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Sample records for accretionary lapilli ash

  1. Experimental volcanic ash aggregation: Internal structuring of accretionary lapilli and the role of liquid bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Jacob, Michael; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can release vast quantities of pyroclastic material into Earth's atmosphere, including volcanic ash, particles with diameters less than two millimeters. Ash particles can cluster together to form aggregates, in some cases reaching up to several centimeters in size. Aggregation alters ash transport and settling behavior compared to un-aggregated particles, influencing ash distribution and deposit stratigraphy. Accretionary lapilli, the most commonly preserved type of aggregates within the geologic record, can exhibit complex internal stratigraphy. The processes involved in the formation and preservation of these aggregates remain poorly constrained quantitatively. In this study, we simulate the variable gas-particle flow conditions which may be encountered within eruption plumes and pyroclastic density currents via laboratory experiments using the ProCell Lab System® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH. In this apparatus, solid particles are set into motion in a fluidized bed over a range of well-controlled boundary conditions (particle concentration, air flow rate, gas temperature, humidity, liquid composition). Experiments were conducted with soda-lime glass beads and natural volcanic ash particles under a range of experimental conditions. Both glass beads and volcanic ash exhibited the capacity for aggregation, but stable aggregates could only be produced when materials were coated with high but volcanically-relevant concentrations of NaCl. The growth and structure of aggregates was dependent on the initial granulometry, while the rate of aggregate formation increased exponentially with increasing relative humidity (12-45% RH), before overwetting promoted mud droplet formation. Notably, by use of a broad granulometry, we generated spherical, internally structured aggregates similar to some accretionary pellets found in volcanic deposits. Adaptation of a powder-technology model offers an explanation for the origin of natural accretionary

  2. Field evidence for contrasting origins of ash pellets, coated ash pellets, and accretionary lapilli: implications for the vertical structure of density currents and atmospheric ash plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branney, M. J.; Brown, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Field evidence from numerous sites reveals that adhesion of fine ash particles occurs in pyroclastic density currents as well as in lofted atmospheric plumes. Moreover, the type of aggregate in a deposit can help distinguish ashfall layers from thin, topography-draping ash deposits of pyroclastic density currents - a crucial distinction in hazard assessments. Ash aggregates additionally have potential to provide much-needed information on the little-understood vertical concentration-structure of density currents. The ashfall origin of ash-clusters and unstructured ash pellets is well established both from recent eruptions and occurrences in ashfall deposits. In contrast, there is growing evidence that some types of large, concentric-laminated accretionary lapilli grow during transport in pyroclastic density currents, as distinct from growing in lofted atmospheric plumes. On Tenerife, they occur matrix-supported within uppermost parts of ignimbrites, but are absent in the associated co-ignimbrite ashfall layers, even proximal to the ignimbrite. The ashfall layers contain only small, clast-supported unstructured pellets of fine ash, and it appears that the lofted co-ignimbrite plumes were not able to support the lapilli. Field relations of deposits on valley sides suggest that the scenario of a high-concentration density current with a buoyant co-ignimbrite ash plume may be over-simplified. They suggest, rather, that the concentrated part of the density current graded up into levels that were less-concentrated, more turbulent, hot, yet still dense enough to rush downslope. As ash pellets from the co-ignimbrite plume drop through the stratified pyroclastic density current, ash accretion is increasingly affected by the elevated temperatures, where reduced moisture levels inhibit adhesion of all but the finest ash particles to the growing lapillus, hence the development of fine-grained rims. As the lapillus descends to lower levels we infer that they heat up and harden

  3. Origin of accretionary lapilli from the Pompeii and Avellino deposits of Vesuvius

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, M.F.; Wohletz, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Accretionary lapilli from the Pompeii and Avellino Plinian ash deposits of Vesuvius consist of centimeter-sized spheroids composed of glass, crystal, and lithic fragments of submillimeter size. The typical structure of the lapilli consists of a central massive core surrounded by concentric layers of fine ash with concentrations of larger clasts and vesicles and a thin outer layer of dust. Clasts within the lapilli larger than 125 ..mu..m are extremely rare. The median grain-size of the fine ash is about 50 ..mu..m and the size-distribution is well sorted. Most constituent particles of accretionary lapilli display blocky shapes characteristic of grains produced by phreatomagmatic hydroexplosions. We have used the scanning electron microscope (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectral analysis (EDS) to investigate the textural and chemical variation along traverses from the core to the rim of lapilli from Vesuvius.

  4. Accretionary lapilli in altered tuffs associated with coal beds.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohor, B.F.; Triplehorn, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Accretionary lapilli (concentrically-zoned structures with featureless cores and layered rims, composed of volcanic materials) have been previously recognized in recent volcanic eruptions, and in rocks from obvious volcanic environments. The present paper extends the known occurrences to rocks of less obvious volcanic origin; in some cases the lapilli are the primary evidence for their volcanic origin. They are reported from tonsteins (clay beds associated with coals and generally interpreted as altered tuffs), and clays not associated with coals or previously interpreted as volcanic in origin, (flint in Missouri and Kentucky). -W.P.F.

  5. Accretionary lapilli: what’s holding them together?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Paul M.; Lynch, David K.; Buesch, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Accretionary lapilli from Tagus cone, Isla Isabela, Galápagos were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. Our main findings are (1) the lapilli formed and hardened in a few minutes while still aloft in the dispersing eruption column. (2) Palagonite rinds developed first on the basaltic glass clasts, and subsequently crystallized (3) The crystallization products contain submicron lamellar crystals of a clay (probably smectite) on the surfaces of basaltic glass clasts and (4) The interlocking of these lamellar clays from adjacent clasts binds and cements them together to form the accretionary lapillus. We argue that palagonite and possibly clay formation occur primarily in the presence of hot water vapor.

  6. 3D Tomography of Accretionary Lapilli From The Island of Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy): Spatial Arrangement, Internal Structure, Grain Size Distribution and Chemical Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Ielpo, M.; Valentini, L.; Laeger, K.; Paredes, J.; Petrelli, M.; Costa, A.; Perugini, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Secche di Lazzaro formation (7 Ka) is a phreatomagmatic deposit in the south-western part of the island of Stromboli (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy). The volcanic sequence is constituted by three main sub-units. In two of them abundant accretionary lapilli are present. We performed granulometric analysis to describe the spatial arrangement and the grain-size distribution of the lapilli inside the deposit. Lapilli were characterized by SEM investigations (BSE images). EMPA and LA-ICP-MS analyses of major and trace elements on glasses and minerals were performed. Although BSE images provide accurate morphological information, they do not allow the real 3D microstructure to be accessed. Therefore, non-invasive 3D imaging of the lapilli was performed by X-ray micro-tomography (X-mCT). The results of the X-mCT measurements provided a set of 2D cross-sectional slices stacked along the vertical axis, with a voxel size varying between 2.7 and 4.1 mm, depending on the size of the sample. The X-mCT images represent a mapping of X-ray attenuation, which in turn depends on the density of the phases distributed within the sample. This technique helped us to better constrain the particle and crystal distribution inside the accretionary lapilli. The recognized phases are: glass, clinopyroxene, plagioclase and Ti-Fe minerals. We discover also a high concentration of Na, Cl and SO3 in the ash matrix. This evidence is ubiquitous in all the accretionary lapilli. The work presented here could define a new route for future studies in the field of physical volcanology as X-ray micro-tomography could be a useful, non destructive technique to better characterize the internal structure of accretionary lapilli helping us to describe grain-size distribution of component particles and their spatial distribution within aggregates.

  7. Accretionary lapilli, tektites, or concretions: the ubiquitous spherules of Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, Barry E.

    2004-11-01

    One of the most enigmatic discoveries made by the NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity (MER-B) at the Meridiani Planum landing site are the ubiquitous spherules referred to as "blueberries" by the science team. They cover the entire landing area and can be seen in every direction within view of the rover cameras. Subsequent analysis of a small grouping of the spherules laying on top of a rock outcrop by Mossbauer spectroscopy showed an intense hematite signature not found on the rock or in the surrounding basaltic soils. Spherules were also found attached to and embedded within sedimentary sulfate rock outcrops found at the landing area that have been determined by the MER science team as having been formed in an acidic liquid water environment. The appearance of most of the Meridiani spherules is strikingly similar to the morphology and size of terrestrial accretionary lapilli and show similarities to terrestrial tektites. Accretionary lapilli are spherical balls and fragments with a concentric layered structure that are formed by a variety of mechanisms including hydrovolcanic eruptions, geysers and large meteorite impacts in water. Tektites are glassy impact spherules that form as a result of large meteorite impacts and also seem apparent in some of the rover images. Tektites can be perfectly spherical or have teardrop and dumbbell shapes. A lack of a visible volcanic source capable of producing high volumes of accretionary lapilli as seen in the MER-B images, in combination with the strong spectral signature of hematite, that some of the spherules display, led the MER science team to favor a concretion hypothesis thus far. All of these types of spherules involve interaction of with surface water or ice to form. Problems exist in explaining how the Martian "concretions", if that is indeed what they are, are of such uniform size and have such a wide distribution. Evidence from Martian orbit and on the surface indicate that the Meridiani Planum landing ellipse

  8. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within <1 km of the vent. The deposits within the A418 pipe, Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (<62 μm). Secondly, the ash aggregates indicate the involvement of moisture coupled with the presence of dilute expanded eruption clouds. The structure and distribution of these deposits throughout the kimberlite conduit demand that aggregation and deposition operate entirely within the confines of the vent; this indicates that aggregation is a rapid process. Ash aggregates within glaciovolcanic sequences are also rarely documented. The

  9. Role of Water and Ice in Ash Aggregation: Constraints from the Upper Scoriae 1 Deposit, Santorini, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durant, A. J.; Ernst, G. G.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanic eruption clouds can disperse ash over large areas, posing hazards on the ground and for air traffic. One distant goal is to develop much needed risk models of ash fallout. This however, is hindered by incompletely understood aspects, one of which is ash aggregation and especially the role of liquid water and ice. We analysed accretionary lapilli-rich fall deposits from Santorini, interpreted here to have formed from eruption clouds elutriated from energetic base surges rich in water, which condensed and froze during rise while interacting with ash. Investigation methods included fieldwork, hand sample binocular microscopy, lapilli and particle size analysis, SEM, EPMA and basic modelling of aggregate settling. Field data indicate both ductile and brittle deformation of aggregates during deposition. Lapilli size distributions peak sharply at 2.5 mm with few aggregates ~10 mm, but most <4.5 mm. Lapilli display a volumetrically-dominant, poorly sorted, coarse-grained core and a thin, fine-grained rim. Particle size distributions in the core and rim peak at 45-70 microns and 10-30 microns (MALVERN and SEM data), with a sharp grain size break. This is consistent with growth by wet collection where aggregate size is limited by `drop break-up'. Fine ash rims imply freezing halts wet accretion, and lapilli >4.5 mm indicate accretion proceeds similar to hailstone growth. Insights from hailstone studies and experiments of Gilbert & Lane (1994) suggest that a liquid skin is needed to aggregate fine rim ash, thus constraining rimming processes to approximately 5-8 km asl. Multiple fine rims indicate recycling of frozen accretionary lapilli. Close association of fine vesiculated ash and large lapilli (i.e. contrasting Vt) in the deposit suggests that fallout of lapilli and mud rain was coeval, perhaps due to a settling-driven instability at the umbrella base. A new conceptual model accounting for all data observations is summarised. The new constraints will be useful

  10. Mineralogy of Juvenile Lapilli in Fort a la Corne Pyroclastic Kimberlites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, R. H.; Kjarsgaard, B. A.; McBride, J.

    2009-05-01

    Pyroclastic-dominated kimberlites of the Fort a la Corne area (Saskatchewan, Canada) are characterized by the presence of juvenile ash and lapilli tuffs together with crystal tuffs composed of discrete crystals of olivine. Juvenile lapilli are amoeboid-to-curviplanar in shape and composed of olivine set in a fine-grained groundmass. Welding of juvenile lapilli is extremely rare. Clasts can be set in a matrix of calcite and/or serpentine. Commonly, olivine crystals protrude from the clast margins. Many, but not all, clasts contain vesicles filled with carbonates and/or serpentine. Carbonates in the vesicles include Sr-bearing calcite, dolomite and Ba-Mg carbonate. Individual kimberlite units in some instances contain several juxtaposed texturally- and mineralogically-different varieties of juvenile lapilli. In others, clasts are of similar petrographic character that differ in only in their spinel mineralogy. In many clasts early-forming microphenocrystal prisms of calcite are present. The groundmass of the ash and lapilli consists of perovskite, serpentine pseudomorphs after monticellite, diverse discrete euhedral, resorbed and atoll spinels, apatite, serpentine, and laths of quench dolomite. Groundmass mica appears to be absent. Spinel assemblages differ between different vents. At Candle Lake the overall trend of spinel compositions follows that typical of hypabyssal kimberlites with individual clasts within a given unit exhibiting segments of this trend. Compositions belong to a spinel- magnesiochromite-chromite-qandilite-magnetite solid solution series. At Smeaton (FALC 169 body), spinel compositions follow the same overall trend but are all relatively more evolved, and typically Ti-rich and Cr-poor. The majority of compositions plot on the rear face of the reduced spinel prism and belong to the spinel- qandilite-ulvospinel-magnetite series. It is concluded that spinels in Fort a la Corne kimberlites follow the "normal" evolutionary trend of spinel compositions

  11. Flotation Experiments with Seafloor-Sampled Pumice Lapilli, IODP 340 - Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzeler, M.; Manga, M.; White, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    A 1.25-m-thick, unconsolidated unit of pink pumice lapilli was recovered at site U1396, IODP expedition 340. The drilling site lies at the top of an entirely submarine ridge in a back-arc of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, 35 km offshore from Montserrat Island. The unit was recovered from 122 m below sea floor, at a water depth of ~800 m. Preliminary biostratigraphy and paleomagnetic analysis yield an age of ~4 Ma. This age is much older than any rocks from the island of Montserrat, suggesting that the pumice lapilli unit may have submarine origin. In addition, the pumice lapilli unit has a grading and sorting that does not match conventional eruption-fed products from air-fall or turbidity currents. The pumice lapilli unit was recovered at two holes 40 m apart, and is identical in the two cores. The change in grain size in the stratigraphy of the unit defines a weak stratification. The pumice lapilli unit comprises two main sub-units, with four ash-rich intervals. The lower sub-unit is ~20 cm thick, framework-supported, and dominated by angular white tube-pumice lapilli (2-4 mm); dense lithic clasts (2 mm) are concentrated at the base of this sub-unit. The upper sub-unit is 1 m thick, and mostly composed of angular to sub-angular, white tube pumice lapilli (average 4 mm, max 32 mm), in a pink ash matrix. The ash is chiefly composed of micro-pumice clasts, feldspar and ferromagnesian crystal fragments, glass shards, and lithic clasts that commonly contain fresh pyrite. Three main parameters constrain the floatability of pumice clasts in water: vesicularity, clast size and shape, and clast temperature. The connected vesicularity of the pumice clasts was measured by subtracting the weight of dry pumice clasts from their water-saturated weight, and by functional stereology applied on SEM images. Clast-size distribution and clast shape were measured by particle size analyzer (CILAS) and sieving. We carried out pyroclast flotation and settling experiments in an

  12. Environmentally-mediated ash aggregate formation: example from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Bernard, Benjamin; Delmelle, Pierre; Douillet, Guilhem A.; Lavallée, Yan; Mueller, Sebastian B.; Dingwell, Donald B.; Dobson, Kate J.

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash is generated during explosive eruptions through an array of different processes; it can be produced in large quantities and can, in some circumstances, have the potential for far-reaching impacts beyond the flanks of the volcano. Aggregation of ash particles can significantly impact the dispersal within the atmosphere, and its subsequent deposition into terrestrial or aquatic environments. However, our understanding of the complex interplay of the boundary conditions which permit aggregation to occur remain incomplete. Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, has been intermittently active since 1999. In August 2006, a series of pyroclastic density currents (PDC) were generated during a series of dry, Vulcanian explosions and travelled down the western and northern flanks of the volcano. In some locations, the related PDC deposits temporarily dammed the Chambo river, and the residual heat within those deposits produced vigorous steam plumes. During several field campaigns (2009-2015), we mapped, sampled, and analysed the related deposits. At the base of the Rea ravine, a large delta fan of PDC deposits had dammed the river over a length of several hundred metres. In several outcrops adjacent to the river and in small erosional gullies we found a peculiar stratigraphic layer (up to ten centimetres thick) at the top of the PDC deposits. As this layer is capped by a thin fall unit of coarse ash that we also find elsewhere at the top of the August 2006 deposits, the primary nature is without doubt. In this unit, we observed abundant ash aggregates up to eight millimetres in diameter within a poorly sorted, ash-depleted lapilli tuff, primarily comprised of rounded pumiceous and scoriaceous clasts of similar size. Leaching experiments have shown that these aggregates contain several hundred ppm of soluble sulphate and chloride salts. Recent laboratory experiments (Mueller et al. 2015) have suggested that in order for accretionary lapilli to be preserved within ash

  13. The origin of pelletal lapilli in explosive kimberlite eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, T. M.; Brown, R. J.; Tait, M. A.; Hincks, T. K.

    2012-05-01

    Kimberlites are volatile-rich magmas from mantle depths of >=150km and are the primary source of diamonds. Kimberlite volcanism involves the formation of diverging pipes or diatremes, which are the locus of high-intensity explosive eruptions. A conspicuous and previously enigmatic feature of diatreme fills are 'pelletal lapilli'--well-rounded clasts consisting of an inner 'seed' particle with a complex rim, thought to represent quenched juvenile melt. Here we show that these coincide with a transition from magmatic to pyroclastic behaviour, thus offering fundamental insights into eruption dynamics and constraints on vent conditions. We propose that pelletal lapilli are formed when fluid melts intrude into earlier volcaniclastic infill close to the diatreme root zone. Intensive degassing produces a gas jet in which locally scavenged particles are simultaneously fluidised and coated by a spray of low-viscosity melt. A similar origin may apply to pelletal lapilli in other alkaline volcanic rocks, including carbonatites, kamafugites and melilitites.

  14. Silicate glass micro and nanospherules generated in explosive eruptions of ultrabasic magmas: Implications for the origin of pelletal lapilli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo Sánchez, M.; Sarrionandia, F.; Arostegui, J.; Gil Ibarguchi, J. I.

    2015-02-01

    The genesis of spherical ash to lapilli-sized clasts with a central phenocryst or lithic fragment, mantled by a rim of fine-grained juvenile material that includes abundant concentrically arranged prismatic crystals, is interpreted as either: (i) the result of the spinning of a magma bleb with a crystalline kernel in a fluidized system, or (ii) the accretion of small melt droplets to a previously crystallized nucleus in a gas jet. We demonstrate that the rims of pelletal lapilli within tephras of the Cabezo Segura volcano (Calatrava, Spain) are clastic and were formed by the progressive welding of juvenile crystals and silicate glass droplets, and, to a lesser extent, filaments (both melt in origin) around a large crystalline nucleus. Our results support the accretion hypothesis and offer explicit and new images of the melt droplets that were so far considered hypothetical particles. These results indicate also that nanometre-scale juvenile pyroclasts (melt droplets and crystals) can be generated in explosive eruptions of ultrabasic magmas. Those pyroclasts can be subsequently welded together inside a dense gas jet generating pelletal lapilli and ash.

  15. Phreatomagmatic and phreatic fall and surge deposits from explosions at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, 1790 a.d.: Keanakakoi Ash Member

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhie, J.; Walker, G.P.L.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    In or around 1790 a.d. an explosive eruption took place in the summit caldera of Kilauea shield volcano. A group of Hawaiian warriors close to the caldera at the time were killed by the effects of the explosions. The stratigraphy of pyroclastic deposits surrounding Kilauea (i.e., the Keanakakoi Ash Member) suggests that the explosions referred to in the historic record were the culmination of a prolonged hydrovolcanic eruption consisting of three main phases. The first phase was phreatomagmatic and generated well-bedded, fine fallout ash rich in glassy, variably vesiculated, juvenile magmatic and dense, lithic pyroclasts. The ash was mainly dispersed to the southwest of the caldera by the northeasterly trade winds. The second phase produced a Strombolian-style scoria fall deposit followed by phreatomagmatic ash similar to that of the first phase, though richer in accretionary lapilli and lithics. The third and culminating phase was phreatic and deposited lithic-rich lapilli and block fall layers, interbedded with cross-bedded surge deposits, and accretionary lapilli-rich, fine ash beds. These final explosions may have been responsible for the deaths of the warriors. The three phases were separated by quiescent spells during which the primary deposits were eroded and transported downwind in dunes migrating southwestward and locally excavated by fluvial runoff close to the rim. The entire hydrovolcanic eruption may have lasted for weeks or perhaps months. At around the same time, lava erupted from Kilauea's East Rift Zone and probably drained magma from the summit storage. The earliest descriptions of Kilauea (30 years after the Keanakakoi eruption) emphasize the great depth of the floor (300-500 m below the rim) and the presence of stepped ledges. It is therefore likely that the Keanakakoi explosions were deepseated within Kilauea, and that the vent rim was substantially lower than the caldera rim. The change from phreatomagmatic to phreatic phases may reflect the

  16. The origin of pelletal lapilli in explosive kimberlite eruptions.

    PubMed

    Gernon, T M; Brown, R J; Tait, M A; Hincks, T K

    2012-01-01

    Kimberlites are volatile-rich magmas from mantle depths of ≥ 150  km and are the primary source of diamonds. Kimberlite volcanism involves the formation of diverging pipes or diatremes, which are the locus of high-intensity explosive eruptions. A conspicuous and previously enigmatic feature of diatreme fills are 'pelletal lapilli'--well-rounded clasts consisting of an inner 'seed' particle with a complex rim, thought to represent quenched juvenile melt. Here we show that these coincide with a transition from magmatic to pyroclastic behaviour, thus offering fundamental insights into eruption dynamics and constraints on vent conditions. We propose that pelletal lapilli are formed when fluid melts intrude into earlier volcaniclastic infill close to the diatreme root zone. Intensive degassing produces a gas jet in which locally scavenged particles are simultaneously fluidised and coated by a spray of low-viscosity melt. A similar origin may apply to pelletal lapilli in other alkaline volcanic rocks, including carbonatites, kamafugites and melilitites. PMID:22588294

  17. What is the role of pyroclastic density currents in volcanic ash aggregation? Perspectives from a phreatoplinian eruption deposit, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eaton, A. R.; Wilson, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    This study documents the processes and products of volcanic ash aggregation within individual phases of the 25.4 ka Oruanui super-eruption from Taupo volcano, New Zealand. Textural and stratigraphic relationships of aggregates are examined in seven of the ten erupted units, which range from relatively dry styles of eruption and deposition (fall units 2, 5) to mixed (units 6, 7, 8) and dominantly wet (unit 3). Aggregate structures and grain size distributions shift abruptly over vertical scales of cm to dm within and between eruptive units, providing diagnostic features that identify deposits emplaced as vertical fallout or pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). The six categories of ash aggregates documented here are used to infer distinct volcanic and meteorological interactions in the eruption cloud related to dispersal characteristics and mode of emplacement. Our field observations support the notion that deposits bearing matrix-supported accretionary lapilli with complex internal layering and abundant rim fragments are associated with emplacement of PDCs. However, on the basis of grain size distributions and field relationships, it is inferred that these types of ash aggregates formed their ultrafine (<10 μm ash) outer layers in the overriding fine ash cloud elutriated from PDCs, not during transport within the basal portion of ground-hugging currents. The propagation of voluminous PDCs beneath an overriding buoyant plume - whether coignimbrite or vent-derived in origin - is proposed to generate the observed, concentrically layered accretionary lapilli by producing wedge-like updrafts of convectively unstable, ash-laden air. The apparent coarsening of mean grain size with distance from source, which is observed in the aggregate-bearing fall deposits, reflects a combination of multi-level plume transport and preferential scavenging of fine ash <250 μm. Proximal fallout and melting of ice in the clouds was likely to have contributed a key source of liquid water

  18. The nature, origins and distribution of ash aggregates in a large-scale wet eruption deposit: Oruanui, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Wilson, Colin J. N.

    2013-01-01

    This study documents the processes and products of volcanic ash aggregation in phreatomagmatic phases of the 25.4 ka Oruanui supereruption from Taupo volcano, New Zealand. Detailed textural and stratigraphic relationships of aggregates are examined in six of the ten erupted units, which range from relatively dry styles of eruption and deposition (units 2, 5) to mixed (units 6, 7, 8) and dominantly wet (unit 3). Aggregate structures and grain size distributions shift abruptly over vertical scales of cm to dm, providing diagnostic features to identify deposits emplaced primarily as vertical fallout or pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). The six categories of ash aggregates documented here are used to infer distinct volcanic and meteorological interactions in the eruption cloud related to dispersal characteristics and mode of emplacement. Our field observations support the notion of Brown et al. (2010, Origin of accretionary lapilli within ground-hugging density currents: evidence from pyroclastic couplets on Tenerife. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 122, 305-320) that deposits bearing matrix-supported accretionary lapilli with concentric internal structure and abundant rim fragments are associated with emplacement of PDCs. However, on the basis of grain size distributions and field relationships, it is inferred that these types of ash aggregates formed their ultrafine ash (dominantly < 10 μm) outer layers in the buoyant plumes of fine ash lofted from PDCs, rather than during lateral transport in ground-hugging density currents. The propagation of voluminous PDCs beneath an overriding buoyant cloud - whether coignimbrite or vent-derived in origin - is proposed to generate the observed, concentrically structured accretionary lapilli by producing multiple updrafts of convectively unstable, ash-laden air. The apparent coarsening of mean grain size with distance from source, which is observed in aggregate-bearing fall facies, reflects a combination of multi-level plume transport

  19. into the accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Atsushi; Musya, Michimasa; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide and methane are major components in geofluids; however, there is little evidence showing how C-H-O fluids evolve in a subduction zone. We investigated fluid inclusions in quartz veins from the Eocene-Oligocene Shimanto belt (Murotohanto subbelt) on Muroto Peninsula, SW Japan using microthermometry and laser Raman spectroscopy. Quartz veins that cut the cleavage of the host rocks in the Murotohanto subbelt contain one-phase carbonic inclusions (CH4) and two-phase aqueous inclusions (CH4 ± CO2 vapor and H2O liquid). The vapor in the two-phase inclusions is essentially CH4 in the northern part of the belt and a CO2-CH4 mixture in the southern part; values of [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] (=CO2 / (CO2 + CH4)) vary from 0 to 0.9. Within a single CO2-bearing vein, [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] values decrease from the vein wall ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] = 0.5 to 0.9) to the vein center ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] = 0), and the homogenization temperature increases from approximately 180°C to 240°C-250°C, indicating a transition of the carbonic species from CO2-CH4 to CH4 during vein formation. CO2-dominant fluids are rare in most accretionary prisms formed under low-grade metamorphic conditions, and the generation of CO2 cannot be explained by diagenesis of organic matter in sediments under the P-T conditions of formation of the CO2-bearing veins (235°C to 245°C, 165 to 200 MPa). The CO2 fluids are distributed preferentially near an out-of-sequence thrust that brings the Murotohanto subbelt into contact with the late Oligocene-early Miocene Nabae subbelt and its many volcanic and intrusive rocks. We therefore suggest that the CO2 fluids were generated in association with near-trench magmatism during the middle Miocene and that the fluids were injected and mixed with the CH4 pore fluids of the sediments in the accretionary prism.

  20. Accretionary orogens through Earth history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cawood, Peter A.; Kroner, A.; Collins, W.J.; Kusky, T.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Windley, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    Accretionary orogens form at intraoceanic and continental margin convergent plate boundaries. They include the supra-subduction zone forearc, magmatic arc and back-arc components. Accretionary orogens can be grouped into retreating and advancing types, based on their kinematic framework and resulting geological character. Retreating orogens (e.g. modern western Pacific) are undergoing long-term extension in response to the site of subduction of the lower plate retreating with respect to the overriding plate and are characterized by back-arc basins. Advancing orogens (e.g. Andes) develop in an environment in which the overriding plate is advancing towards the downgoing plate, resulting in the development of foreland fold and thrust belts and crustal thickening. Cratonization of accretionary orogens occurs during continuing plate convergence and requires transient coupling across the plate boundary with strain concentrated in zones of mechanical and thermal weakening such as the magmatic arc and back-arc region. Potential driving mechanisms for coupling include accretion of buoyant lithosphere (terrane accretion), flat-slab subduction, and rapid absolute upper plate motion overriding the downgoing plate. Accretionary orogens have been active throughout Earth history, extending back until at least 3.2 Ga, and potentially earlier, and provide an important constraint on the initiation of horizontal motion of lithospheric plates on Earth. They have been responsible for major growth of the continental lithosphere through the addition of juvenile magmatic products but are also major sites of consumption and reworking of continental crust through time, through sediment subduction and subduction erosion. It is probable that the rates of crustal growth and destruction are roughly equal, implying that net growth since the Archaean is effectively zero. ?? The Geological Society of London 2009.

  1. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  2. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-22

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  3. Multidisciplinary observations of the 2011 explosive eruption of Telica volcano, Nicaragua: Implications for the dynamics of low-explosivity ash eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor; Rodgers, Mel; LaFemina, Peter; Witter, Molly; Roman, Diana; Muñoz, Angelica; Tenorio, Virginia; Alvarez, Julio; Jacobo, Vladimir Conde; Nilsson, Daniel; Galle, Bo; Feineman, Maureen D.; Furman, Tanya; Morales, Allan

    2014-02-01

    We present multidisciplinary observations of the March-June 2011 VEI 2 eruptive episode of the basaltic-andesite Telica volcano, Nicaragua, which allow for a comprehensive study of the eruption mechanics of low-explosivity eruptions at persistently active volcanoes. The observations are from a dense network of seismic and GPS instrumentation augmented by visual observations of the eruptive episode, geochemical and petrologic analysis of eruptive products, plume SO2 measurements, and temperature measurements of fumaroles inside and outside the active vent. The 2011 eruptive episode was Telica's most explosive since 1999 and consisted of numerous vulcanian explosions, with maximum column heights of 1.5-2 km above the crater rim, depositing a low volume of dominantly hydrothermally altered ash. Based on observed variations in seismicity, temperature, and SO2 flux, the lack of deformation of the edifice, the non-juvenile origin of and predominance of accretionary lapilli in the ash, we propose that temporary sealing of the hydrothermal system between ~ 0.5 and 2 km depth, allowed pressure to build up prior to vulcanian explosions, making this a phreatic eruptive episode.

  4. Hydrogeochemistry of the northern Barbados accretionary complex transect: Ocean Drilling Project leg 110

    SciTech Connect

    Gieskes, J.M. ); Vrolijk, P. ); Blanc, G. )

    1990-06-10

    Detailed studies of the major element geochemistry, oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of pore fluids, and the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of dissolved strontium have made it possible to unravel physical and chemical processes that affect the pore fluid chemistry in a transect of drill holes across the northern Barbados accretionary complex. These processes include (1) alteration of volcanic ash buried in the Pleisticene-Pliocene sediment column; (2) alteration of underlying basalts of layer 2 of the oceanic crust; (3) movement of fluids from deep in the accretionary complex along fault zones (particularly the decollement) and minor permeable layers; these fluids from deeper in the complex are characterized by low chloride concentrations and increased {sup {delta}18}O(H{sub 2}O) values, presumably as a result of dehydration of smectite interlayers; and (4) mixing processes involving the migrating fluids cause incongruities in the geochemical anomalies of these fluids.

  5. Unusual lapilli tuff ejecta erupted at Stromboli during the 15 March 2007 explosion shed light on the nature and thermal state of rocks forming the crater system of the volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, Stefano; Renzulli, Alberto; Landi, Patrizia; La Felice, Sonia; Rosi, Mauro

    2013-03-01

    Textural and mineralogical study of high-temperature, angular blocks erupted during the Stromboli explosion of 15 March 2007 was used to make inferences on the nature and thermal state of rocks forming the subsurface of the volcano' summit crater terrace. The studied ejecta consist of lapilli tuff that formed as a result of the transformation and high temperature induration (sintering) of the basaltic scoriae, lapilli and ash originally accumulated as loose tephra during the current activity of the volcano. The main processes leading to the tephra transformation were investigated through microstructural observations, mineral and glass analyses (SEM-EDS and EMP analyses). Investigations revealed that subsolidus reactions and partial melting of the tephra occurred, at temperatures higher than 600 °C and under variable fO2 conditions from QFM to HM buffering curves. In some blocks, evidence of high-T reheating and partial melting at the expense of secondary hydrothermal minerals was also observed. In order to track the subsolidus reheating history of the basaltic pyroclasts, a detailed study of the pseudomorphic phases and reactions after olivine, driven by iron oxidation under high-T conditions, was performed. The observed mineralogical transformation suggests that the lapilli tuff material, originating from the burial of tephra routinely accumulated by persistent Strombolian explosions within the crater terrace, were in some cases altered by the circulation of acidic fluids and were in any case reheated due to isotherm rise forced by high heat flux and gas streaming delivered by the underlying magma system. It is worth noting that the ejection of these unusual volcanic lithotypes was possible because a few days before the 15 March 2007 event, the craters were clogged with lapilli tuff material that slid into the crater bottom between 7 and 9 March. Findings of this study suggest that the scattered permanently active vents and shallow conduits of Stromboli are

  6. Quantify ash aggregation associated to the 26 April 1979 Saint Vincent de la Soufrière eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poret, Matthieu; Costa, Antonio; Folch, Arnau

    2016-04-01

    The 26 April 1979 an eruption occurred at Saint Vincent de la Soufrière volcano, West Indies, generating an extended tephra fallout deposit from the slope of the volcano toward the South of the island. This event was observed and studied by Brazier et al. (1982). This study provided a few tens of field observations that allowed an estimation of the tephra loading map and other observations on volcanological parameters such as eruptive column height, duration and erupted volume. They also provided information related to aggregation that was significant during the eruption. Here, the field observations and the meteorological fields are used in order to reconstruct the tephra dispersal by using the Fall3D model. The main goal is to better quantify the total mass of fine ash that aggregated during the eruption providing important information and constraints on aggregation processes. The preliminary results show that field observations are well captured using the simplified aggregation parameterization proposed by Cornell et al. (1983) whereas accretionary lapilli can be described adding a second aggregate class (with a diameter of 2 mm, a density of 2000 kg/m3 and a sphericity of 1) representing only a few percentage of the total amount of tephra. Such percentage was estimated by an empirical approach best fitting field observation. The simulation that best fit the field observations gives an estimation of the column height of about 12.5 km above the vent, a mass eruption rate of 6.0d+6 kg/s and a total mass of 2.2d+9 kg erupted. To go further we will use these results within the 1-D cross-section averaged eruption column model named FPLUME-1.0 based on the Buoyant Plume Theory (BPT) that considers aggregation processes within the plume.

  7. Structure and Stratigraphy of the Barbados Accretionary Prism and the Tobago Forearc Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaderton, N. A.; Wood, L. J.; Mann, P.

    2004-12-01

    The relationship between the Lesser Antilles island arc, the Tobago forearc basin, and the Barbados accretionary prism shows classic convergent margin geometry. Barbados is the only emergent part of the accretionary prism with 80% of the island's land area being covered by Pleistocene limestone. Erosion of the limestone cap in the northeastern part of the island exposes older rocks of the prism. A 450-km2 2-D seismic data volume allows extension of these stratigraphic units offshore and definition of a regional structural framework. The relationship between the unit identified onshore as the Early Eocene to Middle Miocene Oceanic Formation and the basal unit, the intensively folded and faulted Eocene prism rocks of the Scotland Group, has long been debated. Previous proposals claim that the Oceanic Formation, consisting of pelagic clays with some ash beds, is allochthonous and has been thrusted into its present position above accreted sediments of the Scotland Group. However, seismic data show no evidence of nappes-the basis for the overthrusting hypothesis. Seismic interpretation presented here supports the opposing view that the Oceanic Formation and its offshore equivalent in the offshore Tobago forearc basin was deposited in situ and onlap the older, more highly deformed rocks of the accretionary prism. Previous workers proposed that the region's extensive mud diapirism (identified onshore as the Joes River Formation) has caused the emergence of Barbados, which continues to rise 0.44 mm/yr. However, seismic lines suggest that the island's emergence and present-day uplift is related to footwall uplift along a large, NE-striking normal fault off the east coast of the island.

  8. New Approaches for the Characterization of Poorly-Exposed Tephra deposits: the Case Study of Fontana Lapilli Eruption, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Houghton, B.

    2006-12-01

    The Fontana Lapilli deposit was erupted in late Pleistocene from a vent located around Masaya volcano (Nicaragua) and represents the product of one of the largest basaltic plinian eruptions studied so far. This eruption evolved from an initial sequence of short hawaiian-strombolian pulses via a moderately explosive phase to the main series of quasi-steady plinian episodes depositing fallout beds of highly-vesicular basaltic- andesite scorias (SiO2 ~ 53 wt%). Even though a few well preserved outcrops in medial area allowed the temporal evolution of the eruption to be well constrained, the lack of deposit exposure in proximal and distal areas prevents crucial eruption parameters to be determined using standard techniques. As a result we have applied an inversion technique in combination with the forward model TEPHRA to achieve column height and total erupted mass of the main units of Fontana Lapilli eruption. The power of this technique is that input parameters are not estimated a priori as in forward modelling but it automates the process of searching for optimal parameters employing a mathematical algorithm to guide the search for the best-fit parameter set. Results on the column height well agree with field data, whereas estimation of the total erupted mass show a significant discrepancy with values obtained using standard techniques. Such a discrepancy significantly affects the estimate of other important parameters, like mass discharge rate and eruption duration. The application of inversion techniques confirms the problematic of uncertainties associated with field data often used as input factors in numerical models, suggesting that numerical solutions should be preferred to curve- fitting techniques for the determination of eruption parameters above all in cases of poor deposit exposure.

  9. Pyroclastic Eruptions in a Mars Climate Model: The Effects of Grain Size, Plume Height, Density, Geographical Location, and Season on Ash Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, L. A.; Head, J. W.; Madeleine, J.; Wilson, L.; Forget, F.

    2010-12-01

    Pyroclastic volcanism has played a major role in the geologic history of the planet Mars. In addition to several highland patera features interpreted to be composed of pyroclastic material, there are a number of vast, fine-grained, friable deposits which may have a volcanic origin. The physical processes involved in the explosive eruption of magma, including the nucleation of bubbles, the fragmentation of magma, the incorporation of atmospheric gases, the formation of a buoyant plume, and the fall-out of individual pyroclasts has been modeled extensively for martian conditions [Wilson, L., J.W. Head (2007), Explosive volcanic eruptions on Mars: Tephra and accretionary lapilli formation, dispersal and recognition in the geologic record, J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 163, 83-97]. We have further developed and expanded this original model in order to take into account differing temperature, pressure, and wind regimes found at different altitudes, at different geographic locations, and during different martian seasons. Using a well-established Mars global circulation model [LMD-GCM, Forget, F., F. Hourdin, R. Fournier, C. Hourdin, O. Talagrand (1999), Improved general circulation models of the martian atmosphere from the surface to above 80 km, J. Geophys. Res. 104, 24,155-24,176] we are able to link the volcanic eruption model of Wilson and Head (2007) to the spatially and temporally dynamic GCM temperature, pressure, and wind profiles to create three-dimensional maps of expected ash deposition on the surface. Here we present results exploring the effects of grain-size distribution, plume height, density of ash, latitude, season, and atmospheric pressure on the areal extent and shape of the resulting ash distribution. Our results show that grain-size distribution and plume height most strongly effect the distance traveled by the pyroclasts from the vent, while latitude and season can have a large effect on the direction in which the pyroclasts travel and the final shape

  10. Taper Angle Evolution in Taiwan Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Chi, W.; Liu, C.

    2011-12-01

    Liwen Chena,b, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan The critical taper model, originally developed using onland Taiwan as an example, is governed by force balance of a horizontal compressional wedge. This model has been successfully applied to many mountainous regions around the world. Among them, Taiwan is located in an oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and the Chinese Passive margin. Previous critical taper angle studies of Taiwan are mainly focusing on utilizing land data. In this study we want to extend these studies to offshore region from the subduction zone to collision zone. Here we study the varying taper angles of the double-vergent wedge derived from 1,000 km of reflection seismic profiles in both the pro-wedge and retro-wedge locations. These profiles were collected in the last two decades. For the retro-wedge, the topography slope angle changes from 2 to 8.8 degrees; some of the steep slope suggests that some part of the retrowedge is currently in a super-critical angle state. Such dramatic changes in taper angle probably strongly affect regional sedimentary processes, including slumping, in addition to structural deformation. These complex processes might even help develop a mélange or re-open a closed basin. We are currently working on studying the taper angle evolution of the pro-wedge from subduction to arc-continent collision zone in the offshore region. Though further works are needed, our preliminary results show that the evolution of wedge angles and the geometry of the wedge are closely linked and inseparable. The structures of the subducting plate might have strong influence on the deformation style of the over-riding plate. It would be interesting to combine the angle variation with the structure interpretation of the accretionary wedge

  11. Ash Deposition Mechanisms and Plume Scrubbing in the 2008 Okmok Eruption, Umnak Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unema, J. A.; Ort, M. H.; Larsen, J. F.; Neal, C. A.; Schaefer, J. R.; Webley, P.

    2010-12-01

    Okmok volcano, Aleutian Arc, Alaska, produced five weeks of explosive eruption in July and August 2008 from vents in a 10-km-wide caldera. Water was available in the caldera in lakes and aquifers, and its interaction with erupting magma (~56% SiO2) is evidenced by observations of white steam clouds throughout the eruption, fine grain size of deposits, and consumption of caldera lakes during eruption. The opening sequence on July 12 produced the eruption’s highest column, 16 km above sea level. Basal deposits from this opening sequence, divided into 3 units, are present in the caldera and on the north-east (NE), east (E), and south-east (SE) flanks and are clast-supported coarse ash to medium lapilli at proximal and medial sites. Unit 1 is made up of vitric coarse ash and lapilli. Fine and medium ash form a matrix in the upper half. Unit 2 is open-framework coarse ash and lapilli, similar in componentry but finer than Unit 1. The uppermost unit of the opening sequence, Unit 3, is poorly sorted ash with scattered lapilli, ash pellets, and cored lapilli. The axes of Units 1 and 2 are oriented NE, while that of Unit 3 has two lobes, one NE and the other east-south-east (ESE), recording a wind shift during Unit 3 deposition. Infrared satellite imagery show a NE-directed plume at 21:45 UTC July 12 and an ESE plume 14:00 UTC July 13, the first visible wind shift during the eruption. A column sufficient to carry the large clasts in Unit 3 was present during July 12-13, not later in the eruption, so this wind shift places the timing of Unit 3 deposition between 21:45 UTC July 12 and 14:00 UTC July 13. Wind direction during the rest of the eruption, as seen in infrared satellite images, varied, sending most plumes NE, E, and SE, with southwest-directed plumes on July 30-August 4. Deposits above Units 1-3 within 7 km of vents are dominated by fine and medium ash with several distinct structures. Facies include layers (cm-dm thick) of 2-6-mm pellets of fine ash, medium ash

  12. Age of the Xalnene Ash, Central Mexico and Archeological Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Feinberg, J. M.; Waters, M. R.; Cabrales, J. A.; Castillo, P. O.; Campa, M. P.; Knight, K. B.

    2005-12-01

    Human footprints ~40 ka old have been reported from the Toloquilla quarry near Valsequillo Reservoir, ca. 15 km south of the city of Puebla in central Mexico (http://www.mexicanfootprints.co.uk/default.htm). If correct, this would be important evidence for early peopling of the Americas. The indentations interpreted as footprints and other ichnofossils occur on the surface of an indurated basaltic lapilli tuff within a several meter thick sequence of thinly bedded (1-10 cm) tuffs of similar character, lacking paleosols, erosional features or interlayered sediments, informally known as the Xalnene ash. A sample was collected at 18°55.402` N latitude and 098°09.375` W longitude from the surface on which the purported footprints occur. Lapilli were separated and analyzed by incremental heating 40Ar/39Ar methods, yielding 9 indistinguishable plateau ages averaging 1.30 ±0.03 Ma (2σ) for single lapilli (N=6) and multiple lapilli (N=3) subsamples. Though some minor discordance (presumably due to 39Ar recoil) is manifest in 5 of the age spectra, all plateaux comprise >60% of the 39Ar released and 4 or more consecutive steps. Paleomagnetic data from azimuthally unoriented bulk samples of 11.25 cm3 reveal a reverse polarity (I = -32.1°) thermoremanent component carried by titanomagnetite and a normal polarity component carried by goethite. Measurements on individual matrix-free lapilli lack the goethite component, which is presumed to be associated with the clay-rich cement. Consistency of the reverse component implies deposition of the lapilli at supra-Curie temperatures, with no postdepositional reworking. Reverse polarity is consistent with deposition during chron C1r.2r (1.77 to 1.07 Ma) as indicated by the 40Ar/39Ar data. If the features observed on the tuff are indeed footprints, their 1.3 Ma antiquity would be truly remarkable, predating by far any other evidence for human presence in the Americas and in fact predating the evolutionary emergence of Homo sapiens

  13. Ash Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Maurice R.

    Ash refers to the inorganic residue remaining after either ignition or complete oxidation of organic matter in a foodstuff. A basic knowledge of the characteristics of various ashing procedures and types of equipment is essential to ensure reliable results. Two major types of ashing are used: dry ashing, primarily for proximate composition and for some types of specific mineral analyses; wet ashing (oxidation), as a preparation for the analysis of certain minerals. Microwave systems now are available for both dry and wet ashing, to speed the processes. Most dry samples (i.e., whole grain, cereals, dried vegetables) need no preparation, while fresh vegetables need to be dried prior to ashing. High-fat products such as meats may need to be dried and fat extracted before ashing. The ash content of foods can be expressed on either a wet weight (as is) or on a dry weight basis. For general and food-specific information on measuring ash content, see references (1-11).

  14. Age of the Xalnene Ash, Central Mexico: A Rock Magnetic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Renne, P. R.; Waters, M. R.; Arroyo-Cabrales, J.; Ochoa-Castillo, P.; Perez-Campo, M.

    2007-05-01

    Features interpreted as human footprints ~40 ka old have been reported from the Toluquilla quarry near Valsequillo Reservoir, 15 km south of the city of Puebla in central Mexico (Gonzalez et al., 2006). The indentations were found in an indurated basaltic lapilli tuff informally known as the Xalnene Ash. The ~40 ka age of the tuff was based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) analysis of baked quartz-rich materials incorporated into the ash during eruption. If true, this ~40 ka age suggests that humans migrated into the Americas at a far earlier time than is currently believed. In contrast to the conclusions of Gonzalez et al. (2006), the age of the Xalnene ash was determined as 1.30 ± 0.03 Ma (2σ) based on highly reproducible 40Ar/39Ar analyses of homogenous basaltic lapilli (Renne et al., 2005). This age is further supported by paleomagnetic data, which shows a reversed polarity for the Xalnene Ash, consistent with deposition during chron C1r.2r (1.77 to 1.07 Ma). The magnetic mineralogy within the Xalnene Ash is not straightforward, and is a reflection of its volcanic origin modified by its subsequent hydrous alteration via prolonged exposure to varying water levels in Lake Valsequillo. Submicron titanomagnetite grains occur within the cores of the lapilli and are characterized by Curie temperatures between 400-500 °C corresponding to unoxidized compositions ranging from Fe2.82Ti0.18O4 to Fe2.68Ti0.32O4. Two components of magnetization were revealed during progressive alternating field (AF) demagnetization of oriented, individual lapilli: a low coercivity, reversed component that is typically removed after 15-20 mT, and a randomly oriented, but well-defined, higher coercivity component. The directions associated with the low coercivity component are consistent with the direction of the bulk rock characteristic remanent magnetization. This low coercivity component may have been acquired immediately after deposition during the final stages of cooling, or

  15. Thermochronology of the Torlesse accretionary complex, Wellington region, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamp, Peter J. J.

    2000-08-01

    The Torlesse Complex comprises several Mesozoic accretionary prism complexes together forming continental basement over large parts of New Zealand. This study focuses on the thermal history of relatively low grade graywacke rocks exposed in a transect in southern North Island that crosses the structural grain of the Torlesse Complex, including its older and younger parts. Zircon fission track (FT) ages for the Late Triassic Rakaia Terrane, which is the most inboard of the accretionary complexes, are partially annealed, some possibly reset, and may indicate early Cretaceous (134±10 Ma) cooling from maximum temperatures (Tmax), probably related to imbrication of younger complexes of the Pahau Terrane. Numerical modeling of the zircon FT ages and published 40ArA/39Ar muscovite and biotite ages for the Rakaia Terrane suggest Tmax values of 265-310°C and exhumation from depths of 10-12 km. The rocks underlying the Aorangi Range and involving the youngest accretionary complex have experienced much lower Tmax values of ≤210° and ≥110°C, bracketed by reset apatite FT ages and detrital zircon FT ages. The occurrence of a circa 100 Ma component of zircon FT ages in both the weakly and highly indurated rocks beneath the Aorangi Range, as well as in remnants of an overlying Albian accretionary slope basin (Whatarangi Formation), imply multistorey accretion and incorporation of sediment into the youngest prism. This circa 100 Ma zircon FT age component also places a maximum age on the termination of Mesozoic subduction beneath the New Zealand region. The occurrence of reset apatite FT ages across the whole of the Wellington transect indicates that at least 4 km of exhumation occurred during the late Miocene.

  16. Two contemporaneous processes of volcanic ash formation at Stromboli volcano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Andronico, Daniele; Taddeucci, Jacopo

    2014-05-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions involve the fragmentation and ejection of pyroclasts. Volcanic ash is the smallest grain size fraction and can be generated by a plethora of processes inside the conduit, during the rise of the gas-particle mixture in the conduit or the eruption column as well as during the (sub)-horizontal transport before final deposition. Volcanic deposits are commonly used to infer for fragmentation and emplacement processes. Different fragmentation modes, eruption styles and emplacement dynamics can be deciphered. Additionally, the characterisation of clasts of different types is used to infer for the ratio of fresh magma to older/altered lava or significantly older country rocks. During a 10 days observation period in May 2013, The North-East Crater of Stromboli volcano (Italy) showed weak explosive eruptions every 10-30 minutes that emitted incandescent blocks and lapilli to heights of up to 200 m above the crater as well as large amounts of black scoriaceous ash. The larger clasts were landing in the vicinity of the crater and continued rolling down the Sciara del Fuoco. Immediately upon impact, light brown ash was lofted by the rolling blocks and dispersed by the wind. These two kinds of primary volcanic ash were deposited together. The black ash is more angular and generally exhibits a higher porosity (magma with the highest porosity) whereas the brown ash (abrasion of rolling lapilli and bombs) can be significantly denser. This quasi-contemporaneous generation of fresh volcanic ash by two distinctly different processes has to be taken into consideration when discerning the ratio of juvenile/lithic components at explosive volcanoes.

  17. What Controls the Sizes and Shapes of Volcanic Ash? Integrating Morphological, Textural and Geochemical Ash Properties to Decipher Eruptive Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash particles encompass a diverse spectrum of shapes as a consequence of differences in the magma properties and the magma ascent and eruption conditions. We show how the quantitative analysis of ash particle shapes can be a valuable tool for deciphering magma fragmentation and transport processes. Importantly, integrating morphological data with ash texture (e.g. bubble and crystal sizes) and dissolved volatile data provides valuable insights into the physical and chemical controls on the resulting ash deposit. To explore the influence of magma-water interaction (MWI) on fine ash generation, we apply this multi-component characterisation to tephra from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires, Iceland. Here, coeval fissure vents spanned sub-aerial to shallow lacustrine environments. Differences in the size and morphology of pyroclasts thus reflect fragmentation mechanisms under different near-surface conditions. Using shape parameters sensitive to both particle roughness and internal vesicularity, we quantify the relative proportions of dense fragments, bubble shards, and vesicular grains from 2-D SEM images. We show that componentry (and particle morphology) varies as a function of grain size, and that this variation can be related back to the bubble size distribution. Although both magmatic and hydromagmatic deposits exhibit similar component assemblages, they differ in how these assemblages change with grain size. These results highlight the benefits of characterising ash deposits over a wide range of grain sizes, and caution against inferring fragmentation mechanism from a narrow grain size range. Elevated matrix glass S concentrations in hydromagmatic ash (600-1500 ppm) compared to those in magmatic ash and scoria lapilli (200-500 ppm) indicate interrupted vesiculation. In contrast to the subaerial 'dry' deposits, fragmentation during MWI likely occurred over a greater range of depths with quench rates sufficient to prevent post-fragmentation degassing. High

  18. The Palaeoproterozoic crustal evolution: evidences from granulite-gneiss belts, collisional and accretionary orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, M. V.; Konilov, A. N.

    2003-04-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic juvenile assemblages were emplaced within two types of mobile belts: (1) high-grade or "granulite-gneiss" belts; (2) low- and medium-grade volcano-sedimentary and volcano-plutonic belts. Type (1) belts resulted from plume-induced heating, magmatism, emergence of riftogenic basins and volcano-tectonic depressions, their filling with rift-type sediments and juvenile but strongly contaminated lavas and ash-flow deposits, high-grade recrystallization of the lower- and mid-crustal assemblages including the filling of the basins and depressions that followed in intraplate and back-arc settings, and final thrusting and exhumation caused by collision-related tectonism. Type (2) belts represent sutures containing MORB- and arc-related assemblages, together with initial rift-related assemblages formed during evolution of the short-lived, mainly Red Sea-type oceans (intracontinental collisional orogens) and systems of oceanic, island-arc and back-arc terranes amalgamated along continent margins (peripheral accretionary orogens). Palaeoproterozoic history can be subdivided into five periods: (1) 2.51-2.44 Ga superplume activity and displacement of Fennoscandia; (2) 2.44-2.0 (2.11) Ga quiescent within-plate development complicated by local plume- and plate tectonics-related processes; (3) a 2.0-1.95 Ga superplume event; (4) 1.95-1.75 (1.71) Ga combined plume- and plate tectonics-related evolution, resulting in the partial disruption of the continental crust, and formation of accretionary orogens along some margins of the supercontinent and rebirth of the supercontinent entity, and (5) < 1,75 Ga post- and anorogenic magmatism and metamorphism. Magmatic and thermal activity during the early Palaeoproterozoic was almost exclusively concentrated within Laurentia (comprising North American and Fennoscandian cratons). In contrast, late Palaeoproterozoic assemblages are distributed within all continents. The simultaneous appearance of within-plate plume

  19. Seismic reflection images of the accretionary wedge of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, T.H.; Stoffa, P.L. ); McIntosh, K.; Silver, E.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The large-scale structure of modern accretionary wedges is known almost entirely from seismic reflection investigations using single or grids of two-dimensional profiles. The authors will report on the first three-dimensional seismic reflection data volume collected of a wedge. This data set covers a 9-km-wide {times} 22-km-long {times} 6-km-thick volume of the accretionary wedge just arcward of the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. The three-dimensional processing has improved the imaging ability of the multichannel data, and the data volume allows mapping of structures from a few hundred meters to kilometers in size. These data illustrate the relationships between the basement, the wedge shape, and overlying slope sedimentary deposits. Reflections from within the wedge define the gross structural features and tectonic processes active along this particular convergent margin. So far, the analysis shows that the subdued basement relief (horst and graben structures seldom have relief of more than a few hundred meters off Costa Rica) does affect the larger scale through going structural features within the wedge. The distribution of mud volcanoes and amplitude anomalies associated with the large-scale wedge structures suggests that efficient fluid migration paths may extend from the top of the downgoing slab at the shelf edge out into the lower and middle slope region at a distance of 50-100 km. Offscraping of the uppermost (about 45 m) sediment occurs within 4 km of the trench, creating a small pile of sediments near the trench lower slope. Underplating of parts of the 400-m-thick subducted sedimentary section begins at a very shallow structural level, 4-10 km arcward of the trench. Volumetrically, the most important accretionary process is underplating.

  20. Accretionary origin for the late Archean Ashuanipi Complex of Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percival, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Ashuanipi complex is one of the largest massif granulite terrains of the Canadian Shield. It makes up the eastern end of the 2000 km long, lower-grade, east-west belts of the Archean Superior Province, permitting lithological, age and tectonic correlation. Numerous lithological, geochemical and metamorphic similarities to south Indian granulites suggest common processes and invite comparison of tectonic evolution. The Ashuanipi granulite terrain of the Cannadian Superior Province was studied in detail, and an origin through self-melting of a 55 km thick accretionary wedge seems possible.

  1. Subsea Gas Emissions from the Barbados Accretionary Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, A.; Sager, W. W.; Snow, J. E.; Max, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    We study newly identified gas plumes in the water column from the Barbados Accretionary Complex using multibeam echo soundings from cruise AT21-02. The multibeam data were used to define a region with several ~600 - 900 m tall gas plumes in the water column directly above cratered hummocky regions of the sea floor that have relatively high backscatter, at a water depth of ~1500 m. The natural gas hydrate stability zone reaches a minimum depth of ~600 m in the water column, similar to that of the tallest imaged bubble plumes, implying hydrate shells on the gas bubbles. Maximum tilt of the plume shows current shear in a direction from northwest to southeast (~128°), similar to the transport direction of North Atlantic Deep Water. The source of hydrocarbons, determined from existing geochemical data, suggests the gas source was subjacent marine Cretaceous source rocks. North-south trending faults, craters and mud volcanoes associated with the gas plumes point to the presence of a deep plumbing system and indicate that gas is a driver of mud volcanism. The widespread occurrence of seafloor morphology related to venting indicates that subsea emissions from the Barbados Accretionary Complex are substantial.

  2. Multifrequency radar imaging of ash plumes: an experiment at Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnadieu, Franck; Freret-Lorgeril, Valentin; Delanoë, Julien; Vinson, Jean-Paul; Peyrin, Frédéric; Hervier, Claude; Caudoux, Christophe; Van Baelen, Joël; Latchimy, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash emissions in the atmosphere are hazardous to aviation while ash fallout affects people and human activities and may cause damage to infrastructures and economic losses. In the framework of the French Government Laboratory of Excellence ClerVolc initiative, an experiment was carried out on Stromboli volcano (Italy), between 28 September and 4 October 2015. The aim was to retrieve various physical properties of the ash plumes, especially the mass loading parameters which are critical for the modelling of ash dispersal. We used a complementary set of cutting edge techniques recording in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The innovative instrument setup consisted in three radars, hyperspectral thermal infrared and dual-band UV cameras, a mini DOAS-Flyspec and a multigas sensor. A drone equipped with differential GPS was flown near the ash plumes with several sensors including SO2, CO2 and particle counter. We mainly focus on radar measurements of over 200 ash plumes and present some preliminary comparisons at three frequencies. The BASTA Doppler radar at 95 GHz, originally designed for atmospheric studies, was deployed at about 2.2 km in slant distance from the eruptive craters. It was configured to observe volumes above one of the active craters with a spatio-temporal resolution of 12.5 m and 1 s. From the same location, a 1.2 GHz volcano Doppler radar (VOLDORAD) was recording the signature of ballistics and small lapilli at 0.15 s in 60 m-deep volumes. In addition, a commercial 24 GHz micro rain Doppler radar (MRR) simultaneously recorded activity from the Rochette station, at 400 to 650 m from the active craters with a sampling rate of 10 s and a resolution of 25 m. The latter was pointing almost perpendicularly to the other radar beams. Reflectivity factors were measured inside the ash plume above the source vent by the BASTA radar (3 mm wavelength) spanning -9 to +21 dBZ. Fallout could sometimes be tracked during several minutes within

  3. Accretionary rims on inclusions in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, G. J.; Hashimoto, A.; Grossman, L.

    1985-01-01

    The origin and composition of the rim sequence on the refractory inclusion in the Allende meteorite are studied. The different textures, mineralogy, and mineral-chemistry of the four layers of the rim are described. The layers are composed of: pyroxene, needles, olivine, hedenbergite, and andradite. Tables of the element and chemical compositions of the layers are presented. The data reveals that: (1) the layers are highly porous masses of euhedral crystals with no intergrowth; (2) layers contain highly disequilibrium mineral assemblages; and (3) the thickness of the layers varies with the underlying topography. These results support the theory that rim structures are accretionary aggregates formed from accretion of independently grown particles onto the surface of inclusions. The formation of the grains in the layers and matrix from nebular condensates is studied.

  4. Accretionary rims on inclusions in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, G. J.; Hashimoto, A.; Grossman, L.

    1985-11-01

    The origin and composition of the rim sequence on the refractory inclusion in the Allende meteorite are studied. The different textures, mineralogy, and mineral-chemistry of the four layers of the rim are described. The layers are composed of: pyroxene, needles, olivine, hedenbergite, and andradite. Tables of the element and chemical compositions of the layers are presented. The data reveals that: (1) the layers are highly porous masses of euhedral crystals with no intergrowth; (2) layers contain highly disequilibrium mineral assemblages; and (3) the thickness of the layers varies with the underlying topography. These results support the theory that rim structures are accretionary aggregates formed from accretion of independently grown particles onto the surface of inclusions. The formation of the grains in the layers and matrix from nebular condensates is studied.

  5. Structure of a growing accretionary prism, Hikurangi margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, F. J.; Hampton, M.; Childs, J.; Fisher, M. A.; Lewis, K.; Pettinga, J. R.

    1986-08-01

    The Hikurangi margin of eastern North Island, New Zealand, represents the feather edge of the Indian plate at its convergent boundary with the subducting Pacific plate. A migrated seismic reflection profile across this margin clearly displays the structural evolution of an accretionary prism. A 25-km-wide band of “protothrusts” is delineated between the toe of the slope and a converging seamount; this illustrates an early stage in the seaward propagation of a deformation front. Landward-tilted trench-slope basins are separated by ridges that have clearly defined thrusts, which appear to sole out at a decollement. The decollement continues at an angle of only 3° beneath the 150-km-wide margin to a depth of 14 km near the coast where it coincides with an onshore zone of high seismicity.

  6. Sediment compaction and fluid migration in the Makran Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minshull, Tim; White, Robert

    1989-06-01

    The Makran continental margin in the Gulf of Oman forms the seaward extremity of an accretionary sediment prism which extends several hundred kilometers inland. A recently acquired multichannel seismic reflection profile shot across the margin imaged the structure of the prism in greater detail than was previously possible and allowed us to investigate the relationship between deformation and pore fluid motion in the region. Velocity analyses of the common midpoint gathers reveal a marked change in velocity structure at the toe of the accretionary wedge, as seen in previous sonobuoy wide-angle data. Accreted sediments show significantly higher vertical velocity gradients than those of sediments entering the prism; this change is interpreted as due to porosity reduction as pore fluids are squeezed out of the compacting sediment. A prominent "bottom simulating reflector" appears 500-800 m beneath the sea bed. Several lines of evidence suggest that this reflector represents the base of a gas hydrate zone underlain by widespread free gas, which may be exsolved from pore water migrating from deep within the sediment pile up permeable fault planes imaged in the profile. The hydrate reflector appears to shallow in the region of some faults, suggesting a temperature anomaly due to the presence of warm pore fluids. A heat flow profile derived from the depth of the hydrate reflector does not show the expected landward decrease as the sediment pile thickens. Simple thermal modeling suggests that advective heat flow within the prism may explain this anomaly. The inferred presence of overpressured pore fluids in the Makran suggests that accreted sediments have a low permeability. The seismic evidence suggests a two-stage compaction process, with rapid initial dewatering through intergranular permeability as sediment enters the prism followed by a buildup of pore pressure as the permeability decreases and fluid migration is restricted to fault zones.

  7. The Cimmerian accretionary wedge of Anarak, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Malaspina, Nadia; Zanchetta, Stefano; Berra, Fabrizio; Benciolini, Luca; Bergomi, Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; Javadi, Hamid Reza; Kouhpeyma, Meyssam

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence in Iran of several ophiolite belts dating between Late Palaeozoic to Triassic poses several questions on the possible existence of various sutures marking the closure of the Palaeotethys ocean between Eurasia and this Gondwana-derived microplate. In this scenario, the Anarak region in Central Iran still represents a conundrum. Contrasting geochronological, paleontological, paleomagnetic data and reported field evidence suggest different origins for the Anarak Metamorphic Complex (AMC). The AMC is either interpreted, as: (1) relict of an accretionary wedge developed at the Eurasia margin during the Palaeotethys subduction as part of the Cimmerian suture zone of NE Iran, displaced to Central Iran by a large counter-clockwise rotation of the central Iranian blocks; (2) autochthonous unit forming a secondary branch of the main suture zone. Our structural, petrographic and geochemical data indicate that the AMC consists of several metamorphic units also including dismembered "ophiolites" which display different tectono-metamorphic evolutions. Three main ductile deformational events can be distinguished in the AMC. The Morghab and Chah Gorbeh complexes preserve a different M1 metamorphism, characterized by blueschist relics in the S1 foliation of the former unit, and greenschist assemblages in the latter. They share a subsequent similar D2 deformational and M2 metamorphic history, showing a prograde metamorphism with syn- to post-deformation growth of blueschist facies mineral assemblages on pre-existing greenschist facies associations. High pressure, low temperature (HP/LT) metamorphism responsible for the growth of sodic amphibole has been recognized also within marble lenses at the contact between the Chah Gorbeh Complex and serpentinites. Evidence of HP/LT metamorphism also occurs in glaucophane-bearing meta-pillow lavas and serpentinites, which contain antigorite and form most of the "ophiolites" within the AMC. Structural relationships show that the

  8. Structural development of the North-Sumatran Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geersen, Jacob; McNeill, Lisa; Henstock, Tim; Gaedicke, Christoph; Ladage, Stefan; Kopp, Heidrun

    2014-05-01

    The accretionary prism of northern Sumatra differs from classical prism examples in a number of ways. It consists of an almost flat, up to 130 km wide plateau and a small but steep outer wedge. Along its entire width from the deformation front to the rear of the prism it is composed of multiple, up to 5 km thick undeformed blocks of layered sediments that are adjacent to seismically chaotic units. The intact thrust blocks are the same thickness as the 5 km thick incoming sediment section and are usually bounded on both sides by steep landward and seaward vergent faults. Similar sedimentary blocks, bounded by conjugate normal faults that relate to bending of the subducting oceanic plate, are also observed in the incoming section. Another striking structural feature is the occurrence of landward vergent (seaward dipping) thrust faults in the outer prism. These unusual deformation structures differ from the common fold-and-thrust belt model in the dip direction of the thrust sheets and have, to a similar extent, only been reported from the Cascadia margin. Seismic reflection data also image a series of high-amplitude negative-polarity reflective faults in the prism and the incoming sediment section that only produce minor displacements. These faults do not intersect the seafloor or the plate-boundary at depth and dip both landward and seaward at a lower angle than most prism thrust faults. We use a combination of reflection seismic and bathymetric data to investigate the parameters and processes that lead to the development of the unusual prism structure and morphology. In addition to detailed structural and morphologic descriptions we summarize and compare fault dips in the incoming section and the prism in order to analyse how proto-deformation of oceanic plate sediments influences the structural development of the prism. We present a conceptual model in line with our observations that could be transferable to accretionary margins with a similar geologic history

  9. The formation and fate of fine volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, W. I.; Durant, A. J.; Horwell, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash is fragmental magma and occurs in size ranges from the lapilli boundary (2 mm) to less than 0.1 μm in diameter. Satellite remote sensing measurements show that ash with diameter <100 μm falls out much faster than it could fall as simple particles. We applied laser diffraction methods to determine the grain size distribution (GSD) of an archive of more than 200 samples of fine-grained ashfalls from plinian, subplinian and peleean eruptions of the past 40 years which range from basalt to dacite. The samples were collected days after eruption and fall. Results show that fine ash fell largely at distances which, based on atmospheric trajectory analyses, represent one to several hours of atmospheric residence, far less than their GSD would suggest based on diameter and fall as simple particles. Many samples show bimodal GSD with larger pyroclasts possibly capturing smaller ones during fall. A large number of samples from all the volcanoes studied have unimodal GSD with Mdφ of 4-7 (8-63 μm diameter) and have fine tails. These samples generally do not contain pyroclasts which could have fallen as simple particles. There is no simple relationship between GSD and distance among these samples. Ice generated from the convective eruption column is strongly suspected to play an important role in the fallout of fine ash, especially in more intense eruptions which reach the upper troposphere or stratosphere because the residence of fine ash matches the residence time of ice, which is unstable in the dry atmosphere. Among important issues that need clarification are: What processes cause fine ash to form? What controls the locations of fall? We found abundant evidence that one process which generates fine ash is milling by pyroclastic flows and elutriation of resulting fines. We also can show that fine ash falls out in a pattern that differs markedly from coarser ash that falls in the turbulent flow regime and that this pattern seems to be related to wind fields

  10. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  11. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-05-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  12. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  13. Structural development of the western Makran Accretionary Complex, Offshore Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burberry, C. M.; Jackson, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Makran Accretionary Complex (MAC), which straddles the southern offshore regions of Iran and Pakistan, is a fold-thrust system bound by the Murray Ridge and Ornach Nal Fault to the east, and the Minab Fault System (MFS) to the west. It is c. 1000 km wide and the frontal c. 125 km of the system is submerged beneath the Gulf of Oman. Relatively little is known about this system, despite the fact that constitutes a large portion of the Central Tethyan Orogen and is one of the largest accretionary complexes in the world. We use offshore 2D seismic reflection data to investigate the structural style and evolution of the Iranian segment of the MAC. The MAC is divided into two morphologically distinct domains: (i) a northern domain (Domain 1), which is located landward of a prominant break-in-slope on the seabed and is characterised by a series of normal fault-bound sub-basins that are approximately 50 km wide, and which contain numerous, unconformity-bound seismic units; and (ii) a southern domain (Domain 2), which is located basinward of the prominent seabed slope break, and is characterised by alternating ridges and troughs. Seismic data indicate that these structures are laterally continuous (over 100 km long) north-dipping thrust faults, which are overlain by south-verging, non-cylindrical, fault-propagation folds. Towards the western end of the study area, immediately offshore of the prominent onshore trace of the MFS, there is no single structure that can be reliably interpreted as the offshore extension of the MFS. Instead, a series of oblique-slip faults with thrust and strike-slip components are identified, spanning a zone that is c. 40 km wide. In the north and close to the coastline, the faults are dominantly strike-slip, whereas further south, closer to the deformation front, the thrust-sense component is more important. Irrespective of their slip sense, faults in this zone have a similar N-S strike to the onshore trace of the MFS. In addition, the basin

  14. Extreme efficiency of mud volcanism in dewatering accretionary prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, Achim; Klaeschen, Dirk; Mascle, Jean

    2001-07-01

    Drilling results from two mud volcanoes on the Mediterranean Ridge accretionary complex as well as bottom sampling and the wealth of geophysical data acquired recently have provided fundamental knowledge of the 3D geometry of mud extrusions. Mud volcanism is generally related to buoyancy (density inversion), and is triggered by the collision of the African and Eurasian blocks, forcing undercompacted clayey sediments to extrude along faults in the central and hinterlandward parts of the prism. Volumetric estimates of extruded mud in several well-studied areas were based on pre-stack depth-migrated seismic profiles across the entire, up to >150 km wide, prism. The resulting volumes of mud were combined with ages from mud dome drilling, so that rates of mud extrusion were obtained. Subtracting the solid rock mass from the bulk mud volume using physical property data, fluid flux as a function of mud volcanism alone has been quantified for the first time. The volume of fluid extruding with the mud is found to be variable, but reaches up to 15 km 3 fluid per km trench length and Ma along cross sections with abundant mud volcanoes. Such large fluid quantities in a region some 50-150 km behind the deformation front exceed estimates from those elsewhere (where undoubtedly the majority of the interstitial fluid is lost due to compaction). Such fluids near the backstop are likely to result predominantly from mineral dehydration and diagenetic reactions at depth, and consequently provide a window to understand deeper processes along the deep décollement. More importantly, the enormous rates with which such fluids and liquified mud escape along the out-of-sequence faults alter fluid budget calculations in subduction zones drastically.

  15. Propagation tectonics and multiple accretionary processes of the Qinling Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yunpeng; Zhang, Xiaoning; Liu, Xiaoming; Li, Wei; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Guowei; Zhang, Hongfu; Yang, Zhao; Sun, Shengsi; Zhang, Feifei

    2015-05-01

    The Qinling Orogen was built through collision between the North China and South China Blocks. Previous detailed geological, geochemical and geochronological investigations revealed that the mountain range can be divided into four tectonic units with distinct tectono-lithostratigraphy, which are, from north to south, the southern sector of the North China Block, North Qinling Belt, South Qinling Belt and northern sector of the South China Block, separated by the Kuanping, Shangdan and Mianlue sutures. According to the petrology, geochemistry and geochronology of ophiolitic mélanges and related magmatic rocks, as well as the features of sedimentary units, we think that the North China Block, the North Qinling Belt and the South China Block were originally independent continental units while the South Qinling Belt had been the northern part of the South China Block. These units experienced three episodes of accretionary tectonic processes and amalgamation from south to north. The Neoproterozoic accretion took place along the Luonan-Luanchuan Fault and Kuanping ophiolitic mélange belt as a result of southward subduction and subsequent collision between the North Qinling and North China Blocks during ca. 1.0-0.8 Ga related to the formation of the supercontinent of Rodinia. The Paleozoic accretion occurred along the Shangdan suture resulted from northward subduction of oceanic lithosphere in the Early Paleozoic and subsequent continental subduction in the Late Paleozoic. Late Triassic accretion took place along the Mianlue suture between the South Qinling and South China Blocks due to northward subduction of the Mianlue oceanic lithosphere during the Permian-Early Triassic and subsequent collision in the Late Triassic. After the Late Triassic collision along the Mianlue suture the whole Qinling Mountain range entered the phase of intense intracontinental deformation.

  16. Linking megathrust earthquakes to brittle deformation in a fossil accretionary complex.

    PubMed

    Dielforder, Armin; Vollstaedt, Hauke; Vennemann, Torsten; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Seismological data from recent subduction earthquakes suggest that megathrust earthquakes induce transient stress changes in the upper plate that shift accretionary wedges into an unstable state. These stress changes have, however, never been linked to geological structures preserved in fossil accretionary complexes. The importance of coseismically induced wedge failure has therefore remained largely elusive. Here we show that brittle faulting and vein formation in the palaeo-accretionary complex of the European Alps record stress changes generated by subduction-related earthquakes. Early veins formed at shallow levels by bedding-parallel shear during coseismic compression of the outer wedge. In contrast, subsequent vein formation occurred by normal faulting and extensional fracturing at deeper levels in response to coseismic extension of the inner wedge. Our study demonstrates how mineral veins can be used to reveal the dynamics of outer and inner wedges, which respond in opposite ways to megathrust earthquakes by compressional and extensional faulting, respectively. PMID:26105966

  17. Linking megathrust earthquakes to brittle deformation in a fossil accretionary complex

    PubMed Central

    Dielforder, Armin; Vollstaedt, Hauke; Vennemann, Torsten; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Seismological data from recent subduction earthquakes suggest that megathrust earthquakes induce transient stress changes in the upper plate that shift accretionary wedges into an unstable state. These stress changes have, however, never been linked to geological structures preserved in fossil accretionary complexes. The importance of coseismically induced wedge failure has therefore remained largely elusive. Here we show that brittle faulting and vein formation in the palaeo-accretionary complex of the European Alps record stress changes generated by subduction-related earthquakes. Early veins formed at shallow levels by bedding-parallel shear during coseismic compression of the outer wedge. In contrast, subsequent vein formation occurred by normal faulting and extensional fracturing at deeper levels in response to coseismic extension of the inner wedge. Our study demonstrates how mineral veins can be used to reveal the dynamics of outer and inner wedges, which respond in opposite ways to megathrust earthquakes by compressional and extensional faulting, respectively. PMID:26105966

  18. Accretionary complex structure and kinematics during Paleozoic arc continent collision in the southern Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Marron, J.; Brown, D.; Perez-Estaun, A.; Puchkov, V.; Gorozhanina, Y.

    2000-10-01

    The southern Urals contain a well-preserved accretionary complex that has overthrust the continental margin during arc-continent collision between the East European Craton (EEC) and the Magnitogorsk island arc in the Late Devonian. Within the accretionary complex, we study three tectonic units that differ in deformation style, and each provides a unique geodynamic implication. The Zilair Nappe, the largest and best exposed unit, consists of 5-6 km of syncollisional, arc-derived Upper Devonian to Lower Carboniferous polymictic and graywacke turbidites that were deposited across the continental margin and incorporated by frontal accretion into the accretionary complex. The Zilair Nappe is a bivergent thrust imbricate where the west-vergent thrusts dominate and have associated kilometer-scale ramp anticlines with well developed east-dipping axial planar cleavage. Along its eastern contact, however, the cleavage fans until it dips moderately westward and the folds are east-vergent. Following its emplacement, west-vergent, basement-involved thrusting that breached the whole accretionary complex imbricated the Zilair Nappe. The Timirovo Duplex is structurally beneath the Zilair Nappe, and outcrops for several tens of kilometers along its northwestern margin. The duplex forms a west-vergent thrust stack composed of a highly deformed and sheared Lower and Middle Devonian reef carbonates of the former EEC margin platform. These rocks were shallowly underplated at the base of the accretionary complex during emplacement over the margin. The Suvanyak Complex outcrops along the eastern contact of the Zilair Nappe, and consists of polydeformed greenschist facies metasediments of the former EEC slope that were offscraped, underplated and incorporated at the rear of the accretionary complex.

  19. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  20. Magnetism of cigarette ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, Neli; Jordanova, Diana; Henry, Bernard; Le Goff, Maxime; Dimov, Dimo; Tsacheva, Tsenka

    2006-06-01

    Mineral composition of cigarette ashes is well studied in the literature, but no reports are available about the magnetic fraction. Our study presents an investigation of the basic magnetic characteristics of ashes from several commercially available cigarette brands and a wood ash. Magnetic susceptibility, which is a concentration-dependent parameter in case of uniform mineralogy, shows that cigarette ashes contain relatively high amount of magnetic iron minerals, similar to that in wood ash from our study and other literature data. Magnetization data suggest that cigarette ashes contain some 0.1 wt% or lower quantity of magnetite, depending on the brand. Analyses of magnetic mineralogy imply that the main magnetic minerals in ashes from higher quality cigarette brands are magnetite and iron carbide cementite, while in ashes from lower quality brands without additives magnetic minerals are pure and substituted with foreign ions magnetite. Magnetic grain-size analysis shows that cigarette ashes contain significant amount of very fine, nano-meter sized magnetic particles, as well as coarser (up to several microns), magnetically stable grains. Thus, the magnetic study of cigarette ashes proved that these plant ashes possess non-negligible magnetic properties. The results could serve for better elucidation of mineralogy of cigarette ashes as a whole, as well as for future investigation on the presence of magnetic ultra fine particles in cigarette smoke, which may be inhaled in lungs during smoking.

  1. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  2. The Eurekan Orogeny: convergent intraplate deformation through accretionary tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip; Pysklywec, Russell; Stephenson, Randell

    2015-04-01

    The Eurekan Orogeny, which created much of the high topography (~1-2km) of Ellesmere Island and adjacent Greenland, exhibits a crustal architecture linked to intraplate orogenesis in the Cenozoic. These features occurred as a result of mountain-building processes the dynamics of which are not well understood. It is generally considered that the rotation of Greenland in the Eocene (related to sedimentary basin formation in Baffin Bay) produced compressional tectonics between Greenland and Ellesmere Island. As part of this process, the Eurekan Orogeny formed away from a traditional convergent ocean-closure plate boundary, and may represent a style of intraplate deformation. One hypothesis is the amalgamation of continental material (i.e., micro-plates) leave deformational `scars' in the crust and mantle lithosphere (specifically in the Ellesmere Island case through accretionary orogenesis in the Palaeozoic). This weakening of the lithosphere may produce episodic reactivation of faults within continental interiors. For example, lithospheric shortening at a time after continental collision could cause the previously deformed crust and mantle lithosphere to produce intraplate deformation. In this work, the geodynamic evolution of the Eurekan Orogeny and its relationship to the tectonics of the Canadian polar margin and northern Baffin Basin is explored using high-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments with the modelling code SOPALE. The modelling of the High Arctic is constrained by the first-order crustal structure of the region (deduced by local gravity field and passive seismological data). Presented are suites of numerical experiments that investigate how the pre-existing lithospheric structures (both crustal and sub-crustal) control the evolution of the resulting intraplate orogen. The influence of other primary modelling parameters, such as crustal thickness and assumed rheology, is also explored. To highlight the role of surface processes on plate

  3. Advanced ash management technologies for CFBC ash.

    PubMed

    Anthony, E J; Berry, E E; Blondin, J; Bulewicz, E M; Burwell, S

    2003-01-01

    The combustion of high-sulphur coal demands the reduction of sulphur emissions. The sorbent most often used in sulphur capture technology is calcium-based. Ashes from technologies such as circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC), therefore, contain high calcium levels. The use and disposal of these ashes poses challenges, because of highly exothermic reactions with water, high-pH leachates, and excessive expansion of solidified materials. This paper looks at the potential of two post-combustion ash treatment processes, CERCHAR hydration and AWDS disposal, in solving these challenges. A high-sulphur coal-derived CFBC ash is examined, after CERCHAR hydration treatment, in conjunction with a conventionally hydrated ash, in a range of chemical, geotechnical and utilization scenarios. The ashes are used to make no-cement and roller-compacted concrete as well as Ash Water Dense Suspensions (AWDS). The solidified mortar paste from no-cement concrete is subjected to an extensive geochemical examination to determine how solidification progresses and strength develops, from a chemical point of view. PMID:12909091

  4. Fluid venting and seepage at accretionary ridges: the Four Way Closure Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Saulwood; Muff, Sina

    2015-12-01

    Within the accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan, widespread gas hydrate accumulations are postulated to occur based on the presence of a bottom simulating reflection. Methane seepage, however, is also widespread at accretionary ridges offshore SW Taiwan and may indicate a significant loss of methane bypassing the gas hydrate system. Four Way Closure Ridge, located in 1,500 m water depth, is an anticlinal ridge that would constitute an ideal trap for methane and consequently represents a site with good potential for gas hydrate accumulations. The analysis of high-resolution bathymetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution seismic profiling and towed video observations of the seafloor shows that Four Way Closure Ridge is and has been a site of intensive methane seepage. Continuous seepage is mainly evidenced by large accumulations of authigenic carbonate precipitates, which appear to be controlled by the creation of fluid pathways through faulting. Consequently, Four Way Closure Ridge is not a closed system in terms of fluid migration and seepage. A conceptual model of the evolution of gas hydrates and seepage at accretionary ridges suggests that seepage is common and may be a standard feature during the geological development of ridges in accretionary prisms. The observation of seafloor seepage alone is therefore not a reliable indicator of exploitable gas hydrate accumulations at depth.

  5. Oceanic, island arc, and back-arc remnants into eastern Kamchatka accretionary complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchuk, A.V.; Vishnevskaya, V.S.; Izvekov, I.N. )

    1990-06-01

    The Kamchatsky Mts. accretionary complex in the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt was studied for identification of the oceanic and suprasubduction components into accretionary wedges. That complex is divided into two tectonic units. The Lower unit is formed sedimentary and tectonic melanges containing arc-related components (Late Senonian volcaniclastics and boninitic gabbro) and oceanic fragments (Fe-Ti-tholeiites, ocean island basalts, and pelagic sediments of Valanginian to Turonian age). The Upper unit consists of ductile deformed oceanic cumulates from troctolites to Fe-Ti-gabbro, 151 to 172 Ma, which are intruded MORB-like diabases with suprasubduction characteristics, 122 to 141 Ma, and are overlain by basalts similar to latter. The Lower and Upper units are separated by a SW-dipping thrust, which is related by an ophiolitoclastic olistostrome of Late Campanian to Early Maestrichtian age. Both units are covered by Paleocene authoclastic deposits. They are all thrusted over the early Neogene island arc complex, 16 to 20 Ma. The Lower unit of the Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was originated in a shear zone between a Late Cretaceous island arc and an Early Cretaceous oceanic plate. The Upper unit represents a Jurassic oceanic remnant that formed a basement of Early Cretaceous back-arc or fore-arc basin. Both units were superposed in the latest Cretaceous. The Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was emplaced into the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt during late Neogene by collision of the early Neogene island arc.

  6. Fluid venting and seepage at accretionary ridges: the Four Way Closure Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Saulwood; Muff, Sina

    2016-06-01

    Within the accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan, widespread gas hydrate accumulations are postulated to occur based on the presence of a bottom simulating reflection. Methane seepage, however, is also widespread at accretionary ridges offshore SW Taiwan and may indicate a significant loss of methane bypassing the gas hydrate system. Four Way Closure Ridge, located in 1,500 m water depth, is an anticlinal ridge that would constitute an ideal trap for methane and consequently represents a site with good potential for gas hydrate accumulations. The analysis of high-resolution bathymetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution seismic profiling and towed video observations of the seafloor shows that Four Way Closure Ridge is and has been a site of intensive methane seepage. Continuous seepage is mainly evidenced by large accumulations of authigenic carbonate precipitates, which appear to be controlled by the creation of fluid pathways through faulting. Consequently, Four Way Closure Ridge is not a closed system in terms of fluid migration and seepage. A conceptual model of the evolution of gas hydrates and seepage at accretionary ridges suggests that seepage is common and may be a standard feature during the geological development of ridges in accretionary prisms. The observation of seafloor seepage alone is therefore not a reliable indicator of exploitable gas hydrate accumulations at depth.

  7. Low-frequency tremors associated with reverse faults in a shallow accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Koichiro; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2009-09-01

    The shallow part of a seismogenic subduction zone is thought to play an important role in tsunami genesis during large interplate thrust earthquakes. Near the updip portion of the seismogenic zone along the Nankai trough, splay faults, which are major active reverse faults in the accretionary prism, likely rupture during large interplate earthquakes such as the 1944 Mw 8.2 Tonankai earthquake off Kii Peninsula. We observed low-frequency tremors associated with reverse faults in a shallow accretionary prism off Kii Peninsula at close range by using ocean bottom seismographs. The tremors were characterized by a dominant frequency range of 2-8 Hz and a lack of energy in the frequency range above 10 Hz. Their duration ranged from tens of seconds to a few minutes. Their source locations lay in three clusters on the landward slope of the Nankai trough. Activity in each cluster continued for from one day to two weeks. Many of the low-frequency tremors were located near the shallowest part of a major splay fault. The episodic activity of low-frequency tremors and of previously reported very-low-frequency earthquakes, which indicate reverse faulting in the shallow accretionary prism, suggests that the reverse faults in the accretionary prism are conditionally stable faults that can become unstable under sufficiently strong dynamic loading, such as that caused by a large earthquake. Such reverse faults, as typified by a splay fault, can rupture during large interplate earthquakes and generate large tsunamis.

  8. Description and mineralogy of Tertiary volcanic ash partings and their relationship to coal seams, near Homer, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Reinink-Smith, L.M.

    1985-04-01

    Outcrops of Tertiary coal-bearing units in sea cliffs of the Kenai Peninsula provide an excellent study area for volcanic ash partings in coals. Twenty mid-to late-Miocene, 50-cm to 3-m thick coal seams exposed in the sea cliffs about 10 km west of Homer contain an average of 10 volcanic ash or lapilli tuff partings each. The bedding relationships of the coal with any one parting cannot be predicted, and the contacts of the partings with the coal range from very sharp to predominantly gradational. These bedding relationships provide clues about the surface on which the ashes fell and on which the coal was accumulating. For example, some ashes fell in standing water, others on irregular subaerial surfaces. The partings are in various stages of alteration to kaolinite and bentonite, and vary in thickness from a few millimeters to about 10 cm. The consistency and texture of the partings depend on the degree of alteration; the less altered partings display visible pumice fragments and euhedral feldspars, commonly within a finer grained matrix. Separate pumice fragments, excluding matrix, can also occur as partings in the coal. The more altered partings may be wet and plastic, or they may be well indurated claystones; the colors range from gray-yellow to dark brown. The indurated prints are more common in older part of the section. The coal seams may be capped by volcanic ash partings and are commonly underlain by a pencil shale of nonvolcanic origin.

  9. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  10. Manganese formations in the accretionary belts of Japan: Implications for subduction-accretion process in an active convergent margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Santosh, M.; Maruyama, S.

    2011-08-01

    In the accretionary complexes of Japan, many bedded manganese and iron-manganese ore deposits occur, especially in the Jurassic complexes such as the Chichibu, Tamba, Mino, Ashio and Northern Kitakami belts. The manganese ores in these Jurassic accretionary complexes probably formed from manganese nodule/crust-bearing siliceous sediments on deep-sea floor and were subsequently converted to the manganese ores by metamorphism during the subduction-accretion process. Some of the deposits also show the signatures of younger granitic intrusions. The manganese formations now incorporated within these belts are marker beds of accretionary tectonics associated with plate tectonic processes in convergent margins.

  11. Modeling Fluid Flow and Microbial Reactions in the Peru Accretionary Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Matmon, D.

    2002-12-01

    Accretionary complexes are sites where sediment compaction and deeper reactions drive large-scale flow systems that can affect global solute budgets. Extensive modeling and drilling studies have elucidated the origin of the fluids, pore pressures, duration of flow, and major flow paths in these settings. An important research goal is to quantify the effect of these flow systems on global chemical budgets of reactive solutes such as carbon. The Peru margin represents an end member setting that can serve as a basis to extend the results to other margins. The sediments are relatively high in organic carbon with an average value of 2.6%. The subduction rate at ~9 cm/yr and taper angle at 14-17° are among the largest in the world. Recent microbial studies on Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201 at the Peru accretionary margin provide many key elements needed to quantify the processes affecting organic carbon in an accretionary complex. Pore water chemistry data from Site 1230 located in the Peru accretionary prism indicate that sulfate reduction is important in the top 8 mbsf. Below this depth, methanogenesis is the dominant process and methane concentrations are among the highest measured at any site on Leg 201. The presence of high methane concentrations at shallow depths suggests that methane is transported upward in the prism by fluid flow. Measurements of in-situ pore pressures and temperatures also support the presence of upward fluid flow. A single in-situ pressure measurement at ~100 mbsf indicated an overpressure of 0.14 MPa. For a reasonable formation permeability of ~ 10-16 m2, the measured overpressure is adequate to produce flow at a rate of ~5 mm/yr. This rate is comparable to previous model estimates for flow rates in the Peru accretionary prism. In addition, curvature in the downhole temperature profile can best be explained by upward fluid flow of 1-10 mm/yr. These data are used to constrain a two-dimensional coupled fluid flow and reactive transport model

  12. Fly-ash utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerby, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The over 200 references in this bibliography cover some of the uses found for fly-ash, which range from the manufacture of bricks and as a new type of concrete to the recovery of aluminum and other valuable ores from the ash. The entries are grouped under seven headings: General, Agriculture, Brickmaking, Cement/Concrete, Land Reclamation, Resource Recovery, and Other.

  13. Estimating basal friction in accretionary wedges from the geometry and spacing of frontal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Bertram; Koyi, Hemin A.

    2001-12-01

    Elastic theory applied to the deformation in accretionary wedges is used to calculate the condition for slip along an active frontal fault and the basal décollement. The equations for calculating the stresses can be solved for the coefficient of basal friction in the situation of the formation of a new frontal thrust fault. This allows us to calculate the efficient coefficient of basal friction, which includes the weakening effect of pore-fluid pressure, from geometric parameters and material properties only. The geometric parameters, like fault dip and layer thickness, can be derived from high-resolution seismic cross-sections. Application of our analysis to the Makran and the Nankai accretionary wedge allows us to estimate the upper limit of the effective coefficient of basal friction, μb≈0.16 and μb≈0.2, in these two areas respectively.

  14. Pre-collisional accretionary growth of the southern Laurasian active margin, Central Pontides, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aygül, Mesut; Okay, Aral I.; Oberhänsli, Roland; Sudo, Masafumi

    2016-03-01

    Cretaceous subduction-accretionary complexes crop out over wide areas in the central part of the Pontides, northern Turkey. To the north, the wedge consists of a low-grade metaflysch sequence with blocks of marble, Na-amphibole-bearing metabasite (PT = 7-12 kbar; 400 ± 70 °C) and serpentinite. 40Ar/39Ar phengite ages from the phyllites of the metaflysch are ca. 100 Ma. The metaflysch sequence is underlain by oceanic crust-derived HP/LT metabasites and micaschists along a major detachment fault. The metabasites are epidote-blueschists consisting of glaucophane, epidote, titanite, and phengite locally with garnet. Fresh lawsonite-blueschists are exposed as blocks along the detachment fault. Peak metamorphic conditions of a garnet-blueschist are constrained to 17 ± 1 kbar and 500 ± 40 °C and of a lawsonite-blueschist to 14 ± 2 kbar and 370-440 °C. 40Ar/39Ar phengite dating on the micaschists constrains the HP/LT metamorphism as 101-92 Ma, younging southward. Middle Jurassic (ca. 160 Ma) accretionary complexes consisting of blueschist to lower greenschist facies metabasites, marble and volcanogenic metasediment intercalations are exposed at the southern part of the Cretaceous wedge. In the studied area, the North Anatolian Fault forms the contact between Cretaceous and Middle Jurassic HP/LT metamorphic rocks. Wide distribution of Cretaceous subduction-accretionary complexes implies accretionary tectonic continental growth along the Laurasian active margin. High amount of clastic sediment flux into the trench has a major effect on enlarging the wedge during the Albian. Tectonic thickening of the oceanic HP/LT metamorphic sequence, however, was possibly achieved by propagation of the décollement along the retreating slab which can create the space necessary for progressive deep level basal underplating and extension of the wedge for subsequent syn-subduction exhumation.

  15. Coal ash monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, C.G.; Wormald, M.R.

    1981-07-14

    A monitor for determining the ash content of coal in rail cars consisting of a structure including means for irradiating each car as it passes the structure with a known dose of neutrons, means for detecting and measuring the intensities of gamma -rays emitted by ash-forming elements in the coal, and means for providing an indication of the concentration of the ash-forming elements. There also are included interlocks for ensuring that the neutron source is only operated when a loaded car is in the appropriate position.

  16. New insights into the active deformation of accretionary prisms: examples from the Western Makran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, Camilla; Copley, Alex; Oveisi, Benham

    2016-04-01

    The Makran subduction zone, along the southern coasts of Iran and Pakistan, hosts one of the largest exposed accretionary wedges in the world. The western Makran has been characterised by a lack of shallow and thrust seismicity in both the instrumental and historical periods. The Mw 6.1 2013 Minab earthquake thus provides a rare opportunity to study the deformation of the accretionary wedge in the transition region between continent-continent collision, in the Zagros, and oceanic subduction, in the Makran. We study the source parameters and slip distribution of this earthquake using seismology, geodesy and field observations. We observe left-lateral strike-slip motion on a fault striking ENE-WSW; approximately perpendicular to the faults of the Minab-Zendan-Palami fault zone, the main structure previously thought to accommodate the right-lateral shear between the Zagros and the Makran. The fault that ruptured in 2013 is one of a series of approximately E-W striking left-lateral faults visible in the geology and geomorphology. These accommodate a velocity field equivalent to right-lateral shear on N-S striking planes by clockwise rotations about vertical axes. The longitudinal range of shear in the western Makran is likely to be controlled by the distance over which the underthrusting Arabian lithosphere deepens in the transition from continent-continent collision to oceanic subduction. The lack of observed megathrust seismicity in the western Makran has led to assertions that the convergence in this region may be aseismic, in contrast to the eastern Makran, which experienced an Mw8.1 earthquake in 1945. The right-lateral Sistan Suture Zone, which runs ~N-S along the Iran-Afghanistan border to the north of the Makran, appears to separate these regimes. However, right-lateral faulting is not observed south of ~27°N, within the wedge. The Minab earthquake and the 2013 Balochistan earthquake show that the Makran accretionary wedge is dominated by strike-slip faulting

  17. Synchrotron texture analysis of clay-rich sediments from the Nankai trench and accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Kai; Stipp, Michael; Leiss, Bernd; Behrmann, Jan-Hinrich

    2013-04-01

    Synchrotron diffraction is the most suitable tool for fast multi-mineral phase texture analysis of water-containing clay rich sediment samples due to short wavelengths (in the range of 0.12 Å), high energy radiation and a resulting mm- to cm-scale sample penetration. We carried out synchrotron texture analysis on a sample set from the Nankai trench and accretionary prism offshore Japan. Samples were encountered by IODP Expeditions 315, 316 and 333 of the NanTroSEIZE project from a depth range between 25 mbsf (meters below seafloor) and 522 mbsf. The accretionary prism sediments have a relatively uniform composition of approximately 40% clay minerals, 25% quartz, 25% feldspar, and up to 10% calcite. A first sample set analyzed was taken as recovered from drilling; a second sample set was additionally experimentally deformed in a triaxial deformation apparatus up to axial strains of 60%. Measurements were carried out at DESY (German Electron Synchrotron source) in Hamburg. In order to measure complete pole figures sample cylinders of 2 cm in diameter and 2 cm in length were measured in a phi angle-range from -90 to +90° in 5° steps. Rietveld refinement results using the MAUD program package show that the composition of the IODP Expedition 333 samples from the incoming plate differs slightly from the relatively uniform IODP Expedition 315 and 316 samples of the accretionary prism. They contain ~35% clay minerals, ~30% quartz and ~35% feldspar. For IODP Expedition 315 and 316 samples the Rietveld refinement results correspond to the standard XRD data. The synchrotron texture results of the recovered samples without experimental deformation show an increasingly strong preferred orientation of the clay minerals with increasing sediment depth for the incoming plate. Interestingly, also feldspar shows a significant texture, which is likely due to a shape fabric of the grains. The sediment texture can be explained by compaction and porosity reduction with increasing

  18. Ash cloud aviation advisories

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S.; Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1992-06-25

    During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

  19. Fluid seepage, Deformation, Tectonics and Accretionary Prism Formation in Two Different Settings of the Nankai Accretionary Prism- Dive Results of YK05-08 Leg 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y. F.; Kawamura, K.; Anma, R.; Yokoyama, S.; Kawakami, S.; Moore, G. F.; Dilek, Y.; S. Y.

    2005-12-01

    Fluid seepages recognized by the presence of bacterial mats, chemosynthetic biocommunities, and carbonate deposits were critically analyzed in relation to large to small scale deformation features in two different settings of the Nankai accretionary prism by the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 during JAMSTEC cruise YK05-08 Leg 2. We present dive profiles in the Shionomisaki and Tenryu submarine canyons that form a 3D transect extending from the outer-arc ridge formed by out-of-sequence thrusts (OOST ridge) to the prism toe. Ten dives in addition to six previous dives (including three unmanned ROV Kaiko dives) verified that Shionomisaki Canyon exposes typical accretionary prism features, including regular repetition of offscraping and underplating structure, whereas Tenryu Canyon shows highly modified structures caused by the collisional subduction of the Paleo-Zenisu ridge of the Izu island arc. The fluid seepages were observed in three different settings: (1) just beneath large thrust faults which demarcate the sharp ridge foot; (2) the open fractured crests of the thrust-anticline folds; and (3) the conspicuous circular expression on the OOST ridge top. The last case and previously known examples in the forearc basin setting are both examples of large scale seepage that might be due to intermittent, sometimes explosive methane seepage, whereas the first two cases are of constant flow rate of smaller magnitude. Such differences may be due to differences in the tectonic setting between the two; the large flow rate example is due to open or strike-slip regime tectonics where large amount of seepage occurs along the high permeability zones. In contrast, the small flow rate example is seepage along a thrust, with rather constant (although intermittent during co-seismic stage) flow rate along thrust faults which are of relatively lower permeability. In addition, we verified some carbonate veins in fractured or sheared rocks along faults, and the various deformation

  20. Modeling consolidation and dewatering near the toe of the northern Barbados accretionary complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stauffer, P.; Bekins, B.A.

    2001-01-01

    At the toe of the northern Barbados accretionary complex, temperature and pore water chemistry data indicate that fluid flow is channeled along the de??collement and other shallow thrust faults. We examine mechanisms that may prevent consolidation and maintain high permeability over large sections of the de??collement. High-resolution bulk density data from five boreholes show that the de??collement is well consolidated at some sites while other sites remain underconsolidated. Underconsolidated de??collement behavior is associated with kilometer-scale negative-polarity seismic reflections from the de??collement plane that have been interpreted to be fluid conduits. We use a coupled fluid flow/consolidation model to simulate the loading response of a 10-km-long by 680-m-thick slice of sediment as it enters the accretionary complex. The simulations capture 185 ka (5 km) of subduction, with a load function representing the estimated effective stress of the overriding accretionary prism (3.8?? taper angle). Simulation results of bulk density in the de??collement 3.2 km arcward of the deformation front are compared with observations. The results show that persistent high pore pressures at the arcward edge of the simulation domain can explain underconsolidated behavior. The scenario is consistent with previous modeling results showing that high pore pressures can propagate intermittently along the de??collement from deeper in the complex. Simulated seaward fluxes in the de??collement (1-14 cm yr-1) lie between previous estimates from modeling studies of steady state (1 m yr-1) flow. Maximum simulated instantaneous fluid sources (2.5??10-13 s-1) are comparable to previous estimates. The simulations show minor swelling of incoming sediments (fluid sources ??? -3 ?? 1015 s-1) up to 3 km before subduction that may help to explain small-scale shearing and normal faulting proximal to the protode??collement. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Development of tectono-sedimentary mélanges in accretionary wedges: Insights from analog modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genti, M.; Malavieille, J.; Molli, G.; Dominguez, S.; Taboada, A.; Vitale-Brovarone, A.

    2012-04-01

    Orogenic wedges locally present chaotic tectonostratigraphic units that contain exotic blocks of various size, origin, age and lithology, embedded in a sedimentary matrix. The occurrence of ophiolitic blocks, sometimes huge, in such "mélanges" raises questions on i) the mechanisms responsible for the incorporation of oceanic basement rocks into an accretionary wedge and ii) the mechanisms allowing exhumation and possibly redeposition of these exotic elements in "mélanges" during wedge growth. The tectonic evolution of the back part of doubly vergent accretionary wedges is mainly controled by backthrusting. The retrowedge is characterized by steep slopes that are prone to gravitational instabilities. We assume that these steep slopes trigger submarine landslides playing a major erosional role and therefore inducing huge mass transfers. This erosion allows exhumation of the ophiolitic fragments formerly accreted at the base of the wedge and then reworked as tectono-sedimentary "mélanges" redeposited in proximal basins located at the base of the retrowedge slope. These basin deposits are then continuously involved in backthrusting-induced deformation. In this study, we present the results of a series of analog experiments performed to characterize the processes and parameters responsible for accretion, exhumation and final tectonosedimentary reworking of oceanic basement lithosphere fragments in an accretionary wedge. The experimental setup is designed to simulate the interaction between tectonics, erosion and sedimentation. Different configurations are applied to study the impact of various parameters, such as irregular oceanic floor due to structural inheritance, or the presence of layers with contrasted rheology that can affect deformation partitioning in the wedge (frontal accretion vs basal accretion) influencing its growth. The experimental results are then compared with observations on ophiolite-bearing mélanges in the Taïwan (Lichi mélange) and northern

  2. Implications of Faulting Styles in the Outer Wedge of the Nankai Accretionary Prism, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kington, J. D.; Tobin, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Nankai Trough, Japan near Kumano Basin displays a well developed accretionary prism with a major out-of-sequence “megasplay” thrust separating the recently active outer wedge of the prism from the forearc basin deposits. While not in the seismogenic zone, this thrust is thought to play a key role in tsunamigenesis by transferring deeper coseismic slip to the seafloor. Understanding the development of this fault requires a detailed understanding of the kinematics and structure of the outer wedge of the accretionary prism. The outer wedge of the Nankai accretionary prism consists of an in-sequence series of landward-dipping thrusts that record two directions of shortening. Based on 3D reflection seismic, older thrusts and their associated folds strike ~225 degrees, almost exactly perpendicular to plate motion in the area, which has an azimuth of 314 (Zang, et al, 2002). The youngest thrusts, including the megasplay at the rear of the outer wedge, trend 240-245 degrees, subparallel to the margin in the area, which trends roughly 250. This suggests two possibilities: 1) the older thrusts formed during a period of relatively strong coupling with the subducting slab, perhaps due to highly irregular oceanic basement topography which has since been subducted, or 2) the trench margin had been previously indented by a subducted seamount and has since been rebuilding. In addition, two right lateral tear faults with offsets of approximately 1km cut the fold-thrust belt of the outer wedge. These faults cleanly offset the fold hinge of faults striking perpendicular to plate motion and interact with the oldest faults that strike parallel to the margin, implying that their timing is coincident with the change in shortening direction. Therefore, these tear faults may accommodate along-strike changes in the taper angle of the accretionary prism following the subduction of irregular basement topography. Significant normal faulting within the seismically imaged portion of the

  3. Application of slip-line analysis to the mechanical model of active accretionary wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, I.; Lee, H.; Kim, J.

    2012-04-01

    An active accretionary wedge is formed from sediments accreted continuously at a continental margin by a subducting plate and mechanically characterized by a plane-strain compressive frictional flow throughout its entire volume. Continuous deformation induced by incoming sediments raises the distortional stress eventually leading to an ultimate condition known as a critical state. According to the critical taper theory (Davis et al., JGR, 1983), the angle of wedge increases as the incoming materials are accreted into the wedge until it reaches a critical value where the shear force on the basal detachment is in equilibrium with the basal friction. Under this concept, we applied the plastic slip-line theory for the computation of stress and velocity fields throughout the continuously deforming area of the wedge. For the simplicity, we assumed that the tapered wedge overlying a basal décollement fault is described by a perfectly plastic rheology complying with the Coulomb failure criterion and the associated flow rule. A complete description of soil rheology at the critical state requires the determination of stress tensors and velocity vectors at given points within the deforming region. For the boundary condition of stress, the effective normal and shear tractions on the upper surface of wedge are equal to zero, and thus the maximum principal stress acts parallel to the surface. Considering the two-dimensional plane strain deformation, we numerically obtained the slip-line solution for the mean effective stress with respect to the orientation of the maximum principal stress at each intersection point of the potential (conjugate) slip lines given by the Coulomb criterion. Then the maximum shear stress was calculated using the failure criterion. After the stress solution was yielded, the velocity field was determined by the same procedure using the boundary condition of the velocity of incoming sediments obtained from the velocity of subducting plate. Our result

  4. Engineering Model for Ash Formation

    1994-12-02

    Ash deposition is controlled by the impaction and sticking of individual ash particles to heat transfer surfaces. Prediction of deposition therefore requires that the important factors in this process be predictable from coal and operational parameters. Coal combustion, boiler heat transfer, ash formation, ash particle aerodynamic, and ash particle sticking models are all essential steps in this process. The model described herein addresses the prediction of ash particle size and composition distributions based upon combustionmore » conditions and coal parameters. Key features of the model include a mineral redistribution routine to invert CCSEM mineralogical data, and a mineral interaction routine that simulates the conversion of mineral matter into ash during coal burning and yields ash particle size and composition distributions.« less

  5. Accretion in the wake of terrane collision: The Neogene accretionary wedge off Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fruehn, J.; Von Huene, R.; Fisher, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Subduction accretion and repeated terrane collision shaped the Alaskan convergent margin. The Yakutat Terrane is currently colliding with the continental margin below the central Gulf of Alaska. During the Neogene the terrane's western part was subducted after which a sediment wedge accreted along the northeast Aleutian Trench. This wedge incorporates sediment eroded from the continental margin and marine sediments carried into the subduction zone on the Pacific plate. Prestack depth migration was performed on six seismic reflection lines to resolve the structure within this accretionary wedge and its backstop. The lateral extent of the structures is constrained by high-resolution swath bathymetry and seismic lines collected along strike. Accretionary structure consists of variably sized thrust slices that were deformed against a backstop during frontal accretion and underplating. Toward the northeast the lower slope steepens, the wedge narrows, and the accreted volume decreases notwith-standing a doubling of sediments thickness in the trench. In the northeasternmost transect, near the area where the terrane's trailing edge subducts, no frontal accretion is observed and the slope is eroded. The structures imaged along the seismic lines discussed here most likely result from progressive evolution from erosion to accretion, as the trailing edge of the Yakutat Terrane is subducting.

  6. Deformation-induced diagenesis and microbial activity in the Nankai accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famin, V.; Andreani, M.; Boullier, A. M.; Raimbourg, H.; Magnin, V.

    2014-12-01

    We performed a microscopic and chemical study of diagenetic reactions in deformation microstructures within deep mud sediments from the Nankai accretionary prism (SW Japan) collected during IODP Expedition 315. Our study reveals that deformation microstructures localize the crystallization of pyrite, a diagenetic reaction also found in large megasplay faults of the prism. Textural observation shows that pyrite crystallization is synchronous of the sediment deformation. The framboidal shape of pyrite crystals, the barium depletion and the strong arsenic enrichment observed in deformation microstructures compared with the sediment matrix, suggest that pyrite crystallization is mediated by the proliferation of anoxic archae. During scientific drilling expeditions IODP 315, 316 and 319, microbial life has been evidenced at depths of up to 800 m below the sea floor by the presence of biogenic methane and sulfate reducers in sediments. We suggest that deformation structures localize microbial proliferation because the fracturing of silicate minerals produces hydrogen, a necessary compound for bacteria under anoxic conditions. Bacteria proliferate as long as active deformation supplies hydrogen, and vanish when the deformation stops. The development of bacteria in deformation structures impacts our mechanical understanding of fault zones in accretionary prisms: Firstly, bacterial activity converts carbon from organic matter and hydrogen into methane and/or water, which may alter the fluid budget of fault zones and the recurrence of dynamic ruptures in megathrusts. Secondly, the abundance of bacteria could be used to recognize active fault zones from inactive ones in drilling cores.

  7. Earthquake faulting in subduction zones: insights from fault rocks in accretionary prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kimura, Gaku

    2014-12-01

    Subduction earthquakes on plate-boundary megathrusts accommodate most of the global seismic moment release, frequently resulting in devastating damage by ground shaking and tsunamis. As many earthquakes occur in deep-sea regions, the dynamics of earthquake faulting in subduction zones is poorly understood. However, the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) and fault rock studies in accretionary prisms exhumed from source depths of subduction earthquakes have greatly improved our understanding of earthquake faulting in subduction zones. Here, we review key advances that have been made over the last decade in the studies of fault rocks and in laboratory experiments using fault zone materials, with a particular focus on the Nankai Trough subduction zone and its on-land analog, the Shimanto accretionary complex in Japan. New insights into earthquake faulting in subduction zones are summarized in terms of the following: (1) the occurrence of seismic slip along velocity-strengthening materials both at shallow and deep depths; (2) dynamic weakening of faults by melt lubrication and fluidization, and possible factors controlling coseismic deformation mechanisms; (3) fluid-rock interactions and mineralogical and geochemical changes during earthquakes; and (4) geological and experimental aspects of slow earthquakes.

  8. Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary transtension and strain partitioning in the Chugach accretionary complex, SE Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. Steven; Roeske, Sarah M.; Karl, Sue M.

    1998-05-01

    Shear zones in the Late Cretaceous Sitka Graywacke of the Chugach accretionary complex in southeast Alaska record constrictional finite strains, with maximum principal stretches plunging shallowly subparallel to strike of the shear zones. Macrostructural analysis indicates the finite strain formed during one deformation event. Microstructural analysis of the shear zones shows that this deformation is ductile, promoted mostly through deformation of low-strength lithic clasts and pressure solution. Kinematic indicators from some of the shear zones indicate dominantly dextral motion. Although multiple scenarios can explain constrictional finite strains in a shear zone, these dextral strike-slip shear zones must have experienced a component of extension across them in order to generate constrictional finite strains. Therefore, the shear zones are dextral transtensional shear zones, an uncommon tectonic regime in an accretionary complex. The transtensional shear zones reflect strike-slip motion related to partitioning of Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary right-oblique convergence between North America and the Farallon plate. The extensional component that was superposed on the strike-slip shear zones to generate transtension resulted from contemporaneous collapse of the forearc following thickening related to underplating.

  9. RECLAMATION OF ALKALINE ASH PILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to develop methods for reclaiming ash disposal piles for the ultimate use as agricultural or forest lands. The ashes studied were strongly alkaline and contained considerable amounts of salts and toxic boron. The ashes were produced from burning bit...

  10. ASH and NASH.

    PubMed

    Scaglioni, F; Ciccia, S; Marino, M; Bedogni, G; Bellentani, S

    2011-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) have a similar pathogenesis and histopathology but a different etiology and epidemiology. NASH and ASH are advanced stages of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD). NAFLD is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver (steatosis), without any other evident causes of chronic liver diseases (viral, autoimmune, genetic, etc.), and with an alcohol consumption ≤20-30 g/day. On the contrary, AFLD is defined as the presence of steatosis and alcohol consumption >20-30 g/day. The most common phenotypic manifestations of primary NAFLD/NASH are overweight/obesity, visceral adiposity, type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension. The prevalence of NAFLD in the general population in Western countries is estimated to be 25-30%. The prevalence and incidence of NASH and ASH are not known because of the impossibility of performing liver biopsy in the general population. Up to 90% of alcoholics have fatty liver, and 5-15% of these subjects will develop cirrhosis over 20 years. The risk of cirrhosis increases to 30-40% in those who continue to drink alcohol. About 10-35% of alcoholics exhibit changes on liver biopsy consistent with alcoholic hepatitis. Natural histories of NASH and ASH are not completely defined, even if patients with NASH have a reduced life expectancy due to liver-related death and cardiovascular diseases. The best treatment of AFLD/ASH is to stop drinking, and the most effective first-line therapeutic option for NAFLD/NASH is non-pharmacologic lifestyle interventions through a multidisciplinary approach including weight loss, dietary changes, physical exercise, and cognitive-behavior therapy. PMID:21734385

  11. Lunar ash flows - Isothermal approximation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.; O'Keefe, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Suggestion of the ash flow mechanism as one of the major processes required to account for some features of lunar soil. First the observational background and the gardening hypothesis are reviewed, and the shortcomings of the gardening hypothesis are shown. Then a general description of the lunar ash flow is given, and a simple mathematical model of the isothermal lunar ash flow is worked out with numerical examples to show the differences between the lunar and the terrestrial ash flow. The important parameters of the ash flow process are isolated and analyzed. It appears that the lunar surface layer in the maria is not a residual mantle rock (regolith) but a series of ash flows due, at least in part, to great meteorite impacts. The possibility of a volcanic contribution is not excluded. Some further analytic research on lunar ash flows is recommended.

  12. Hygroscopic properties of volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathem, T. L.; Kumar, P.; Nenes, A.; Dufek, J.; Sokolik, I. N.; Trail, M.; Russell, A.

    2011-06-01

    Limited observational data exists on the physical interactions between volcanic ash particles and water vapor; yet it is thought that these interactions can strongly impact the microphysical evolution of ash, with implications for its atmospheric lifetime and transport, as well as formation of water and ice clouds. In this study, we investigate for the first time, the hygroscopic properties of ultra-fine volcanic ash (<125 μm diameter) from the eruptions of Mt. St. Helens in 1980, El Chichón in 1982, Tungurahua in 2006, Chaitén in 2008, Mt. Redoubt in 2009, and Eyjafjallajökull in 2010. The hygroscopicity of the ash particles is quantified by their ability to uptake water and nucleate into cloud drops under controlled levels of water vapor supersaturation. Evidence presented strongly suggests that ash uptakes water efficiently via adsorption and a simple parameterization of ash hygroscopicity is developed for use in ash plume and atmospheric models.

  13. Regional Variation of CH4 and N2 Production Processes in the Deep Aquifers of an Accretionary Prism

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Makoto; Ishikawa, Shugo; Nagai, Kazushige; Hirata, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Kunio; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accretionary prisms are mainly composed of ancient marine sediment scraped from the subducting oceanic plate at a convergent plate boundary. Large amounts of anaerobic groundwater and natural gas, mainly methane (CH4) and nitrogen gas (N2), are present in the deep aquifers associated with an accretionary prism; however, the origins of these gases are poorly understood. We herein revealed regional variations in CH4 and N2 production processes in deep aquifers in the accretionary prism in Southwest Japan, known as the Shimanto Belt. Stable carbon isotopic and microbiological analyses suggested that CH4 is produced through the non-biological thermal decomposition of organic matter in the deep aquifers in the coastal area near the convergent plate boundary, whereas a syntrophic consortium of hydrogen (H2)-producing fermentative bacteria and H2-utilizing methanogens contributes to the significant production of CH4 observed in deep aquifers in midland and mountainous areas associated with the accretionary prism. Our results also demonstrated that N2 production through the anaerobic oxidation of organic matter by denitrifying bacteria is particularly prevalent in deep aquifers in mountainous areas in which groundwater is affected by rainfall. PMID:27592518

  14. Structure and Evolution of the Accretionary Margin of Java-Sumatra. Seismic Data and Numerical Modeling Comparisons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, H.; Hindle, D.

    2007-12-01

    We present a numerical model for the evolution of an accretionary prism along a subduction margin. We find the mechanical partitioning of the growing prism into active region, abutting against a deformable backstop, and a relatively undeformed forearc basin is a function of the double tapered basal geometry, where the dip of the detachment is assumed to be opposite above oceanic or continental lithopshere. Varying properties of both materials and detachment can be used to adjust the surface slope and hence geometry of the system, but mechanical partitioning remains essentially the same with the regions becoming broader or narrower. The model appears to closely reproduce the geometry of the Sumatra-Java prism, where a high accretion margin has produced the same distinct mechanical units. Newly prestack depth-migrated marine seismic data reveal the extent and geometry of the active deformation of the deformable backstop, and give indications of some material passing into a subduction channel below the accretionary complex. The deformable backstop appears to be composed of multiple duplex structures, but present day tectonic activity is mostly in the form of transtensive or transpressive deformation, possibly reactivating older dip-slip, accretionary structures. The numerical approach used in the simulation (distinct elements) shows great promise in modelling large deformation in situations such as accretionary prisms, and has also been adapted to incorporate the role of fluid pressure and migration in tandem with large deformation (shortening of the order of 100's of kilometres).

  15. Episodic fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex: Timescale, geochemistry, flow rates, and fluid budget

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Down-hole geochemical anomalies encountered in active accretionary systems can be used to constrain the timing, rates, and localization of fluid flow. Here we combine a coupled flow and solute transport model with a kinetic model for smectite dehydration to better understand and quantify fluid flow in the Nankai accretionary complex offshore of Japan. Compaction of sediments and clay dehydration provide fluid sources which drive the model flow system. We explicitly include the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments in our calculations to evaluate the impact that variations in this unknown quantity have on pressure and chloride distribution. Sensitivity analysis of steady state pressure solutions constrains bulk and flow conduit permeabilities. Steady state simulations with 30% smectite in the incoming sedimentary sequence result in minimum chloride concentrations at site 808 of 550 mM, but measured chlorinity is as low as 447 mM. We simulate the transient effects of hydrofracture or a strain event by assuming an instantaneous permeability increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude along a flow conduit (in this case the de??collement), using steady state results as initial conditions. Transient results with an increase in de??collement permeability from 10-16 m2 to 10-13 m2 and 20% smectite reproduce the observed chloride profile at site 808 after 80-160 kyr. Modeled chloride concentrations are highly sensitive to the consolidation rate of underthrust sediments, such that rapid compaction of underthrust material leads to increased freshening. Pressures within the de??collement during transient simulations rise rapidly to a significant fraction of lithostatic and remain high for at least 160 kyr, providing a mechanism for maintaining high permeability. Flow rates at the deformation front for transient simulations are in good agreement with direct measurements, but steady state flow rates are 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than observed. Fluid budget calculations

  16. Cohesive Strength of Clay-Rich Sediment and Implications for Accretionary Wedge Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, M.; Huepers, A.; Kopf, A.

    2011-12-01

    While studies of rock and sediment friction are common, cohesion is a component of the shear strength that is often ignored despite its potential importance for faulting and the structure of accretionary wedges. We directly measure the cohesion of clay-rich sediment by measuring its shear strength in a direct-shear apparatus with no applied effective normal stress (σn' = 0). We present measurements of cohesion for two cases: (1) After vertical consolidation only, and (2) after vertical consolidation followed by shear under applied normal stress. Under consolidation stresses of 90 kPa to 2 MPa, cohesion of both the unsheared and sheared cases depends linearly on the (previously) applied load. We interpret the cohesion measured after shearing under load to be the cohesive strength that exists throughout the shearing process, suggesting that for clay-rich materials the coefficient of internal friction should be used rather than the coefficient of sliding friction. In both sheared and unsheared cases, cohesion depends positively on clay mineral content. Cohesion is low in room-dry sediment, suggesting that it is controlled by the presence of water and may be related to the atomic charge imbalance of clays, which results in hydrogen bonding between adsorbed water molecules and the clay mineral surfaces. Coulomb wedge theory dictates that the taper angle of accretionary wedges depends on the internal friction of the wedge, the basal sliding friction of the décollement, and the amount of excess pore pressure in these locations. Cohesion is typically neglected in such analyses. In the case of the Nankai subduction zone, the accretionary wedge and décollement are composed of clay-rich sediments, meaning that cohesion should not negligible based on our experimental results. This is the case even along the décollement where active slip occurs, because sheared sediment exhibits significant cohesion that is actually higher compared to sediment that experienced only

  17. Modeling ash dispersal of the 23 February 2013 Etna lava fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poret, Matthieu; Costa, Antonio; Andronico, Daniele; Scollo, Simona; Gouhier, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    Most plumes generated by explosive eruptions from Mt. Etna, Italy, are affected by winds towards East driving volcanic ash over the sea. It implies that erupted tephra can be collected only at proximal area around the volcano, i.e. within 20-25 km. It follows that the quantification of fine ash component and the Total Grain Size Distribution (TGSD) are very difficult and highly uncertain. Among the five lava fountain episodes occurred on the New South-East Crater of Mt. Etna, from the 17 to 23 February 2013, the 23 February paroxysmal phase lasted 1 hour and produced magma jets higher than 500 m and an eruptive plume that reached ~9 km above sea level. Winds oriented toward North-East advected the plume and produced an extended tephra fallout deposit from the slope of Etna up to Puglia region (~ 400 km from the volcano), allowing lapilli and ash to be sampled at different locations. Here, we first estimate the TGSD and the fine ash content associated to 12 samples collected after the paroxysmal episode over the entire tephra blanket. The TGSD is compared with the one related to the 12-13 January 2011 lava fountain showing a similar distribution with a mode around phi = -3. Satellite data describing the evolution of PM10 from the vent up to Calabria region were used to quantify the tail of the distribution and the fraction of the very fine ash. In order to reproduce both the field and spaceborne (MSG-SEVIRI) observations we simulated the tephra dispersal using the computational model Fall3D after modifying the TGSD by adding the fine ash component empirically. A set of simulations allowed us to assess key volcanological parameters such as the column height, the mass distribution within the plume and the effective TGSD. Best fit results indicate a Mass Eruption Rate around 1.0d+6 kg/s, a Total Erupted Mass of about 3.8d+9 kg and a PM10 fraction of ~0.73% respect to the total mass. Results lead the 23 February 2013 lava fountain episode as one of the most intense in

  18. Geochemical and geothermal evidence for fluid migration in the Barbados Accretionary Prism (ODP leg 110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrolijk, Peter; Fisher, Andrew; Gieskes, Joris

    Measured geochemical and geothermal effects of fluid migration in the northern Barbados accretionary prism indicate that: (1) fluid flows laterally along low-angle active faults; (2) the entire length of the Leg 110 transect is a fluid discharge zone; (3) migration results in heating of sediments across the transect but most strongly at the deformation front; and (4) migration results in dilution of pore water-Cl and 18O enrichment more in the arcward than the seaward side of the prism, suggesting that the Cl-poor, 18O-rich fluids that intrude the prism are derived from smectiteillite reactions occurring arcward. These conclusions have strengthened those derived from the initial appraisal of shipboard data, modified ideas about where fluids are heated most and where the geochemistry is strongly altered, and provided new ideas about the sources of fluids and their relative contributions.

  19. Early Jurassic Volcanic Rocks from the Raohe Accretionary Complex of NE China: Petrogenesis and Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhihui; Ge, Wenchun

    2016-04-01

    The Raohe accretionary complex is located at the boundary between the Russian Far East and Northeast China, and is an important part of the Western Pacific Ocean tectonic regime. However, owing to the lack of precise age and geochemical constraints, the tectonic setting and petrogenesis of magmatic rocks in this area have been controversial, which has led to the debate on crustal growth mechanisms and subduction accretionary processes in the Northeast China. Herein, we report newly-defined calc-alkaline andesites, dacites, rhyolites, Nb-enriched basaltic-andesites and andesites, and N-MORB type basalts and basaltic-andesites from the Raohe accretionary complex, NE China. All these volcanic rocks are collected from rocks mapped previously as the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic stratums. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating for one andesite, one dacites and three rhyolites indicate the occurrence of magmatic events in the Early Jurassic (186-174 Ma). They have positive ɛHf(t) values of +3.4 to +10.6 and relatively high (87Sr/86Sr)i values of 0.704711 to 0.710235. The calc-alkaline andesites, dacites and rhyolites are typical arc magmas, with moderately enriched LILEs and LREEs, distinctly negative HFSEs, consistent with the chemistry of volcanic rocks from an active continental margin setting. The Nb-enriched basaltic-andesites and andesites have higher TiO2, Nb, and Zr contents, higher Nb/Ta (24.03-87.60), Nb/U (11.89-75.94), (Nb/Th)PM (0.67-2.70), and (Nb/La)PM (1.95-5.00) ratios than typical arc basalts. They are relatively enriched in Nb, Zr, Hf and Ti. They have negative ɛNd(t) values of -5.47 to -6.04 and relatively variable (87Sr/86Sr)i values of 0.704648 to 0.711430, suggesting that they were possibly generated by a partial melting of mantle wedge peridotites metasomatized by slab-derived adakitic melts and minor fluids. The N-MORB type basalts and basaltic-andesites have comparatively low TiO2 concentrations (1.18-1.42 wt.%), show almost flat REE patterns with

  20. Mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges Cohesive Coulomb theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.; Suppe, J.; Davis, D.

    1984-01-01

    A self-consistent theory for the mechanics of thin-skinned accretionary Coulomb wedges is developed and applied to the active fold-and-thrust belt of western Taiwan. The state of stress everywhere within a critical wedge is determined by solving the static equilibrium equations subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of wedge cohesion, which gives rise to a concave curvature of the critical topographic surface and affects the orientation of the principal stresses and Coulomb fracture within the wedge, is considered. The shape of the topographic surface and the angles at which thrust faults step up from the basal decollement in the Taiwanese belt is analyzed taking into account the extensive structural and fluid-pressure data available there. It is concluded that the gross geometry and structure of the Taiwan wedge are consistent with normal laboratory frictional and fracture strengths of sedimentary rocks.

  1. ASH EMISSIVITY CHARACTERIZATION AND PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Charlene R. Crocker

    1999-12-01

    The increased use of western subbituminous coals has generated concerns regarding highly reflective ash disrupting heat transfer in the radiant zone of pulverized-fuel boilers. Ash emissivity and reflectivity is primarily a function of ash particle size, with reflective deposits expected to consist of very small refractory ash materials such as CaO, MgO, or sulfate materials such as Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. For biomass fuels and biomass-coal blends, similar reflectivity issues may arise as a result of the presence of abundant organically associated calcium and potassium, which can transform during combustion to fine calcium, and potassium oxides and sulfates, which may act as reflective ash. The relationship of reflectivity to ash chemistry is a second-order effect, with the ash particle size distribution and melting point being determined by the size and chemistry of the minerals present in the starting fuel. Measurement of the emission properties of ash and deposits have been performed by several research groups (1-6) using both laboratory methods and measurements in pilot- and full-scale combustion systems. A review of the properties and thermal properties of ash stresses the important effect of ash deposits on heat transfer in the radiant boiler zone (1).

  2. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines. PMID:26931824

  3. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  4. Dry bottom ash removal -- Ash cooling vs. boiler efficiency effects

    SciTech Connect

    Carrea, E.; Scavizzi, G.C.; Barsin, J.

    1998-07-01

    The current wet method of removing boiler bottom ash from coal fired utility boilers quenches the ash which in turn heats the water, evaporates a portion of it adding to the gas weights moved through the steam generator. The newer dry ash removal systems use a portion of the combustion air to cool ash and thus return some of the otherwise lost latent heat back to the furnace. There has been some debate concerning the overall effect upon boiler efficiency. For example when a large quantity of ash cooling air is required and the resulting decrease in air side air heater mass flow could result in an elevate stack gas temperature thus negating the efficiency enhancing dry bottom ash effect expected. The presentation will present actual data form operating units and provide various heat balances to demonstrate the actual performance conditions that have been achieved.

  5. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200–2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines. PMID:26931824

  6. Mixing of methane and sulphate due to fluid flow in the Barbados accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Laier, T. )

    1996-01-01

    Methane concentrations above background level in sulphate-containing (15 mmol/l) pore waters have been observed in the d6collement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism. The peak in methane concentration in the decollement was found at a number of sites by headspace analysis of cores retrieved during ODP Legs 110 156 at the toe of the accretionary prism. [delta][sup 13]C[sub 1] values between -22[per thousand] and -36[per thousand] indicate that methane oxidation occurs possibly due to sulphate reduction. Thus, the presence of both methane and sulphate at the same depths suggests mixing of fluids due to fluid flow. Fluid flow is also indicated by the distinct minima in chloride concentrations at the same depths. In the case of on-going methane oxidation, mixing of sulphate and methane fluids is anticipated to have occurred fairly recently. Sulphate concentration decreases only little with depth in the Pleistocene to lower Miocene sediments where TOC is very low, <0.2 %. Sulphate decreases more rapidly with depth in the Oligocene to Eocene sediments where numerous relatively thin turbidites occur. The turbidites have significantly higher TOC, 0.5-1.5 %, than the interbedded hemipelagic sediments, TOC <0.2 %. High methane concentrations were not found in any of the boreholes, but the trends in sulphate and methane in boreholes indicate that high methane concentrations exist in older sediments not reached by drilling. The decollement zone is composed of lower Miocene to upper Oligocene sediments near the toe of the prism, but deepens into stratigraphically lower sediments prism ward. Thus, methane originating from these older sediments may have been brought to shallower depths by active fluid flow in the decollement.

  7. Mixing of methane and sulphate due to fluid flow in the Barbados accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Laier, T.

    1996-12-31

    Methane concentrations above background level in sulphate-containing (15 mmol/l) pore waters have been observed in the d6collement zone of the Barbados accretionary prism. The peak in methane concentration in the decollement was found at a number of sites by headspace analysis of cores retrieved during ODP Legs 110 & 156 at the toe of the accretionary prism. {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} values between -22{per_thousand} and -36{per_thousand} indicate that methane oxidation occurs possibly due to sulphate reduction. Thus, the presence of both methane and sulphate at the same depths suggests mixing of fluids due to fluid flow. Fluid flow is also indicated by the distinct minima in chloride concentrations at the same depths. In the case of on-going methane oxidation, mixing of sulphate and methane fluids is anticipated to have occurred fairly recently. Sulphate concentration decreases only little with depth in the Pleistocene to lower Miocene sediments where TOC is very low, <0.2 %. Sulphate decreases more rapidly with depth in the Oligocene to Eocene sediments where numerous relatively thin turbidites occur. The turbidites have significantly higher TOC, 0.5-1.5 %, than the interbedded hemipelagic sediments, TOC <0.2 %. High methane concentrations were not found in any of the boreholes, but the trends in sulphate and methane in boreholes indicate that high methane concentrations exist in older sediments not reached by drilling. The decollement zone is composed of lower Miocene to upper Oligocene sediments near the toe of the prism, but deepens into stratigraphically lower sediments prism ward. Thus, methane originating from these older sediments may have been brought to shallower depths by active fluid flow in the decollement.

  8. Mechanical and hydraulic properties of subducted sediments, Nankai Trough accretionary prism: Effect of stress path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, H.; Chester, F. M.; Biscontin, G.

    2010-12-01

    To understand the evolution of mechanical and hydraulic properties of sediments during burial, underthrusting, underplating, accretion, and exhumation within accertionary subduction zones, triaxial deformation experiments were conducted on consolidated sediment from the Nankai Trough sampled during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) Stage 1 Expeditions. Samples of older, accretionary prism sediments at the forearc basin, underthrust slope sediments beneath the megasplay fault, and overthrust Upper Shikoku Basin sediments along the frontal thrust, were tested using different load paths. Specifically, isotropic loading, uniaxial strain loading, and triaxial compression (at constant confining pressure, Pc), undrained Pc reduction, drained Pc reduction, and triaxial unloading at constant Pc were employed. We find that all samples are overconsolidated and cemented. From the Pc-reduction stress paths, yield surfaces for the sediments are well described by the original Cam-Clay model and Coulomb failure criteria. Combined with results from the other load paths, we determine the yield surfaces for the sediments in situ, constrain the current stress state, and infer the relationship between consolidation state and deformation history including the effect of horizontal stress changes. Porosity evolution is relatively independent of stress path, and the sediment porosity decreases as the yield surface expands. In contrast, permeability evolution depends on the stress path and consolidation state, e.g., permeability reduction by shear-enhanced compaction occurs at a greater rate under triaxial-compression relative to uniaxial-strain and isotropic loading. Improved understanding of the evolution of hydromechanical properties for different load paths is necessary to accurately treat coupling of deformation and fluid flow in accretionary subduction zones.

  9. Reconciling the detrital zircon record and crustal growth within juvenile accretionary orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, C. J.; Cawood, P. A.; Roberts, N. M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Ancient cratons are generally characterised by Archaean cores surrounded by Proterozoic accretionary belts with large volumes of juvenile crust. Their crustal growth histories provide important insights into the genesis of continents and orogenic evolution. Whole-rock and detrital zircon isotopic studies are often used to deduce those histories, but the extent to which representative lithologies within the orogens are reliably sampled for such studies is not well established. This is especially true in cases where juvenile, zircon-poor mafic crust comprises a significant proportion of an orogen such as the East African (0.8-0.5 Ga), Namaqua-Natal (1.2-1.0 Ga), Trans-Hudson (1.9-1.8 Ga), and Kola (2.5 Ga). In particular, the Mesoproterozoic Namaqua-Natal orogenic belt (NNO) fringing the Kalahari Craton is a case in point in which Nd isotopic studies of whole-rock outcrop samples and U-Pb-Hf isotopic studies of detrital zircons from sediments of the Orange River (which drains the NNO) show different crust-formation ages and proportions of new and reworked crustal material. We hypothesise that this discrepancy is due to biasing of the detrital zircon record towards felsic rocks. Understanding the representative nature of the crustal archive preserved in detrital zircons remains critical for many studies of crustal evolution. We present data that: (a) addresses the scale of potential bias within an accretionary orogen containing large proportions of juvenile material, (b) demonstrates how the whole-rock and detrital zircon records can be reconciled for the Namaqua-Natal orogen to start, and (c) can be used to evaluate the effect of zircon bias on previous crustal growth models.

  10. Fluid Overpressure and Connections to Seismicity, Cascadia Tertiary Accretionary Prism, Olympic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, H.; Mattinson, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    Metamorphic dehydration reactions and fluid movement in accretionary prisms have been linked to the recently discovered episodic tremor and slip (ETS) earthquake events along subduction zones, but prior studies lack the detail to effectively test the hypothesis that fluid flow triggers ETS events. I conducted field work along a 52.5 km transect on the Olympic Peninsula metasedimentary accretionary prism of the Cascadia subduction zone, and collected approximately 40 representative samples of sandstone and mudrock that were buried to 6-15 km. This depth range intersects the 10-50 km depth range of ETS events. My objectives are to quantify the water flow recorded in rocks of the Olympic Peninsula via petrographic, whole rock, and isotopic analyses to test the prediction that water release increases at ~10 km depth, creating fluid overpressure needed to trigger seismicity. I calculated that on the Olympic Peninsula 1 km3 of 50% sandstone and 50% mudrock loses ~105 kg H2O/yr during burial from 6-14 km depth, comparable to the values expected from large-scale fluid budget models. Quartz veins that compose 0.5-1% of the Obstruction Peak site (~14 km burial depth) are important records of fluid flow quantity and origin. δ18O values of +11.8‰ to +15.2‰ indicate that vein H2O originated from metamorphic reactions. Flow recorded by 1 km3 of rock containing 0.5-1% quartz veins is >106 kg H2O/yr, comparable to the values 2 × 107 to 2 × 108 kg H2O/yr modeled at compositionally similar subduction zones to produce fluid overpressure conditions. I observed fibrous quartz veins, which also indicate fluid overpressure conditions were reached and support my H2O flow estimates. Therefore, Olympic Peninsula rocks at depths of ~10-14 km record dehydration and fluid overpressure large enough to trigger subduction zone seismicity.

  11. Circle of Ashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Circle of Ashes

    This plot tells astronomers that a pulsar, the remnant of a stellar explosion, is surrounded by a disk of its own ashes. The disk, revealed by the two data points at the far right from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, is the first ever found around a pulsar. Astronomers believe planets might rise up out of these stellar ashes.

    The data in this plot, or spectrum, were taken by ground-based telescopes and Spitzer. They show that light from around the pulsar can be divided into two categories: direct light from the pulsar, and light from the dusty disk swirling around the pulsar. This excess light was detected by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Dust gives off more infrared light than the pulsar because it's cooler.

    The pulsar, called 4U 0142+61, was once a massive star, until about 100,000 years ago, when it blew up in a supernova explosion and scattered dusty debris into space. Some of that debris was captured into what astronomers refer to as a 'fallback disk,' now circling the leftover stellar core, or pulsar. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks around young stars, out of which planets are thought to be born.

    The data have been corrected to remove the effects of light scattering from dust that lies between Earth and the pulsar.

    The ground-based data is from the Keck I telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  12. Fate of mass-transport deposits in convergent margins: Super- or sub-critical state in accretionary- or non-accretionary slope toes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Anma, R.

    2011-12-01

    Co-seismic mass-transportation is evidenced by voluminous bathymetric change during subduction type earthquakes of magnitude 8 or 9 class, exemplified by the March 11 2011 Tohoku earthquake in the Japan trench, where 50 m horizontal dislocation with 10 m vertical uplift was detected for the large tsunami(Kawamura et al., this session). On account of such successive mass transportation in the trench slope toe being slid into the grabens at the trench axis of the Pacific plate side lead the continuous migration of the trench slope toward the Honshu arc since the middle Miocene, playing the efficient role for the tectonic erosion (Hilde, 1983 Tectonophysics; von Huene & Lallemand, 1990 GSAB). Previously accreted materials of the former prism are largely exposed in the inner slope along the Japan trench, and the present slope is composed of brecciated, calcareous cemented mudstone and sandstone of middle Miocene age according to the submersible observation and sampling (Ogawa, 2011 Springer Book). Due to this trench migration landward, the island volcanic arc front vastly retreated to the west since the middle Miocene for more than 100 km. Such mass transportation occurred compensating the slope instability due to super-critical state of the slope angle. However, the tectonic erosion process is apt not to be preserved in ancient prisms (or "terranes") because they are entirely lost from the surface by erosion and subduction. On the other hand, many examples of such gravitational mass transportation deposits, slid-slumped deposits, liquefied and injected bodies, which are totally classified as mélanges or chaotic deposits, or olistostromes are preserved in ancient on-land prisms such as in the Shimanto and Miura-Boso accretionary complexes(Yamamoto et al., 2009 Island Arc), because they are preserved by offscraping process during plate subduction. Similar processes are known from the present Nankai prism surface and were observed by submersible and bathymetric survey

  13. MSW fly ash stabilized with coal ash for geotechnical application.

    PubMed

    Kamon, M; Katsumi, T; Sano, Y

    2000-09-15

    The solidification and stabilization of municipal solid waste (MSW) fly ash for the purpose of minimizing the geo-environmental impact caused by toxic heavy metals as well as ensuring engineering safety (strength and soaking durability) are experimentally evaluated. The mixtures of MSW fly ash stabilized with cement and fluidized bed combustion coal fly ash (FCA) were used for unconfined compressive strength tests, leachate tests, and soaking tests. The behavior of soluble salts contained in the MSW fly ash significantly affects strength development, soaking durability, and the hardening reaction of the stabilized MSW fly ash mixtures. The cement stabilization of the MSW fly ash does not have enough effect on strength development and soaking durability. The addition of cement only contributes to the containment of heavy metals due to the high level of alkalinity. When using FCA as a stabilizing agent for MSW fly ash, the mixture exhibits high strength and durability. However, the Cd leachate cannot be prevented in the early stages of curing. Using a combination of cement and FCA as a MSW fly ash stabilizer can attain high strength, high soaking durability, and the containment of heavy metals. The stabilized MSW fly ash with cement and FCA can be practically applied to embankments. PMID:10936538

  14. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  15. Ophiolites in the Xing'an-Inner Mongolia accretionary belt of the CAOB: Implications for two cycles of seafloor spreading and accretionary orogenic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shuguang; Wang, Ming-Ming; Xu, Xin; Wang, Chao; Niu, Yaoling; Allen, Mark B.; Su, Li

    2015-10-01

    The Xing'an-Inner Mongolia accretionary belt in the southeastern segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) was produced by the long-lived subduction and eventual closure of the Paleo-Asian Ocean and by the convergence between the North China Craton and the Mongolian microcontinent. Two ophiolite belts have been recognized: the northern Erenhot-Hegenshan-Xi-Ujimqin ophiolite belt and the southern Solonker-Linxi ophiolite belt. Most basalts in the northern ophiolite belt exhibit characteristics of normal-type to enriched-type mid-ocean ridge basalt affinities with depleted Nd isotopic composition (ɛNd(t) > +5), comparable to modern Eastern Pacific mid-ocean ridge basalts. Most basaltic rocks in the southern belt show clear geochemical features of suprasubduction zone-type oceanic crust, probably formed in an arc/back-arc environment. The inferred back-arc extension along the Solonker-Linxi belt started at circa 280 Ma. Statistics of all the available age data for the ophiolites indicates two cycles of seafloor spreading/subduction, which gave rise to two main epochs of magmatic activity at 500-410 Ma and 360-220 Ma, respectively, with a gap of ~50 million years (Myr). The spatial and temporal distribution of the ophiolites and concurrent igneous rocks favor bilateral subduction toward the two continental margins in the convergence history, with final collision at ~230-220 Ma. In the whole belt, signals of continental collision and Himalayan-style mountain building are lacking. We thus conclude that the Xing'an-Inner Mongolia segment of the CAOB experienced two cycles of seafloor subduction, back-arc extension, and final "Appalachian-type" soft collision.

  16. An atlas of volcanic ash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiken, G.

    1974-01-01

    Volcanic ash samples collected from a variety of recent eruptions were studied, using petrography, chemical analyses, and scanning electron microscopy to characterize each ash type and to relate ash morphology to magma composition and eruption type. The ashes are best placed into two broad genetic categories: magnetic and hydrovolcanic (phreatomagmatic). Ashes from magmatic eruptions are formed when expanding gases in the magma form a froth that loses its coherence as it approaches the ground surface. During hydrovolcanic eruptions, the magma is chilled on contact with ground or surface waters, resulting in violent steam eruptions. Within these two genetic categories, ashes from different magma types can be characterized. The pigeon hole classification used here is for convenience; there are eruptions which are driven by both phreatic and magmatic gases.

  17. Ash in the Soil System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, P.

    2012-04-01

    Ash is the organic and inorganic residue produced by combustion, under laboratory and field conditions. This definition is far away to be accepted. Some researchers consider ash only as the inorganic part, others include also the material not completely combusted as charcoal or biochar. There is a need to have a convergence about this question and define clear "what means ash". After the fire and after spread ash onto soil surface, soil properties can be substantially changed depending on ash properties, that can be different according to the burned residue (e.g wood, coal, solid waste, peppermill, animal residues), material treatment before burning, time of exposition and storage conditions. Ash produced in boilers is different from the produced in fires because of the material diferent propertie and burning conditions. In addition, the ash produced in boilers is frequently treated (e.g pelletization, granulation, self curing) previously to application, to reduce the negative effects on soil (e.g rapid increase of pH, mycorrhiza, fine roots of trees and microfauna). These treatments normally reduce the rate of nutrients dissolution. In fires this does not happen. Thus the implications on soil properties are logically different. Depending on the combustion temperature and/or severity, ash could have different physical (e.g texture, wettability) and chemical properties (e.g amount and type of total and leached nutrients) and this will have implications on soil. Ash can increase and decrease soil aggregation, wettablity and water retention, bulk density, runoff and water infiltration. Normally, ash increases soil pH, Electrical Conductivity, and the amount of some basic nutrients as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. However it is also a potential source of heavy metals, especially if ash pH is low. However the effect of ash on soil in space and time depends especially of the ash amount and characteristics, fire temperature, severity, topography, aspect

  18. Ameliorative effect of fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhumbla, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    Agronomic effectiveness and environmental impact of fly ashes used to reclaim pyritic acid mine spoils were investigated in the laboratory and field. Mine spoils at two abandoned sites were amended with three rates of fly ash, three rates of rock phosphate, and seeded with alfalfa and wheat. Application of fly ash decreased bulk density and increased moisture retention capacity of spoils. Fly ash application reduced cation exchange capacity, acidity, toxic levels of Al, Fe, and Mn in soils by buffering soil pH at 6.5, and retarded pyrite oxidation. The reduction in cation exchange capacity was compensated by release of plant nutrients through diffusion and dissolution of plerospheres in fly ash. Improvement of spoil physical, chemical and microbial properties resulted in higher yield, more nitrogen fixation, and utilization of P from rock phosphate by alfalfa. Laboratory investigations demonstrated that neutralization potential and the amounts of amorphous oxides of iron were more important for classifying fly ashes than the total elemental analysis presently used in a taxonomic classification system. Contamination of the food chain through plant removal of Mo and As in fly ash treated mine spoils was observed only for Mo and only for the first year of cropping. Plant available As and Mo decreased with time. Laboratory leaching and adsorption studies and a field experiment showed that trace metals do not leach from fly ashes at near neutral pH and more oxyanions will leach from fly ashes with low neutralization potential and low amounts of amorphous oxides of iron.

  19. Can ash clog soil pores?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoof, Cathelijne; Stoof, Cathelijne; Gevaert, Anouk; Gevaert, Anouk; Baver, Christine; Baver, Christine; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Morales, Veronica; Morales, Veronica; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Martin, Deborah; Martin, Deborah; Steenhuis, Tammo; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2015-04-01

    Wildfire can greatly increase a landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion events, and ash is thought to play a large role in controlling runoff and erosion processes after wildfire. Although ash can store rainfall and thereby reduce runoff and erosion for a limited period after wildfires, it has also been hypothesized to clog soil pores and reduce infiltration. Several researchers have attributed the commonly observed increase in runoff and erosion after fire to the potential pore-clogging effect of ash. Evidence is however incomplete, as to date, research has solely focused on identifying the presence of ash in the soil, with the actual flow processes associated with the infiltration and pore-clogging of ash remaining a major unknown. In several laboratory experiments, we tested the hypothesis that ash causes pore clogging to the point that infiltration is hampered and ponding occurs. We first visualized and quantified pore-scale infiltration of water and ash in sand of a range of textures and at various infiltration rates, using a digital bright field microscope capturing both photo and video. While these visualization experiments confirm field and lab observation of ash washing into soil pores, we did not observe any clogging of pores, and have not been able to create conditions for which this does occur. Additional electrochemical analysis and measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity indicate that pore clogging by ash is not plausible. Electrochemical analysis showed that ash and sand are both negatively charged, showing that attachment of ash to sand and any resulting clogging is unlikely. Ash also had quite high saturated conductivity, and systems where ash was mixed in or lying on top of sand had similarly high hydraulic conductivity. Based on these various experiments, we cannot confirm the hypothesis that pore clogging by ash contributes to the frequently observed increase in post-fire runoff, at least for the medium to coarse sands

  20. Fly ash quality and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B.; Beer, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  1. Reconstructing the Lethal Part of the 1790 Eruption at Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, D.; Weaver, S. J.; Houghton, B. F.

    2011-12-01

    The most lethal known eruption from a volcano in the United States took place in November 1790 at Kilauea, killing perhaps 400-800 people (estimates range widely) who were crossing the summit on their way to a distant battle site. The eruption culminated ca. 300 years of sporadic explosive activity after the formation of Kilauea Caldera in about 1500. No contemporary account exists of the 1790 activity, but an eruption plume was observed from Kawaihae, 100 km NW of Kilauea, that probably was 10 km or higher. We are attempting to piece together the lethal event from a study of the 1790 and enclosing deposits and by using published accounts, written several decades later, based on interviews with survivors or others with knowledge of the tragedy. Determining what deposits actually formed in November 1790 is crucial. The best tie to that date is a deposit of phreatomagmatic lithic lapilli and ash that occurs SE of the caldera and must have been advected by high-level (>~10 km) westerly winds rather than low-level NE trade winds. It is the only contender for deposits from the high column observed in 1790. Small lapilli from the high column fell onto, and sank deeply into, a 3-5-cm-thick accretionary lapilli layer that was wet and likely no more than a few hours old. The wet ash occurs south of the caldera, where the lithic lapilli fell into it, and is also found west of the caldera in the saddle between Kilauea and Mauna Loa, where the victims were probably walking along a main foot trail still visible today. A lithic pyroclastic surge swept across the saddle, locally scouring away the wet accretionary lapilli layer but generally leaving a deposit <1 to 15 cm thick on the ash and embedding 1-cm lithic lapilli deeply within it. This indicates that the surge also erupted in November 1790, while the underlying ash was still wet. Though scattered ballistic blocks later fell in the area, the surge left the youngest continuous deposit on the west flank of Kilauea. An account

  2. Tectonic imbrication of Palaeo- and Neo-Tethyan accretionary complexes in the central Pontides, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okay, A. I.; Tuysuz, O.; Satir, M.; Eren, R. H.

    2003-04-01

    -eclogite thrust slice was previously also regarded as part of the Palaeo-Tethyan (Triassic) subduction-accretion complex. However, recent isotopic dating of the Elekdag eclogites have yielded Cretaceous ages, indicating that Palaeo- and Neo-Tethyan accretionary complexes were thrust imbricated during the Late Cretaceous subduction. A similar observation was recently reported from the Eskisehir region, 370 km to the west, where Triassic blueschists and eclogites are imbricated with the Upper Cretaceous accretionary complexes. Close association of Paleo- and Neo-Tethyan accretionary complexes along the Izmir-Ankara suture indicates that the latest Triassic-earliest Jurassic Cimmeride orogeny in Turkey was of accretional rather than collisional nature, and that the Izmir-Ankara suture represents a long-lived plate boundary of late Palaeozoic to early Tertiary age.

  3. Understanding tectonic stress and rock strength in the Nankai Trough accretionary prism, offshore SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Katelyn A.

    Understanding the orientation and magnitude of tectonic stress in active tectonic margins like subduction zones is important for understanding fault mechanics. In the Nankai Trough subduction zone, faults in the accretionary prism are thought to have historically slipped during or immediately following deep plate boundary earthquakes, often generating devastating tsunamis. I focus on quantifying stress at two locations of interest in the Nankai Trough accretionary prism, offshore Southwest Japan. I employ a method to constrain stress magnitude that combines observations of compressional borehole failure from logging-while-drilling resistivity-at-the-bit generated images (RAB) with estimates of rock strength and the relationship between tectonic stress and stress at the wall of a borehole. I use the method to constrain stress at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 808 and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site C0002. At Site 808, I consider a range of parameters (assumed rock strength, friction coefficient, breakout width, and fluid pressure) in the method to constrain stress to explore uncertainty in stress magnitudes and discuss stress results in terms of the seismic cycle. I find a combination of increased fluid pressure and decreased friction along the frontal thrust or other weak faults could produce thrust-style failure, without the entire prism being at critical state failure, as other kinematic models of accretionary prism behavior during earthquakes imply. Rock strength is typically inferred using a failure criterion and unconfined compressive strength from empirical relations with P-wave velocity. I minimize uncertainty in rock strength by measuring rock strength in triaxial tests on Nankai core. I find strength of Nankai core is significantly less than empirical relations predict. I create a new empirical fit to our experiments and explore implications of this on stress magnitude estimates. I find using the new empirical fit can decrease stress

  4. Precambrian accretionary history and phanerozoic structures-A unified explanation for the tectonic architecture of the nebraska region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    The Phanerozoic history in Nebraska and adjacent regions contains many patterns of structure and stratigraphy that can be directly related to the history of the Precambrian basement rocks of the area. A process is proposed that explains the southward growth of North America during the period 1.8-1.6 Ga. A series of families of accretionary events during the Proterozoic emplaced sutures that remained as fundamental basement weak zones. These zones were rejuvenated in response to a variety of continental stress events that occurred during the Phanerozoic. By combining the knowledge of basement history with the history of rejuvenation during the Phanerozoic, both the details of Proterozoic accretionary growth and an explanation for the patterns of Phanerozoic structure and stratigraphy is provided. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America. All rights reserved.

  5. Volcanic ash - Terrestrial versus extraterrestrial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A principal difference between terrestrial and extraterrestrial lavas may consist in the greater ability of terrestrial lavas to form thin films (like those of soap bubbles) and hence foams. It would follow that, in place of the pumice and spiny shards found in terrestrial volcanic ash, an extraterrestrial ash should contain minute spherules. This hypothesis may help to explain lunar microspherules.

  6. Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an invasive beetle from Asia that has caused large scale ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in North America. This book chapter reviews the taxonomy, biology, life history of this invasive pest and its associated natural enemies in both its native ...

  7. Hybrid granodiorites intruding the accretionary prism, Kodiak, Shumagin, and Sanak Islands, southwest Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Malcolm; Morris, Julie; Whelan, Joseph

    1981-11-01

    A narrow belt of tonalite-granodiorite-granite plutons and batholiths intruded the accretionary prism in southwestern Alaska about 60 m.y. ago, simultaneously with plutonism over 100 km north along the main arc axis. The presence of metasedimentary xenoliths, kyanite, and garnet within the intrusions exposed on the Kodiak, Shumagin and Sanak islands establishes the presence of a crustal component. Extremely high values of δ18O, from +10.9 to +13.2 o/oo, require a crustal origin for much of the oxygen in the intrusions. Open-system alteration has disrupted whole-rock Rb-Sr systematics in some samples from the Sanak pluton and Shumagin batholith. Mineral isochrons using unaltered minerals yield an age of 58.7 ± 1.2 m.y. and 87Sr/86Sri = 0.70534 ± 10 for the Shumagin batholith, and ages of 62.7 ± 1.2 m.y. and 87Sr/86Sri = 0.70523 ± 14 for the Sanak pluton. Comparison of the isotopic data for the intrusions with those of sedimentary rocks in the Kodiak and Shumagin formations requires that a low-δ18O, low-87Sr/86Sr component be present as well. Mixing models combining 87Sr/87Sr and Sr contents of various kinds of mafic magmas with partial melts of metasedimentary wall rocks suggest that three types of mafic magmas can satisfactorily duplicate the oxygen isotope signature of the intrusions: (1) a mid ocean ridge (MORB)-like magma, (2) a magma derived by partial fusion of altered MORB, or (3) an arc basalt. The MORB model predicts abundances of Rb, Sr, Ba, and rare earth elements which are similar to those in the intrusions, while the altered MORB model does not. The arc magma model provides a better trace element match than the remelted MORB model, but is not as successful as the MORB model. These intrusions were preceded by a pulse of mafic to intermediate volcanism near or within the accretionary prism, recorded in the Paleocene Ghost Rocks Formation. This volcanism is probably the heat and mass source of the mafic component within the intrusions, and may be

  8. Linking collisional and accretionary orogens during Rodinia assembly and breakup: Implications for models of supercontinent cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Peter A.; Strachan, Robin A.; Pisarevsky, Sergei A.; Gladkochub, Dmitry P.; Murphy, J. Brendan

    2016-09-01

    Periodic assembly and dispersal of continental fragments has been a characteristic of the solid Earth for much of its history. Geodynamic drivers of this cyclic activity are inferred to be either top-down processes related to near surface lithospheric stresses at plate boundaries or bottom-up processes related to mantle convection and, in particular, mantle plumes, or some combination of the two. Analysis of the geological history of Rodinian crustal blocks suggests that internal rifting and breakup of the supercontinent were linked to the initiation of subduction and development of accretionary orogens around its periphery. Thus, breakup was a top-down instigated process. The locus of convergence was initially around north-eastern and northern Laurentia in the early Neoproterozoic before extending to outboard of Amazonia and Africa, including Avalonia-Cadomia, and arcs outboard of Siberia and eastern to northern Baltica in the mid-Neoproterozoic (∼760 Ma). The duration of subduction around the periphery of Rodinia coincides with the interval of lithospheric extension within the supercontinent, including the opening of the proto-Pacific at ca. 760 Ma and the commencement of rifting in east Laurentia. Final development of passive margin successions around Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia was not completed until the late Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic (ca. 570-530 Ma), which corresponds with the termination of convergent plate interactions that gave rise to Gondwana and the consequent relocation of subduction zones to the periphery of this supercontinent. The temporal link between external subduction and internal extension suggests that breakup was initiated by a top-down process driven by accretionary tectonics along the periphery of the supercontinent. Plume-related magmatism may be present at specific times and in specific places during breakup but is not the prime driving force. Comparison of the Rodinia record of continental assembly and dispersal with that

  9. Polyphase deformation of a Paleozoic metamorphosed subduction-accretionary complex in Beishan Orogen, southern Altaids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongfang; Xiao, Wenjiao

    2014-05-01

    formed at ~423 Ma and ~280 Ma, respectively. These indicate that D1 occurred in the interval 424-423 Ma, D2 occurred at or shortly after 423 Ma, D3 and D4 in the period 423-280 Ma. These structural patterns and magmatism events can be interpreted as a result of northward subduction of the Niujuanzi Ocean to the south of the Lebaquan Complex during the Paleozoic. The Lebaquan Complex represent a subduction-accretionary complex probably formed in a forearc setting. Combined with other published data, we conclude that the Beishan orogen may have undergone multiple subduction-accretionary processes during the Paleozoic.

  10. Confined deep water system development on the accretionary wedge (Miocene, Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin, S turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, Murat; Cronin, Bryan T.; Gürbüz, Kemal

    2012-09-01

    According to theoretical studies, the foreland basin consists of: accretionary wedge (including wedge top or piggyback basin), foredeep, forebulge and backbulge depozones. All of them are parallel to the orogenic belts of the overlying and underlying plates. The closure of the southern branch of the Neotethys during the Late Cretaceous led to an oblique collision of the Arabian Plate and the Anatolide-Taurides Platform, leading to the development of the Miocene Kahramanmaraş Foreland Basin (KFB). Thus, the promontory shape of the Arabian Plate prevented the development of an accretionary wedge parallel to the orogenic belt. The accretionary wedge of the KFB includes blocks of various sizes and age (mainly Mesozoic limestone) scattered within an Early Tertiary matrix (mass wasting deposits and shallow to deep marine sediments). At the beginning of the Miocene, transtensional tectonism led to the development of half-graben basins on top of the accretionary wedge. These basins (namely; the Tekir and Çukurhisar) also cut the foredeep of the KFB obliquely (in contrast with the theoretical study). This paper focuses on the evolution and fillings of those basins. Initially, claystone and basin margin reef deposits filled the half-graben basins as a consequence of the Lower Miocene sea invasion. Then, long and narrow conglomeratic channels starting from the northern edge of the basins (fan-delta) progressed southwards, passing into sandy lobes, then into claystones. An activation of the boundary faults of the wedge top basin stopped the progression of the Lower-Middle Miocene sediments and led to their deformation. Then, the sedimentation of the KFB shifted towards the basin centre during the Middle Miocene.

  11. Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Songjian; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian; Mao, Qigui

    2016-04-01

    The continental growth mechanism of the Altaids in Central Asia is still in controversy between models of continuous subduction-accretion versus punctuated accretion by closure of multiple oceanic basins. The Beishan orogenic belt, located in the southern Altaids, is a natural laboratory to address this controversy. Key questions that are heavily debated are: the closure time and subduction polarity of former oceans, the emplacement time of ophiolites, and the styles of accretion and collision. This paper reports new structural data, zircon ages and Ar-Ar dates from the eastern Beishan Orogen that provide information on the accretion process and tectonic affiliation of various terranes. Our geochronological and structural results show that the younging direction of accretion was northwards and the subduction zone dipped southwards under the northern margin of the Shuangyingshan micro-continent. This long-lived and continuous accretion process formed the Hanshan accretionary prism. Our field investigations show that the emplacement of the Xiaohuangshan ophiolite was controlled by oceanic crust subduction beneath the forearc accretionary prism of the Shuangyingshan-Mazongshan composite arc to the south. Moreover, we address the age and terrane affiliation of lithologies in the eastern Beishan orogen through detrital zircon geochronology of meta-sedimentary rocks. We provide new information on the ages, subduction polarities, and affiliation of constituent structural units, as well as a new model of tectonic evolution of the eastern Beishan orogen. The accretionary processes and crustal growth of Central Asia were the result of multiple sequences of accretion and collision of manifold terranes. Reference: Ao, S.J., Xiao, W., Windley, B.F., Mao, Q., Han, C., Zhang, J.e., Yang, L., Geng, J., Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Gondwana Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

  12. Human Footprints in Relation to the 1790 Eruption of Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, D. A.; Rausch, J.

    2008-12-01

    In 1790, a party of warriors and their families was decimated by an explosive eruption of Kilauea; fatality estimates range from about 80 to 5,405. In 1920, thousands of footprints made by barefoot walkers in wet accretionary lapilli ash were found within a few kilometers southwest of Kilauea's summit. In 1921, Jaggar related the footprints to survivors or rescuers of the 1790 eruption, mainly because he assumed that few people visited the supposedly forbidden area except in 1790. Archaeologists from Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park recently questioned whether the footprints were made at that time and by warriors, citing a wide range of directions that people were walking and evidence of extensive human use of the area. Forensic and anthropologic studies indicate that a human foot is about 15 percent of an individual's height. A man's foot may be slightly more that 15 percent, a women's slightly less, but nonetheless the height can be estimated to within a few centimeters. We measured the heel-big toe length of more than 400 footprints and calculated an average height of 1.5 m, including some children only a little more than 1 m tall. Few calculated heights are 1.75 m or more. Early Europeans described Hawaiian warriors as tall, one missionary estimating an average height of 1.78 m. A footprint may be larger than a foot, particularly in slippery, wet ash, so our estimates of heights are probably somewhat too large. The data indicate that most of the footprints were made by women and children, not by men, much less warriors. We traced the footprint-bearing ash into the tephra section on the southwest side of Kilauea's caldera. It occurs high in the section, resting on older explosive deposits. Its surface is indented by small lithic lapilli, which fell into the ash while it was still wet; a few even landed in footprints. The lithic lapilli are at the edge of a thick block and lapilli deposit that fell from a high eruption column; the column reached well into the jet

  13. Beneficial uses of CFB ash

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.J.; Cotton, J.L. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Coal-fired generation accounts for almost 55 percent of the electricity produced in the United States. It has been estimated that over 90 million tons of coal combustion waste by-products were generated in 1990. Currently, only 30% of coal combustion waste is recycled for various beneficial applications. The remaining waste is primarily managed in landfills and surface impoundments. Circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology will play an important role in supplying power for future load growth and Title 4 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments compliance. CFB ash by-products have many beneficial uses. This paper describes potential applications of CFB ashes based on the ash characteristics. The beneficial uses of CFB ash discussed in this study include agricultural applications, acidic waste stabilizer, ash rock, sludge stabilizer, strip mine reclamation, and structural fill.

  14. Trace elements in coal ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Doughten, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    In this fact sheet, the form, distribution, and behavior of trace elements of environmental interest in samples of coal fly ash were investigated in response to concerns about element mobility in the event of an ash spill. The study includes laboratory-based leaching experiments to examine the behavior of trace elements, such as arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr), in response to key environmental factors including redox conditions (degree of oxygenation), which are known to vary with depth within coal ash impoundments and in natural ecosystems. The experiments show that As dissolves from samples of coal fly ash into simulated freshwater under both oxic (highly oxygenated) and anoxic (poorly oxygenated) conditions, whereas dissolved Cr concentrations are very redox dependent. This U.S. Geological Survey research helps define the distribution of elements such as As in coal ash and shows that element mobility can vary considerably under different conditions expected in the environment.

  15. An evaluation of factors influencing pore pressure in accretionary complexes: Implications for taper angle and wedge mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    At many subduction zones, accretionary complexes form as sediment is off-scraped from the subducting plate. Mechanical models that treat accretionary complexes as critically tapered wedges of sediment demonstrate that pore pressure controls their taper angle by modifying basal and internal shear strength. Here, we combine a numerical model of groundwater flow with critical taper theory to quantify the effects of sediment and de??collement permeability, sediment thickness, sediment partitioning between accretion and underthrusting, and plate convergence rate on steady state pore pressure. Our results show that pore pressure in accretionary wedges can be viewed as a dynamically maintained response to factors which drive pore pressure (source terms) and those that limit flow (permeability and drainage path length). We find that sediment permeability and incoming sediment thickness are the most important factors, whereas fault permeability and the partitioning of sediment have a small effect. For our base case model scenario, as sediment permeability is increased, pore pressure decreases from near-lithostatic to hydrostatic values and allows stable taper angles to increase from ??? 2.5?? to 8??-12.5??. With increased sediment thickness in our models (from 100 to 8000 m), increased pore pressure drives a decrease in stable taper angle from 8.4??-12.5?? to 15?? to <4??) with increased sediment thickness (from <1 to 7 km). One key implication is that hydrologic properties may strongly influence the strength of the crust in a wide range of geologic settings. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. HFSE-rich picritic rocks from the Mino accretionary complex, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyama, Yuji; Ishiwatari, Akira

    2005-06-01

    Sills, pillow lavas and hyaloclastites of the HFSE-rich picrite and related rocks (ankaramite and basanite) occur in the Middle Permian cherts in the Mino Jurassic accretionary complex, southwestern Japan. These rocks show systematic trace element patterns enriched in incompatible elements, which indicate that the associated ankaramite and basanite are formed by the crystal fractionation from the picrite. The presence of the hyaloclastite in the chert sequence covering a large tholeiitic greenstone body indicates that the picrite was produced in an intraoceanic setting in the Middle Permian time subsequent to the extrusion of the voluminous oceanic island tholeiite. The Mino picrites resemble the Siberian meimechite and Polynesian picrites in its HFSE-rich chemical composition. The HFSE enrichment in these picrites cannot be explained by low degree of partial melting of primitive peridotite mantle only, and needs a source material involving recycled oceanic crust (eclogite). The differences in MgO content and in TiO2/Al2O3 and Zr/Y ratios among the HFSE-rich picrites indicate that the melting pressure increases from the Polynesian picrite through Mino picrite to Siberian picrite. This may reflect the increasing thickness of the overlying lithosphere at the time and place of magmatism. The HFSE-rich picrites may be a product of a superplume event. The presence of HFSE-rich picrite in Mino and Siberia indicate that the superplume activities occur in both continental and oceanic settings in the Permian time.

  17. Falls Lake melange, a polydeformed accretionary complex in the North Carolina piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.W. Jr.; Blake, D.E.; Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Stoddard, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    The Falls Lake melange in the eastern Piedmont of North Carolina is composed of mafic and ultramafic blocks and pods of diverse shapes and sizes, from about 1 cm to 7 km in length, dispersed without stratigraphic continuity in a matrix of pelitic schist and metagraywacke. The melange lies between the Carolina slate belt on the west and the Raleigh belt on the east. This terrane has been mapped in detail from near Wilton in Granville County, southward for about 40 km to west Raleigh in Wake County. Preliminary petrologic and geochemical data suggest an oceanic crustal origin for the mafic and ultramafic inclusions. Although the lenticular shapes of most fragments are attributable to ductile deformation, a few more equant fragments that are clearly overprinted by the earliest recognized matrix schistosity have round to angular shapes resembling sedimentary clasts. These observations suggest formation by a combination of sedimentary and tectonic processes, perhaps in the accretionary wedge of a convergent plate margin. The Falls Lake melange and the overlying late Proterozoic to Early Cambrian volcanic-arc terrane of the accreted Carolina slate belt were thrust upon a probably continental terrane of the Raleigh belt before overprinting by late Paleozoic folding and metamorphism. The melange and its folded basal decollement are truncated on the east by a later fault of the Nutbush Creek system and have not been found east of this fault.

  18. Estimation of slip parameters of a slip zone in the shallow portion of an accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Y.; Hirono, T.; Ishikawa, T.

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the widely accepted scenario that a megasplay fault branching from a subduction boundary megathrust can contribute to the generation of devastating tsunamis, we investigated a major reverse fault in the Emi Group, Boso Peninsula, Japan, corresponding to the shallow portion of a thrust in an accretionary prism. We examined the rocks of the slip zone and the surrounding host rocks microscopically, and analyzed their trace elements and isotopes. On the basis of the fluid-mobile trace-element spectrum, which is sensitive to fluid-rock interaction at high temperatures, we estimated the paleo-thermal history of the slip zone. We discovered that the slip zone experienced frictional heating of >350 °C caused by high-velocity sliding. By numerical analysis of the frictional heating, we also estimated a large displacement of several meters along the fault at the shallow depth of approximately 1-2 km below the seafloor. Our results support the hypothesis that the megasplay fault plays an important role in the generation of huge tsunamis during subduction boundary earthquakes.

  19. Rock varnish in New York: An accelerated snapshot of accretionary processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krinsley, David H.; Dorn, Ronald I.; DiGregorio, Barry E.; Langworthy, Kurt A.; Ditto, Jeffrey

    2012-02-01

    Samples of manganiferous rock varnish collected from fluvial, bedrock outcrop and Erie Barge Canal settings in New York state host a variety of diatom, fungal and bacterial microbial forms that are enhanced in manganese and iron. Use of a Dual-Beam Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscope to manipulate the varnish in situ reveals microbial forms that would not have otherwise been identified. The relative abundance of Mn-Fe-enriched biotic forms in New York samples is far greater than varnishes collected from warm deserts. Moisture availability has long been noted as a possible control on varnish growth rates, a hypothesis consistent with the greater abundance of Mn-enhancing bioforms. Sub-micron images of incipient varnish formation reveal that varnishing in New York probably starts with the mortality of microorganisms that enhanced Mn on bare mineral surfaces; microbial death results in the adsorption of the Mn-rich sheath onto the rock in the form of filamentous networks. Clay minerals are then cemented by remobilization of the Mn-rich material. Thus, the previously unanswered question of what comes first - clay mineral deposition or enhancement of Mn - can be answered in New York because of the faster rate of varnish growth. In contrast, very slow rates of varnishing seen in warm deserts, of microns per thousand years, make it less likely that collected samples will reveal varnish accretionary processes than samples collected from fast-accreting moist settings.

  20. Biogas production using anaerobic groundwater containing a subterranean microbial community associated with the accretionary prism.

    PubMed

    Baito, Kyohei; Imai, Satomi; Matsushita, Makoto; Otani, Miku; Sato, Yu; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    In a deep aquifer associated with an accretionary prism, significant methane (CH₄) is produced by a subterranean microbial community. Here, we developed bioreactors for producing CH₄ and hydrogen (H₂) using anaerobic groundwater collected from the deep aquifer. To generate CH₄, the anaerobic groundwater amended with organic substrates was incubated in the bioreactor. At first, H₂ was detected and accumulated in the gas phase of the bioreactor. After the H₂ decreased, rapid CH₄ production was observed. Phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium and hydrogenotrophic methanogen were predominant in the reactor. The results suggested that syntrophic biodegradation of organic substrates by the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen contributed to the CH₄ production. For H₂ production, the anaerobic groundwater, amended with organic substrates and an inhibitor of methanogens (2-bromoethanesulfonate), was incubated in a bioreactor. After incubation for 24 h, H₂ was detected from the gas phase of the bioreactor and accumulated. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis suggested the dominance of the H₂ -producing fermentative bacterium in the reactor. Our study demonstrated a simple and rapid CH4 and H2 production utilizing anaerobic groundwater containing an active subterranean microbial community. PMID:25267392

  1. Biogas production using anaerobic groundwater containing a subterranean microbial community associated with the accretionary prism

    PubMed Central

    Baito, Kyohei; Imai, Satomi; Matsushita, Makoto; Otani, Miku; Sato, Yu; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a deep aquifer associated with an accretionary prism, significant methane (CH4) is produced by a subterranean microbial community. Here, we developed bioreactors for producing CH4 and hydrogen (H2) using anaerobic groundwater collected from the deep aquifer. To generate CH4, the anaerobic groundwater amended with organic substrates was incubated in the bioreactor. At first, H2 was detected and accumulated in the gas phase of the bioreactor. After the H2 decreased, rapid CH4 production was observed. Phylogenetic analysis targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that the H2-producing fermentative bacterium and hydrogenotrophic methanogen were predominant in the reactor. The results suggested that syntrophic biodegradation of organic substrates by the H2-producing fermentative bacterium and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen contributed to the CH4 production. For H2 production, the anaerobic groundwater, amended with organic substrates and an inhibitor of methanogens (2-bromoethanesulfonate), was incubated in a bioreactor. After incubation for 24 h, H2 was detected from the gas phase of the bioreactor and accumulated. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis suggested the dominance of the H2-producing fermentative bacterium in the reactor. Our study demonstrated a simple and rapid CH4 and H2 production utilizing anaerobic groundwater containing an active subterranean microbial community. PMID:25267392

  2. Fluid flow and mass flux determinations at vent sites on the Cascadia margin accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, B.; Strasser, J.C. ); Suess, E. )

    1990-06-10

    Fluid venting from the toe of the accretionary prism off Oregon was measured in situ during a series of dives with DSRV Alvin in 1987 and 1988. A benthic chamber was place over active vent sites to sequentially collect samples of venting fluids and to make direct measurements of discharge rates. Calibrated flow meter measurements and flow rates determined from dissolved methane transfer indicate that discharge from two vent sites, Alvin 1428 and Alvin 1900, ranges roughly between 100 and 500 l/m{sup 2}d with the most reliable estimates falling in the range of 125-150 l/m{sup 2}d. These rates imply subsurface advective flow on the order of 100 m/yr. Comparison of observed discharge rates with rates calculated for steady state expulsion supported by accretion-related compaction indicates that the observed flow is greater than predicted flow by several orders of magnitude. The disparity dictates that fluids are not derived locally, but are transported laterally within the prism, or that flow is not steady state and that individual vents are short-lived features in the ongoing accretion process.

  3. Hydrocarbon gas potential of accretionary melange terranes: an example from the olympic peninsula, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Snavely, P.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between the oceanic and North American plates during middle late Eocene and late middle Miocene times produced two principal accretionary terranes of melange and broken formation on the continental margin of Washington. Hydrocarbon analyses of these melange units were undertaken to evaluate their source rock potential for oil and gas and to assess the generative processes operating in these thick melange wedges. The results of pyrolysis, vitrinite reflectance, and visual kerogen analyses of samples of these melanges are consistent and in good agreement, showing mainly Type III organic matter that is marginally mature to mature with respect to gas generation. Coastal exposure of Ozette melange commonly have a petroliferous odor which contains methane through at least the pentanes as prominent constitutents. Hydrocarbon gases from seeps and from an abandoned well in the study area have been molecular compositions and methane carbon isotopic values indicating related sources. The authors evidence suggest that the Ozette assemblage melange is the principal source for thermogenic hydrocarbon gases. Potential exploration targets may exist in western Washington where melange and broken formation are thrust beneath the Eocene oceanic crust (Crescent Formation). Gas generated from the underplated rocks could have migrated through the upper plate into structures in the Tertiary strata that overlie these Eocene basalts.

  4. Ferromanganese nodules from MANOP Sites H, S, and R-Control of mineralogical and chemical composition by multiple accretionary processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dymond, J.; Lyle, M.; Finney, B.; Piper, D.Z.; Murphy, K.; Conard, R.; Pisias, N.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical composition of ferromanganese nodules from the three nodule-bearing MANOP sites in the Pacific can be accounted for in a qualitative way by variable contributions of distinct accretionary processes. These accretionary modes are: 1. (1) hydrogenous, i.e., direct precipitation or accumulation of colloidal metal oxides in seawater, 2. (2) oxic diagenesis which refers to a variety of ferromanganese accretion processes occurring in oxic sediments; and 3. (3) suboxic diagenesis which results from reduction of Mn+4 by oxidation of organic matter in the sediments. Geochemical evidence suggests processes (1) and (2) occur at all three MANOP nodule-bearing sites, and process (3) occurs only at the hemipelagic site, H, which underlies the relatively productive waters of the eastern tropical Pacific. A normative model quantitatively accounts for the variability observed in nearly all elements. Zn and Na, however, are not well explained by the three end-member model, and we suggest that an additional accretionary process results in greater variability in the abundances of these elements. Variable contributions from the three accretionary processes result in distinct top-bottom compositional differences at the three sites. Nodule tops from H are enriched in Ni, Cu, and Zn, instead of the more typical enrichments of these elements in nodule bottoms. In addition, elemental correlations typical of most pelagic nodules are reversed at site H. The three accretionary processes result in distinct mineralogies. Hydrogenous precipitation produces ??MnO2. Oxic diagenesis, however, produces Cu-Ni-rich todorokite, and suboxic diagenesis results in an unstable todorokite which transforms to a 7 A?? phase ("birnessite") upon dehydration. The presence of Cu and Ni as charge-balancing cations influence the stability of the todorokite structure. In the bottoms of H nodules, which accrete dominantly by suboxic diagenesis, Na+ and possibly Mn+2 provide much of the charge balance for

  5. Sorptivity of fly ash concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    A factorial experiment was designed to measure the sorptivity of cement and fly ash concretes in order to compare the durability of fly ash concrete against the cement concrete. Sorptivity measurements based on the capillary movement of water was made on three grades of cement concrete and six grades of fly ash mixes. The effect of curing was also studied by treating the samples in two curving conditions. A functional relationship of sorptivity against the strength, curing condition and fly ash content has been presented. The results were useful to analyze the factors influencing the durability of cement and fly ash concretes and to explain why some of the previously reported findings were contradictory. Curing conditions have been found to be the most important factor that affected the durability properties of fly ash concrete. When proper curing was provided, a mix with 40% fly ash was found to reduce the sorptivity by 37%. Under inadequate curing the sorptivity was found to increase by 60%. The influence of curing on cement concrete was found to be of much less importance.

  6. Volcanic ash in deep marine sediment: A comparison of dispersed ash and adjacent ash layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, R. P.; Murray, R. W.; Kutterolf, S.; Schindlbeck, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of dispersed volcanic ash in pelagic marine sediment (as differentiated from ash found in discrete layers) has been known since the 1970's. Most previous studies have assessed the dispersed component through sedimentological and petrographic methods. As part of an effort to quantitatively determine the amount, and chemical composition, of dispersed ash in pelagic sediments, we are undertaking a systematic study of the western Pacific marine sediments. ODP Site 1149 (Leg 185), located immediately east of the Izu-Bonin Arc, consists of aluminosilicate clay and large amounts of volcanic ash (>75 ash layers described in units I and II). In addition to the ash layers, there is abundant dispersed ash (20 - 50% of the bulk). Using a multi-elemental geochemical and statistical approach we can characterize and quantify this dispersed ash component, and thus complement the original ash layer record by a novel dataset. At Site 1149, our previous work based on refractory trace element end members of potential sources (from the literature) indicate that Chinese Loess, Ryukyu Dacite (Japan), and an average of Izu-Bonin Front Arc material yield the best mixing to explain the bulk sedimentary composition (Scudder et al., 2009, EPSL, 284, 639-648). Contribution of a significant distal Ryukyu Arc component to the sediment eastward of Izu-Bonin (i.e., Site 1149) is surprising, yet is required by our chemical results, and is consistent with the previous work of Egeberg et al. (1992). While Scudder et al. (2009) was based on a small number of samples (~15 samples for complete major, trace, and REE analysis) and a modest element menu, we here present the results from an expansive suite of analyses (>80 samples) allowing us to test the effect of sample number on the statistical results and achieve additional quantitative resolution of volcanic and upper crustal sources (e.g., loess). This further improves our statistical ability to resolve temporal changes that may be

  7. Landfilling ash/sludge mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, J.; Eighmy, T.T.; Crannell, B.S.

    1999-10-01

    The geotechnical properties of a mixture of municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge was investigated for a proposed ash/sludge secure landfill. The components as well as mixtures ranging from 10:1 to 5:1 (ash:sludge, by volume) were evaluated, where appropriate, for a number of geotechnical index and mechanical properties including particle size, water content, specific gravity, density-moisture relationships, shear strength, and compressibility. The results from a compactibility study and stability analysis of the proposed landfill were used to help approve a landfill codisposal concept; a full-scale facility was constructed and is currently operating successfully.

  8. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than...

  9. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than...

  10. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than...

  11. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than...

  12. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than...

  13. Morphology and petrography of volcanic ashes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiken, G.

    1972-01-01

    Study of volcanic ash samples collected from a variety of recent eruptions using petrography, chemical analyses, and scanning electron microscopy to characterize each type and to relate ash morphology to magma composition and the type of eruption. The ashes are placed in the broad genetic categories of magmatic and phreatomagmatic. The morphology of ash particles from magmatic eruptions of high viscosity magma is governed primarily by vesicle density and shape. Ash particles from eruptions of low viscosity magmas are mostly droplets. The morphology of ash particles from phreatomagmatic eruptions is controlled by stresses within the chilled magma which result in fragmentation of the glass to form small blocky or pyramidal glass ash particles.

  14. Alkali ash material: a novel fly ash-based cement.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Hossein; Brendley, William

    2003-08-01

    The United States generates 110 million t of coal ash annually. Approximately 70 million t of this coal ash is fly ash, of which 27% is recycled and the remaining 73% is landfilled. Disposal of such a huge quantity of ash poses a significant environmental problem. A new cementitious material has been developed, called alkali ash material (AAM), which is used to produce concrete for construction. AAM can be used to create a variety of concrete strengths and could revolutionize the concrete product manufacturing industry due to its economic advantage. AAM contains 40-95% Class F fly ash and is used as cement to bind sand, stone, and fibers creating concrete. AAM concrete has been tested for strength, durability, mechanical properties, and, most importantly, economic viability. AAM concrete is economically and technically viable for many construction applications. Some properties include rapid strength gain (90% of ultimate in 1 d), high ultimate strengths (110 MPa or 16,000 psi in 1 d), excellent acid resistance, and freeze-thaw durability. AAM's resistance to chemical attack, such as sulfuric (H2SO4), nitric (HNO3), hydrochloric (HCl), and organic acids, is far better than portland cement concrete. AAM is resistant to freeze-thaw attack based on ASTM C-666 specifications. Potential immediate applications of AAM are blocks, pipe, median barriers, sound barriers, and overlaying materials. Eventual markets are high strength construction products, bridge beams, prestressed members, concrete tanks, highway appurtenances, and other concrete products. PMID:12966995

  15. Geological Controls of a Gas-Hydrate System in the Frontal Taiwan Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.; Lin, A.; Liu, C.; Hsu, S.; Lin, C.; Chen, G.; Schn Êrle, P.

    2008-12-01

    The frontal accretionary wedge offshore southwest Taiwan is characterized by rapid sedimentation, erosion along submarine canyons, and tectonic uplift due to folding and thrusting. The possible existence of gas hydrates beneath the seafloor has been indicated by geophysical and geological data. The interplays between the processes of sedimentation, erosion, and tectonic uplift therefore maintain a dynamic equilibrium system in which gas hydrates are preserved in the strata. In order to understand this system, we use data of chirp sonar, reflection seismics, and seafloor sediment samples to characterize the geological controls on the gas-hydrate system in the study area. The study area lies in the lower slope domain of the accretionary wedge. Seismic data reveals that, in the west of the study area (i.e., the frontal segment), it consists of a series of folds cored by blind thrusts; in the east of the study area (i.e., the rear segment), it consists of an array of emergent thrusts. The most frontal emergent thrust separates the frontal and rear segments of the lower slope. There are different in sedimentary features, structural styles, distributions of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) in the frontal and rear segments. In the frontal segment, sedimentation prevails in this region. Areas of major erosion and mass-wasting processes occur mostly in the reaches of submarine canyons. The spatial distribution of BSRs is sparse in this region and BSRs occur mostly beneath the anticlinal and bathymetric ridges. In the rear segment, it typically shows west-vergent and asymmetric fold profiles with long and planar backlimbs versus short forelimbs. The forelimbs are absent or very short in profile, and the east-dipping backlimbs are steeper beneath bathymetric ridge with its stratal dip decreasing and exhibit a homoclinal feature. There is usually a significant stratigraphic section deposited on backlimbs, showing evidences of limb rotation during fold growth. A few seafloor

  16. Impactites related to atmospheric effects on the surface of Mars: Evidence from Lonar Crater, India and Henbury, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beal, R.; Newsom, H. E.; Wright, S. P.

    2011-12-01

    The surface of Mars has been exposed to impact cratering processes for billions of years and massive megabreccia deposits have been observed in many craters. However, the materials caught up in the hot plume in the atmosphere above the crater should be present in surficial ejecta, but have not been identified by the martian rovers. These materials can include shocked ejecta, impact melts and accretionary lapilli. The effects of melting of the surface due to impinging airbursts from projectiles that breakup in the atmosphere might also be present (Newsom et al., 2010). The erosional effects of wind and water have probably erased much of this evidence from all but more recent craters, but the evidence from terrestrial craters suggests that these features should exist. The Henbury, Australia crater field (largest crater 157m diameter) contains Ni-bearing impactites (confirmed by analysis of ~30 samples by portable XRF) that are hard to explain by any mechanism other than breakup of the iron-meteorite high in the atmosphere and impingement of this Fe-bearing high-temperature gas onto the surface. The Lonar crater in Maharashtra, India (1.8 km diameter) was emplaced in Deccan basalt. The basaltic nature of Lonar crater and its well preserved ejecta blanket makes it an important Mars analog. We have discovered impact melt particles coated in fine grained material and melt fragments in the ejecta at Lonar that suggests that significant welding of material took place within the initial ejecta plume. Although impact melt spherules have been previously observed in Lonar ejecta, we have recently identified two new classes of sub-millimeter (avg size 900 μm) particles. These particles display a layering of fine-grain material and are similar to lapilli at volcanic as well as at other impact craters. Accretionary lapilli are spheroidal ash aggregates deposited either in discrete layers or enclosed in a matrix of fine-grain ash that exhibit a target nucleus interpreted to be

  17. Fluid expulsion sites on the Cascadia accretionary prism: mapping diagenetic deposits with processed GLORIA imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carson, Bobb; Seke, Erol; Paskevich, Valerie F.; Holmes, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

     Point-discharge fluid expulsion on accretionary prisms is commonly indicated by diagenetic deposition of calcium carbonate cements and gas hydrates in near-surface (<10 m below seafloor; mbsf) hemipelagic sediment. The contrasting clastic and diagenetic lithologies should be apparent in side scan images. However, sonar also responds to variations in bottom slope, so unprocessed images mix topographic and lithologic information. We have processed GLORIA imagery from the Oregon continental margin to remove topographic effects. A synthetic side scan image was created initially from Sea Beam bathymetric data and then was subtracted iteratively from the original GLORIA data until topographic features disappeared. The residual image contains high-amplitude backscattering that we attribute to diagenetic deposits associated with fluid discharge, based on submersible mapping, Ocean Drilling Program drilling, and collected samples. Diagenetic deposits are concentrated (1) near an out-of-sequence thrust fault on the second ridge landward of the base of the continental slope, (2) along zones characterized by deep-seated strikeslip faults that cut transversely across the margin, and (3) in undeformed Cascadia Basin deposits which overlie incipient thrust faults seaward of the toe of the prism. There is no evidence of diagenetic deposition associated with the frontal thrust that rises from the dècollement. If the dècollement is an important aquifer, apparently the fluids are passed either to the strike-slip faults which intersect the dècollement or to the incipient faults in Cascadia Basin for expulsion. Diagenetic deposits seaward of the prism toe probably consist dominantly of gas hydrates

  18. Comparison of frictional strength and velocity dependence between fault zones in the Nankai accretionary complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Saffer, Demian M.

    2011-04-01

    Accretionary complexes host a variety of fault zones that accommodate plate convergence and internal prism deformation, including the décollement, imbricate thrusts, and out-of-sequence thrusts or splays. These faults, especially the décollement and major splay faults, are considered to be candidates for hosting slow slip events and large magnitude earthquakes, but it is not clear what modes of slip should be expected at shallow levels or how they are related to fault rock frictional properties. We conducted laboratory experiments to measure the frictional properties of fault and wall rock from three distinct fault zone systems sampled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 316 and Ocean Drilling Program Leg 190 to the Nankai Trough offshore Japan. These are (1) a major out-of-sequence thrust fault, termed the "megasplay" (Site C0004), (2) the frontal thrust zone, a region of diffuse thrust faulting near the trench (Site C0007), and (3) the décollement zone sampled 2 km from the trench (Site 1174). At 25 MPa effective normal stress, at slip rates of 0.03-100 μm/s, and in the presence of brine as a pore fluid, we observe low friction (μ ≤ 0.46) for all of the materials we tested; however, the weakest samples (μ ≤ 0.30) are from the décollement zone. Material from the megasplay fault is significantly weaker than the surrounding wall rocks, a pattern not observed in the frontal thrust and décollement. All samples exhibit primarily velocity-strengthening frictional behavior, suggesting that earthquakes should not nucleate at these depths. A consistent minimum in the friction rate parameter a-b at sliding velocities of ˜1-3 μm/s (˜0.1-0.3 m/d) is observed at all three sites, suggesting that these shallow fault zones may be likely to host slow slip events.

  19. Headless submarine canyons and fluid flow on the toe of the Cascadia accretionary complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orange, D.L.; McAdoo, B.G.; Moore, J.C.; Tobin, H.; Screaton, E.; Chezar, H.; Lee, H.; Reid, M.; Vail, R.

    1997-01-01

    Headless submarine canyons with steep headwalls and shallowly sloping floors occur on both the second and third landward vergent anticlines on the toe of the Cascadia accretionary complex off central Oregon (45 ??N, 125?? 30??W). In September 1993, we carried out a series of nine deep tow camera sled runs and nine ALVIN dives to examine the relationship between fluid venting, structure and canyon formation. We studied four canyons on the second and third landward vergent anticlines, as well as the apparently unfailed intercanyon regions along strike. All evidence of fluid expulsion is associated with the canyons; we found no evidence of fluid flow between canyons. Even though all fluid seeps are related to canyons, we did not find seeps in all canyons, and the location of the seeps within the canyons differed. On the landward facing limb of the second landward vergent anticline a robust cold seep community occurs at the canyon's inflection point. This seep is characterized by chemosynthetic vent clams, tube worms and extensive authigenic carbonate. Fluids for this seep may utilize high-permeability flow paths either parallel to bedding within the second thrust ridge or along the underlying thrust fault before leaking into the overriding section. Two seaward facing canyons on the third anticlinal ridge have vent clam communities near the canyon mouths at approximately the intersection between the anticlinal ridge and the adjacent forearc basin. No seeps were found along strike at the intersection of the slope basin and anticlinal ridge. We infer that the lack of seepage along strike and the presence of seeps in canyons may be related to fluid flow below the forearc basin/slope unconformity (overpressured by the impinging thrust fault to the west?) directed toward canyons at the surface.

  20. Décollement processes at the Nankai accretionary margin, southeast Japan: Propagation, deformation, and dewatering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Julia K.; Karig, Daniel E.

    1995-08-01

    The décollement zone, expressed on seismic profiles and observed in drill cores from the Nankai accretionary margin off the southeast coast of Japan, reveals several unique characteristics which appear to distinguish it from thrust faults identified in the same setting. Physical manifestations of these include evidence for the asymmetric distribution of deformation structures about the décollement, the extension of this fault zone well in front of the tectonic deformation front, and the absence of features indicative of precursory shear, for example, folded sediments, shear bands, and penetrative mineral fabrics. These characteristics suggest that the mode of formation and evolution of this décollement zone may be unique from that of most thrust faults. We propose that the décollement zone propagates not as a shear fracture controlled by tectonic stress conditions but rather as a subhorizontal tension fracture propagating under high pore pressures. To test this possibility, physical property measurements and clay mineral fabrics were obtained for several samples from the Nankai décollement zone using computed tomography and X ray texture methods. Our findings suggest that deformation within the décollement zone is partitioned into a volumetric component, preserved as reduced porosities within coherent fragments, and a localized shear component, evidenced by mineral preferred orientations along discrete slip surfaces. We suggest that the reduced porosities result from the destruction of "cementation" in the sediments during the early stages of deformation and may arise from cyclic fatiguing of the sediment induced by fluctuating pore pressures. The nonpenetrative shear fabrics probably develop as the tectonic deformation front migrates seaward, and the weakened protodécollement subsequently accommodates shear displacements along discrete fractures.

  1. Accretionary Complex Origin of the Mafic-ultramafic Bodies of the Sanbagawa Belt, Central Shikoku, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terabayashi, M.; Okamoto, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Kaneko, Y.; Ota, T.; Maruyama, S.; Katayama, I.; Komiya, T.; Anma, R.; Ozawa, H.; Windley, B. F.; Liou, J. G.

    2004-12-01

    In the high-grade Cretaceous Sanbagawa high pressure (HP) metamorphic belt our new 1:5000 scale mapping of the eclogitic mafic-ultramafic bodies and their surrounding epidote-amphibolite-facies schists, has revealed a duplex structure formed by the subduction of the Izanagi-Pacific oceanic plate. Lithologies of the two largest mafic-ultramafic bodies in the Sanbagawa belt, the Iratsu eclogite and the Higashi-Akaishi peridotite, strike WNW-ESE and dip N; the upper boundary with the surrounding schist is a normal fault, whereas the lower boundary is a thrust. The Iratsu body is subdivided into at least two tectonic units; the unit boundary is sub-parallel to a lithological boundary. The protoliths of the upper unit are gabbro, basalt, minor quartz rock and pelite, and those of the lower unit are pyroxenite, gabbro, basalt, chert and marble, in ascending order. The lower unit is characterized by layers of alternating eclogitic metagabbro and pyroxenite. The layers are extensive at the bottom of the Iratsu eclogite, and transient towards the Higashi-Akaishi body. Eclogite-facies metapsammite is intercalated between the Iratsu and Higashi-Akaishi bodies. Our mapping has revealed the following; (1) a duplex structure of the mafic-ultramafic bodies indicating their accretionary complex origin. (2) Reconstructed oceanic plate stratigraphy in ascending order of peridotite, gabbro, basalt, limestone, minor chert and pelite suggests that different parts of the protolith were derived from a mid-oceanic topographic high, an oceanic island or plateau, and an overlying trench turbidite. (3) The convergent motion of the oceanic plate changed from NW to NE during the accretion of the large oceanic island or plateau.

  2. Detrital zircon geochronology and provenance analysis applied to the onshore Makran accretionary wedge, SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Burg, J.; Winkler, W.; Ruh, J. B.; Von Quadt, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Makran is one of the largest accretionary wedges in the world, located in Southeast Iran. The Makran Basin is composed of turbidity sediments ranging in age from late Cretaceous to Holocene. The analysis of detrital zircons is important to interpret the provenance of the sediments and to clarify the geological history of the sedimentary basins and their surrounding source regions. We present about 2777 new U-Pb ages (ICP laser ablation mass spectrometry) from individual detrital zircons of 18 sandstone samples collected throughout the onshore Makran. 101 detrital zircon ages from a late Cretaceous fine grained sandstone ranges from 180-160 Ma (Mid-Jurassic). 478 detrital zircon ages obtained from the mid to late Eocene sandstone reveals different sources for the NE and NW parts of the Makran Basin. Zircon grains in the NE basin belong to two populations peaked at Mid-Jurassic and Mid-Eocene, with the noticeable absence of Cretaceous grains. In the NW basin, detrital zircons are Mid-Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene. 587 detrital zircon grains from fine to medium grained Oligocene sandstones collected in different parts of the basin range from Mid-Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene. 1611 detrital zircon age from Early Miocene sandstones collected in the eastern and western parts of the basin show distinctly different detrital zircon ages. They range from Mid-Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene in the eastern basin, from Late Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene in the west. Detrital zircon ages from Mid and Late Miocene sandstones rang from Late Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene. These new detrital zircon U-Pb age data show that the eastern and western parts of the Makran Basin received sediments from different source areas during Eocene and Early Miocene times. Mid and Late Miocene sediment are recycled (cannibalism) from the Oligocene units of the basin.

  3. Late Paleozoic accretionary complexes on the Gondwana margin of southern Chile: Evidence from the Chonos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Mpodozis, Constantino; Godoy, Estanislao; Hervé, Francisco; Pankhurst, Robert; Brook, Maureen

    The late Paleozoic "basement" rocks that crop out along the Pacific side of the Chonos Archipelago (44°-46°S) can be divided into two north-south trending belts: (1) an eastern belt formed of submarine fan-turbidites and subordinate pelagic cherts, each containing well-preserved primary sedimentary structures, and (2) a western belt, mainly formed by strongly foliated mica schists and greenschists. Trace element contents in the cherts and greenschists indicate rocks of oceanic affinity. The structures present within the eastern rock suite are principally subiso-clinal folds (with tectonic imbrication) and locally developed zones of broken formation. The transition from these rocks into the foliated schists appears to be related to a progressive increase in metamorphism and strain associated with the development of westward verging recumbent folds and a flat-lying crenulation cleavage. It is inferred that these structures developed during the construction of a Late Carboniferous-Early Permian accretionary prism (about 260 Ma Rb-Sr ages), although sedimentation may have taken place throughout the upper Paleozoic. Rb-Sr whole-rock isochrons giving Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous ages for some localities may indicate much later development of S2 structures. Alternatively, they may represent isotopic resetting by hydrothermal effects during the emplacement of transgressive Early Cretaceous granites, one of which gives a new Rb-Sr isochron age of 125±2Ma. This overall scenario seems to be consistent with that reported in the slightly older coastal metamorphic basement north of 34°S and equivalent or younger complexes farther south in the Madre de Dios Archipelago.

  4. Insights on deep, accretionary subduction processes from the Sistan ophiolitic "mélange" (Eastern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angiboust, S.; Agard, P.; De Hoog, J. C. M.; Omrani, J.; Plunder, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Sistan ophiolitic belt, formed by the closure of the N-S trending Sistan Ocean during late Cretaceous times, comprises several branches and basins across a 100 × 700 km area along the Iran-Afghanistan border. One of these, the Ratuk complex, exposes disrupted HP ophiolitic blocks from a paleo-subduction complex generally interpreted as a tectonic "mélange". In order to better understand its overall structure and evaluate the degree of mixing within this mélange, an extensive set of serpentinized peridotites, mafic rocks and metasediments was collected in the Sulabest area (Ratuk complex). A detailed geological and structural map of the Sulabest area is herein provided, in which three main units (the Western, Upper and Eclogitic Units) separated by relatively sharp tectonic contacts were identified. The latter two of these slices exhibit metamorphic evidence for burial along the same HP-LT gradient (up to blueschist and eclogite facies, respectively). Sharp differences in peak metamorphic conditions and retrograde parageneses nevertheless suggest that they followed two distinct P-T trajectories. Geochemical signatures of ultramafic rocks indicate an abyssal origin for the non-metamorphic Western Unit while the presence of mantle wedge serpentinites is inferred for some samples from the high-pressure units. The differences in peak temperatures (between 520 and 650 °C) and the geochemical heterogeneity of mafic rocks suggest that tectonic mixing occurred (only) within the high-pressure units, possibly within the hydrated mantle wedge. Our results show that this portion of the Sistan ophiolitic belt did not form, as earlier proposed, by chaotic tectonic "mélange" (i.e. where small tectonic blocks with distinct P-T histories are mixed in a mechanically weak matrix). We instead propose that this segment of the ophiolitic belt formed via accretionary processes deep in the subduction zone, whereby distinct slices with different P-T histories were tectonically

  5. Slope basins, headless canyons, and submarine palaeoseismology of the Cascadia accretionary complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAdoo, B.G.; Orange, D.L.; Screaton, E.; Lee, H.; Kayen, R.

    1997-01-01

    A combination of geomorphological, seismic reflection and geotechnical data constrains this study of sediment erosion and deposition at the toe of the Cascadia accretionary prism. We conducted a series of ALVIN dives in a region south of Astoria Canyon to examine the interrelationship of fluid flow and slope failure in a series of headless submarine canyons. Elevated head gradients at the inflection point of canyons have been inferred to assist in localized failures that feed sediment into a closed slope basin. Measured head gradients are an order of magnitude too low to cause seepage-induced slope failure alone; we therefore propose transient slope failure mechanisms. Intercanyon slopes are uniformly unscarred and smooth, although consolidation tests indicate that up to several metres of material may have been removed. A sheet-like failure would remove sediment uniformly, preserving the observed smooth intercanyon slope. Earthquake-induced liquefaction is a likely trigger for this type of sheet failure as the slope is too steep and short for sediment flow to organize itself into channels. Bathymetric and seismic reflection data suggest sediment in a trench slope basin between the second and third ridges from the prism's deformation is derived locally. A comparison of the amounts of material removed from the slopes and that in the basin shows that the amount of material removed from the slopes may slightly exceed the amount of material in the basin, implying that a small amount of sediment has escaped the basin, perhaps when the second ridge was too low to form a sufficient dam, or through a gap in the second ridge to the south. Regardless, almost 80% of the material shed off the slopes around the basin is deposited locally, whereas the remaining 20% is redeposited on the incoming section and will be re-accreted.

  6. Long duration ash probe

    DOEpatents

    Hurley, John P.; McCollor, Don P.; Selle, Stanley J.

    1994-01-01

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

  7. ITER helium ash accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. ); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. . Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  8. Long duration ash probe

    DOEpatents

    Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

    1994-07-26

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

  9. Structural characteristics of shallowly buried accretionary prism: Rapidly uplifted Neogene accreted sediments on the Miura-Boso Peninsula, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Ogawa, Y.

    2005-10-01

    The upper Miocene Misaki and Nishizaki formations on the Miura and Boso peninsulas in central Japan preserve the deformation features of an off-scraped accretionary prism. The spatial distribution, geometry, and style of accretion-related deformation with paleotemperature and burial depth estimation are elucidated in this study. The deformation structures and textures are similar to those of modern accretionary prisms. The low maximum paleotemperature (<50°C) and high preserved porosity of the sediments (30-50%) imply a maximum burial depth of less than 1000 m. On the basis of the mode of deformation, this off-scraped body is divided into an imbricate thrust, a thrust unit, and an upper coherent unit in ascending order. The imbricate thrust corresponds to a branch from the basal décollement zone and is subdivided into a brecciated zone, a main gouge zone, and a shear band zone. The thrust unit hosts a concentration of thrust systems that form various orders of duplex structures, while the upper coherent unit is characterized by gravitational instability- and earthquake-induced deformation without thrust faulting. The duplex distribution, shear strain, and fluid migration associated with the off-scraping processes are clearly localized within the imbricate thrust and thrust unit. This accretion-related deformation occurred before lithification of the sediment and under high fluid pressure induced by shear deformation, thickening of the sedimentary sequence, and earthquake-induced liquefaction. These processes are inferred to control the effect on the mode of deformation and the location of thrusting during early deformation of the accretionary prism.

  10. Fold Thrust Belt Kinematics from 3D Seismic Imaging along the NanTroSEIZE Transect, Nankai Accretionary Prism, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kington, J. D.; Tobin, H.; Moore, G.

    2008-12-01

    The accretionary prism of the Nankai Trough, Japan provides an excellent location to study the kinematics of a fold and thrust belt developed primarily in low permeability units. Recently acquired 3D reflection seismic data covering a 12 x 56 km area from the Kumano basin seaward to the deformation front reveals three structural domains within the frontal accretionary prism. The farthest seaward domain of the prism consists closely-spaced, apparently in-sequence thrust sheets forming a steep critical taper angle. The primary decollement beneath these thrusts ramps upsection above a topographic high within the oceanic basement. The farthest landward domain within the study area consists of the hanging wall of an apparently out of sequence megasplay thrust fault that dips landward to the top of the oceanic crust. The central structural domain within the prism consists of thrust sheets formed above a decollement approximately 2 km above the top of the oceanic crust, above the decollement associated with the more seaward thrusts. These thrusts are more widely spaced than those nearer the deformation front and are blanketed with syn and post kinematic sediments. Synkinematic sediments indicate that thrusts in the most seaward and most landward structural domains within the prism are the most active, though some reactivation of structures in the middle domain has occurred. Additionally, gas hydrate bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) in the lowermost portions of the prism are present as discrete bands striking parallel to thrusts. These BSRs occur primarily along the most active thrusts, and are only present as small patches within the central structural domain of the prism. As these are expected to be the result of fluid migration along faults and permeable structures, they provide insight into the hydrologic controls on thrusting within the accretionary prism.

  11. Approximate General Coulomb Model for Accretionary Prisms: An Integrated Study of the Kumano Transect, Nankai Subduction Zone, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, Rob; Ikari, Matt; Hüpers, Andre; Rempel, Alan; Wilson, Dean; Kitajima, Hiroko

    2014-05-01

    In accretionary wedges, the mechanical and hydrologic properties along splay faults and the plate boundary fault at the base of the wedge are intimately related to properties within the wedge itself, as well as to sedimentation and/or mass wasting at the wedge surface, and accretionary flux at the wedge toe; Coulomb wedge theories tie these processes together and have been successful in their application to convergent margins. Most such theories assume for the sake of simplicity that mechanical parameters (e.g. bulk density, compressibility, frictional strength) and pore pressure are constant throughout the overlying wedge. However, the values of these parameters must necessarily change with depth and distance from the trench. Here, we derive a model for a fully general Coulomb wedge, parameterized using data specific to the Kumano transect at Nankai, to better understand the location of the basal plate interface and the properties of material composing an actively accretionary prism. We use shear strength data collected for incoming sediments at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site C0011 of the NanTroSEIZE project to parameterize the wedge's coefficient of friction. Preliminary results of models where the friction coefficient of the wedge decreases with depth, with other parameters constant and zero cohesion, indicate that including depth dependent frictional strength in the wedge decreases the taper angle of the wedge, with the effect becoming more pronounced with distance from the trench. This model will be further refined by including seismically and numerically determined spatial variations in fluid pressure within the wedge, as well as detailed locations of the upper and basal wedge surfaces along the Kumano transect determined from 3-D seismic data.

  12. Consolidation patterns during initiation and evolution of a plate-boundary decollement zone: northern Barbados accretionary prism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.C.; Klaus, A.; Bangs, N.L.; Bekins, B.; Bucker, C.J.; Bruckmann, W.; Erickson, S.N.; Hansen, O.; Horton, T.; Ireland, P.; Major, C.O.; Moore, G.F.; Peacock, S.; Saito, S.; Screaton, E.J.; Shimeld, J.W.; Stauffer, P.H.; Taymaz, T.; Teas, P.A.; Tokunaga, T.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole logs from the northern Barbados accretionary prism show that the plate-boundary decollement initiates in a low-density radiolarian claystone. With continued thrusting, the decollement zone consolidates, but in a patchy manner. The logs calibrate a three-dimensional seismic reflection image of the decollement zone and indicate which portions are of low density and enriched in fluid, and which portions have consolidated. The seismic image demonstrates that an underconsolidated patch of the decollement zone connects to a fluid-rich conduit extending down the decollement surface. Fluid migration up this conduit probably supports the open pore structure in the underconsolidated patch.

  13. Structure and clay mineralogy: borehole images, log interpretation and sample analyses at Site C0002 Nankai Trough accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Schleicher, Anja

    2015-04-01

    Our research focused on the characterization of fracture and fault structures from the deep Nankai Trough accretionary prism in Japan. Logging Data and cuttings samples from the two most recent International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expeditions 338 and 348 of the NanTroSEIZE project were analyzed by Logging While Drilling (LWD) oriented images, geophysical logs and clay mineralogy. Both expeditions took place at Site C0002, but whereas Hole C0002F (Expedition 338) was drilled down to 2004.5 mbsf, Hole C0002N and C0002P (Expedition 348) reached a depth of 2325.5 mbsf and 3058.8 mbsf respectively. The structural interpretation of borehole imaging data illustrates the deformation within the fractured and faulted sections of the accretionary prism. All drill holes show distinct areas of intense fracturing and faulting within a very clay-dominated lithology. Here, smectite and illite are the most common clay minerals, but the properties and the role they may play in influencing the fractures, faults and folds in the accretionary prism is still not well understood. When comparing clay mineralogy and fracture/fault areas in hole C0002F (Expedition 338), a trend in the abundance of illite and smectite, and in particular the swelling behavior of smectite is recognizable. In general, the log data provided a good correlation with the actual mineralogy and the relative abundance of clay. Ongoing postcruise preliminary research on hole C0002 N and C0002P (Expedition 348) should confirm these results. The relationship between fracture and fault structures and the changes in clay mineralogy could be explained by the deformation of specific areas with different compaction features, fluid-rock interaction processes, but could also be related to beginning diagenetic processes related to depth. Our results show the integration of logging data and cutting sample analyses as a valuable tool for characterization of petrophysical and mineralogical changes of the structures of the

  14. Controlling formaldehyde emissions with boiler ash.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Jennifer; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba; Banerjee, Sujit

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized wood ash reduces formaldehyde in air from about 20 to <1 ppmv. Methanol is removed to a much lower extent. The efficiency of formaldehyde reduction increases with increasing moisture content of the ash. Sorption of formaldehyde to ash can be substantially accounted for by partitioning to the water contained in the ash followed by rate-controlling binding to the ash solids. Adsorption occurs at temperatures of up to 165 degrees C; oxidation predominates thereafter. It is proposed that formaldehyde could be stripped from an air stream in a fluidized bed containing ash, which could then be returned to a boiler to incinerate the formaldehyde. PMID:16053116

  15. Fly ash chemical classification based on lime

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.

    2007-07-01

    Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  16. The 2005 and 2010 dome collapse driven block and ash flows on Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka: Morphological analysis using satellite- and field-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krippner, J.; Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    A new multi-scale investigation of recent block and ash flow deposits on Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka, using satellite- and field-based data has produced a detailed description of the surface deposits. In February, 2005 and October, 2010 Shiveluch produced large dome-collapse block and ash flows that travelled more than 19 km down the southern flanks. These deposits have now been interpreted using high-resolution (~0.5 m) WorldView-02 and QuickBird-02 panchromatic satellite data to describe surficial morphologies, block distributions, forest devastation and the subsequent tree deposition. These data reveal complex deposits composed of overlapping flows and lobes with diverse morphologies including channel and levee structures, varying lobate terminations, compaction features, ridges, small hummock-like features, arcuate scarps, as well as post-depositional erosion and reworking, which were later investigated in the field. The deposits are composed of poorly sorted, porphyritic, dome material which is largely oxidized with rare evidence of hydrothermal alteration, as well as lithics eroded from older deposits, all within an ash-lapilli matrix. Large dome blocks up to 12 m in diameter are deposited to the distal edges of the deposit and are dominantly sub-rounded, and composed of banded, porphyritic, poorly vesicular, variably oxidized dome material with mafic xenolith inclusions. Many of these display fracturing and impact scours. This study links satellite-based interpretations of large block and ash flow deposits to field observations, allowing the remote identification of morphological features. This multi-scale investigation of these morphologies can be applied elsewhere for the rapid and safe identification of fresh deposits in dangerous or remote locations.

  17. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Ash in fire affected ecosystems Ash lefts an important footprint in the ecosystems and has a key role in the immediate period after the fire (Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). It is an important source of nutrients for plant recover (Pereira et al., 2014a), protects soil from erosion and controls soil hydrological process as runoff, infiltration and water repellency (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2012, Pereira et al., 2014b). Despite the recognition of ash impact and contribution to ecosystems recuperation, it is assumed that we still have little knowledge about the implications of ash in fire affected areas. Regarding this situation we wanted to improve our knowledge in this field and understand the state of the research about fire ash around world. The special issue about "The role of ash in fire affected ecosystems" currently in publication in CATENA born from the necessity of joint efforts, identify research gaps, and discuss future cooperation in this interdisciplinary field. This is the first special issue about fire ash in the international literature. In total it will be published 10 papers focused in different aspects of the impacts of ash in fire affected ecosystems from several parts of the world: • Fire reconstruction using charcoal particles (Burjachs and Espositio, in press) • Ash slurries impact on rheological properties of Runoff (Burns and Gabet, in press) • Methods to analyse ash conductivity and sorbtivity in the laboratory and in the field (Balfour et al., in press) • Termogravimetric and hydrological properties of ash (Dlapa et al. in press) • Effects of ash cover in water infiltration (Leon et al., in press) • Impact of ash in volcanic soils (Dorta Almenar et al., in press; Escuday et al., in press) • Ash PAH and Chemical extracts (Silva et al., in press) • Microbiology (Barreiro et al., in press; Lombao et al., in press) We believe that this special issue will contribute importantly to the better understanding of

  18. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Ash in fire affected ecosystems Ash lefts an important footprint in the ecosystems and has a key role in the immediate period after the fire (Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). It is an important source of nutrients for plant recover (Pereira et al., 2014a), protects soil from erosion and controls soil hydrological process as runoff, infiltration and water repellency (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2012, Pereira et al., 2014b). Despite the recognition of ash impact and contribution to ecosystems recuperation, it is assumed that we still have little knowledge about the implications of ash in fire affected areas. Regarding this situation we wanted to improve our knowledge in this field and understand the state of the research about fire ash around world. The special issue about "The role of ash in fire affected ecosystems" currently in publication in CATENA born from the necessity of joint efforts, identify research gaps, and discuss future cooperation in this interdisciplinary field. This is the first special issue about fire ash in the international literature. In total it will be published 10 papers focused in different aspects of the impacts of ash in fire affected ecosystems from several parts of the world: • Fire reconstruction using charcoal particles (Burjachs and Espositio, in press) • Ash slurries impact on rheological properties of Runoff (Burns and Gabet, in press) • Methods to analyse ash conductivity and sorbtivity in the laboratory and in the field (Balfour et al., in press) • Termogravimetric and hydrological properties of ash (Dlapa et al. in press) • Effects of ash cover in water infiltration (Leon et al., in press) • Impact of ash in volcanic soils (Dorta Almenar et al., in press; Escuday et al., in press) • Ash PAH and Chemical extracts (Silva et al., in press) • Microbiology (Barreiro et al., in press; Lombao et al., in press) We believe that this special issue will contribute importantly to the better understanding of

  19. Fluid circulation in the depths of accretionary prisms: an example of the Shimanto Belt, Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimbourg, Hugues; Vacelet, Maxime; Ramboz, Claire; Famin, Vincent; Augier, Romain; Palazzin, Giulia; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Kimura, Gaku

    2015-08-01

    Accretionary prisms constitute ideal targets to study fluid circulation and fluid-rock interactions at depths beyond the reach of active margin deep drilling. The highest-grade rocks from the Shimanto Belt on Kyushu were buried under 3-5 kbars at ~ 300°C (Toriumi and Teruya, 1988). They contain abundant quartz veins, formed throughout burial and exhumation and variably affected by brittle and ductile deformation. Cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals the existence of two distinct types of quartz, characterized by a blue and brown color, respectively. CL-blue quartz fills macro-veins (width ≥ 10μm), while CL-brown quartz is present in micro-veins (width ~ 1 - 10μm) and ductilely recrystallized domains. On the basis of microstructures, the fluids associated with the CL-blue and CL-brown quartz are interpreted as "external" and "local", respectively. Quartz growth rims of alternating CL colors as well as mutually cross-cutting veins show that the two fluids cyclically wetted the host rock. From fluid inclusions analysis, the fluid associated with CL-blue quartz has a salinity similar to seawater, while the fluid associated with CL-brown quartz is less saline. In addition, CL-blue quartz is richer in aluminum than the CL-brown one. In contrast to the salinity/aluminum signature, the δ18O isotopic signature of both quartz types is similar and buffered by host rock. The difference between the preservation of the salinity signature of the fluid and the loss of its δ18O signature is explained by quicker exchange kinetics and larger host rock buffering capacity for isotopic reequilibration. The "local" fluid, associated with CL-brown quartz, reflects the dilution of pore water by the pure water produced by prograde dehydration reactions of clay minerals. The "external" fluid associated with CL-blue quartz is interpreted as seawater or pore water from shallow (depth < 1-2 km below seafloor) sediments. We propose that downward percolation of shallow water to depths ~ 10 km

  20. Mud volcano venting induced gas hydrate formation at the upper slope accretionary wedge, offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Saulwood; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Cheng, Wan-Yen; Chou, Cheng-Tien; Chen, NeiChen; Hsieh, I.-Chih

    2016-04-01

    TsanYao Mud Volcano (TYMV) is the largest mud volcano cone in the Hengchun Mud Volcano Group (HCMVG), located at the upper slope of the accrretionary wedge, southwest of Taiwan. The region is under active tectonic activity with the Philippine Plate, moving northwestward at a rate of ~8 cm/year. This region also receives huge quantity of suspended particle load of ~100 mT/year at present time from adjacent small rivers of the Island of Taiwan. Large loads of suspended sediments influx become a major source of organic carbon and later gas and other hydrocarbon. Gas and fluid in the mud volcano are actively venting from deep to the sea floor on the upper slope of the accretionary wedge. In order to understand venting on the HCMVG, echo sounder, towcam and coring were carried out. Pore water sulfate, chloride, potassium, calcium, stable isotope O-18, gas compositions, dissolved sulfide were analysed. The HCMVG consists of 12 volcano cones of different sizes. Large quantity of gas and fluid are venting directly from deep to the TYMV structure high, as well as 50+ other vents as appeared as flares on the echo sounder. Some flares are reaching to the atmosphere and likely a source of green house gases to the atmosphere. Venting fluids include gas bubbles, suspended particle, mud, and breccia. Breccia size could reach more than 12 cm in diameter. Circular bands in different color appeared around the cone may represent stages of vent eruptions. Compositions of vent gas include methane, ethane and propane. High proportions of ethane and propane in the vent gas demonstrated that source of gas are thermogenic in origin. Patchy authigenic carbonate, bacterial mats, bivalves, tube worms and other chemosynthesis organisms were supported by venting gas AOM process near the sea floor. Pore water chloride concentrations show distinct variation pattern from center cone to the side of the volcano, with low in the center and high away from the cone. Pore water with higher than seawater

  1. The Calm Before the Storm: Exploring the Post Accretionary Doldrums Prior to the Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, W. F., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The early bombardment of the inner solar system played a critical role in planetary evolution, but there is still considerable uncertainty about what happened when. Dynamical models suggest two major bombardment phases may have taken place: (i) a post-accretionary period where newly-formed worlds were struck by leftover planetesimals, and (ii) a late heavy bombardment period, possibly produced by conditions related to a violent reshuffling of the planets ~4.1-4.2 Gyr ago (Ga). If valid, a relative impact lull took place between the two bombardment phases. We explore the evidence for such doldrums in this talk. Consider: a) Mars. Geochemical and meteorite evidence indicates the giant 10,600 × 8,500 km Borealis basin formed > 4.5 Ga. Many postulated basins forming afterwards, however, can be ruled out by the surprisingly pristine nature of the Borealis boundary in topography and gravity. Three of the four largest remaining basins, Hellas, Isidis, and Argyre, have superposed craters counts indicating they are < 4.1 Ga. b) Asteroids. The oldest and most extensive sets of 39Ar-40Ar shock degassing ages, found within meteorites that were heavily shocked, shock-melted, or otherwise showed some evidence for having been part of a large collision, show age clusters between ~3.5-4.1 Ga and ~4.4-4.54 Ga. Using dynamical/impact heating models, it can be argued that relatively few projectiles were on planet-crossing orbits between ~4.1-4.4 Ga. c) Moon. The Moon is probably 4.47 Ga, yet most sample evidence for basin-sized impacts may be < 4.2 Ga. The age gap is curious unless many basins were created close in time to the solidification of the lunar crust. Using collisional/dynamical models, it can be shown that many early basins and craters formed > 4.4 Ga. Here the early impactors may be surviving debris from the Moon-forming giant impact event; note that ejecta initially escaping the Earth-Moon system can come back over many tens of Myr. This would leave doldrums between ~4

  2. Origin and evolution of fluids from mud volcanoes in the Barbados accretionary complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godon, Arnaud; Jendrzejewski, Nathalie; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Dia, Aline; Pineau, Françoise; Boulègue, Jacques; Javoy, Marc

    2004-05-01

    A large collection of fluids (54 interstitial fluids and four expelled fluids) were sampled at the Manon site, at the outer edge of the Barbados accretionary complex. These warm fluids (up to 20°C) are expelled by sub-marine (5000 mbsl) mud volcanoes consisting of diapirs (unchanneled flow) and diatremes (channeled). Chlorine stable isotope ratios of these fluids were measured by IRMS with a reproducibility of ± 0.05‰ (1σ) versus SMOC (Standard Mean Ocean Chloride). A large range of δ 37Cl between -5.3‰ and +0.1‰ is observed. Data from each volcanic structure describe a mixing between seawater and a low-δ 37Cl fluid. The whole set of data is interpreted as the result of a mixing between two deep components and seawater. The two deep fluids are chemically distinct (e.g., in Ca, Mg, K, Li, Sr and Br contents and Br/Cl ratio). They display low and significantly different 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.707790 and 0.707892, respectively) and δ 37Cl values (-4.51 and -5.24‰, respectively). Physicochemical processes such as mineralogical transformation, diffusion, compaction or ion filtration are known to fractionate chlorine stable isotopes and can produce fluids with negative δ 37Cl values. Ion filtration due to sediment compaction appears to be the more likely process to explain the negative δ 37Cl values observed at the Manon site. A model for the generation of these signatures is proposed where a residual negative δ 37Cl fluid reservoir is created at the bottom of the prism or the sediment pile. Further compaction/fracturing and/or dewatering of the slab may flush out these fluids and focus them towards the décollement zone. Mixing between the fluids and ultimately with seawater and water released during gas hydrate destabilizations may explain the data set within the individual cores and between the different structures.

  3. Stress states at site C0002, Nankai accretionary wedge, down to 2000 m below seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chandong; Song, Insun; Lee, Hikweon

    2015-04-01

    The boreholes drilled at site C0002 under the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment project, southwest Japan were used to estimate in situ stress states that prevail in the plate interface region between Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate. The depth covered in this study is from seafloor down to ~2000 meter below seafloor (mbsf), somewhat shallow compared to the depths of the megasplay fault (~5000 mbsf) and the plate interface (~6800 mbsf). However, the shallow stress may reflect some tectonic processes prevailing in this region and may give some insight into tectonic settings. Multiple techniques of borehole observations and borehole tests were used to estimate the magnitudes and the orientations of the stresses. The borehole breakouts in the vertical boreholes indicate a consistent orientation (margin-parallel) of the maximum horizontal principal stress (SHmax) throughout the depths. The analysis on the geometry (or azimuthal span) of borehole breakouts and rock strengths (from log-based estimations) suggests that the stress states in the upper forearc basin sediments above the unconformity (~980 mbsf) are constrained to be in favor of normal faulting (vertical stress (Sv) > SHmax > least horizontal stress (Shmin)). The stress states in the old accretionary prism below the unconformity down to ~1400 mbsf are possibly varying with depth between normal, strike-slip and reverse faulting favored stress regimes. At depths below 1400 mbsf, occurrences of borehole stress indicators (breakouts and drilling-induced tensile fractures (DITFs)) are limited due to optimally controlled mud pressures. Two sets of breakouts (1616 and 1862 mbsf) and DITFs (1648 and 1884 mbsf) were jointly used to constrain stress states there, which yielded that Shmin is 79-85% of Sv and SHmax is nearly equal to Sv, suggesting a mixed stress regime for normal and strike-slip faulting (Sv ~ SHmax > Shmin). The range of constrained Shmin is consistent with the results from leak

  4. Observations and Rock Analyses in a Kumano Mud Volcano in Nankai Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Aoike, K.; Sawada, T.; Ashi, J.; Gulick, S. P.; Flemings, P. B.; Kuramoto, S.; Saito, S.; Mikada, H.; Kinoshita, M.

    2002-12-01

    Kumano Basin is a forearc basin on the eastern Nankai Accretionary Prism off southwest Japan. Recent bathymetric survey showed existence of small knolls in the Kumano Basin. Submersible and ROV dives, sidescan sonar and deep-towed camera investigations revealed so far that at least five of the small knolls are mud volcanoes erupted on the Kumano Basin floor. In June and August, 2002, Dive 677 and 681 by submersible SHINKAI 6500 (YK02-02: R/V Yokosuka) and Dive 267 by ROV KAIKO (KR02-10: R/V Kairei) were performed in one of the mud volcanoes, Kumano Knoll No.4, which is 100 m high and 800 m in diameter at the foot of the knoll. The knoll has a plateau of about 300 m diameter on the top, which shows bumpy surface where there are waves, steps and craters of several meters in diameter. The craters imply active or dead cold seeps and are occasionally accompanied by Calyptogena colonies. The plateau is mostly covered with mud. Rock gravels and boulders were observed mainly on outer slope of the knoll. Sidescan sonar and subbottom profiler data by KAIKO system show marked contrasts in sonic reflectivity and penetration between the Kumano Knoll No.4 and the Kumano Basin floor. The high sonic reflectivity and the low penetration on the knoll indicate that main body of the knoll is composed of clastic ejecta as a mud volcano. On the Kumano Knoll No.4, the dives obtained semi-consolidated mudstone, mud breccia, and biotite arkose sandstone. Chronological analysis on nannofossil indicates the sedimentary rocks are in the late Early Miocene through the Middle Miocene. According to this age and geological information on land, it is likely that the sedimentary rocks on the knoll were originally deposited at the beginning of formation of the Kumano Basin. Porosity of these sedimentary rocks is very low (< 18 %). Some mud breccias contain calcite veins that cut the angular mud gravels. These features lead to finding processes until when the sedimentary rocks reached to the seafloor

  5. Identification and Analysis of Methane Plumes from the Barbados Accretionary Complex Identified in Multibeam Sonar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, A.; Casey, J.

    2013-12-01

    Integration of modern high-resolution multibeam deliverables can relate water column features to seafloor geologic structures. As well as providing coverage of wide areas, the data can also be used to infer volume and variability of gas seeps and characterize the spatial relationships with seafloor features. As part of cruise AT21-02 to the Barbados Accretionary Complex a ~12 kHz Kongsberg EM122 hull-mounted multibeam system was deployed. We processed the multibeam data using the QPS modules to produce a subsea 4D multi-resolution scene files containing bathymetry, acoustic backscatter and midwater data. Within the scene we have identified a region of giant mud volcanoes and a second region along strike containing several ~1000 m tall flares in the water column data directly above cratered hummocky seafloor with high amplitude backscatter at ~-1500 m water depth that are interpreted as ebullition craters beneath gas plumes. From the acoustic returns we relate the bubble diameter or volume to the received signal strength. Evidence exists for armoring of the gas bubbles in the water column by hydrate: the modeled gas hydrate stability zone reaches ~600 m above the seafloor but the acoustic resolution of our dataset is similar to the maximum depth of disappearance of the bubble plume. The shear observed in the rising gas plume may be the result of transport in the current direction of the lowest water mass from the northwest to southeast at 128°, a direction similar to the transport direction of the lowest water mass in this region, or the presence of abyssal undular vortices. Seismic data from this area has bottom simulating reflectors indicating the presence of methane hydrate and it is likely that the observed flares are related to dissociation of methane in the subsurface. The release of gasses may be related to changes in the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone in the underlying sediments responding to temperature changes in the lowest water mass. To

  6. Minimum work analysis on the critical taper accretionary wedges- insights from analogue modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santimano, Tasca; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2014-05-01

    The Critical taper theory (CTT) is a fundamental concept for the understanding of mountain building processes. Based on force balance it predicts the preferred steady state geometry of an accretionary wedge system and its tectonic regime (extensive, compressive, stable). However, it does not specify which structures are formed and reactivated to reach the preferred state. The latter can be predicted by the minimum work concept. Here we test both concepts and their interplay by analysing two simple sand wedge models which differ only in the thickness of the basal detachment (a layer of glass beads). While the steady state critical taper is controlled by internal and basal friction coefficients and therefore the same in all experiments, different processes can minimise work by 1. reducing gravitational work e.g. by lowering the amount of uplift or volume uplifted, or 2. reducing frictional work e.g. by lowering the load or due to low friction coefficient along thrusts. Since a thick detachment allows entrainment of low friction material and therefore lowering of the friction along active thrusts, we speculate that the style of wedge growth will differ between the two models. We observe that the wedge with a thin basal detachment localizes strain at the toe of the wedge periodically and reactivate older faults to reach the critical topography. On the contrary, in the wedge with the thicker detachment layer, friction along thrusts is lowered due to the entrainment of low friction material from the detachment zone, subsequently increasing the lifetime of a thrust. Long thrust episodes are always followed by a fault of shorter lifetime, with the aim of reaching the critical taper. From the two experiments, we analyze the time-series evolution of the wedge to infer the work done by the two styles of deformation and predict the trend over time to differ but the maximum work to be similar Our observations show that the critical taper theory determines the geometry of the

  7. Formation of forearc basins by collision between seamounts and accretionary wedges: an example from the New Hebrides subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collot, J.-Y.; Fisher, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Seabeam data reveal two deep subcircular reentrants in the lower arc slope of the New Hebrides island arc that may illustrate two stages in the development of a novel type of forearc basin. The Malekula reentrant lies just south of the partly subducted Bougainville seamount. This proximity, as well as the similarity in morphology between the reentrant and an indentation in the lower arc slope off Japan, suggests that the Malekula reentrant formed by the collision of a seamount with the arc. An arcuate fold-thrust belt has formed across the mouth of the reentrant, forming the toe of a new accretionary wedge. The Efate reentrant may show the next stage in basin development. This reentrant lies landward of a lower-slope ridge that may have begun to form as an arcuate fold-thrust belt across the mouth of a reentrant. This belt may have grown by continued accretion at the toe of the wedge, by underplating beneath the reentrant, and by trapping of sediment shed from the island arc. These processes could result in a roughly circular forearc basin. Basins that may have formed by seamount collision lie within the accretionary wedge adjacent to the Aleutian trenches. -Authors

  8. Provenance analysis of the Miocene accretionary prism of the Hengchun Peninsula, southern Taiwan, and regional geological significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinchang; Yan, Yi; Huang, Chi-Yue; Chen, Duofu; Shan, Yehua; Lan, Qin; Chen, Wenhuang; Yu, Mengming

    2014-05-01

    Petrographic analysis, detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and Neodymium isotope are applied to the Middle-Late Miocene turbidite sequences in the Hengchun accretionary prism, southern Taiwan, to constrain the provenance and nature of sedimentation in the Manila subduction system. Both petrographic study and detrital zircon U-Pb ages show that the Middle-Late Miocene turbidite sequences were primarily derived from Mesozoic granites and volcanic rocks of the Cathaysian Block in SE China, which were transported southeastward via rivers like Minjiang and Jiulongjiang to the Taiwan area. This conclusion is further supported by Nd isotope analyses of shales intercalated within sandstone sequences showing negative ɛNd values (-13.3 to -10.5) of a continental origin. During the Late Miocene when global sea-level fell significantly, the SE China coastline shifted seaward to the eastern part of the present Taiwan Strait, which would have facilitated these continent-derived sediments being transported southeastward to the shelf-upper slope of the Chinese continental margin. These turbidite sequences were then deformed and accreted into the accretionary prism of the Hengchun Peninsula when the South China Sea oceanic lithosphere subducted eastward beneath the Philippine Sea Plate in the Late Miocene. Our study suggests that sedimentary deposition of the turbidite sequences in the Hengchun Peninsula could be strongly controlled by different river system supply, submarine channeling transport and fluctuations of sea-level.

  9. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be disposed of as prescribed in 33 CFR parts 151.55 through 151.77. ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment...

  10. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... be disposed of as prescribed in 33 CFR parts 151.55 through 151.77. ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment...

  11. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... be disposed of as prescribed in 33 CFR parts 151.55 through 151.77. ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment...

  12. 46 CFR 148.225 - Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... be disposed of as prescribed in 33 CFR parts 151.55 through 151.77. ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). 148.225 Section... § 148.225 Calcined pyrites (pyritic ash, fly ash). (a) This part does not apply to the shipment...

  13. COMPARISON OF LEACHABLE TRACE ELEMENT LEVELS IN COAL GASIFIER ASH WITH LEVELS IN POWER PLANT ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a comparison of the levels of 14 trace elements in leachates from three types of ash of a common origin coal. The 1-year study was conducted at the Kosovo plant in Obilic, Yugoslavia, comparing coal gasifier ash with fly ash and bottom ash from a coal-f...

  14. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  15. Rising from the ashes: Coal ash in recycling and construction

    SciTech Connect

    Naquin, D.

    1998-02-01

    Beneficial Ash Management (BAM, Clearfield, Pa.) has won an environmental award for its use of ash and other waste to fight acid mine drainage. The company`s workers take various waste materials, mainly fly ash from coal-burning plants, to make a cement-like material or grouting, says Ernest Roselli, BAM president. The grouting covers the soil, which helps prevent water from contacting materials. This, in turn, helps control chemical reactions, reducing or eliminating formation of acid mine drainage. The company is restoring the 1,400-acre Bark Camp coal mine site near Penfield in Clearfield County, Pa. Under a no-cost contract with the state of Pennsylvania, BAM is using boiler slag, causticizing byproducts (lime) and nonreclaimable clarifier sludge from International Paper Co. (Erie, Pa.). The mine reclamation techniques developed and monitored at the site include using man-made wetlands to treat acid mine drainage and testing anhydrous ammonia as a similar treatment agent. BAM researches and tests fly ash mixed with lime-based activators as fill material for land reclamation, and develops and uses artificial soil material from paper mill and tannery biosolids.

  16. Transcriptomic Signatures of Ash (Fraxinus spp.) Phloem

    PubMed Central

    Mamidala, Praveen; Bonello, Pierluigi; Herms, Daniel A.; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2011-01-01

    Background Ash (Fraxinus spp.) is a dominant tree species throughout urban and forested landscapes of North America (NA). The rapid invasion of NA by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), a wood-boring beetle endemic to Eastern Asia, has resulted in the death of millions of ash trees and threatens billions more. Larvae feed primarily on phloem tissue, which girdles and kills the tree. While NA ash species including black (F. nigra), green (F. pennsylvannica) and white (F. americana) are highly susceptible, the Asian species Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica) is resistant to A. planipennis perhaps due to their co-evolutionary history. Little is known about the molecular genetics of ash. Hence, we undertook a functional genomics approach to identify the repertoire of genes expressed in ash phloem. Methodology and Principal Findings Using 454 pyrosequencing we obtained 58,673 high quality ash sequences from pooled phloem samples of green, white, black, blue and Manchurian ash. Intriguingly, 45% of the deduced proteins were not significantly similar to any sequences in the GenBank non-redundant database. KEGG analysis of the ash sequences revealed a high occurrence of defense related genes. Expression analysis of early regulators potentially involved in plant defense (i.e. transcription factors, calcium dependent protein kinases and a lipoxygenase 3) revealed higher mRNA levels in resistant ash compared to susceptible ash species. Lastly, we predicted a total of 1,272 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 980 microsatellite loci, among which seven microsatellite loci showed polymorphism between different ash species. Conclusions and Significance The current transcriptomic data provide an invaluable resource for understanding the genetic make-up of ash phloem, the target tissue of A. planipennis. These data along with future functional studies could lead to the identification/characterization of defense genes involved in resistance of ash to A. planipennis, and in future

  17. Utilization of fly ash in metallic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.; Guo, R.Q.; Golden, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Fly ash particles have been successfully dispersed into aluminum alloy to make aluminum alloy-fly ash composites (Ashalloy) at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Additions of solid and hollow particles of fly ash reduce the cost and density of aluminum castings while increasing their performance. Ashalloy represents a candidate material for high value added use of fly ash, while reducing the disposal volumes of fly ash for the electric utility industry and making the US foundries more competitive. The fly ash particle distribution in the matrix aluminum alloy and the microstructure of aluminum-fly ash composite was determined. Selected properties of cast aluminum-fly ash composites are also presented in this paper. Mechanical properties of aluminum-fly ash composites show that the composite possesses higher hardness and higher elastic modulus compared to the matrix alloy. The flow behavior of molten aluminum-fly ash slurries along with the components cast in aluminum-fly ash composites will be presented. Fly ash containing metal components have potential applications in covers, shrouds, casings, manifolds, valve covers, garden furniture, engine blocks in automotive, small engine and electromechanical industry sector.

  18. A comparison between sludge ash and fly ash on the improvement in soft soil

    SciTech Connect

    Deng-Fong Lin; Kae-Long Lin; Huan-Lin Luo

    2007-01-15

    In this study, the strength of soft cohesive subgrade soil was improved by applying sewage sludge ash as a soil stabilizer. Test results obtained were compared with earlier tests conducted on soil samples treated with fly ash. Five different proportions of sludge ash and fly ash were mixed with soft cohesive soil, and tests such as pH value, compaction, California bearing ratio, unconfined compressive strength (UCS), and triaxial compression were performed to understand soil strength improvement because of the addition of both ashes. Results indicate that pH values increase with extending curing age for soil with sludge ash added. The UCS of sludge ash/soil were 1.4 2 times better than untreated soil. However, compressive strength of sludge ash/soil was 20 30 kPa less than fly ash/soil. The bearing capacities for both fly ash/soil and sludge ash/soil were five to six times and four times, respectively, higher than the original capacity. Moreover, the cohesive parameter of shear strength rose with increased amounts of either ash added. Friction angle, however, decreased with increased amounts of either ash. Consequently, results show that sewage sludge ash can potentially replace fly ash in the improvement of the soft cohesive soil. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Control of structural inheritance on thrust initiation and material transfer in accretionary wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leever, Karen; Geersen, Jacob; Ritter, Malte; Lieser, Kathrin; Behrmann, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Faults in the incoming sediment layer are commonly observed in subduction zone settings and well developed in the incoming plate off Sumatra. To investigate how they affect the structural development of the accretionary wedge, we conducted a series of 2D analogue tectonic experiments in which a 2 cm thick quartz sand layer on top of a thin detachment layer of glass beads was pulled against a rigid backstop by a basal conveyor belt in a 20cm wide box with glass walls. A gap at the base of the back wall avoids entrainment of the glass beads. At regular spacing of either 2.3, 5.5 or 7.8 cm (fractions of the thrust sheet length in the reference model), conjugate pairs of weakness zones dipping 60deg were created by cutting the sand layer with a thin (1 mm) metal blade. Both the undisturbed sand and the pre-cuts have an angle of internal friction of ~29o, but their cohesion is different by 50 Pa (110 Pa for the undisturbed material, 60 Pa along the pre-cuts). Friction of the glass beads is ~24deg. The experiments are monitored with high resolution digital cameras; displacement fields derived from digital image correlation are used to constrain fault activity. In all experiments, a critically tapered wedge developed with a surface slope of 7.5deg. In the reference model (no weakness zones in the input section), the position of new thrust faults is controlled by the frontal slope break. The average length of the thrust sheets is 11 cm and the individual thrusts accommodate on average 8 cm displacement each. The presence of weakness zones causes thrust initiation at a position different from the reference case, and affects their dip. For a fault spacing of 7.8 cm (or 75% of the reference thrust sheet length), every single incoming weakness zone causes the formation of a new thrust, thus resulting in thrust sheets shorter than the equilibrium case. In addition, less displacement is accommodated on each thrust. As a consequence, the frontal taper is smaller than expected

  20. Is the Chrystalls Beach Accretionary Melange a Fossil Subduction Channel Shear Zone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Sibson, R. H.

    2007-12-01

    In the northeast of the Hikurangi subduction margin, a 1-2 km thick layer of high Vp/Vs, low Qp and distributed microseismicity is present along the subduction megathrust interface (Eberhart-Phillips & Chadwick, 2002). This zone is interpreted as a 'subduction channel' consisting of a fluid-saturated, highly sheared mixture of trench-fill sediments, which have been subducted below (or eroded from) the accretionary prism (von Huene & Scholl, 1991). Seismic style within subduction channels may vary from large megathrust ruptures to aseismic slip associated with microseismic activity. The factors controlling these variations in style are not well understood due to the inaccessible nature of active subduction thrust interfaces. The Chrystalls Beach Complex, SE Otago, New Zealand, is a possible analogue for the seismogenic zone of an active subduction channel. This complex comprises an intensely sheared mixture of chert, terrigenous mud and sand, minor volcanogenic sediments and pillow lavas. It has a 'block-in-matrix' mélange structure, where asymmetric, dismembered beds of sand-rich competent material are enclosed within a relatively incompetent, cleaved pelitic matrix. The rock assemblage has been progressively deformed in a top-to-the-north shear zone, and is pervaded by an anastomosing network of quartz/calcite shear- and extension veins, where individual veins can be traced for tens of metres. The presence of extension veins indicates episodes where the tensile overpressure condition (Pf > σ3) was locally attained. Initially the sediments experienced compaction, volume loss and layer-parallel soft sediment shearing, developing a slaty cleavage and viscous S/C shear structures. The dense vein network developed during subsequent brittle deformation. The mineral assemblage (pumpellyite-chlorite to pumpellyite-actinolite), mica b0 spacing and illite crystallinity indicate deformation in a high pressure - low temperature environment ( ~ 3-6 kbar, ~ 200-300°C). This

  1. Low frequency tremors in the Tonankai accretionary prism, triggered by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, A.; Obana, K.; Takahashi, N.; Fukao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    There have been many reports of triggered tremors and micro-earthquakes, by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, most of which are based on land observations. Here, we report that numerous low frequency tremors are recorded by broadband ocean-bottom seismographs of DONET, a network of cabled observatory systems deployed in the Tonankai accretionary prism of the Nankai trough. Ten stations were in operation at the time of the earthquake. The tremors are observed at five of the stations, which are located on the landward slope of the Nankai trough. On the other hand, the signals are weak at stations near the coast, which are placed on the Kumano Forarc basin. The tremors are dominant in a frequency range of 1-10Hz. Their duration ranges from tens of seconds to a few minutes. More than 20 events per hour can be detected in the first few days after the earthquake. The activity continues about three weeks with a decrease in the frequency of occurrence. An intriguing feature of the observed tremors is that some of them have a very low frequency (VLF) component, most clearly visible between 0.02 and 0.05 Hz. We found 74 such events within 5 days after the great earthquake. For each event, the VLF signal is detected only at one station in contrast to the high frequency signal (2-8Hz), which can be observed at more than a few stations. We estimated the source location of the VLF events, by measuring the onset of envelope seismograms constructed from the high frequency (2-8Hz) horizontal component. Due to the unclear onset and the limited number of observable stations per event, the individual events were located with large location errors. Therefore, we assumed that 11 of the events, whose VLF waveforms are similar to each other with high correlation coefficient (> 0.92), are co-located. The measured travel times for the 11 events are compared and some outliers were discarded. We grid-searched through a 3-D S-wave velocity model for the event location, which minimizes the travel

  2. Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A.

    2009-11-15

    Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Accretionary margin of north-western Hispaniola: morphology, structure and development of part of the northern Caribbean plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Austin, James A., Jr.; Scanlon, K.M.; Terence, Edgar N.; Parson, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Broad-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) images and single- and multi-channel seismic reflection profiles demonstrate that the margin of north-western Hispaniola has experienced compression as a consequence of oblique North American-Caribbean plate convergence. Two principal morphological or structural types of accretionary wedges are observed along this margin. The first type is characterized by a gently sloping (???4??) sea floor and generally margin-parallel linear sets of sea-floor ridges that gradually deepen towards the flat Hispaniola Basin floor to the north. The ridges are caused by an internal structure consisting of broad anticlines bounded by thrust faults that dip southwards beneath Hispaniola. Anticlines form at the base of the slope and are eventually sheared and underthrust beneath the slope. In contrast, the second type of accretionary wedge exhibits a steeper (???6-16??) sea-floor slope characterized by local slumping and a more abrupt morphological transition to the adjacent basin. The internal structure appears chaotic on seismic reflection profiles and probably consists of tight folds and closely spaced faults. We suggest that changes in sea-floor declivity and internal structure may result from variations in the dip or frictional resistance of the de??collement, or possibly from changes in the cohesive strength of the wedge sediments. The observed pattern of thickening of Hispaniola Basin turbidites towards the insular margin suggests differential southwards tilting of the Hispaniola Basin strata, probably in response to North America-Caribbean plate interactions since the Early Tertiary. Based upon indirect age control from adjacent parts of the northern caribbean plate boundary, we infer a Late Eocene to Early Miocene episode of transcurrent motion (i.e. little or no tilting), an Early Miocene to Late Pliocene period of oblique convergence (i.e. increased tilt) during which the accretionary wedge began to be constructed, and a Late Pliocene to

  4. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aughenbaugh, Katherine; Stutzman, Paul; Juenger, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS), calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS), a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  5. Boiler wood ash as a soil amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.C.

    1996-12-31

    Each of the 88 pulp and paper mills in the southeastern United States produces an average of 43 t of boiler ash daily (47 US tons). Forty percent is wood ash, 5% is coal ash, and the remaining is a combination ash. An analysis of boiler ash from 14 Alabama pulp and paper mills averaged 38% CaCO3 equivalent with a dry density of 500 kg m{sup -3}. Most agricultural soils in the southeastern US require periodic application of ground limestone in order to maintain productivity. Using boiler wood ash and combination ash as an alternative to ground limestone is agronomically productive, environmentally safe, and fiscally sound for both the ash producer and the landowner/ farmer. While plant, nutrient content of ash is variable, it should be considered as an incidental source of plant nutrients for field crops. Metals and phytotoxic components are very low. Extensive research has been reported on the value and safety of wood-fired boiler ashes. Nevertheless, research and development projects continue in efforts to assure safe use of boiler wood ash as an alternative soil liming material.

  6. Ash fusion study of West Virginia coals

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, K.C., Smith, C.J.; Hohn, M.E.

    1984-12-01

    As more industries and utilities convert to coal, ash fusion information becomes more important for boiler design (waste disposal systems). For example, burning a low fusion temperature coal can cause slagging - the buildup of molten ash on boiler waterwall tubes. Not only is boiler efficiency lowered, but downtime is also increased. Recently, potential buyers of West Virginia coal have inquired frequently about ash fusion. However, the amount of information in the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey's data base is limited to data from about 800 samples, 50% of which were collected in five counties. Thus, the survey is conducting a study of ash fusion temperatures for the state's coals, to increase available data and its geographic coverage. A Leco AF-500 automated ash fusion analyzer was used in this study, which addresses: 1) reliability of results from an automated analyzer, 2) comparison of automated data with conventional data, 3) techniques of sample preparation, high-temperature ashing, and cone preparation, 4) ash-fusion trends in the state, and 5) research developments. The research sought to develop for West Virginia coal a statistical correlation model relating ash-elemental data with fusion data, and to investigate the relationship between ash color and fusion temperature. (Light-colored ashes generally have higher fusion temperatures than darker ashes.)

  7. Utilization of lignite ash in concrete mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Demirbas, A.; Karslioglu, S.; Ayas, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this article 11 ashes from various Turkish lignite sources were studied to show the effects upon lignite ash quality for use as a mineral admixture in concrete. The lignite ashes were classified into two general types (Class A and Class B) based on total of silica, alumina, and iron oxide. Total content of the three major oxides must be more than 50% for Class A lignite ash and more than 70% for Class B lignite ash. When 25% of the cement was replaced by LA-1 (Class A) lignite ash, based on 300 kg/m{sup 3} cementitious material, the 28-day compressive strength increased 24.3% compared to the control mix. The optimal lignite ash replacement was 25% at 300 kg/m{sup 3} cementitious material.

  8. Gasification of ash-containing solid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, G.

    1983-03-01

    Ash-contaminated solid or semi-solid fuel is passed into the bottom zone of a fluidized bed gasifier, preferably containing cao to fix labile sulfur moieties, and gasified at a temperature below the ash-softening point. The resulting char and ash of relatively low size and/or weight pass to a top zone of the bed wherein the char is gasified at a temperature above the ash-softening point whereby a substantial proportion of the ash sticks to and agglomerates with solids in the top zone until the particle size and/or weight of the resulting agglomerates causes them to sink to the bottom of the gasifier from where they can be recovered. The hot gases leaving the top of the gasifying bed have a reduced burden of entrained ash, and may be cooled to prevent any entrained ash adhering to downstream equipment through which the gases pass.

  9. ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

  10. Highly Sideophile Element Abundance Constraints on the Nature of the Late Accretionary Histories of Earth, Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Puchtel, I. S.; Brandon, A. D.; Horan, M. F.; James, O. B.

    2007-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE) include Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd. These elements are initially nearly-quantitatively stripped from planetary silicate mantles during core segregation. They then may be re-enriched in mantles via continued accretion sans continued core segregation. This suite of elements and its included long-lived radiogenic isotopes systems (Re-187 (right arrow) Os-187; Pt-190 (right arrow) Os-186) can potentially be used to fingerprint the characteristics of late accreted materials. The fingerprints may ultimately be useful to constrain the prior nebular history of the dominant late accreted materials, and to compare the proportion and genesis of late accretionary materials added to the inner planets. The past ten years have seen considerable accumulation of isotopic and compositional data for HSE present in the Earth's mantle, lunar mantle and impact melt breccias, and Martian meteorites. Here we review some of these data and consider the broader implications of the compiled data.

  11. Late Proterozoic evolution of the northern part of the Hamisana zone, northeast Sudan - Constraints on Pan-African accretionary tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. M.; Dixon, T. H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes deformation fabrics developed in the northern part of the Hamisana zone in northeast Sudan. New structural data are presented which establish a structural chronology that characterizes distinct events of accretion, folding, and thrust faulting and reactivation of accretion-related faults. The structural data point to an intraplate compressional origin for the Hamisana zone. A review of available isotopic age data is carried out, and it is concluded that Pan-African accretionary processes may have been analogous to Phanerozoic ophiolite and island arc accretion in the western North American Cordillera, where penetrative deformation occurred in response to periodic intraplate shortening events, rather than an ultimate collision of unrelated crustal fragments.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of the petroleum potential of the Tertiary accretionary terrane, west side of the Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Convergence between the Pacific and North American plates during late Eocene and late middle Miocene times produced two principal terranes of melange and broken formation (Eocene, Ozette Melange and Miocene, Hoh Melange) exposed onshore along the west side of the Olympic Peninsula. Organic geochemical analyses of 150 samples collected from these two accretionary terranes indicate that they are marginally mature and have a low content of type III organic matter, therefore, they are gas prone rather than oil prone. Geochemical analyses, using molecular markers, indicate that the oil in the Sunshine Mining Co. Medina No. 1 is related to oil extracted from middle Eocene siltstone of the Ozette Melange located as much as 140 km north of the well. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic abundance of methane in natural gas seeps and gas in the melange along the west side of the Olympic Peninsula indicate that the gas is mainly thermogenic; however, the relation between these two sources of gas is uncertain.

  13. Early Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis along northern margin of Gondwana constrained by high-Mg metaigneous rocks, SW Yunnan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiaowan; Wang, Yuejun; Cawood, Peter A.; Zhang, Yuzhi

    2015-12-01

    SW Yunnan of China constituted part of the northern margin of Gondwana facing the proto-Tethys ocean in the early Paleozoic. However, the evolution of the region and its relationship with the accretionary orogenism have been poorly established. This paper reports a set of new zircon U-Pb age data and whole-rock major oxides, elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic data for early Paleozoic metavolcanic rocks from the previously defined Lancang Group and reveals the development of an Ordovician suprasubduction zone in SW Yunnan. Zircon U-Pb ages of 462 ± 6 and 454 ± 27 Ma for two representative samples indicate eruption of the volcanic rocks in the Late Ordovician. Geochemical data for the metavolcanic rocks together with other available data indicate a calc-alkaline affinity with high Al2O3 (13.04-18.77 wt%) and low TiO2 (0.64-1.00 wt%). They have Mg-numbers ranging from 62 to 50 with SiO2 of 53.57-69.10 wt%, compositionally corresponding to the high-Mg andesitic rocks. They display enrichments in LREEs and LILEs with significant Eu negative anomalies (δEu = 0.20-0.33), and depletions in HFSEs, similar to arc volcanic rocks. Their initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.721356 to 0.722521 and ɛNd(t) values from -7.63 to -7.62 with Nd model ages of 2.06-2.10 Ga. Integration of ages and geochemical data with available geological observations, we propose the presence of Ordovician magmatism related to proto-Tethyan evolution in SW Yunnan and the metaigneous rocks formed in an island-arc setting. They were part of a regional accretionary orogen that extended along the northern margin of Gondwana during Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic period.

  14. Flexural bending-induced plumelets and their seamounts in accretionary (Japanese-style) and collisional (Tethyan-style) orogenic belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, N.; Dilek, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Seamounts and seamount chains are common in both the upper and lower plates of active subduction zones. Their OIB-type volcanic products are distinctly different from suprasubduction zone (arc, forearc and backarc) generated volcanic rocks in terms of their compositions and mantle sources. Tectonic accretion of such seamounts into the Japanese archipelago in the NW Pacific and into subduction-accretion complexes and active margins of continents/microcontinents within the Tethyan realm during the Cretaceous played a significant role in continental growth. Seamount assemblages comprise alkaline volcanic rocks intercalated with radiolarian and hemipelagic chert, and limestone, and may also include hypabyssal dolerite and gabbro intrusions. In the Tethyan orogenic belts these seamount rocks commonly occur as km-scale blocks in mélange units beneath the late Jurassic - Cretaceous ophiolites nappes, whereas on the Japanese islands they form discrete, narrow tectonic belts within the late Jurassic - Cretaceous accretionary prism complexes. We interpret some of these OIB occurrences in the Japanese and Tethyan mountain belts as asperities in downgoing oceanic plates that formed in <10 million years before their accretion. Their magmas were generated by decompressional melting of upwelling asthenosphere, without any significant mantle plume component, and were brought to the seafloor along deep-seated brittle fractures that developed in the flexed, downgoing lithosphere as it started bending near a trench. The modern occurrences of these "petit-spot volcanoes" are well established in the northwestern Pacific plate, off the coast of Japan. The proposed mechanism of the formation of these small seamounts better explains the lack of hotspot trails associated with their occurrence in the geological record. Magmatic outputs of such flexural bending-induced plumelets should be ubiquitious in the accretionary (Japanese-style) and collisional (Tethyan-style) orogenic belts.

  15. Small size very low frequency earthquakes in the Nankai accretionary prism, following the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Akiko; Obana, Koichiro; Sugioka, Hiroko; Araki, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Narumi; Fukao, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    A large number of shallow low frequency events were recorded after the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake by the cabled network of broadband ocean bottom seismometers (DONET) deployed in the eastern part of the Nankai trough. This low frequency event activity was intense for the first few days after the great earthquake and gradually decreased. Signals of the events are most clearly visible at the frequency range around 2-8 Hz. Some of the events are accompanied by a very long frequency (VLF) signal, which is clearly observed at around 0.02-0.05 Hz. The magnitude and source duration estimated by waveform analysis for one of the largest very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) was 3.0-3.5 and 17 s. This source duration is extremely long compared to ordinary earthquakes of comparable magnitude. These newly detected VLFEs are likely to be normal fault earthquakes located at shallow depths within the accretionary prism, in contrast to the previously reported VLFEs that were explained by a low angle thrusting along the decollement zone. On the other hand, the low frequency events with no clear VLF signal were previously regarded as being low frequency tremors (LFTs). We show that events with and without the VLF signal likely represent the same phenomenon, and the VLF signal is only observed when a large magnitude event occurs near the station. The waveforms of VLFEs are characterized by the coexistence of long source duration and high-frequency radiation of signals, and such features were previously explained by the co-occurrence of shear failure and hydrofractures under the influence of fluid brought into the decollement zone. Our result indicates that the stress state and the mechanical environment, which promote the occurrence of VLFEs, exist not only along the decollement zone but also in the shallower part of the accretionary prism.

  16. Permeability of Silty Claystone and Turbidite Samples from IODP Expedition 348, Hole C0002P, Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C.; Underwood, M.

    2014-12-01

    One of the main objectives of IODP Expedition 348 was to characterize the variations of lithology and structure with depth in the interior of the Nankai Trough accretionary complex beneath the Kumano forearc basin (offshore SW Japan). Six cores were recovered from Hole C0002P between 2163 and 2218 mbsf. Four whole-round (WR) specimens from depths of 2174.98 to 2209.64 mbsf were tested for constant-flow permeability with a focus on thin interbeds of silty claystone and fine-grained turbidites. Samples are from lithostratigraphic Unit V (accreted trench or Shikoku Basin hemipelagic deposits). Coarser interbeds are important for assessing the prospects of flow through stratigraphic conduits. Our primary objective is to better understand how hydrogeologic properties of different lithologies respond to deformation within the accretionary prism. Equipment for permeability tests consists of a withdrawal-infuse syringe pump to simultaneously inject and extract pore fluid from the top and bottom of the specimen to generate hydraulic head difference. Specimens were trimmed for tests in both vertical direction (along-core) and horizontal direction (cross-core) with the diameter of 3.8 cm (1.5 in). The isotropic effective stress is set at 0.55 MPa. The WR specimens are heterogeneous. The major lithology is silty claystone to fine-grained silty claystone. Some intervals contain thin (~1.3 cm) oblique sandy layers and black organic bands. Bedding is steep to vertical (~70-80˚). One goal is to determine how this lithologic variability affects the anisotropy of permeability. Environmental SEM was used to image the cores (in multiple directions) to evaluate the relation between sediment microstructure and anisotropy of permeability.

  17. Field evidence for fault controlled intrusion of blue-schist-bearing melange into an accretionary wedge, Island Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lamons, R.

    1985-01-01

    Two lithologic units of the Franciscan are well exposed along a loop of the Eel River at Island Mountain. They are 1) zeolite or lower grade lithic graywackes, and 2) a 0.5 km wide band of black shaly melange containing blueschist, chert, greenstone, metagraywacke, and a graywacke-hosted copper deposit. Sedimentary features were not observed in the melange. The graywacke was subdivided on the basis of presence or absence of sodium-cobaltonitrate stained K-spar. Field relationships suggest that the blueschist-bearing melange was emplaced along steep NW-dipping faults in an accretionary wedge. Mapping of S. Jewett Rock and SW Lake Mountain quadrangles show narrow anastomosing bands of the melange following NW-trending faults. East of this band, graywackes without K-spar are folded along NW/SE axes. No folds were found to the west. Other Melange bands pinch out into faults which juxtapose graywackes of different facies. The sheared melange bands are not folded and shale beds in the graywacke show little shear so the melange bands are unlikely to be sheared olistostromes. The areal extent of graywacke is about ten times that of melange shales. Assuming this pattern continues laterally and at depth, the amount of ductile material in the melange is far less than that assumed by Cloos (1982) in his flow model for melange. The ductile melange may have been forced upward by metamorphically produced volatiles, or as a result of relative plate motion. It originated at depth, moved up along the top of a subducting slab, plucking clasts, then splayed upward into pre-existing faults in the accretionary wedge.

  18. Rates of fluid expulsion across the northern Cascadia accretionary prism: Constraints from new heat flow and multichannel seismic reflection data

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.E.; Hyndman, R.D. ); Villinger, H. )

    1990-06-10

    One hundred and ten closely spaced probe heat flwo measurements provide new constraints on the thermal regime of the northern Cascadia accretionary prism off Vancouver Island. Complementary heat flow values have been obtained from the depth of a bottom-simulating seismic reflector (BSR) that is interpreted to mark the thermally controlled base of a methane hydrate layer. The only local heat flow variations observed are associated with a sediment slump that is seen in SeaMARC II acoustic images and with the outcrop of several major thrust faults. Fluid expulsion resulting from the dewatering of the prism sediments appears to occur regionally in the 10-20-km-wide zone landward of the deformation front. In this area there is a significant disagreement between the probe and BSR heat flow estimates (roughly 30%) that can be explained by a regionally uniform vertical fluid flow at a rate of about 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} m/s. This is in good agreement with the estimated fluid expulsin rate required by the decrease in porosity landward of the deformation front, as estimated from the increase in seismic velocities derived from multichannel reflection data. The heat flow in Cascadia Basin seaward of the deformation front is in excellent agreement with that predicted by cooling plate models. Landward, there is a regional trend of decreasing heat flow across the accretionary prism, which is consistent with a model of simple tectonic thickening. Temperatures at the interface between the prism and the oceanic crust continue to increase landward, and reach 400-450 C beneath the middle to inner continental shelf. Initiation of megathrust earthquake failure along the main subduction thrust may be thus restricted by the high temperatures to the zone beneath the continental slope and outer shelf.

  19. Variation in deformation of the South Panama Accretionary Prism: Response to oblique subduction and trench sediment variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Mary E.; Moore, Gregory F.

    1990-08-01

    Migrated single-channel seismic lines and Sea-MARC II side scan and bathymetry data document an active accretionary prism along the obliquely convergent margin of south Panama, a region previously believed to be a transform margin. The eastern flank of the Coiba Ridge is being subducted in this region, creating the requisite geometry for along-strike variation in trench sediment thickness and type. The regional east dip of the downgoing plate causes the depth of the oceanic crust along the trench to drop approximately 1800 m from west to east. In the western region of the study area the incoming sedimentary section consists of approximately 600 m of pelagic and hemipelagic sediments. A wedge of trench turbidites that overlies the incoming hemipelagic sediments thickens from less than 100 m in the western region to more than 900 m in the eastern region of the study area. The eastward increase in sediment thickness correlates with the following changes in the accretionary prism: (1) decrease in initial surface slope; (2) broadening of the inner trench slope; (3) increase in thrust spacing; (4) steepening of frontal thrusts; and (5) fold development. Each of the responses reflects, in varying degrees, the increase in volume and changing physical properties of the accreted material, as well as the changing shear strength of the décollement. The increase in overburden pressure and compaction in the deeper sediments, together with the change in lithology from oceanic to trenchfill sediments, should produce an eastward increase in sediment shear strength both within the wedge and along its base. Because the décollement will tend to form where the pore fluid pressure-overburden ratio is at a maximum, the shear strength within the wedge should increase relative to basal shear strength. Decreased surface slopes will result from the increasing contrast in shear strength between the wedge and its base.

  20. Arc-parallel extension and fluid flow in an ancient accretionary wedge: The San Juan Islands, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schermer, E.R.; Gillaspy, J.R.; Lamb, R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of the Lopez Structural Complex, a major Late Cretaceous terrane-bounding fault zone in the San Juan thrust system, reveals a sequence of events that provides insight into accretionary wedge mechanics and regional tectonics. After formation of regional ductile flattening and shear-related fabrics, the area was crosscut by brittle structures including: (1) southwest-vergent thrusts, (2) extension veins and normal faults related to northwest-southeast extension, and (3) conjugate strike-slip structures that record northwest-southeast extension and northeast-southwest shortening. Aragonite-bearing veins are associated with thrust and normal faults, but only rarely with strike-slip faults. High-pressure, low-temperature (HP-LT) minerals constrain the conditions for brittle deformation to ???20 km and <250 ??C. The presence of similar structures elsewhere indicates that the brittle structural sequence is typical of the San Juan nappes. Sustained HP-LT conditions are possible only if structures formed in an accretionary prism during active subduction, which suggests that these brittle structures record internal wedge deformation at depth and early during uplift of the San Juan nappes. The structures are consistent with orogen-normal shortening and vertical thickening followed by vertical thinning and along-strike extension. The kinematic evolution may be related initially to changes in wedge strength, followed by response to overthickening of the wedge in an unbuttressed, obliquely convergent setting. The change in vein mineralogy indicates that exhumation occurred prior to the strike-slip event. The pressure and temperature conditions and spatial and temporal extent of small faults associated with fluid flow suggest a link between these structures and the silent earthquake process. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  1. Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation

    SciTech Connect

    Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh [times] 0, 200 mesh [times] 0, and 325 mesh [times] 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

  2. Active mineral additives of sapropel ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomich, V. A.; Danilina, E. V.; Krivonos, O. I.; Plaksin, G. V.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the presented research is to establish a scientific rational for the possibility of sapropel ashes usage as an active mineral additive. The research included the study of producing active mineral additives from sapropels by their thermal treatment at 850900 °C and afterpowdering, the investigation of the properties of paste matrix with an ash additive, and the study of the ash influence on the cement bonding agent. Thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray investigations allowed us to establish that while burning, organic substances are removed, clay minerals are dehydrated and their structure is broken. Sapropel ashes chemical composition was determined. An amorphous ash constituent is mainly formed from silica of the mineral sapropel part and alumosilicagels resulted from clay minerals decomposition. Properties of PC 400 and PC 500A0 sparopel ash additives were studied. Adding ashes containing Glenium plasticizer to the cement increases paste matrix strength and considerably reduces its water absorption. X-ray phase analysis data shows changes in the phase composition of the paste matrix with an ash additive. Ash additives produce a pozzolanic effect on the cement bonding agent. Besides, an ash additive due to the alumosilicagels content causes transformation from unstable calcium aluminate forms to the stable ones.

  3. Heavy metals leaching in Indian fly ash.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bably; Mondal, Kajal Kumar

    2008-04-01

    Fly ash is an industrial waste generated from thermal power plants. Fly ash constitutes 80-85% of the total ash produced. A small part of fly ash is utilised in some sectors such as construction materials, building engineering, road, back fill, agriculture, selective engineering and processing useful materials. A large part of fly ash produced is disposed of with very high environmental risk. In the present paper, laboratory leaching test has been used to determine the potential mobility of Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn and Ni in fly ash samples, collected from Chandrapura Thermal Power Plant, Jharkhand and Ramagundam Super Thermal Power Plant, Andhra Pradesh, in order to assess their leachability when these wastes are disposed of. A cascade-leaching test was used at liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S) ranging between 20 and 100. Both fly ash samples exhibited neutral reactions, as indicated by pH values <11.75 and >7.0 at L/S=10 and contact time of 10 minutes. The percentage of leached amounts found to follow the trend Zn>Fe>Mn>Cr>Pb>Cu>Ni>Cd for fly ash from Chandrapura and Fe>Zn>Cu>Mn>Cr>Ni>Pb>Cd for fly ash from Ramagundam. Effect of pH on metals released from ash surface in aqueous solution followed a predictable pattern of decreasing release with increasing pH. PMID:19295096

  4. Volcanic Ash on Slopes of Karymsky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A volcanic eruption can produce gases, lava, bombs of rock, volcanic ash, or any combination of these elements. Of the volcanic products that linger on the land, most of us think of hardened lava flows, but volcanic ash can also persist on the landscape. One example of that persistence appeared on Siberia's Kamchatka Peninsula in spring 2007. On March 25, 2007, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the area around the Karymsky Volcano. In this image, volcanic ash from earlier eruptions has settled onto the snowy landscape, leaving dark gray swaths. The ash stains are confined to the south of the volcano's summit, one large stain fanning out toward the southwest, and another toward the east. At first glance, the ash stain toward the east appears to form a semicircle north of the volcano and sweep back east. Only part of this dark shape, however, is actually volcanic ash. Near the coast, the darker color may result from thicker vegetation. Similar darker coloring appears to the south. Volcanic ash is not really ash at all, but tiny, jagged bits of rock and glass. These jagged particles pose serious health risks to humans and animals who might inhale them. Likewise, the ash poses hazards to animals eating plants that have been coated with ash. Because wind can carry volcanic ash thousands of kilometers, it poses a more far-reaching hazard than other volcanic ejecta. Substantial amounts of ash can even affect climate by blocking sunlight. Karymsky is a stratovolcano composed of alternating layers of solidified ash, hardened lava, and volcanic rocks. It is one of many active volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, which is part of the 'Ring of Fire' around the Pacific Rim. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  5. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05ashes generated in gasification plants every day. Subsequently, appropriate disposal methods can be recommended for each toxicity category. PMID:26923299

  6. Vitrification of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash using biomass ash as additives.

    PubMed

    Alhadj-Mallah, Moussa-Mallaye; Huang, Qunxing; Cai, Xu; Chi, Yong; Yan, JianHua

    2015-01-01

    Thermal melting is an energy-costing solution for stabilizing toxic fly ash discharged from the air pollution control system in the municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant. In this paper, two different types of biomass ashes are used as additives to co-melt with the MSWI fly ash for reducing the melting temperature and energy cost. The effects of biomass ashes on the MSWI fly ash melting characteristics are investigated. A new mathematical model has been proposed to estimate the melting heat reduction based on the mass ratios of major ash components and measured melting temperature. Experimental and calculation results show that the melting temperatures for samples mixed with biomass ash are lower than those of the original MSWI fly ash and when the mass ratio of wood ash reaches 50%, the deformation temperature (DT), the softening, hemisphere temperature (HT) and fluid temperature (FT) are, respectively, reduced by 189°C, 207°C, 229°C, and 247°C. The melting heat of mixed ash samples ranges between 1650 and 2650 kJ/kg. When 50% wood ash is mixed, the melting heat is reduced by more than 700 kJ/kg for the samples studied in this paper. Therefore, for the vitrification treatment of the fly ash from MSW or other waste incineration plants, wood ash is a potential fluxing assistant. PMID:25220259

  7. Can vegetative ash be water repellent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodí, M. B.; Cerdà, A.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    In most of the literature, ash is referred to as a highly wettable material (e.g. Cerdà and Doerr, 2008; Etiegni and Campbell, 1991; Woods and Balfour 2010). However, the contrary was suggested in few articles, albeit with no further quantification (Gabet and Sternberg, 2008; Khanna et al., 1996; Stark, 1977). To clarify this question, water repellency measurements on ash using the Water Drop Penetration Times (WDPT) method were performed on ash from Mediterranean ecosystems and it was found to be water repellent (Bodí et al. 2011). Water repellency on ash from different wildfires ranged from 40 to 10 % occurrence with samples being extreme repellent (lasting more than 3600 s to penetrate). Part of the ash produced in the laboratory was also water repellent. After that, other ash samples had been found water repellent in wildfires in Colorado (unpublished results), Portugal (Gonzalez-Pelayo, 2009), or in prescribed fires in Australia (Bodí et al. 2011b; Petter Nyman, personnal communication). All the samples exhibiting water repellent properties had in common that were combusted at low temperatures, yielding in general ash with dark colour and contents of organic carbon of more than 18 % (Bodí et al. 2011a), although these properties were not exactly proportional to its water repellency occurrence or persistence. In addition, the species studied in Bodí et al. (2011) had been found to produce different levels of WR repellency, being ash from Pinus halepensis more repellent than that from Quercus coccifera and Rosmarins officinalis. Ash from Eucaliptus radiata had been found also very water repellent, as Pinus halepensis (unpublished data). The reasons of the existance of water repellent ash are that the charred residue produced by fire (an also contained in the ash) can contain aromatic compounds that have a lower free energy than water and therefore behave as hydrophobic materials with reduced solubility (Almendros et al., 1992 and Knicker, 2007

  8. Conditions and timescales for welding block-and-ash flow deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.; Campbell, M. E.; Welles, J.; Farquharson, J. I.; Ryan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits to reform a coherent rock mass is a common phenomenon, especially for pumiceous pyroclastic density current deposits (i.e., ignimbrites). However, and despite the pervasive abundance of block-and-ash flow (BAF) deposits in the geological and modern record, instances of strongly welded BAF deposits are few. Here, we present a series of high-temperature (800-900 °C) compaction experiments designed to map the conditions (deposit thickness/stress and temperature/viscosity) and timescales that permit or inhibit the welding of BAF deposits. Our experiments were performed on unconsolidated aggregates (containing an ash and lapilli component) derived from crushed and sieved lava blocks (containing 25% crystals) taken from the well-documented welded BAF deposit at Mount Meager volcano (British Columbia, Canada). The experiments demonstrate that welding efficiency increases with increasing time and temperature. Progressive welding is expressed by increasing axial strain, porosity loss, and bulk density. The rate of change of each of these physical properties reduces as welding progresses. Microstructural analysis of the experimental products shows that the loss of interclast porosity during welding results from the progressive sintering and amalgamation of vitric fragments, and that the pore shape changes from sub-equant pores to stretched lenses sandwiched between vitric and crystal fragments. The coincidence between the microstructure and rock physical properties of the natural and experimental samples highlight that we have successfully reproduced welded BAF in the laboratory. Furthermore, our permeability measurements highlight a hysteresis in the return journey of the "there-and-back-again" volcanic permeability cycle (expressed by an increase in permeability due to vesiculation and fragmentation followed by a decrease due to welding). This hysteresis cannot be described by a single porosity-permeability power law relationship and

  9. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water

  10. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water

  11. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans. PMID:6832120

  12. Volcanic ash: toxicity to isolated lung cells.

    PubMed

    Castranova, V; Bowman, L; Shreve, J M; Jones, G S; Miles, P R

    1982-02-01

    Samples of volcanic ash from Mount St. Helens were collected from Spokane, Washington, after the major eruption of May 18, 1980. The toxicity of ash to the lung was estimated by monitoring the effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure on various physiological parameters of isolated lung cells. Volcanic ash had little effect on O2 consumption of rabbit type II pneumocytes, O2 consumption or superoxide release of resting rat alveolar macrophages, or membrane integrity of rat alveolar macrophages. Ash also caused no significant lipid peroxidation in rat lung microsomes. However, volcanic ash did inhibit superoxide anion release from zymosan-stimulated rat alveolar macrophages. Since superoxide is an antibacterial substance, this result suggests that exposure to volcanic ash may adversely affect the ability of alveolar macrophages to protect the lung from infection. PMID:6281450

  13. COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced �cars�) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993�1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High

  14. Constraining exhumation pathway in an accretionary wedge by (U-Th)/He thermochronology—Case study on Meliatic nappes in the Western Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putiš, Marián; Danišík, Martin; Ružička, Peter; Schmiedt, Ivan

    2014-11-01

    This study reconstructs the late stages in the exhumation history of a nappe derived from the Meliatic accretionary wedge in the Western Carpathians by means of zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He dating. The Meliatic accretionary wedge formed due to the closure of the Neotethyan Triassic-Jurassic Meliata-Hallstatt Ocean in the Late Jurassic. The studied fragments of the blueschist-bearing Meliatic Bôrka Nappe were metamorphosed at low-temperature and high- to medium-pressure conditions at ca. 160-150 Ma and included into the accretionary wedge. The time of the accretionary wedge formation constrains the beginning of the Bôrka Nappe northward thrusting over the Gemeric Unit of the evolving Central Western Carpathians (CWC) orogenic wedge. The zircon (U-Th)/He data on four samples recorded three evolutionary stages: (i) cooling through the ∼180 °C isotherm at 130-120 Ma related to starting collapse of the accretionary wedge, following exhumation of the high-pressure slices in the Meliatic accretionary wedge; (ii) postponed exhumation and cooling of some fragments through the ∼180 °C isotherm from 115 to 95 Ma due to ongoing collapse of this wedge; and (iii) cooling from 80 to 65 Ma, postdating the thrusting (∼100-80 Ma) of the Bôrka Nappe slices during the Late Cretaceous compression related to formation of the CWC orogenic wedge. The third stage already documents cooling of the Meliatic Bôrka Nappe slices in the CWC orogenic wedge. The apatite (U-Th)/He data may indicate cooling of a Bôrka Nappe slice to near-surface temperatures at ∼65 Ma. The younger AHe age clusters indicate that at least one, or possibly two, reheating events could have occurred in the longer interval from ∼40 to ∼10 Ma during the Oligocene-Miocene. These were related to sedimentary burial and/or the magmatism as documented in other parts of the CWC.

  15. Effects of fly ash particle size on strength of Portland cement fly ash mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogdu, K.; Tuerker, P.

    1998-09-01

    Fly ashes do not have the same properties for different size fractions. It can be accepted that the effect of a fly ash on mortar strength is a combined effect of its size fractions. Therefore, it was concluded that by separating the size fractions and replacing cement with them, the combined bulk effect of a fly ash on strength can be better analyzed. In this study, different size fractions of fly ash were used to replace cement partially in standard compressive strength mortars. The authors attempted to interpret the strength of Portland cement-fly ash mortars in terms of the chemical, mineralogical, morphological, and physical properties of different fly ash size fractions used. Strengths of the mortars were compared at 2, 7, 28, and 90 days. Also strength of mortars with all-in ash (original ash containing all the fractions) were estimated by using strength of mortars with size fractions and the suitability of this estimation was discussed.

  16. Hazards Associated With Recent Popocatepetl Ash Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, A.; Martin, A.; Espinasa-Pereña, R.; Ferres, D.

    2013-05-01

    Popocatepetl has been producing ash from small eruptions since 1994. Until 2012 about 650 small ash emissions have been recorded at the monitoring system of Popocatépetl Volcano. Ash consists mainly of glassy lithic clasts from the recent crater domes, plagioclase and pyroxene crystals, and in major eruptions, olivine and/or hornblende. Dome forming eruptions produced a fine white ash which covers the coarser ash. This fine ash consists of plagioclase, glass and cristobalite particles mostly under15 microns. During the recent crisis at Popocatépetl, April and May2012 ash fell on villages to the east and west of the volcano, reaching Mexico City (more than 20 million people) and Puebla (2 million people). In 14 cases the plumes had heights over 2 km, the largest on May 2 and 11 (3 and 4 km in height, respectively). Heavier ash fall occurred on April 13, 14, 20, and 23 and May 2, 3, 5, 11, 14, 23, 24 and 25. A database for ash fall was constructed from April 13 with field observations, reports emitted by the Centro Nacional de Comunicaciones (CENACOM), ash fall advisories received at CENAPRED and alerts from the Servicios a la Navegación en el Espacio Aéreo Mexicano (SENEAM). This aim of this database is to calculate areas affected by the ash and estimate the ash fall volume emitted by Popocatépetl in each of these events. Heavy ash fall from the May 8 to May 11 combined with reduced visibility due to fog forced to closure of the Puebla airport during various periods of time, for up to 13 hours. Domestic and international flights were cancelled. Ash eruptions have caused respiratory conditions in the state of Puebla, to the east of the volcano, since 1994 (Rojas et al, 2001), but because of the changing wind conditions in the summer mainly, some of these ash plumes go westward to towns in the State of Mexico and even Mexico City. Preliminary analyses of these eruptions indicate that some ash emissions produced increased respiratory noninfectious problems

  17. Proceedings: Tenth international ash use symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the 1993 International Coal Ash Use Symposium, the tenth in a series since 1967, is to publicize innovations in coal ash technology. these symposia support the mission of the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) to promote coal ash use in a variety of markets through technology transfer and commercialization. the 82 papers were submitted to ACAA by authors from sixteen countries. this volume 1 contains reports on the following: waste stabilization, aggregate, agriculture, structural fill, mine reclamation, aquatic uses, and environmental concerns. individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  18. Characterization of ash cenospheres in fly ash from Australian power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Ling-ngee Ngu; Hongwei Wu; Dong-ke Zhang

    2007-12-15

    Ash cenospheres in fly ashes from five Australian power stations have been characterized. The experimental data show that ash cenosphere yield varies across the power stations. Ash partitioning occurred in the process of ash cenosphere formation during combustion. Contradictory to conclusions from the literature, iron does not seem to be essential to ash cenosphere formation in the cases examined in the present work. Further investigation was also undertaken on a series of size-fractioned ash cenosphere samples from Tarong power station. It is found that about 70 wt% of ash cenospheres in the bulk sample have sizes between 45 and 150 {mu}m. There are two different ash cenosphere structures, that is, single-ring structure and network structure. The percentage of ash cenospheres of a network structure increases with increasing ash cenosphere size. Small ash cenospheres (in the size fractions {lt}150 {mu}m) have a high SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, and the majority of the ash cenospheres are spherical and of a single-ring structure. Large ash cenosphere particles (in the size fractions of 150-250 {mu}m and {gt}250 {mu}m) have a low SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, and a high proportion of the ash cenospheres are nonspherical and of a network structure. A novel quantitative technique has been developed to measure the diameter and wall thickness of ash cenospheres on a particle-to-particle basis. A monolayer of size-fractioned ash cenospheres was dispersed on a pellet, which was then polished carefully before being examined using a scanning electron microscope and image analysis. The ash cenosphere wall thickness broadly increases with increasing ash cenosphere size. The ratios between wall thickness and diameter of ash cenospheres are limited between an upper bound of about 10.5% and a lower bound of about 2.5%, irrespective of the ash cenosphere size. 52 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Lithostratigraphic analysis and geochemistry of a vitric spatter-bearing ignimbrite: the Quaternary Adeje Formation, Cañadas volcano, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávila-Harris, P.; Ellis, B. S.; Branney, M. J.; Carrasco-Núñez, G.

    2013-06-01

    The 1.5-Ma Adeje Formation in SW Tenerife contains an ignimbrite sheet with remarkable textural and chemical complexity. A basal Plinian pumice-fall layer is overlain by a partly welded compound ignimbrite in which phonolitic pumice lapilli and dense obsidian spatter rags with irregular, fluidal-shaped margins are supported in a poorly sorted tuff matrix. The lower ignimbrite flow-unit contains accretionary lapilli in its upper part, overlain by an ash-pellet-bearing fallout layer from a co-ignimbrite plume. The upper ignimbrite flow-unit comprises a locally welded massive lapilli-tuff that grades up into lithic breccia containing juvenile obsidian blocks and both cognate and vent-derived lithic blocks. Geochemically, the Adeje Formation shows two distinct juvenile populations that relate to crystal-poor and crystal-rich magma types. Crystal-rich juvenile clasts contain multiple compositions of ilmenite and magnetite, and crystal aggregates of bytownite (An79-86). The varied assemblage of juvenile clasts reflects an eruptive style that may have involved rapid changes in magma chamber pressure associated with caldera collapse, and possibly the disruption of a lava lake. The Adeje eruption started with a Plinian explosive phase that rained ash and pumice lapilli across SW Tenerife; followed by pyroclastic fountaining feeding density currents with explosive ejecta of juvenile glassy material producing the coarse, spatter-bearing ignimbrite facies. A short pause between pyroclastic density currents is recorded by the co-ignimbrite ash and pellet-fall bed. The climactic phase of the eruption probably involved caldera subsidence as recorded by a widespread massive heterolithic breccia.

  20. A potential record of slow slip earthquakes from the Kodiak Accretionary Complex and the role of silica redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Slow slip earthquakes are observed along both accretionary and nonaccretionary subduction zones with continuous GPS networks, so one would expect that deeply exhumed paleo-decollements in ancient accretionary complexes would carry a record of these events in the form of fault fabrics, microstructures, or veins. One potential example is within the Central Belt of the Late Cretaceous Kodiak Formation, a 10's of meters thick, subhorizontal paleo-decollement zone from the Kodiak accretionary complex in southwest Alaska that is exposed for over 100 km along strike in a regional culmination in the Kodiak archipelago. Here, the main criteria that are likely necessary for slow slip earthquakes are satisfied: 1) proximity to the downdip transition from velocity weakening to velocity strengthening, 2) low effective stresses driven by high fluid pressures related to the onset of dehydration reactions in low permeability rocks, 3) dilation, with hundreds of events of cracking and crack closure, and 4) a regime of simple shear. The central belt is pervasively veined at the scale of mm's, but there are larger veins organized into en echelon sets that lie in seaward dipping arrays regularly spaced at ~0.5 m with small vugs in many cases. There are two types of microstructures in these veins that represent different crack closure mechanisms: crack seal bands and collapse residues. All the early, closely spaced veins close only by sealing (continuous crack seal bands of metamorphic chlorite grown from the seeds on the crack wall), but the center of the larger veins in en echelon sets show a temporal transition from continuous crack seal bands, to discontinuous crack seal bands, to inclusion free growth of euhedral crystals, with bands of collapse residues of dissolved wall rock. Crack seal bands indicate ~10 microns as the median crack aperture, with a large tail in the distribution toward larger values. Fluid inclusion trails that track the crack displacement path systematically

  1. Crustal and Fault Strengths from Critical Taper Measurements: Insights into the behavior of Accretionary Wedges using Distinct-Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, L.; Suppe, J.

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly clear that many major faults are weak relative to quasistatic friction because of dynamical effects involving the microprocesses of high-velocity friction and the energetics of large-scale fault rupture. Even at the toes of accretionary wedges where velocity strengthening is expected, large displacements can occur dynamically. We seek to better understand the relationship between the large-scale strength of such faults and of the crust containing them over a timescale much greater than seismic cycles. Critical-taper theory provides straightforward quantitative relationships between accretionary wedge geometry and absolute basal fault and wedge strengths with minimal assumptions. Wedge tapers constrain the far-field stresses under which detachments slip and wedges grow during wedge-growing events, whether they are dynamical or quasistatic. To date most applications of wedge mechanics to accretionary wedges involve analog and numerical modeling with largely conceptual insight, for example illuminating the role of geological heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate that recent theoretical advances that are successful in extracting absolute wedge and detachment strengths from the geometry of active wedges can also be applied to extract large-scale strengths in distinct element numerical models in both mechanically homogeneous and heterogeneous wedges. The distinct element method (DEM) is an ideal tool for the study and modeling of critical taper wedges: model wedges can be initially cohesive (bonded) or cohesionless. Faults and folds form naturally as the result of progressive bond breakage during shortening and wedge growth. Heterogeneity can be introduced by creating layered groups of particles of differing mechanical properties. The DEM suffers to some extent in that macro material properties cannot be directly prescribed but rather must be defined by a modest number of micro-properties and the process in necessarily iterative and developing a wide

  2. Large Erosional Features on the Cascadia Accretionary Wedge Imaged with New High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry and Seismic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, J. W.; Goldfinger, C.

    2013-12-01

    Utilizing new high resolution multibeam bathymetric data along with chirp sub-bottom and multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data, we identified remarkable erosional features on the toe of the Cascadia accretionary wedge near Willapa Canyon, offshore Washington, USA. Bathymetric data was compiled from the Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects (COAST) cruise and from the site survey cruise for the Cascadia Initiative. These features loosely resemble slope failures of the frontal thrust, but can be distinguished from such failures by several key features: They incise the crest of the frontal thrust and encompass the landward limb; They have floors below the level of the abyssal plain, similar to plunge pool morphology; They show no evidence of landslide blocks at the base of the slope indicative of block sliding. The features where likely formed during the latest Pleistocene based on post event deposition, cross-cutting relationships with Juan de Fuca Channel and the Willapa Channel levees and wave field, and post event slip on the frontal thrust of the Cascadia accretionary prism. The Holocene levees of both Willapa Channel and Juan de Fuca Channel overlap these older features, and clearly place an upper bound on the age of the erosional features in the latest Pleistocene. A lower bound is estimated from a sub-bottom profile that images ~30 meters of post scour sediment fill. Using existing literature of Holocene and Pleistocene sedimentation rates we estimate a lower age bound between ~23,000 - 56,000 y.b.p. We also map a fault scarp within the erosional feature, with ~60 m of vertical offset. Using multi-channel seismic reflection profiles from the COAST cruise we interpret this scarp as the surface expression of the landward vergent frontal thrust fault. The apparent short duration of the erosional event along the seaward margin of the accretionary wedge, coupled with the presence of the fresh fault scarp within the erosion zone, are indicative of a dormant

  3. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  4. 10 Risk to Ash from Emerald Ash Borer: Can Biological Control Prevent the Loss of Ash Stands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ash trees were once relatively free of serious, major diseases and insect pests in North America until the arrival of EAB, which was first detected in North America in Michigan in 2002. As of February 2014, EAB had been detected in 22 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, killing millions of ash ...

  5. Changes of the ash structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, Václav; Friedel, Pavel; Janša, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the article is to appraisal of the changes in the structure of the ash due to the addition of compounds capable of the eutectics composition change. For the transformation were used limestone and dolomite dosed in amounts of 2, 5 and 10 wt.% with pellets of spruce wood, willow wood and refused derived fuel. Combustion temperatures of the mixtures were adjusted according to the temperatures reached during the using of fuels in power plants, i.e. 900, 1000, 1100 and 1200 °C.

  6. Pressure Wave Propagation along the Décollement of the Nankai Accretionary Wedge: Implications for Aseismic Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, A.; Appold, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and hydrologic observations of the Nankai subduction zone made by the Ocean Drilling Program suggest that pore fluid pressures within the accretionary wedge décollement are highly overpressured to near lithostatic values below depths of 2 km beneath the sea floor as a result of sediment diagenesis and dehydration of the subducting oceanic plate. This overpressured zone is also observed to discharge pulses of high fluid pressure that migrate up-dip along the décollement at rates of 1's of km/day. These high pressure pulses along the décollement may cause large enough reductions in the local effective stress to account for aseismic slip events that have been found to propagate also at rates of 1's of km/day. Because elevated fluid pressure and correspondingly decreased effective stress can lead to a dilation of porosity, the pressure waves may become effective agents of fluid transport that can travel more quickly than fluids flowing in the background Darcian flow regime. The purpose of the present study was to seek theoretical confirmation that pressure waves are able to travel quickly enough to account for the seismic and hydrological observations documented. This confirmation was sought through a transient one-dimensional numerical solution to the differential fluid mass conservation equation for an elastic porous medium. Results of the numerical simulations show that when overpressures at depths greater than 2 km in the décollement exceed lithostatic pressure by at least 3%, pressure waves are formed that migrate up-dip at rates fast enough to account for aseismic slip over a broad range of geologic conditions. Pressure waves spawned from these depths in the décollement may travel fast enough to account for aseismic slip when overpressures there are as low as 99% of lithostatic pressure, but require low specific storage of 3×10-6 m-1, high sensitivity of permeability to effective stress, low permeability no higher than about 10-21 m2 at depths below

  7. Seamount subduction to the Nankai accretionary wedge and its impact on methane hydrate accumulation: insights from analogue and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Nagamura, N.; Baba, K.; Matsuoka, T.

    2006-12-01

    Seamount sudbuction is a common feature at convergent plate margins and several examples can also be seen at the Nankai wedge, but its impact on methane hydrate accumulation has not fully described. In order to understand the accumulation mechanism of methane hydrate, the key issue would be the fluid flow within the sediments. The fluid flow can be classified into two types; the diffusive flow by intergranular porosity and the focused flow along faults (Baba and Yamada, 2004). The diffusive flow can be modeled by conventional reservoir simulator type of approaches, but the focused flow along faults may be difficult. One possible scenario was suggested by Sibson (1995) that fluid may migrate along a fault surface when it slipped (breakage of seal). Following the idea, the focused fluid flow can be evaluated by fault activity that can be modeled and examined by analogue experiments and numerical simulations (Yamada et al., submitted). This research employed analogue experiments that used granular materials (dry sand and glass beads) and numerical simulations that approximate the geologic body as particles (distinct element method). The analogue model results are further analyzed by optical image correlation technique, PIV, to extract faulting events in detail. By using the same tectonic model of sea mount subduction to an accretionary prism, we examined the deformation process particularly the faulting by these two techniques. The results of the analogue experiments and numerical simulations are basically the same, apart from the reproducibility of small structures influenced by the particle size. The models suggest that a sea mount subduction causes segmentation of wedge formation. The segmentation of wedge also produces two types of fault systems; one formed before sea mount subduction and the other afterward. The geometry of these faults illustrates that the fluid from the deeper segment of the sedimentary pile may focus on the faults that formed after sudbuction

  8. Splay Faults and Associated Mass Transport Deposits in the Manila Accretionary Wedge near Taiwan: Implications for Geohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, A. T.; Liu, C. S.; Dirgantara, F.

    2015-12-01

    Plate interface megathrusts are major seismogenic faults in subduction zone, capable of generating great earthquakes with widespread submarine landslides and damaging tsunami. Upward branching of megathrusts results in splay faults in the accretionary wedge. Reflection seismic data across the accretionary wedge off southern Taiwan, reveal at least two strands of splay faults as well as multiple stacked mass transport deposits (MTDs) nearby the faults. With the help of sediment coring and age datings in the vicinity of the splay fault, implications for temporal evolution of the mass wasting processes and episodic activities of splay faults are discussed in this paper. Seismic data show two branches of arcward and gently-dipping splay faults with two slope basins lying in the footwall and hangingwall of the faults, respectively. The older and buried splay fault is inactive as the fault tip is covered by up to 1000 m thick sediments in the footwall slope basin, indicating that it ceased to be active around 0.5 Ma ago. Repeated slip of this fault prior to ~0.5 Ma ago may also result in 4 stacked and multiple mass transport deposits (MTDs) of up to 700-m thick found in vicinity of this fault. This fossil splay fault is characterized by reflection polarity similar to that of seafloor, indicative of low water saturation along the fault zone and hence not an active fluid conduit. The younger and overlying splay fault cuts through the seafloor and the emergent fault tip lying at the toe of steep slope (~ 15 degree) with significant slope break. There is also a 500-m horizontal offset, between the buried paleo-seafloor in the footwall and the present-day seafloor on the hangingwall. The reflection polarity of this fault zone is reversed to that of seafloor, indicating fluid rich for this fault patch. These lines of evidence suggest that this young splay fault is an active fault with active fluid circulation along the fault. Our results indicate that the old splay fault

  9. Timing of magmatism and migmatization in the 2.0-1.8 Ga accretionary Svecokarelian orogen, south-central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Åke; Stephens, Michael B.

    2016-07-01

    Hedesunda-Tierp sample area. The close spatial and temporal interplay between ductile deformation, magmatism and migmatization, the P-T metamorphic conditions, and the continuation of similar magmatic activity around and after 1.8 Ga support solely accretionary rather than combined accretionary and collisional orogenic processes as an explanation for the metamorphism. The generally lower metamorphic grade and restricted influence of the younger metamorphic episode, at least at the ground surface level, distinguishes the central part of the Bergslagen lithotectonic unit from the migmatite belts further north and south.

  10. Initiation and development of slickenlined surfaces in clay-rich material of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Schleicher, Anja

    2016-04-01

    During the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348, which is part of the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (stage 3), the drilling vessel Chikyu advanced the deep riser hole at Site C0002, located 80 km offshore of the Kii Peninsula (Japan), from a depth of 860 meters below sea floor (mbsf) to 3058.5 mbsf. Underlying the Kumano Basin sediments, the Nankai accretionary prism appears, below 975.5 mbsf. It accreted during Upper Miocene to Pliocene times and is formed mainly by turbiditic silty claystone with rarely observed sandstone intercalations. Cuttings from both the 1-4 mm and >4 mm size fractions were investigated, showing slickenlined surfaces and deformation bands together with carbonate veins throughout the entire section from 1045.5 until 3058.5 mbsf. A scaly fabric is increasingly observed below approximately 2400 mbsf. Clay-rich cuttings were selected at different depth for specific SEM-EDS analysis, in order to investigate the initiation and development of the slickenlined surfaces, from both a structural and mineralogical point of view. Two end-members of the slickenlined surface types were observed: a) isolated smooth and uniform planes, between 20 and 50 μm long, formed by single grains of smectite with marked lineations and frequently jagged boundaries and b) microfaults (longer than 100 μm) with sharp boundaries to the undeformed rock, formed by aggregates of illite and smectite and with a well-developed lineation. In transition between these two end-member types, planes that are apparently unconnected draw a single plane and show subparallel lineations. Concerning the orientation of the slickenlines, it seems to be coherent with that observed in an array of conjugated faults, i.e. all the slickenlines belong to the same plane, in turn sub-perpendicular to the intersection of conjugated planes. These observations suggest that the slickenlined surfaces initiated along single grains of smectite and that with increasing

  11. Building a Comprehensive Collection of Ash Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) has conserved seed collections of ash germplasm at the USDA-ARS North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station (NCRPIS) in Ames, IA since the 1970s. When Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was introduced into southeastern MI, the NCRPIS maintained a relatively...

  12. Scientists Outline Volcanic Ash Risks to Aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-01-01

    The ash clouds that belched out of Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano last spring and dispersed over much of Europe, temporarily paralyzing aviation, were vast smoke signal warnings about the hazard that volcanic ash poses for air traffic around the world. At a 15 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, two experts with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) presented an overview of the damage airplanes can sustain from rock fragment- and mineral fragment-laden ash, an update on efforts to mitigate the hazard of ash, and an outline of further measures that are needed to address the problem. Between 1953 and 2009, there were 129 reported encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds, according to a newly released USGS document cited at the briefing. The report, “Encounters of aircraft with volcanic ash clouds: A compilation of known incidents, 1953-2009,” by Marianne Guffanti, Thomas Casadevall, and Karin Budding, indicates that 26 encounters involved significant damage to the airplanes; nine of those incidents resulted in engine shutdown during flight. The report, which does not focus on the effects on airplanes of cumulative exposure to dilute ash and does not include data since 2009, indicates that “ash clouds continue to pose substantial risks to safe and efficient air travel globally.”

  13. Energy efficient continuous flow ash lockhopper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr. (Inventor); Suitor, Jerry W. (Inventor); Dubis, David (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to an energy efficient continuous flow ash lockhopper, or other lockhopper for reactor product or byproduct. The invention includes an ash hopper at the outlet of a high temperature, high pressure reactor vessel containing heated high pressure gas, a fluidics control chamber having an input port connected to the ash hopper's output port and an output port connected to the input port of a pressure letdown means, and a control fluid supply for regulating the pressure in the control chamber to be equal to or greater than the internal gas pressure of the reactor vessel, whereby the reactor gas is contained while ash is permitted to continuously flow from the ash hopper's output port, impelled by gravity. The main novelty resides in the use of a control chamber to so control pressure under the lockhopper that gases will not exit from the reactor vessel, and to also regulate the ash flow rate. There is also novelty in the design of the ash lockhopper shown in two figures. The novelty there is the use of annular passages of progressively greater diameter, and rotating the center parts on a shaft, with the center part of each slightly offset from adjacent ones to better assure ash flow through the opening.

  14. Resource recovery ash - hazard or resource

    SciTech Connect

    Waffenschmidt, J.G.

    1995-05-01

    Resource Recovery ash quality is dependent, in part, on the quality of the refuse from which it is derived. Based on current recycling, waste diversion practices, projected waste quality, and procedures in place at resource recovery facilities it appears that they will not lead to substantial changes in ash quality in the foreseeable future. A number of reviews regarding the environmental fate of resource recovery ash residues have demonstrated that the leachability is significantly below that predicted by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Numerous demonstration projects have shown that ash can be used in a number of products, including reefs, road bed material, and block formation. Two applications appear to be particularly attractive from an environmental perspective -- ash as MSW landfill cover material and as a mitigatory measure for acid mine drainage caused by strip mining. The use of the scientific method provides us with the ability to assess the environmental effects of ash management, utilization, and disposal. The data base on ash is extensive and demonstrates that ash can be handled and used as a non-hazardous material; all that is required is for public policy to catch up.

  15. Environmental assessment and utilization CFB ash

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.

    1997-12-31

    Landfill disposal has generally been accepted as the most common option for ash management in CFB power plants. However, the cost of ash disposal continues to increase due to a reduction in landfill capacity and more stringent environmental regulations. As a result, beneficial uses of CFB ashes (versus landfilling) are being investigated in order to provide a more cost effective ash management program. The chemical and physical characteristics of CFB by-products will influence both their environmental impact and potential utilization options. Compared to conventional pulverized coal boiler ashes, CFB ashes generally have different chemical properties which may limit their utilization for production of Portland cement. Other diverse utilization options have been identified for CFB residues which include: agricultural applications, structural fill, and waste stabilization. Most of these applications have to meet specifications by following certain test methods. The exact utilization options for CFB by-products will depend primarily on the type of fuel being fired, and to a lesser extent, the type of sorbent utilized for sulfur capture. Based on laboratory investigation of ash characteristics, utilization options were concluded for different Foster Wheeler commercial boilers throughout the US and abroad. Based on the results of this study, it was demonstrated that most CFB ashes could be utilized for one or more of the purposes noted above.

  16. FATE OF INHALED FLY ASH IN HAMSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine pulmonary deposition, translocation, and clearance of inhaled fly ash, hamsters received a single 95-min nose-only exposure to neutron-activated fly ash. Over a period of 99 days postexposure, the hamsters were sacrificed in groups of six animals. Lungs, liver, kidne...

  17. A MECHANISM FOR ASH ASSISTED SLUDGE DEWATERING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of various additives to improve the dewaterability of activated sludge was determined and the surface properties of additives characterized in order to arrive at a mechanism for ash conditioning of activated sludge. The primary additives investigated were fly ash and ...

  18. Worldwide high-volume coal ash utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.E.

    1996-10-01

    The utilization of coal ash in concrete is the most extensive and widespread throughout the world, as compared to other uses of ash. However, in addition to the use in 1992 of over 39 million tons of coal ash in concrete, there were over 40 billion tons used in structural, land, or embankment fill; almost 7 million tons for pavement base course or subgrade; over 40 million tons for filler for mines, quarries or pits; almost 3 million tons for soil amendment; over 1.8 million tons for lightweight aggregate; and over 7 million tons for aerated blocks. In 1992, China had the largest production of coal ash as well as the largest utilization. Russian and the US had the second and third largest production. Russia, Germany, US, and Poland were next to China in utilization. This paper summarizes recent coal ash production and utilization in the world and presents a country-by-country survey of the high-volume users.

  19. Construction procedures using self hardening fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, S. I.; Parker, D. G.

    1980-07-01

    Fly ash produced in Arkansas from burning Wyoming low sulfur coal is self-hardening and can be effective as a soil stabilizing agent for clays and sands. The strength of soil-self hardening fly ash develops rapidly when compacted immediately after mixing. Seven day unconfined compressive strengths up to 1800 psi were obtained from 20% fly ash and 80% sand mixtures. A time delay between mixing the fly ash with the soil and compaction of the mixture reduced the strength. With two hours delay, over a third of the strength was lost and with four hours delay, the loss was over half. Gypsum and some commercial concrete retarders were effective in reducing the detrimental effect of delayed compaction. Adequate mixing of the soil and fly ash and rapid compaction of the mixtures were found to be important parameters in field construction of stabilized bases.

  20. Adsorption of phenolic compounds on fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Akgerman, A.; Zardkoohi, M.

    1996-03-01

    Adsorption isotherms for adsorption of phenol, 3-chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol from water onto fly ash were determined. These isotherms were modeled by the Freundlich isotherm. The fly ash adsorbed 67, 20, and 22 mg/g for phenol, chlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol, respectively, for the highest water phase concentrations used. The affinity of phenolic compounds for fly ash is above the expected amount corresponding to a monolayer coverage considering that the surface area of fly ash is only 1.87 m{sup 2}/g. The isotherms for contaminants studied were unfavorable, indicating that adsorption becomes progressively easier as more solutes are taken up. Phenol displayed a much higher affinity for fly ash than 3-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol.

  1. Proceedings: Ninth international ash use symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the 1991 International Coal Ash Use Symposium, the ninth in a series since 1967, is to publicize innovations in coal ash technology. These symposia support the mission of the American Ash Association (established originally as the National Ash Association after the first symposium) to promote coal ash technology transfer and commercial utilization. The three-volume publication contains 80 papers, presented at seventeen sessions during the January 1991 event. Volume 1 contains papers related to concrete and related products like cellular concrete, and aggregates. Volume 2 covers the growing market in waste stabilization/solidification and aquatic uses. This volume (Volume 2) brings together papers on a variety of high-volume uses, and R D projects. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  2. Fly Ash Amendments Catalyze Soil Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Kim, Jungbae; Russell, Colleen K.; Palumbo, A. V.; Daniels, William L.

    2003-09-15

    We tested the effects of four alkaline fly ashes {Class C (sub-bituminous), Class F (bituminous), Class F [bituminous with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) products], and Class F (lignitic)} on a reaction that simulates the enzyme-mediated formation of humic materials in soils. The presence of FGD products completely halted the reaction, and the bituminous ash showed no benefit over an ash-free control. The sub-bituminous and lignitic fly ashes, however, increased the amount of polymer formed by several-fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of metal oxide co-oxidation (Fe and Mn oxides), alkaline pH, and physical stabilization of the enzyme (porous silica cenospheres).

  3. Properties and Leachability of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporated with Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The process of combustion in coal-fired power plant generates ashes, namely fly ash and bottom ash. Besides, coal ash produced from coal combustion contains heavy metals within their compositions. These metals are toxic to the environment as well as to human health. Fortunately, treatment methods are available for these ashes, and the use of fly ash and bottom ash in the concrete mix is one of the few. Therefore, an experimental program was carried out to study the properties and determine the leachability of selfcompacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash. For experimental study, self-compacting concrete was produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a replacement for sand with the ratios of 10%, 20%, and 30% respectively. The fresh properties tests conducted were slump flow, t500, sieve segregation and J-ring. Meanwhile for the hardened properties, density, compressive strength and water absorption test were performed. The samples were then crushed to be extracted using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and heavy metals content within the samples were identified accordingly using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results demonstrated that both fresh and hardened properties were qualified to categorize as self-compacting concrete. Improvements in compressive strength were observed, and densities for all the samples were identified as a normal weight concrete with ranges between 2000 kg/m3 to 2600 kg/m3. Other than that, it was found that incorporation up to 30% of the ashes was safe as the leached heavy metals concentration did not exceed the regulatory levels, except for arsenic. In conclusion, this study will serve as a reference which suggests that fly ash and bottom ash are widely applicable in concrete technology, and its incorporation in self-compacting concrete constitutes a potential means of adding value to appropriate mix and design.

  4. Investigation on Leaching Behaviour of Fly Ash and Bottom Ash Replacement in Self-Compacting Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    Fly ash and bottom ash are some of the waste generated by coal-fired power plants, which contains large quantities of toxic and heavy metals. In recent years, many researchers have been interested in studying on the properties of self-compacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash but there was very limited research from the combination of fly ash and bottom ash towards the environmental needs. Therefore, this research was focused on investigating the leachability of heavy metals of SCC incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash by using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure and Static Leaching Test. The samples obtained from the coal-fired power plant located at Peninsula, Malaysia. In this study, the potential heavy metals leached out from SCC that is produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a substitute for sand with the ratios from 10% to 30% respectively were designated and cast. There are eight heavy metals of concern such as As, Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mn and Fe. The results indicated that most of the heavy metals leached below the permissible limits from the United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization limit for drinking water. As a conclusion, the minimum leaching of the heavy metals from the incorporation of fly ash and bottom ash in self-compacting concrete was found in 20% of fly ash and 20% of bottom ash replacement. The results also indicate that this incorporation could minimize the potential of environmental problems.

  5. The effect of fault-bend folding on seismic velocity in the marginal ridge of accretionary prisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cai, Y.; Wang, Chun-Yong; Hwang, W.-t.; Cochrane, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluid venting in accretionary prisms, which feeds chemosynthetic biological communities, occurs mostly on the marginal thrust ridge. New seismic data for the marginal ridge of the Cascadia prism show significantly lower velocity than that in the adjacent oceanic basin and place important constraints on the interpretations of why fluid venting occurs mostly on the marginal ridge. We employed a finite-element method to analyze a typical fault-bend folding model to explain the phenomenon. The fault in the model is simulated by contact elements. The elements are characterized not only by finite sliding along a slide line, but also by elastoplastic deformation. We present the results of a stress analysis which show that the marginal ridge is under subhorizontal extension and the frontal thrust is under compression. This state of stress favors the growth of tensile cracks in the marginal ridge, facilitates fluid flow and reduces seismic velocities therein; on the other hand, it may close fluid pathways along the frontal thrust and divert fluid flow to the marginal ridge. ?? 1995 Birkha??user Verlag.

  6. Relationship between tectonics, argilokinetic structures, and environmental patterns at the south boundary of the Barbados accretionary prism

    SciTech Connect

    Griboulard, R.; Bobier, C.; Faugeres, J.C.; Gonthier, E.

    1993-02-01

    Recent studies have been carried out on limited sectors of the South Barbados accretionary prism. They are supported by SeaBeam map analysis, high resolution seismic data, time-lapse and video camera tracks, numerous cores and Side Scan Sonar data. The analysis of these data point out numerous evidences of an active and present tectonic activity on the southern part of this domain. The development of very large indurate sea-bottoms on which deep-sea communities frequently occur and where we can observe some [open quotes]sigmoidal[close quotes] features and network of conjugate fractures which suggest the presence of shear deformation zone. In addition, tracks of important and probably deep faults extend across both soft and indurated bottom sediments. The regional morphological anomalies are comparable to analogical deformation model for a thick cover sticking out of its sub-stratum and the tectonic activity is closely associated to the presence of deep dysharmonic levels which control, obviously, an important clay-diapirism. This is an effect of both the structural location of this region, at the junction of three lithospheric plates (Caribbean, Atlantic, and South-American) and paleogeographical and sedimentological changes since Neogene time, with the very important terrigeneous supplies coming from the Orinoco River. Consequently, the main deformations that we observed in this region are rather under influence of shearing and transpressive than compressive movements.

  7. Major and trace element geochemistry and Os isotopic composition of metalliferous umbers from the Late Cretaceous Japanese accretionary complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yasuhiro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2005-07-01

    Metalliferous umbers and red shales occur as unique products of the Kula-Pacific ridge-forearc collision in the Late Cretaceous Shimanto Supergroup, an accretionary complex in Japan. These umbers are closely associated with greenstones of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) origin and are regarded as hydrothermal metalliferous precipitates related to MOR-type volcanism. The umbers and red shales were deposited in the trench area where both terrigenous detritus from land and hydrothermal metalliferous particulates from a MOR were supplied simultaneously. Besides a predominance of Fe and Mn, the umbers exhibit remarkable enrichments in P, V, Co, Ni, Zn, Y, Mo, rare earth elements (REEs), and Os relative to continental crustal abundances. The X/Fe (X = Mn, P, V, Co, Ni, Zn, Y, and REEs) ratios and PAAS-normalized REE patterns of the umbers are very similar to those of modern hydrothermal plume fallout precipitates deposited on flanks of MOR. This indicates that the umbers preserve primary geochemical signatures of hydrothermal metalliferous sediments that scavenged seawater-derived elements and thus can be used as a proxy for Late Cretaceous seawater. The marine 187Os/188Os ratios reconstructed from the late Maastrichtian umbers range from 0.42 to 0.56 and are very consistent with recent data obtained from the Pacific and Atlantic pelagic carbonates that record an abrupt decline from 0.55 to 0.4 during the period between 67.0 Ma and 65.7 Ma.

  8. Accretionary nature of the crust of Central and East Java (Indonesia) revealed by local earthquake travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, Christian; Bohm, Mirjam; Asch, Günter

    2014-12-01

    Reassessment of travel time data from an exceptionally dense, amphibious, temporary seismic network on- and offshore Central and Eastern Java (MERAMEX) confirms the accretionary nature of the crust in this segment of the Sunda subduction zone (109.5-111.5E). Traveltime data of P- and S-waves of 244 local earthquakes were tomographically inverted, following a staggered inversion approach. The resolution of the inversion was inspected by utilizing synthetic recovery tests and analyzing the model resolution matrix. The resulting images show a highly asymmetrical crustal structure. The images can be interpreted to show a continental fragment of presumably Gondwana origin in the coastal area (east of 110E), which has been accreted to the Sundaland margin. An interlaced anomaly of high seismic velocities indicating mafic material can be interpreted to be the mantle part of the continental fragment, or part of obducted oceanic lithosphere. Lower than average crustal velocities of the Java crust are likely to reflect ophiolitic and metamorphic rocks of a subduction melange.

  9. The 50 Ma granodiorite of the eastern Gulf of Alaska - Melting in an accretionary prism in the forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Fred; Farmer, G. L.; Ayuso, R. A.; Plafker, George; Lull, J. S.

    1992-05-01

    The paper addresses the generation of granitic rocks by the melting of flyschoid sediments in an accretionary prism as part of an investigation of 50-Ma silicic igneous rocks in the Gulf of Alaska, near Cordova, Alaska. Three intrusive bodies exhibiting a range of chemical and initial isotopic compositions were chosen: the McKinley Peak, Rude River, and Sheep Bay plutons. The present chemical data, modeling, and comparison with melting experiments of graywacke by Conrad et al. (1988) indicate that the granodiorite originated by large fractions (65-90 percent) of melting of the Orca Group graywacke and argillite. Plagioclase, pyroxene, and biotite were residual to melting at about 850-950 C and at low H2O activities. It is suggested that the distinct chemical and isotopic compositions of the McKinley Peak pluton result from variations in the character of the flysch at depth in the prism, rather than from mixing between melts of the flysch and mafic magmas injected into the prism itself.

  10. The relationship between mud volcanoes, petroleum migration and accretionary prisms: Lessons from the Caucasus, the Australian margin and Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, P.

    1996-08-01

    Mud volcanoes have been widely documented in areas of overpressure where explosive expansion of trapped methane has occurred during argillokinesis. In an area with high sedimentation rate, such as the Gulf of Mexico, there may be no time for fine-grained sediment to de-water before being covered by impermeable material. In an accretionary wedge this process is complicated by overthrusting of off-scraped material which increases the overburden pressure and provides many more avenues for the migration of fluids through the system. In some cases, such as is seen in the Caribbean, the fluids may escape directly to the surface (or seabottom) through high permeability beds. When this happens there may be no diapirism. In other cases, such as in Venezuela, the forearc may be the site of rapid, laterally-derived, sedimentation, and fluids from the overthrusted rocks may be forced to escape through several kilometers of recent deltaic sediments. Since these fluids may include petroleum, this has obvious exploration potential. If there are no suitable reservoir rocks, such as in Timor, there may be no commercial accumulations. However, many giant fields are associated, world-wide, with mud volcanoes, such as those in Azerbaijan.

  11. Accumulation of an earthquake-induced extremely turbid layer in a terminal basin of the Nankai accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashi, Juichiro; Sawada, Ritsuko; Omura, Akiko; Ikehara, Ken

    2014-12-01

    Seismic shaking is a major trigger for sediment redistribution in subduction zones, and clouds of dilute suspended sediment have been reported in association with large earthquakes. Dive observations in a basin on the slope of the central Nankai accretionary prism soon after the 2004 off-Kii Peninsula earthquakes documented a layer of suspended sediment with extremely high turbidity. We estimated the thickness of this bottom turbid layer to be more than 2.5 m by comparison of seafloor depths between surveys in 2004 and 2010 and about 2.6 m from instrumental evidence involving the submersion of a heat-flow probe. A high-resolution subbottom profiling survey across the basin revealed acoustically transparent layers thicker than 2 m. Because the slope basin is a terminal basin completely enclosed by topographic highs, we examined the possibility that the uppermost transparent layer was deposited as a consequence of the 2004 earthquakes. Considering the sediment source area and the volume of the basin fills, the mobilization and redeposition of thin surface sediments on the prism slope can account for the volume of the transparent layer. We conclude that the 2004 earthquakes caused widespread disturbance of the prism slope and concentrated surface sediments in this terminal basin. Our results emphasize the utility of a terminal basin in a subduction zone as an earthquake recorder.

  12. Fluid flow in and around a mud volcano field seaward of the Barbados accretionary wedge: Results from Manon cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Pierre; Le Pichon, Xavier; Lallemant, Siegfried; Lance, Sophie; Martin, Jonathan B.; Foucher, Jean-Paul; Fiala-MéDioni, Aline; Rostek, Frauke; Guilhaumou, Nicole; Pranal, Vincent; Castrec, Maryse

    1996-09-01

    A field of mud diapirs and mud volcanoes situated in the Barbados trench at 13°50'N and extending along an old oceanic fracture zone (Mercurus) was investigated during the Manon cruise using both surface ship and Nautile submersible sampling and measurements. The entire zone from 13°50'N up to 14°20'N has an anomalously high heat flow which implies that fluids are drained into it from a segment of the accretionary wedge a few hundred kilometers wide. Two structures interpreted as diatremes, Atalante and Cyclops, expell large amounts of water and methane. We propose that they were formed from the release of a light fluid when gas hydrates were dissociated in the sediment as the result of the circulation of warm fluid in the area. However they expell only a small fraction of the incoming fluid, implying that disperse flow is the dominant mode of expulsion in this area. The chemoautotrophic communities on the surface of the structures rely mostly on sulfides. Submersible observations, temperature measurements in the sediment, and the chemistry of the pore fluid indicate that convection of seawater occurs within the first few meters of sediment through high-permeability channels, such as cemented carbonate conduits. We propose that this convection is driven by the density difference between the pore fluid and seawater, but fresh water released by the dissolution of shallow hydrates may also contribute. This shallow convection may be a frequent process in cold seep environments.

  13. Resonant seismic and microseismic ground motion of the Cascadia subduction zone accretionary prism and implications for seismic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Earl E.; Heesemann, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Seafloor pressure and seismic observations have been made along a transect of sites off southwestern Canada using connections to the NEPTUNE Canada cabled network beginning in the fall of 2009. A comparison of the vertical ground motion response to oceanographic and seismic loading at a site on the outer Cascadia subduction zone accretionary prism to that at a site on the adjacent Juan de Fuca Plate shows generally stronger ground motion at the prism site across the full bandwidths of infragravity waves and microseisms and a strong sharp peak in the relative response at a period of 9 s. This peak is seen in the response to loading by local storm waves and dispersive swell sequences, as well as in the average response to storm- and swell-generated pressure fluctuations averaged over long periods of time. Tuned response to teleseismic surface waves is also seen at the same frequency. We infer that this behavior results from quarter-wavelength harmonic resonance of the prism, with the two-way travel time of compressional waves between the seafloor and underlying igneous crust being one half the resonance period. The consistency of the anomalous spectral peak from year to year at this particular site suggests that the behavior might be used to track small (≈1%) changes in the vertical seismic velocity of the prism if variations related to strain or pore fluid pressure changes through a subduction thrust earthquake cycle were to occur.

  14. Controls on accretion of flysch and melange belts at convergent margins: evidence from the Chugach Bay thrust and Iceworm melange, Chugach accretionary wedge, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kusky, T.M.; Bradley, D.C.; Haeussler, P.J.; Karl, S.

    1997-01-01

    Controls on accretion of flysch and melange terranes at convergent margins are poorly understood. Southern Alaska's Chugach terrane forms the outboard accretionary margin of the Wrangellia composite terrane, and consists of two major lithotectonic units, including Triassic-Cretaceous melange of the McHugh Complex and Late Cretaceous flysch of the Valdez Group. The contact between the McHugh Complex and the Valdez Group on the Kenai Peninsula is a tectonic boundary between chaotically deformed melange of argillite, chert, greenstone, and graywacke of the McHugh Complex and a less chaotically deformed melange of argillite and graywacke of the Valdez Group. We assign the latter to a new, informal unit of formational rank, the Iceworm melange, and interpret it as a contractional fault zone (Chugach Bay thrust) along which the Valdez Group was emplaced beneath the McHugh Complex. The McHugh Complex had already been deformed and metamorphosed to prehnite-pumpellyite facies prior to formation of the Iceworm melange. The Chugach Bay thrust formed between 75 and 55 Ma, as shown by Campanian-Maastrichtian depositional ages of the Valdez Group, and fault-related fabrics in the Iceworm melange that are cut by Paleocene dikes. Motion along the Chugach Bay thrust thus followed Middle to Late Cretaceous collision (circa 90-100 Ma) of the Wrangellia composite terrane with North America. Collision related uplift and erosion of mountains in British Columbia formed a submarine fan on the Farallon plate, and we suggest that attempted subduction of this fan dramatically changed the subduction/accretion style within the Chugach accretionary wedge. We propose a model in which subduction of thinly sedimented plates concentrates shear strains in a narrow zone, generating melanges like the McHugh in accretionary complexes. Subduction of thickly sedimented plates allows wider distribution of shear strains to accommodate plate convergence, generating a more coherent accretionary style

  15. Accretionary Complexes: Recorders of Plate Tectonism and Environmental Conditions Through Time on Earth and Possibly Those Early Noachian (Hadean-equivalent) in Age on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Miyamoto, H.; Viviano-Beck, C. E.; Anderson, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    On Earth, highlighted in Japan, North America, Europe, and Greenland, accretionary complexes comprehensively record information compiled while the oceanic crust is en route from the mid-oceanic ridge to the subduction zone, spanning hundreds of millions of years. At the zone, oceanic crustal materials are stacked along thrust faults and/or subducted to be eventually recycled into the mantle. The surviving accretionary-complex materials include Ocean Plate Stratigraphy (OPS). The ideal succession of the OPS (from oldest to youngest) is mid-ocean ridge basalt, pelagic sediment including radiolarian chert, hemipelagic sediment including siliceous shale, and trench turbidite deposits. Therefore, accretionary complexes often record diverse environmental conditions from deep- to shallow-marine environments, including those perturbed by magmatic, impact, and possibly extrasolar events. Stratigraphic, impact-crater, paleotectonic, and magnetic-anomaly information point to Early Noachian (Hadean-equivalent) Martian geologic terrains; they are extremely ancient environmental records compared to those destroyed on Earth due to differences in planetary mass and evolutional states. Such record a dynamic phase of the evolution of Mars, including interacting ocean, landmass, and atmosphere, as well as possible plate tectonism during an operating dynamo. A candidate accretionary complex and nearby outcrops of steeply dipping beds comprising olistostrome-like blocks, nearby and in the Claritas rise, respectively, may be key evidence of major crustal shortening related to plate tectonism, in addition to being extremely ancient environmental records. Claritas rise is a rugged promontory about 250 km across, which forms the northwest part of an extremely ancient and large mountain range, Thaumasia highlands, with a length nearing 2,400 km, or approximating that of the Himalayas. Future investigation of the ancient Martian basement, which includes geochemical analyses for possible OPS

  16. Tectonostratigraphy and provenance of an accretionary complex within the Yarlung-Zangpo suture zone, southern Tibet: Insights into subduction-accretion processes in the Neo-Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Fulong; Ding, Lin; Leary, Ryan J.; Wang, Houqi; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Liyun; Yue, Yahui

    2012-10-01

    Accretionary complexes record critical information about the history of subduction and accretion along the southern margin of Asia prior to the India-Asia collision. This paper presents detailed field mapping, petrographic and detrital zircon U-Pb data from an accretionary complex within the Yalung-Zangpo suture zone, southern Tibet. From structurally higher to lower levels, the accretionary complex consists of a serpentinite mélange, the chert-matrix Tangga mélange, the mud-matrix Pomunong mélange, and the coherent Rongmawa Formation. The Tangga mélange consists of Late Triassic-Early Cretaceous abyssal chert and siliceous shale with blocks of chert and mafic to ultra-mafic rocks. The Tangga mélange was accreted beneath ophiolitic rocks during the Aptian. The Pomunong mélange consists of a Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous hemipelagic siliceous shale and chert matrix with blocks from Early Permian seamounts and from Late Cretaceous trench-fill sandstones; it was accreted beneath the Tangga mélange after the Aptian but prior to 71 Ma. Structurally beneath these mélanges to the south, the uppermost Cretaceous Rongmawa Formation consists of turbiditic sandstone, pelagic chert, and siliceous shale and records a transition in depositional setting from lower abyssal plain to upper trench. Detrital zircons from sandstone blocks of the Pomunong mélange and the coherent Rongmawa Formation display similar U-Pb age spectra and are dominated by peaks at 71-231 Ma, 481-693 Ma, and 701-1372 Ma. These age peaks overlap with igneous crystallization ages and detrital zircon ages from sedimentary strata in the Lhasa terrane. Our data indicate that the serpentinite mélange, Tangga mélange, Pomunong mélange and Rongmawa Formation comprise a southward-younging accretionary complex that developed during the northward subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere beneath the south margin of the Lhasa terrane and that all exposed ophiolitic and accretionary complex assemblages

  17. The development of folds and cleavages in slate belts by underplating in accretionary complexes: A comparison of the Kodiak Formation, Alaska and the Calaveras Complex, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Scott R.; Sample, James C.

    1988-08-01

    The development of folds and cleavages in slate and graywacke belts is commonly attributed to arc-continent or continent-continent collisions. However, the Kodiak Formation of southern Alaska and the Calaveras Complex of the western Sierra Nevada, California, are two slate and graywacke belts in which folds and slaty cleavages developed during simple underthrusting and underplating within accretionary wedges. The Maastrichtian Kodiak Formation is composed dominantly of coherent turbidites but includes lesser pebbly mudstone, minor conglomerate, and rare chert. The Kodiak Formation is part of a large accretionary complex that youngs in age seaward, but bedding tops generally show landward younging. A progression of structures has been determined by crosscutting relationships and includes (1) syndeformational depositional features; (2) broken formation; (3) slaty cleavage, folds, and thrust faults; (4) crenulations and crenulation cleavage; (5) late brittle thrust faults; and (6) right-lateral strike-slip faults. Broken formation, slaty cleavage, thrust faults, and folds developed during underthrusting and underplating within an accretionary wedge. Crenulations and brittle thrust faults are related to subsequent intrawedge shortening. Based on peak metamorphism in the uppermost zeolite to prehnite-pumpellyite facies, underplating occurred at a minimum depth of 10 km. The Calaveras Complex is composed of argillite, chert, graywacke, pebbly mudstone, limestone, and volcanic rocks. Its age of deposition has a maximum range from Permian to Early Jurassic. Overall, the unit appears to young westward, but local facing indicators show eastward younging of individual blocks. The sequence of structures developed in the Calaveras Complex is (1) syn-depositional olistostromes; (2) broken formation; (3) slaty cleavage, folds, and thrust faults; and (4) younger Jura-Triassic folds and crenulation cleavages. Broken formation and slaty cleavage developed during underthrusting and

  18. Geochemical features of metabasic rocks from an Early to Middle Jurassic Accretionary Complex (Refahiye metamorphics, Eastern Pontides, NE Turkey): Implications for Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous magmatic lull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göçmengil, G.; Topuz, G.; Çelik, Ö. F.; Altıntaş, Ä.°. E.; Özkan, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Refahiye metamorphics (Eastern Pontides, NE Turkey) represent a metamorphosed accretionary complex of Early to Middle Jurassic age and occur as an interleave between coeval ophiolite. This Early to Middle Jurassic metamorphics and ophiolites are bound by a Permo-Triassic accretionary complex in the north and a Late Cretaceous accretionary complex in the south. The Refahiye metamorphics are made up of greenschist, marble, serpentine, phyllite and subordinately amphibolite, micaschist, eclogite and metachert knockers. The Jurassic and Late Cretaceous accretionary complexes in Eastern Mediterranean are related to the consumption of a Mesozoic ocean, the so-called Neo-Tethys. Regional geology in the Eastern Pontides indicate that the Early to Middle Jurassic and Late Cretaceous times correspond to volumious igneous activity, while Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time to an igneous lull. Here we present whole-rock geochemical data on metabasic rocks from the Refahiye accretionary complex, and discuss these data in terms of accreted material and its implications for the Jurassic evolution of the Eastern Pontides. All the metabasic rocks are well recrystallized, free of any relict texture and are variably hydrated (LOI ~ 1.3-5.1 wt%). Some samples are characterized by the unusually high-Al2O3 contents (up to 20.8 wt%) suggestive of derivation from high-Al basalts. Geochemically three distinct metabasic group are distinguished, on the basis of fluid immobile HFSEs and REEs. Group I is characterized by moderately to strongly fractionated REE patterns [(La/Yb)cn ~8-18], absence of any Nb-Ta anomaly in multi element variation diagrams and high Ti and low Zr/Nb ratios (3.68-5.72), corresponding to unorogenic alkaline basalts (ocean island basalt). Group II characterized by moderately fractionated REE ratios [(La/Yb)cn ~0.6-2.6], absence of any Nb-Ta anomaly, resembling unorogenic tholeiitic basalts (E and N-MORB). Group III on the other hand, displays unfractionated

  19. Structural controls on the development of submarine channel/fan systems since the Pleistocene in the accretionary wedge off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Kang-Nien; Tien-Shun Lin, Andrew; Lin, Che-Chuan; Liu, Char-Shine; Wang, Yunshuen

    2016-04-01

    The accretionary wedge off SW Taiwan is the result of incipient arc-continent collision between the Luzon volcanic arc and the northern rifted margin of the South China Sea (SCS). Dynamic interactions of thrusting, folding and a rigorous sediment supply from the Taiwan mountain belts have resulted in two arrays of canyons/channels and slope-fan systems in the accretionary wedge. The Penghu canyon/fan system lies in the lower wedge and near the northern rifted margin of the SCS. The Penghu canyon is a river-fed canyon and receives sediments from southern Taiwan and SE China during eustatic lowstands. It becomes detached from river inputs during eustatic highstands as it is in the present-day. The Gaoping canyon/fan system in the south traverses both the upper slope and lower slope domains of the accretionary wedge. This system is a river-fed system during a full eustatic cycle and it drains sediments from the onshore Gaoping River. We interpreted multiple grids of multichannel seismic reflection data of MCS994, MCS1000-6, MCS1014, MCS1046 collected onboard Ocean Research I during 2012 April to 2013 August to map out thrust/fold structures and channel/fan systems in the study area. Seismic facies analyses were performed on seismic sections and key stratal surfaces of base of Pliocene and base of Pleistocene are correlated from boreholes drilled in the shelf of the northern SCS margin. Our results show that the upper Gaoping Canyon has been confined by structural ridges with limited switching of canyon courses, whereas the lower Gaoping canyon/fan system has been developed on lower slope with channel/levee deposition in multiple slope fans since early Pleistocene. Pleistocene lateral aggrading channel-and-levee systems are especially evident near the modern canyon course in the lower slope. The Penghu can/fan system in the lower accretionary wedge is also evident by seismic facies showing channel cut-and-fill, channel abandonment and channel-and-levee systems. This

  20. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  1. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  2. Characterization of metals released from coal fly ash during dredging at the Kingston ash recovery project.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Averett, D E; Seiter, J M; Lafferty, B; Jones, W T; Hayes, C A; Chappell, M A; Clarke, J U; Steevens, J A

    2013-09-01

    A storage-pond dike failure occurred on December 22, 2008 at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant resulting in the release of over 4million cubic meters (5million cubic yards) of fly ash. Approximately half of the released ash was deposited in the main channel of the Emory River, Tennessee, USA. Remediation efforts of the Emory River focused on hydraulic dredging, as well as mechanical excavation in targeted areas. However, agitation of the submerged fly ash during hydraulic dredging introduces river water into the fly ash material, which could promote dissolution and desorption of metals from the solid fly ash material. Furthermore, aeration of the dredge slurry could alter the redox state of metals in the fly ash material and thereby change their sorption, mobility, and toxicity properties. The research presented here focuses on the concentrations and speciation of metals during the fly ash recovery from the Emory River. Our results indicate that arsenite [As(III)] released from the fly ash material during dredging was slowly oxidized to arsenate [As(V)] in the slurry recovery system with subsequent removal through precipitation or sorption reactions with suspended fly ash material. Concentrations of other dissolved metals, including iron and manganese, also generally decreased in the ash recovery system prior to water discharge back to the river. PMID:23706374

  3. Leaching characteristics of lead from melting furnace fly ash generated by melting of incineration fly ash.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Tomikawa, Hiroki

    2012-11-15

    This study investigated the effect of the chemical composition of incineration fly ash on the leaching characteristics of Pb from melting furnace fly ash generated by melting incineration fly ash. Melting furnace fly ash from both a real-scale melting process and lab-scale melting experiments was analyzed. In addition, the theoretical behavior of Cl that affects the leaching characteristics of Pb was simulated by a thermodynamic equilibrium calculation. Proportions of water-soluble Pb in the melting furnace fly ash were correlated with equivalent ratios of total Pb in the ash and Cl transferred to gas. The amount of Cl in the gas increased with an increase in the molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in the incineration fly ash. The thermodynamic calculation predicted that HCl generation is promoted by the increase in the molar ratio, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated a possible presence of PbCl(2) in the melting furnace fly ash. These results implied that the formation of water-soluble PbCl(2) with HCl was affected by the relationships among the amounts of Na, K, and Cl in the incineration fly ash. This is highly significant in determining the leaching characteristics of Pb from the melting furnace fly ash. PMID:22789656

  4. Volcanic ash layer depth: Processes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacre, H. F.; Grant, A. L. M.; Harvey, N. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Webster, H. N.; Marenco, F.

    2015-01-01

    The long duration of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption provided a unique opportunity to measure a widely dispersed volcanic ash cloud. Layers of volcanic ash were observed by the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network with a mean depth of 1.2 km and standard deviation of 0.9 km. In this paper we evaluate the ability of the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) to simulate the observed ash layers and examine the processes controlling their depth. NAME simulates distal ash layer depths exceptionally well with a mean depth of 1.2 km and standard deviation of 0.7 km. The dominant process determining the depth of ash layers over Europe is the balance between the vertical wind shear (which acts to reduce the depth of the ash layers) and vertical turbulent mixing (which acts to deepen the layers). Interestingly, differential sedimentation of ash particles and the volcano vertical emission profile play relatively minor roles.

  5. Kohonen's feature maps for fly ash categorization.

    PubMed

    Nataraja, M C; Jayaram, M A; Ravikumar, C N

    2006-12-01

    Fly ash is a common admixture used in concrete and may constitute up to 50% by weight of the total binder material. Incorporation of fly ash in Portland-cement concrete is highly desirable due to technological, economic, and environmental benefits. This article demonstrates the use of artificial intelligence neural networks for the classification of fly ashes in to different groups. Kohonen's Self Organizing Feature Maps is used for the purpose. As chemical composition of fly ash is crucial in the performance of concrete, eight chemical attributes of fly ashes have been considered. The application of simple Kohonen's one-dimensional feature maps permitted to differentiate three main groups of fly ashes. Three one-dimensional feature maps of topology 8-16, 8-24 and 8-32 were explored. The overall classification result of 8-16 topology was found to be significant and encouraging. The data pertaining to 80 fly ash samples were collected from standard published works. The categorization was found to be excellent and compares well with Canadian Standard Association's [CSA A 3000] classification scheme. PMID:17285691

  6. Erodibility of fly ash-treated minesoils

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.M.; Sencindiver, J.C.; Singh, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    Fly ash, a by-product of coal-fired power plants, has been used successfully in reclaiming adverse mine sites such as abandoned mine lands by improving minesoil chemical and physical properties. But, the fine sand-silt particle size of fly ash may make it more susceptible to detachment and transport by erosive processes. Furthermore, the high content of silt-size particles in fly ash may make it more susceptable to surface crust formation resulting in reduced infiltration and increased surface runoff and erosion. In the summer of 1989, fly ash/wood waste mixtures were surface applied on two separate mine sites, one with 10% slope and the other 20% slope, in central Preston County, West Virginia. Erosion rates were measured directly using the Linear Erosion/Elevation Measuring Instrument (LEMI). Erosion measurements were taken during the first two growing seasons on both sites. Erosion values were up to five times greater on the fly ash-treated minesoil than on the minesoil without fly ash cover. Mulching with wood chips reduced fly ash erosion to about one-half the loss of the unmulched plots. Erosion was related to both the amount and type of ground cover. Increased vegetative ground cover resulted in reduced erosion. Mosses and fungi appeared to provide better erosion protection than grass-legume cover.

  7. A review of volcanic ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. J.; Bonadonna, C.; Durant, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Most volcanic ash particles with diameters <63 μm settle from eruption clouds as particle aggregates that cumulatively have larger sizes, lower densities, and higher terminal fall velocities than individual constituent particles. Particle aggregation reduces the atmospheric residence time of fine ash, which results in a proportional increase in fine ash fallout within 10-100 s km from the volcano and a reduction in airborne fine ash mass concentrations 1000 s km from the volcano. Aggregate characteristics vary with distance from the volcano: proximal aggregates are typically larger (up to cm size) with concentric structures, while distal aggregates are typically smaller (sub-millimetre size). Particles comprising ash aggregates are bound through hydro-bonds (liquid and ice water) and electrostatic forces, and the rate of particle aggregation correlates with cloud liquid water availability. Eruption source parameters (including initial particle size distribution, erupted mass, eruption column height, cloud water content and temperature) and the eruption plume temperature lapse rate, coupled with the environmental parameters, determines the type and spatiotemporal distribution of aggregates. Field studies, lab experiments and modelling investigations have already provided important insights on the process of particle aggregation. However, new integrated observations that combine remote sensing studies of ash clouds with field measurement and sampling, and lab experiments are required to fill current gaps in knowledge surrounding the theory of ash aggregate formation.

  8. Marine mesocosm bacterial colonisation of volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Verena; Cimarelli, Corrado; Ayris, Paul; Kueppers, Ulrich; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald; Woerheide, Gert

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, wind-delivered volcanic ash may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation remain unknown. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. The effect of substrate properties on bacterial colonisation was tested by exposing five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash (Sakurajima, Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size, in controlled marine coral reef aquaria under low light conditions for six months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis of Similarity supported significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community with the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community composition during colonisation of volcanic ash in a coral reef-like environment is controlled by the

  9. Ash iron mobilization in volcanic eruption plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshyaripour, G.; Hort, M.; Langmann, B.

    2014-12-01

    It has been shown that volcanic ash fertilizes the Fe-limited areas of the surface ocean through releasing soluble iron. As ash iron is mostly insoluble upon the eruption, it is hypothesized that heterogeneous in-plume and in-cloud processing of the ash promote the iron solubilization. Direct evidences concerning such processes are, however, lacking. In this study, a 1-D numerical model is developed to simulate the physicochemical interactions of gas-ash-aerosol in volcanic eruption plumes focusing on the iron mobilization processes at temperatures between 600 and 0 °C. Results show that sulfuric acid and water vapor condense at ~150 and ~50 °C on the ash surface, respectively. This liquid phase then efficiently scavenges the surrounding gases (>95% of HCl, 3-20% of SO2 and 12-62% of HF) forming an extremely acidic coating at the ash surface. The low pH conditions of the aqueous film promote acid-mediated dissolution of the Fe-bearing phases present in the ash material. We estimate that 0.1 to 33% of the total iron available at the ash surface is dissolved in the aqueous phase before the freezing point is reached. The efficiency of dissolution is controlled by the halogen content of the erupted gas as well as the mineralogy of the iron at ash surface: elevated halogen concentrations and presence of Fe2+-carrying phases lead to the highest dissolution efficiency. Findings of this study are in agreement with the data obtained through leaching experiments.

  10. Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servranckx, R.; Stunder, B.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDM) have been used operationally since the mid 1990's by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) designated Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) to provide ash forecast guidance. Over the years, significant improvements in the detection and prediction of airborne volcanic ash have been realized thanks to improved models, increases in computing power, 24-hr real time monitoring by VAACs / Meteorological Watch Offices and close coordination with Volcano Observatories around the world. Yet, predicting accurately the spatial and temporal structures of airborne volcanic ash and the deposition at the earth's surface remains a difficult and challenging problem. The forecasting problem is influenced by 3 main components. The first one (ERUPTION SOURCE PARAMETERS) comprises all non-meteorological parameters that characterize a specific eruption or volcanic ash cloud. For example, the volume / mass of ash released in the atmosphere, the duration of the eruption, the altitude and distribution of the ash cloud, the particle size distribution, etc. The second component (METEOROLOGY) includes all meteorological parameters (wind, moisture, stability, etc.) that are calculated by Numerical Weather Prediction models and that serve as input to the VATDM. The third component (TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION) combines input from the other 2 components through the use of VATDM to transport and disperse airborne volcanic ash in the atmosphere as well as depositing it at the surface though various removal mechanisms. Any weakness in one of the components may adversely affect the accuracy of the forecast. In a real-time, operational response context such as exists at the VAACs, the rapid delivery of the modeling results puts some constraints on model resolution and computing time. Efforts are ongoing to evaluate the reliability of VATDM forecasts though the use of various methods, including ensemble techniques. Remote sensing data

  11. Rocky Flats ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)

    SciTech Connect

    Winstead, M.L.

    1995-09-14

    Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. This test will also gain information on the effects of the glovebox atmosphere (moisture) on the stabilized material. This document provides instructions for testing Rocky Flats Ash in the HC-21C muffle furnace process.

  12. Electrodialytic removal of Cd from biomass combustion fly ash suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Damoe, Anne J; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2013-04-15

    Due to relatively high concentrations of Cd, biomass combustion fly ashes often fail to meet Danish legislative requirements for recycling as fertilizer. In this study, the potential of using electrodialytic remediation for removal of Cd from four different biomass combustion fly ashes was investigated with the aim of enabling reuse of the ashes. The ashes originated from combustion of straw (two ashes), wood chips, and co-firing of wood pellets and fuel oil, respectively. A series of laboratory scale electrodialytic remediation experiments were conducted with each ash. The initial Cd concentration in the ashes varied between 8.8 mg Cd/kg (co-firing ash) and 64 mg Cd/kg (pre-washed straw ash), and pH varied from 3.7 (co-firing ash) to 13.3 (wood ash). In spite of such large variations between the ashes, the electrodialytic method showed to be sufficiently robust to treat the ashes so the final Cd concentration was below 2.0mg Cd/kg DM in at least one experiment done with each ash. This was obtained within 2 weeks of remediation and at liquid to solid (L/S) ratios of L/S 16 for the pre-washed straw ash and L/S 8 for the straw, co-firing and wood ash. PMID:23454460

  13. Fly Ash Disposal in Ash Ponds: A Threat to Ground Water Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Gupta, N. C.; Guha, B. K.

    2016-07-01

    Ground water contamination due to deposition of fly ash in ash ponds was assessed by simulating the disposal site conditions using batch leaching test with fly ash samples from three thermal power plants. The periodic analysis of leachates was performed for selected elements, Fe, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb and Cd in three different extraction solutions to determine the maximum amount that can be leached from fly ash. It was observed that at low pH value, maximum metals are released from the surface of the ash into leachate. The average concentration of these elements found in ground water samples from the nearby area of ash ponds shows that almost all the metals except `Cr' are crossing the prescribed limits of drinking water. The concentration of these elements at this level can endanger public health and environment.

  14. System for the pulsed pneumatic transport of ash from ash-collector bins

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Chernyshev; S.N. Kochurov; V.A. Il'in; V.V. Ermakov

    2007-07-15

    Results of investigations of the dependence of the percentage of voids on the shear force of a layer of ash, on the basis of which the design principle of the subassembly for the feed of ash to a transport pipeline is developed, are examined for optimization of ash flows in a pulsed regime. The schematic of a system of pulsed pneumatic transport of ash from the bins of ash collectors, and results of measurements during experimental operation of the system, as well as relationships for the calculation of its dynamic parameters are presented. Conclusions concerning the high reliability of the removal and pneumatic transport of ash over a distance of more than 80 m with minimal air consumption are drawn on the basis of results of the experimental operation.

  15. A lithium isotopic study of sub-greenschist to greenschist facies metamorphism in an accretionary prism, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lin; Rudnick, Roberta L.; Ague, Jay J.; McDonough, William F.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of Li during low-grade metamorphism and fluid flux in an accretionary prism we measured the Li concentrations ([Li]) and isotopic compositions (δ7Li) of sub-greenschist and greenschist-facies Otago Schist composites, as well as cross-cutting quartz veins, which are interpreted to have precipitated from slab-derived fluids. The average [Li] of sub-greenschist facies composites (41 ± 13 μg/g, 2σ) is statistically distinct (97% confidence level, student t test) to that of greenschist facies composites (34 ± 9 μg/g, 2σ), which have experienced mass addition of silica in the form of quartz veins having [Li] between 0.4-2.3 μg/g. A linear regression of the correlation between [Li] and calculated mass additions suggests that the depletion of [Li] in greenschist facies composites is due to both dilution from the addition of the quartz veins, as well as metamorphic dehydration. The [Li] of both groups of composites correlates with their CIA (Chemical Index of Alteration) values (50-58), which are low, consistent with the inferred graywacke protolith of the Otago Schist. The δ7Li of sub-greenschist and greenschist facies composites are remarkably constant, with an average δ7Li of 0.2 ± 1.7 (2σ) and -0.5 ± 1.9 (2σ), respectively, and comparable to that of the average upper continental crust. Thus, metamorphism has had no discernable effect on δ7Li in these samples. The Li isotopic signature of the schists is similar to that seen in pelitic sedimentary rocks and likely reflects the δ7Li of the protoliths. The surprisingly light δ7Li of the quartz veins (-2.8 to -1.4) likely records kinetic fractionation associated with Li ingress into the veins from surrounding wallrock. An isotopic equilibrium fluid flow model indicates that: 1) if the [Li] of slab-derived fluids is less than a few μg/g, the δ7Li of the overlying lithologies (i.e., the schists) is not significantly influenced by the fluid flux, regardless of the δ7Li of the

  16. Causes and consequences of the great strength variability among soft Nankai accretionary prism sediments from offshore SW-Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipp, Michael; Schumann, Kai; Leiss, Bernd; Ullemeyer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    The Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is the very first attempt to drill into the seismogenic part of a subduction zone. Offshore SW-Japan the oceanic Philippine sea plate is subducted beneath the continental Eurasian plate causing earthquakes of magnitude 8.0 to 8.5 and related tsunamis with a recurrence rate of 80-100 years. For the tsunamigenic potential of the forearc slope and accreted sediments their mechanical strength, composition and fabrics have been investigated. 19 drill core samples of IODP Expeditions 315, 316 and 333 were experimentally deformed in a triaxial cell under consolidated and undrained conditions at confining pressures of 400-1000 kPa, room temperature, axial shortening rates of 0.01-9.0 mm/min, and up to an axial strain of ˜64% (Stipp et al., 2013). With respect to the mechanical behavior, two distinct sample groups could be distinguished. Weak samples from the upper and middle forearc slope of the accretionary prism show a deviatoric peak stress after only a few percent strain (< 10%) and a continuous stress decrease after a maximum combined with a continuous increase in pore pressure. Strong samples from the accretionary prism toe display a constant residual stress at maximum level or even a continuous stress increase together with a decrease in pore pressure towards high strain (Stipp et al., 2013). Synchrotron texture and composition analysis of the experimentally deformed and undeformed samples using the Rietveld refinement program MAUD indicates an increasing strength of the illite and kaolinite textures with increasing depth down to 523 m below sea floor corresponding to a preferred mineral alignment due to compaction. Experimentally deformed samples have generally stronger textures than related undeformed core samples and they show also increasing strength of the illite and kaolinite textures with increasing axial strain. Mechanically weak samples have a bulk clay plus

  17. Seismic structure of the southern Cascadia subduction zone and accretionary prism north of the Mendocino triple junction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gulick, S.P.S.; Meltzer, A.M.; Clarke, S.H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Four multichannel-seismic reflection profiles, collected as part of the Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment, image the toe of the southern Cascadia accretionary prism. Today, 250-600 m of sediment is subducting with the Gorda plate, and 1500-3200 m is accreting to the northern California margin. Faults imaged west and east of the deformation front show mixed structural vergence. A north-south trending, 20 km long portion of the central margin is landward vergent for the outer 6-8 km of the toe of the prism. This region of landward vergence exhibits no frontal thrust, is unusually steep and narrow, and is likely caused by a seaward-dipping backstop close to the deformation front. The lack of margin-wide preferred seaward vergence and wedge-taper analysis suggests the prism has low basal shear stress. The three southern lines image wedge-shaped fragments of oceanic crust 1.1-7.3 km in width and 250-700 m thick near the deformation front. These wedges suggest shortening and thickening of the upper oceanic crust. Discontinuities in the seafloor west of the prism provide evidence for mass wasting in the form of slump blocks and debris fans. The southernmost profile extends 75 km west of the prism imaging numerous faults that offset both the Gorda basin oceanic crust and overlying sediments. These high-angle faults, bounding basement highs, are interpreted as strike-slip faults reactivating structures originally formed at the spreading ridge. Northeast or northwest trending strike-slip faults within the basin are consistent with published focal mechanism solutions and are likely caused by north-south Gorda-Pacific plate convergence. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Recognition and implication for two stage layer-parallel faults in accretionary prisms onland and under the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michiguchi, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    2006-12-01

    The Nishizaki Formation of the Miura Group in the southernmost Boso Peninsula, southeast of Tokyo, close to the only trench-trench-trench (TTT)-type triple junction, is thought to be an accretionary prism from the late Miocene to early Pliocene, having many initial deformation structures without strong metamorphism. Layer- parallel faults composed of black seams of a few mm thick in the upper alternating beds of sandstone and siltstone are developed ubiquitously in the Nishizaki Formation, crosscutting late faults of both normal and thrust senses, suggesting to form before lithification. By SEM and thin section observation the black seam is characterized not by grain-crushing but by rearrangement of mica-clay minerals. In additon, the mica-clay minerals array at least 2 directions. Such features are similar to the black seam was commonly observed in the samples from the Nankai Trough prism collected by Sinkai 6500 of JAMSTEC. XRD analysis indicates the mica-clay minerals in black seams for both the Nishizaki and Nankai are composed of smectite and illite. Some black seams occurred parallel to bedding plane immediately after sedimentation, because they are cut by vein structure and the grains on the boundary flow ductility, probably during submarine sliding. This kind of faults is transitional to either normal or thrust faults laterally, most probably similar to the based slip plane of land sliding. However, there are at least two stages layer-parallel faults. One is submarine sliding stage before accretion, that is gravitation, another is thrust fault stage during accretion, that is tectonic.

  19. Seismic structure of the southern Cascadia subduction zone and accretionary prism north of the Mendocino triple junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Sean P. S.; Meltzer, Anne M.; Clarke, Samuel H., Jr.

    1998-11-01

    Four multichannel-seismic reflection profiles, collected as part of the Mendocino triple junction seismic experiment, image the toe of the southern Cascadia accretionary prism. Today, 250-600 m of sediment is subducting with the Gorda plate, and 1500-3200 m is accreting to the northern California margin. Faults imaged west and east of the deformation front show mixed structural vergence. A north-south trending, 20 km long portion of the central margin is landward vergent for the outer 6-8 km of the toe of the prism. This region of landward vergence exhibits no frontal thrust, is unusually steep and narrow, and is likely caused by a seaward-dipping backstop close to the deformation front. The lack of margin-wide preferred seaward vergence and wedge-taper analysis suggests the prism has low basal shear stress. The three southern lines image wedge-shaped fragments of oceanic crust 1.1-7.3 km in width and 250-700 m thick near the deformation front. These wedges suggest shortening and thickening of the upper oceanic crust. Discontinuities in the seafloor west of the prism provide evidence for mass wasting in the form of slump blocks and debris fans. The southernmost profile extends 75 km west of the prism imaging numerous faults that offset both the Gorda basin oceanic crust and overlying sediments. These high-angle faults, bounding basement highs, are interpreted as strike-slip faults reactivating structures originally formed at the spreading ridge. Northeast or northwest trending strike-slip faults within the basin are consistent with published focal mechanism solutions and are likely caused by north-south Gorda-Pacific plate convergence.

  20. Intrinsic versus extrinsic variability of analogue sand-box experiments - Insights from statistical analysis of repeated accretionary sand wedge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santimano, Tasca; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2015-06-01

    Analogue models are not perfectly reproducible even under controlled boundary conditions which make their interpretation and application not always straight forward. As any scientific experiment they include some random component which can be influenced both by intrinsic (inherent processes) and extrinsic (boundary conditions, material properties) sources. In order to help in the assessment of analogue model results, we discriminate and quantify the intrinsic versus extrinsic variability of results from "sandbox" models of accretionary wedges that were repeated in a controlled environment. The extrinsic source of variability, i.e. the parameter varied is the nature of the décollement (material, friction and thickness). Experiment observables include geometric properties of the faults (lifetime, spacing, dip) as well as wedge geometry (height, slope, length). For each variable we calculated the coefficient of variance (CV) and quantified the variability as a symmetric distribution (Normal, Laplacian) or asymmetric distribution (Gamma) using a Chi squared test (χ2). Observables like fault dip/back thrust dip (CV = 0.6-0.7/0.2-0.6) are less variable and decrease in magnitude with decreasing basal friction. Variables that are time dependent like fault lifetime (CV = 0.19-0.56) and fault spacing (CV = 0.12 - 0.36) have a higher CV consequently affecting the variability of wedge slope (CV = 0.12-0.33). These observables also increase in magnitude with increasing basal friction. As the mechanical complexity of the evolving wedge increases over time so does the CV and asymmetry of the distribution. In addition, we confirm the repeatability of experiments using an ANOVA test. Through the statistical analysis of results from repeated experiments we present a tool to quantify variability and an alternative method to gaining better insights into the dynamic mechanics of deformation in analogue sand wedges.

  1. Local Seismicity Recorded by ChilePEPPER: Implications for Dynamic Accretionary Prism Response and Long-term Prism Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moor, A.; Trehu, A. M.; Tryon, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the dynamic response of the outer accretionary wedge updip from the patch of greatest slip during the Mw8.8 2010 Maule earthquake, 10 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) were deployed from May 2012 to March 2013 in a small array with an inter-instrument spacing of ~12 km . Nine instruments were recovered, with 4 recording data on 3 intermediate-band 3-component seismometers and a differential pressure gauge and 5 recording data from absolute pressure gauges. [note: All instruments were also equipped with a fluid flow meter sensitive to flow rates as low as 0.0001 cm/yr in or out of the sediments. However, no flow signal was detected.] Here we present hypocenters for 569 local events that have S-P times less than 17 seconds (i.e. within ~125 km of the array) using hand-picked arrival times and a 1D velocity model derived from a 2D seismic refraction profile through the region (Moscoso et al 2011, EPSL). We analyze the distribution of seismicity in the context of published slip models, ChilePEPPER high-resolution seismic reflection data, critical taper analysis done by Cubas et al 2013 (EPSL), and offshore gravity data. The data show distinct segmentation within the outer prism. The northern section of the study area is characterized by a lack of seismicity, accretion of nearly all incoming sediment and a prism at critical taper. In contrast, abundant seismicity, significant sediment underthrusting at the deformation front and a prism below critical taper angle characterize the southern part of the study area. Both coseismic slip and post-rupture local seismicity can be related to density anomalies within the upper plate as revealed by free air gravity data corrected for the effects of bathymetry and the subducting plate. [ChilePEPPER - Project Evaluating Prism Post-Earthquake Response

  2. In situ stress magnitudes at the toe of the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism, offshore Shikoku Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    Quantifying the orientation and magnitude of tectonic stresses is essential toward understanding deformation and faulting in subduction zones. However, constraints on in situ horizontal stress magnitudes (Shmin and SHmax) are rare. We estimate Shmin and SHmax at Ocean Drilling Program Site 808 at the toe of the Nankai accretionary prism offshore Japan, using coupled constraints from (1) the width of wellbore breakouts together with estimates of rock strength and a model describing stress redistribution at the borehole wall and (2) limits on regional differential stress defined by failure on preexisting faults. Our analysis extends from 175 to 915 m below seafloor (mbsf) and spans the active frontal thrust. For an upper bound on rock unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and assuming hydrostatic formation pore pressure, Shmin and SHmax (referenced to the seafloor) increase from 6.5 MPa at 175 mbsf to 17.4 MPa at 915 mbsf, with the stress state gradually transitioning from a thrust or strike-slip faulting regime above 800 mbsf to a normal faulting regime below. For cases with higher formation pore pressure, horizontal stresses are slightly lower but follow a similar pattern. We show that estimated Shmin and SHmax are strongly dependent on UCS, breakout width, and friction coefficient, all of which are characterized by uncertainty. Our results suggest that the prism is near thrust failure in the upper ~300 mbsf, but far from failure below. This may be reconciled with active thrusting if thrust faults are locally weaker than the surrounding rock or if SHmax fluctuates during the seismic cycle.

  3. Distinct deformational history of two contrasting tectonic domains in the Chinese Altai: Their significance in understanding accretionary orogenic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Sun, Min; Schulmann, Karel; Zhao, Guochun; Wu, Qihang; Jiang, Yingde; Guy, Alexandra; Wang, Yuejun

    2015-04-01

    The Chinese Altai, a key component of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt, is considered to be formed through multiple accretions of different terranes. However, the deformational histories of each terrane (tectonic domain), i.e. structural records before and after the accretion, are rarely studied, which has hindered our understanding of the accretionary processes. To fill the gap, a systematic macro- and microscopic structural analysis was carried out on two contrasting litho-tectonic units, i.e. the early Paleozoic low-grade Alegedayi Ophiolitic Complex (AOC) juxtaposed to the high grade Tarlang Granitic Massif (TGM). Selected rock samples were analyzed using zircon U-Pb isotopic dating to constrain the timing of polyphase deformation. Our structural and geochronological data suggest that the two litho-tectonic units were initially detached and located in different crustal levels and experienced distinct phases of deformation under contrasting P-T conditions. They were mutually accreted with each other in the early Devonian and jointly underwent a WNW-ESE-directed shortening deformational event (D1) at ∼390 Ma. The change of tectonic regime was further enhanced by a subsequent NNE-SSW-directed shortening deformation (D2) after ∼ 380 Ma. The shortening process ended before the crustal-scale sinistral strike-slip shearing deformation along the Erqis fault zone at 290 - 240 Ma. Results of this study provide solid field-based evidence for a model that the Chinese Altai initially underwent a nearly E-W-oriented subduction-accretional event in the middle Paleozoic, before it was reoriented to a nearly N-S-oriented convergence.

  4. Structural development of a high-pressure collisional accretionary wedge: The Samaná complex, Northern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Gabites, Janet; Suárez-Rodríguez, Ángela

    2011-05-01

    The Samaná metamorphic complex exposes a segment of a high-pressure collisional accretionary wedge, built during Caribbean island arc-North America continental margin convergence. Combined detailed mapping, structural and metamorphic analysis, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology show that the deformation can be divided into five main events. Early subduction-related D1 deformation and high-P/low-T M1 metamorphism under lawsonite blueschist (325-425 °C/12-18 kbar; Rincon Marbles and Santa Bárbara Schists lower structural nappes) and eclogite facies conditions (425-450 °C/18-20 kbar; Punta Balandra upper structural nappe), was followed by M2 decompression and cooling in the blueschist facies conditions during D2 folding, thrusting and nappe stacking. 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages and T-t/P-t estimations revealed Late Eocene to earliest Miocene retrograde M2 metamorphism in the different nappes for a consistent D2 top-to-the-ENE tectonic transport, which suggests a general northeastward progradation of deformation. The D3 event substantially modified the nappe stack and produced open to tight folds with amplitudes up to kilometer-scale and the D4 ductile to brittle normal shear zones and faults, and related subhorizontal folding, record a late extensional deformation, which also affects the whole nappe pile. Non-penetrative D3 and D4 fabrics indicate M3 cooling in and under the M3 greenschist-facies conditions. From the Miocene to the Present, the nappe pile was cut and laterally displaced by a D5 sinistral strike-slip and reverse fault system associated with the Septentrional fault zone.

  5. Block and shear-zone architecture of the Minnesota River Valley subprovince: Implications for late Archean accretionary tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southwick, D.L.; Chandler, V.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Minnesota River Valley subprovince of the Superior Province is an Archean gneiss terrane composed internally of four crustal blocks bounded by three zones of east-northeast-trending linear geophysical anomalies. Two of the block-bounding zones are verified regional-scale shears. The geological nature of the third boundary has not been established. Potential-field geophysical models portray the boundary zones as moderately north-dipping surfaces or thin slabs similar in strike and dip to the Morris fault segment of the Great Lakes tectonic zone at the north margin of the subprovince. The central two blocks of the subprovince (Morton and Montevideo) are predominantly high-grade quartzofeldspathic gneiss, some as old as 3.6 Ga, and late-tectonic granite. The northern and southern blocks (Benson and Jeffers, respectively) are judged to contain less gneiss than the central blocks and a larger diversity of syntectonic and late-tectonic plutons. A belt of moderately metamorphosed mafic and ultramafic rocks having some attributes of a dismembered ophiolite is partly within the boundary zone between the Morton and Montevideo blocks. This and the other block boundaries are interpreted as late Archean structures that were reactivated in the Early Proterozoic. The Minnesota River Valley subprovince is interpreted as a late accretionary addition to the Superior Province. Because it was continental crust, it was not subductible when it impinged on the convergent southern margin of the Superior Craton in late Archean time, and it may have accommodated to convergent-margin stresses by dividing into blocks and shear zones capable of independent movement.

  6. A Role of Low-angle Thrust Fault for the Occurrence of rain-induced Rockslides in an Accretionary Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, N.; Chigira, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, extreme weather related to global warming occurs frequently all over the world; there have been many record-setting rainfall events. Accordingly, potential of rain-induced rockslides increases. Examples of recent rain-induced rock avalanches with tens or more than a hundred of fatalities are a rockslide in Shiaolin village, Taiwan by 2009 Typhoon Morakot, and rockslides induced by 2011 typhoon Talas in Japan. However, the method to predict potential sites of rockslides is not established. Geological causes of rockslides are site specific and they must be clarified for each case. 2011 Typhoon Talas induced more than 50 rockslides in the outer belt of the Southwest Japan, where is underlain by Cretaceous - lower Miocene accretionary complexes. We performed thorough geological mapping in the Akatani area, where two huge rockslides occurred with volumes of 2 million and 8 million m3 respectively. As a result, we found that these two rockslides had their sliding surfaces along a low-angle-thrust with a dip of 29°~40° extending more than 5 km, which fault we name Kawarabi-thrust. This thrust has a fracture zone of 6.0 m in the maximum width, composed of clayey fault breccia with a few layers of black gouges. These fault materials are very weak and impermeable, so the fracture zone is expected to prevent the groundwater filtration and build up the pore pressure. This thrust had been exposed along the riversides at the foot of the two rockslides, which suggests that the slopes on the thrust had been destabilized by the undercutting of long-term river incision. The destabilization induced gravitational slope deformation with small scarps before the catastrophic failure. Our finding suggests that locating a large-scale low-angle-thrust is essentially important to predict potential sites of catastrophic rockslides as well as interpreting the internal structure of gravitationally deformed slopes.

  7. Effect of ash circulation in gasification melting system on concentration and leachability of lead in melting furnace fly ash.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Suzuki, Masaru

    2013-11-30

    In some gasification-melting plants, generated melting furnace fly ash is returned back to the melting furnace for converting the ash to slag. This study investigated the effect of such ash circulation in the gasification-melting system on the concentration and leachability of lead in the melting furnace fly ash. The ash circulation in the melting process was simulated by a thermodynamic calculation, and an elemental analysis and leaching tests were performed on a melting furnace fly ash sample collected from the gasification-melting plant with the ash circulation. It was found that by the ash circulation in the gasification-melting, lead was highly concentrated in the melting furnace fly ash to the level equal to the fly ash from the ash-melting process. The thermodynamic calculation predicted that the lead volatilization by the chlorination is promoted by the ash circulation resulting in the high lead concentration. In addition, the lead extraction from the melting furnace fly ash into a NaOH solution was also enhanced by the ash circulation, and over 90% of lead in the fly ash was extracted in 5 min when using 0.5 mol l(-1) NaOH solution with L/S ratio of 10 at 100 °C. Based on the results, a combination of the gasification-melting with the ash circulation and the NaOH leaching method is proposed for the high efficient lead recovery. PMID:24121545

  8. Biotoxicity evaluation of fly ash and bottom ash from different municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Chou, Jing-Dong; Wey, Ming-Yen; Liang, Hsiu-Hao; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2009-08-30

    Different types of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly and bottom ash were extracted by TCLP and PBET procedures. The biotoxicity of the leachate of fly ash and bottom ash was evaluated by Vibrio fischeri light inhibition test. The results indicate the following: (1) The optimal solid/liquid ratio was 1:100 for PBET extraction because it had the highest Pb and Cu extractable mass from MSWI fly ash. (2) The extractable metal mass from both fly ash and bottom ash by PBET procedure was significantly higher than that by TCLP procedure. (3) The metal concentrations of fly ash leachate from a fluidized bed incinerator was lower than that from mass-burning and mass-burning combined with rotary kiln incinerator. (4) The TCLP and PBET leachate from all MSWI fly ash samples showed biotoxicity. Even though bottom ash is regarded as a non-hazardous material, its TCLP and PBET leachate also showed biotoxicity. The pH significantly influenced the biotoxicity of leachate. PMID:19264394

  9. Potential products from North Dakota lignite fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G R

    1980-06-01

    Four major areas where fly ash can be used are explored. Concrete building blocks with fly ash replacing 50% of the portland cement have proven to be successful using current ASTM standards. Results in the ceramics area show that a ceramic-like product using fly ash and crushed glass with a small amount of clay as a green binder. Some preliminary results using sulfur ash in building materials are reported and with results of making wallboard from ash. (MHR)

  10. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system

    DOEpatents

    Schenone, Carl E.; Rosinski, Joseph

    1984-02-28

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  11. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process

    DOEpatents

    Schenone, Carl E.; Rosinski, Joseph

    1984-12-04

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  12. Rocky Flats Ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)

    SciTech Connect

    Funston, G.A.

    1995-06-14

    Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. The test will provide information to determine charge sizes, soak times and mesh screen sizes (if available at time of test) for stabilization of Rocky Flats Ash items to be processed in the HC-21C Muffle Furnace Process. Once the charge size and soak times have been established, a program for the temperature controller of the HC-21C Muffle Furnace process will be generated for processing Rocky Flats Ash.

  13. Wildland fire ash: future research directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodí, Merche B.; Martins, Deborah A.; Cerdà, Artemi; Balfour, Victoria N.; Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H.; Pereira, Paulo; Mataix-Solera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Ash is a key component of the forest fires affected land (Cerdà, 1998; Bodí et al., 2011; Pereira et al., 2013a). Ash controls the hydrological processes and determines the water repellency (Dlapa et al., 2012) and the infiltration rates (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008;). Moreover, ash is the key factor on runoff initiation and then on the soil erosion. Little is known about the impact of ash in different ecosystems, but during the last decade a substantial increase in the papers that show the role of ash in the Earth and Soil System were published (Bodí et al., 2012; Pereira et al., 2013b).. Ash is being found as the key component of the post-fire pedological, geomorphological and hydrological response after forest fires (Fernández et al., 2012; Martín et al., 2012; Bodí et al., 2013; Guénon et al., 2013; Pereira et al., 2013c). A recent State-of-the-Art review about wildland fire ash (Bodí et al., 2014) compiles the knowledge regarding the production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects of wildland fire ash. In the present paper we indicate the knowledge gaps detected and suggest topics that need more research effort concerning: i) data collection and analysis techniques: a) To develop standardized sampling techniques that allow cross comparison among sites and avoid inclusion of the underlying soil unless the burned surface soil forms part of the ash layer, b) To develop standardized methods to define and characterize ash, including its color, physical properties such as particle size distribution or density, proportion of pyrogenic C, chemical and biological reactivity and persistence in the environment, c) To validate, calibrate and test measurements collected through remote sensing with on-the-ground measurements. ii) ash production, deposition redistribution and fate: d) To untangle the significance of the effects of maximum temperature reached during combustion versus the duration of heating, e) To understand the production of ash by measuring its

  14. Fly ash system technology improves opacity

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

  15. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.

  16. Stabilization/solidification of TSCA incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Trotter, D.R.; Francis, C.L.; Morgan, I.L.

    1994-06-01

    Stabilization/solidification is a well-known waste treatment technique that utilizes different additives and processes. The Phoenix Ash Technology of the Technical Innovation Development Engineering Company is such a technique that uses Cass C fly ash and mechanical pressure to make brick waste forms out of solid wastes, such as the bottom ash from the Toxic Substances Control Act incinerator at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. One advantage of this technique is that no volume increase over the bulk volume of the bottom ash occurs. This technique should have the same high pH stabilization for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals as similar techniques. Also, consolidation of the bottom ash minimizes the potential problems of material dispersion and container corrosion. The bottom ash was spiked with {sup 99}{Tc} to test the effectiveness of the bricks as a physical barrier. The {sup 99}{Tc} leachability index measured for these bricks was 6.8, typical for the pertechnetate anion in cementitious waste forms, indicating that these bricks have accessible porosity as high as that of other cementitious waste forms, despite the mechanical compression, higher waste form density, and water resistant polymer coating.

  17. A frictional law for volcanic ash gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Y.; Hirose, T.; Kendrick, J. E.; De Angelis, S.; Petrakova, L.; Hornby, A. J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-08-01

    Volcanic provinces are structurally active regions - undergoing continual deformation along faults. Within such fault structures, volcanic ash gouge, containing both crystalline and glassy material, may act as a potential fault plane lubricant. Here, we investigate the frictional properties of volcanic ash gouges with varying glass fractions using a rotary shear apparatus at a range of slip rates (1.3-1300 mm/s) and axial stresses (0.5-2.5 MPa). We show that the frictional behaviour of volcanic ash is in agreement with Byerlee's friction law at low slip velocities, irrespective of glass content. The results reveal a common non-linear reduction of the friction coefficient with slip velocity and yield a frictional law for fault zones containing volcanic ash gouge. Textural analysis reveals that strain localisation and the development of shear bands are more prominent at higher slip velocities (>10 mm/s). The textures observed here are similar to those recorded in ash gouge at the surface of extrusive spines at Mount St. Helens (USA). We use the rate-weakening component of the frictional law to estimate shear-stress-resistance reductions associated with episodic seismogenic slip events that accompany magma ascent pulses. We conclude that the internal structure of volcanic ash gouge may act as a kinematic marker of exogenic dome growth.

  18. Densification of pond ash by blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, S.R.; Dey, A.K.; Selvam, S.

    1999-10-01

    Fly ash from thermal power plants is disposed, in huge quantities in ash ponds, which occupy large land areas otherwise useful for agriculture, housing, or other development. For effective rehabilitation of ash ponds, densification of the slurry deposit is essential to increase the bearing capacity and to improve its resistance to liquefaction. Extensive field trials were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of deep blasting for densification of deposited fly ash. Ninety explosions comprising 15 single blasts, with varying depths and quantities of charges, and 3 group blasts, each having 25 charges placed at various spacings, were carried out. The compaction achieved in terms of an increase in relative density was evaluated from surface settlement measurements. Extensive field monitoring was undertaken through pore-water pressure measurements, vibration measurements, penetration tests, and block vibration tests. For the average charge of 2--4 g of explosive per cubic meter of untreated deposit, the average relative density was found to improve from 50% to 56--58%. Analysis of the test results indicates that deep blasting may be an effective technique for modest compaction of loose fly ash deposits. The field testing program presented in this paper provides valuable information that can be used for planning blast densification of fly ash deposits.

  19. Hydrothermal reactions of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    The emphasis of the work done has been to determine the reactivities of two ashes believed to be representative of those generated. A bituminous ash and a lignitic ash have been investigated. The reactions of these ashes undergo when subjected to mild hydrothermal conditions were explored. The nature of the reactions which the ashes undergo when alkaline activators, calcium hydroxide and calcium sulfate are present was also investigated. It was determined that calcium silicate hydrate, calcium aluminate hydrate, and the calcium sulfoaluminate hydrate ettringite form under these conditions. It appears 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}3CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}32H{sub 2}O (ettringite) formation needs to be considered in ashes which contain significant amounts of sulfate. Therefore the stability region for ettringite was established. It was also determined that calcium silicate hydrate, exhibiting a high internal surface area, will readily form with hydrothermal treatment between 50{degrees} and 100{degrees}C. This phase is likely to have a significant capacity to take up heavy metals and oxyanions and this ability is being explored.

  20. Seep carbonates and chemosynthetic coral communities in the Early Paleocene alpine accretionary wedge: evidences from the Bocco Shale (Internal Liguride ophiolitic sequence, Northern Apennine, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, Luca; Boschi, Chiara; Luvisi, Edoardo; Alessandro, Ellero; Marroni, Michele; Meneghini, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    In Northern Apennines, the Internal Liguride units are characterized by an ophiolite sequence that represents the stratigraphic base of a Late Jurassic-Early Paleocene sedimentary cover. The Bocco Shale represents the youngest deposit recognized in the sedimentary cover of the ophiolite sequence, sedimented just before the inception of subduction-related deformation history. The Bocco Shale has been interpreted as a fossil example of deposits related to the frontal tectonic erosion of the alpine accretionary wedge slope. The frontal tectonic erosion resulted in a large removal of material from the accretionary wedge front reworked as debris flows and slide deposits sedimented on the lower plate above the trench deposits. These trench-slope deposits may have been successively deformed and metamorphosed during the following accretion processes. The frontal tectonic erosion can be envisaged as a common process during the convergence-related evolution of the Ligure-Piemontese oceanic basin in the Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary time span. In the uppermost Internal Liguride tectonic unit (Portello Unit of Pandolfi and Marroni. 1997), that crops-out in Trebbia Valley, several isolated blocks of authigenic carbonates, unidentificated corals and intrabasinal carbonatic arenites have been recognized inside the fine-grained sediments that dominate the Early Paleocene Lavagnola Fm. (cfr. Bocco Shale Auctt.). The preliminary data on stable isotopes from blocks of authigenic carbonates (up to 1 m thick and 3 m across) and associated corals archive a methane signatures in their depleted carbon isotope pattern (up to δ13C -30‰ PDB) and suggest the presence of chemosynthetic paleocommunities. The seep-carbonates recognized at the top of Internal Liguride succession (cfr. Bocco Shale Auctt.) occur predominantly as blocks in very thick mudstone-dominated deposits and probably developed in an environment dominated by the expulsion of large volume of cold methane-bearing fluids

  1. Origin and transport of pore fluids in the Nankai accretionary prism inferred from chemical and isotopic compositions of pore water at cold seep sites off Kumano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Tomohiro; Higa, Ryosaku; Ijiri, Akira; Tsunogai, Urumu; Ashi, Juichiro

    2014-12-01

    We used push corers during manned submersible dives to obtain sediment samples of up to 30 cm from the subseafloor at the Oomine Ridge. The concentrations of B in pore water extracted from the sediment samples from cold seep sites were higher than could be explained by organic matter decomposition, suggesting that the seepage fluid at the site was influenced by B derived from smectite-illite alteration, which occurs between 50°C and 160°C. Although the negative δ18OH2O and δDH2O values of the pore fluids cannot be explained by freshwater derived from clay mineral dehydration (CMD), we considered the contribution of pore fluids in the shallow sediments of the accretionary prism, which showed negative δ18OH2O and δDH2O values according to the results obtained during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions 315 and 316. We calculated the mixing ratios based on a four-end-member mixing model including freshwater derived from CMD, pore fluids in the shallow (SPF) accretionary prism sediment, seawater (SW), and freshwater derived from methane hydrate (MH) dissociation. However, the Oomine seep fluids were unable to be explained without four end members, suggesting that deep-sourced fluids in the accretionary prism influenced the seeping fluids from this area. This finding presents the first evidence of deep-sourced fluids at cold seep sites in the Oomine Ridge, indicating that a megasplay fault is a potential pathway for the deep-sourced fluids.

  2. Triassic deformation of Permian Early Triassic arc-related sediments in the Beishan (NW China): Last pulse of the accretionary orogenesis in the southernmost Altaids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhonghua; Xiao, Wenjiao; Sun, Jimin; Windley, Brian F.; Glen, Richard; Han, Chunming; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ji'en; Wan, Bo; Ao, Songjian; Song, Dongfang

    2015-11-01

    The Beishan orogenic collage (BOC) in the southernmost Altaids provides evidence of the final stage of evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. However, the closure time of the Paleo-Asian Ocean in the BOC is controversial. From field mapping, and structural analysis of mesoscale, superposed folds in Early Triassic sediments in the Hongyanjing Basin in the central BOC, we define at least two phases of deformation, which we can bracket in age as end-Permian to Early-Late Triassic. The sandstones in the basin are poorly sorted with angular clasts, which indicates immaturity characteristic of proximal and rapid deposition. Geochemical data indicate that the Hongyanjing Basin probably developed in an arc-related setting near an active continental margin or mature island arc. Combined with published regional geological data, we interpret the Hongyanjing Basin as a Permian-Early Triassic inter-arc basin between the Carboniferous Mazongshan arc to the north and the Ordovician to Permian Huaniushan-Dundunshan arc to the south. In addition, the age distribution of our sediments shows that the active continental margin or continental arc on which the Hongyanjing arc-related basin sat was somehow independently distributed in the Paleo-Asian Ocean without any major contribution of provenance from the Tarim Craton and Dunhuang Block to the south and Southern Mongolia accretionary system to the north. Deformation of the superposed folds began in the end-Permian, continued in the Early Triassic, and ended before the middle Late Triassic (219 Ma). Therefore the accretionary orogenesis in the Beishan part of the southernmost Altaids was still ongoing in the early to middle Triassic, and it finished in the Late Triassic, which might have been the last pulse of the accretionary orogenesis in the southernmost Altaids. We correlate this terminal event with tectonic developments in the Kunlun and Qinling orogens in the Tethyan domain.

  3. Provenance and origins of a Late Paleozoic accretionary complex within the Khangai-Khentei belt in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, central Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hidetoshi; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Kon, Yoshiaki; Uchino, Takayuki; Suzuki, Toshiya; Takeuchi, Makoto; Nakane, Yuki; Nuramkhaan, Manchuk; Chuluun, Minjin

    2013-10-01

    We have investigated the petrography, geochemistry, and detrital zircon U-Pb LA-ICPMS dating of sandstone from the Gorkhi Formation of the Khangai-Khentei belt in the Ulaanbaatar area, central Mongolia. These data are used to constrain the provenance and source rock composition of the accretionary complex, which is linked to subduction of the Paleo-Asian Ocean within the Central Asian Orogenic Belt during the Middle Devonian to Early Carboniferous. Field and microscopic observations of the modal composition of sandstone and constituent mineral chemistry indicate that the sandstone of the Gorkhi Formation is feldspathic arenite, enriched in saussuritized plagioclase. Geochemical data show that most of the sandstone and shale were derived from a continental margin to continental island arc setting, with plutonic rocks being the source rocks. Detrital zircon 206Pb/238U ages of two sandstones yields age peaks of 322 ± 3 and 346 ± 3 Ma. The zircon 206Pb/238U age of a quartz-pumpellyite vein that cuts sandstone has a weighted mean age of 339 ± 3 Ma. Based on these zircon ages, we infer that the depositional age of sandstone within the Gorkhi Formation ranges from 320 to 340 Ma (i.e., Early Carboniferous). The provenance and depositional age of the Gorkhi Formation suggest that the evolution of the accretionary complex was influenced by the intrusion and erosion of plutonic rocks during the Early Carboniferous. We also suggest that spatial and temporal changes in the provenance of the accretionary complex in the Khangai-Khentei belt, which developed aound the southern continental margin of the Siberian Craton in relation to island arc activity, were influenced by northward subduction of the Paleo-Asian Ocean plate.

  4. Wildland fire ash: future research directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodí, Merche B.; Martins, Deborah A.; Cerdà, Artemi; Balfour, Victoria N.; Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H.; Pereira, Paulo; Mataix-Solera, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Ash is a key component of the forest fires affected land (Cerdà, 1998; Bodí et al., 2011; Pereira et al., 2013a). Ash controls the hydrological processes and determines the water repellency (Dlapa et al., 2012) and the infiltration rates (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008;). Moreover, ash is the key factor on runoff initiation and then on the soil erosion. Little is known about the impact of ash in different ecosystems, but during the last decade a substantial increase in the papers that show the role of ash in the Earth and Soil System were published (Bodí et al., 2012; Pereira et al., 2013b).. Ash is being found as the key component of the post-fire pedological, geomorphological and hydrological response after forest fires (Fernández et al., 2012; Martín et al., 2012; Bodí et al., 2013; Guénon et al., 2013; Pereira et al., 2013c). A recent State-of-the-Art review about wildland fire ash (Bodí et al., 2014) compiles the knowledge regarding the production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects of wildland fire ash. In the present paper we indicate the knowledge gaps detected and suggest topics that need more research effort concerning: i) data collection and analysis techniques: a) To develop standardized sampling techniques that allow cross comparison among sites and avoid inclusion of the underlying soil unless the burned surface soil forms part of the ash layer, b) To develop standardized methods to define and characterize ash, including its color, physical properties such as particle size distribution or density, proportion of pyrogenic C, chemical and biological reactivity and persistence in the environment, c) To validate, calibrate and test measurements collected through remote sensing with on-the-ground measurements. ii) ash production, deposition redistribution and fate: d) To untangle the significance of the effects of maximum temperature reached during combustion versus the duration of heating, e) To understand the production of ash by measuring its

  5. Difference in mechanical and hydrological properties between hemipelagic and turbidite mudstones cored from the Nankai Trough accretionary prism at Site C0002 of the IODP Expedition 315

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Azuma, S.; Uehara, S.; Inoue, A.; Kanagawa, K.

    2011-12-01

    Very low frequency earthquakes recently found in the Nankai Trough accretionary prism of SW Japan have been ascribed to rather slow faulting along out-of-sequence thrusts or splay faults (Ito and Obara, 2006a). Ito and Obara (2006b) also showed that the stress drops after these earthquakes are as small as 0.1-1% of those after regular earthquakes. Thus at least two types of earthquake faulting occur in the accretionary prism. In order to address the issue of such difference in earthquake faulting, we investigated the mechanical and hydrological properties of mudstones cored from the Nankai Trough accretionary prism. We paid attention to stress drops in particular possibly affected by such properties as permeability. Two mudstone samples designated as #51R06 and #65R02 hereafter were cored from c.a. 1000 mbsf at Site C0002 of the IODP Expedition 315. XRD analyses and SEM observations revealed that the sample #51R06 is a hemipelagic mudstone consisting of well-sorted very fine grains rich in smectite, whereas that the sample #65R02 is a turbidite mudstone consisting of poor-sorted grains rich in quartz and feldspar clasts. We have conducted triaxial compression experiments to induce brittle failure in these mudstone specimens (20 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length), after measurements of elastic and hydrological properties. At room temperature and presumed in-situ confining and pore-water pressures (36~38 MPa and 28~29 MPa, respectively), we first measured Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, permeability and storage capacity of each specimen, then deformed it at a constant axial displacement rate of either 1 micron/sec or 10 micron/sec until its failure. Permeability measurements revealed that the sample #51R06 is 10 times less permeable (2.3×10-20 m2) than the sample #65R02 (2.9×10-19 m2). Triaxial compression experiments revealed that the maximum strength of the former (14.5 MPa) is much lower than that of the latter (20 MPa), and also that the duration time

  6. Reconstructing the deadly eruptive events of 1790 CE at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Don; Weaver, Samantha J; Houghton, Bruce F

    2014-01-01

    A large number of people died during an explosive eruption of Kīlauea Volcano in 1790 CE. Detailed study of the upper part of the Keanakāko‘i Tephra has identified the deposits that may have been responsible for the deaths. Three successive units record shifts in eruption style that agree well with accounts of the eruption based on survivor interviews 46 yr later. First, a wet fall of very fine, accretionary-lapilli–bearing ash created a “cloud of darkness.” People walked across the soft deposit, leaving footprints as evidence. While the ash was still unconsolidated, lithic lapilli fell into it from a high eruption column that was seen from 90 km away. Either just after this tephra fall or during its latest stage, pulsing dilute pyroclastic density currents, probably products of a phreatic eruption, swept across the western flank of Kīlauea, embedding lapilli in the muddy ash and crossing the trail along which the footprints occur. The pyroclastic density currents were most likely responsible for the fatalities, as judged from the reported condition and probable location of the bodies. This reconstruction is relevant today, as similar eruptions will probably occur in the future at Kīlauea and represent its most dangerous and least predictable hazard.

  7. Validation of Volcanic Ash Forecasting Performed by the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salemi, A.; Hanna, J.

    2009-12-01

    In support of NOAA’s mission to protect life and property, the Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) uses satellite imagery to monitor volcanic eruptions and track volcanic ash. The Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) was established in late 1997 through an agreement with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). A volcanic ash advisory (VAA) is issued every 6 hours while an eruption is occurring. Information about the current location and height of the volcanic ash as well as any pertinent meteorological information is contained within the VAA. In addition, when ash is detected in satellite imagery, 6-, 12- and 18-hour forecasts of ash height and location are provided. This information is garnered from many sources including Meteorological Watch Offices (MWOs), pilot reports (PIREPs), model forecast winds, radiosondes and volcano observatories. The Washington VAAC has performed a validation of their 6, 12 and 18 hour airborne volcanic ash forecasts issued since October, 2007. The volcanic ash forecasts are viewed dichotomously (yes/no) with the frequency of yes and no events placed into a contingency table. A large variety of categorical statistics useful in describing forecast performance are then computed from the resulting contingency table.

  8. Enhancing performance and durability of slag made from incinerator bottom ash and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ing-Jia; Wang, Kuen-Sheng; Tsai, Chen-Chiu

    2009-02-01

    This work presents a method capable of melting the incinerator bottom ash and fly ash in a plasma furnace. The performance of slag and the strategies for recycling of bottom ash and fly ash are improved by adjusting chemical components of bottom ash and fly ash. Ashes are separated by a magnetic process to improve the performance of slag. Analytical results indicate that the air-cooled slag (ACS) and magnetic-separated slag (MSS) have hardness levels below 590 MPa, indicating fragility. Additionally, the hardness of crystallized slag (RTS) is between 655 and 686 MPa, indicating toughness. The leached concentrations of heavy metals for these three slags are all below the regulatory limits. ACS appears to have better chemical stability than MSS, and is not significantly different from RTS. In the potential alkali-silica reactivity of slag, MSS falls on the border between the harmless zone and the potentially harmful zone. ACS and RTS fall in the harmless zone. Hence, the magnetic separation procedure of ashes does not significantly improve the quality of slag. However, RTS appears to improve its quality. PMID:18544471

  9. Effect of emerald ash borer on structure and material properties of ash trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) currently occurs in fifteen states in the United States, as well as Ontario and Quebec in Canada. A decline in ash tree strength following EAB infestation is potentially hazardous to public safety, particularly when trees are left standing for several years after dying. Dead ...

  10. Comparative study on the characteristics of fly ash and bottom ash geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chalee, Wichian; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2009-02-01

    This research was conducted to compare geopolymers made from fly ash and ground bottom ash. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) solutions were used as activators. A mass ratio of 1.5 Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH and three concentrations of NaOH (5, 10, and 15M) were used; the geopolymers were cured at 65 degrees C for 48 h. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used on the geopolymer pastes. Geopolymer mortars were also prepared in order to investigate compressive strength. The results show that both fly ash and bottom ash can be utilized as source materials for the production of geopolymers. The properties of the geopolymers are dependent on source materials and the NaOH concentration. Fly ash is more reactive and produces a higher degree of geopolymerization in comparison with bottom ash. The moderate NaOH concentration of 10 M is found to be suitable and gives fly ash and bottom ash geopolymer mortars with compressive strengths of 35 and 18 MPa. PMID:18715775

  11. Comparative study on the characteristics of fly ash and bottom ash geopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chalee, Wichian; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2009-02-15

    This research was conducted to compare geopolymers made from fly ash and ground bottom ash. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) solutions were used as activators. A mass ratio of 1.5 Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH and three concentrations of NaOH (5, 10, and 15 M) were used; the geopolymers were cured at 65 deg. C for 48 h. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used on the geopolymer pastes. Geopolymer mortars were also prepared in order to investigate compressive strength. The results show that both fly ash and bottom ash can be utilized as source materials for the production of geopolymers. The properties of the geopolymers are dependent on source materials and the NaOH concentration. Fly ash is more reactive and produces a higher degree of geopolymerization in comparison with bottom ash. The moderate NaOH concentration of 10 M is found to be suitable and gives fly ash and bottom ash geopolymer mortars with compressive strengths of 35 and 18 MPa.

  12. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

    2006-03-01

    The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

  13. Insight of the fusion behavior of volcanic ash: Implications for Volcanic ash Hazards to Aircraft Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenjia; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Küppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Cimarelli, Corrado; Lavallée, Yan; Sohyun, Park; Gattermann, Ulf; Müller, Dirk; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of volcanic ash with jet turbines during via ingestion of ash into engines operating at supra-volcanic temperatures is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for jet aircraft. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The fusibility of volcanic ash is believed to impact strongly its deposition in the hotter parts of jet engines. Despite this, explicit investigation of ash sintering using standardized techniques is in its infancy. Volcanic ash may vary widely in its physical state and chemical composition between and even within explosive volcanic eruptions. Thus a comparative study of the fusibility of ash which involves a standard recognized techniques would be highly desirable. In this work, nine samples of fine ash, deposited from co-pyroclastic offrom nine different volcanoes which cover a broad range of chemical composition, were investigated. Eight of them were collected from 2001-2009 eruptions. Because of the currently elevated level of eruptive activity and its potential hazards to aircraft safety and the remaining one sample was collected from a 12,121 ± 114 yr B.P. eruption. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by defining four characteristic temperatures (shrinkage temperature, deformation temperature, hemispherical temperature, and flow temperature) by means of heating microscope instrument and different thermal analysis methods. Here, we find that there are similar sticking ability and flow behavior of

  14. AL(0) in municipal waste incinerator ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipp, S. L.; Ronsbo, J. G.; Zunic, T. B.; Christensen, T. H.

    2003-04-01

    Disposal of municipal waste is a challenge to society. Waste volume is substantially decreased by incineration but residual ash usually contains a number of toxic components which must be immobilised to insure environmental protection. One element, chromium, is mobile and toxic in its oxidised state as Cr(VI) but it can be reduced to Cr(III) and immobilised. Reduction can be promoted by ash treatment with Fe(0) or Fe(II), but recent evidence shows that at least some Cr(VI) is reduced spontaneously in the ash. Aspects of ash behaviour suggest metallic aluminium as the reducing agent, but no direct evidence of Al(0) has been found until now. We examined filter ash from an energy-producing, municipal-waste incinerator (Vest-forbrænding) near Copenhagen. X-ray diffraction (XRD) identified expected salts of Na, K and Ca such as halite, sylvite, calcite, anhydrite and gypsum as well as quartz, feldspar and some hematite. Wave-dispersive electron microprobe produced elemen-tal maps of the ash; Al-rich areas were analysed quantitatively by comparison with standards. We identified metallic Al particles, averaging 50 to 100 micrometers in di-ameter, often with a fractured, glassy border of aluminum oxide. The particles were porous, explaining fast Cr(VI) reduction and they contained thin exsolution lamellae of Al-alloys of Pb and Cu or Mn, Fe and Ag, which provide clues of the Al(0) origin in the waste. Sometimes Al(0) occurred inside glassy globes of Al2O3. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) proved that surface Al concentrations on ash particles were below detection, confirming reactivity of the Al(0) bulk. The persistence of reduced Al through the highly oxidising combustion procedure comes as a surprise and is a benefit in the immobilisation of Cr(VI) from municipal-waste incineration residues.

  15. Isotopic paleoclimate from hydrated volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, I.; Izett, G.A.; Gleason, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The deuterium composition (deltaD) of secondary water in glass shards of volcanic ash can be used to calculate the deltaD--and hence the climatic association--of water that was in contact with the ash during the first 10,000 years after eruption of the ash; this being the approximate (+/-5000 years) time necessary for water to diffuse completely through the thin walls of the pumice and glass shards. The fractionation between environmental water and water diffusing into the glassy ash must be known in order to calculate the deltaD of the ancient ground water. With help from A.J. Gude and R.A. Sheppard, the authors have recently determined this fractionation, and have used it to derive a value for deltaD of water from 25 samples of glass from the Huckleberry Ridge (2.1 m.y.), Bishop Tuff (0.74 m.y.), and Lava Creek B (0.61 m.y.) ashes collected from sites throughout the Western US. All of these deltaD values correlate very well with latitude and with the present distribution of deltaD in surface water. For example, the deltaD of water in Huckleberry Ridge ash varies from -85 per thousand SMOW for samples collected in Texas, to -148 per thousand for samples from south-central Montana. Thus, water of hydration in rhyolitic ash represents samples of ancient environmental water and can be used to study changes in the deltaD of the precipitation through time.

  16. International Database of Volcanic Ash Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, K.; Cameron, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Jenkins, S.; Brown, S.; Leonard, G.; Deligne, N.; Stewart, C.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash creates extensive impacts to people and property, yet we lack a global ash impacts catalog to organize, distribute, and archive this important information. Critical impact information is often stored in ephemeral news articles or other isolated resources, which cannot be queried or located easily. A global ash impacts database would improve 1) warning messages, 2) public and lifeline emergency preparation, and 3) eruption response and recovery. Ashfall can have varying consequences, such as disabling critical lifeline infrastructure (e.g. electrical generation and transmission, water supplies, telecommunications, aircraft and airports) or merely creating limited and expensive inconvenience to local communities. Impacts to the aviation sector can be a far-reaching global issue. The international volcanic ash impacts community formed a committee to develop a database to catalog the impacts of volcanic ash. We identify three user populations for this database: 1) research teams, who would use the database to assist in systematic collection, recording, and storage of ash impact data, and to prioritize impact assessment trips and lab experiments 2) volcanic risk assessment scientists who rely on impact data for assessments (especially vulnerability/fragility assessments); a complete dataset would have utility for global, regional, national and local scale risk assessments, and 3) citizen science volcanic hazard reporting. Publication of an international ash impacts database will encourage standardization and development of best practices for collecting and reporting impact information. Data entered will be highly categorized, searchable, and open source. Systematic cataloging of impact data will allow users to query the data and extract valuable information to aid in the development of improved emergency preparedness, response and recovery measures.

  17. Sources of Low-Chloride Fluids in Sediments beneath Biological Communities on the Nankai Accretionary Wedge off Kumano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, T.; Tsunogai, U.; Gamo, T.; Kuramoto, S.; Ashi, J.

    2003-12-01

    We report chemical and isotopic compositions of interstitial waters extracted from surface sediments inside and outside of dense biological communities on the seafloor of the Nankai accretionary prism off Kumano. Particularly those taken within bacterial mat at the Oomine Ridge site show the following characteristics: (1) CH4 enrichment (more than 600 μ mol/kg), (2) chloride depletion (up to 10% depletion from bottom seawater), and (3) δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O depletion (more than 4‰ and 0.7‰ depletion, respectively), compared with bottom seawater. The highest CH4 value observed at the Oomine Ridge samples is compatible with that previously reported at one of the most active seep areas within Nankai Trough, suggesting that also this site should be one of the most active seep sites in Nankai Trough. The fluid chemistries of these samples show that the fluids of CH4 enrichment, chloride depletion, and low δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O value relative to bottom seawater are ascending from deeper zone to sediments beneath the Oomine Ridge site. Assuming simple two-component mixing of ambient seawater with fresh water of Cl- = 0 mmol/kg, the estimated end-member δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O values were -46+/-7‰ SMOW and -6.3+/-0.7‰ SMOW, respectively. The δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O values coincide with those of groundwater at nearby land area. Land-derived groundwater could be one of the possible sources for the low chloride fluids, while we donOt have any idea for such underground lateral flow system of groundwater to the depth of ca. 2,500 m and ca. 100 km off the Japan Islands. Alternative possible source to produce the fluid of low Cl-, δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O is phase separation of seawater. Phase separation would lower Cl-, δ DH2O and δ 18OH2O of vapor phase by a fractionation process during boiling, while we have no idea for a heat source to induce phase separation at the area. Fault slips during large earthquake could possibly be result in such source of heat.

  18. Seafloor distribution and last glacial to postglacial activity of mud volcanoes on the Calabrian accretionary prism, Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceramicola, Silvia; Praeg, Daniel; Cova, Andrea; Accettella, Daniela; Zecchin, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mud volcanoes (MVs) are abundant along the eastern Mediterranean subduction zones, recording mud breccia extrusion over long timescales (106 years), but to date relatively few have been recognised in the northern Ionian Sea on the Calabrian accretionary prism (CAP). In the present study, the seafloor distribution and recent activity of MVs is investigated across a 35,600 km2 sector of the CAP using a regional acoustic dataset (multibeam bathymetric and backscatter imagery, integrated with subbottom profiles) locally ground-truthed by sediment cores. A total of 54 MVs are identified across water depths of 150-2,750 m using up to four geophysical criteria: distinctive morphology, high backscatter, unstratified subbottom facies and, in one case, a hydroacoustic flare. Fourteen MVs are identified from 3-4 criteria, of which five have been previously proven by cores containing mud breccia beneath up to 1.6 m of hemipelagic sediments (Madonna dello Ionio MVs 1-3, Pythagoras MV and the newly named Sartori MV), while nine others are identified for the first time (Athena, Catanzaro, Cerere, Diana, Giunone, Minerva, `right foot', Venere 1 and 2). Forty other as yet unnamed MVs are inferred from 1-2 geophysical criteria (three from distinctive morphology alone). All but one possible MV lie on the inner plateau of the CAP, landwards of the Calabrian Escarpment in a zone up to 120 km wide that includes the inner pre-Messinian wedge and the fore-arc basins, where they are interpreted to record the ascent from depth of overpressured fluids that interacted with tectonic structures and with evaporitic or shale seals within the fore-arc basins. The rise of fluids may have been triggered by post-Messinian out-of-sequence tectonism that affected the entire pre-Messinian prism, but Plio-Quaternary sedimentation rates and depositional styles support the inference that significant mud volcanism has taken place only on the inner plateau. Sedimentation rates across the CAP applied to a 12

  19. Middle Jurassic oceanic island igneous rocks of the Raohe accretionary complex, northeastern China: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui; Ge, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Long; Bi, Jun-Hui; Tian, De-Xin; Xu, Wen-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Whole-rock major and trace element, and Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopic data, together with zircon U-Pb ages and in situ zircon Hf isotopes, are reported for Middle Jurassic igneous rocks of the Raohe accretionary complex, northeastern China, to investigate their petrogenesis and tectonic implications. The igneous rocks consist of pillow basalt, pyroxenite, gabbro, plagioclasite, and plagiogranite. The zircons from one plagioclasite and one plagiogranite are euhedral-subhedral and display fine-scale oscillatory growth zoning, indicating a magmatic origin. Zircon U-Pb dating gives an emplacement age of 169-167 Ma. The basalts are associated with late Paleozoic to middle Mesozoic sediments typical of ocean plate stratigraphy; i.e., limestone, bedded chert, and siliceous shale. The basalts, which show geochemical features similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs), are enriched in TiO2, light rare earth elements (LREEs) (average: La/Smn = 2.12), and Nb (average: Zr/Nb = 12.24), and are characterized by positive Nb anomalies (averages: Nb/Thpm = 1.46, Nb/Lapm = 1.31). The rocks are depleted in heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) (average: Gd/Ybn = 2.03) and exhibit high εNd(t) (+8.2 to +8.3) and εHf(t) (+9.0 to +9.1) values. The geochemical features indicate the Jurassic OIB-like basalts were derived by a low degree of partial melting (<5%) of peridotite in the garnet stability field. The intermediate-mafic intrusive rocks show typical OIB affinities and are geochemically similar to the basalts. Most of the intermediate-mafic intrusive rocks are enriched in LREEs and Nb, depleted in HREEs, and show low Zr/Nb ratios and high εNd(t) (+7.2 to +8.2) and εHf(t) (+8.8 to +10.3) values, indicating they were derived from a common source and are the products of fractional crystallization of the OIB-like basalts. All of the igneous rocks are likely fragments of oceanic islands/seamounts. The identification of OIB-like basalts and associated intermediate-mafic intrusive rocks

  20. Structure of a paleo subduction décollement, Suzume Fault, Okitsu Mélange, Shimanto Accretionary Complex, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Chester, F. M.; Sakaguchi, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Suzume fault is an internal thrust of an exhumed duplex of underplated rock in the Shimanto accretionary complex. On the basis of structure, age, and paleo-temperature of rock in the duplex, the thrust is a subduction décollement exhumed from the shallow region of the seismogenic zone. Mesoscale structure of the thrust was characterized to investigate slip processes and structural evolution of the décollement. The thrust exhibits an asymmetric structure characterized by a decimeter-thick ultracataclasite bounded by a several-meter-thick zone of fractured basalt in the hanging wall and a 20-meter-thick zone of ductily sheared sedimentary rock in the footwall. The structure of the thrust is similar to that of active décollements drilled at the frontal portions of prisms, but differs in the greater intensity of ductile deformation and the occurrence of ultracataclasite. Hence, the footwall of the Suzume fault records aseismic, distributed shear in poorly consolidated sediment during shallow underthrusting followed by coseismic, localized-slip in lithified sedimentary rock during underplating at depth. The hanging wall, in contrast, records only the later stage of coseismic, localized-slip associated with underplating. The ultracataclasite layers in the Suzume fault exhibit shear localization onto a through-going fracture surface and fabrics indicative of distributed flow, which are likely associated with the seismic cycle, i.e., alternating co- and inter-seismic slip. Off-fault fracture fabric in the hanging wall, related to thrusting at depth, records predominantly up-dip propagation of fault slip events. /// A synthesis of observations of ~20 subduction megathrusts representing the 0-15 km depth range, combined with the findings from the Suzume fault and modern Nankai megathrusts, documents a systematic decrease in the thickness of the slip zone, changes in deformation mechanisms and fluid-rock reactions, and an increase in shear heating, with depth. These

  1. Drilling into the deep interior of the Nankai accretionary prism: Preliminary results of IODP NanTroSEIZE Expedition 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, H. J.; Hirose, T.; Saffer, D. M.; Toczko, S.; Maeda, L.

    2014-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348, the latest advance of the NanTroSEIZE project, started on 13 September 2013 and was completed on 29 January 2014. During Expedition 348, the drilling vessel Chikyu advanced the ultra-deep riser hole at Site C0002, located 80 km offshore of the Kii Peninsula, from a depth of 860 meters below sea floor (mbsf) to 3058.5 mbsf, the world record for the deepest scientific ocean drilling, and cased it for future deepening. The drilling operation successfully obtained data on formation physical properties from logging while drilling (LWD) tools, as well as from lithological analyses of cuttings and core from the interior of the active accretionary prism at the Nankai Trough. IODP Site C0002 is the currently only borehole to access the deep interior of an active convergent margin. Preliminary scientific results of Expedition 348 are as follows: (1) Fine-grained turbiditic mudstones with coarser silty and sandy interbeds, exhibiting steep dips (between ~60 and 90 degrees) are predominant in the prism down to ~3000 mbsf. The biostratigraphic age of the sediments in the lowermost part of the hole is thought to be 9-11 Ma, with an assumed age of accretion of 3-5 Ma. (2) Slickenlined surfaces, deformation bands and mineral veins are present throughout the drilled interval, while well-developed scaly clay fabrics are increasingly observed below ~2200 mbsf. A substantial fault zone with well-developed foliation was successfully cored from the deep interior of the prism at ~2205 mbsf. (3) Porosity generally decreases from ~60% to ~20% from the seafloor to 3000 mbsf. However, physical properties including grain density, electrical conductivity and P-wave velocity suggest fairly homogeneous properties in the interior of the prism between ~2000 and 3000 mbsf. (4) Mud gas analysis during the riser drilling indicates that a source of methane gas shifts from microbial origin to thermogenic at around 2325 mbsf. (5) The maximum

  2. Pioneering Research on Accretionary Processes - Jean Francheteau's Contributions to Understanding Mid-Ocean Ridges and Seafloor Volcanic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornari, D. J.; Ballard, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Jean Francheteau's 40-year career as a marine geophysicist spanned an exceptionally broad range of research interests and influenced generations of marine scientists, providing new concepts and insights on accretionary tectonics and seafloor volcanism. Using seafloor mapping techniques that at the time (in the early 1970s) were innovative in their own right, Jean and colleagues provided some of the first detailed perspectives of mid-ocean ridge axial topography that helped solidify acceptance of volcanic accretion at the ridges and specifically the highly focused volcanism occurring within the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Building on that work, Jean collaborated with many investigators, including one of us (RDB), over several decades of exploratory work that elucidated the fine-scale volcanic and tectonic features of many segments of the global mid-ocean ridge from the Mid-Atlanic Ridge to the northern and southern East Pacific Rise. His work in marine tectonics was equally eclectic and included detailed studies of fracture zones, microplates and exposures of crustal and upper mantle rocks in Hess Deep. Jean excelled at using the latest technologies to investigate and map seafloor volcanic and hydrothermal terrains. His work helped establish routine academic use of multibeam sonar and deep submergence technologies - both towed camera and ultimately submersibles - to make in situ field observations and collect samples. In so doing, Jean and colleagues amassed a vast amount of data pertaining to submarine volcanic and hydrothermal processes and he was one of the first to help establish causal links between these processes and their distribution along and across spreading center axes separating at slow to ultra-fast rates. Jean's superb mentorship of young marine scientists, involving them in both field and laboratory studies was a hallmark of his gracious style and reflects one of the many ways in which he admirably served the international oceanographic

  3. Chemical characterization of ash from gasification of alfalfa stems: Implications for ash management

    SciTech Connect

    Mozaffari, M.; Rosen, C.J.; Russelle, M.P.; Nater, E.A.

    2000-06-01

    Electricity generation from biomass is an attractive option from an environmental perspective. Pilot studies have indicated that alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stems are suitable feedstock for energy generation via gasification. Detailed information on chemical characteristics of the ash generated from gasification of alfalfa stem is required to develop environmentally and economically sound ash management strategies. Alfalfa fly and bottom ashes were characterized with respect to chemical properties that are important in developing ash management practices with emphasis on beneficial utilization as a soil amendment. Mean concentrations of total C, K, Ca, and Cl were 424, 120, 85, and 26 g kg{sup {minus}1}, respectively, in fly ash. In bottom ash, the mean concentrations of C, K, and Ca, were 63, 61, and 193 g kg{sup {minus}1}. Concentrations of total Pb, As, Cd, Co, and Se were below detection limits in both ash types. Naphthalene ranged from 6.2 to 74 mg kg{sup {minus}1}, but concentrations of many other polyaromatic hydrocarbons were low or below mg kg{sup {minus}1} detection limits. Available K and P in fly ash were 90 to 120 and 8 to 10 g kg{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Mean CaCO{sub 3} equivalent value of fly ash was 400 g kg{sup {minus}1}, its electrical conductivity (EC) and pH were 127 dS m{sup {minus}1} and 11.5, respectively. These results suggest that when managed properly, gasified alfalfa ash could potentially be utilized as a beneficial soil amendment with few potential environmental concerns.

  4. Analysis of municipal refuse incinerator ashes for asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Patel-Mandlik, K.J.; Manos, C.G.; Lisk, D.J.

    1988-12-01

    The ash which results from incineration includes bottom ash (slag) and fly ash, the latter being trapped in electrostatic precipitators or fabric filtration systems (baghouses, etc.). These ashes are collected separately or mixed and usually disposed in secure landfills with or without prior recovery of reusable metals. Whereas many published surveys have dealt with the concentrations of heavy metals and toxic organics in such ashes, very little has been reported on the possible presence of asbestos in them. In the work reported here, an analytical survey was conducted of the possible presence of asbestos in 20 such ashes from 18 incinerators in the United States.

  5. Marine Mesocosm Bacterial Colonisation of Volcanic Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, V.; Cimarelli, C.; Ayris, P. M.; Kueppers, U.; Erpenbeck, D.; Dingwell, D. B.; Woerheide, G.

    2014-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions regularly eject large quantities of ash particles into the atmosphere, which can be deposited via fallout into oceanic environments. Such fallout has the potential to alter pH, light and nutrient availability at local or regional scales. Shallow-water coral reef ecosystems - "rainforests of the sea" - are highly sensitive to disturbances, such as ocean acidification, sedimentation and eutrophication. Therefore, ash deposition may lead to burial and mortality of such reefs. Coral reef ecosystem resilience may depend on pioneer bacterial colonisation of the ash layer, supporting subsequent establishment of the micro- and ultimately the macro-community. However, it is currently unknown which bacteria are involved in pioneer colonisation. We hypothesize that physico-chemical properties (i.e., morphology, chemistry, mineralogy) of the ash may dictate bacterial colonisation. We have tested the effect of substrate properties on bacterial diversity and abundance colonising five substrates: i) quartz sand ii) crystalline ash from the Sakurajima volcano (Japan) iii) volcanic glass iv) carbonate reef sand and v) calcite sand of similar grain size - by incubation in a controlled marine mesocosm (coral reef aquarium) under low light conditions for three months. Bacterial communities were screened every month by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA Internal Transcribed Spacer region. Multivariate statistics revealed discrete groupings of bacterial communities on substrates of volcanic origin (ash and glass) and reef origin (three sands). Analysis Of Similarity supports significantly different communities associated with all substrates (p=0.0001), only quartz did not differ from both carbonate and calcite sands. The ash substrate exhibited the most diverse bacterial community and carried the most substrate-specific bacterial operational taxonomic units. Our findings suggest that bacterial diversity and community

  6. Estimating volcanic ash hazard in European airspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, Adam; Rutgersson, Anna

    2014-10-01

    The widespread disruption of European air traffic in late April 2010, during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, showed the importance of early assessment of volcanic hazard from explosive eruptions. In this study, we focus on the short-term hazard of airborne ash from a climatological perspective, focusing on eruptions on Iceland. By studying eruptions of different intensity and frequency, we estimate the overall probability that ash concentration levels considered hazardous to aviation are exceeded over different parts of Europe. The method involves setting up a range of eruption scenarios based on the eruptive history of Icelandic volcanoes, and repeated simulation of these scenarios for 2 years' worth of meteorological data. Simulations are conducted using meteorological data from the ERA-Interim reanalysis set, which is downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The weather data are then used to drive the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF for each of the eruption scenarios. A set of threshold values, commonly used in Volcanic Ash Advisories, are used to analyze concentration data from the dispersion model. We see that the dispersion of ash is highly dominated by the mid-latitude westerlies and mainly affect northern UK and the Scandinavian peninsula. The occurrence of high ash levels from Icelandic volcanoes is lower over continental Europe but should not be neglected for eruptions when the release rate of fine ash (< 16μ m) is in the order of 107 kg s - 1 or higher. There is a clear seasonal variation in the ash hazard. During the summer months, the dominating dispersion direction is less distinct with some plumes extending to the northwest and Greenland. In contrast, during the winter months, the strong westerly winds tend to transport most of the emissions eastwards. The affected area of a winter-time eruption is likely to be larger as high concentrations can be found at a further distance downwind from the volcano

  7. Use of fracture filling mineral assemblages for characterizing water-rock interactions during exhumation of an accretionary complex: An example from the Shimanto Belt, southern Kyushu Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takuya; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Metcalfe, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Various fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals in fracture walls were formed by fluid-rock interaction during the exhumation of the Palaeogene Shimanto Belt of Kyushu, Japan, which is located in an accretionary complex. Each mineral formed under favourable geological conditions and can be used to estimate the conditions of accretion and formation of the related rock sequences. Petrographic observations, mineralogical and geochemical analyses were made on fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals from boreholes of ca. 140 m depth, drilled in the Shimanto Belt. Results reveal that the secondary minerals were formed in three major stages distinguished by the sequential textural relationships of the minerals and the interpreted environment of mineral formation. Filling mineral assemblages show that the studied rock formation has been subducted to a depth of several km and the temperature reached was ca. 200-300 °C. After the subduction, the rock formation was uplifted and surface acidic water penetrated up to 80 m beneath the present ground surface. The acid water dissolved calcite fracture filling minerals to form the present groundwater flow-paths, which allowed recent wall rock alteration to occur. The results shown here imply that filling mineral assemblages can be an effective tool to evaluate the environmental changes during exhumation of an accretionary complex.

  8. Neotethyan rifting-related ore occurrences: study of an accretionary mélange complex (Darnó Unit, NE Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Gabriella B.; Oláh, Erika; Zaccarini, Federica; Szakáll, Sándor

    2016-02-01

    The geology of the NE Hungarian Darnó Unit is rather complicated, as it is composed mostly of a Jurassic accretionary mélange complex, according to the most recent investigations. The magmatic and sedimentary rock blocks of the mélange represent products of different evolutionary stages of the Neotethys; including Permian and Triassic sedimentary rocks of marine rifting related origin, Triassic pillow basalt of advanced rifting related origin and Jurassic pillow basalt originated in back-arc-basin environment. This small unit contains a copper-gold occurrence in the Permian marly-clayey limestone, an iron enrichment in the Triassic sedimentary succession, a copper-silver ore occurrence in Triassic pillow basalts and a copper ore indication, occurring both in the Triassic and Jurassic pillow basalts. The present study deals with the Cu(-Ag) occurrence in the Triassic basalt and the Fe occurrence in the Triassic sedimentary succession. The former shows significant similarities with the Michigan-type mineralizations, while the latter has typical characteristics of the Fe-SEDEX deposits. All the above localities fit well into the new geological model of the investigated area. The mineralizations represent the different evolutionary stages of the Neotethyan rifting and an epigenetic, Alpine metamorphism-related process and their recent, spatially close position is the result of the accretionary mélange formation. Thus, the Darnó Unit represents a perfect natural laboratory for studying and understanding the characteristic features of several different rifting related ore forming processes.

  9. Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the Paleo-Asian Ocean: Insights from detrital zircons from Silurian to Carboniferous strata at the northwestern margin of the Tarim Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yigui; Zhao, Guochun; Sun, Min; Eizenhöfer, Paul R.; Hou, Wenzhu; Zhang, Xiaoran; Liu, Dongxing; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Guowei

    2015-02-01

    A detrital zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic study was carried out in the Middle Silurian to Late Carboniferous sedimentary strata of the northwestern Tarim Craton in order to understand accretionary processes in the southern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Detrital zircons from these strata yielded U-Pb ages clustering around 2.8-2.3 Ga, 2.0-1.7 Ga, 1.3-0.9 Ga, 880-600 Ma, and 500-400 Ma, with age populations and Hf isotopic signatures matching those of magmatic rocks in the Tarim Craton and the Central Tianshan Block. Abundant 500-400 Ma detrital zircons most likely reflect deposition in a retroarc foreland basin inboard of an Andean-type magmatic arc to the north, supporting the northern Tarim-Central Tianshan connection during early Paleozoic time. The absence of 380-310 Ma zircon population in the Carboniferous siliciclastic rocks suggests that the Central Tianshan Block may have been separated from the Tarim Craton in the Early Devonian, caused by the interarc/back-arc opening of the South Tianshan Ocean. We propose an accretionary orogenic model switching from advancing to retreating mode during Paleozoic time in the southwestern part of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. This transition most likely occurred coevally with the rifting of Southeast Asian blocks from the northeastern margin of Gondwana.

  10. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  11. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    United States Department of Commerce; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    2007-01-01

    The National Aviation Weather Program Strategic Plan (1997) and the National Aviation Weather Initiatives (1999) both identified volcanic ash as a high-priority informational need to aviation services. The risk to aviation from airborne volcanic ash is known and includes degraded engine performance (including flameout), loss of visibility, failure of critical navigational and operational instruments, and, in the worse case, loss of life. The immediate costs for aircraft encountering a dense plume are potentially major—damages up to $80 million have occurred to a single aircraft. Aircraft encountering less dense volcanic ash clouds can incur longer-term costs due to increased maintenance of engines and external surfaces. The overall goal, as stated in the Initiatives, is to eliminate encounters with ash that could degrade the in-flight safety of aircrews and passengers and cause damage to the aircraft. This goal can be accomplished by improving the ability to detect, track, and forecast hazardous ash clouds and to provide adequate warnings to the aviation community on the present and future location of the cloud. To reach this goal, the National Aviation Weather Program established three objectives: (1) prevention of accidental encounters with hazardous clouds; (2) reduction of air traffic delays, diversions, or evasive actions when hazardous clouds are present; and (3) the development of a single, worldwide standard for exchange of information on airborne hazardous materials. To that end, over the last several years, based on numerous documents (including an OFCMsponsored comprehensive study on aviation training and an update of Aviation Weather Programs/Projects), user forums, and two International Conferences on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety (1992 and 2004), the Working Group for Volcanic Ash (WG/VA), under the OFCM-sponsored Committee for Aviation Services and Research, developed the National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and Support of the

  12. Proceedings: Tenth international ash use symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the 1993 International Coal Ash Use Symposium, the tenth in a series since 1967, is to publicize innovations in coal ash technology. These symposia support the mission of the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA) to promote coal ash use in a variety of markets through technology transfer and commercialization. The two-volume publication contains 82 papers arranged in fourteen sections which include: waste solidification and stabilization; aggregate; agriculture; structural fill; mine reclamation; aquatic uses; environmental considerations; concrete and flowable fill; base stabilization; clean coal by-products; international and regional perspectives; research and development; fillers in plastic and aluminum; and manufactured products--marketable gypsum, masonry blocks, cast in-situ and precast houses, bricks, mineral wool fibers and ready-mixed concrete. The 82 papers were submitted to ACAA by authors from sixteen countries including. The symposium, with 45 percent of the papers from locations outside the USA, represents a truly international interest in the development of uses for coal ash. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  13. Provenance analysis and detrital zircon geochronology on the onshore Makran accretionary wedge, SE Iran: implication for the geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Ali; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Winkler, Wilfried; Ruh, Jonas

    2014-05-01

    The Makran, located in Southeast Iran and South Pakistan, is one of the largest accretionary wedges on Earth. In Iran it comprises turbiditic sediments ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. We present a provenance analysis on sandstones, which is aimed at reconstructing the assemblages of source rocks and the tectonic setting from which the clastic material was derived. Sandstone samples collected from different units span the regional stratigraphy from Late Cretaceous to Miocene. Laser ablation ICP-MS resulted in ca 2800 new U-Pb ages of individual detrital zircons from 18 samples collected in onshore Makran. 101 detrital zircons from a Late Cretaceous fine grained sandstone range from 180 to 160 Ma (Middle Jurassic). 478 detrital zircons from mid- to late Eocene sandstones allow differentiating a NE and NW sector of the Makran Basin. Zircon grains in the NE basin belong to two populations peaking at 180 to 160 Ma (late Early to Middle Jurassic) and 50 to 40 Ma (Mid-Eocene), with the noticeable absence of Cretaceous grains. In the NW basin, detrital zircons are 120 to 40 Ma (late Early Cretaceous to Lutetian, Eocene). 587 detrital zircon grains from fine to medium grained Oligocene sandstones collected over the whole area also range from 120 to 40 Ma (late Early Cretaceous to Eocene, Lutetian). 1611 detrital zircons from early Miocene sandstones show again distinctly different ages in the eastern and western parts of the basin. They range from 120 to 40 Ma (late Early Cretaceous to Eocene) in the eastern and from 80 to 40 Ma (Late Cretaceous to Eocene) in the western basin. Hf isotopes analyses were performed on 120 zircon grains from 6 samples. Negative values (-2 to -15) in Middle Jurassic and late Early Cretaceous zircons indicate minor or no influence of mantle reservoirs which implies a rifting setting during crystallization of the zircons. Low negative to positive (-5 to +10) values in Late Cretaceous and Eocene zircons indicate mixed crustal and

  14. Tectonic implications for the occurrence of ocean floor, hotspot, and island arc materials within accretionary prisms: Examples from the Mesozoic-Cenozoic NW Pacific Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Hirano, N.; Hirano, N.; Taniguchi, H.; Taniguchi, H.; Taniguchi, H.

    2001-12-01

    On-land Mesozoic-Cenozoic accretionary prisms exposed in Japan commonly have basaltic rocks incorporated as blocks into melanges or fault zones during a prolonged history of subduction and/or obduction. Chemical signatures of these basaltic rocks and their mode of occurrence with sedimentary covers and/or associated sedimentary rocks indicate that most of these isolated small basaltic blocks consistently display a WPB chemistry, whereas large slabs of basaltic rocks around the Izu Arc collision zone show MORB chemistry with rare examples of IAT, BABB, and/or WPB affinities. Comparing with the present uniformitarian examples of convergent plate boundaries in the western Pacific that we know through the DSDP and ODP projects and submersible and seismic surveys, we can interpret some of the basaltic material with WPB affinity in the Japanese accretionary prisms as relict edifices of seamounts with hotspot origin. These hotspot-related basaltic rocks are commonly associated with reefal limestones and were incorporated into continental margin melanges either by submarine sliding from the downgoing oceanic plate or by shallow-level offscraping along decollement surfaces during the subduction of oceanic plates. Older, uplifted parts of the fossil accretionary prisms on the continent side further inward from the trench where the deeper levels of accreted material are exposed include larger amounts of basaltic blocks. This observation suggests that significant amount of underplating might have occurred in the deeper levels of oceanic crust along decollement zones at structurally lower depths. The metamorphic belts (e.g.Sambagawa, Chichibu, Shimanto etc.) have commonly alkaline rocks or plateau-type E-MORB basalts without any trace of N-MORB rocks with rare special exceptions. Besides these ordinary accretionary prism examples formed by a simple plate subduction system, another type of accretion resulting from island arc or ridge collision is observed to have occurred in

  15. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  16. Size dependent cytotoxicity of fly ash particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Tam, J.S.K.; Wong, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Fly ash samples were collected from the electrostatic precipitator of a coal-fired power plant in Hong Kong. The particles of the respirable range (smaller than 10 {mu}m) were divided into 4 groups according to their particle size (mass median aerodynamic diameters). The surface morphology and the metal contents (Fe, Mn, Al and Zn) of fly ash particles were examined by a scanning electron microscopy and an inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometer, respectively. The particles were very heterogeneous in size and shape as well as the concentration of metals. The cytotoxicity of these four groups of fly ash particles were evaluated using an in vitro rat alveolar macrophages culture assay. The viability of alveolar macrophages was lower when incubated with smaller size particles. This relationship was also reflected by the damage of the surface morphology of the cells and the release of cytoplasmic (lactate dehydrogenase) and lysosomal (acid phosphatase and {beta}-glucuronidase) marker enzymes into the culture media.

  17. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Wai, Chien M.; Nagy, Zoltan

    1984-01-01

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  18. Correlation between the critical viscosity and ash fusion temperatures of coal gasifier ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Peter Y.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James

    2015-09-27

    Coal gasification yields synthesis gas, an important intermediate in chemical manufacturing. It is also vital to the production of liquid fuels through the Fischer-Tropsch process and electricity in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power generation. Minerals naturally present in coal become molten in entrained-flow slagging gasifiers. Molten coal ash slag penetrates and dissolves refractory bricks, leading to costly plant shutdowns. The extent of coal ash slag penetration and refractory brick dissolution depends on the slag viscosity, the gasification temperature, and the composition of slag and bricks. Here, we measured the viscosity of several synthetic coal ash slags with a high-temperature rotary viscometer and their ash fusion temperatures through optical image analysis. We made all measurements in a carbon monoxide-carbon dioxide reducing atmosphere that approximates coal gasification conditions. Empirical correlation models based on ash fusion temperatures were used to calculate critical viscosity temperatures based on the coal ash compositions. These values were then compared with those obtained from thermodynamic phase-transition models. Finally, an understanding of slag viscosity as a function of ash composition is important to reducing refractory wear in slagging coal gasifiers, which would help to reduce the cost and environmental impact of coal for chemical and electricity production.

  19. Estimating volcanic ash hazard in European airspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingwell, Adam; Rutgersson, Anna

    2014-05-01

    The wide spread disruption of European air traffic in late April 2010, during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, showed the importance of early assessment of volcanic hazard from explosive eruptions. In this study we look at the short term hazard of airborne ash through a climatological perspective, focusing on eruptions on Iceland. By studying eruptions of different magnitude and frequency we attempt to estimate the overall probability that ash concentrations considered hazardous to aviation are exceeded over different parts of Europe. The method involves setting up a range of eruption scenarios based on the eruptive history of Icelandic volcanoes, and repeated simulation of these scenarios for several years' worth of weather data. Simulations are conducted using meteorological data from the ERA-Interim reanalysis set which is downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The weather data is then used to drive the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF, which is set up appropriately for each eruption scenario. We see that the dispersion of ash is highly dominated by the mid-latitude westerlies and mainly affect northern UK and the Scandinavian peninsula. The occurrence of high ash levels from Icelandic volcanoes is lower over continental Europe but should not be neglected for eruptions of volcanic explosivity index (VEI) 5 or greater, which have a recurrence interval of about 120-150 years. There is a clear seasonal variation in the ash hazard. During the summer months there is no single dominating dispersion direction and high concentrations are restricted to a relatively small area around Iceland with some plumes extending to the northwest and Greenland. In contrast, during the winter months the strong westerly winds will transport most of the emissions eastwards. The affected area of a winter-time eruption will be larger as high concentrations can be found at a further distance downwind from the volcano, effectively increasing

  20. Pulmonary response to cadmium and nickel coated fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Bajpai, R.; Waseem, M.; Kaw, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    Pulmonary reaction to fly ash coated with cadmium (Cd) or nickel (Ni) and to native fly ash was studied in rats after intratracheal inoculation of dust suspensions. The histopathological alterations and changes in biochemical and cellular constituents of the bronchoalveolar lavage were correlated with the metal content in lungs and kidneys. More Ni was adsorbed than Cd on fly ash particulates. Metal-coated fly ash was more toxic than uncoated fly ash. Cd-coated fly ash produced significantly more histopathological and biochemical changes than Ni-coated fly ash. A high concentration of Cd was detected in the kidneys of rats exposed to Cd-coated fly ash. 32 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Fusion characteristics of volcanic ash relevant to aviation hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wenjia; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Damby, David E.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-04-01

    The fusion dynamics of volcanic ash strongly impacts deposition in hot parts of jet engines. In this study, we investigate the sintering behavior of volcanic ash using natural ash of intermediate composition, erupted in 2012 at Santiaguito Volcano, Guatemala. A material science procedure was followed in which we monitored the geometrical evolution of cylindrical-shaped volcanic ash compact upon heating from 50 to 1400°C in a heating microscope. Combined morphological, mineralogical, and rheological analyses helped define the evolution of volcanic ash during fusion and sintering and constrain their sticking potential as well as their ability to flow at characteristic temperatures. For the ash investigated, 1240°C marks the onset of adhesion and flowability. The much higher fusibility of ash compared to that of typical test sands demonstrates for the need of a more extensive fusion characterization of volcanic ash in order to mitigate the risk posed on jet engine operation.

  2. Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.; Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H.; Georgiou, D.N.; Wheeldon, J.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objectives of this study are to determine the market potential and the technical feasibility of using PFBC ash in high volume ash use applications. The information will be of direct use to the utility industry in assessing the economics of PFBC power generation in light of ash disposal avoidance through ash marketing. In addition, the research is expected to result in the generation of generic data on the use of PFBC ash that could lead to novel processing options and procedures. The specific objectives of the proposed research and demonstration effort are: Define resent and future market potential of PFBC ash for a range of applications (Phase I); assess the technical feasibility of PFBC ash use in construction, civil engineering and agricultural applications (Phase II); and demonstrate the most promising of the market and ash use options in full-scale field demonstrations (Phase III).

  3. Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A.

    2009-07-01

    The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants like mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF ASH FROM COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes existing data on the chemical and physical characteristics of ashes produced by the burning of coal in steam-electric generating plants. It summarizes several recent coal or ash characterization studies, emphasizing the elemental chemical composition, partic...

  5. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2010-04-15

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) and 10 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 deg. C for 48 h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0 MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.

  6. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) and 10M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 degrees C for 48h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers. PMID:19854038

  7. Using fly ash to mitigate explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Taulbee, D.

    2008-07-01

    In 2005 the University of Kentucky's Center for Applied Energy Research was given funding to evaluate the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) to reduce the explosive potential of ammonium nitrate (AN) fertilizers. Fly ash C (FAC), fly ash F (FAF) and flue gas desulfurization by-product (FGD) were evaluated. It was found that applying a CCB coating to the AN particles at concentrations of 5 wt% or greater prevented the AN explosion from propagating. The article reports on results so far and outlines further work to be done. 6 figs.

  8. Fly Ash Characteristics and Carbon Sequestration Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Amonette, James E.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Daniels, William L.

    2007-07-20

    Concerns for the effects of global warming have lead to an interest in the potential for inexpensive methods to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). One of the proposed methods is the sequestration of carbon in soil though the growth of crops or forests.4,6 If there is an economic value placed on sequestration of carbon dioxide in soil there may be an an opportunity and funding to utilize fly ash in the reclamation of mine soils and other degraded lands. However, concerns associated with the use of fly ash must be addressed before this practice can be widely adopted. There is a vast extent of degraded lands across the world that has some degree of potential for use in carbon sequestration. Degraded lands comprise nearly 2 X 109 ha of land throughout the world.7 Although the potential is obviously smaller in the United States, there are still approximately 4 X 106 ha of degraded lands that previously resulted from mining operations14 and an additional 1.4 X 108 ha of poorly managed lands. Thus, according to Lal and others the potential is to sequester approximately 11 Pg of carbon over the next 50 years.1,10 The realization of this potential will likely be dependent on economic incentives and the use of soil amendments such as fly ash. There are many potential benefits documented for the use of fly ash as a soil amendment. For example, fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, HCO3-, Cl- and basic cations, although some effects are notably decreased in high-clay soils.8,13,9 The potential is that these effects will promote increased growth of plants (either trees or grasses) and result in greater carbon accumulation in the soil than in untreated degraded soils. This paper addresses the potential for carbon sequestration in soils amended with fly ash and examines some of the issues that should be considered in planning this option. We describe retrospective studies of soil carbon accumulation on

  9. Changeing of fly ash leachability after grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, J.; Szabo, R.; Racz, A.; Banhidi, O.; Mucsi, G.

    2016-04-01

    Effect of grinding on the reactivity of fly ash used for geopolymer production was tested. Extraction technique using different alkaline and acidic solutions were used for detect the change of the solubility of elements due to the physical and mechano-chemical transformation of minerals in function of grinding time. Both the extraction with alkaline and acidic solution have detected improvement in solubility in function of grinding time. The enhancement in alkaline solution was approx. 100% in case of Si and Al. The acidic medium able to dissolve the fly ash higher manner than the alkaline, therefore the effect of grinding was found less pronounced.

  10. Proceedings: Ninth international ash use symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the 1991 International Coal Ash Use Symposium, the ninth in a series since 1967, is to publicize innovations in coal ash technology. The three-volume publication contains 80 papers, presented at seventeen sessions during the January 1991 event. Volume 1 contains papers related to concrete and related products like cellular concrete, and aggregates. This volume before (Volume 2) covers the growing market in waste stabilization/solidification and aquatic uses. Volume 3 brings together papers on a variety of high-volume uses, and R D projects. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases.

  11. Utilization options for fly ash, bottom ash, and slag in Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, O.E.

    1995-12-01

    Since 1967, at least six ash utilization symposiums have been held in the United States, with papers presented by several European authors on the utilization of coal by-products in Eastern Europe. There is currently over 80,000 megawatts of installed coal-fired capacity available in that region. Unfortunately, of the 117,778,000 tonnes of fly ash, bottom ash, and slag produced in Eastern Europe in 1989, only 13% was utilized. This paper outlines the research and levels and kinds of coal by-product utilization taking place in Eastern Europe since the late 1960s.

  12. Growth of Larval Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and Fitness of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Blue Ash (Fraxinus quadrangulata) and Green Ash (F. pennsylvanica).

    PubMed

    Peterson, Donnie L; Duan, Jian J; Yaninek, J S; Ginzel, Matthew D; Sadof, Clifford S

    2015-12-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an invasive primary pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. Blue ash (F. quadrangulata) is less susceptible to emerald ash borer infestations in the forest than other species of North American ash. Whereas other studies have examined adult host preferences, we compared the capacity of emerald ash borer larvae reared from emerald ash borer eggs in the field and in the laboratory to survive and grow in blue ash and the more susceptible green ash (F. pennsylvanica). Emerald ash borer larval survivorship was the same on both ash species. Mortality due to wound periderm formation was only observed in living field grown trees, but was low (<4%) in both green and blue ash. No difference in larval mortality in the absence of natural enemies suggests that both green and blue ash can support the development of emerald ash borer. Larvae reared from eggs on blue ash were smaller than on green ash growing in the field and also in bolts that were infested under laboratory conditions. In a laboratory study, parasitism rates of confined Tetrastichus planipennisi were similar on emerald ash borer larvae reared in blue and green ash bolts, as were fitness measures of the parasitoid including brood size, sex ratio, and adult female size. Thus, we postulate that emerald ash borer larvae infesting blue ash could support populations of T. planipennisi and serve as a potential reservoir for this introduced natural enemy after most of the other native ash trees have been killed. PMID:26314024

  13. One dimensional lunar ash flow with and without heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.

    1971-01-01

    The characteristics of lunar ash flow are discussed in terms of the two phase flow theory of a mixture of a gas and small solid particles. A model is developed to present the fundamental equations and boundary conditions. Numerical solutions for special ash flow with and without heat transfer are presented. In the case of lunar ash flow with small initial velocity, the effect of the heat transfer makes the whole layer of ash flow more compacted together than the corresponding isothermal case.

  14. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Xochilt; Schiavi, Federica; Keppler, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the interaction between volcanic gases and ash is important to derive gas compositions from ash leachates and to constrain the environmental impact of eruptions. Volcanic HCl could potentially damage the ozone layer, but it is unclear what fraction of HCl actually reaches the stratosphere. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash was therefore studied from -76 to +150 °C to simulate the behavior of HCl in the dilute parts of a volcanic plume. Finely ground synthetic glasses of andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic composition as well as a natural obsidian from Vulcano (Italy) served as proxies for fresh natural ash. HCl adsorption is an irreversible process and appears to increase with the total alkali content of the glass. Adsorption kinetics follow a first order law with rate constants of 2.13 ṡ10-6 s-1 to 1.80 ṡ10-4 s-1 in the temperature range investigated. For dacitic composition, the temperature and pressure dependence of adsorption can be described by the equation ln ⁡ c = 1.26 + 0.27 ln ⁡ p - 715.3 / T, where c is the surface concentration of adsorbed HCl in mg/m2, T is temperature in Kelvin, and p is the partial pressure of HCl in mbar. A comparison of this model with a large data set for the composition of volcanic ash suggests that adsorption of HCl from the gas phase at relatively low temperatures can quantitatively account for the majority of the observed Cl concentrations. The model implies that adsorption of HCl on ash increases with temperature, probably because of the increasing number of accessible adsorption sites. This temperature dependence is opposite to that observed for SO2, so that HCl and SO2 are fractionated by the adsorption process and the fractionation factor changes by four orders of magnitude over a temperature range of 250 K. The assumption of equal adsorption of different species is therefore not appropriate for deriving volcanic gas compositions from analyses of adsorbates on ash. However, with the experimental

  15. AUTOMATION OF THE RESISTIVITY MEASUREMENT FOR FLY ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article describes the automation of the resistivity measurement for fly ash. Fly ash resistivity is an important consideration in the operation of particulate control devices based on electrostatic principles (the higher the resistivity of the fly ash, the more difficult it i...

  16. ULTRAFINE ASH AEROSOLS FROM COAL COMBUSTION: CHARACTERIZATION AND HEALTH EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrafine coal fly ash particles, defined here as those with diameters less than 0.5 micrometer, typically comprise less than 1% of the total fly ash mass. These particles are formed almost exclusively through ash vaporization, nucleation, and coagulation/condensation mechanisms,...

  17. Evaluation of Pollutant Leaching Potential of Coal Ashes for Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D.; Woo, N. C.; Kim, H.; Yoon, H.; Chung, D.

    2011-12-01

    By 2009, coal ashes produced from coal-based power plants in Korea have been reused as cement supplement materials; however, the rest is mostly disposed in landfills inside the plant properties. Continuous production of coal ashes and limited landfill sites require more recycles of coal ashes as base materials, specifically in constructions of roads and of huge industrial complex. Previous researches showed that coal ashes could contain various metals such as arsenic(As), chromium(Cr), lead(Pb), nickel(Ni), selenium(Se), etc. In this study, we collected four types of bottom ashes and two of fly ashes from four coal-based power plants. These ash samples were tested with distilled water through the column leaching process in oxidized conditions. The column test results were compared with those of total digestion, sequential extraction processes and TCLP. Concentrations of metals in outflows from columns are generally greater in fly ashes than in bottom ashes, specifically for As, Se, B, Sr and SO4. Only one fly ash (J2-F) shows high concentrations of arsenic and selenium in leachate. Sequential extraction results indicate that these metals are in readily soluble forms, such as adsorbed, carbonated, and reducible forms. Results of TCLP analysis indicate no potential contaminants leached from the ashes. In conclusion, recycling of coal combustion ashes could be encouraged with proper tests such as sequential and leaching experiments.

  18. MEASURE OF FLY ASH RESISTIVITY USING SIMULATED FLUE GAS ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, describing the apparatus and laboratory procedures used to determine resistivity for a number of fly ashes under a variety of test conditions, supports research to develop a technique for predicting fly ash resistivity from chemical analyses of coal and coal ash. This...

  19. Economic analysis of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) management options.

    PubMed

    Vannatta, A R; Hauer, R H; Schuettpelz, N M

    2012-02-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), plays a significant role in the health and extent of management of native North American ash species in urban forests. An economic analysis of management options was performed to aid decision makers in preparing for likely future infestations. Separate ash tree population valuations were derived from the i-Tree Streets program and the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) methodology. A relative economic analysis was used to compare a control option (do-nothing approach, only removing ash trees as they die) to three distinct management options: 1) preemptive removal of all ash trees over a 5 yr period, 2) preemptive removal of all ash trees and replacement with comparable nonash trees, or 3) treating the entire population of ash trees with insecticides to minimize mortality. For each valuation and management option, an annual analysis was performed for both the remaining ash tree population and those lost to emerald ash borer. Retention of ash trees using insecticide treatments typically retained greater urban forest value, followed by doing nothing (control), which was better than preemptive removal and replacement. Preemptive removal without tree replacement, which was the least expensive management option, also provided the lowest net urban forest value over the 20-yr simulation. A "no emerald ash borer" scenario was modeled to further serve as a benchmark for each management option and provide a level of economic justification for regulatory programs aimed at slowing the movement of emerald ash borer. PMID:22420272

  20. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport...

  1. Utilization of CFB fly ash for construction applications

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.E.; Sellakumar, K.; Bland, A.E.

    1999-07-01

    Disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler power plants. Recently, larger CFB boilers with generating capacities up to 300 MWe are currently being planned, resulting in increased volumes and disposal cost of ash by-product. Studies have shown that CFB ashes do not pose environmental concerns that should significantly limit their potential utilization. Many uses of CFB ash are being investigated by Foster Wheeler, which can provide more cost-effective ash management. Construction applications have been identified as one of the major uses for CFB ashes. Typically, CFB ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. However, CFB ashes can be used for other construction applications that require less stringent specifications including soil stabilization, road base, structural fill, and synthetic aggregate. In this study, potential construction applications were identified for fly ashes from several CFB boilers firing diverse fuels such as petroleum coke, refuse derived fuel (RDF) and coal. The compressive strength of hydrated fly ashes was measured in order to screen their potential for use in various construction applications. Based on the results of this work, the effects of both ash chemistry and carbon content on utilization potential were ascertained. Actual beneficial uses of ashes evaluated in this study are also discussed.

  2. Insulation formed of precipitated silica and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Barito, R.W.; Downs, K.L.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes a slab of board-like material for use as a thermal insulation comprising: a. a precipitated silica and a fly ash material, between 30% and 70% based upon the total weight of the precipitated silica and fly ash material; and b. a gas and water light envelope containing the mixture of precipitated silica and fly ash material.

  3. Rock magnetic properties of dusty olivine: a potential carrier of pre-accretionary remanence in unequilibrated ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappe, S. C. L. L.; Harrison, R. J.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of chondrule formation is an important outstanding question in cosmochemistry. Magnetic signals recorded by Fe-Ni nanoparticles in chondrules could carry clues to their origin. Recently, research in this area has focused on 'dusty olivine' grains within ordinary chondrites as potential carriers of pre-accretionary remanence. Dusty olivine is characterised by the presence of sub-micron Fe-Ni inclusions within the olivine host. These metal particles form via subsolidus reduction of the olivine during chondrule formation and are thought to be protected from subsequent chemical and thermal alteration by the host olivine. Three sets of synthetic dusty olivines have been produced, using natural olivine (average Ni-content of 0.3 wt%), synthetic Ni-containing olivine (0.1wt% Ni) and synthetic Ni-free olivine as starting materials. The starting materials were ground to powders, packed into a 2-3 mm3 graphite crucible, heated up to 1350 °C under a pure CO gas flow and kept at this temperature for 10 minutes. After this the samples were held in a fixed orientation and quenched into water in a range of known magnetic fields, ranging from 0.2 mT to 1.5 mT. We present here for the first time an analysis of a new FORC-based method of paleointensity determination applied to metallic Fe-bearing samples [1, 2]. The method uses a first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagram to generate a Preisach distribution of coercivities and interaction fields within the sample and then physically models the acquisition of TRM as a function of magnetic field, temperature and time using thermal relaxation theory. The comparison of observed and calculated NRM demagnetisation spectra is adversely effected by a large population of particles in the single-vortex state. Comparison of observed and calculated REM' curves, however, yields much closer agreement in the high-coercivity SD-dominated range. Calculated values of the average REM' ratio show excellent agreement with the experimental

  4. Microstructures, Chemical Composition, and Viscosities of Fault-generated Friction Melts in the Shimanto Accretionary Complex, Southwest Japan: Implication for Dynamics of Earthquake Faulting in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, K.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2004-12-01

    The pseudotachylytes (PT) were recently found in the Cretaceous Shimanto accretionary complex of eastern and western Shikoku, southwest Japan, but their microstructures under a backscattered electron image, chemical composition, and effects of frictional melting on co-seismic slip in the accretionary prism remains poorly understood. The PT bearing fault is the 1-2 m thick roof thrust of a duplex structure, which bounds the off-scraped coherent turbidites above from the imbricated melange below without a thermal inversion across the fault. The fault zone consists of foliated cataclasite of sandstone-shale melange in origin and dark veins. The PT commonly occurs as brecciated fragments in dark veins. The PT matrix is transparent under plane-polarized light and is optically homogeneous under cross-polarized light, similar to glass matrix. Under a backscattered electron image, the PT clearly shows the evidences for frictional melting and subsequent rapid cooling: rounded and irregularly shaped grains and vesicles in matrix and fracturing associated with grain margins. These textural features of the PT are very similar to those of experimentally generated PT. The EPMA analysis indicates that chemical composition of the PT matrix corresponds to illite with 5.7-9.9 wt% H2O and that partially melted grains are dominated by orthoclase and quartz. This indicates that the temperatures of the PT melt could reach the breakdown temperatures of orthoclase (1150 C) and quartz (1730 C), greater than the maximum temperature recorded in host rocks (170-200 C). We calculated the viscosity of friction melt, based on the chemical composition of the PT matrix and the volume fraction and aspect ratio of grains in the PT. We considered both Arrhenian and non-Arrhenian models for viscosity calculation. Our result demonstrates that the melt viscosity is much lower than PT in continental plutonic and metamorphic rocks: 10^3 Pa s (Arrhenian model) and 10^2 Pa s (non-Arrhenian model) even at

  5. Generation and emplacement of Triassic granitoids within the Songpan Ganze accretionary-orogenic wedge in a context of slab retreat accommodated by tear faulting, Eastern Tibetan plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sigoyer, Julia; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Duchêne, Stéphanie; Billerot, Audrey

    2014-07-01

    The eastern Songpan Ganze accretionary-orogenic wedge (northern Tibetan plateau) is characterized by extensive magmatism coeval with Middle to Upper Triassic closure of the Paleotethys Ocean along a double subduction system, traced by the Kunlun-Anyemaqen suture to the north and the Jinsha-Litang suture to the south. New field, petrographic and geochemical data on Mesozoic plutons intrusive into Triassic metasediments of the eastern Songpan Ganze wedge are presented and integrated in a review of available data for the region. Three types of granitoids are distinguished: (i) high-K calc-alkaline granite to granodiorite (Yanggon, Maoergai, Markam, Sheng Meng, Xue Sheng, Taiyanghe, Menggu, Manai, Dusong Xian, Tagong and Jiulong plutons), (ii) high-K alkaline granite (Nyanbaoyeche and Rilong plutons and the Niuxingou shoshonitic syenite), and (iii) peraluminous S-type granite (Markam and Manai leucogranites). Elemental and isotopic signatures of these granitoids are consistent with the implication of both crustal (Yangtze craton, and Songpan Ganze metasediments) and mantle (asthenospheric mantle and metasomatised lithospheric mantle) sources. Based on (i) the ages of the plutons that are concomitant with the end of the northern and southern subductions of the Paleo-Tethys, (ii) the position of the plutons intrusive in the crustal tectonically accreted units decoupled from the downgoing plate of this double subduction system, (iii) the diversity of their petrological and geochemical signatures, we propose that magma emplaced in the Songpan Ganze accretionary-orogenic wedge were generated at the end of the Paleotethys closure in a context of slab retreat, accommodated by a tear fault along the passive margin of the South China block. Indeed, we argue that this context is the most favourable to trigger synchronous partial melting of (i) the suprasubduction enriched mantle wedge owing to lowering of the mantle solidus by metasomatism, (ii) the upwelled undepleted

  6. Evaluation of Coseismic Fluid-Rock Interaction in Fault Zones on the Basis of Geochemistry of Fault Rocks in Accretionary Prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Hirono, T.; Honda, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies revealed that concentration and isotopic composition of fluid-mobile trace elements such as Li, Rb, Cs and Sr in slip-zone rocks can change significantly during coseismic fluid-rock interaction at high temperatures (e.g., Ishikawa et al., 2008). In this study, we summarize the results obtained for fault-zone rocks recovered from various depths of the subduction zones. Analysis of a slip-zone sample recovered from shallow portion (0.27 km bsf) of the magasplay fault at Site C0004, IODP Exp. 316, Nankai Trough showed no clear fluid-induced geochemical signals, although a peak temperature over 300 deg. C is estimated on the basis of vitrinite reflectance data (Sakaguchi et al., 2011). In contrast, a major reverse fault in a fossil accretionary prism, the Emi Group (burial depth, 1-2 km) exhibited marked decreases of Li, Rb and Cs relative to adjacent host rocks, suggesting coseismic fluid-rock interactions at >350 deg. C. Geochemical signals observed in the Emi slip zone have a strong resemblance to those observed in the Taiwan chelungpu fault at comparable depths (1.1-1.2 km). Slip-zone samples collected from a fossil out-of-sequence thrust at greater depth (2.5-5.5 km) adjacent to the Kure Melange in the Shimanto accretionary prism showed unique geochemical characteristics, in which effects from disequilibrium flash melting to generate pseudotachylyte coexist with those from fluid-rock interactions at >350 deg. C. In the cases of Emi and Chelungpu, it is possible that the fluid-induced geochemical signatures, together with fluidization structures observed in these samples, resulted from thermal pressurization. On the other hand, the Kure data suggest a slip process in which high-temperature pore fluids were generated by frictional slip, but the thermally-enhanced pressure might not have reached a sufficient level to cause thermal pressurization, and the temperature continued to increase to attain melting. Kinetic estimation suggests that fluid

  7. Tectonic and Sedimentary Interactions on the Initiation and the Architecture of the Accretionary Wedges in the Southwestern Edge of the Caribbean, off Panama and Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Maurin, T.; Barat, F.; Auxietre, J.

    2013-12-01

    The structurally and stratigraphically complex area of North Panama deformed belt, Sinu-Uraba accretionary prism and south Caribbean deformed belt holds the key to understand the plate tectonic evolution of the southwestern margins of the Caribbean Sea. New geological fieldworks, sedimentary and structural analysis, detailed offshore and onshore seismic interpretation provide insights into the regional structural and stratigraphic evolution of those margins. Detailed results constraint the geodynamic history of these complex wedge architecture which registered successive changes of sedimentary supplies and gravity collapses. During the Paleocene and Eocene time, the southeastward subduction of the Caribbean plate below the northwestern edge of South America is characterized by the development of an accretionary wedge off the Caribbean margin of Colombia, due to the accumulation of a large amount of sediments provided by the Magdalena and the Sinu rivers. The Atrato river, at that time, was providing sediments to the basins restricted within the Panama Isthmus. During the Middle Miocene, the Panama Isthmus began to collide against South America, inducing the uplift of the San Jacinto/Sinu Belt in Colombia. As a consequence, the Magdalena river was deviated northward. The Sinu river was also deviated to the North and started to load the back of the the Sinu accretionary wedge which then began to collapse as convergence has ceased. In the same way, the uplift of the Darien Shear Zone, east of the Atrato basin, has deflected the sedimentary supply from the Chucunaque/Tuira basins to the northern margin of the isthmus, allowing the development of a sedimentary basin and the initiation of the North Panama Deformed Belt. Thus, on one hand, the structure of the Colombian Wedge, the Sinu Wedge and the North Panama Deformed belt, was controlled by the tectonic forces, a consequence of the convergence and progressive accretion of the Central American isthmus against the

  8. Jurassic metabasic rocks in the Kızılırmak accretionary complex (Kargı region, Central Pontides, Northern Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Ömer Faruk; Chiaradia, Massimo; Marzoli, Andrea; Özkan, Mutlu; Billor, Zeki; Topuz, Gültekin

    2016-03-01

    The Kızılırmak accretionary complex near Kargı is tectonically bounded by the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous metamorphic massives of the Central Pontides. It consists mainly of serpentinite, serpentinized peridotite, gabbro, basalt, metabasite and deep-marine sedimentary rocks. The metabasites in the Kızılırmak accretionary complex are tectonically located within a serpentinite, radiolarian chert, spilitized basalt, gabbro association and commonly display a steep contact with serpentinites. Amphiboles from metabasites yielded robust 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging between 159.4 ± 0.4 Ma and 163.5 ± 0.8 Ma. These are interpreted as cooling ages of the metabasites. The metabasites have 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7035 and 0.7044 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 18.18 and 18.92. The gabbros have higher 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7044 and 0.7060 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 17.98 and 18.43. Three basalt samples display 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7040 and 0.7059. Their 206Pb/204Pb(i) are unrealistically low (15.42 and 15.62), suggesting, most likely, Pb loss which results in over-corrected values for decay through time. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic compositions for all samples consistently plot between the fields of MORB or the Depleted MORB Mantle reservoirs and enriched mantle reservoirs (EMII rather than EMI). All the samples (except one dolerite dike) have negative ɛNdDM(t = 160 Ma) values, suggesting derivation from a reservoir more enriched than the depleted mantle. The protoliths of metabasites correspond to diverse sources (N-MORB, E-MORB, OIB and IAT) based on whole rock major and trace element composition. An IAT-like protolith for the metabasites indicates that the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan ocean domain was subducting and the tectonic regime was compressional during Late Jurassic and before. The protoliths of these rocks were metamorphosed during the subduction/accretion processes, as observed in the metamorphic rocks located along the Balkan, Northern Turkey and

  9. Tectonic and Sedimentation Interactions in the East Caribbean Subduction Zone: AN Overview from the Orinoco Delta to the Barbados Accretionary Prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deville, E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent marine geophysical acquisitions and piston-coring allow to better understand the close interactions between the sand-rich Orinoco turbidite system and the compressional structures of the Barbados prism. Because of the morphologic and tectonic control in the east-Caribbean active margin, the Orinoco turbiditic pattern system does not exhibit a classic fan geometry. The sea-floor geometry between the slope of the front of the Barbados prism and the slope of the South-American margin induces the convergence of the turbidite channels toward the abyssal plain, at the front of the accretionary prism. Also, whereas in most passive margins the turbidite systems are organized upstream to downstream as canyon, then channel-levee, then lobes, here, due to the tectonic control, the sedimentary system is organized as channel-levee, then canyons, then channelized lobes. At the edge of the Orinoco platform, the system has multiple sources with several distributaries and downward the channel courses are complex with frequent convergences or divergences that are emphasized by the effects of the undulating seafloor tectonic morphologies associated with active thrust tectonics and mud volcanism. On top of the accretionary prism, turbidite sediments are filling transported piggy-back basins whose timing of sedimentation vs. deformation is complex. Erosion processes are almost absent on the highly subsiding Orinoco platform and in the upper part of the turbidite system. Erosion processes develop mostly between 2000 and 4000 m of water depth, above the compressional structures of the Barbados prism (canyons up to 3 km wide and 300 m deep). In the abyssal plain, turbiditic channels develop on very long distance (> 1000 km) joining the mid-Atlantic channel (sourced mostly by the Amazon), filling several elongated basins corresponding to transform faults (notably the Barracuda Basin), and finally sourcing the Puerto-Rico trench, the deepest morphologic depression of this region

  10. Mössbauer characterization of feed coal, ash and fly ash from a thermal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes Caballero, F.; Martínez Ovalle, S. A.; Moreno Gutiérrez, M.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was apply 57Fe Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy at room temperature in order to study the occurrence of iron-containing mineral phases in: 1) feed coal; 2) coal ash, obtained in different stages of the ASTM D3174 standard method; and 3) fly ash, produced when coal is burned in the TERMOPAIPA IV thermal power plant localized in Boyacá, Colombia. According to obtained results, we can conclude the occurrence of pyrite and jarosite in the feed coal; Fe2+ and Fe3+ crystalline paramagnetic phases, superparamagnetic hematite and hematite in coal ash; Fe2+ and Fe3+ noncrystalline and crystalline phases, magnetite and hematite in fly ash. Precisely, for a basic understanding, this work discusses some the possible transformations that take place during coal combustion.

  11. Processing of Sugarcane Bagasse ash and Reactivity of Ash-blended Cement Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay, Goyal; Hattori, Kunio; Ogata, Hidehiko; Ashraf, Muhammad

    Sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA), a sugar-mill waste, has the potential of a partial cement replacement material if processed and obtained under controlled conditions. This paper discusses the reactivity of SCBA obtained by control burning of sugarcane bagasse procured from Punjab province of India. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to ascertain the amorphousness and morphology of the minerals ash particles. Destructive and non-destructive tests were conducted on SCBA-blended mortar specimens. Ash-blended cement paste specimens were analyzed by XRD, thermal analysis, and SEM methods to evaluate the hydration reaction of SCBA with cement. Results showed that the SCBA processed at 600°C for 5 hours was reactive as ash-blended mortar specimens with up to 15% substitution of cement gave better strength than control specimens.

  12. 2007 world of coal ash conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    The theme of the conference was science, applications and sustainability. Papers are presented under the following topics: aggregates/geotechnology; agriculture; ash facility; management; CCT products; cement and concrete; chemistry and mineralogy; emerging technology; environmental; LOI/beneficiation/handling; mercury; mining and regulations and standards. The poster papers are included as well.

  13. Building a Comprehensive Collection of Ash Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) has conserved Fraxinus germplasm at the USDA-ARS North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station (NCRPIS) since the 1970s. When Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) was first found in the US, the NCRPIS maintained limited seed collections t...

  14. NICKEL SPECIATION OF RESIDUAL OIL ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: R827649C002
    Title: Nickel Speciation Of Residual Oil Ash
    Investigators: Kevin C. Galbreath, John Won, Frank E. Huggins, Gerald P. Huffman, Christopher J. Zygarlicke, Donald L. Toman
    Institution: University of North Dakota<...

  15. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfman, Lois; Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, they invite every college and…

  16. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elfman, Lois; Walker, Marlon A.

    2011-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, "Diverse" invites every college and…

  17. Mutagenicity of fly ash particles in Paramecium

    SciTech Connect

    Smith-Sonneborn, J.; Palizzi, R.A.; Herr, C.; Fisher, G.L.

    1981-01-09

    Paramecium, a protozoan that ingests nonnutritive particulate matter, was used to determine the mutagenicity of fly ash. Heat treatment inactivated mutagens that require metabolic conversion to their active form but did not destroy all mutagenicity. Extraction of particles with hydrochloric acid, but not dimethyl sulfoxide, removed detectable mutagenic activity.

  18. SODA ASH TREATMENT OF NEUTRALIZED MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilization of acid mine drainage (AMD) streams as a source of potable and industrial water has become a major goal of several proposed AMD treatment schemes. From among the various schemes available, the lime neutralization/soda ash softening process was selected for use at Alto...

  19. A Profile of Ashe County, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rash, James O., Jr.; And Others

    From 1950 to 1970, the shift from agriculture to industry dominated Ashe County, North Carolina, isolated on the Blue Ridge by rugged terrain and severe weather. Rural farm population declined by 2/3 but rural non-farm population tripled. Many new industries helped shift the bulk of the work force to industry. In 1950, 45% of the work force farmed…

  20. Chemical constraints on fly ash glass compositions

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Brindle; Michael J. McCarthy

    2006-12-15

    The major oxide content and mineralogy of 75 European fly ashes were examined, and the major element composition of the glass phase was obtained for each. Correlation of compositional trends with the glass content of the ash was explored. Alkali content was deduced to have a major influence on glass formation, and this in turn could be related to the probable chemistry of clay minerals in the source coals. Maximal glass content corresponded to high aluminum content in the glass, and this is in accordance with the theoretical mechanism of formation of aluminosilicate glasses, in which network-modifying oxides are required to promote tetrahedral coordination of aluminum in glass chain structures. Iron oxide was found to substitute for alkali oxides where the latter were deficient, and some indications of preferred eutectic compositions were found. The work suggests that the proportion of the glass phase in the ash can be predicted from the coal mineralogy and that the utility of a given ash for processing into geopolymers or zeolites is determined by its source. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. FLY ASH RECYCLE IN DRY SCRUBBING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the effects of fly ash recycle in dry scrubbing. (Previous workers have shown that the recycle of product solids improves the utilization of slaked lime--Ca(OH)2--for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by spray dryers with bag filters.) In laboratory-scale experimen...

  2. 1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

  3. Characterizing uncertainty in the motion, future location and ash concentrations of volcanic plumes and ash clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webley, P.; Patra, A. K.; Bursik, M. I.; Pitman, E. B.; Dehn, J.; Singh, T.; Singla, P.; Stefanescu, E. R.; Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Jones, M.; Morton, D.; Pavolonis, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Forecasting the location and airborne concentrations of volcanic ash plumes and their dispersing clouds is complex and knowledge of the uncertainty in these forecasts is critical to assess and mitigate the hazards that could exist. We show the results from an interdisciplinary project that brings together scientists drawn from the atmospheric sciences, computer science, engineering, mathematics, and geology. The project provides a novel integration of computational and statistical modeling with a widely-used volcanic particle dispersion code, to provide quantitative measures of confidence in predictions of the motion of ash clouds caused by volcanic eruptions. We combine high performance computing and stochastic analysis, resulting in real time predictions of ash cloud motion that account for varying wind conditions and a range of model variables. We show how coupling a real-time model for ash dispersal, PUFF, with a volcanic eruption model, BENT, allows for the definition of the variability in the dispersal model inputs and hence classify the uncertainty that can then propagate for the ash cloud location and downwind concentrations. We additionally analyze the uncertainty in the numerical weather prediction forecast data used by the dispersal model by using ensemble forecasts and assess how this affects the downwind concentrations. These are all coupled together and by combining polynomical chaos quadrature with stochastic integration techniques, we provide a quantitative measure of the reliability (i.e. error) of those predictions. We show comparisons of the downwind height calculations and mass loadings with observations of ash clouds available from satellite remote sensing data. The aim is to provide a probabilistic forecast of location and ash concentration that can be generated in real-time and used by those end users in the operational ash cloud hazard assessment environment.

  4. Availability of residual phosphorus from broiler litter ash and layer manure ash amended soil for Paspalum vaginatum uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been hypothesized by several scientists that poultry litter ash could be used as a slow releasing phosphorus fertilizer that will become available over time. To test this hypothesis, a greenhouse study was conducted using a broiler litter ash, layer manure ash and calcium phosphate to determ...

  5. Identification and antennal electrophysiology of ash bark volatiles for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biologically active bark volatiles from ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) might be used as tools in monitoring the presence of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis. Two compounds have been identified from the volatile emissions from white ash bark. These two compounds were readily sen...

  6. Sorbate characteristics of fly ash. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Grow, J.; Sheih, M.; Trattner, R.; Kohut, J.; Zwillenberg, M.

    1983-08-01

    The objective of this investigation is to correlate the sorbate and leaching characteristics of fly ash with coal properties and monitored combustion conditions in order to design a system for the inexpensive treatment of industrial wastes and leachate from industrial landfills using mixtures of fly ash as inexpensive sorbents. Such a low-cost treatment system could also treat ash pond effluent for water reuse by powerplants as cooling tower makeup. Twelve unblended coals from 10 different mines were burned under monitored conditions in three different types of coal fired boilers in order to determine the influence of coal composition, ash fusion temperatures, boiler additives, combustion conditions and co-firing of natural gas or oil with the coal, on the leaching and sorbate characteristics of the fly ash produced. This included the determination of: (1) SiO/sub 2/, Al/sup 2/O/sub 3/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO, K/sub 2/O, Na/sub 2/O, MgO, sulfur, ash fusion temperatures Ti, Cd, Sn, Ni, Pb, Mo, Cu, Cr, n, Mn, Ba and V in the coals and their respective fly ashes and bottom ashes; (2) Moessbauer spectra of a number of coals and their fly ashes; and (3) surface analysis of the fly ashes using ESCA. The leaching exhibited by the fly ashes with regard to pH, Cd, B, Sn, Ni, Pb, Mo, Cu, Cr, Mn and Fe was examined. In addition, the removal of Cd, B, Sn, Ni, Pb, Mo, Cu, Cr, Fe, As and organics by fly ash was evaluated, using from actual ash pond samples to model realistic inlet concentrations. The results show that fly ash can be used for the treatment of Cadmium, Boron, Tin, Molybdenum, Nickel, Lead, Copper, Chromium, Zinc, Manganese, Iron, Arsenic and organics in actual ash pond effluents. 18 references, 64 figures, 60 tables.

  7. Ash3d: A finite-volume, conservative numerical model for ash transport and tephra deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop a transient, 3-D Eulerian model (Ash3d) to predict airborne volcanic ash concentration and tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. This model simulates downwind advection, turbulent diffusion, and settling of ash injected into the atmosphere by a volcanic eruption column. Ash advection is calculated using time-varying pre-existing wind data and a robust, high-order, finite-volume method. Our routine is mass-conservative and uses the coordinate system of the wind data, either a Cartesian system local to the volcano or a global spherical system for the Earth. Volcanic ash is specified with an arbitrary number of grain sizes, which affects the fall velocity, distribution and duration of transport. Above the source volcano, the vertical mass distribution with elevation is calculated using a Suzuki distribution for a given plume height, eruptive volume, and eruption duration. Multiple eruptions separated in time may be included in a single simulation. We test the model using analytical solutions for transport. Comparisons of the predicted and observed ash distributions for the 18 August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr in Alaska demonstrate to the efficacy and efficiency of the routine.

  8. Cast-concrete products made with FBC ash and wet-collected coal-ash

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, T.R.; Kraus, R.N.; Chun, Y.M.; Botha, F.D.

    2005-12-01

    Cast-concrete hollow blocks, solid blocks, and paving stones were produced at a manufacturing plant by replacing up to 45% (by mass) of portland cement with fluidized bed combustion (FBC) coal ash and up to 9% of natural aggregates with wet-collected, low-lime, coarse coal-ash (WA). Cast-concrete product specimens of all three types exceeded the compressive strength requirements of ASTM from early ages, with the exception of one paving-stone mixture, which fell short of the requirement by less than 10%. The cast-concrete products made by replacing up to 40% of cement with FBC ash were equivalent in strength (89-113% of control) to the products without ash. The abrasion resistance of paving stones was equivalent for up to 34% FBC ash content. Partial replacement of aggregates with WA decreased strength of the products. The resistance of hollow blocks and paving stones to freezing and thawing decreased appreciably with increasing ash contents. The cast-concrete products could be used indoors in regions where freezing and thawing is a concern, and outdoors in a moderate climate.

  9. Removal of hazardous metals from MSW fly ash--an evaluation of ash leaching methods.

    PubMed

    Fedje, Karin Karlfeldt; Ekberg, Christian; Skarnemark, Gunnar; Steenari, Britt-Marie

    2010-01-15

    Incineration is a commonly applied management method for municipal solid waste (MSW). However, significant amounts of potentially hazardous metal species are present in the resulting ash, and these may be leached into the environment. A common idea for cleaning the ash is to use enhanced leaching with strong mineral acids. However, due to the alkalinity of the ash, large amounts of acid are needed and this is a drawback. Therefore, this work was undertaken in order to investigate some alternative leaching media (EDTA, ammonium nitrate, ammonium chloride and a number of organic acids) and to compare them with the usual mineral acids and water. All leaching methods gave a significant increase in ash specific surface area due to removal of soluble bulk (matrix) compounds, such as CaCO(3) and alkali metal chlorides. The use of mineral acids and EDTA mobilised many elements, especially Cu, Zn and Pb, whereas the organic acids generally were not very effective as leaching agents for metals. Leaching using NH(4)NO(3) was especially effective for the release of Cu. The results show that washing of MSW filter ash with alternative leaching agents is a possible way to remove hazardous metals from MSW fly ash. PMID:19744790

  10. Hot-Gas Filter Ash Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dockter, B.A.; Hurley, J.P.; Watne, T.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; O`Keefe, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Large-scale hot-gas testing over the past several years has revealed numerous cases of cake buildup on filter elements that have been difficult, if not impossible to remove. At times, the cake can bridge between candle filters, leading to high filter failure rates. Physical factors, including particle-size distribution, particle shape, the aerodynamics of deposition, and system temperature contribute to difficulty in removing the cake. It is speculated that chemical as well as physical effects are playing a role in leading the ash to bond to the filter or to itself. The Energy and Environmental research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota is working with Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a consortium of companies in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform the research necessary to determine the factors that cause hot-gas cleanup filters to be blinded by ash or to develop deposits that can bridge the filters and cause them to fail. The objectives of this overall project are threefold: first, to determine the mechanisms by which difficult-to-clean ash is formed; second, to develop a method to determine the rate of blinding/bridging based on fuel and sorbent properties and operating conditions; finally, to provide suggestions fro ways to prevent filter blinding by the troublesome ash. The projects consists of four tasks: field sampling and archive sample analyses, laboratory-scale testing, bench-scale testing, and model and database development testing. This paper present preliminary data from Task 2 on determining the tensile strengths of coal ash particles at elevated temperatures and simulated combustor gas conditions.

  11. Evidence for tectonic emplacement of ultramafic and associated rocks in the pre-Silurian eugeoclinal belt of western New England- vestiges of an ancient accretionary wedge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, R.S.; Roy, D.L.; Hatch, N.L., Jr.; Knapp, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Three ultramafic and associated rocks occur in a highly faulted zone of pre-Silurian metamorphosed rocks, in which serpentinites and talc-carbonate rocks occur as slivers along faults that separate contrasting lithic assemblages. Results of detailed investigation of the map pattern, fault fabrics, lithic assemblages and metamorphism of the ultramafic belt in the Jay area of northern Vermont and comparison with its southern continuation in Massachusetts are cited as evidence supporting interpretation of the ultramafic and associated rocks as imbricated fragments of oceanic crust. Emplacement of the fragments in a stratigraphic sequence that was originally deposited along the continental margin of North America and on adjoining oceanic crust accompanied development of an accretionary wedge associated with an east-dipping subduction zone. (Preceding abstracts)-M.S.

  12. Late Paleozoic-Mesozoic tectonic evolution of SW Japan: A review - Reappraisal of the accretionary orogeny and revalidation of the collisional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charvet, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    This paper makes a review of the interpretations of the tectonic evolution of SW Japan during the last three decades. In the late 1970s, the dominant model was the so-called "Pacific-type orogeny", emphasizing the purported absence of nappes and the contrast with the alpine chains, and interpreting the evolution as due to a steady oceanic subduction since the Paleozoic time. In the 80s, the discovery of the actual structure made of a pile of large thrust sheets led authors to propose collisional models, involving the intermittent underthrusting of buoyant blocks like micro-continents. At the same time, the use of high-resolution biostratigraphy allowed several authors to recognize ancient accretionary wedges, with a reconstructed ocean plate stratigraphy of individual accreted units, especially in the Tanba and Shimanto zones. Also, precise radiometric dating permitted the distinction of metamorphosed units, especially in Sanbagawa and Shimanto belts. As a result of these new data, since the 1990s, the plate tectonic interpretation of the history of the Japanese Islands was revised by Japanese scientists and presented again in terms of accretionary processes linked to a steadily oceanic subduction, with an episodic ridge subduction: the so-called "Miyashiro-type orogeny". The review of different data leads to the following conclusions. The structure of SW Japan is made of a pile of sub-horizontal nappes, polydeformed, with a geometry similar to the one encountered in collisional orogens. The geodynamic mechanisms advocated for the tectonic building within the accretionary orogeny concept (Miyashiro-type orogeny) are inappropriate. A permanent oceanic subduction with the intermittent "collision" (actually subduction) of an active ridge or seamount chain is unable to build such structures, as this process induces in fact an acceleration of the tectonic erosion and collapse of the upper plate; the underthrusting of a micro-continent or mature arc is likely needed. The

  13. Prevention of lead leaching from fly ashes by mechanochemical treatment.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Fujiwara, K; Terada, A; Nakai, S; Hosomi, M

    2010-07-01

    Fly ashes from a municipal solid waste incinerator were subjected to mechanochemical (MC) treatment in a planetary ball mill, and the treated fly ashes were cemented with a binder. The leachability of lead (Pb) from the treated fly ashes and from the cement product were investigated, and the speciation of lead in the treated and untreated ashes was determined by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. MC treatment of the fly ashes and subsequent cementation prevented Pb leaching by 99.9%, whereas MC treatment alone prevented Pb leaching by 92.8%. Analysis of the X-ray absorption near-edge spectrum of the untreated fly ashes revealed that the predominant Pb species in the ashes was PbCl(2). In contrast, the counterpart in the treated fly ashes was Pb(3)O(4) insoluble in water. The formation of a species of Pb with a lower solubility in water than that of PbCl(2) was confirmed by MC treatment of PbCl(2)-spiked fly ashes for 48h, indicating the reduction of PbCl(2) in the spiked fly ashes to Pb via Pb(3)O(4) during MC treatment. Our results indicate that such reduction to an insoluble species prevented Pb from leaching and that MC treatment followed by cementation is a feasible method for the recycling of fly ashes. PMID:20022740

  14. Increasing bioavailability of phosphorus from fly ash through vermicomposting.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, S S; Chattopadhyay, G N

    2002-01-01

    Due to the environmental problems created by large-scale fly ash generation throughout the world, efforts are being made to recycle these materials. An important component of the recycling effort is using fly ash to improve low-fertility soils. Because availability of many nutrients is very low in fly ash, available ranges of such nutrients must be improved to increase the effectiveness of fly ash as a soil amendment. In the present study, we assessed the possibility of increasing P bioavailability in fly ash through vermicomposting in a yard experiment. Fly ash was mixed with organic matter in the form of cow (Bos taurus) dung at 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1 ratios and incubated with and without epigeic earthworm (Eisenia fetida) for 50 d. The concentration of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) was found to increase many fold in the earthworm-treated series of fly ash and organic matter combinations compared with the series without earthworm. This helped to transform considerable amounts of insoluble P from fly ash into more soluble forms and thus resulted in increased bioavailability of the nutrients in the vermicomposted series. Among different combinations of fly ash and organic matter, P availability in fly ash due to vermicomposting was significantly higher in the 1:1 fly ash to cow dung treatment compared with the other treatments. PMID:12469864

  15. Propagation of a lithospheric tear fault (STEP) through the western boundary of the Calabrian accretionary wedge offshore eastern Sicily (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallais, Flora; Graindorge, David; Gutscher, Marc-André; Klaeschen, Dirk

    2013-08-01

    The rollback of a segmented slab of oceanic lithosphere is typically accompanied by vertical lithospheric tear fault(s) along the lateral slab edge(s) and by strike slip movement in the upper plate, defined as a STEP fault (Subduction Tear Edge Propagator). The Neogene evolution of the Central Mediterranean is dominated by the interaction between the slow Africa-Eurasia convergence and the SE-ward rollback of the Ionian slab, that leads to the back-arc opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Here, we present post-stack time migrated and pre-stack depth migrated Archimede (1997) multichannel seismic lines, that were acquired offshore eastern Sicily, at the foot of the Malta escarpment. First, we identify the recent deformation along the lateral ramp of the Calabrian accretionary wedge. Towards the east, the Calabrian wedge is formed by the accretion of the post-evaporitic sediments, above a decollement at the base of the Messinian evaporites. At the latitude of Syracuse, 50 km east of the Malta escarpment, a major N150°E trending crustal scale and vertical fault slices through the entire accretionary wedge. This fault cuts by several kilometers, through the pre-evaporitic Messinian sediments and into the basement. The vertical offset along this vertical fault decreases from north to south, and the fault is no longer observed on the seismic lines, 50 km SE of the Alfeo seamount. A previously published Moho depth isocontour map, offshore Sicily and the recent GPS data, combined with the presence of strike slip movements NE onshore Sicily, allow us to identify this 200 km long crustal-scale fault as the surface expression of a STEP fault. The presence of syntectonic Pleistocene sediments on top this crustal-scale fault suggests a recent lithospheric vertical movement of the STEP fault, in response to the rollback of the Ionian slab and to the SE-ward advance of the Calabria-Peloritan block.

  16. In-situ stress and strength in the Nankai inner accretionary prism at Site C0002, IODP NanTroSEIZE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, H.; Valdez, R. D.; Kitamura, M.; Sone, H.; Saffer, D. M.; Tobin, H. J.; Hirose, T.; Kuo, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE), a deep riser borehole has been drilled into the Kumano forearc basin and the underlying inner accretionary wedge at Site C0002, located ~35 km landward from the trench. One of the primary objectives of drilling the riser site was to characterize in-situ stress and pore pressure in the hanging wall above the locked plate boundary. Here, we: (1) investigate the mechanical strength and deformation behavior of prism sediment via laboratory experiments on core samples; and (2) quantify in-situ stress (Sv, Sh, and SH), and pore pressure (Pp) in the Kumano basin and the inner prism. We conducted triaxial compression experiments on core samples recovered from ~ 2200 meters below sea floor (mbsf) during IODP Expedition 348, at effective pressures (Pe) ranging from 8 and 36 MPa, and at temperatures of either 25°C or 60°C. Our preliminary results indicate that the prism (20 - 42% porosity) rocks deform brittlely at Pe < 22 MPa, but exhibit strain hardening at Pe = 36 MPa. This pressure-porosity condition for a brittle-ductile transition is consistent with previous work defining yield models for incoming sediments at the Nankai Trough (Kitajima and Saffer, 2012). Combining P-wave velocity logs and downhole measurements of leak-off pressure at Site C0002 with an empirical relationship between P-wave velocity, porosity, and effective stress, we show that the Kumano forearc basin is in a uniaxial-strain loading path, which defines a normal faulting stress regime (Sv>SH>=Sh), whereas the inner accretionary prism is in a triaxial-strain loading path that defines a strike-slip faulting regime (SH>Sv>Sh). We estimate excess pore pressure below ~2000 mbsf ranging from 0-12 MPa, corresponding to a pore pressure ratio λ* of 0 - 0.40.

  17. Structural Features and Gas Hydrate Distribution Across the Boundary of the Submarine Taiwan Accretionary Wedge and Passive China Continental Margin Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Liu, C.; Lin, C.; Hsu, H.; Ko, C.; Chen, S.; Chung, S.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzes a 3D seismic data volume in the upper reach of the Penghu Submarine Canyon for gas hydrate investigation. This 3D seismic data set runs across the deformation front which separates the passive China continental slope from the Taiwan accretionary wedge. Bottom-simulating reflectors (BSRs) are widely distributed in the study area which suggests that gas hydrates are present in both the extensional and compressive structure domains. We use 3D seismic images to map the spatial distribution of BSRs, and to identify structural and sedimentary features across the deformation front. Seismic attribute analysis of the 3D seismic volume has been performed which helps to reveal structure details and physical properties of the substrata. Our study identifies detailed structural variations across the deformation front: In the passive continental slope domain, besides normal faults, buried submarine canyons and paleo-topography of the continental slope before the arc-continent collision are recognized, while in the accretionay wedge domain, the fold and thrust structures dominate. BSR distribution in the 3D box correlates well with the seafloor topography, buried channels and fluid migration paths, we suggest that there may be different gas hydrate systems for the passive continental slope and for the accretionary wedge domains. As the Penghu Submarine Canyon is an important conduit offshore southwestern Taiwan for transporting terrestrial and shallow marine sediments, we suggest that the buried channels that filled with coarse-grain sediments could be good reservoirs for gas hydrates and free gases. Accurate substrata velocity models derived from a large-offset 2D seismic profile data in the study area will help us to better estimate the gas hydrate concentration in those reservoirs.

  18. Tectonometamorphic evolution of the Samaná complex, northern Hispaniola: Implications for the burial and exhumation of high-pressure rocks in a collisional accretionary wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Valverde-Vaquero, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The Samaná complex exposes a segment of a high-P metasedimentary collisional accretionary wedge, built during Caribbean island arc-North America continental margin convergence. Combined detailed mapping, metamorphic mineral assemblages, multi-equilibrium calculations and thermodynamical modelling of garnet zoning, together with isotopic ages, allow proposing a tectonothermal evolution of the complex involving three major stages (M1 to M3). M1 metamorphism was characterised by a prograde P-T path towards the pressure-peak in the lawsonite-blueschists (Santa Bárbara Schists and Rincón Marbles lower structural nappes) and garnet-blueschists to eclogite-facies conditions (Punta Balandra upper nappe). This high-P metamorphism and related D1 deformation took place from the Eocene to Late Oligocene, when the different nappes were buried along a cold subduction-zone gradient. Contemporary to the D2 deformation, M2 retrograde metamorphism was associated in all nappes with substantial decompression under nearly isothermal or cooling conditions to the epidote-blueschists and greenchists facies conditions. D2 deformation produced ENE-directed folding, thrusting and nappe stacking in the complex, when nappes went sequentially incorporated to a growing collisional accretionary complex between the Late Eocene and the earliest Miocene. D2 deformation is thus responsible for much of the exhumation of the subducted rocks and for the thinning of the nappe pile. As the continuity of the P-T conditions within the accreted metasedimentary material were in this case preserved, the exhumation mechanisms for Samaná complex high-P rocks was most probably driven by underthrusting/underplating and erosion. Non-penetrative fabrics associated with D3 and D4 late deformations indicate M3 cooling in the greenschists and subgreenchists-facies conditions. D5 sinistral strike-slip brittle faults cut and laterally displaced the whole nappe pile of the Samaná complex from the Lower Miocene to the

  19. Structure, age, and mechanism of emplacement of the Amur and Kiselevka-Manoma accretionary complexes of the lower Amur region, Russian Far East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyabrev, S. V.; Anoikin, V. I.; Kudymov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The Amur and Kiselevka-Manoma accretionary complexes belong to the Cretaceous Khingan-Okhotsk active continental margin, which was formed in the east of Eurasia as a result of the subduction of the Pacific oceanic plates. The Kiselevka-Manoma complex is composed of oceanic pelagic and hemipelagic sedimentary rocks and intraplate oceanic basalts. It is located to the southeast, along the ocean-faced front of the Amur complex, which is predominantly composed of turbidites of the convergent boundary of lithospheric plates. The biostratigraphic study of radiolarians from rocks of the frontal part of the Amur complex allowed us to correlate them with rocks of the Kiselevka-Manoma complex and to define the period of accretion to be from the Late Aptian to the Middle Albian. The tectonostratigraphic interrelations of these two contrasting lithotectonic complexes are established and two possible models of their common emplacement are suggested. Both models suppose a continuous spatiotemporal relation of complexes with the primary paleolocation of the Kiselevka-Manoma complex in front of (on the ocean side) the Amur complex. The frontal part of the Amur complex and the Kiselevka-Manoma complex were emplaced synchronously with the western part of the East Sakhalin accretionary complex. This scenario defines the Early Cretaceous tectonic zonation of the region and the choice of the appropriate paleotectonic model. At the end of the Early Cretaceous, a single convergent boundary of the lithospheric plates is suggested with the position of the Sakhalin island arc system south of the Khingan-Okhotsk active continental margin.

  20. Fundamental objectives of municipal solid waste incinerator ash management

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, R.A. )

    1988-01-01

    Recent data are discussed that corroborate earlier indications that municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator ash is hazardous. These data demonstrate that: ash contains high levels of several highly toxic metals, and can also contain dangerous levels of dioxins; certain of the metals -- lead and cadmium, in particular -- are readily leachable from ash at levels that frequently exceed the limits defining a hazardous waste; incineration concentrates and mobilizes the metals present in MSW, and can create dioxins, opening up several new pathways of exposure to these toxins; and ash is toxic when tested by several means in addition to the EP toxicity test. Each of these findings is especially evident for the fly ash component of MSW incinerator ash. Objectives for environmentally sound ash management are presented and discussed.

  1. Fly ash of mineral coal as ceramic tiles raw material.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, A; Bergmann, C P

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of mineral coal fly ash as a raw material in the production of ceramic tiles. The samples of fly ash came from Capivari de Baixo, a city situated in the Brazilian Federal State of Santa Catarina. The fly ash and the raw materials were characterized regarding their physical chemical properties, and, based on these results; batches containing fly ash and typical raw materials for ceramic tiles were prepared. The fly ash content in the batches varied between 20 and 80 wt%. Specimens were molded using a uniaxial hydraulic press and were fired. All batches containing ash up to 60 wt% present adequate properties to be classified as several kinds of products in the ISO 13006 standard () regarding its different absorption groups (pressed). The results obtained indicate that fly ash, when mixed with traditional raw materials, has the necessary requirements to be used as a raw material for production of ceramic tiles. PMID:16540298

  2. Volcanic Ash fall Impact on Vegetation, Colima 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M. G.; Martin, A.; Fonseca, R.; Nieto, A.; Radillo, R.; Armienta, M.

    2007-05-01

    An ash sampling network was established arround Colima Volcano in 2005. Ash fall was sampled on the North, Northeast, East, Southeast, South, Southwest and West of the volcano. Samples were analyzed for ash components, geochemistry and leachates. Ash fall ocurred on April (12), May (10, 23), June (2, 6, 9, 10, 12, 14), July (27), September (27), October (23) and November (24). Most of the ash is made of andesitic dome-lithics but shows diferences in crystal, juvenile material and lithic content. In May, some samples contained grey and dark pumice (scoria). Texture varies from phi >4 to phi 0. Leachate concentration were low: SO4 (7.33-54.19) Cl- (2.29-4.97) and F- (0.16-0.37). During 2005, Colima Volcano's ash fall rotted some of the guava and peach fruits and had a drying effect on spearment and epazote plants. Even these small ash amounts could have hindered sugar cane and agave growth.

  3. Chemical composition in relation with biomass ash structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef

    2014-08-01

    Biomass combustion can be more complicated like combustion of fossil fuels because it is necessary to solve problems with lower ash melting temperature. It can cause a lot of problems during combustion process. Chemical composition of biomass ash has great impact on sinters and slags creation in ash because it affects structure of heated ash. In this paper was solved relation between chemical composition and structure of heated ash from three types of biomass (spruce wood, miscanthus giganteus and wheat straw). Amount of SiO2, CaO, MgO, Al2O3 and K2O was determined. Structure of heated ash was optically determined after heating to 1000 °C or 1200 °C. Results demonstrated that chemical composition has strong effect on structure and color of heated ash.

  4. Immobilization of incinerator ash in a concrete matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R S; Charlesworth, D L

    1988-01-01

    The ashcrete process will solidfy ash generated by the consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The ashcrete unit produces ashcrete, a stable cement-based wasteform, by remotely adding cement and water and tumbling drums of ash. Ashcrete product homogeneity, temperature rise during setting, and compressive strength were measured and product formulations were developed for several nonradioactive dry ash types. Saturation level and wet and dry ash densities for several ash types have been measured. Preliminary mixture formulations for the anticipated ash were tested. A proof-of-principle test was performed using a mockup of the CIF ash system. Finally, mechanical modifications to prepare the unit for use with the CIF and to ensure reliable operation are being implemented. 4 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Possibilities of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash utilisation.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Silvie; Koval, Lukáš; Škrobánková, Hana; Matýsek, Dalibor; Winter, Franz; Purgar, Amon

    2015-08-01

    Properties of the waste treatment residual fly ash generated from municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were investigated in this study. Six different mortar blends with the addition of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were evaluated. The Portland cement replacement levels of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash used were 25%, 30% and 50%. Both, raw and washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash samples were examined. According to the mineralogical composition measurements, a 22.6% increase in the pozzolanic/hydraulic properties was observed for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash sample. The maximum replacement level of 25% for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in mortar blends was established in order to preserve the compressive strength properties. Moreover, the leaching characteristics of the crushed mortar blend was analysed in order to examine the immobilisation of its hazardous contents. PMID:26060198

  6. Stabilizing soft fine-grained soils with fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Edil, T.B.; Acosta, H.A.; Benson, C.H.

    2006-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of self-cementing fly ashes derived from combustion of subbituminous coal at electric power plants for stabilization of soft fine-grained soils. California bearing ratio (CBR) and resilient modulus (M{sub r}) tests were conducted on mixtures prepared with seven soft fine-grained soils (six inorganic soils and one organic soil) and four fly ashes. The soils were selected to represent a relatively broad range of plasticity, with plasticity indices ranging between 15 and 38. Two of the fly ashes are high quality Class C ashes (per ASTM C 618) that are normally used in Portland cement concrete. The other ashes are off-specification ashes, meaning they do not meet the Class C or Class F criteria in ASTM C 618. Tests were conducted on soils and soil-fly ash mixtures prepared at optimum water content (a standardized condition), 7% wet of optimum water content (representative of the typical in situ condition in Wisconsin), and 9-18% wet of optimum water content (representative of a very wet in situ condition). Addition of fly ash resulted in appreciable increases in the CBR and M{sub r} of the inorganic soils. For water contents 7% wet of optimum, CBRs of the soils alone ranged between 1 and 5. Addition of 10% fly ash resulted in CBRs ranging between 8 and 17, and 18% fly ash resulted in CBRs between 15 and 31. Similarly, M{sub r} of the soil alone ranged between 3 and 15 MPa at 7% wet of optimum, whereas addition of 10% fly ash resulted in M{sub r} between 12 and 60 MPa and 18% fly ash resulted in M{sub r} between 51 and 106 MPa. In contrast, except for one fly ash, addition of fly ash generally had little effect on CBR or M{sub r} of the organic soil.

  7. Estimating potential emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) populations using ash inventory data.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Deborah G; Siegert, Nathan W

    2007-10-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem-feeding pest native to Asia, was identified in June 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus spp.), mortality in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Localized populations of A. planipennis have since been found across lower Michigan and in areas of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Maryland, and Ontario. Officials working to contain A. planipennis and managers of forestlands near A. planipennis infestations must be able to compare alternative strategies to allocate limited funds efficiently and effectively. Empirical data from a total of 148 green ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh., and white ash, Fraxinus americana L., trees were used to develop models to estimate surface area of the trunk and branches by using tree diameter at breast height (dbh). Data collected from 71 additional F. pennsylvanica and F. americana trees killed by A. planipennis showed that on average, 88.9 +/- 4.6 beetles developed and emerged per m2 of surface area. Models were applied to ash inventory data collected at two outlier sites to estimate potential production of A. planipennis beetles at each site. Large trees of merchantable size (dbh > or = 26 cm) accounted for roughly 6% of all ash trees at the two sites, but they could have contributed 55-65% of the total A. planipennis production at both sites. In contrast, 75- 80% of the ash trees at the outlier sites were < or =13 cm dbh, but these small trees could have contributed only < or =12% of the potential A. planipennis production at both sites. Our results, in combination with inventory data, can be used by regulatory officials and resource managers to estimate potential A. planipennis production and to compare options for reducing A. planipennis density and slowing the rate of spread for any area of interest. PMID:17972635

  8. Fly ash and concrete: a study determines whether biomass, or coal co-firing fly ash, can be used in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuangzhen; Baxter, Larry

    2006-08-01

    Current US national standards for using fly ash in concrete (ASTM C618) state that fly ash must come from coal combustion, thus precluding biomass-coal co-firing fly ash. The co-fired ash comes from a large and increasing fraction of US power plants due to rapid increases in co-firing opportunity fuels with coal. The fly ashes include coal fly ash, wood fly ash from pure wood combustion, biomass and coal co-fired fly ash SW1 and SW2. Also wood fly ash is blended with Class C or Class F to produce Wood C and Wood E. Concrete samples were prepared with fly ash replacing cement by 25%. All fly ash mixes except wood have a lower water demand than the pure cement mix. Fly ashes, either from coal or non coal combustion, increase the required air entraining agent (AEA) to meet the design specification of the mixes. If AEA is added arbitrarily without considering the amount or existence of fly ash results could lead to air content in concrete that is either too low or too high. Biomass fly ash does not impact concrete setting behaviour disproportionately. Switch grass-coal co-fired fly ash and blended wood fly ash generally lie within the range of pure coal fly ash strength. The 56 day flexure strength of all the fly ash mixes is comparable to that of the pure cement mix. The flexure strength from the coal-biomass co-fired fly ash does not differ much from pure coal fly ash. All fly ash concrete mixes exhibit lower chloride permeability than the pure cement mixes. In conclusion biomass coal co-fired fly ash perform similarly to coal fly ash in fresh and hardened concrete. As a result, there is no reason to exclude biomass-coal co-fired fly ash in concrete.

  9. Generation of volcanic ash: a textural study of ash produced in various laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallée, Yan; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2010-05-01

    In volcanology, ash is commonly understood as a fragment of a bubble wall that gets disrupted during explosive eruptions. Most volcanic ashes are indeed the product of explosive eruptions, but the true definition is however that of a particle size being inferior to 2 mm. The term does not hold any information about its genesis. During fragmentation, particles of all sizes in various amounts are generated. In nature, fragmentation is a brittle response of the material (whether a rock or magma) caused by changes in 1) strain rate and 2) temperature, and/or 3) chemical composition. Here we used different experimental techniques to produce ash and study their physical characteristics. The effects of strain rate were investigated by deforming volcanic rocks and magma (pure silicate melt and crystal-bearing magma) at different temperatures and stresses in a uniaxial compression apparatus. Failure of pure silicate melts is spontaneous and generates more ash particles than fragmentation of crystal-bearing melts. In the latter, the abundance of generated ash correlates positively with the strain rate. We complemented this investigation with a study of particles generated during rapid decompression of porous rocks, using a fragmentation apparatus. Products of decompression experiments at different initial applied pore pressure show that the amount of ash generated by bubble burst increase with the initial applied pressure and the open porosity. The effects of temperature were investigated by dropping pure silicate melts and crystal-bearing magma at 900 and 1100°C in water at room temperature. Quenching of the material is accompanied by rapid contraction and near instantaneous fragmentation. Pure silicate melts respond more violently to the interaction with water and completely fragmented into small particles, including a variety of ash morphologies and surface textures. Crystal-bearing magmas however fragmented only very partially when in contact with water and produced a

  10. Experimental study on ash fusion characteristics of biomass.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiang; Jia, Li

    2012-01-01

    In this study, ash fusion characteristics (AFC) of biomass red pine, corn straw, Bermuda grass and bamboo are investigated. Results of this study show that ash melting temperatures are higher when samples are ashed at 815 °C than at 600 °C, but the differences are small. The ash deformation temperatures of pine and straw are over 1100 °C, but the ash deformation temperatures of Bermuda grass and bamboo are lower than the former biomass. Also, Bermuda grass and bamboo are prone to sintering phenomenon when burning. In the thermogravimetric experiment on ash, the heating process can be divided into three stages, namely water evaporation, oxidation of organic compounds and evaporation, and reaction of inorganic components. The ash of Bermuda grass and bamboo contains more unburned organic matters because of sintering, and higher calcium content in pine ash results in a more mass loss in the third stage. The ash fusion characteristics for co-combustion of biomass with coal are investigated. It is found that the ash melting temperature firstly decreases and then increases with the content of the corn straw increase, changing as "V" shape. PMID:22154746

  11. Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-05-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  12. FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF LOW-NOx COMBUSTION FLY ASH UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    ERIC M. SUUBERG; ROBERT H. HURT

    1998-10-19

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over fifty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  13. Fundamental Study of Low-Nox Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    E. M. Suuberg; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R. H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-11-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  14. Application of solid ash based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin

    2008-10-01

    Solid wastes, fly ash, and bottom ash are generated from coal and biomass combustion. Fly ash is mainly composed of various metal oxides and possesses higher thermal stability. Utilization of fly ash for other industrial applications provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of recycling this solid waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects. On the one hand, due to the higher stability of its major component, aluminosilicates, fly ash could be employed as catalyst support by impregnation of other active components for various reactions. On the other hand, other chemical compounds in fly ash such as Fe2O3 could also provide an active component making fly ash a catalyst for some reactions. In this paper, physicochemical properties of fly ash and its applications for heterogeneous catalysis as a catalyst support or catalyst in a variety of catalytic reactions were reviewed. Fly-ash-supported catalysts have shown good catalytic activities for H2 production, deSO(x), deNO(x), hydrocarbon oxidation,and hydrocracking, which are comparable to commercially used catalysts. As a catalyst itself, fly ash can also be effective for gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, aqueous-phase oxidation of organics, solid plastic pyrolysis, and solvent-free organic synthesis. PMID:18939526

  15. Optical properties of volcanic ash: improving remote sensing observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelley, Patrick; Colarco, Peter; Aquila, Valentina; Krotkov, Nickolay; Bleacher, Jake; Garry, Brent; Young, Kelsey; Rocha Lima, Adriana; Martins, Vanderlei; Carn, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Many times each year explosive volcanic eruptions loft ash into the atmosphere. Global travel and trade rely on aircraft vulnerable to encounters with airborne ash. Volcanic ash advisory centers (VAACs) rely on dispersion forecasts and satellite data to issue timely warnings. To improve ash forecasts model developers and satellite data providers need realistic information about volcanic ash microphysical and optical properties. In anticipation of future large eruptions we can study smaller events to improve our remote sensing and modeling skills so when the next Pinatubo 1991 or larger eruption occurs, ash can confidently be tracked in a quantitative way. At distances >100km from their sources, drifting ash plumes, often above meteorological clouds, are not easily detected from conventional remote sensing platforms, save deriving their quantitative characteristics, such as mass density. Quantitative interpretation of these observations depends on a priori knowledge of the spectral optical properties of the ash in UV (>0.3μm) and TIR wavelengths (>10μm). Incorrect assumptions about the optical properties result in large errors in inferred column mass loading and size distribution, which misguide operational ash forecasts. Similarly, simulating ash properties in global climate models also requires some knowledge of optical properties to improve aerosol speciation.

  16. Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Bohac, C.E.

    1990-04-01

    Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. The leaching characteristics of selenium from coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Wang, J.; Burken, J.G.; Ban, H.; Ladwig, K.

    2007-11-15

    The leaching characteristics of selenium from several bituminous and subbituminous coal fly ashes under different pH conditions were investigated using batch methods. Results indicated that pH had a significant effect on selenium leaching from bituminous coal ash. The minimum selenium leaching occurred in the pH range between 3 and 4, while the maximum selenium leaching occurred at pH 12. The release of selenium from subbituminous coal ashes was very low for the entire experimental pH range, possibly due to the high content of calcium which can form hydration or precipitation products as a sink for selenium. The adsorption results for different selenium species indicated that Se(VI) was hardly adsorbable on either bituminous coal ashes or subbitumminous coal ashes at any pH. However, Se(I) was highly adsorbed by bituminous coal ashes under acidic pH conditions and was mostly removed by subbitumminous coal ashes across the entire pH range. This result suggests that the majority of selenium released from the tested fly ashes was Se(IV). A speciation-based model was developed to simulate the adsorption of Se(IV) on bituminous coal fly ash, and the pH-independent adsorption constants of HSeO{sup 3-} and SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} were determined. The modeling approach is useful for understanding and predicting the release process of selenium from fly ash.

  18. Application of solid ash based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaobin Wang

    2008-10-01

    Solid wastes, fly ash, and bottom ash are generated from coal and biomass combustion. Fly ash is mainly composed of various metal oxides and possesses higher thermal stability. Utilization of fly ash for other industrial applications provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of recycling this solid waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects. On the one hand, due to the higher stability of its major component, aluminosilicates, fly ash could be employed as catalyst support by impregnation of other active components for various reactions. On the other hand, other chemical compounds in fly ash such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} could also provide an active component making fly ash a catalyst for some reactions. In this paper, physicochemical properties of fly ash and its applications for heterogeneous catalysis as a catalyst support or catalyst in a variety of catalytic reactions were reviewed. Fly-ash-supported catalysts have shown good catalytic activities for H{sub 2} production, deSOx, deNOx, hydrocarbon oxidation, and hydrocracking, which are comparable to commercially used catalysts. As a catalyst itself, fly ash can also be effective for gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, aqueous-phase oxidation of organics, solid plastic pyrolysis, and solvent-free organic synthesis. 107 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. General nature and using potentiality of fly ash in China

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, J.; Wang, Z.; Shao, X.; Zhi, X.; Wang, G.

    1998-12-31

    China is the largest fly ash producer of the world. Currently, it produces at least 100 million tons of fly ash each year. Since the different coal types, different coal forming conditions, and different burners are used around the country, the nature of fly ash produced in different plants varies. The characteristics of fly ash influence their utilization. In this paper, numerous data about the characteristics of fly ash in China are collected and analyzed, such as the main chemical components of fly ash (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, K{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), LOI (C content), and some trace elements and radioactive elements, grain size distribution, phase compositions including types, shapes and contents of glassy bodies, types of inorganic minerals, specific gravity, specific surface, ratio of water requirement, ratio of water content, 28-day compressive strength, etc. Based upon these parameters, methods of fly ash utilization are analyzed systematically. The methods of utilization incorporated with the nature of fly ash can improve the level of fly ash utilization. Fly ash in China is primarily used in road construction, production of building materials (cement, concrete, bricks, tiles, ceramsites and mortar), backfilling, construction engineering, agriculture, and materials recovery of useful components.

  20. Sustainable use of biofuel by recycling ash to forests: treatment of biofuel ash.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudkhani, Maryam; Richards, Tobias; Theliander, Hans

    2007-06-01

    The influence of treatment techniques on leaching properties of alkaline species from biofuel ash is investigated in this paper. Ash samples from combustion of biofuels in a circulating fluidized bed and grate-firing combustion plants are studied. The samples are treated using three different treatment techniques; self-hardening, thermal treatment, and hardening bythe addition of binding materials. Nontreated and treated samples are evaluated for the leaching properties of the alkaline compounds and, furthermore, are characterized with respect to both physical and chemical characteristics. The results show the influence of treatment techniques on the physical structure and leaching characteristics of alkaline species. Results also indicate that ash samples show different behavior when treated with different methods, i.e., the influence of treatment technique on controlling the leaching properties is highly dependent on the initial chemical composition of ash. It was also found that there is an interaction between leaching of limited and easily soluble species, e.g., calcium and potassium leaching. Therefore, to control the leaching rate of alkaline species from ash, the characteristics that correlate the leaching properties of both easily and limited soluble species need to be adjusted. PMID:17612199

  1. 2005 world of coal ash conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2005-07-01

    The theme of the conference was science, applications and sustainability. Papers are presented under the following topics: aggregates; FGD; policy; SCR; chemistry; cement and concrete (including alkali and silica reaction); agriculture; chemistry - mercury; mine reclamation; new products; and environmental management. The papers from the regulation, risk and reclamation with coal combustion byproducts at mines - OSM interactive forum and the 2005 conference on unburned carbon on utility fly ash are also included. The poster papers are included as well.

  2. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  3. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Hnat, James G.; Mathur, Akshay; Simpson, James C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  4. Eirich technology for the preparation of ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Eirich, G.

    1994-12-31

    The paper describes a mixer manufactured by Maschinenfabrik Gustav Eirich that can be used in the agglomeration of power plant ashes and residues. No matter whether the power plant burns coal, fuel oil, wood, peat, or garbage or whether the power plant plans to dispose or utilize the residue, most flowsheets will contain an agglomeration step. The paper describes some of the uses to which this mixer can be put.

  5. Fly ash as a liming material for cotton.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Gene; Dunn, David

    2004-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of fly ash from a coal combustion electric power facility on soil acidity in a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) field. Fresh fly ash was applied to a Bosket fine sandy loam (fine-loamy, mixed, thermic Mollic Hapludalf) soil with an initial soil pH(salt) of 4.8. The fly ash was equivalent to 42 g kg(-1) calcium carbonate with 97% passing through a 60 mesh (U.S. standard) sieve. Fly ash was applied one day before cotton planting in 1999 at 0, 3.4, 6.7, and 10.1 Mg ha(-1). No fly ash was applied in 2000. Within 60 d of fly ash application in 1999, all rates of fly ash significantly increased soil pH above 6.0. Manganese levels in cotton petioles were reduced significantly by 6.7 and 10.1 Mg ha(-1) of fly ash. Soil boron (B) and sodium (Na) concentrations were significantly increased with fly ash. In 1999, B in cotton leaves ranged from 72 to 84 mg kg(-1) in plots with fly ash applications. However, no visual symptoms of B toxicity in plants were observed. In 1999, cotton lint yield decreased on average 12 kg ha(-1) for each Mg of fly ash applied. In 2000, cotton yields were significantly greater for the residual 3.4 and 6.7 Mg fly ash ha(-1) plots than the untreated check. Due to the adverse yield effects measured in the first year following application, fly ash would not be a suitable soil amendment for cotton on this soil at this time. PMID:14964389

  6. Correlation of ash-flow tuffs.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Mahood, G.

    1985-01-01

    Discrimination and correlation of ash-flow sheets is important in structurally complex, long-lived volcanic fields where such sheets provide the best keys to the regional stratigraphic framework. Three-dimensional complexities resulting from pulsatory eruptions, sectorial emplacement, mechanical sorting during outflow, thermal and compositional zoning of magmas, the physical zoning of cooling units, and structural and erosional disruption can make such correlation and discrimination difficult. When lithologic, magnetic, petrographic, chemical, and isotopic criteria for correlating ash-flow sheets are critically evaluated, many problems and pitfalls can be identified. Distinctive phenocrysts, pumice clasts, and lithic fragments are among the more reliable criteria, as are high-precision K-Ar ages and thermal remanent magnetization (TRM) directions in unaltered welded tuff. Chemical correlation methods should rely principally upon welded or nonwelded pumice blocks, not upon the ash-flow matrix, which is subject to fractionation, mixing, and contamination during emplacement. Compositional zoning of most large sheets requires that many samples be analyzed before phenocryst, glass or whole-rock chemical trends can be used confidently as correlation criteria.-Authors

  7. Market assessment of PFBC ash use

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, A. E.; Brown, T. H., Western Research Institute

    1998-01-01

    Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) of coal is undergoing demonstration in the United States, as well as throughout the world. American Electric Power`s (AEP`s) bubbling PFBC 70 MWe Tidd demonstration program in Ohio and pilot-scale development at Foster Wheeler Energia Oy 10 MWth circulating PFBC at Karhula, Finland, have demonstrated the advantages of PFBC technology. Further technology development in the US is planned with the deployment of the technology at the MacIntosh Clean Coal project in Lakeland, Florida. Development of uses for solid wastes from PFBC coal-fired power systems is being actively pursued as part of the demonstration of PFBC technologies. Ashes collected from Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, operating on (1) low sulfur subbituminous and (2) high sulfur bituminous coal; and ash from the AEP`s high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at Western Research Institute (WRI).

  8. Hot-gas filter ash characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.P.; Strobel, T.M.; Dockter, B.A.

    1995-11-01

    One of the key difficulties in the development of advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems is the need to remove particulates from the gas stream at high temperatures and pressures. Research has revealed numerous cases of ash cake buildup on filter elements that has been difficult to remove using on-line jet pulsing. The objectives of this research are to: (1) determine the mechanisms by which a difficult-to-clean ash is formed and how it blinds or bridges hot-gas filters; (2) develop a method to determine the rate of blinding or bridging based on analyses of the feed coal and sorbent and on the operating conditions; and (3) provide suggestions for ways to prevent filter blinding and bridging by the troublesome ash. Four tasks are being performed: Task 1--field sampling and archive sample analysis; Task 2--laboratory-scale testing; Task 3--bench-scale testing; and Task 4--computer modeling. Results are presented from the first two tasks.

  9. Radiometric ash monitor with iron compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmann, C.; Erken, M.; Fauth, G.; Kern, H.

    1996-12-31

    The recent development of special devices for the measurement of the coal preparation product`s quality makes it possible to design feed forward and feed back quality control systems. For the determination of the ash content in coal very reliable radiometric measuring devices using the dual energy transmission method are available and well tested since several years. While the devices of the fire generation, where the probes were mounted in the center of the belt, determine the composition of only a part of the material, multi channel systems were developed and installed in preparation plants of different German and foreign mines. These analyzers work with three to five pairs of detectors which are placed across the belt to overcome representativity problems at inhomogeneously loaded belts. Another attempt to overcome those problems is the measurement behind an automatic sampler in a bypass. Dual energy ash meters are well developed and available from different companies round the world. Different examples show that some applications give excellent results while other applications show only poor accuracies due to variations in the composition. A new development using radiation with lower energies to determine important ingredients of coal shows an improvement of the ash measurement. Installed behind a sampler, the system offers a representative measurement which is less dependent on variations of the composition. First results will be presented.

  10. Radiative properties of ash and slag

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Markham, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal radiation plays a key role in the operation and efficiency of combustion systems, accounting for over 90% of the heat transfer. The analysis of radiative heat transfer in coal-fired boilers, combustion chambers and other energy systems requires accounting for the effects of inorganic deposits on bounding surfaces and of entrained particulates, such as pulverized coal, char and fly-ash. These effects can be predicted; however, the accuracy in predicting the radiative properties of entrained particles (ash) and deposit layers (slag) is limited by inaccurate knowledge of the physical/chemical properties of the materials over a range of material temperatures and radiative wavelengths that is representative of conditions in practical combustion systems. The objective of this project is to make laboratory measurements of the radiative properties of extracted ash deposit samples. During this quarter, technique validation measurements were performed on several test samples. Technique validation has been achieved for infrared opaque and semi-transparent materials that exhibit a high degree of specular reflection (i.e. having a negligible diffuse reflectance component). Validation has not been achieved for non-specular reflecting surfaces, but work is progressing on modifying the present system to accommodate these materials.

  11. Aerodynamic characteristics of popcorn ash particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkaduvasala, V.; Murphy, D.W.; Ban, H.; Harrison, K.E.; Monroe, L.S.

    2007-07-01

    Popcorn ash particles are fragments of sintered coal fly ash masses that resemble popcorn in low apparent density. They can travel with the flow in the furnace and settle on key places such as catalyst surfaces. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are often used in the design process to prevent the carryover and settling of these particles on catalysts. Particle size, density, and drag coefficient are the most important aerodynamic parameters needed in CFD modeling of particle flow. The objective of this study was to experimentally determine particle size, shape, apparent density, and drag characteristics for popcorn ash particles from a coal-fired power plant. Particle size and shape were characterized by digital photography in three orthogonal directions and by computer image analysis. Particle apparent density was determined by volume and mass measurements. Particle terminal velocities in three directions were measured in water and each particle was also weighed in air and in water. The experimental data were analyzed and models were developed for equivalent sphere and equivalent ellipsoid with apparent density and drag coefficient distributions. The method developed in this study can be used to characterize the aerodynamic properties of popcorn-like particles.

  12. Volatile Contents, Degassing Behaviour and Hydration of Early-erupted Rhyolitic Pyroclasts and Ashes from Vulcan Chaitén, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuffen, H.; Riley, C. S.; Castro, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The concentration of dissolved volatile species in silicic pyroclasts, especially that of water, can yield key information about magma degassing and fragmentation depths. However, post-eruptive hydration can be highly problematic, with meteoric water overprinting magmatic water contents, especially in fine-grained or highly porous samples that have large surface area to volume ratios. In this study we have used thermogravimetric analysis-mass spectroscopy (TGA-MS) to characterize the volatile contents and degassing behaviour of a selection of juvenile pyroclasts and ashes erupted from Chaitén volcano, Chile in May-June 2008. The advantage of the selected samples is the short delay between eruption and collection (days to weeks), meaning that post-eruptive hydration ought to be minimal. The samples analysed, which were collected from proximal fallout deposits in June 2008, include a suite of centimetric pumices and obsidian clasts of varying porosity, the <250 μm ash fraction of the matrix, and a lapilli tuff. Samples were powdered to 125-500 μm and heated at 5 °C/min to 1250 °C after an initial 12 hour purge. Additionally, aliquots of ash samples were hydrated in distilled water for up to 3 months. The results indicate that pumices and obsidian samples have a similar total volatile content (0.7-1.6 wt %), which is dominated by water. The temperature of most rapid weight loss (dTGA peak) was significantly lower in the pumices (550-700 °C) than the dense obsidians (850-1000 °C), reflecting their greater surface area for diffusive degassing. Relationships between dTGA peak temperatures and total volatile contents are therefore different for pumices and obsidians, and results plot close to the non-hydrated obsidian endmember of Denton et al. (2009). Experimentally hydrated ash had two clearly separate dTGA peaks at 184-211 °C and 517-542 °C, which represent external and magmatic water respectively. The low-temperature peak is almost completely missing from

  13. The in-situ production of ash in pyroclastic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, M.; Dufek, J.; Standish, D.

    2007-12-01

    Abrasion and fragmentation of pumice clasts during the propagation of pyroclastic flows has long been recognized as a potential source for the enhanced production of volcanic ash, however its relative importance has eluded quantification (Walker, 1981). The amount of ash produced in-situ can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash introduced in the upper atmosphere, and internal pore pressure. We conduct a series of laboratory experiments on the collisional production of ash that may occur during different regimes of pyroclastic flow transport. We further parameterize the experiments of Cagnoli and Manga (2004) to determine the rate of production of frictional ash. We find that the energy of these interactions is insufficient to create a fractal particle size distribution; rather a bimodal suite of large particles and 10-100 micron ash particles are typically produced Using these laboratory experiments we can develop a subgrid model for ash production that can be included in analytical and multiphase numerical procedures to estimate the total volume of ash produced during transport. We examine numerically a range of initial flow energies and bed slopes over which the flows propagate. To simplify the problem we consider flows starting with 1 cm pumice clasts that can be broken up into 100 micron ash. We find that for most flow conditions10-20% of the initial 1 cm clasts comminutes into ash with the percentage increasing as a function of initial flow energy. Most of the ash is produced in the high-energy regions near the flow inlet, although flow acceleration on steep slopes can produce ash far from the vent. Ash produced at the frictional base of the flow and in the collisional upper regions of the flow can be redistributed through the entirety of the flow, although frictionally produced ash accumulates preferentially near its source in the bed-load. As slope increases, the relative proportion of ash generated by friction increases

  14. Anomalously high porosity in subduction inputs to the Nankai Trough (SW Japan) potentially caused by volcanic ash and pumice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huepers, A.; Ikari, M.; Underwood, M.; Kopf, A.

    2013-12-01

    At convergent margins, the sedimentary section seaward of the trench on the subducting oceanic lithosphere provides the source material for accretionary prisms and eventually becomes the host rock of the plate boundary megathrust. The mechanical properties of the sediments seaward of the subduction zone have therefore a first order control on subduction zone forearc mechanics and hydrogeology. At the Nankai Trough (SW Japan) the majority of sediment approaching the subduction zone is clay-rich. Scientific drilling expeditions in the framework of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) have revealed an anomalous zone of high porosity in a major lithologic unit known as the Upper Shikoku Basin facies (USB), which is associated with elevated volcanic ash content and high amounts of silica in the interstitial water. The existence of the high porosity zone has previously been associated with advanced silica cementation, driven by the dual diagenetic transition of opal-A to opal-CT, and opal-CT to quartz. However, temperature estimates from recent drilling expeditions offshore the Kii peninsula reveal different in situ temperatures at the proposed diagenetic boundary in the Shikoku Basin. Furthermore, laboratory measurements using core samples from the USB show that cohesive strength is not elevated in the high porosity zone, suggesting that a process other than cementation may be responsible. The USB sediment is characterized by abundant volcanic ash and pumice, therefore the high porosity zone in the USB may be closely linked to the mechanical behavior of this phase. We conducted consolidation tests in the range 0.1 to 8 MPa effective vertical stress on artificial ash-smectite and pumice-smectite mixtures, as well as intact and remolded natural samples from the IODP Sites C0011 and C0012 to investigate the role of the volcanic constituent on porosity loss with progressive burial. Our results show that both remolded and intact

  15. Volcanic ash as an oceanic iron source and sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogan, Nicholas; Achterberg, Eric P.; Le Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Marsay, Chris M.; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Williams, Richard G.

    2016-03-01

    Volcanic ash deposition to the ocean forms a natural source of iron (Fe) to surface water microbial communities. Inputs of lithogenic material may also facilitate Fe removal through scavenging. Combining dissolved Fe (dFe) and thorium-234 observations alongside modeling, we investigate scavenging of Fe in the North Atlantic following the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption. Under typical conditions biogenic particles dominate scavenging, whereas ash particles dominate during the eruption. The size of particles is important as smaller scavenging particles can become saturated with surface-associated ions. Model simulations indicate that ash deposition associated with Eyjafjallajökull likely led to net Fe removal. Our model suggests a threefold greater stimulation of biological activity if ash deposition had occurred later in the growing season when the region was Fe limited. The implications of ash particle scavenging, eruption timing, and particle saturation need to be considered when assessing the impact of ash deposition on the ocean Fe cycle and productivity.

  16. Iowa coal land being reclaimed with Class C ash

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Class C fly ash is being successfully used to reclaim former strip-mined coal lands near Kirkville, Iowa. The ash is used in a dry state and is transported and distributed in a specially developed bottom dump trailer which can discharge the ash directly onto the ground. The trailer unloads by gravity feed rather than pneumatically thereby minimizing the dust problem. The run-off-water from the mine site is captured in retention ponds preventing the acid water (average pH 4) from getting into local streams. The ash is pushed into the pond water where it hydrates, forms an underwater layer which hardens. The process is continued until a fly ash mantle is formed on which spoil is spread. Additional fly ash is added to the surface of the reclaimed area, fertilizer applied and a vegetative cover established.

  17. Proceedings: Eighth international ash utilization symposium: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The two-volume publication contains 65 papers, including six abstracts, presented at ten sessions during the October 1987 event. Some topics covered basic research themes, such as new studies of fly ash, fly ash concrete, and important properties and construction uses; updated ash sampling and testing procedures; advances in fluidized bed combustion (FBC), flue gas desulfurization (FGD), and other sulfur dioxide control products; and latest pozzolan programs of the Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) of the National Bureau of Standards. Other topics focused on applied coal ash technology including: airport, highway and dam construction; structural fills; flowable fill; roller compacted concrete; lightweight building products; recovery of metals from coal ash; fillers for paints and plastics; and new coal ash uses in agriculture and reclamation.

  18. Proceedings: Eighth international ash utilization symposium: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The two-volume publication contains 65 papers, including six abstracts, presented at ten sessions during the October 1987 event. Some topics covered basic research themes, such as: new studies of fly ash, fly ash concrete, and important properties and construction uses; updated ash sampling and testing procedures; advances in fluidized bed combustion (FBC), flue gas desulfurization (FGD), and other sulfur dioxide control products; and latest pozzolan programs of the Cement and Concrete Reference Laboratory (CCRL) of the National Bureau of Standards. Other topics focused on applied coal ash technology, including: airport, highway and dam construction; structural fills; flowable fill; roller compacted concrete;lightweight building products; recovery of metals from coal ash; fillers for paints and plastics; and new coal ash uses in agriculture and reclamation.

  19. Base surge deposits, eruption history, and depositional processes of a wet phreatomagmatic volcano in Central Anatolia (Cora Maar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gençalioğlu-Kuşcu, Gonca; Atilla, Cüneyt; Cas, Ray A. F.; Kuşcu, İlkay

    2007-01-01

    Cora Maar is a Quaternary volcano located to the 20 km northwest of Mount Erciyes, the largest of the 19 polygenetic volcanic complexes of the Cappadocian Volcanic Province in central Anatolia. Cora Maar is a typical example of a maar-diatreme volcano with a nearly circular crater with a mean diameter of c.1.2 km, and a well-bedded base surge-dominated maar rim tephra sequence up to 40 m in thickness. Having a diameter/depth ratio ( D/ d) of 12, Cora is a relatively "mature" maar compared to recent maar craters in the world. Cora crater is excavated within the andesitic lava flows of Quaternary age. The tephra sequence is not indurated, and consists of juvenile clasts up to 70 cm, non-juvenile clasts up to 130 cm, accretionary lapilli up to 1.2 cm in diameter, and ash to lapilli-sized tephra. Base surge layers display well-developed antidune structures indicating the direction of the transport. Both progressive and regressive dune structures are present within the tephra sequence. Wavelength values increase with increasing wave height, and with large wavelength and height values. Cora tephra display similarities to Taal and Laacher See base surge deposits. Impact sags and small channel structures are also common. Lateral and vertical facies changes are observed for the dune bedded and planar bedsets. According to granulometric analyses, Cora Maar tephra samples display a bimodal distribution with a wide range of Md φ values, characteristic for the surge deposits. Very poorly sorted, bimodal ash deposits generally vary from coarse tail to fine tail grading depending on the grain size distribution while very poorly sorted lapilli and block-rich deposits display a positive skewness due to fine tail grading.

  20. 'Snake River (SR)-type' volcanism at the Yellowstone hotspot track: Distinctive products from unusual, high-temperature silicic super-eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Branney, M.J.; Bonnichsen, B.; Andrews, G.D.M.; Ellis, B.; Barry, T.L.; McCurry, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new category of large-scale volcanism, here termed Snake River (SR)-type volcanism, is defined with reference to a distinctive volcanic facies association displayed by Miocene rocks in the central Snake River Plain area of southern Idaho and northern Nevada, USA. The facies association contrasts with those typical of silicic volcanism elsewhere and records unusual, voluminous and particularly environmentally devastating styles of eruption that remain poorly understood. It includes: (1) large-volume, lithic-poor rhyolitic ignimbrites with scarce pumice lapilli; (2) extensive, parallel-laminated, medium to coarse-grained ashfall deposits with large cuspate shards, crystals and a paucity of pumice lapilli; many are fused to black vitrophyre; (3) unusually extensive, large-volume rhyolite lavas; (4) unusually intense welding, rheomorphism, and widespread development of lava-like facies in the ignimbrites; (5) extensive, fines-rich ash deposits with abundant ash aggregates (pellets and accretionary lapilli); (6) the ashfall layers and ignimbrites contain abundant clasts of dense obsidian and vitrophyre; (7) a bimodal association between the rhyolitic rocks and numerous, coalescing low-profile basalt lava shields; and (8) widespread evidence of emplacement in lacustrine-alluvial environments, as revealed by intercalated lake sediments, ignimbrite peperites, rhyolitic and basaltic hyaloclastites, basalt pillow-lava deltas, rhyolitic and basaltic phreatomagmatic tuffs, alluvial sands and palaeosols. Many rhyolitic eruptions were high mass-flux, large volume and explosive (VEI 6-8), and involved H2O-poor, low-??18O, metaluminous rhyolite magmas with unusually low viscosities, partly due to high magmatic temperatures (900-1,050??C). SR-type volcanism contrasts with silicic volcanism at many other volcanic fields, where the fall deposits are typically Plinian with pumice lapilli, the ignimbrites are low to medium grade (non-welded to eutaxitic) with abundant pumice lapilli

  1. Market opportunities for fly ash fillers in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.; Harris, T.; Gledhill, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Direct Acid Leaching (DAL) processed fly ash is derived from treating raw and beneficiated coal fly ash with hydrochloric acid. The DAL process allows for the production of fly ash with greater chemical purity and consistency than raw fly ash alone. In addition, DAL fly ash is similar to various minerals used in a wide range of applications that require filler minerals. This project investigates the feasibility of using three grades of DAL fly ash ranging from 10 microns to 30 microns in diameter as an alternative filler material to mineral fillers. Six major applications in North America, requiring large volumes of filler minerals were investigated by region including: (1) asphalt roofing shingles (2) carpet backing (3) joint compound and wallboard (4) industrial coatings (5) plastics (6) vinyl flooring. It is determined that calcium carbonate was the primary mineral filler DAL fly ash would be competing with in the applications investigated. Calcium carbonate is used in all applications investigated. The application which demonstrated the greatest potential for using DAL fly ash is asphalt shingles. Asphalt shingles were the largest calcium carbonate consuming application identified, consuming 4.8 million tons in 1988, and is the least sensitive to the dark color of the DAL fly ash. Although the DAL fly ash typically has a smaller particle size, in comparison to calcium carbonate, the asphalt shingle manufacturers felt it would be a good substitute. Other promising applications for DAL fly ash were industrial coatings and plastics where the calcium carbonate particle size requirements of 3 to 6 microns very closely matches the particle size of the DAL fly ash considered in this project. 17 figs., 36 tabs.

  2. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    1979-11-01

    The invention relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  3. Recovery of aluminum and other metal values from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    The invention described herein relates to a method for improving the acid leachability of aluminum and other metal values found in fly ash which comprises sintering the fly ash, prior to acid leaching, with a calcium sulfate-containing composition at a temperature at which the calcium sulfate is retained in said composition during sintering and for a time sufficient to quantitatively convert the aluminum in said fly ash into an acid-leachable form.

  4. Improved prediction and tracking of volcanic ash clouds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webley, P.; Mastin, L.

    2009-01-01

    During the past 30??years, more than 100 airplanes have inadvertently flown through clouds of volcanic ash from erupting volcanoes. Such encounters have caused millions of dollars in damage to the aircraft and have endangered the lives of tens of thousands of passengers. In a few severe cases, total engine failure resulted when ash was ingested into turbines and coating turbine blades. These incidents have prompted the establishment of cooperative efforts by the International Civil Aviation Organization and the volcanological community to provide rapid notification of eruptive activity, and to monitor and forecast the trajectories of ash clouds so that they can be avoided by air traffic. Ash-cloud properties such as plume height, ash concentration, and three-dimensional ash distribution have been monitored through non-conventional remote sensing techniques that are under active development. Forecasting the trajectories of ash clouds has required the development of volcanic ash transport and dispersion models that can calculate the path of an ash cloud over the scale of a continent or a hemisphere. Volcanological inputs to these models, such as plume height, mass eruption rate, eruption duration, ash distribution with altitude, and grain-size distribution, must be assigned in real time during an event, often with limited observations. Databases and protocols are currently being developed that allow for rapid assignment of such source parameters. In this paper, we summarize how an interdisciplinary working group on eruption source parameters has been instigating research to improve upon the current understanding of volcanic ash cloud characterization and predictions. Improved predictions of ash cloud movement and air fall will aid in making better hazard assessments for aviation and for public health and air quality. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  5. The U-Pb age and Hf isotope record of detrital zircons from Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the proto-Andean accretionary orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlburg, Heinrich

    2010-05-01

    The global record of detrital zircon ages is frequently interpreted as reflecting cycles of supercontinent assembly and dispersal. When peaks in zircon age distributions are combined with data on the relative production of juvenile crust through time, a coincidence between the data sets is discernible for events mainly in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic. Hawkesworth et al. (2009) recently concluded that peaks in U-Pb detrital ages (n=7000; Campbell and Allen, 2008) and juvenile crust production do not always coincide on a global scale, and that a link to supercontinent cycles may in fact not exist. The reason for this is seen in the poor preservation potential of juvenile magmatic arc crust of accretionary orogens relative to continental collisional systems. This is significant as juvenile crust tends to be produced at active margins where it is also prone to destruction by subduction erosion. Granitic magmatic systems in collisional mountain belts, which later may become prolific sources of detrital zircons when eroded, are often formed by partial melting of preexisting crust. They may be volumetrically smaller than arc systems but have a better preservation potential due to their position in the interior of the evolving orogenic belts. The difference in formation and preservation potential is seen as a potential bias of the detrital zircon record towards collisional mountain belts. In contrast, non-collisional accretionary orogens should have detrital zircon age records free of this bias. The SW Amazonia Orogenic System evolved by the episodic accretion of marginal orogenic belts to Amazonia from c. 2.3 to 0.9 Ga. From 0.9 to 0.25 Ga it was superseded by the Andean portion of the Terra Australis accretionary orogen. Recent reconsiderations of paleomagnetic data (e.g. Evans et al., 2010) together with the tectonic evolution of these orogens indicate that they reflect a c. 2 Ga long orogenic history free of major continental collisions. A compilation of U

  6. Petrology of blueschist from the Western Himalaya (Ladakh, NW India): Exploring the complex behavior of a lawsonite-bearing system in a paleo-accretionary setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groppo, Chiara; Rolfo, Franco; Sachan, Himanshu K.; Rai, Santosh K.

    2016-05-01

    Although the Himalaya is the archetype of collisional orogens, formed as a consequence of the closure of the Neo-Tethyan ocean separating India from Asia, high-pressure metamorphic rocks are rare. Beside few eclogites, corresponding to the metamorphosed continental Indian crust dragged below Asia or underthrusted beneath southern Tibet, blueschists occur seldom along the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture zone, i.e. the suture marking the India-Asia collision. These blueschists, mostly interpreted as related to paleo-accretionary prisms formed in response to the subduction of the Neo-Tethyan ocean below the Asian plate, are crucial for constraining the evolution of the India-Asia convergence zone during the closure of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. In the Western Himalaya, the best occurrence of blueschist is that of the Sapi-Shergol Ophiolitic Mélange in Ladakh. This unit is dominated by volcanoclastic sequences rich in mafic material with subordinate interbedding of metasediments, characterized by very fresh lawsonite blueschist-facies assemblages. In this paper, the lawsonite blueschist-facies metasediments have been petrologically investigated with the aims of (i) constraining the P-T evolution of the Sapi-Shergol Ophiolitic Mélange, (ii) evaluating the influence of Fe2O3 and of H2O on the stability of the high-pressure mineral assemblages, (iii) understanding the processes controlling lawsonite formation and preservation, and (iv) interpreting the P-T evolution of the Sapi-Shergol blueschists in the framework of India-Asia collision. Our results indicate that (i) the Sapi-Shergol blueschists experienced a cold subduction history along a low thermal gradient, up to peak conditions of ca. 470 °C, 19 kbar; furthermore, in order to preserve lawsonite in the studied lithologies, exhumation must have been coupled with significant cooling, i.e. the resulting P-T path is characterized by a clockwise hairpin loop along low thermal gradients (< 8-9 °C/km); (ii) the presence of ferric

  7. Assessing fly ash treatment: remediation and stabilization of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Lima, A T; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2012-03-01

    Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through the electrodialytic process (EDR) has been tried out before. The goal of removing heavy metals has always been the reuse of fly ash, for instance in agricultural fields (BEK). The best removal rates are here summarized and some new results have been added. MSW fly ashes are still too hazardous after treatment to even consider application to the soil. ST ash is the only residue that gets concentrations low enough to be reused, but its fertilizing value might be questioned. An alternative reuse for the three ashes is here preliminary tested, the combination of fly ash with mortar. Fly ashes have been substituted by cement fraction or aggregate fraction. Surprisingly, better compressive strengths were obtained by replacing the aggregate fraction. CW ashes presented promising results for the substitution of aggregate in mortar and possibly in concrete. PMID:21167631

  8. Ash content of bones in the pigtail monkey, Macaca nemestrina.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vose, G. P.; Roach, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    Ash analyses of skeletons of four adult primates, Macaca nemestrina, revealed some similarities and some marked contrasts when compared with published data on human skeletal ash. The skull in both Macaca nemestrina and man has the highest ash content of all bones in the skeleton. While the bones of the arms of humans have an ash content nearly identical to that of the legs (0.3% difference), in Macaca nemestrina the humeri and radii contain 5.4% more ash than the femora and tibiae. Similarly in Macaca nemestrina the bones of the hands contain 3.5% more ash than the bones of the feet, while in humans the same bones agree within 0.3% implying that adaptive use function is a factor in bone ash concentration. The ribs of Macaca nemestrina showed an unexpectedly high ash content in comparison with those of humans. In contrast with the relatively constant ash content throughout the vertebrae in humans, a conspicuous decrease axially was noted in Macaca nemestrina.

  9. Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout

    SciTech Connect

    Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A.; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

  10. Multitechnique multielemental analysis of coal and fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Nadkarni, R.A.

    1980-05-01

    The coal sample is first ashed with high temperature ashing or with RF plasma low temperature ashing. The coal ash or fly ash can be analyzed for major ash elements by fusing with lithium tetraborate in an automatic fusion device, the Claisse Fluxer. The ash samples are also dissolved in a Parr bomb in a mixture of aqua regia and HF. Subsequently, the solutions are analyzed for eight major (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Si, and Ti) and 20 trace elements (As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, U, V, and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Mercury in coal and fly ash is determined on a separate aliquot by the cold vapor atomic absorption technique. Fluorine and chlorine in the samples are determined by fusing with Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and Eschka mixture, respectively, and then measuring the two ions in solution with specific ion electrodes. Oxygen in the samples can be determined rapidly and nondestructively by 14-MeV neutron activation analysis. These methods have been tested by analyzing several NBS coal and fly ash standards with good accuracy and reproducibility. 10 tables.