6 mg/cc. Simulations predict a collapsed layer in which the density reaches ˜45 times initial density. Side-on x-ray backlighting was the principal diagnostic. We have successfully imaged shocks with average velocities between 95-205 km/sec, with measured thicknesses of 45-150 μm in experiments lasting up to 20 ns and spanning up 2.5 mm in extent. Comparison of the shock position as a function of time from these experiments to 1D radiation hydrodynamic simulation results show some discrepancy, which will be explored. Optical depth before and behind the shock is important for meaningful comparison to these astrophysical systems. This shock is optically thin to emitted radiation in the unshocked region and optically thick to radiation in the shocked, dense region. We compare this system to collapsed shocks in astrophysical systems with similar optical depth profiles. An experiment using a Thomson scattering diagnostic across the shock front is also discussed. This research was sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Research Grants DE-FG52-03NA00064, DE-FG53-2005-NA26014, and other grants and contracts.

  2. Crawling to Collapse: Ecologically Unsound Ornamental Invertebrate Fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Rhyne, Andrew; Rotjan, Randi; Bruckner, Andrew; Tlusty, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Fishery management has historically been an inexact and reactionary discipline, often taking action only after a critical stock suffers overfishing or collapse. The invertebrate ornamental fishery in the State of Florida, with increasing catches over a more diverse array of species, is poised for collapse. Current management is static and the lack of an adaptive strategy will not allow for adequate responses associated with managing this multi-species fishery. The last decade has seen aquarium hobbyists shift their display preference from fish-only tanks to miniature reef ecosystems that include many invertebrate species, creating increased demand without proper oversight. The once small ornamental fishery has become an invertebrate-dominated major industry supplying five continents. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we analyzed the Florida Marine Life Fishery (FLML) landing data from 1994 to 2007 for all invertebrate species. The data were organized to reflect both ecosystem purpose (in the wild) and ecosystem services (commodities) for each reported species to address the following question: Are ornamental invertebrates being exploited for their fundamental ecosystem services and economic value at the expense of reef resilience? We found that 9 million individuals were collected in 2007, 6 million of which were grazers. Conclusions/Significance The number of grazers now exceeds, by two-fold, the number of specimens collected for curio and ornamental purposes altogether, representing a major categorical shift. In general, landings have increased 10-fold since 1994, though the number of licenses has been dramatically reduced. Thus, despite current management strategies, the FLML Fishery appears to be crawling to collapse. PMID:20027312

  3. Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M; Jackson, D; Cynn, H; Aracne, C; Evans, W; McMahan, A

    2008-05-23

    X-ray diffraction measurements of cerium in the vicinity of the isostructural {gamma}-{alpha} transition have been performed with high precision and accuracy from room temperature to almost 800 K. The disputed location of the critical point has been found to occur at 1.5 {+-} 0.1 GPa and 480 {+-} 10 K. The data is well fit by the Kondo volume collapse model plus a quasiharmonic representation of the phonons. The resultant free energy is validated against data for the thermodynamic Grueneisen parameter, and beyond the dominant spin fluctuation contribution, indicates a dramatic change in the lattice Grueneisen parameter across the transition.

  4. Modelling Protogalactic Collapse and Magnetic Field Evolution with FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orban, C. M.; Ricker, P. M.

    2004-12-01

    An important outstanding question regarding magnetic fields in spiral galaxies within the framework of the alpha-omega dynamo model is the origin of the initial seed field needed. Several seed field mechanisms have been proposed. The Biermann battery, which generates fields from electron-ion separation effects in protogalactic shocks, is a promising mechanism since it arises naturally during the process of galaxy formation. We present simulations of the Biermann battery in a simple model of protogalactic collapse performed using the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH to estimate the magnitude of the Biermann battery effect and assess its viability as a seed field generation mechanism.

  5. Bolometric and UV light curves of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, T. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; Brown, Peter J.; Bayless, Amanda J.; Frey, Lucille H.

    2014-06-01

    The Swift UV-Optical Telescope (UVOT) has been observing core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) of all subtypes in the UV and optical since 2005. Here we present 50 CCSNe observed with the Swift UVOT, analyzing their UV properties and behavior. Where we have multiple UV detections in all three UV filters (λ {sub c} = 1928-2600 Å), we generate early time bolometric light curves, analyze the properties of these light curves and the UV contribution to them, and derive empirical corrections for the UV-flux contribution to optical-IR based bolometric light curves.

  6. Gravitational collapse with rotating thin shells and cosmic censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Jorge V.

    2015-04-01

    Gravitational collapse of matter in the presence of rotation is a mostly unexplored topic but it might have important implications for cosmic censorship. Recently a convenient setup was identified to address this problem, by considering thin matter shells at the interface between two equal angular momenta Myers-Perry spacetimes in five dimensions. This note provides more details about the matching of such cohomogeneity-1 spacetimes and extends the results obtained therein to arbitrary higher odd dimensions. It is also pointed out that oscillatory orbits for shells in asymptotically flat spacetimes can be naturally obtained if the matter has a negative pressure component.

  7. Shock wave emission during the collapse of cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garen, W.; Hegedűs, F.; Kai, Y.; Koch, S.; Meyerer, B.; Neu, W.; Teubner, U.

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave emission induced by intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. The present work focuses on the conditions of shock wave emission in glycerine and distilled water during the first bubble collapse. Experimental investigations are carried out in liquids as a function of temperature and viscosity. Comparison is made with the theoretical work of Poritsky (Proc 1st US Natl Congress Appl Mech 813-821, 1952) and Brennen (Cavitation and bubble dynamics, Oxford University Press 1995). To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first experimental verification of those theories.

  8. Surface-enhanced unfolding of collapsed polymers in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander-Katz, A.; Netz, R. R.

    2007-10-01

    Using hydrodynamic simulations we study the shear-induced unfolding of a collapsed polymer near a planar wall. Above a well-defined threshold shear rate \\dot{\\gamma}^* , the globule becomes unstable and displays stretching-refolding events. With decreasing distance from the surface, the critical shear rate \\dot{\\gamma}^* goes down, which is rationalized within a scaling analysis in terms of increased hydrodynamic stress due to a surface-induced slowing-down of globule rotation and translation. Our results are relevant for protein-assisted blood clotting in capillary vessels.

  9. Pasta phases in core-collapse supernova matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Helena; Chiacchiera, Silvia; Providência, Constança

    2016-04-01

    The pasta phase in core-collapse supernova matter (finite temperatures and fixed proton fractions) is studied within relativistic mean field models. Three different calculations are used for comparison, the Thomas-Fermi (TF), the Coexisting Phases (CP) and the Compressible Liquid Drop (CLD) approximations. The effects of including light clusters in nuclear matter and the densities at which the transitions between pasta configurations and to uniform matter occur are also investigated. The free energy and pressure, in the space of particle number densities and temperatures expected to cover the pasta region, are calculated. Finally, a comparison with a finite temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculation is drawn.

  10. Bifurcation, chaos, and voltage collapse in power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.W.; Varghese, M.; Varaiya, P.; Wu, F.F.

    1995-11-01

    A model of a power system with load dynamics is studied by investigating qualitative changes in its behavior as the reactive power demand at a load bus is increased. In addition to the saddle node bifurcation often associated with voltage collapse, the system exhibits sub- and supercritical Hopf bifurcations, cyclic fold bifurcation, and period doubling bifurcation. Cascades of period doubling bifurcations terminate in chaotic invariant sets. The presence of these new bifurcations motivates a reexamination of the saddle-node bifurcation as the boundary of the feasible set of power injections.

  11. Multiplicative noise can lead to the collapse of dissipative solitons.

    PubMed

    Descalzi, Orazio; Cartes, Carlos; Brand, Helmut R

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the influence of spatially homogeneous multiplicative noise on the formation of localized patterns in the framework of the cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. We find that for sufficiently large multiplicative noise the formation of stationary and temporally periodic dissipative solitons is suppressed. This result is characterized by a linear relation between the bifurcation parameter and the noise amplitude required for suppression. For the regime associated with exploding dissipative solitons we find a reduction in the number of explosions for larger noise strength as well as a conversion to other types of dissipative solitons or to filling-in and eventually a collapse to the zero solution. PMID:27575135

  12. Collapse of Rotating Magnetized Molecular Cloud Cores and Mass Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomisaka, Kohji

    2002-08-01

    The collapse of rotating magnetized molecular cloud cores is studied with axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Because of the change of the equation of state of the interstellar gas, molecular cloud cores experience several phases during the collapse. In the earliest isothermal runaway collapse (n<~1010 H2 cm-3), a pseudodisk is formed, and it continues to contract until an opaque core is formed at the center. In this disk, a number of MHD fast and slow shock pairs appear whose wave fronts are parallel to the disk. We assume that the interstellar gas obeys a polytropic equation of state with the exponent of Γ>1 above the critical density at which the core becomes optically thick against the thermal radiation from dusts ncr~1010 cm-3. After the equation of state becomes hard, an adiabatic quasi-static core forms at the center (the first core), which is separated from the isothermal contracting pseudodisk by the accretion shock front facing radially outward. By the effect of the magnetic tension, the angular momentum is transferred from the disk midplane to the surface. The gas with an excess angular momentum near the surface is finally ejected, which explains the molecular bipolar outflow. Two types of outflows are found. When the poloidal magnetic field is strong (its energy is comparable to the thermal one), a U-shaped outflow is formed, in which gas is mainly outflowing through a region whose shape looks like a capital letter U at a finite distance from the rotation axis. The gas is accelerated by the centrifugal force and the magnetic pressure gradient of the toroidal component. The other is a turbulent outflow in which magnetic field lines and velocity fields seem to be randomly oriented. In this case, globally the gas moves out almost perpendicularly from the disk, and the outflow looks like a capital letter I. In this case, although the gas is launched by the centrifugal force, the magnetic force working along the poloidal field lines plays an

  13. FORMATION OF KUIPER BELT BINARIES BY GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Youdin, Andrew N.; Richardson, Derek C.

    2010-09-15

    A large fraction of {approx}100 km class low-inclination objects in the classical Kuiper Belt (KB) are binaries with comparable masses and a wide separation of components. A favored model for their formation is that they were captured during the coagulation growth of bodies in the early KB. However, recent studies have suggested that large, {approx}>100 km objects can rapidly form in the protoplanetary disks when swarms of locally concentrated solids collapse under their own gravity. Here, we examine the possibility that KB binaries formed during gravitational collapse when the excess of angular momentum prevented the agglomeration of available mass into a solitary object. We find that this new mechanism provides a robust path toward the formation of KB binaries with observed properties, and can explain wide systems such as 2001 QW{sub 322} and multiples such as (47171) 1999 TC{sub 36}. Notably, the gravitational collapse is capable of producing {approx}100% binary fraction for a wide range of the swarm's initial angular momentum values. The binary components have similar masses ({approx}80% have a secondary-over-primary radius ratio >0.7) and their separation ranges from {approx}1000 to {approx}100,000 km. The binary orbits have eccentricities from e = 0 to {approx}1, with the majority having e < 0.6. The binary orbit inclinations with respect to the initial angular momentum of the swarm range from i = 0 to {approx}90{sup 0}, with most cases having i < 50{sup 0}. The total binary mass represents a characteristic fraction of the collapsing swarm's total initial mass, M{sub tot}, suggesting M{sub tot} equivalent to that of a radius {approx}100-250 km compact object. Our binary formation mechanism also implies that the primary and secondary components in each binary pair should have identical bulk composition, which is consistent with the current photometric data. We discuss the applicability of our results to the Pluto-Charon, Orcus-Vanth, (617) Patroclus

  14. Late time emission from core-collapse supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, C.

    The evolution and emission from the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae are modeled for epochs later than 200 days. The emission at these times reflects the nucleosynthesis in the progenitor star and in the explosion, as well as the hydrodynamical structure of the explosion. The results are compared to observations of SN 1987A. Contents: 1. Introduction. 2. Supernovae. 3. SN 1987A. 4. Late time emission (Gamma-ray thermalization (Astrophys. J., Vol. 390, p. 602 - 621 (10 May 1992); The freeze-out phase (Astrophys. J., Lett., Vol. 408, p. L25 - L28 (1 May 1993); Late spectral evolution of SN 1987A (C. Kozma, C. Fransson).

  15. PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF STRUCTURE UNDER COLLAPSE LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    J. PEPIN; E. RODRIGUEZ; ET AL

    2001-01-05

    Engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are currently developing the capability to provide a reliability-based structural evaluation technique for performing weapon reliability assessments. To enhance the analyst's confidence with these new methods, an integrated experiment and analysis project has been developed. The uncertainty associated with the collapse response of commercially available spherical marine float is evaluated with the aid of the non-linear explicit dynamics code DYNA3D (Whirley and Engelmann 1988) coupled with the probabilistic code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) (Thacker et al. 1998). Variations in geometric shape parameters and uncertainties in material parameters are characterized and included in the probabilistic model.

  16. Collapse of wormhole space and the baby-Universe production.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomimatsu, A.

    The author considers a time evolution of collapsing wormhole space, by solving the vacuum Einstein equations. The wormhole mass is assumed to be very large compared with the tube length between two mouths. The author shows an interesting dynamical effect caused by the non-Euclidean topology: a compact space of topology S1×S2 is gradually reabsorbed into the parent tube and finally disappears. This wormhole dynamics proceeds smoothly in the 4-dimensional spacetime and can be interpreted as a topology changing process of the baby-Universe production and reabsorption.

  17. Optomechanical Sensing of Spontaneous Wave-Function Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmrichter, Stefan; Hornberger, Klaus; Hammerer, Klemens

    2014-07-01

    Quantum experiments with nanomechanical oscillators are regarded as a test bed for hypothetical modifications of the Schrödinger equation, which predict a breakdown of the superposition principle and induce classical behavior at the macroscale. It is generally believed that the sensitivity to these unconventional effects grows with the mass of the mechanical quantum system. Here we show that the opposite is the case for optomechanical systems in the presence of generic noise sources, such as thermal and measurement noise. We determine conditions for distinguishing these decoherence processes from possible collapse-induced decoherence in continuous optomechanical force measurements.

  18. The one dimensional collapse models of turbulent protostellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamozdra, S. N.

    The spherically-symmetric numerical modelling of the gravitational collapse of protostellar clouds is carried out, taking ambipolar diffusion and the pressure of Alfvenic turbulence into account. It is shown that the dependency of protostar formation time on ekg (the initial turbulent-to-gravitational energies ratio) is non-monotonic because it is determined by the complex interaction of large scale magnetosonic waves with the waves of turbulence amplification. Protostellar mass is almost independent on ekg while accretion rate variations with ekg can be of order of 10%.

  19. Dissipative spherical collapse of charged anisotropic fluid in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausar, H. Rizwana; Noureen, Ifra

    2014-02-01

    This manuscript is devoted to the study of the combined effect of a viable model and the electromagnetic field on the instability range of gravitational collapse. We assume the presence of a charged anisotropic fluid that dissipates energy via heat flow and discuss how the electromagnetic field, density inhomogeneity, shear, and phase transition of astrophysical bodies can be incorporated by a locally anisotropic background. The dynamical equations help to investigate the evolution of self-gravitating objects and lead to the conclusion that the adiabatic index depends upon the electromagnetic background, mass, and radius of the spherical objects.

  20. Environmental consequences of the Retsof Salt Mine roof collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1994, the largest salt mine in North America, which had been in operation for more than 100 years, catastrophically flooded when the mine ceiling collapsed. In addition to causing the loss of the mine and the mineral resources it provided, this event formed sinkholes, caused widespread subsidence to land, caused structures to crack and subside, and changed stream flow and erosion patterns. Subsequent flooding of the mine drained overlying aquifers, changed the groundwater salinity distribution (rendering domestic wells unusable), and allowed locally present natural gas to enter dwellings through water wells. Investigations including exploratory drilling, hydrologic and water-quality monitoring, geologic and geophysical studies, and numerical simulation of groundwater flow, salinity, and subsidence have been effective tools in understanding the environmental consequences of the mine collapse and informing decisions about management of those consequences for the future. Salt mines are generally dry, but are susceptible to leaks and can become flooded if groundwater from overlying aquifers or surface water finds a way downward into the mined cavity through hundreds of feet of rock. With its potential to flood the entire mine cavity, groundwater is a constant source of concern for mine operators. The problem is compounded by the viscous nature of salt and the fact that salt mines commonly lie beneath water-bearing aquifers. Salt (for example halite or potash) deforms and “creeps” into the mined openings over time spans that range from years to centuries. This movement of salt can destabilize the overlying rock layers and lead to their eventual sagging and collapse, creating permeable pathways for leakage of water and depressions or openings at land surface, such as sinkholes. Salt is also highly soluble in water; therefore, whenever water begins to flow into a salt mine, the channels through which it flows increase in diameter as the surrounding salt dissolves